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Sample records for interactions involving ikkg

  1. Modeling Systems Involving Interactions Between Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. B.

    2005-05-01

    When we think of numerical models, `simulation modeling' often comes to mind: The modeler strives to include as many of the processes operating in the system of interest, and in as much detail, as is practical. The goal is typically to make accurate quantitative predictions. However, numerical models can also play an explanatory role. The goal of explaining a poorly understood phenomenon is often best pursued with an `exploratory' model (Murray 2002, 2003), in which a modeler minimizes the processes included and the level of detail, to try to determine what mechanisms-and what aspects of those mechanisms-are essential. These strategies are closely associated with different approaches to modeling processes across temporal and spatial scales. Simulation models often involve `explicit numerical reductionism'-the direct representation of interactions at scales as small as possible. Parameterizing sub-grid-scale processes is often seen as an unfortunate necessity, to be avoided if possible. On the other hand, when devising an exploratory model, a top-down strategy is often employed; an effort is made to represent only the effects that much smaller-scale processes have on the scale of interest. This approach allows investigation of the interactions between the emergent variables and structures that most directly explain many complex behaviors. As a caricature, we don't investigate water-wave phenomena by simulating molecular collisions. In addition, basing a model on processes at much smaller scales than those of the phenomena of interest leads to the concern that model imperfections may propagate up through the scales; that if the small-scale processes are not treated very accurately, the key interactions that emerge at larger scales may not occur as they do in the natural system. However, this risk can be bypassed by basing a model directly on larger-scale interactions, and examining which of these interactions might cause a phenomenon. For this reason, it has been

  2. Van der Waals Interactions Involving Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Charles M.; Neal, Brian L.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. Whereas the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models. with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation, and crystal growth.

  3. Interaction Involvement: A Fundamental Dimension of Interpersonal Communication Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cegala, Donald J.

    E. Husserl's concept of intentionality provides a conceptual perspective of interpersonal communication that suggests a notion of face-to-face communication called "interaction involvement." Structured along dimensions of awareness and responsiveness, interaction involvement explains interpersonal communication as a transactional relationship…

  4. Student projects involving novel interaction with large displays.

    PubMed

    Dias, Paulo; Sousa, Tiago; Parracho, Joao; Cardoso, Igor; Monteiro, Andre; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    DETI-Interact is an interactive system that offers information relevant to students in the lobby of the University of Aveiro's Department of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics (DETI). The project started in 2009 with a master's thesis addressing interaction with public displays through Android smartphones. Since then, it has evolved considerably; it currently allows gesture interaction based on a Kinect sensor. Meanwhile, it has involved third-year students, master's students, and undergraduate students participating in a research initiation program. PMID:24808202

  5. Lexical Cues of Interaction Involvement in Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Duyen T.; Fussell, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    We explore how people express and interpret lexical cues of interaction involvement in dyadic conversations via instant messaging (IM) in two studies. In Study 1, an experiment with 60 participants, we manipulated level of involvement in a conversation with a distraction task. We examined how participants' uses of verbal cues such as pronouns…

  6. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions.

    PubMed

    Norris, Anne E; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-05-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design.

  7. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Anne E.; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design. PMID:24748718

  8. Communicative interactions involving plants: information, evolution, and ecology.

    PubMed

    Mescher, Mark C; Pearse, Ian S

    2016-08-01

    The role of information obtained via sensory cues and signals in mediating the interactions of organisms with their biotic and abiotic environments has been a major focus of work on sensory and behavioral ecology. Information-mediated interactions also have important implications for broader ecological patterns emerging at the community and ecosystem levels that are only now beginning to be explored. Given the extent to which plants dominate the sensory landscapes of terrestrial ecosystems, information-mediated interactions involving plants should be a major focus of efforts to elucidate these broader patterns. Here we explore how such efforts might be enhanced by a clear understanding of information itself-a central and potentially unifying concept in biology that has nevertheless been the subject of considerable confusion-and of its relationship to adaptive evolution and ecology. We suggest that information-mediated interactions should be a key focus of efforts to more fully integrate evolutionary biology and ecology. PMID:27421106

  9. Myelin basic protein domains involved in the interaction with actin.

    PubMed

    Roth, G A; Gonzalez, M D; Monferran, C G; De Santis, M L; Cumar, F A

    1993-11-01

    A fluorescence assay was used to measure the interaction of myelin basic protein (MBP) with monomeric actin labeled with a fluorescent compound (IAEDANS). The complex actin-IAEDANS increase the fluorescence in presence of MBP. The enhancement of the fluorescence has a sigmoidal dependence on the concentration of MBP and the fluorescence maximum is reached at a MBP:actin molar ratio of 1:20. The fluorescence maximum in absence of Ca2+ and ATP is 4 times lower than that in their presence although it is reached at the same MBP:actin molar ratio. Similar behavior is observed when synapsin replaces MBP, while acetylated MBP and bovine serum albumin fail to induce any fluorescence change. To define possible interacting domains on MBP involved in the actin-MBP interaction, experiments were performed using MBP-derived peptides obtained under controlled proteolysis of the whole molecule. The fluorescence changes induced by the different peptides depend on their location in the native protein and can not be explained simply by a difference in the net charge of the peptides. The results suggest that two sites are involved in the interaction. A Ca2+/ATP-dependent site located in the amino-terminal region (peptide 1-44) and a Ca2+/ATP-independent one near the carboxyl terminus of the MBP molecule. The actin-MBP interaction was also observed using immunoblot and ELISA techniques.

  10. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  11. Estrogen Stimulation of Cell Migration Involves Multiple Signaling Pathway Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Santen, Richard J.; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Park, Hoyong; Fan, Ping; Yue, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Hormone-dependent breast cancers respond to inhibitors of estrogen synthesis or action with tumor regression and with a reduction of new metastases. The mechanisms underlying the effects of estrogen on metastasis likely differ from those on tumor regression. Cell migration is a key first step in the metastatic process. Based on our prior work and other published data, we designed and tested a working model that suggested that estrogen receptor α, epidermal growth factor receptor, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, p60 Src tyrosine kinase (c-Src), c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and MAPK interact to facilitate estradiol (E2)-induced cell migration. Accordingly, we examined the effect of E2 on activation of these pathways and demonstrated mechanistic effects by blocking each component and assessing cell migration as a biologic endpoint. Initial studies validated a robust cell migration assay characterized by highly reproducible, dose-dependent responses to E2. Examining various mechanisms involved in migration, we showed that E2 induced activation of c-Src, FAK, and paxillin with early peaks within 5–30 min and later peaks at 24 h. ERK and protein kinase B phosphorylation exhibited only early peaks. Blockade of various steps in these signaling pathways with use of small interfering RNA or specific inhibitors demonstrated mechanistic effects of these signaling molecules on cell migration. Our results suggest that the effects of E2 on cell migration involve multiple, interacting signaling pathways. Important effects are mediated by the MAPK, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways and use FAK, paxillin, and c-Src for activation. Each pathway represents a potential target for blocking cell migration and metastasis of breast cancer cells. PMID:20861240

  12. Father Involvement in Feeding Interactions with Their Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Alma D.; Chu, Lynna; Franke, Todd; Kuo, Alice A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations of father-child feeding and physical interactions with dietary practices and weight status in children. Methods A nationally representative sample of children, mothers, and fathers who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth cohort study (N = 2441) was used to explore the relationship of father-child feeding and physical activity interactions with child dietary practices and weight status. Logistic multivariable regression analyses were adjusted for child, father, mother, and socio-demographic characteristics. Results Approximately 40% of fathers reported having a great deal of influence on their preschool child’s nutrition and about 50% reported daily involvement in preparing food for their child and assisting their child with eating. Children had over 2 times the odds of consuming fast food at least once a week if fathers reported eating out with their child a few times a week compared to fathers who reported rarely or never eating out with their child (OR, 2.89; 95% CI, 1.94–4.29), adjusting for all covariates. Whether fathers reported eating out with their children was also significantly associated with children’s sweetened beverage intake. Conclusions Potentially modifiable behaviors that support healthy dietary practices in children may be supported by targeting fathers. PMID:26931754

  13. Interactions between genes involved in exocytotic membrane fusion in paramecium.

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, H; Gulik-Krzywicki, T; Grandchamp, C; Cohen, J

    1992-03-01

    Crosses between members of two independent collections of Paramecium tetraurelia mutants blocked in the final membrane fusion step of trichocyst release (nd mutants) allowed us to define 13 complementation groups comprising 23 alleles. The mutant nd9a was then used as a target in a mutagenesis experiment designed to screen both revertants and new mutants in order to identify interacting genes. This mutant was chosen because it is the best known of its class to date and seems to be altered in assembly of the material connecting the trichocyst membrane to the plasma membrane and in assembly of the "rosette," a complex array of intramembranous particles in the plasma membrane at the trichocyst insertion sites. No revertants were obtained but two new mutants deficient for rosette assembly were identified, nd16b and nd18, whose gene products appear to interact with that of nd9. Indeed, the double mutants grown at 18 degrees, a permissive temperature for each of the single mutants, are characterized by a deficiency in exocytosis and in rosette assembly, as are also double mutants combining other allelic forms of the same genes. Moreover, aberrant dominance relationships among alleles of nd9 and of nd16 indicate the existence of interactions between identical subunits, which most likely assemble into multimeric structures. The nd16 gene product was shown by microinjection experiments to be a cytosolic factor, as is the nd9 gene product. It is therefore tempting to propose that the nd16 gene product also belongs to the connecting material and is involved in rosette assembly, in cooperation with nd9 and nd18.

  14. Formation mechanism for a hybrid supramolecular network involving cooperative interactions.

    PubMed

    Mura, Manuela; Silly, Fabien; Burlakov, Victor; Castell, Martin R; Briggs, G Andrew D; Kantorovich, Lev N

    2012-04-27

    A novel mechanism of hybrid assembly of molecules on surfaces is proposed stemming from interactions between molecules and on-surface metal atoms which eventually got trapped inside the network pores. Based on state-of-the-art theoretical calculations, we find that the new mechanism relies on formation of molecule-metal atom pairs which, together with molecules themselves, participate in the assembly growth. Most remarkably, the dissociation of pairs is facilitated by a cooperative interaction involving many molecules. This new mechanism is illustrated on a low coverage Melamine hexagonal network on the Au(111) surface where multiple events of gold atoms trapping via a set of so-called "gate" transitions are found by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations based on transition rates obtained using ab initio density functional theory calculations and the nudged elastic band method. Simulated STM images of gold atoms trapped in the pores of the Melamine network predict that the atoms should appear as bright spots inside Melamine hexagons. No trapping was found at large Melamine coverages, however. These predictions have been supported by preliminary STM experiments which show bright spots inside Melamine hexagons at low Melamine coverages, while empty pores are mostly observed at large coverages. Therefore, we suggest that bright spots sometimes observed in the pores of molecular assemblies on metal surfaces may be attributed to trapped substrate metal atoms. We believe that this type of mechanism could be used for delivering adatom species of desired functionality (e.g., magnetic) into the pores of hydrogen-bonded networks serving as templates for their capture. PMID:22680886

  15. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  16. Channel-interacting PDZ protein, 'CIPP', interacts with proteins involved in cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Emanuele; Landi, Elena; Barilari, Manuela; Serresi, Michela; Salvadori, Piero; Bachi, Angela; Dente, Luciana

    2009-04-15

    Neuronal CIPP (channel-interacting PDZ protein) is a multivalent PDZ protein that interacts with specific channels and receptors highly expressed in the brain. It is composed of four PDZ domains that behave as a scaffold to clusterize functionally connected proteins. In the present study, we selected a set of potential CIPP interactors that are involved directly or indirectly in mechanisms of cytoskeletal remodelling and membrane protrusion formation. For some of these, we first proved the direct binding to specific CIPP PDZ domains considered as autonomous elements, and then confirmed the interaction with the whole protein. In particular, the small G-protein effector IRSp53 (insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate protein p53) specifically interacts with the second PDZ domain of CIPP and, when co-transfected in cultured mammalian cells with a tagged full-length CIPP, it induces a marked reorganization of CIPP cytoplasmic localization. Large punctate structures are generated as a consequence of CIPP binding to the IRSp53 C-terminus. Analysis of the puncta nature, using various endocytic markers, revealed that they are not related to cytoplasmic vesicles, but rather represent multi-protein assemblies, where CIPP can tether other potential interactors.

  17. Differential phytosociological interactions involving male and female atriplex bonnevillensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinclair, J.; Emlen, J.M.; Rinella, M.; Snelgrove, J.; Freeman, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Wind-pollinated dioecious plants often exhibit spatial segregation of the sexes. This partial niche separation has most often been explored using abiotic niche axes. However, if the sexes are truly separated in space, then they are apt to encounter different plant species that may heavily affect growth and reproduction. Also, to the extent that their niches differ, the sexes may respond differently to the same co-occurring species. Here we examine interspecific interactions that influence male and female reproductive potential in Atriplex bonnevillensis. Using Emlen's interaction assessment, a technique which assesses species interactions based on cover classes, we show that Salsola species compete significantly with females but not males, while Halogeton glomeratus competes with males but not females. The effect of competition only became apparent when we corrected for site-specific fertility. These results imply that differential competition must be considered when studying dioecious plants that display spatial segregation of the sexes.

  18. The nature of interactions involving prefrontal and striatal dopamine systems.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, L S

    1997-01-01

    A number of converging lines of evidence from work in rodents suggest that dopamine (DA) function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatal terminal fields may be linked, possibly in an 'inverse' manner, whereby a change in prefrontal dopamine transmission in one direction occasions an opposite change in dopamine function in striatal territories. The present article considers the possible functional importance of this concept in the light of recent neuroanatomical data and new data from our own laboratory indicating that, at the neurochemical level, the basic finding of an inverse relationship between dopamine function in prefrontal and striatal regions also holds good in the non-human primate. The main conclusion is that the simple idea of an inverse relationship between prefrontal and striatal dopamine systems emphasizing presynaptic release mechanisms is unlikely to underlie, solely, the full repertoire of functional interactions. Whilst there is evidence consistent with dynamic interactions between prefrontal and striatal dopamine release under some circumstances, specifically, during the early phases of aversive learning, a complete account of possible interactions between prefrontal and striatal dopamine systems requires consideration of additional factors. Such factors include: (1) the precise nature of the psychological function investigated, (2) the possibility of acute, localized changes in striatal postsynaptic function secondary to changes in presynaptic function and (3) the possibility of manipulations of prefrontal cortex leading to adaptive changes in striatal function, at a diffuse, neural systems level.

  19. Interactions of Dnd proteins involved in bacterial DNA phosphorothioate modification

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Zhao, Gong; Yu, Hao; He, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    DNA phosphorothioation (PT) is the first discovered physiological DNA backbone modification, in which a non-bridging oxygen atom of the phosphodiester bond is replaced with a sulfur atom in Rp (rectus for plane) configuration. PT modification is governed by a highly conserved gene cluster dndA/iscS-dndBCDE that is widespread across bacterial and archaeal species. However, little is known about how these proteins coordinately react with each other to perform oxygen–sulfur swap. We here demonstrated that IscS, DndC, DndD and DndE form a protein complex of which the molecular ratio for four proteins in the complex is approximate 1:1:1:1. DndB here displayed little or weak affinity to the complex and the constructs harboring dndACDE can confer the host in vivo PT modification. Using co-purification and pull down strategy, we demonstrated that the four proteins assemble into a pipeline in collinear to its gene organization, namely, IscS binding to DndC, DndC binding to DndD, and DndD binding to DndE. Moreover, weak interactions between DndE and IscS, DndE and DndC were also identified. PMID:26539172

  20. Human macrophage differentiation involves an interaction between integrins and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Laouar, A.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Collart, F.; Huberman, E.

    1997-03-14

    The authors have examined the role of integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in macrophage differentiation of (1) human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and (2) human peripheral blood monocytes induced by either PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Increased {beta}{sub 1} integrin and fibronectin (FN) gene expression was observed in PMA-treated HL-60 cells and PMA- or M-CSF-treated monocytes, even at a time preceding the manifestation of macrophage markers. Treated HL-60 cells and monocytes also released and deposited FN on the culture dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in protein kinase C {beta} (PKC{beta}) and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, failed to express FN after PMA treatment. Restoration of PKC{beta} resulted in PMA-induced FN gene expression and macrophage differentiation. The macrophage phenotype induced in HL-60 cells or monocytes was attenuated by anti-{beta}{sub 1} integrin or anti-FN MAbs. The authors suggest that macrophage differentiation involves activation of PKC and expression of specific integrins and ECM proteins. The stimulated cells, through their integrins, attach and spread on these substrates by binding to the deposited ECM proteins. This attachment and spreading in turn, through integrin signaling, leads to the macrophage phenotype.

  1. Tubulin-G protein interactions involve microtubule polymerization domains

    SciTech Connect

    Nan Wang; Rasenick, M.M. )

    1991-11-12

    It has been suggested that elements of the cytoskeleton contribute to the signal transduction process and that they do so in association with one or more members of the signal-transducing G protein family. Relatively high-affinity binding between dimeric tubulin and the {alpha} subunits of G{sub s} and G{sub i1} has also been reported. Tubulin molecules, which exist in solution as {alpha}{beta} dimers, have binding domains for microtubule-associated proteins as well as for other tubulin dimers. This study represents an attempt to ascertain whether the association between G proteins and tubulin occurs at one of these sites. Removal of the binding site for MAP2 and tau from tubulin by subtilisin proteolysis did not influence the association of tubulin with G protein, as demonstrated in overlay studies with ({sup 125}I)tubulin. However, ring structures formed from subtilisin-treated tubulin were incapable of effecting such inhibition. Stable G protein-tubulin complexes were formed, and these were separated from free tubulin by Octyl-Sepharose chromatography. Using this methodology, it was demonstrated that assembled microtubules bound G protein quite weakly compared with tubulin dimers. The {alpha} subunit of G{sub i1} and, to a lesser extent, that of G{sub o} were demonstrated to inhibit microtubule polymerization. In aggregate, these data suggest that dimeric tubulin binds to the {alpha} subunits of G protein at the sites where it binds to other tubulin dimers during microtubule polymerization. Interaction with signal-transducing G proteins, thus, might represent a role for tubulin dimers which is independent of microtubule formation.

  2. Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Christopher Robert

    2013-01-01

    Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications examines the ways that communication is structured and experienced by looking at interactions involving augmented communicators--people with severe speech disabilities who use forms of assistive technology in order to communicate…

  3. Communication Adaptability and Interaction Involvement as Predictors of Cross-Cultural Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Guo-Ming

    A study of 142 foreign college students staying in the United States examined the effects of communication adaptability and interaction involvement on cross-cultural adjustment. Further testing was conducted to investigate which of the components of communication adaptability and interaction involvement best predicted the dimensions of…

  4. The impact of banners on digital television: the role of program interactivity and product involvement.

    PubMed

    Cauberghe, Verolien; De Pelsmacker, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    In a sample of 281 respondents, the effect of a noninteractive and a medium-interactive television program on recall and brand attitudes for low- and high-involvement products advertised in banners during these programs was investigated. Medium-interactive programs resulted in less product and brand recall and recognition of brands in embedded banner advertisements, but generated more positive brand attitudes than noninteractive programs. These effects were more outspoken for a high-involvement product than for a low-involvement product. The impact of perceived program interactivity on brand attitude is fully mediated program valence and involvement for low-involvement products, but not for high-involvement products, for which perceived program interactivity had a direct impact on brand attitude.

  5. The impact of banners on digital television: the role of program interactivity and product involvement.

    PubMed

    Cauberghe, Verolien; De Pelsmacker, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    In a sample of 281 respondents, the effect of a noninteractive and a medium-interactive television program on recall and brand attitudes for low- and high-involvement products advertised in banners during these programs was investigated. Medium-interactive programs resulted in less product and brand recall and recognition of brands in embedded banner advertisements, but generated more positive brand attitudes than noninteractive programs. These effects were more outspoken for a high-involvement product than for a low-involvement product. The impact of perceived program interactivity on brand attitude is fully mediated program valence and involvement for low-involvement products, but not for high-involvement products, for which perceived program interactivity had a direct impact on brand attitude. PMID:18275319

  6. Elucidating the role of aromatic interactions in rotational barriers involving aromatic systems.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carlos F R A C; Gomes, Lígia R; Low, John N; Silva, Artur M S; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2012-11-16

    The measurement of aryl-naphthyl rotational barriers, ΔG(⧧), in various solvents for two substituted 1,8-diarylnaphthalenes by dynamic (1)H NMR showed that ΔG(‡) trends in aromatic systems can be fully rationalized only when considering the different types of aromatic interactions that can be established in the ground and transition states, namely, intramolecular interactions involving the aromatic rings and specific solvation interactions. PMID:23106141

  7. An Exploratory Study to Measure Excessive Involvement in Multitasking Interaction with Smart Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yubo; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This study developed a scale measuring excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices. An online questionnaire was designed and surveyed in a sample of 380 respondents. The sample was split into two groups for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, respectively. A four-factor structure was identified with an acceptable goodness of fit. The first two factors, "Obsession and neglect" and "Problematic control," described the obsessive feelings, neglect behaviors, and behavior control problems accompanied by excessive multitasking interaction with smart devices. The latter two factors, "Multitasking preference" and "Polychronic orientation," referred to multitaskers' preference of engaging in multiple media use or interaction tasks rather than a single task from the time orientation perspective. The four-factor structure indicates that excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices shares some similarities with other behavioral addiction types, but demonstrates uniqueness compared with excessive engagement in single media use.

  8. An Exploratory Study to Measure Excessive Involvement in Multitasking Interaction with Smart Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yubo; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This study developed a scale measuring excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices. An online questionnaire was designed and surveyed in a sample of 380 respondents. The sample was split into two groups for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, respectively. A four-factor structure was identified with an acceptable goodness of fit. The first two factors, "Obsession and neglect" and "Problematic control," described the obsessive feelings, neglect behaviors, and behavior control problems accompanied by excessive multitasking interaction with smart devices. The latter two factors, "Multitasking preference" and "Polychronic orientation," referred to multitaskers' preference of engaging in multiple media use or interaction tasks rather than a single task from the time orientation perspective. The four-factor structure indicates that excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices shares some similarities with other behavioral addiction types, but demonstrates uniqueness compared with excessive engagement in single media use. PMID:27327067

  9. Development of Inventories for Assessing Parent and Teacher Interaction and Involvement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Earl S.; Edgerton, Marianna

    This study was designed to develop a conceptual scheme and brief reliable measures of parent and teacher involvement and interaction, to be given to kindergarteners' parents and teachers at the time of enrollment and again at the end of kindergarten. The inventories provide a framework for an analysis of (1) characteristics of parents and teachers…

  10. Creating Parental Involvement: A Manual for School Children and Parents Interacting Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Delia C.

    The Children and Parents Interacting program is a federally funded Title VII project designed to create and promote greater Hispanic parent involvement in the educational system. The program represents a joint effort of Monroe and Dade County Public Schools and Florida International University's Center for Latino Education. The major thrust of the…

  11. Is interaction of amyloid β-peptides with metals involved in cognitive activity?

    PubMed

    Tamano, Haruna; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Metal ions, i.e., Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), are released from neuron terminals in the hippocampus, which plays important roles in spatial and declarative memory, and may serve as a signal factor. Synaptic homeostasis of metal ions is critical for cognitive activity in the hippocampus. Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a causative candidate for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Aβ-induced synapse dysfunction is easy to emerge along with normal aging and leads to the cognitive decline and memory loss in the pre-dementia stage of AD. Because Aβ interacts with Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), it is likely that these metal ions are involved in the Aβ-induced modification of the synaptic function. There is evidence to indicate that the inhibition of the interaction of Aβ with Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) may ameliorate the pathophysiology of AD. Interaction of extracellular Zn(2+) with Aβ in the hippocampus is involved in transiently Aβ-induced cognition deficits, while the interaction of extracellular Cu(2+) reduces bioavailability of intracellular Cu(2+), followed by an increase in oxidative stress, which may lead to cognitive deficits. It is likely that Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) play as a key-mediating factor in pathophysiology of the synaptic dysfunction in which Aβ is involved. Based on the idea that understating Aβ-induced changes in synaptic plasticity is important to prevent AD, the present paper summarizes the interaction of Aβ with metal ions in cognition. PMID:25959547

  12. Proteins involved in motility and sperm-egg interaction evolve more rapidly in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Alberto; Lüke, Lena; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies of spermatozoa have identified a large catalog of integral sperm proteins. Rapid evolution of these proteins may underlie adaptive changes of sperm traits involved in different events leading to fertilization, although the selective forces underlying such rapid evolution are not well understood. A variety of selective forces may differentially affect several steps ending in fertilization, thus resulting in a compartmentalized adaptation of sperm proteins. Here we analyzed the evolution of genes associated to various events in the sperm's life, from sperm formation to sperm-egg interaction. Evolutionary analyses were performed on gene sequences from 17 mouse strains whose genomes have been sequenced. Four of these are derived from wild Mus musculus, M. domesticus, M. castaneus and M. spretus. We found a higher proportion of genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection among those related to sperm motility and sperm-egg interaction. Furthermore, sperm proteins involved in sperm-egg interaction exhibited accelerated evolution in comparison to those involved in other events. Thus, we identified a large set of candidate proteins for future comparative analyses of genotype-phenotype associations in spermatozoa of species subjected to different sexual selection pressures. Adaptive evolution of proteins involved in motility could be driven by sperm competition, since this selective force is known to increase the proportion of motile sperm and their swimming velocity. On the other hand, sperm proteins involved in gamete interaction could be coevolving with their egg partners through episodes of sexual selection or sexual conflict resulting in species-specific sperm-egg interactions and barriers preventing interspecies fertilization.

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Involved in Rabies Virus Infection through Its Interaction with Viral Phosphoprotein P

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Baptiste; Nikolic, Jovan; Larrous, Florence; Bourhy, Hervé; Wirblich, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rabies virus (RABV) phosphoprotein P is a multifunctional protein: it plays an essential role in viral transcription and replication, and in addition, RABV P has been identified as an interferon antagonist. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen revealed that RABV P interacts with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The binding involved the 106-to-131 domain, corresponding to the dimerization domain of P and the C-terminal domain of FAK containing the proline-rich domains PRR2 and PRR3. The P-FAK interaction was confirmed in infected cells by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of FAK with P in Negri bodies. By alanine scanning, we identified a single mutation in the P protein that abolishes this interaction. The mutant virus containing a substitution of Ala for Arg in position 109 in P (P.R109A), which did not interact with FAK, is affected at a posttranscriptional step involving protein synthesis and viral RNA replication. Furthermore, FAK depletion inhibited viral protein expression in infected cells. This provides the first evidence of an interaction of RABV with FAK that positively regulates infection. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus exhibits a small genome that encodes a limited number of viral proteins. To maintain efficient virus replication, some of them are multifunctional, such as the phosphoprotein P. We and others have shown that P establishes complex networks of interactions with host cell components. These interactions have revealed much about the role of P and about host-pathogen interactions in infected cells. Here, we identified another cellular partner of P, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Our data shed light on the implication of FAK in RABV infection and provide evidence that P-FAK interaction has a proviral function. PMID:25410852

  14. Do Parentese Prosody and Fathers' Involvement in Interacting Facilitate Social Interaction in Infants Who Later Develop Autism?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David; Cassel, Raquel S.; Saint-Georges, Catherine; Mahdhaoui, Ammar; Laznik, Marie-Christine; Apicella, Fabio; Muratori, Pietro; Maestro, Sandra; Muratori, Filippo; Chetouani, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether development of autism impacts the interactive process between an infant and his/her parents remains an unexplored issue. Methodology and Principal Findings Using computational analysis taking into account synchronic behaviors and emotional prosody (parentese), we assessed the course of infants' responses to parents' type of speech in home movies from typically developing (TD) infants and infants who will subsequently develop autism aged less than 18 months. Our findings indicate: that parentese was significantly associated with infant responses to parental vocalizations involving orientation towards other people and with infant receptive behaviours; that parents of infants developing autism displayed more intense solicitations that were rich in parentese; that fathers of infants developing autism spoke to their infants more than fathers of TD infants; and that fathers' vocalizations were significantly associated with intersubjective responses and active behaviours in infants who subsequently developed autism. Conclusion The parents of infants who will later develop autism change their interactive pattern of behaviour by both increasing parentese and father's involvement in interacting with infants; both are significantly associated with infant's social responses. We stress the possible therapeutic implications of these findings and its implication for Dean Falk's theory regarding pre-linguistic evolution in early hominins. PMID:23650498

  15. Involving elderly users in design: techniques to collect preferences for Interactive Digital Television.

    PubMed

    Spagnolli, Anna; Gamberini, Luciano; Ibanez, Francisco; Fabregat, Maria Elena; Debelic, Tijana; Orso, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    SeniorChannel is a European project that explores the potential of using an Interactive Digital Television (IDTV) to turn elderly people at home into an active audience. Techniques to involve elderly users in the requirement collection during the design phase should take into account the decrease in perception, cognition and motor abilities associated with aging. The paper describes the specific solutions adopted here to elicit users' contribution, as well as the contributed preferences in terms of IDTV content and interaction modalities. PMID:22954862

  16. Involvement of the carboxyl group in QPs in interaction with succinate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Yu, L.; Yu, C.

    1987-05-01

    Bovine heart mitochondrial succinate-ubiquinone reductase (SQR) can be resolved into two reconstitutively active fractions; soluble succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and a two-subunit Q-binding protein known as QPs or cytochrome b/sub 560/ fraction. The interaction between SDH and QPs involves both hydrophobic and ionic interactions. The involvement of an amino group in SDH has been established, the participation of a negatively charged group in QPs was then being speculated. Recently, they have used dicyclohexyl carbodiimide (DCCD) to study the involvement of carboxyl group in QPs with respect to interaction with SDH. When isolated QPs was treated with a 300-molar excess of DCCD per mole of protein at pH 6.0 in the presence of 0.2% D-N-gluco-N-methyl-decanamide, more than 80% of the reconstitutive activity of QPs was diminished. The inhibition of QPs by DCCD is pH and detergent concentration dependent. When intact or reconstituted SQR was treated with DCCD, no inhibition was observed, indicating that a carboxyl group in QPs which is essential for interaction with SDH is protected from DCCD modification in the presence of active SDH. No protecting effect was observed when reconstitutively inactive SDH was used, indicating that there is no interaction between reconstitutively inactive SDH and QPs. The (/sup 14/C)-DCCD labeling study showed that the DCCD was incorporated into the smaller subunit of QPs. The modification of QPs by DCCD also caused an alteration of spectral characteristics of cytochrome b/sub 560/.

  17. Structural Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in Bacterial Cell Wall Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laddomada, Federica; Miyachiro, Mayara M.; Dessen, Andréa

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for survival, and proteins that participate in its biosynthesis have been the targets of antibiotic development efforts for decades. The biosynthesis of its main component, the peptidoglycan, involves the coordinated action of proteins that are involved in multi-member complexes which are essential for cell division (the “divisome”) and/or cell wall elongation (the “elongasome”), in the case of rod-shaped cells. Our knowledge regarding these interactions has greatly benefitted from the visualization of different aspects of the bacterial cell wall and its cytoskeleton by cryoelectron microscopy and tomography, as well as genetic and biochemical screens that have complemented information from high resolution crystal structures of protein complexes involved in divisome or elongasome formation. This review summarizes structural and functional aspects of protein complexes involved in the cytoplasmic and membrane-related steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, with a particular focus on protein-protein interactions whereby disruption could lead to the development of novel antibacterial strategies. PMID:27136593

  18. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions involved in CNT biofunctionalization with short ss-DNA.

    PubMed

    Carot, Maria Lucrecia; Torresi, Roberto M; Garcia, Carlos D; Esplandiu, Maria Jose; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2010-03-18

    This work is aimed at studying the adsorption mechanism of short chain 20-mer pyrimidinic homo-ss-DNA (oligodeoxyribonucleotide, ODN: polyC(20) and polyT(20)) onto CNT by reflectometry. To analyze the experimental data, the effective-medium theory using the Bruggemann approximation represents a suitable optical model to account for the surface properties (roughness, thickness and optical constants) and the size of the adsorbate. Systematic information about the involved interactions is obtained by changing the physico-chemical properties of the system. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are evaluated by comparing the adsorption on hydrophobic CNT and on hydrophilic silica and by modulating the ionic strength with and without Mg(2+). The ODN adsorption process on CNT is driven by hydrophobic interactions only when the electrostatic repulsion is suppressed. The adsorption mode results in ODN molecules in a side-on orientation with the bases (non-polar region) towards the surface. This unfavorable orientation is partially reverse by adding Mg(2+). On the other hand, the adsorption on silica is dominated by the strong repulsive electrostatic interaction that is screened at high ionic strength or mediated by Mg(2+). The cation-mediated process induces the interaction of the phosphate backbone (polar region) with the surface, leaving the bases free for hybridization. Although the general adsorption behavior of the pyrimidine bases is the same, polyC(20) presents higher affinity for the CNT surface due to its acid-base properties. PMID:20563224

  19. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions involved in CNT biofunctionalization with short ss-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Carot, Maria Lucrecia; Torresi, Roberto M.; Garcia, Carlos D.; Esplandiu, Maria Jose; Giacomelli, Carla E.

    2010-01-01

    This work is aimed at studying the adsorption mechanism of short chain 20-mer pyrimidinic homo-ss-DNA (oligodeoxyribonucleotide, ODN: polyC20 and polyT20) onto CNT by reflectometry. To analyze the experimental data, the effective-medium theory using the Bruggemann approximation represents a suitable optical model to account for the surface properties (roughness, thickness and optical constants) and the size of the adsorbate. Systematic information about the involved interactions is obtained by changing the physico-chemical properties of the system. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are evaluated by comparing the adsorption on hydrophobic CNT and on hydrophilic silica and by modulating the ionic strength with and without Mg2+. The ODN adsorption process on CNT is driven by hydrophobic interactions only when the electrostatic repulsion is suppressed. The adsorption mode results in ODN molecules in a side-on orientation with the bases (non-polar region) towards the surface. This unfavorable orientation is partially reverse by adding Mg2+. On the other hand, the adsorption on silica is dominated by the strong repulsive electrostatic interaction that is screened at high ionic strength or mediated by Mg2+. The cation-mediated process induces the interaction of the phosphate backbone (polar region) with the surface, leaving the bases free for hybridization. Although the general adsorption behavior of the pyrimidine bases is the same, polyC20 presents higher affinity for the CNT surface due to its acid-base properties. PMID:20563224

  20. Evolution of the interaction between Runx2 and VDR, two transcription factors involved in osteoblastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mineralized skeleton is a major evolutionary novelty that has contributed to the impressive morphological diversifications of the vertebrates. Essential to bone biology is the solidified extracellular matrix secreted by highly specialized cells, the osteoblasts. We now have a rather complete view of the events underlying osteogenesis, from a cellular, molecular, genetic, and epigenetic perspective. Because this knowledge is still largely restricted to mammals, it is difficult, if not impossible, to deduce the evolutionary history of the regulatory network involved in osteoblasts specification and differentiation. In this study, we focused on the transcriptional regulators Runx2 and VDR (the Vitamin D Receptor) that, in mammals, directly interact together and stabilize complexes of co-activators and chromatin remodellers, thereby allowing the transcriptional activation of target genes involved in extracellular matrix mineralization. Using a combination of functional, biochemical, and histological approaches, we have asked if the interaction observed between Runx2 and VDR represents a recent mammalian innovation, or if it results from more ancient changes that have occurred deep in the vertebrate lineage. Results Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in developing embryos of chick, frog and teleost fishes, we have revealed that the co-expression of Runx2 and VDR in skeletal elements has been particularly strengthened in the lineage leading to amniotes. We show that the teleost Runx2 orthologue as well as the three mammalian Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3 paralogues are able to co-immunoprecipitate with the VDR protein present in nuclear extracts of rat osteoblasts stimulated with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In addition, the teleost Runx2 can activate the transcription of the mammalian osteocalcin promoter in transfection experiments, and this response can be further enhanced by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Finally, using pull-down experiments

  1. Banana ethylene response factors are involved in fruit ripening through their interactions with ethylene biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun-yi; Chen, Jian-ye; Kuang, Jiang-fei; Shan, Wei; Xie, Hui; Jiang, Yue-ming; Lu, Wang-jin

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factor (TF) in the transcriptional regulation of ethylene biosynthesis genes during fruit ripening remains largely unclear. In this study, 15 ERF genes, designated as MaERF1-MaERF15, were isolated and characterized from banana fruit. These MaERFs were classified into seven of the 12 known ERF families. Subcellular localization showed that MaERF proteins of five different subfamilies preferentially localized to the nucleus. The 15 MaERF genes displayed differential expression patterns and levels in peel and pulp of banana fruit, in association with four different ripening treatments caused by natural, ethylene-induced, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-delayed, and combined 1-MCP and ethylene treatments. MaERF9 was upregulated while MaERF11 was downregulated in peel and pulp of banana fruit during ripening or after treatment with ethylene. Furthermore, yeast-one hybrid (Y1H) and transient expression assays showed that the potential repressor MaERF11 bound to MaACS1 and MaACO1 promoters to suppress their activities and that MaERF9 activated MaACO1 promoter activity. Interestingly, protein-protein interaction analysis revealed that MaERF9 and -11 physically interacted with MaACO1. Taken together, these results suggest that MaERFs are involved in banana fruit ripening via transcriptional regulation of or interaction with ethylene biosynthesis genes. PMID:23599278

  2. CIPK7 is involved in cold response by interacting with CBL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Conglin; Ding, Shuo; Zhang, Hua; Du, Hang; An, Lizhe

    2011-07-01

    The family of calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins is a unique group of Ca(2+) sensors in plants. CBLs relay the calcium signal by interacting with and regulating the family of CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs). Extensive studies have demonstrated that the CBL-CIPK complexes mediate plant responses to a variety of external stresses. However, there are few reports on the CBL-CIPK involved in cold stress responses. In this study, we analyzed expression of CIPK7 and CBL1 in Arabidopsis during cold treatments. Expression of CIPK7 was induced by cold, and CIPK7 interacted with CBL1 in vitro. Moreover, affinity chromatography purification of CIPK7 from Arabidopsis plants using CBL1 suggested that CIPK7 may associate with CBL1 in vivo. Expression of CBL1 was cold inducible, and CBL1 had a role in regulating cold response. By comparing expression patterns of CIPK7 between wild-type and cbl1 mutant plants, we found the induction of CIPK7 by cold stress was influenced by CBL1. This is the first report to demonstrate that CIPK7 may play a role in cold response via its interaction with CBL1.

  3. Metabolomics of reef benthic interactions reveals a bioactive lipid involved in coral defence

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Hartmann, Aaron C.; Galtier d'Auriac, Ines; Benler, Sean; Haas, Andreas; Quistad, Steven D.; Lim, Yan Wei; Little, Mark; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-01-01

    Holobionts are assemblages of microbial symbionts and their macrobial host. As extant representatives of some of the oldest macro-organisms, corals and algae are important for understanding how holobionts develop and interact with one another. Using untargeted metabolomics, we show that non-self interactions altered the coral metabolome more than self-interactions (i.e. different or same genus, respectively). Platelet activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF, central inflammatory modulators in mammals, were major lipid components of the coral holobionts. When corals were damaged during competitive interactions with algae, PAF increased along with expression of the gene encoding Lyso-PAF acetyltransferase; the protein responsible for converting Lyso-PAF to PAF. This shows that self and non-self recognition among some of the oldest extant holobionts involve bioactive lipids identical to those in highly derived taxa like humans. This further strengthens the hypothesis that major players of the immune response evolved during the pre-Cambrian. PMID:27122568

  4. [Infections associated with intra- and extravascular catheters: factors involved in microorganism-biomaterial interactions].

    PubMed

    Baldassarri, L; Gelosia, A; Donelli, G

    1994-01-01

    Infections is one of the most common cause of catheter failure as well as the most difficult to manage, most often requiring catheter removal. Staphylococcus is the etiologic agent of such infections more frequently isolated, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis. Several factors have been suggested to be involved in bacteria-biomaterial interactions such as catheter surface morphology, molecular biofilm and bacterial virulence features. Different strategies have been tried to avoid the development to catheter-associated infections: among them adsorption of antibiotic molecules to the catheter surface might represent a successful tool to improve catheter implant life.

  5. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  6. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  7. MCT Expression and Lactate Influx/Efflux in Tanycytes Involved in Glia-Neuron Metabolic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Elizondo, Roberto; Llanos, Paula; Uranga, Romina María; Nualart, Francisco; García, María Angeles

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic interaction via lactate between glial cells and neurons has been proposed as one of the mechanisms involved in hypothalamic glucosensing. We have postulated that hypothalamic glial cells, also known as tanycytes, produce lactate by glycolytic metabolism of glucose. Transfer of lactate to neighboring neurons stimulates ATP synthesis and thus contributes to their activation. Because destruction of third ventricle (III-V) tanycytes is sufficient to alter blood glucose levels and food intake in rats, it is hypothesized that tanycytes are involved in the hypothalamic glucose sensing mechanism. Here, we demonstrate the presence and function of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) in tanycytes. Specifically, MCT1 and MCT4 expression as well as their distribution were analyzed in Sprague Dawley rat brain, and we demonstrate that both transporters are expressed in tanycytes. Using primary tanycyte cultures, kinetic analyses and sensitivity to inhibitors were undertaken to confirm that MCT1 and MCT4 were functional for lactate influx. Additionally, physiological concentrations of glucose induced lactate efflux in cultured tanycytes, which was inhibited by classical MCT inhibitors. Because the expression of both MCT1 and MCT4 has been linked to lactate efflux, we propose that tanycytes participate in glucose sensing based on a metabolic interaction with neurons of the arcuate nucleus, which are stimulated by lactate released from MCT1 and MCT4-expressing tanycytes. PMID:21297988

  8. Classical lattice spin models involving singular interactions isotropic in spin space.

    PubMed

    Chamati, Hassan; Romano, Silvano

    2015-07-01

    We address here a few classical lattice spin models, involving n-component unit vectors (n=2,3), associated with a D-dimensional lattice Z(D),D=1,2, and interacting via a pair potential restricted to nearest neighbors and being isotropic in spin space, i.e., defined by a function of the scalar product between the interacting spins. When the potential involves a continuous function of the scalar product, the Mermin-Wagner theorem and its generalizations exclude orientational order at all finite temperatures in the thermodynamic limit, and exclude phase transitions at finite temperatures when D=1; on the other hand, we have considered here some comparatively simple functions of the scalar product which are bounded from below, diverge to +∞ for certain mutual orientations, and are continuous almost everywhere with integrable singularities. Exact solutions are presented for D=1, showing an absence of phase transitions and an absence of orientational order at all finite temperatures in the thermodynamic limit; for D=2, and in the absence of more stringent mathematical results, extensive simulations carried out on some of them point to the absence of orientational order at all finite temperatures and suggest the existence of a Berezinskiĭ-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. PMID:26274152

  9. Interactions involving ozone, Botrytis cinerea, and B. squamosa on onion leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Interactions involving Botrytis cinerea Pers., B. squamosa Walker, and ozone on onion (alium cepae L.) were investigated. Initially, threshold dosages of ozone required to predispose onion leaves to greater infection by B. cinerea and B. squamosa were determined under controlled conditions in an ozone-exposure chamber. Subsequent experiments supported the hypothesis that nutrients leaking out of ozone-injured cells stimulated lesion production by B. cinerea. The electrical conductivity of, and carbohydrate concentration in, dew collected from leaves of onion plants which had been exposed to ozone were greater than the electrical conductivity of, and carbohydrate concentration in, dew collected from leaves of other, non-exposed onion plants. When conidia of B. cinerea were suspended in dew collected from leaves of plants which had been exposed to ozone and the resulting suspension atomized onto leaves of non-exposed plants, more lesions were induced than on leaves of other non-exposed plants inoculated with conidia suspended in dew collected from plants which had not been exposed to ozone. EDU protected onion leaves from ozone-induced predisposition to these fungi under controlled conditions. Experiments designed to detect interaction between B. cinerea and B. squamosa in onion leaf blighting indicated that such interaction did not occur. Leaves were blighted rapidly when inoculated with B. squamosa whether B. cinerea was present or absent.

  10. Numerical and Analytical Solutions of Hypersonic Interactions Involving Surface Property Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Inger, George R.

    1999-01-01

    The local viscous-inviscid interaction field generated by a wall temperature jump on a flat plate in supersonic flow and on the windside of a Reusable Launch Vehicle in hypersonic flow is studied in detail by both a Navier-Stokes numerical code and an analytical triple-deck model. Treatment of the rapid heat transfer changes both upstream and downstream of the jump is included. Closed form relationships derived from the triple-deck theory are presented. The analytically predicted pressure and heating variations including upstream influence are found to be in generally good agreement with the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) predictions. These analyses not only clarify the interactive physics involved but also are useful in preliminary design of thermal protection systems and as an insertable module to improve CFD code efficiency when applied to such small-scale interaction problems. The analyses only require conditions at the wall and boundary-layer edge which are easily extracted from a baseline, constant wall temperature, CFD solution.

  11. Involvement of apoptosis in host-parasite interactions in the zebra mussel.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Laëtitia; Brulé, Nelly; Sohm, Bénédicte; Devin, Simon; Giambérini, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether cell death by apoptosis plays a biological function during infection is key to understanding host-parasite interactions. We investigated the involvement of apoptosis in several host-parasite systems, using zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha as test organisms and their micro- and macroparasites. As a stress response associated with parasitism, heat shock proteins (Hsp) can be induced. In this protein family, Hsp70 are known to be apoptosis inhibitors. Mussels were diagnosed for their respective infections by standard histological methods; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL methods on paraffin sections and Hsp70 by immunohistochemistry on cryosections. Circulating hemocytes were the main cells observed in apoptosis whereas infected tissues displayed no or few apoptotic cells. Parasitism by intracellular bacteria Rickettsiales-like and the trematode Bucephalus polymorphus were associated with the inhibition of apoptosis whereas ciliates Ophryoglena spp. or the trematode Phyllodistomum folium did not involve significant differences in apoptosis. Even if some parasites were able to modulate apoptosis in zebra mussels, we did not see evidence of any involvement of Hsp70 on this mechanism. PMID:23785455

  12. Secretomics identifies Fusarium graminearum proteins involved in the interaction with barley and wheat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fen; Jensen, Jens D; Svensson, Birte; Jørgensen, Hans J L; Collinge, David B; Finnie, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a phytopathogenic fungus primarily infecting small grain cereals, including barley and wheat. Secreted enzymes play important roles in the pathogenicity of many fungi. In order to access the secretome of F. graminearum, the fungus was grown in liquid culture with barley or wheat flour as the sole nutrient source to mimic the host-pathogen interaction. A gel-based proteomics approach was employed to identify the proteins secreted into the culture medium. Sixty-nine unique fungal proteins were identified in 154 protein spots, including enzymes involved in the degradation of cell walls, starch and proteins. Of these proteins, 35% had not been identified in previous in planta or in vitro studies, 70% were predicted to contain signal peptides and a further 16% may be secreted in a nonclassical manner. Proteins identified in the 72 spots showing differential appearance between wheat and barley flour medium were mainly involved in fungal cell wall remodelling and the degradation of plant cell walls, starch and proteins. The in planta expression of corresponding F. graminearum genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in barley and wheat spikelets harvested at 2-6 days after inoculation. In addition, a clear difference in the accumulation of fungal biomass and the extent of fungal-induced proteolysis of plant β-amylase was observed in barley and wheat. The present study considerably expands the current database of F. graminearum secreted proteins which may be involved in Fusarium head blight.

  13. Involvement of Apoptosis in Host-Parasite Interactions in the Zebra Mussel

    PubMed Central

    Minguez, Laëtitia; Brulé, Nelly; Sohm, Bénédicte; Devin, Simon; Giambérini, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether cell death by apoptosis plays a biological function during infection is key to understanding host-parasite interactions. We investigated the involvement of apoptosis in several host-parasite systems, using zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha as test organisms and their micro- and macroparasites. As a stress response associated with parasitism, heat shock proteins (Hsp) can be induced. In this protein family, Hsp70 are known to be apoptosis inhibitors. Mussels were diagnosed for their respective infections by standard histological methods; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL methods on paraffin sections and Hsp70 by immunohistochemistry on cryosections. Circulating hemocytes were the main cells observed in apoptosis whereas infected tissues displayed no or few apoptotic cells. Parasitism by intracellular bacteria Rickettsiales-like and the trematode Bucephalus polymorphus were associated with the inhibition of apoptosis whereas ciliates Ophryoglena spp. or the trematode Phyllodistomum folium did not involve significant differences in apoptosis. Even if some parasites were able to modulate apoptosis in zebra mussels, we did not see evidence of any involvement of Hsp70 on this mechanism. PMID:23785455

  14. DNA methylation, riboswitches, and transcription factor activity: fundamental mechanisms of gene-nutrient interactions involving vitamins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Janet; Vieira, Amandio

    2006-12-01

    Nutrient-gene interactions occur with a variety of nutrients including some minerals, vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acids and other lipids. Fundamental molecular mechanisms that underlie many of the effects of nutrients on gene expression are presented herein. Two of the mechanisms described influence gene transcription: DNA methylation and transcription factor activation. Another mechanism, riboswitching, can regulate gene expression at different levels, for example, at the mRNA translation level. The first two mechanisms are widely distributed across animal phyla. Riboswitches are documented primarily in more primitive organisms, but may prove to be of wider relevance. Riboswitches are known for several vitamins; those involving thiamine are presented here. The role of folates and retinoids in DNA methylation and transcriptional factor (nuclear retinoid receptor) activities, respectively, is presented in the context of cell proliferation and differentiation, and related physiological or pathological effects during embryogenesis and cancer.

  15. Interactions of cellular proteins involved in the transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J A; Wu, F K; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1987-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a human retrovirus which is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To study the cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of this virus, we performed DNase I footprinting of the viral LTR using partially purified HeLa cell extracts. Five regions of the viral LTR appear critical for DNA binding of cellular proteins. These include the negative regulatory, enhancer, SP1, TATA and untranslated regions. Deletion mutagenesis of these binding domains has significant effects on the basal level of transcription and the ability to be induced by the viral tat protein. Mutations of either the negative regulatory or untranslated regions affect factor binding to the enhancer region. In addition, oligonucleotides complementary to several of the binding domains specifically compete for factor binding. These results suggest that interactions between several distinct cellular proteins are required for HIV transcriptional regulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3428273

  16. Interactions of cellular proteins involved in the transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J A; Wu, F K; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1987-12-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a human retrovirus which is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To study the cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of this virus, we performed DNase I footprinting of the viral LTR using partially purified HeLa cell extracts. Five regions of the viral LTR appear critical for DNA binding of cellular proteins. These include the negative regulatory, enhancer, SP1, TATA and untranslated regions. Deletion mutagenesis of these binding domains has significant effects on the basal level of transcription and the ability to be induced by the viral tat protein. Mutations of either the negative regulatory or untranslated regions affect factor binding to the enhancer region. In addition, oligonucleotides complementary to several of the binding domains specifically compete for factor binding. These results suggest that interactions between several distinct cellular proteins are required for HIV transcriptional regulation.

  17. Local Area Disadvantage and Gambling Involvement and Disorder: Evidence for Gene-Environment Correlation and Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Slutske, Wendy S.; Deutsch, Arielle R.; Statham, Dixie B.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that local area characteristics (such as disadvantage and gambling outlet density) and genetic risk factors are associated with gambling involvement and disordered gambling. These two lines of research were brought together in the present study by examining the extent to which genetic contributions to individual differences in gambling involvement and disorder contributed to being exposed to, and were also accentuated by, local area disadvantage. Participants were members of the national community-based Australian Twin Registry who completed a telephone interview in which the past-year frequency of gambling and symptoms of disordered gambling were assessed. Indicators of local area disadvantage were based on census data matched to the participants' postal codes. Univariate biometric model-fitting revealed that exposure to area disadvantage was partially explained by genetic factors. Bivariate biometric model-fitting was conducted to examine the evidence for gene-environment interaction while accounting for gene-environment correlation. These analyses demonstrated that: (a) a small portion of the genetic propensity to gamble was explained by moving to or remaining in a disadvantaged area, and (b) the remaining genetic and unique environmental variation in the frequency of participating in electronic machine gambling (among men and women) and symptoms of disordered gambling (among women) was greater in more disadvantaged localities. As the gambling industry continues to grow, it will be important to take into account the multiple contexts in which problematic gambling behavior can emerge -- from genes to geography -- as well as the ways in which such contexts may interact with each other. PMID:26147321

  18. Adhesion receptors involved in HSC and early-B cell interactions with bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    De Grandis, Maria; Lhoumeau, Anne-Catherine; Mancini, Stéphane J C; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoiesis takes place in the bone marrow of adult mammals and is the process by which blood cells are replenished every day throughout life. Differentiation of hematopoietic cells occurs in a stepwise manner through intermediates of differentiation that could be phenotypically identified. This has allowed establishing hematopoietic cell classification with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) at the top of the hierarchy. HSCs are mostly quiescent and serve as a reservoir for maintenance of lifelong hematopoiesis. Over recent years, it has become increasingly clear that HSC quiescence is not only due to intrinsic properties, but is also mediated by cognate interactions between HSCs and surrounding cells within micro-anatomical sites called “niches”. This hematopoietic/stromal crosstalk model also applies to more mature progenitors such as B cell progenitors, which are thought to reside in distinct “niches”. This prompted many research teams to search for specific molecular mechanisms supporting leuko-stromal crosstalk in the bone marrow and acting at specific stage of differentiation to regulate hematopoietic homeostasis. Here, we review recent data on adhesion mechanisms involved in HSCs and B cell progenitors interactions with surrounding bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:26495446

  19. Worker Injuries Involving the Interaction of Cattle, Cattle Handlers, and Farm Structures or Equipment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Shannon; Ricketts, Mitch; Minton, J Ernest

    2015-01-01

    Cattle have been identified as leading sources of injuries to agricultural workers. The present study focused on worker injuries that involved the interaction of cattle, cattle handlers, and farm structures or equipment. The goal of the study was to identify opportunities for injury prevention. We examined 221 reports of injury to cattle handlers from the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Expected interactions led to many of the cattle-handling injuries reported in the NEISS database. In almost 30% of cases, cattle pushed workers into structures such as fences, gates, posts, and walls. In another 16% to 19% of injuries, cattle struck gates and other objects, propelling them at the victims. The present research makes several important contributions to the study of cattle-handling injuries. First, the research supports an increased emphasis on the development of safer gate designs (e.g., gates that are remotely operated or that absorb energy to limit the speed at which they may be propelled by animals). Second, the research suggests a need for additional study of energy-absorbing fence and wall structures. We view these two points to be of significance because gates and associated structures (e.g., posts, fences, and walls) accounted for 45% of the injuries in the dataset, based on the associated injury narrative. Finally, the research identifies a previously unexplored source of agricultural injury data, namely the NEISS database. PMID:26211350

  20. DUF581 Is Plant Specific FCS-Like Zinc Finger Involved in Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction. PMID:24901469

  1. DUF581 is plant specific FCS-like zinc finger involved in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction.

  2. Functional interactions between type IV secretion systems involved in DNA transfer and virulence.

    PubMed

    de Paz, Héctor D; Sangari, Félix J; Bolland, Silvia; García-Lobo, Juan M; Dehio, Christoph; de la Cruz, Fernando; Llosa, Matxalen

    2005-11-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the functional interactions between type IV secretion systems (T4SS) that are part of the conjugative machinery for horizontal DNA transfer (cT4SS), and T4SS involved in bacterial pathogenicity (pT4SS). The authors' previous work showed that a conjugative coupling protein (T4CP) interacts with the VirB10-type component of the T4SS in order to recruit the protein-DNA complex to the transporter for conjugative DNA transfer. This study now shows by two-hybrid analysis that conjugative T4CPs also interact with the VirB10 element of the pT4SS of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (At), Bartonella tribocorum (Bt) and Brucella suis (Bs). Moreover, the VirB10 component of a cT4SS (protein TrwE of plasmid R388) could be partially substituted by that of a pT4SS (protein TrwE of Bt) for conjugation. This result opens the way for the construction of hybrid T4SS that deliver DNA into animal cells. Interestingly, in the presence of part of the Bs T4SS the R388 T4SS protein levels were decreased and R388 conjugation was strongly inhibited. Complementation assays between the Trw systems of R388 and Bt showed that only individual components from the so-called 'core complex' could be exchanged, supporting the concept that this core is the common scaffold for the transport apparatus while the other 'peripheral components' are largely system-specific. PMID:16272374

  3. Transcriptome profiling of bacterial responses to root exudates identifies genes involved in microbe-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mark, G. Louise; Dow, J. Maxwell; Kiely, Patrick D.; Higgins, Hazel; Haynes, Jill; Baysse, Christine; Abbas, Abdelhamid; Foley, Tara; Franks, Ashley; Morrissey, John; O'Gara, Fergal

    2005-01-01

    Molecules exuded by plant roots are thought to act as signals to influence the ability of microbial strains to colonize the roots and to survive in the rhizosphere. Differential bacterial responses to signals from different plant species may mediate the selection of specific rhizosphere populations. Very little, however, is known about the effects of plant exudates on patterns of bacterial gene expression. Here, we have tested the concept that plant root exudates modulate expression of bacterial genes involved in establishing microbe-plant interactions. We have examined the influence on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 transcriptome of exudates from two varieties of sugarbeet that select for genetically distinct pseudomonad populations in the rhizosphere. The response to the two exudates showed only a partial overlap; the majority of those genes with altered expression was regulated in response to only one of the two exudates. Genes with altered expression included those with functions previously implicated in microbe-plant interactions, such as aspects of metabolism, chemotaxis and type III secretion, and a subset with putative or unknown function. Use of a panel of mutants with targeted disruptions allowed us to identify previously uncharacterized genes with roles in the competitive ability of P. aeruginosa in the rhizosphere within this subset. No genes with host-specific effects were identified. Homologues of the genes identified occur in the genomes of both beneficial and pathogenic root-associated bacteria, suggesting that this strategy may help to elucidate molecular interactions that are important for biocontrol, plant growth promotion, and plant pathogenesis. PMID:16301542

  4. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  5. Interaction Involvement in Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination of a Communication Process in Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Thi Thao Duyen

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores how participants express and interpret verbal cues of interaction involvement in dyadic conversations via text-based Instant Messaging (IM). Moreover, it seeks to discover differences in the way American participants and Chinese participants use verbal cues when they are highly, or lowly involved. Based on previous…

  6. The different interactions of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides with two strawberry varieties and the involvement of salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Li-Qing; Song, Li-Li; Duan, Ke; Li, Na; Wang, Yan-Xiu; Gao, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The disease symptoms recognized as ‘Anthracnose’ are caused by Colletotrichum spp. and lead to large-scale strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa Duchesne) losses worldwide in terms of both quality and production. Little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying the genetic variations in the strawberry–Colletotrichum spp. interaction. In this work, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C. gloeosporioides) infection was characterized in two varieties exhibiting different susceptibilities, and the involvement of salicylic acid (SA) was examined. Light microscopic observation showed that C. gloeosporioides conidia germinated earlier and faster on the leaf surface of the susceptible cultivar compared with the less-susceptible cultivar. Several PR genes were differentially expressed, with higher-amplitude changes observed in the less-susceptible cultivar. The less-susceptible cultivar contained a higher level of basal SA, and the SA levels increased rapidly upon infection, followed by a sharp decrease before the necrotrophic phase. External SA pretreatment reduced susceptibility and elevated the internal SA levels in both varieties, which were sharply reduced in the susceptible cultivar upon inoculation. The less-susceptible cultivar also displayed a more sensitive and marked increase in the transcripts of NB-LRR genes to C. gloeosporioides, and SA pretreatment differentially induced transcript accumulation in the two varieties during infection. Furthermore, SA directly inhibited the germination of C. gloeosporioides conidia; NB-LRR transcript accumulation in response to SA pretreatment was both dose- and cultivar-dependent. The results demonstrate that the less-susceptible cultivar showed reduced conidia germination. The contribution of SA might involve microbial isolate-specific sensitivity to SA, cultivar/tissue-specific SA homeostasis and signaling, and the sensitivity of R genes and the related defense network to SA and pathogens. PMID:27004126

  7. Non-covalent interactions involving halogenated derivatives of capecitabine and thymidylate synthase: a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Adhip; Hoque, Mohammad Mazharol; Khan, Mohammad A K; Sarwar, Mohammed G; Halim, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Capecitabine, a fluoropyrimidine prodrug, has been a frequently chosen ligand for the last one and half decades to inhibit thymidylate synthase (TYMS) for treatment of colorectal cancer. TYMS is a key enzyme for de novo synthesis of deoxythymidine monophosphate and subsequent synthesis of DNA. Recent years have also seen the trait of modifying ligands using halogens and trifluoromethyl (-CF3) group to ensure enhanced drug performance. In this study, in silico modification of capecitabine with Cl, Br, I atoms and -CF3 group has been performed. Density functional theory has been employed to optimize the drug molecules and elucidate their thermodynamic and electrical properties such as Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, electronic energy, dipole moment and frontier orbital features (HOMO-LUMO gap, hardness and softness). Flexible and rigid molecular docking have been implemented between drugs and the receptor TYMS. Both inter- and intra-molecular non-covalent interactions involving the amino acid residues of TYMS and the drug molecules are explored in details. The drugs were superimposed on the resolved crystal structure (at 1.9 Å) of ZD1694/dUMP/TYMS system to shed light on similarity of the binding of capecitabine, and its modifiers, to that of ZD1694. Together, these results may provide more insights prior to synthesizing halogen-directed derivatives of capecitabine for anticancer treatment. PMID:27026843

  8. Fluid–structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration. PMID:24415796

  9. Fluid-structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration.

  10. Multiple EPS interactions involved in the cohesion and structure of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Caudan, Cédric; Filali, Ahlem; Spérandio, Mathieu; Girbal-Neuhauser, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to clarify the biochemical nature and interactions of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) involved in the structure and cohesive properties of aerobic granules. Granules were incubated with selective hydrolytic enzymes or with chemicals and the resistance of digested granules to shear stress was evaluated. After α-amylase digestion, the hydrodynamic stress released macro-particles (>315 μm) while soluble molecules (<1.5 μm) and micro-particles (1.5-315 μm) where mainly recovered after savinase and EDTA treatments. These data show that α (1-4) glucans and proteins are key polymers for granule cohesion and that divalent cationic bridging is a major aggregative mechanism. On the basis of these experiments and microscopy observations, a model is proposed for the spatial organization of EPS in the granular structure, in which α glucans are arranged in a capsular layer surrounding bacterial clusters while anionic proteins constitute the intercellular cement that may reinforce cohesion inside the bacterial clusters.

  11. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  12. Feedback regulation of an Agrobacterium catalase gene katA involved in Agrobacterium-plant interaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Q; Li, L P; Pan, S Q

    2001-11-01

    Catalases are known to detoxify H2O2, a major component of oxidative stress imposed on a cell. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens catalase encoded by a chromosomal gene katA has been implicated as an important virulence factor as it is involved in detoxification of H2O2 released during Agrobacterium-plant interaction. In this paper, we report a feedback regulation pathway that controls the expression of katA in A. tumefaciens cells. We observed that katA could be induced by plant tissue sections and by acidic pH on a minimal medium, which resembles the plant environment that the bacteria encounter during the course of infection. This represents a new regulatory factor for catalase induction in bacteria. More importantly, a feedback regulation was observed when the katA-gfp expression was studied in different genetic backgrounds. We found that introduction of a wild-type katA gene encoding a functional catalase into A. tumefaciens cells could repress the katA-gfp expression over 60-fold. The katA gene could be induced by H2O2 and the encoded catalase could detoxify H2O2. In addition, the katA-gfp expression of one bacterial cell could be repressed by other surrounding catalase-proficient bacterial cells. Furthermore, mutation at katA caused a 10-fold increase of the intracellular H2O2 concentration in the bacteria grown on an acidic pH medium. These results suggest that the endogenous H2O2 generated during A. tumefaciens cell growth could serve as the intracellular and intercellular inducer for the katA gene expression and that the acidic pH could pose an oxidative stress on the bacteria. Surprisingly, one mutated KatA protein, exhibiting no significant catalase activity as a result of the alteration of two important residues at the putative active site, could partially repress the katA-gfp expression. The feedback regulation of the katA gene by both catalase activity and KatA protein could presumably maintain an appropriated level of catalase activity and H2O2 inside A

  13. Evidence for new homotypic and heterotypic interactions between transmembrane helices of proteins involved in receptor tyrosine kinase and neuropilin signaling.

    PubMed

    Sawma, Paul; Roth, Lise; Blanchard, Cécile; Bagnard, Dominique; Crémel, Gérard; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Duneau, Jean-Pierre; Sturgis, James N; Hubert, Pierre

    2014-12-12

    Signaling in eukaryotic cells frequently relies on dynamic interactions of single-pass membrane receptors involving their transmembrane (TM) domains. To search for new such interactions, we have developed a bacterial two-hybrid system to screen for both homotypic and heterotypic interactions between TM helices. We have explored the dimerization of TM domains from 16 proteins involved in both receptor tyrosine kinase and neuropilin signaling. This study has revealed several new interactions. We found that the TM domain of Mucin-4, a putative intramembrane ligand for erbB2, dimerizes not only with erbB2 but also with all four members of the erbB family. In the Neuropilin/Plexin family of receptors, we showed that the TM domains of Neuropilins 1 and 2 dimerize with themselves and also with Plexin-A1, Plexin-B1, and L1CAM, but we were unable to observe interactions with several other TM domains notably those of members of the VEGF receptor family. The potentially important Neuropilin 1/Plexin-A1 interaction was confirmed using a surface plasmon resonance assay. This work shows that TM domain interactions can be highly specific. Exploring further the propensities of TM helix-helix association in cell membrane should have important practical implications related to our understanding of the structure-function of bitopic proteins' assembly and subsequent function, especially in the regulation of signal transduction. PMID:25315821

  14. Perspectives of Foster Parents on Interactions and Involvement with K-12 Public Schools in a County in Southern California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein-Steele, Eric Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) understand foster parents' perceptions of their parental roles and their involvement in their foster children's academic work; (b) understand their perceptions of their experiences in interacting with their foster children's public school; and (c) provide suggestions to enhance the parent-school…

  15. Comparative genomics of plant-associated Pseudomonas spp.: Insights into diversity and inheritance of traits involved in multitrophic interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group, including seven new genomic sequences for plant-associated strains. These strains exhibit a diverse spectrum of traits involved in biological control and other multitrophic interactions with plants, microbes, and ins...

  16. Collaboratives for Wildlife-Wind Turbine Interaction Research: Fostering Multistakeholder Involvement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, K.

    2013-04-01

    This poster highlights the various wildlife-wind collaboratives (specific to wildlife-wind turbine interaction research) that currently exist. Examples of collaboratives are included along with contact information, objectives, benefits, and ways to advance the knowledge base.

  17. Adhesins and ligands involved in the interaction of Candida spp. with epithelial and endothelial surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Hostetter, M K

    1994-01-01

    Adhesion of candidal species to the epithelium of the gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract stands as a critical first step in the pathogenesis of candidal infection. After colonization and replication at mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans and other pathogenic species may penetrate the mucosal barrier, enter the vascular tree, and disseminate hematogenously. The consequences of this pathogenic cascade evoke considerable morbidity and mortality, especially among immunocompromised patients. Thus, interactions of C. albicans and other candidal species with epithelium and endothelium may lead to serious consequences for the human host. This review evaluates candidate candidal adhesions for epithelial and endothelial surfaces, with emphasis on the specificity of the interaction, the inhibitors that have been employed, and the ligands that have been identified on mammalian cells or matrices. Three types of interactions are described: protein-protein interactions, lectin-like interactions, and incompletely defined interactions in which the adhesive ligand is as yet unidentified. Special attention is given to the roles of integrin-like proteins. Differences in the mechanisms of candidal attachment to epithelium and endothelium are delineated. Last, on the basis of the available literature, avenues of potentially fruitful investigation are proposed. Images PMID:8118789

  18. Modelization of nanospace interaction involving a ferromagnetic atom: a spin polarization effect study by thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, K S V; Chen, Xu; Gupta, S

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio studies of ferromagnetic atom interacting with carbon nanotubes have been reported in the literature that predict when the interaction is strong, a higher hybridization with confinement effect will result in spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom. The spin polarization effect on the thermal oxidation to form its oxide is modeled here for the ferromagnetic atom and its alloy, as the above studies predict the 4s electrons are polarized in the atom. The four models developed here provide a pathway for distinguishing the type of interaction that exists in the real system. The extent of spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom has been examined by varying the amount of carbon nanotubes in the composites in the thermogravimetric experiments. In this study we report the experimental results on the CoNi alloy which appears to show selective spin polarization. The products of the thermal oxidation has been analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. PMID:24734699

  19. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  20. A Kinesthetic Model Demonstrating Molecular Interactions Involved in Anterior-Posterior Pattern Formation in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Kristin R.

    2008-01-01

    Prerequisites for the Developmental Biology course at Augustana College are introductory courses in zoology and cell biology. After introductory courses students appreciate the fact that proteins have three-dimensional structures; however, they often fail to recognize how protein interactions with other cellular components can lead to specific…

  1. NLRP7, Involved in Hydatidiform Molar Pregnancy (HYDM1), Interacts with the Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB16.

    PubMed

    Singer, Heike; Biswas, Arijit; Nuesgen, Nicole; Oldenburg, Johannes; El-Maarri, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the maternal effect gene NLRP7 cause biparental hydatidiform mole (HYDM1). HYDM1 is characterized by abnormal growth of placenta and lack of proper embryonic development. The molar tissues are characterized by abnormal methylation patterns at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes. It is not known whether this occurs before or after fertilization, but the high specificity of this defect to the maternal allele indicates a possible maternal germ line-specific effect. To better understand the unknown molecular mechanism leading to HYDM1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen against an ovarian library using NLRP7 as bait. We identified the transcriptional repressor ZBTB16 as an interacting protein of NLRP7 and verified this interaction in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Native protein analysis detected NLRP7 and ZBTB16 in a 480kD protein complex and both proteins co-localize in the cytoplasm in juxtanuclear aggregates. HYDM1-causing mutations in NLRP7 did not show altered patterns of interaction with ZBTB16. Hence, the biological significance of the NLRP7-ZBTB16 interaction remains to be revealed. However, a clear effect of harvesting ZBTB16 to the cytoplasm when the NLRP7 protein is overexpressed may be linked to the pathology of the molar pregnancy disease.

  2. Membrane recognition by vesicular stomatitis virus involves enthalpy-driven protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Fabiana A; Bianconi, M Lucia; Weissmüller, Gilberto; Stauffer, Fausto; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2002-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection depends on the fusion of viral and cellular membranes, which is mediated by virus spike glycoprotein G at the acidic environment of the endosomal compartment. VSV G protein does not contain a hydrophobic amino acid sequence similar to the fusion peptides found among other viral glycoproteins, suggesting that membrane recognition occurs through an alternative mechanism. Here we studied the interaction between VSV G protein and liposomes of different phospholipid composition by force spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Force spectroscopy experiments revealed the requirement for negatively charged phospholipids for VSV binding to membranes, suggesting that this interaction is electrostatic in nature. In addition, ITC experiments showed that VSV binding to liposomes is an enthalpically driven process. Fluorescence data also showed the lack of VSV interaction with the vesicles as well as inhibition of VSV-induced membrane fusion at high ionic strength. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements showed that the extent of G protein conformational changes depends on the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the target membrane. Although the increase in PS content did not change the binding profile, the rate of the fusion reaction was remarkably increased when the PS content was increased from 25 to 75%. On the basis of these data, we suggest that G protein binding to the target membrane essentially depends on electrostatic interactions, probably between positive charges on the protein surface and negatively charged phospholipids in the cellular membrane. In addition, the fusion is exothermic, indicating no entropic constraints to this process.

  3. PsbS interactions involved in the activation of energy dissipation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Correa-Galvis, Viviana; Poschmann, Gereon; Melzer, Michael; Stühler, Kai; Jahns, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The non-photochemical quenching of light energy as heat (NPQ) is an important photoprotective mechanism that is activated in plants when light absorption exceeds the capacity of light utilization in photosynthesis. The PsbS protein plays a central role in this process and is supposed to activate NPQ through specific, light-regulated interactions with photosystem (PS) II antenna proteins. However, NPQ-specific interaction partners of PsbS in the thylakoid membrane are still unknown. Here, we have determined the localization and protein interactions of PsbS in thylakoid membranes in the NPQ-inactive (dark) and NPQ-active (light) states. Our results corroborate a localization of PsbS in PSII supercomplexes and support the model that the light activation of NPQ is based on the monomerization of dimeric PsbS and a light-induced enhanced interaction of PsbS with Lhcb1, the major component of trimeric light-harvesting complexes in PSII.

  4. Membrane Recognition by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Involves Enthalpy-Driven Protein-Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Fabiana A.; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Weissmüller, Gilberto; Stauffer, Fausto; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2002-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection depends on the fusion of viral and cellular membranes, which is mediated by virus spike glycoprotein G at the acidic environment of the endosomal compartment. VSV G protein does not contain a hydrophobic amino acid sequence similar to the fusion peptides found among other viral glycoproteins, suggesting that membrane recognition occurs through an alternative mechanism. Here we studied the interaction between VSV G protein and liposomes of different phospholipid composition by force spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Force spectroscopy experiments revealed the requirement for negatively charged phospholipids for VSV binding to membranes, suggesting that this interaction is electrostatic in nature. In addition, ITC experiments showed that VSV binding to liposomes is an enthalpically driven process. Fluorescence data also showed the lack of VSV interaction with the vesicles as well as inhibition of VSV-induced membrane fusion at high ionic strength. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements showed that the extent of G protein conformational changes depends on the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the target membrane. Although the increase in PS content did not change the binding profile, the rate of the fusion reaction was remarkably increased when the PS content was increased from 25 to 75%. On the basis of these data, we suggest that G protein binding to the target membrane essentially depends on electrostatic interactions, probably between positive charges on the protein surface and negatively charged phospholipids in the cellular membrane. In addition, the fusion is exothermic, indicating no entropic constraints to this process. PMID:11907215

  5. Interpreters' Involvement in Multi-Party Interactions: The Nature of Participation as Listener and Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takimoto, Masato

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates two naturally occurring business interpreting situations where there are a number of participants. Unlike dialogue interpreting situations where there are only two primary interlocutors, the overall interaction shows more complexity in these multi-party situations. This, in turn, means that the interpreters' functions and…

  6. Unique and Interactive Effects of Empathy and Social Status on Involvement in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caravita, Simona C. S.; Di Blasio, Paola; Salmivalli, Christina

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between affective and cognitive empathy, social preference and perceived popularity, and involvement in bullying situations by bullying others or defending the victimized children. The participants were 266 primary and 195 secondary school students. Affective and cognitive empathy, as well as the status…

  7. The Interactive Effects of Perceived Parental Involvement and Personality on Teacher Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chung-Kai; Hung, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the relations between teachers' perception of parental involvement and teacher satisfaction. It further aims to investigate how this relationship may be moderated by interpersonal personality traits. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire was conducted; participants were 572 classroom teachers who teach at…

  8. Reducing Maladaptive Family Interaction by Involving Significant Others of Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabel, Sanford

    The program was set up to involve, on a continuing basis, the significant other of frequently-readmitted hospitalized psychiatric VA patients. The couples identified their characteristic strengths, and their maladaptive ways of functioning, and were expected to make use of alternative ways of behaving which were recommended by the staff. A…

  9. Relationship of Purchasing, Brand, and Self Involvement with Advertising Interactions and Beliefs among Malaysian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaprasad, Jyotika

    A study examined Malaysian students' involvement with purchasing, with branded products, and with themselves as well as their responses to and beliefs about advertising, by ethnic group. Subjects, 387 students at a university in Penang, Malaysia, completed questionnaires measuring their responses to advertising. Results indicated a relatively high…

  10. Construction of protein interaction network involved in lung adenocarcinomas using a novel algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Li, Zhu; Xu, Ning; Yu, Bo; Xu, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Pei-Ge; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Lin, Dian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Studies that only assess differentially-expressed (DE) genes do not contain the information required to investigate the mechanisms of diseases. A complete knowledge of all the direct and indirect interactions between proteins may act as a significant benchmark in the process of forming a comprehensive description of cellular mechanisms and functions. The results of protein interaction network studies are often inconsistent and are based on various methods. In the present study, a combined network was constructed using selected gene pairs, following the conversion and combination of the scores of gene pairs that were obtained across multiple approaches by a novel algorithm. Samples from patients with and without lung adenocarcinoma were compared, and the RankProd package was used to identify DE genes. The empirical Bayesian (EB) meta-analysis approach, the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins database (STRING), the weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) package and the differentially-coexpressed genes and links package (DCGL) were used for network construction. A combined network was also constructed with a novel rank-based algorithm using a combined score. The topological features of the 5 networks were analyzed and compared. A total of 941 DE genes were screened. The topological analysis indicated that the gene interaction network constructed using the WGCNA method was more likely to produce a small-world property, which has a small average shortest path length and a large clustering coefficient, whereas the combined network was confirmed to be a scale-free network. Gene pairs that were identified using the novel combined method were mostly enriched in the cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. The present study provided a novel perspective to the network-based analysis. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Compared with single methods, the combined algorithm used in the present study may provide a novel method to

  11. Clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioid analgesics used for pain treatment in patients with cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Klepstad, Pål; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioids are the most frequently used drugs to treat pain in cancer patients. In some patients, however, opioids can cause adverse effects and drug–drug interactions. No advice concerning the combination of opioids and other drugs is given in the current European guidelines. Objective To identify studies that report clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioids used for pain treatment in adult cancer patients. Design and data sources Systematic review with searches in Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the start of the databases (Embase from 1980) through January 2014. In addition, reference lists of relevant full-text papers were hand-searched. Results Of 901 retrieved papers, 112 were considered as potentially eligible. After full-text reading, 17 were included in the final analysis, together with 15 papers identified through hand-searching of reference lists. All of the 32 included publications were case reports or case series. Clinical manifestations of drug–drug interactions involving opioids were grouped as follows: 1) sedation and respiratory depression, 2) other central nervous system symptoms, 3) impairment of pain control and/or opioid withdrawal, and 4) other symptoms. The most common mechanisms eliciting drug–drug interactions were alteration of opioid metabolism by inhibiting the activity of cytochrome P450 3A4 and pharmacodynamic interactions due to the combined effect on opioid, dopaminergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic activity in the central nervous system. Conclusion Evidence for drug–drug interactions associated with opioids used for pain treatment in cancer patients is very limited. Still, the cases identified in this systematic review give some important suggestions for clinical practice. Physicians prescribing opioids should recognize the risk of drug–drug interactions and if possible avoid polypharmacy. PMID:26396499

  12. The Effect of Diet and Opponent Size on Aggressive Interactions Involving Caribbean Crazy Ants (Nylanderia fulva)

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Katherine C.; Eubanks, Micky D.; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Biotic interactions are often important in the establishment and spread of invasive species. In particular, competition between introduced and native species can strongly influence the distribution and spread of exotic species and in some cases competition among introduced species can be important. The Caribbean crazy ant, Nylanderia fulva, was recently introduced to the Gulf Coast of Texas, and appears to be spreading inland. It has been hypothesized that competition with the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, may be an important factor in the spread of crazy ants. We investigated the potential of interspecific competition among these two introduced ants by measuring interspecific aggression between Caribbean crazy ant workers and workers of Solenopsis invicta. Specifically, we examined the effect of body size and diet on individual-level aggressive interactions among crazy ant workers and fire ants. We found that differences in diet did not alter interactions between crazy ant workers from different nests, but carbohydrate level did play an important role in antagonistic interactions with fire ants: crazy ants on low sugar diets were more aggressive and less likely to be killed in aggressive encounters with fire ants. We found that large fire ants engaged in fewer fights with crazy ants than small fire ants, but fire ant size affected neither fire ant nor crazy ant mortality. Overall, crazy ants experienced higher mortality than fire ants after aggressive encounters. Our findings suggest that fire ant workers might outcompete crazy ant workers on an individual level, providing some biotic resistance to crazy ant range expansion. However, this resistance may be overcome by crazy ants that have a restricted sugar intake, which may occur when crazy ants are excluded from resources by fire ants. PMID:23776702

  13. The effect of diet and opponent size on aggressive interactions involving caribbean crazy ants (Nylanderia fulva).

    PubMed

    Horn, Katherine C; Eubanks, Micky D; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Biotic interactions are often important in the establishment and spread of invasive species. In particular, competition between introduced and native species can strongly influence the distribution and spread of exotic species and in some cases competition among introduced species can be important. The Caribbean crazy ant, Nylanderia fulva, was recently introduced to the Gulf Coast of Texas, and appears to be spreading inland. It has been hypothesized that competition with the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, may be an important factor in the spread of crazy ants. We investigated the potential of interspecific competition among these two introduced ants by measuring interspecific aggression between Caribbean crazy ant workers and workers of Solenopsis invicta. Specifically, we examined the effect of body size and diet on individual-level aggressive interactions among crazy ant workers and fire ants. We found that differences in diet did not alter interactions between crazy ant workers from different nests, but carbohydrate level did play an important role in antagonistic interactions with fire ants: crazy ants on low sugar diets were more aggressive and less likely to be killed in aggressive encounters with fire ants. We found that large fire ants engaged in fewer fights with crazy ants than small fire ants, but fire ant size affected neither fire ant nor crazy ant mortality. Overall, crazy ants experienced higher mortality than fire ants after aggressive encounters. Our findings suggest that fire ant workers might outcompete crazy ant workers on an individual level, providing some biotic resistance to crazy ant range expansion. However, this resistance may be overcome by crazy ants that have a restricted sugar intake, which may occur when crazy ants are excluded from resources by fire ants. PMID:23776702

  14. The effect of diet and opponent size on aggressive interactions involving caribbean crazy ants (Nylanderia fulva).

    PubMed

    Horn, Katherine C; Eubanks, Micky D; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Biotic interactions are often important in the establishment and spread of invasive species. In particular, competition between introduced and native species can strongly influence the distribution and spread of exotic species and in some cases competition among introduced species can be important. The Caribbean crazy ant, Nylanderia fulva, was recently introduced to the Gulf Coast of Texas, and appears to be spreading inland. It has been hypothesized that competition with the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, may be an important factor in the spread of crazy ants. We investigated the potential of interspecific competition among these two introduced ants by measuring interspecific aggression between Caribbean crazy ant workers and workers of Solenopsis invicta. Specifically, we examined the effect of body size and diet on individual-level aggressive interactions among crazy ant workers and fire ants. We found that differences in diet did not alter interactions between crazy ant workers from different nests, but carbohydrate level did play an important role in antagonistic interactions with fire ants: crazy ants on low sugar diets were more aggressive and less likely to be killed in aggressive encounters with fire ants. We found that large fire ants engaged in fewer fights with crazy ants than small fire ants, but fire ant size affected neither fire ant nor crazy ant mortality. Overall, crazy ants experienced higher mortality than fire ants after aggressive encounters. Our findings suggest that fire ant workers might outcompete crazy ant workers on an individual level, providing some biotic resistance to crazy ant range expansion. However, this resistance may be overcome by crazy ants that have a restricted sugar intake, which may occur when crazy ants are excluded from resources by fire ants.

  15. Transgenerational interactions involving parental age and immune status affect female reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Nystrand, M; Dowling, D K

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that the parental phenotype can influence offspring phenotypic expression, independent of the effects of the offspring's own genotype. Nonetheless, the evolutionary implications of such parental effects remain unclear, partly because previous studies have generally overlooked the potential for interactions between parental sources of non-genetic variance to influence patterns of offspring phenotypic expression. We tested for such interactions, subjecting male and female Drosophila melanogaster of two different age classes to an immune activation challenge or a control treatment. Flies were then crossed in all age and immune status combinations, and the reproductive success of their immune- and control-treated daughters measured. We found that daughters produced by two younger parents exhibited reduced reproductive success relative to those of other parental age combinations. Furthermore, immune-challenged daughters exhibited higher reproductive success when produced by immune-challenged relative to control-treated mothers, a pattern consistent with transgenerational immune priming. Finally, a complex interplay between paternal age and parental immune statuses influenced daughter's reproductive success. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of age- and immune-mediated parental effects, traceable to both parents, and regulated by interactions between parents and between parents and offspring.

  16. Coil–globule transition of a polymer involved in excluded-volume interactions with macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kenta; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-07

    Polymers adopt extended coil and compact globule states according to the balance between entropy and interaction energies. The transition of a polymer between an extended coil state and compact globule state can be induced by changing thermodynamic force such as temperature to alter the energy/entropy balance. Previously, this transition was theoretically studied by taking into account the excluded-volume interaction between monomers of a polymer chain using the partition function. For binary mixtures of a long polymer and short polymers, the coil-globule transition can be induced by changing the concentration of the shorter polymers. Here, we investigate the transition caused by short polymers by generalizing the partition function of the long polymer to include the excluded-volume effect of short polymers. The coil-globule transition is studied as a function of the concentration of mixed polymers by systematically varying Flory’s χ-parameters. We show that the transition is caused by the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction and the dispersion state of short polymers in the solvent. We also reveal that the same results can be obtained by combining the mixing entropy and elastic energy if the volume of a long polymer is properly defined.

  17. Quantitative analysis of regions of adenovirus E1A products involved in interactions with cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, D; Marcellus, R C; Bacchetti, S; Bayley, S T; Branton, P E

    1992-01-01

    Human adenovirus E1A proteins and oncogene products of several other DNA tumour viruses derive much of their oncogenic potential from interactions with cellular polypeptides. E1A proteins form complexes with p105Rb and a related p107 polypeptide, and with at least three other proteins (p60cycA, p130, and p300); all may be required for cell transformation. Using a series of E1A deletion mutants, we have carried out a quantitative analysis of the binding patterns of cellular proteins to E1A products. Binding of most of the proteins was affected at least partially by mutations within the amino terminal 25 residues, amino acids 36-69 within conserved region 1 (CR1), and residues 121-138 in conserved region 2 (CR2). However, the specific binding characteristics of each protein varied considerably. p300 was the only species for which binding was totally eliminated by deletions at the amino terminus. Removal of regions within CR1 eliminated binding of all species except p107 and p60cycA. Deletion of portions of CR2 reduced or eliminated binding of all proteins except p300. Thus, whereas cellular polypeptides generally were found to interact with the same three regions of E1A proteins, specific interactions varied considerably. PMID:1297336

  18. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment.

  19. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment. PMID:26500605

  20. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    PubMed Central

    Pignatello, R.; Musumeci, T.; Basile, L.; Carbone, C.; Puglisi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy. PMID:21430952

  1. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment. PMID:26500605

  2. Hydrophobic interactions are involved in the inhibition of human leukocyte elastase by alkyltrimethylammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Kouadri-Boudjelthia, A; Wallach, J M

    1997-02-01

    Electrostatic forces and hydrophobic interactions had been suggested to modify the adsorption of elastases onto insoluble fibrous elastin, which is the initial stage of elastolysis, but conflicting results had been obtained, and comparison between compounds with different structures was difficult. In order to explore these observations, we have studied the effect of six alkyltrimethylammonium bromides, with alkyl chain length ranging from six to 16 carbon atoms, on human leucocyte elastase activities, either with a synthetic substrate or with insoluble elastin. The enzymatic studies were performed either spectrophotometrically or using conductimetry, and direct binding on to elastin was conductimetrically measured. Binding of the alkyltrimethylammonium salts is increasing with alkyl chain length and we could demonstrate a cooperative binding for tetra- and hexadecyl chains. No effect of the six compounds could be evidenced on hydrolysis of a specific synthetic substrate. With insoluble elastin, elastolysis inhibition could be demonstrated for alkyl chain longer than ten carbon atoms, the effect increasing with chain length. A similar inhibition was observed with the soluble kappa-elastin, but it was less effective. The study shows that the interaction between the alkyltrimethylammonium salts and elastin plays a major role in the inhibitory potency of these molecules. As this effect is enhanced with alkyl chain length, it was concluded that hydrophobic interactions favour their binding, protecting elastin against elastase adsorption.

  3. Transcript profiles of maize embryo sacs and preliminary identification of genes involved in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai Shuai; Wang, Fang; Tan, Su Jian; Wang, Ming Xiu; Sui, Na; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The embryo sac, the female gametophyte of flowering plants, plays important roles in the pollination and fertilization process. Maize (Zea mays L.) is a model monocot, but little is known about the interactions between its embryo sac and the pollen tube. In this study, we compared the transcript profiles of mature embryo sacs, mature embryo sacs 14–16 h after pollination, and mature nucelli. Comparing the transcript profiles of the embryo sacs before and after the entry of the pollen tube, we identified 3467 differentially expressed transcripts (3382 differentially expressed genes; DEGs). The DEGs were grouped into 22 functional categories. Among the DEGs, 221 genes were induced upon the entry of the pollen tube, and many of them encoded proteins involved in RNA binding, processing, and transcription, signaling, miscellaneous enzyme family processes, and lipid metabolism processes. Genes in the DEG dataset were grouped into 17 classes in a gene ontology enrichment analysis. The DEGs included many genes encoding proteins involved in protein amino acid phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination, implying that these processes might play important roles in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction. Additionally, our analyses indicate that the expression of 112 genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) is induced during pollination and fertilization. The CRPs likely regulate pollen tube guidance and embryo sac development. These results provide important information on the genes involved in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction in maize. PMID:25566277

  4. Interactions among stakehoklders involved in return to work after sick leave due to mental disorders: a meta-ethnography.

    PubMed

    Neves, Robson da Fonseca; Nunes, Mônica de Oliveira; Magalhães, Lilian

    2015-11-01

    Mental disorders cause impact in the work environment. Investigations of interaction among stakeholders who are involved in the return to work are scarce. Meta-ethnography serves to synthesize qualitative studies by means of ongoing interpretation and comparison of the ideas presented in the articles. The goal of this study is to present a meta-ethnography of the interactions among the stakeholders involved in the return to work process after leave of absence due to mental disorders. It aims: (1) to investigate the interactions among stakeholders involved in return to work; (2) to identify enablers or obstacles for the return to work. The database search found 619 articles, 16 of which met the inclusion criteria. Analysis of the articles revealed six second-order concepts that resulted in two syntheses. The first is about performance ethos in the return to work, and the second shows return to work as a catalyst of new life styles. Models that favor the worker's performance ethos, as well as a perspective oriented by psychosocial aspects may enable return to work practices after leave of absence due to mental disorders.

  5. Influence of external inputs and asymmetry of connections on information-geometric measures involving up to ten neuronal interactions.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yimin; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Tatsuno, Masami

    2014-10-01

    The investigation of neural interactions is crucial for understanding information processing in the brain. Recently an analysis method based on information geometry (IG) has gained increased attention, and the property of the pairwise IG measure has been studied extensively in relation to the two-neuron interaction. However, little is known about the property of IG measures involving more neuronal interactions. In this study, we systematically investigated the influence of external inputs and the asymmetry of connections on the IG measures in cases ranging from 1-neuron to 10-neuron interactions. First, the analytical relationship between the IG measures and external inputs was derived for a network of 10 neurons with uniform connections. Our results confirmed that the single and pairwise IG measures were good estimators of the mean background input and of the sum of the connection weights, respectively. For the IG measures involving 3 to 10 neuronal interactions, we found that the influence of external inputs was highly nonlinear. Second, by computer simulation, we extended our analytical results to asymmetric connections. For a network of 10 neurons, the simulation showed that the behavior of the IG measures in relation to external inputs was similar to the analytical solution obtained for a uniformly connected network. When the network size was increased to 1000 neurons, the influence of external inputs almost disappeared. This result suggests that all IG measures from 1-neuron to 10-neuron interactions are robust against the influence of external inputs. In addition, we investigated how the strength of asymmetry influenced the IG measures. Computer simulation of a 1000-neuron network showed that all the IG measures were robust against the modulation of the asymmetry of connections. Our results provide further support for an information-geometric approach and will provide useful insights when these IG measures are applied to real experimental spike data.

  6. Involvement of a GNRA tetraloop in long-range RNA tertiary interactions.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, L; Michel, F; Westhof, E

    1994-03-11

    Terminal loops with a GNRA consensus sequence are widespread in RNA. It has been suggested that these loops act as "anchors" during tertiary folding, by interacting in a sequence-specific way with helices at distant locations along the molecule. We now show that a GUGA loop changes state upon disruption of the tertiary architecture of a self-splicing group I intron. Successful replacement of the postulated loop-helix contact by classical base-pairing points to binding of the loop into the shallow (minor) groove of the helix, as also indicated by partial restoration of ribozyme stability upon a specific double nucleotide substitution.

  7. Two domains of the epidermal growth factor receptor are involved in cytoskeletal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wei; Wu Jing; Ge Gaoxiang; Lin Qishui

    2008-06-13

    Epidermal growth factor receptor can interact directly with F-actin through an actin-binding domain. In the present study, a mutant EGFR, lacking a previously identified actin-binding domain (ABD 1), was still able to bind elements of the cytoskeleton. A second EGFR actin-binding domain (ABD 2) was identified in the region of the receptor that includes Tyr-1148 by a yeast two-hybrid assay. GST fusion proteins comprising ABD 1 or ABD 2 bound actin in vitro and competed for actin-binding with the full-length EGFR. EGFR binding to actin was also studied in intact cells using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The localization of the EGFR/actin-binding complex changed after EGF stimulation. Fusion proteins containing mutations in ABD1 or ABD2 did not display a FRET signal. The results lead to the conclusion that the interaction between ABD1 and ABD2 and actin during EGF-induced signal transduction, and thus between EGFR and actin, are important in cell activation.

  8. Interaction of galactoglucomannan oligosaccharides with auxin involves changes in flavonoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kučerová, Danica; Kollárová, Karin; Vatehová, Zuzana; Lišková, Desana

    2016-01-01

    Galactoglucomannan oligosaccharides (GGMOs) are signalling molecules originating from plant cell walls influencing plant growth and defence reactions. The present study focused on their interaction with exogenous IAA (indole-3-acetic acid). GGMOs acted as auxin antagonists and diminished the effect of IAA on Arabidopsis primary root growth. Their effect is associated with meristem enlargement and prolongation of the elongation zone. Reduction of the elongation zone was a consequence of the IAA action, but IAA did not affect the size of the meristem. In the absence of auxin, GGMOs stimulated root growth, meristem enlargement and elongation zone prolongation. It is assumed that the effect of GGMOs in the absence of exogenous auxin resulted from their interaction with the endogenous form. In the presence of auxin transport inhibitor GGMOs did not affect root growth. It is known that flavonoids are auxin transport modulators but this is the first study suggesting the role of flavonoids in GGMOs' signalling. The accumulation of flavonoids in the meristem and elongation zone decreased in GGMOs' treatments in comparison with the control. These oligosaccharides also diminished the effect of IAA on the flavonoids' elevation. The fact that GGMOs decreased the accumulation of flavonoids, known to be modulators of auxin transport, and the loss of GGMOs' activity in the presence of the auxin transport inhibitor indicates that the root growth stimulation caused by GGMOs could be related to changes in auxin transport, possibly mediated by flavonoids.

  9. A conserved protein interaction network involving the yeast MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1.

    PubMed

    Kusari, Anasua B; Molina, Douglas M; Sabbagh, Walid; Lau, Chang S; Bardwell, Lee

    2004-01-19

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 bind to multiple regulators and substrates. We show that mutations in a conserved docking site in these MAPKs (the CD/7m region) disrupt binding to an important subset of their binding partners, including the Ste7 MAPK kinase, the Ste5 adaptor/scaffold protein, and the Dig1 and Dig2 transcriptional repressors. Supporting the possibility that Ste5 and Ste7 bind to the same region of the MAPKs, they partially competed for Fus3 binding. In vivo, some of the MAPK mutants displayed reduced Ste7-dependent phosphorylation, and all of them exhibited multiple defects in mating and pheromone response. The Kss1 mutants were also defective in Kss1-imposed repression of Ste12. We conclude that MAPKs contain a structurally and functionally conserved docking site that mediates an overall positively acting network of interactions with cognate docking sites on their regulators and substrates. Key features of this interaction network appear to have been conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:14734536

  10. Molecular Players Involved in the Interaction Between Beneficial Bacteria and the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Delgado, Susana; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is a very complex ecosystem, in which there is a continuous interaction between nutrients, host cells, and microorganisms. The gut microbiota comprises trillions of microbes that have been selected during evolution on the basis of their functionality and capacity to survive in, and adapt to, the intestinal environment. Host bacteria and our immune system constantly sense and react to one another. In this regard, commensal microbes contribute to gut homeostasis, whereas the necessary responses are triggered against enteropathogens. Some representatives of our gut microbiota have beneficial effects on human health. Some of the most important roles of these microbes are to help to maintain the integrity of the mucosal barrier, to provide nutrients such as vitamins, or to protect against pathogens. In addition, the interaction between commensal microbiota and the mucosal immune system is crucial for proper immune function. This process is mainly performed via the pattern recognition receptors of epithelial cells, such as Toll-like or Nod-like receptors, which are able to recognize the molecular effectors that are produced by intestinal microbes. These effectors mediate processes that can ameliorate certain inflammatory gut disorders, discriminate between beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, or increase the number of immune cells or their pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review intends to summarize the molecular players produced by probiotic bacteria, notably Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains, but also other very promising potential probiotics, which affect the human immune system. PMID:26635753

  11. Potential Role of Pathogen Signaling in Multitrophic Plant-Microbe Interactions Involved in Disease Protection

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Brion; Keel, Christoph; Défago, Geneviève

    2004-01-01

    Multitrophic interactions mediate the ability of fungal pathogens to cause plant disease and the ability of bacterial antagonists to suppress disease. Antibiotic production by antagonists, which contributes to disease suppression, is known to be modulated by abiotic and host plant environmental conditions. Here, we demonstrate that a pathogen metabolite functions as a negative signal for bacterial antibiotic biosynthesis, which can determine the relative importance of biological control mechanisms available to antagonists and which may also influence fungus-bacterium ecological interactions. We found that production of the polyketide antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) was the primary biocontrol mechanism of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Q2-87 against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici on the tomato as determined with mutational analysis. In contrast, DAPG was not important for the less-disease-suppressive strain CHA0. This was explained by differential sensitivity of the bacteria to fusaric acid, a pathogen phyto- and mycotoxin that specifically blocked DAPG biosynthesis in strain CHA0 but not in strain Q2-87. In CHA0, hydrogen cyanide, a biocide not repressed by fusaric acid, played a more important role in disease suppression. PMID:15006813

  12. Interaction of galactoglucomannan oligosaccharides with auxin involves changes in flavonoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kučerová, Danica; Kollárová, Karin; Vatehová, Zuzana; Lišková, Desana

    2016-01-01

    Galactoglucomannan oligosaccharides (GGMOs) are signalling molecules originating from plant cell walls influencing plant growth and defence reactions. The present study focused on their interaction with exogenous IAA (indole-3-acetic acid). GGMOs acted as auxin antagonists and diminished the effect of IAA on Arabidopsis primary root growth. Their effect is associated with meristem enlargement and prolongation of the elongation zone. Reduction of the elongation zone was a consequence of the IAA action, but IAA did not affect the size of the meristem. In the absence of auxin, GGMOs stimulated root growth, meristem enlargement and elongation zone prolongation. It is assumed that the effect of GGMOs in the absence of exogenous auxin resulted from their interaction with the endogenous form. In the presence of auxin transport inhibitor GGMOs did not affect root growth. It is known that flavonoids are auxin transport modulators but this is the first study suggesting the role of flavonoids in GGMOs' signalling. The accumulation of flavonoids in the meristem and elongation zone decreased in GGMOs' treatments in comparison with the control. These oligosaccharides also diminished the effect of IAA on the flavonoids' elevation. The fact that GGMOs decreased the accumulation of flavonoids, known to be modulators of auxin transport, and the loss of GGMOs' activity in the presence of the auxin transport inhibitor indicates that the root growth stimulation caused by GGMOs could be related to changes in auxin transport, possibly mediated by flavonoids. PMID:26691060

  13. Bench to Bed Evidences for Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions Involving Oseltamivir and Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qi; Wo, Siukwan; Ngai, Karry L. K.; Wang, Xiaoan; Fok, Benny; Ngan, Teresa M.; Wong, Vivian T.; Chan, Thomas Y. K.; Lee, Vincent H. L.; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul K. S.; Chow, Moses S. S.; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir (OA), an ethyl ester prodrug of oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is clinically used as a potent and selective inhibitor of neuraminidase. Chinese medicines have been advocated to combine with conventional drug for avian influenza. The current study aims to investigate the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of a Chinese medicine formula, namely, Yin Qiao San and Sang Ju Yin (CMF1), commonly used for anti-influenza in combination with OA in both rat and human, and to reveal the underlined mechanisms. It was found that although Cmax, AUC and urinary recovery of OC, as well as metabolic ratio (AUCOC/AUCOA), were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner following combination use of CMF1 and OA in rat studies (P < 0.01), such coadministration in 14 healthy volunteers only resulted in a trend of minor decrease in the related parameters. Further mechanistic studies found that although CMF1 could reduce absorption and metabolism of OA, it appears to enhance viral inhibition of OA (P < 0.01). In summary, although there was potential interaction between OA and CMF1 found in rat studies, its clinical impact was expected to be minimal. The coadministration of OA and CMF1 at the clinical recommended dosages is, therefore, considered to be safe. PMID:24527044

  14. Neurotransmitter, opiodergic system, steroid-hormone interaction and involvement in the replacement therapy of sexual disorders.

    PubMed

    Frajese, G; Lazzari, R; Magnani, A; Moretti, C; Sforza, V; Nerozzi, D

    1990-11-20

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) are the neurotransmitters most directly involved in sexual activity. DA plays a stimulatory role while 5-HT has an inhibitory effect. The two monoaminergic systems modulate the secretion of many hormones (GnRH, LH, testosterone, prolactin and endorphins) involved in sexual functional capacity. Furthermore, hormones influence synthesis and storage of brain neurotransmitters. Impotence can often be associated to clinical depression and altered neurotransmitter function. Moreover, stress represents an unbalance between various neurotransmitter systems and can induce impotence especially when disorders of the endorphinic system are present. Replacement therapy is based upon the understanding of these basic concepts. Impotence due to an underlying depressive illness must be treated with dopaminergic antidepressant drugs; while in stressful conditions a good response to the naloxone test is the preliminary criterion to subsequent naltrexone treatment. When a hormonal deficiency has been proved, the hormone replacement therapy is of course highly effective (gonadotropins in hypogonadotropic syndromes, testosterone in aging, etc.). Finally, idiopathic impotence could be treated by DA agonist and/or 5-HT antagonist drugs either alone or better yet in association with psychotherapy.

  15. Neurotransmitter, opiodergic system, steroid-hormone interaction and involvement in the replacement therapy of sexual disorders.

    PubMed

    Frajese, G; Lazzari, R; Magnani, A; Moretti, C; Sforza, V; Nerozzi, D

    1990-11-20

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) are the neurotransmitters most directly involved in sexual activity. DA plays a stimulatory role while 5-HT has an inhibitory effect. The two monoaminergic systems modulate the secretion of many hormones (GnRH, LH, testosterone, prolactin and endorphins) involved in sexual functional capacity. Furthermore, hormones influence synthesis and storage of brain neurotransmitters. Impotence can often be associated to clinical depression and altered neurotransmitter function. Moreover, stress represents an unbalance between various neurotransmitter systems and can induce impotence especially when disorders of the endorphinic system are present. Replacement therapy is based upon the understanding of these basic concepts. Impotence due to an underlying depressive illness must be treated with dopaminergic antidepressant drugs; while in stressful conditions a good response to the naloxone test is the preliminary criterion to subsequent naltrexone treatment. When a hormonal deficiency has been proved, the hormone replacement therapy is of course highly effective (gonadotropins in hypogonadotropic syndromes, testosterone in aging, etc.). Finally, idiopathic impotence could be treated by DA agonist and/or 5-HT antagonist drugs either alone or better yet in association with psychotherapy. PMID:1979499

  16. Mapping of murine IgE epitopes involved in IgE-Fc epsilon receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Schwarzbaum, S; Nissim, A; Alkalay, I; Ghozi, M C; Schindler, D G; Bergman, Y; Eshhar, Z

    1989-06-01

    The generation of anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies has permitted the identification of various serological epitopes on the IgE molecule. The relationship of the sites on IgE recognized by such antibodies to the Fc epsilon receptor (Fc epsilon R) interaction site has been determined using cross-inhibition studies. However, interpretation of this type of experiment is limited by problems of steric hindrance. Thus, to accomplish precise mapping on the IgE molecule of the Fc epsilon R interaction site and the binding sites of various anti-IgE mAb, we employed site-directed mutagenesis of the IgE heavy chain gene. To this end we have constructed and expressed a recombinant murine constant epsilon heavy chain (C epsilon) gene bearing a (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetic acid (NP)-binding VH region. Several site-specific mutants in the C epsilon 3 and C epsilon 4 domains of this recombinant C epsilon gene were prepared and expressed by transfection into the light chain-producing J558L myeloma cell line. The resulting IgE antibodies were tested for binding to mast cells and to various anti-IgE mAb. The mutants produced include a proline to histidine point mutant at amino acid residue 404 in the C epsilon 3 domain, a mutant with a truncated C epsilon 4 domain, a mutant with a 45 amino acid deletion in the carboxy end of C epsilon 3, and a chimeric human C epsilon in which the human C epsilon 3 was replaced by the homologous mouse C epsilon 3 domain. These mutants have permitted the localization, to the C epsilon 3 domain, of the epitopes recognized by the 84.1C and 95.3 anti-IgE mAb. The 84.1C mAb recognizes a site on IgE which is identical or very close to the Fc epsilon R binding site, and 95.3 recognizes a site on IgE which is related, but not identical to the Fc epsilon R binding site. The antigenic determinant recognized by the 51.3 mAb, which is inefficient at blocking the IgE-Fc epsilon R interaction, has been mapped to the C epsilon 4 domain. When tested for binding to

  17. Interactive tutorial to improve student understanding of single photon experiments involving a Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-03-01

    We have developed and evaluated a quantum interactive learning tutorial (QuILT) on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with single photons to expose upper-level students in quantum mechanics courses to contemporary quantum optics applications. The QuILT strives to help students develop the ability to apply fundamental quantum principles to physical situations in quantum optics and explore the differences between classical and quantum ideas. The QuILT adapts visualization tools to help students build physical intuition about counter-intuitive quantum optics phenomena with single photons including a quantum eraser setup and focuses on helping them integrate qualitative and quantitative understanding. We discuss findings from in-class evaluations.

  18. The global allostery model of hemoglobin: an allosteric mechanism involving homotropic and heterotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Takashi; Tsuneshige, Antonio

    2003-06-01

    Studies of the allosteric mechanism of hemoglobin (Hb) have evolved from phenomenological descriptions to structure-based molecular mechanisms, as the molecular structures of Hb in deoxy and ligated states have been elucidated. The MWC two-state concerted model has been the widely accepted as the most plausible of the allosteric mechanisms of Hb. It assumes that the O2-affinity of Hb is regulated/controlled primarily by the T/R quaternary structural transition and that heterotropic effectors bind preferentially to T (deoxy) Hb to shift the T/R allosteric equilibrium toward the T state. However, recent more comprehensive O2-binding measurements of Hb have revealed a new mechanism, the Global Allostery model. It describes that the O2-affinity and the cooperativity are modulated in greater extents and the Bohr effect is generated primarily by the tertiary structural changes in both T (deoxy) and R (ligated) states of Hb. Differential interactions of heterotropic allosteric effectors with both T (deoxy) and R (ligated) states of Hb induce these tertiary structural changes. The X-ray structure of a complex of R (ligated) Hb with BZF, a potent heterotropic effector, has revealed the stereo-chemical influence of these effectors on the structure of R (ligated) Hb, resulting in the reduction of the ligand affinity in R (ligated) Hb. This model stresses the fundamental importance of the heterotropic interactions in regulation/control of the functionality of Hb. They alter the tertiary structures of both T (deoxy) and R (oxy) Hb, leading to large-scale modulations of the O2 affinity (KT and KR), and consequently the cooperativity (KR/KT) and the Bohr effect (delta P50/delta pH) from a global viewpoint of allostery in Hb.

  19. Bezafibrate-mizoribine interaction: Involvement of organic anion transporters OAT1 and OAT3 in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Huo, Xiaokui; Liu, Zhihao; Sun, Pengyuan; Yang, Xiaobo; Sun, Huijun; Qin, Jianhua; Liu, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    A patient with rheumatoid arthritis developed rhabdomyolysis while undergoing treatment with mizoribine concomitantly with bezafibrate. The symptoms rapidly disappeared and laboratory test results normalized when she discontinued the two drugs. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the transporter-mediated molecular pharmacokinetic mechanisms of drug-drug interactions between bezafibrate and mizoribine. Comparing bezafibrate-mizoribine group with bezafibrate group, the Tmax and Cmax of bezafibrate were essentially unchanged in rats. The AUC of bezafibrate was significantly increased and t1/2β was prolonged markedly with an obviously reduction in plasma clearance and cumulative urinary excretion. The changes were similar to oral studies following intravenous co-administration. In rat kidney slices, the uptake of bezafibrate was markedly inhibited by p-aminohippurate, benzylpenicillin and probenecid but not by tetraethyl ammonium. Mizoribine not only decreased the uptake of bezafibrate, but also inhibited the uptake of p-aminohippurate and benzylpenicillin. The uptakes of bezafibrate and mizoribine were significantly higher compared to vector-HEK293 cells. The uptakes of bezafibrate and mizoribine in highest concentration were increased 1.63 and 1.46 folds in hOAT1-transfected cells, 1.43 and 1.24 folds in hOAT3-transfected cells, respectively. The Km values of bezafibrate uptake by hOAT1/3hOAT1-/hOAT3-HEK293 K293 cells were increased 1.68 fold in hOAT1-HEK293 cell and 2.12 fold in hOAT3-HEK293 cell in the presence of mizoribine with no change of Vmax. It indicated that mizoribine could inhibit the uptake of bezafibrate by hOAT1/3-HEK293 cells in a competitive way. In conclusion, OAT1 and OAT3 are the target transporters of drug-drug interactions between bezafibrate and mizoribine in pharmacokinetic aspects. PMID:26474691

  20. Involvement of the histaminergic system on appetitive learning and its interaction with haloperidol in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Medalha, Carla Christina; Mattioli, Rosana

    2007-05-17

    This study investigated the actions of the histaminergic system on appetitive learning and memory, and its interaction with the dopaminergic system in goldfish. It consisted of nine sessions, in which fish were tested in a four-arm tank. On day 1, the animals were habituated for 10 min. On day 2, they were placed in one arm and had to find food at the left or the right arm. Time to begin feeding was recorded, and the procedure repeated for more 3 days (training phase). On training day 4, seven groups were injected with saline, seven with haloperidol (2.0 mg/kg) and one with DMSO solution before training and after feeding, three groups received saline, six chlorpheniramine (CPA) (1.0, 4.0 and 8.0 mg/kg), and six l-histidine (LH) (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg). Saline groups were considered as control of CPA and LH treated groups and DMSO as control of haloperidol. A non-injected group was also included. Testing occurred after 24 h. A reversal procedure was conducted 24h after testing and repeated for 3 days. The groups receiving CPA at 1.0 and 8.0 mg/kg and LH at 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg differed between Test and Reversal day 1. Pre-treatment with haloperidol plus 8.0 mg/kg of CPA and 25 and 50 mg/kg of LH reverted the treatment effect. However, in the groups treated with 1.0 mg/kg of CPA and 100 mg/kg of LH, the difference remained. This study confirmed the interaction between the histaminergic and the dopaminergic systems on memory process in goldfish.

  1. Modulation of pineal melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Villela, Darine; Atherino, Victoria Fairbanks; Lima, Larissa de Sá; Moutinho, Anderson Augusto; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; Peres, Rafael; Martins de Lima, Thais; Torrão, Andréa da Silva; Cipolla-Neto, José; Scavone, Cristóforo; Afeche, Solange Castro

    2013-01-01

    The glutamatergic modulation of melatonin synthesis is well known, along with the importance of astrocytes in mediating glutamatergic signaling in the central nervous system. Pinealocytes and astrocytes are the main cell types in the pineal gland. The objective of this work was to investigate the interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes as a part of the glutamate inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis. Rat pinealocytes isolated or in coculture with astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence of norepinephrine, and the melatonin content, was quantified. The expression of glutamate receptors, the intracellular calcium content and the NF- κ B activation were analyzed in astrocytes and pinealocytes. TNF- α 's possible mediation of the effect of glutamate was also investigated. The results showed that glutamate's inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis involves interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes, possibly through the release of TNF- α . Moreover, the activation of the astrocytic NF- κ B seems to be a necessary step. In astrocytes and pinealocytes, AMPA, NMDA, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were observed, as well as the intracellular calcium elevation. In conclusion, there is evidence that the modulation of melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through the activation of the astrocytic NF- κ B transcription factor and possibly by subsequent TNF- α release.

  2. Self protein-protein interactions are involved in TPPP/p25 mediated microtubule bundling

    PubMed Central

    DeBonis, Salvatore; Neumann, Emmanuelle; Skoufias, Dimitrios A.

    2015-01-01

    TPPP/p25 is a microtubule-associated protein, detected in protein inclusions associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Deletion analysis data show that TPPP/p25 has two microtubule binding sites, both located in intrinsically disordered domains, one at the N-terminal and the other in the C-terminal domain. In copolymerization assays the full-length protein exhibits microtubule stimulation and bundling activity. In contrast, at the same ratio relative to tubulin, truncated forms of TPPP/p25 exhibit either lower or no microtubule stimulation and no bundling activity, suggesting a cooperative phenomenon which is enhanced by the presence of the two binding sites. The binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminally truncated proteins to taxol-stabilized microtubules are similar to the full-length protein. However, the C-terminally truncated TPPP/p25 shows a lower Bmax for microtubule binding, suggesting that it may bind to a site of tubulin that is masked in microtubules. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation assays in cells expressing combinations of various TPPP/p25 fragments, but not that of the central folded domain, resulted in the generation of a fluorescence signal colocalized with perinuclear microtubule bundles insensitive to microtubule inhibitors. The data suggest that the central folded domain of TPPP/p25 following binding to microtubules can drive s homotypic protein-protein interactions leading to bundled microtubules. PMID:26289831

  3. AUTONOMY AND RELATEDNESS IN MOTHER-TEEN INTERACTIONS AS PREDICTORS OF INVOLVEMENT IN ADOLESCENT DATING AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Niolon, Phyllis Holditch; Kuperminc, Gabriel P.; Allen, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This multi-method, longitudinal study examines the negotiation of autonomy and relatedness between teens and their mothers as etiologic predictors of perpetration and victimization of dating aggression two years later. Method Observations of 88 mid-adolescents and their mothers discussing a topic of disagreement were coded for each individual’s demonstrations of autonomy and relatedness using a validated coding system. Adolescents self-reported on perpetration and victimization of physical and psychological dating aggression two years later. We hypothesized that mother’s and adolescents’ behaviors supporting autonomy and relatedness would longitudinally predict lower reporting of dating aggression, and that their behaviors inhibiting autonomy and relatedness would predict higher reporting of dating aggression. Results Hypotheses were not supported; main findings were characterized by interactions of sex and risk status with autonomy. Maternal behaviors supporting autonomy predicted higher reports of perpetration and victimization of physical dating aggression for girls, but not for boys. Adolescent behaviors supporting autonomy predicted higher reports of perpetration of physical dating aggression for high-risk adolescents, but not for low-risk adolescents. Conclusions Results indicate that autonomy is a dynamic developmental process, operating differently as a function of social contexts in predicting dating aggression. Examination of these and other developmental processes within parent-child relationships is important in predicting dating aggression, but may depend on social context. PMID:25914852

  4. A neuron-glia interaction involving GABA Transaminase contributes to sleep loss in sleepless mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Feng; Maguire, Sarah; Sowcik, Mallory; Luo, Wenyu; Koh, Kyunghee; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is an essential process and yet mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Loss of the Drosophila quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene increases neuronal excitability and diminishes daily sleep, providing an excellent model for exploring the underpinnings of sleep regulation. Here, we used a proteomic approach to identify proteins altered in sss brains. We report that loss of sleepless post-transcriptionally elevates the CG7433 protein, a mitochondrial γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABAT), and reduces GABA in fly brains. Loss of GABAT increases daily sleep and improves sleep consolidation, indicating that GABAT promotes wakefulness. Importantly, disruption of the GABAT gene completely suppresses the sleep phenotype of sss mutants, demonstrating that GABAT is required for loss of sleep in sss mutants. While SSS acts in distinct populations of neurons, GABAT acts in glia to reduce sleep in sss flies. Our results identify a novel mechanism of interaction between neurons and glia that is important for the regulation of sleep. PMID:24637426

  5. Macrofaunal involvement in the sublittoral decay of kelp debris: the detritivore community and species interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, A. P.; Moore, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The fauna associated with sea-bed accumulations of decomposing Laminaria saccharina has been studied by year-round SCUBA diving at two sites in the Clyde Sea area. Seasonal changes in density of 64 species are reported. In the autumn, large quantities of kelp are detached by storms. This weed carries with it to the sea bed a large part of its normal fauna. Additional species settle onto the weed from the plankton whilst others migrate onto it from the surrounding sea bed. Peak densities of associated species were recorded in autumn. Litter bag experiments in situ showed that, except during the summer, weed is lost from sea-bed accumulations at a faster rate when macrofaunal animals are excluded. The macrofauna therefore inhibits decomposition. The relative importance of interactive cropping by three macrodetritivores, Psammechinus miliaris (Echinodermata), Platynereis dumerilii (Polychaeta) and Gammarus locusta (Amphipoda) was studied by in situ containment of different species combinations. The presence of Gammarus with Psammechinus resulted in less weed being lost than when Psammechinus was isolated. This is because Gammarus selectively crops rotting weed, retarding frond disintegration by microbes. Platynereis retards microbial colonization of frond tissues ruptured during its feeding by repeated cropping of the same region. Weed would decompose very rapidly were it not for macrofaunal cropping. Macroalgal decay thus differs profoundly from that of vascular plants.

  6. Structural Features of Vps35p Involved in Interaction with Other Subunits of the Retromer Complex

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Ricardo; Zhao, Xiang; Peter, Harald; Zhang, Bao-yan; Arvan, Peter; Nothwehr, Steven F.

    2008-01-01

    The penta-subunit retromer complex of yeast mediates selective retrieval of membrane proteins from the prevacuolar endosome to the trans Golgi network. In this study, we set out to generate a panel of vps35 dominant-negative mutants that disrupt retromer-mediated cargo sorting. Mapping of the mutations revealed two types of alterations leading to dominant-negative behavior of the 944-amino acid protein: (i) mutations at or near the R98 residue or (ii) C-terminal truncations exemplified by a nonsense mutation at codon 733. Both could be suppressed by overexpression of wild-type Vps35p, suggesting that these dominant-negative mutants compete for interactions with other retromer subunits. Interestingly, Vps35-R98W expression destabilized Vps26p while having no effect on Vps29p stability, while Vps35-Q733* expression affected Vps29p stability but had no effect on Vps26p. Measurement of Vps35/Vps26 and Vps35/Vps29 pairwise associations by coimmunoprecipitation in the presence or absence of other retromer subunits indicated that the R98 residue, which is part of a conserved PRLYL motif, is critical for Vps35p binding to Vps26p, while both R98 and residues 733–944 are needed for efficient binding to Vps29p. PMID:17892535

  7. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning.

    PubMed

    Fais, A; Johnson, M; Wilson, M; Aguilar Soto, N; Madsen, P T

    2016-01-01

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1-2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes. PMID:27340122

  8. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning

    PubMed Central

    Fais, A.; Johnson, M.; Wilson, M.; Aguilar Soto, N.; Madsen, P. T.

    2016-01-01

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1–2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes. PMID:27340122

  9. Screening of genes involved in interactions with intestinal epithelial cells in Cronobacter sakazakii.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin-Jun; Zhang, Xia; Li, Ping; Xue, Rui; Wang, Shuo

    2016-12-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii possesses a significant ability to adhere to and invade epithelial cells in its host. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. In the current study, the adhesive and invasive capabilities of 56 C. sakazakii strains against human epithelial cells were evaluated, and one of them was selected for construction of a mutant library using the Tn5 transposon. In a systematic analysis of the adhesive and invasive capabilities of 1084 mutants, 10 mutants that showed more than a 50 % reduction in adhesion or invasion were obtained. Tail-PCR was used to sequence the flanking regions of the inserted transposon and 8 different genes (in 10 different mutants) were identified that encoded an exonuclease subunit, a sugar transporter, a transcriptional regulator, two flagellar biosynthesis proteins, and three hypothetical proteins. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze variations in the biochemical components of the mutants, and the results showed that there were fewer amide III proteins, protein -CH deformations, nucleic acids and tyrosines and more phenylalanine, carotenes, and fatty acids in the mutants than in the wild type strain. Real-time PCR was used to further confirm the involvement of the genes in the adhesive and invasive abilities of C. sakazakii, and the results indicated that the expression levels of the 8 identified genes were upregulated 1.2- to 11.2-fold. The results of this study provide us with insight into the mechanism by which C. sakazakii infects host cells at molecular level. PMID:27637944

  10. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning.

    PubMed

    Fais, A; Johnson, M; Wilson, M; Aguilar Soto, N; Madsen, P T

    2016-06-24

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1-2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes.

  11. Ground- and surface-water interactions involving an abandoned underground coal mine in Pike County, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, D.; Olyphant, G.A.; Sjogren, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    Several highwall pits of an abandoned surface mine in the Springfield Coal Member (Pennsylvanian) are currently occupied by ponds with a total area of approximately 2.3 x 10{sup 4} m{sup 2}. These ponds are adjacent to an abandoned underground mine (Patoka Valley Coal and Coke Company No. 1 Mine) in the same coalbed. The mine underlies about 0.3 km{sup 2} and contains approximately 4 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} of flooded voids. Monitoring of water levels in wells that are screened in the mine and of the levels of adjacent ponds reveal that average hourly levels vary in unison across a range of less than one meter. The mean potentiometric level of the mine-aquifer, the neighboring ponds, and an artesian spring that issues through the outcrop of the coalbed, are at elevations of about 163 m above sea level. Long-term monitoring and a field experiment that involved pumping of a pond indicated that the mine was connected to two of the ponds and served to recharge, rather than discharge, the ponds. The monitoring and field experiment also allowed determination of the mine aquifers barometric efficiency (0.3) and its storativity (2 x 10{sup -3}) . A water-balance calculation indicates that the average recharge rate of the mine is about 0.1 mm/day.

  12. Influence of gold(I) complexes involving adenine derivatives on major drug-drug interaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Zdeněk; Novotná, Aneta; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-12-01

    A series of considerably anti-inflammatory active gold(I) mixed-ligand complexes, involving the benzyl-substituted derivatives of N6-benzyladenine (HLn) and triphenylphosphine (PPh3) as ligands and having the general formula [Au(Ln)(PPh3)]·xH2O (1-4; n=1-4 and x=0-1), was evaluated for the ability to influence the expression of CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A4 and transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid (GR) and aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) receptors in primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. In both tests, evaluating the ability of the complexes to modulate the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in primary human hepatocytes and influence the transcriptional activity of AhR and GR in the reporter cell lines, no negative influence on the major drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and their signaling pathway (through GR and AhR receptors) was observed. These positive findings revealed another substantial evidence that could lead to utilization of the complexes as effective and relatively safe drugs for the treatment of hard-to-treat inflammation-related diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, comparable or even better than clinically used gold-containing drug Auranofin. PMID:24157406

  13. PIWI-interacting RNA 021285 is involved in breast tumorigenesis possibly by remodeling the cancer epigenome.

    PubMed

    Fu, Alan; Jacobs, Daniel I; Hoffman, Aaron E; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhu, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Although PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) account for the largest class of the small non-coding RNA superfamily, virtually nothing is known of their function in human carcinogenesis. Once thought to be expressed solely in the germ line where they safeguard the genome against transposon-induced insertional mutations, piRNAs are now believed to play an active role in somatic gene regulation through sequence-specific histone modification and DNA methylation. In the current study, we investigate the role of piRNA-021285 (piR-021285) in the regulation of the breast cancer methylome. Genotypic screening of a panel of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-containing piRNAs revealed a significant association between SNP rs1326306 G>T in piR-021285 and increased likelihood for breast cancer in a Connecticut-based population (441 cases and 479 controls). Given nascent but compelling evidence of piRNA-mediated gene-specific methylation in the soma, a genome-wide methylation screen was then carried out using wild type (WT) and variant piR-021285 mimic-transfected MCF7 cells to explore whether the observed association could be attributed in part to piR-021285-induced methylation at cancer-relevant genes. We found significant methylation differences at a number of experimentally implicated breast cancer-related genes, including attenuated 5' untranslated region (UTR)/first exon methylation at the proinvasive ARHGAP11A gene in variant mimic-transfected cells. Follow-up functional analyses revealed both concurrent increased ARHGAP11A mRNA expression and enhanced invasiveness in variant versus WT piR-021285 mimic-transfected breast cancer cell lines. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the first evidence supporting a role of piRNAs, a novel group of non-coding RNA, in human tumorigenesis via a piRNA-mediated epigenetic mechanism, which warrants further confirmation and investigation. PMID:26210741

  14. Protein interactions of MADS box transcription factors involved in flowering in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Ciannamea, Stefano; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Frau, Marta; Tonaco, Isabella A Nougalli; Petersen, Klaus; Nielsen, Klaus K; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of flowering time is best understood in the dicot model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Molecular analyses revealed that genes belonging to the MADS box transcription factor family play pivotal regulatory roles in both the vernalization- and photoperiod-regulated flowering pathways. Here the analysis of three APETALA1 (AP1)-like MADS box proteins (LpMADS1-3) and a SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP)-like MADS box protein (LpMADS10) from the monocot perennial grass species Lolium perenne is reported. Features of these MADS box proteins were studied by yeast two-hybrid assays. Protein-protein interactions among the Lolium proteins and with members of the Arabidopsis MADS box family have been studied. The expression pattern for LpMADS1 and the protein properties suggest that not the Arabidopsis AP1 gene, but the SUPPRESSOR OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) gene, is the functional equivalent of LpMADS1. To obtain insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of LpMADS1 gene expression in vernalization-sensitive and -insensitive Lolium accessions, the upstream sequences of this gene from a winter and spring growth habit variety were compared with respect to MADS box protein binding. In both promoter elements, a putative MADS box transcription factor-binding site (CArG-box) is present; however, the putative spring promoter has a short deletion adjacent to this DNA motif. Experiments using yeast one-hybrid and gel retardation assays demonstrated that the promoter element is bound by an LpMADS1-LpMADS10 higher order protein complex and, furthermore, that this complex binds efficiently to the promoter element from the winter variety only. This strongly supports the model that LpMADS1 together with LpMADS10 controls the vernalization-dependent regulation of the LpMADS1 gene, which is part of the vernalization-induced flowering process in Lolium. PMID:17005923

  15. Human anterior thalamic nuclei are involved in emotion-attention interaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lihua; Peräkylä, Jari; Polvivaara, Markus; Öhman, Juha; Peltola, Jukka; Lehtimäki, Kai; Huhtala, Heini; Hartikainen, Kaisa M

    2015-11-01

    Patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) provide an opportunity to study affective processes in humans with "lesion on demand" at key nodes in the limbic circuitries, such as at the anterior thalamic nuclei (ANT). ANT has been suggested to play a role in emotional control with its connection to the orbitofrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex. However, direct evidence for its role in emotional function in human subjects is lacking. Reported side effects of ANT-DBS in the treatment of refractory epilepsy include depression related symptoms. In line with these mood-related clinical side effects, we have previously reported that stimulating the anterior thalamus increased emotional interference in a visual attention task as indicated by prolonged reaction times due to threat-related emotional distractors. We used event-related potentials to investigate potential attentional mechanism behind this behavioural observation. We hypothesized that ANT-DBS leads to greater attention capture by threat-related distractors. We tested this hypothesis using centro-parietal N2-P3 peak-to-peak amplitude as a measure of allocated attentional resources. Six epileptic patients treated with deep brain stimulation at ANT participated in the study. Electroencephalography was recorded while the patients performed a computer based Executive-Reaction Time test with threat-related emotional distractors. During the task, either ANT or a thalamic control location was stimulated, or the stimulation was turned off. Stimulation of ANT was associated with increased centro-parietal N2-P3 amplitude and increased reaction time in the context of threat-related emotional distractors. We conclude that high frequency electric stimulation of ANT leads to greater attentional capture by emotional stimuli. This is the first study to provide direct evidence from human subjects with on-line electric manipulation of ANT for its role in emotion-attention interaction. PMID:26440152

  16. EptC of Campylobacter jejuni mediates phenotypes involved in host interactions and virulence.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Thomas W; O'Brien, John P; Hendrixson, David R; Giles, David K; Hobb, Rhonda I; Thompson, Stuart A; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Trent, M Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a natural commensal of the avian intestinal tract. However, the bacterium is also the leading cause of acute bacterial diarrhea worldwide and is implicated in development of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Like many bacterial pathogens, C. jejuni assembles complex surface structures that interface with the surrounding environment and are involved in pathogenesis. Recent work in C. jejuni identified a gene encoding a novel phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) transferase, EptC (Cj0256), that plays a promiscuous role in modifying the flagellar rod protein, FlgG; the lipid A domain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS); and several N-linked glycans. In this work, we report that EptC catalyzes the addition of pEtN to the first heptose sugar of the inner core oligosaccharide of LOS, a fourth enzymatic target. We also examine the role pEtN modification plays in circumventing detection and/or killing by host defenses. Specifically, we show that modification of C. jejuni lipid A with pEtN results in increased recognition by the human Toll-like receptor 4-myeloid differentiation factor 2 (hTLR4-MD2) complex, along with providing resistance to relevant mammalian and avian antimicrobial peptides (i.e., defensins). We also confirm the inability of aberrant forms of LOS to activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Most exciting, we demonstrate that strains lacking eptC show decreased commensal colonization of chick ceca and reduced colonization of BALB/cByJ mice compared to wild-type strains. Our results indicate that modification of surface structures with pEtN by EptC is key to its ability to promote commensalism in an avian host and to survive in the mammalian gastrointestinal environment.

  17. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  18. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease.

  19. A Computational Study of the Interaction and Polarization Effects of Complexes Involving Molecular Graphene and C60 or a Nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Otero, Nicolás; Karamanis, Panaghiotis; Pouchan, Claude; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2016-01-21

    A systematic analysis of the molecular structure, energetics, electronic (hyper)polarizabilities and their interaction-induced counterparts of C60 with a series of molecular graphene (MG) models, CmHn, where m = 24, 84, 114, 222, 366, 546 and n = 12, 24, 30, 42, 54, 66, was performed. All the reported data were computed by employing density functional theory and a series of basis sets. The main goal of the study is to investigate how alteration of the size of the MG model affects the strength of the interaction, charge rearrangement, and polarization and interaction-induced polarization of the complex, C60-MG. A Hirshfeld-based scheme has been employed in order to provide information on the intrinsic polarizability density representations of the reported complexes. It was found that the interaction energy increases approaching a limit of -26.98 kcal/mol for m = 366 and 546; the polarizability and second hyperpolarizability increase with increasing the size of MG. An opposite trend was observed for the dipole moment. Interestingly, the variation of the first hyperpolarizability is relatively small with m. Since polarizability is a key factor for the stability of molecular graphene with nucleobases (NB), a study of the magnitude of the interaction-induced polarizability of C84H24-NB complexes is also reported, aiming to reveal changes of its magnitude with the type of NB. The binding strength of C84H24-NB complexes is also computed and found to be in agreement with available theoretical and experimental data. The interaction involved in C60 B12N12H24-NB complexes has also been considered, featuring the effect of contamination on the binding strength between MG and NBs.

  20. Coordination polymers of Ag(I) based on iminocarbene ligands involving metal-carbon and metal-heteroatom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netalkar, Sandeep P.; Netalkar, Priya P.; Revankar, Vidyanand K.

    2016-03-01

    The reaction of Ag2O with three novel imino-NHC ligands derived from 2-chloroacetophenone with pendant N-donor functional group incorporated by reaction with methoxyamine and 1-methyl/ethyl/n-butyl-substituted imidazoles afforded one-dimensional coordination polymers with [(-NHCarbene)Ag(NHCarbene-)PF6]n formulation involving both carbon-metal and heteroatom-metal interactions, the carbon and heteroatom involved in coordination to silver being from different molecule of the ligand. The complexes as well as the ligands were characterized by spectroscopic methods as well as the solid state structures determined in case of 2a, 3a and complex 5. The iminocarbene ligands serve as non-chelating building block for supramolecular silver assemblies.

  1. Involvement of sulfates from cruzipain, a major antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi, in the interaction with immunomodulatory molecule Siglec-E.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Maximiliano R; Heins, Anja M; Soprano, Luciana L; Acosta, Diana M; Esteva, Mónica I; Jacobs, Thomas; Duschak, Vilma G

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the involvement of sulfated groups in the Trypanosoma cruzi host-parasite relationship, we studied the interaction between the major cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi, cruzipain (Cz), a sulfate-containing sialylated molecule and the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin like lectin-E (Siglec-E). To this aim, ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence assays and flow cytometry, using mouse Siglec-E-Fc fusion molecules and glycoproteins of parasites, were performed. Competition assays verified that the lectins, Maackia amurensis II (Mal II) and Siglec-E-Fc, compete for the same binding sites. Taking into account that Mal II binding remains unaltered by sulfation, we established this lectin as sialylation degree control. Proteins of an enriched microsomal fraction showed the highest binding to Siglec-E as compared with those from the other parasite subcellular fractions. ELISA assays and the affinity purification of Cz by a Siglec-E column confirmed the interaction between both molecules. The significant decrease in binding of Siglec-E-Fc to Cz and to its C-terminal domain (C-T) after desulfation of these molecules suggests that sulfates contribute to the interaction between Siglec-E-Fc and these glycoproteins. Competitive ELISA assays confirmed the involvement of sulfated epitopes in the affinity between Siglec-E and Cz, probably modified by natural protein environment. Interestingly, data from flow cytometry of untreated and chlorate-treated parasites suggested that sulfates are not primary receptors, but enhance the binding of Siglec-E to trypomastigotic forms. Altogether, our findings support the notion that sulfate-containing sialylated glycoproteins interact with Siglec-E, an ortholog protein of human Siglec-9, and might modulate the immune response of the host, favoring parasitemia and persistence of the parasite. PMID:26047932

  2. Molecular Basis of Gene-Gene Interaction: Cyclic Cross-Regulation of Gene Expression and Post-GWAS Gene-Gene Interaction Involved in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chengqi; Zhang, Hongfu; Lu, Qiulun; Chang, Le; Wang, Fan; Wang, Pengxia; Zhang, Rongfeng; Hu, Zhenkun; Song, Qixue; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Cong; Li, Sisi; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yang, Qin; Yin, Dan; Wang, Xiaojing; Si, Wenxia; Li, Xiuchun; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Dan; Huang, Yuan; Luo, Chunyan; Li, Jia; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Wang, Longfei; Wang, Li; Han, Meng; Ye, Jian; Chen, Feifei; Liu, Jingqiu; Liu, Ying; Wu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yuhua; Wu, Yanxia; Ke, Tie; Chen, Qiuyun; Tu, Xin; Elston, Robert; Rao, Shaoqi; Yang, Yanzong; Xia, Yunlong; Wang, Qing K.

    2015-01-01

    -gene interactions involved in genetics of complex disease traits. PMID:26267381

  3. Interaction of chandipura virus N and P proteins: identification of two mutually exclusive domains of N involved in interaction with P.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Arindam; Roy, Arunava; Sarkar, Sandipto; Mukherjee, Jishnu; Ganguly, Tridib; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti

    2012-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (N) and the phosphoprotein (P) of nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses interact with each other to accomplish two crucial events necessary for the viral replication cycle. First, the P protein binds to the aggregation prone nascent N molecules maintaining them in a soluble monomeric (N(0)) form (N(0)-P complex). It is this form that is competent for specific encapsidation of the viral genome. Second, the P protein binds to oligomeric N in the nucleoprotein complex (N-RNA-P complex), and thereby facilitates the recruitment of the viral polymerase (L) onto its template. All previous attempts to study these complexes relied on co-expression of the two proteins in diverse systems. In this study, we have characterised these different modes of N-P interaction in detail and for the first time have been able to reconstitute these complexes individually in vitro in the chandipura virus (CHPV), a human pathogenic NNS RNA virus. Using a battery of truncated mutants of the N protein, we have been able to identify two mutually exclusive domains of N involved in differential interaction with the P protein. An unique N-terminal binding site, comprising of amino acids (aa) 1-180 form the N(0)-P interacting region, whereas, C-terminal residues spanning aa 320-390 is instrumental in N-RNA-P interactions. Significantly, the ex-vivo data also supports these observations. Based on these results, we suggest that the P protein acts as N-specific chaperone and thereby partially masking the N-N self-association region, which leads to the specific recognition of viral genome RNA by N(0).

  4. NKp46 O-glycan sequences that are involved in the interaction with hemagglutinin type 1 of influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Michal; Tekoah, Yoram; Zilka, Alon; Gershoni-Yahalom, Orly; Gazit, Roi; Achdout, Hagit; Bovin, Nicolai V; Meningher, Tal; Mandelboim, Michal; Mandelboim, Ofer; David, Ayelet; Porgador, Angel

    2010-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells serve as a crucial first-line defense against tumors and virus-infected cells. We previously showed that lysis of influenza virus (IV)-infected cells is mediated by the interaction between the NK receptor, NKp46, and the IV hemagglutinin (HA) type 1 expressed by the infected cells. This interaction requires the presence of sialyl groups on the NKp46-T225 O-glycoforms. In the current study, we analyzed the O-glycan sequences that are imperative for the interaction between recombinant NKp46 (rNKp46) and IV H1N1 strains. We first showed that rNKp46 binding to IV H1N1 is not mediated by a glycoform unique to the Thr225 site. We then characterized the O-glycan sequences that mediate the interaction of rNKp46 and IV H1N1; we employed rNKp46s with dissimilar glycosylation patterns and IV H1N1 strains with different sialic acid alpha2,3 and alpha2,6 linkage preferences. The branched alpha2,3-sialylated O-glycoform Neu5NAcalpha2,3-Galbeta1,4-GlcNAcbeta1,6[Neu5NAcalpha2,3-Galbeta1,3]GalNAc competently mediated the interaction of rNKp46 with IV H1N1, manifesting a preference for alpha2,3 linkage. In contrast, the linear alpha2,3-sialylated O-glycoform Neu5NAcalpha2,3-Galbeta1,3-GalNAc was not correlated with enhanced interaction between rNKp46 and IV H1N1 or a preference for alpha2,3 linkage. The branched alpha2,3- and alpha2,6-sialylated O-glycoform Neu5NAcalpha2,3-Galbeta1,3[Neu5NAcalpha2,6]GalNAc competently mediated the interaction of rNKp46 with IV H1N1, manifesting a preference for alpha2,6 linkage. Previous viral HA-binding-specificity studies were performed with glycopolymer conjugates, free synthetic sialyl oligosaccharides, and sialidase-treated cells. This study shed light on the O-glycan sequences involved in the interaction of glycoprotein and viral hemagglutinins and may help in the design of agents inhibitory to hemagglutinin for influenza treatment.

  5. Heat Stress Response in Pea Involves Interaction of Mitochondrial Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase with a Novel 86-Kilodalton Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Escobar Galvis, Martha L.; Marttila, Salla; Håkansson, Gunilla; Forsberg, Jens; Knorpp, Carina

    2001-01-01

    In this work we have further characterized the first mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase (mtNDPK) isolated from plants. The mitochondrial isoform was found to be especially abundant in reproductive and young tissues. Expression of the pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Oregon sugarpod) mtNDPK was not affected by different stress conditions. However, the pea mtNDPK was found to interact with a novel 86-kD protein, which is de novo synthesized in pea leaves upon exposure to heat. Thus, we have evidence for the involvement of mtNDPK in mitochondrial heat response in pea in vivo. Studies on oligomerization revealed that mtNDPK was found in complexes of various sizes, corresponding to the sizes of e.g. hexamers, tetramers, and dimers, indicating flexibility in oligomerization. This flexibility, also found for other NDPK isoforms, has been correlated with the ability of this enzyme to interact with other proteins. We believe that the mtNDPK is involved in heat stress response in pea, possibly as a modulator of the 86-kD protein. PMID:11351071

  6. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  7. Protein-protein interactions involving voltage-gated sodium channels: Post-translational regulation, intracellular trafficking and functional expression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongmin; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2009-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), classically known to play a central role in excitability and signalling in nerves and muscles, have also been found to be expressed in a range of 'non-excitable' cells, including lymphocytes, fibroblasts and endothelia. VGSC abnormalities are associated with various diseases including epilepsy, long-QT syndrome 3, Brugada syndrome, sudden infant death syndrome and, more recently, various human cancers. Given their pivotal role in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, regulation of functional VGSC expression has been the subject of intense study. An emerging theme is post-translational regulation and macro-molecular complexing by protein-protein interactions and intracellular trafficking, leading to changes in functional VGSC expression in plasma membrane. This partially involves endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several proteins have been shown to associate with VGSCs. Here, we review the interactions involving VGSCs and the following proteins: p11, ankyrin, syntrophin, beta-subunit of VGSC, papin, ERM and Nedd4 proteins. Protein kinases A and C, as well as Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase II that have also been shown to regulate intracellular trafficking of VGSCs by changing the balance of externalization vs. internalization, and an effort is made to separate these effects from the short-term phosphorylation of mature proteins in plasma membrane. Two further modulatory mechanisms are reciprocal interactions with the cytoskeleton and, late-stage, activity-dependent regulation. Thus, the review gives an updated account of the range of post-translational molecular mechanisms regulating functional VGSC expression. However, many details of VGSC subtype-specific regulation and pathophysiological aspects remain unknown and these are highlighted throughout for completeness. PMID:19401147

  8. Interaction between RNA helicase ROOT INITIATION DEFECTIVE 1 and GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 1 is involved in female gametophyte development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dong Zi; Zhao, Xue Fang; Liu, Chang Zhen; Ma, Fang Fang; Wang, Fang; Gao, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-01-01

    ROOT INITIATION DEFECTIVE 1 (RID1) is an Arabidopsis DEAH/RHA RNA helicase. It functions in hypocotyl de-differentiation, de novo meristem formation, and cell specification of the mature female gametophyte (FG). However, it is unclear how RID1 regulates FG development. In this study, we observed that mutations to RID1 disrupted the developmental synchrony and retarded the progression of FG development. RID1 exhibited RNA helicase activity, with a preference for unwinding double-stranded RNA in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Furthermore, we found that RID1 interacts with GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 1 (GFA1), which is an integral protein of the spliceosome component U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particle. Substitution of specific RID1 amino acids (Y266F and T267I) inhibited the interaction with GFA1. In addition, the mutated RID1 could not complement the seed-abortion phenotype of the rid1 mutant. The rid1 and gfa1 mutants exhibited similar abnormalities in pre-mRNA splicing and down-regulated expression of some genes involved in FG development. Our results suggest that an interaction between RID1 and the U5 snRNP complex regulates essential pre-mRNA splicing of the genes required for FG development. This study provides new information regarding the mechanism underlying the FG developmental process. PMID:27683728

  9. Seasonal phenology of interactions involving short-lived annual plants, a multivoltine herbivore and its endoparasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Fei, Minghui; Gols, Rieta; Harvey, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial-temporal realism is often missing in many studies of multitrophic interactions, which are conducted at a single time frame and/or involving interactions between insects with a single species of plant. In this scenario, an underlying assumption is that the host-plant species is ubiquitous throughout the season and that the insects always interact with it. We studied interactions involving three naturally occurring wild species of cruciferous plants, Brassica rapa, Sinapis arvensis and Brassica nigra, that exhibit different seasonal phenologies, and a multivoltine herbivore, the large cabbage white butterfly, Pieris brassicae, and its gregarious endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia glomerata. The three plants have very short life cycles. In central Europe, B. rapa grows in early spring, S. arvensis in late spring and early summer, and B. nigra in mid to late summer. P. brassicae generally has three generations per year, and C. glomerata at least two. This means that different generations of the insects must find and exploit different plant species that may differ in quality and which may be found some distance from one another. Insects were either reared on each of the three plant species for three successive generations or shifted between generations from B. rapa to S. arvensis to B. nigra. Development time from neonate to pupation and pupal fresh mass were determined in P. brassicae and egg-to-adult development time and body mass in C. glomerata. Overall, herbivores performed marginally better on S. arvensis and B. nigra plants than on B. rapa plants. Parasitoids performance was closely tailored with that of the host. Irrespective as to whether the insects were shifted to a new plant in successive generations or not, development time of P. brassicae and C. glomerata decreased dramatically over time. Our results show that there were some differences in insect development on different plant species and when transferred from one species to another. However, all three

  10. Seasonal phenology of interactions involving short-lived annual plants, a multivoltine herbivore and its endoparasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Fei, Minghui; Gols, Rieta; Harvey, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial-temporal realism is often missing in many studies of multitrophic interactions, which are conducted at a single time frame and/or involving interactions between insects with a single species of plant. In this scenario, an underlying assumption is that the host-plant species is ubiquitous throughout the season and that the insects always interact with it. We studied interactions involving three naturally occurring wild species of cruciferous plants, Brassica rapa, Sinapis arvensis and Brassica nigra, that exhibit different seasonal phenologies, and a multivoltine herbivore, the large cabbage white butterfly, Pieris brassicae, and its gregarious endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia glomerata. The three plants have very short life cycles. In central Europe, B. rapa grows in early spring, S. arvensis in late spring and early summer, and B. nigra in mid to late summer. P. brassicae generally has three generations per year, and C. glomerata at least two. This means that different generations of the insects must find and exploit different plant species that may differ in quality and which may be found some distance from one another. Insects were either reared on each of the three plant species for three successive generations or shifted between generations from B. rapa to S. arvensis to B. nigra. Development time from neonate to pupation and pupal fresh mass were determined in P. brassicae and egg-to-adult development time and body mass in C. glomerata. Overall, herbivores performed marginally better on S. arvensis and B. nigra plants than on B. rapa plants. Parasitoids performance was closely tailored with that of the host. Irrespective as to whether the insects were shifted to a new plant in successive generations or not, development time of P. brassicae and C. glomerata decreased dramatically over time. Our results show that there were some differences in insect development on different plant species and when transferred from one species to another. However, all three

  11. Carbon: Nitrogen Interaction Regulates Expression of Genes Involved in N-Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Parul; Bhuria, Monika; Kaushal, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    In plants, several cellular and metabolic pathways interact with each other to regulate processes that are vital for their growth and development. Carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) are two main nutrients for plants and coordination of C and N pathways is an important factor for maintaining plant growth and development. In the present work, influence of nitrogen and sucrose (C source) on growth parameters and expression of genes involved in nitrogen transport and assimilatory pathways was studied in B. juncea seedlings. For this, B. juncea seedlings were treated with four combinations of C and N source viz., N source alone (-Suc+N), C source alone (+Suc-N), with N and C source (+Suc+N) or without N and C source (-Suc-N). Cotyledon size and shoot length were found to be increased in seedlings, when nitrogen alone was present in the medium. Distinct expression pattern of genes in both, root and shoot tissues was observed in response to exogenously supplied N and C. The presence or depletion of nitrogen alone in the medium leads to severe up- or down-regulation of key genes involved in N-uptake and transport (BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.8) in root tissue and genes involved in nitrate reduction (BjNR1 and BjNR2) in shoot tissue. Moreover, expression of several genes, like BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2 and BjPK in root and two genes BjAMT2 and BjGS1.1 in shoot were found to be regulated only when C source was present in the medium. Majority of genes were found to respond in root and shoot tissues, when both C and N source were present in the medium, thus reflecting their importance as a signal in regulating expression of genes involved in N-uptake and assimilation. The present work provides insight into the regulation of genes of N-uptake and assimilatory pathway in B. juncea by interaction of both carbon and nitrogen. PMID:27637072

  12. High affinity DNA-microtubule interactions: evidence for a conserved DNA-MAP interaction involving unusual high CsCl density repetitious DNA families.

    PubMed

    Marx, K A; Denial, T

    1992-12-01

    distinct bands in total DNA CsCl gradients, nor could we isolate them in purified tubulin control binding experiments. This apparently general phenomena may be identifying some of the sequence families involved in the high affinity microtubule interaction, which appears to be conserved in evolution.

  13. Amino acid residues in the laminin G domains of protein S involved in tissue factor pathway inhibitor interaction.

    PubMed

    Somajo, Sofia; Ahnström, Josefin; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Gierula, Magdalena; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2015-05-01

    Protein S functions as a cofactor for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and activated protein C (APC). The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)-like region of protein S, consisting of two laminin G-like domains (LG1 and LG2), contains the binding site for C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and TFPI. Furthermore, the LG-domains are essential for the TFPI-cofactor function and for expression of full APC-cofactor function. The aim of the current study was to localise functionally important interaction sites in the protein S LG-domains using amino acid substitutions. Four protein S variants were created in which clusters of surface-exposed amino acid residues within the LG-domains were substituted. All variants bound normally to C4BP and were fully functional as cofactors for APC in plasma and in pure component assays. Two variants, SHBG2 (E612A, I614A, F265A, V393A, H453A), involving residues from both LG-domains, and SHBG3 (K317A, I330A, V336A, D365A) where residues in LG1 were substituted, showed 50-60 % reduction in enhancement of TFPI in FXa inhibition assays. For SHBG3 the decreased TFPI cofactor function was confirmed in plasma based thrombin generation assays. Both SHBG variants bound to TFPI with decreased affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. The TFPI Kunitz 3 domain is known to contain the interaction site for protein S. Using in silico analysis and protein docking exercises, preliminary models of the protein S SHBG/TFPI Kunitz domain 3 complex were created. Based on a combination of experimental and in silico data we propose a binding site for TFPI on protein S, involving both LG-domains.

  14. Global MHD modeling of an ICME focused on the physics involved in an ICME interacting with a solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Jun-Mo; Magara, Tetsuya; Inoue, Satoshi; Hayashi, Keiji; Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code to investigate the structure of a solar wind, the properties of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the interaction between them. This MHD code is based on the finite volume method incorporating total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme with an unstructured grid system. In particular, this grid system can avoid the singularity at the north and south poles and relax tight CFL conditions around the poles, both of which would arise in a spherical coordinate system (Tanaka 1994). In this model, we first apply an MHD tomographic method (Hayashi et al. 2003) to interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observational data and derive a solar wind from the physical values obtained at 50 solar radii away from the Sun. By comparing the properties of this solar wind to observational data obtained near the Earth orbit, we confirmed that our model captures the velocity, temperature and density profiles of a solar wind near the Earth orbit. We then insert a spheromak-type CME (Kataoka et al. 2009) into the solar wind to reproduce an actual CME event occurred on 29 September 2013. This has been done by introducing a time-dependent boundary condition to the inner boundary of our simulation domain (50rs < r < 300rs). On the basis of a comparison between the properties of a simulated CME and observations near the Earth, we discuss the physics involved in an ICME interacting with a solar wind.

  15. Excretory/secretory antigens from Dirofilaria immitis adult worms interact with the host fibrinolytic system involving the vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    González-Miguel, Javier; Morchón, Rodrigo; Mellado, Isabel; Carretón, Elena; Montoya-Alonso, José Alberto; Simón, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is the causative agent of canine and feline heartworm disease. The parasite can survive for long periods of time (7 years or more) in the circulatory system of immunocompetent reservoirs, producing usually a chronic inflammatory vascular disease. In addition, the simultaneous death of groups of adult worms can trigger an acute disease characterized by the exacerbation of inflammatory reactions and the emergence of serious thromboembolic events. In the context of the D. immitis/host relationships, the aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the excretory/secretory antigens from D. immitis adult worms (DiES) and the fibrinolytic system of the host. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we showed that DiES extract is able to bind plasminogen and generate plasmin, although this fact requires the presence of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Moreover, we established that DiES extract enhances t-PA expression in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Additionally, 10 plasminogen-binding proteins from DiES extract were identified by mass spectrometry (HSP60, actin-1/3, actin, actin 4, transglutaminase, GAPDH, Ov87, LOAG_14743, galectin and P22U). The data suggest that DiES antigens interact with the environment of the parasite regulating the activation of the fibrinolytic system of the host with involvement of the vascular endothelium in the process.

  16. Pleiotropic effect of disrupting a conserved sequence involved in a long-range compensatory interaction in the Drosophila Adh gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, John F; Parsch, John; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental analyses of the evolution of RNA secondary structures suggest a more complex scenario than that typically considered by Kimura's classical model of compensatory evolution. In this study, we examine one such case in more detail. Previous experimental analysis of long-range compensatory interactions between the two ends of Drosophila Adh mRNA failed to fit the classical model of compensatory evolution. To further investigate and verify long-range pairing in Drosophila Adh with respect to models of compensatory evolution and its potential functional role, we introduced site-directed mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene. We explore two alternative hypotheses for why previous analysis of long-range compensatory interactions failed to fit the classical model. Specifically, we investigate whether the disruption of a conserved short-range pairing within Adh exon 2 has an effect on Adh expression or if there is a dual functional role of a conserved sequence in the 3'-UTR in both long-range pairing and the negative regulation of Adh expression. We find that a classical result was not observed due to the pleiotropic effect of changing a nucleotide involved in both long-range base pairing and the negative regulation of gene expression. PMID:15020421

  17. Rydberg and valence state excitation dynamics: a velocity map imaging study involving the E-V state interaction in HBr.

    PubMed

    Zaouris, Dimitris; Kartakoullis, Andreas; Glodic, Pavle; Samartzis, Peter C; Rafn Hróðmarsson, Helgi; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-04-28

    Photoexcitation dynamics of the E((1)Σ(+)) (v' = 0) Rydberg state and the V((1)Σ(+)) (v') ion-pair vibrational states of HBr are investigated by velocity map imaging (VMI). H(+) photoions, produced through a number of vibrational and rotational levels of the two states were imaged and kinetic energy release (KER) and angular distributions were extracted from the data. In agreement with previous work, we found the photodissociation channels forming H*(n = 2) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) to be dominant. Autoionization pathways leading to H(+) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) via either HBr(+)((2)Π3/2) or HBr(+)*((2)Π1/2) formation were also present. The analysis of KER and angular distributions and comparison with rotationally and mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra revealed the excitation transition mechanisms and characteristics of states involved as well as the involvement of the E-V state interactions and their v' and J' dependence. PMID:25801122

  18. The involvement of sand disturbance, cannibalism and intra-guild predation in competitive interactions among pit-building antlion larvae.

    PubMed

    Barkae, Erez D; Scharf, Inon; Subach, Aziz; Ovadia, Ofer

    2010-10-01

    Competition in trap-building predators such as antlion larvae is a complex biotic interaction, potentially involving exploitation competition, sand throwing (i.e., interference competition), cannibalism and intra-guild predation. We investigated the short-term behavioral and developmental responses of the strict sit-and-wait antlion predator Myrmeleon hyalinus to sand disturbance (i.e., quantification of the impact of severe sand throwing), and to con- and hetero-specific competition by a larger sit-and-pursue antlion species Lopezus fedtschenkoi. We found that antlions subjected to sand disturbances reduced their pit construction activity and relocated less often. Furthermore, the reduction in pit construction activity was stronger among antlions subjected to disturbances prior to feeding. Almost no death occurred during the sand disturbance experiment, but as expected, disturbances caused reductions in the relative growth rates of antlions. This negative effect was stronger in the group exposed to sand disturbances prior to feeding. The presence of the sit-and-pursue competitor led to reductions both in pit construction and in relocation activities of M. hyalinus. Although the per-capita food supply was identical in both experiments, only 48% of M. hyalinus larvae survived the competition experiment, and this pattern was consistent between the con- and hetero-specific treatments. However, in the presence of hetero-specific competitors, the relative growth rate of surviving larvae was significantly lower than that measured in the presence of con-specific competitors. Our study demonstrates that investigating the different components of complex biotic interactions can markedly improve our understanding of how these different factors interact to influence the behavior and life history of organisms.

  19. Ligand requirements for involvement of PKCε in synergistic analgesic interactions between spinal μ and δ opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, D J; Metcalf, M D; Kitto, K F; Messing, R O; Fairbanks, C A; Wilcox, G L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We recently found that PKCε was required for spinal analgesic synergy between two GPCRs, δ opioid receptors and α2A adrenoceptors, co-located in the same cellular subpopulation. We sought to determine if co-delivery of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists would similarly result in synergy requiring PKCε. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Combinations of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists were co-administered intrathecally by direct lumbar puncture to PKCε-wild-type (PKCε-WT) and -knockout (PKCε-KO) mice. Antinociception was assessed using the hot-water tail-flick assay. Drug interactions were evaluated by isobolographic analysis. KEY RESULTS All agonists produced comparable antinociception in both PKCε-WT and PKCε-KO mice. Of 19 agonist combinations that produced analgesic synergy, only 3 required PKCε for a synergistic interaction. In these three combinations, one of the agonists was morphine, although not all combinations involving morphine required PKCε. Morphine + deltorphin II and morphine + deltorphin I required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + deltorphin, did not. Additionally, morphine + oxymorphindole required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + oxycodindole, did not. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We discovered biased agonism for a specific signalling pathway at the level of spinally co-delivered opioid agonists. As the bias is only revealed by an appropriate ligand combination and cannot be accounted for by a single drug, it is likely that the receptors these agonists act on are interacting with each other. Our results support the existence of μ and δ opioid receptor heteromers at the spinal level in vivo. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24827408

  20. The involvement of sand disturbance, cannibalism and intra-guild predation in competitive interactions among pit-building antlion larvae.

    PubMed

    Barkae, Erez D; Scharf, Inon; Subach, Aziz; Ovadia, Ofer

    2010-10-01

    Competition in trap-building predators such as antlion larvae is a complex biotic interaction, potentially involving exploitation competition, sand throwing (i.e., interference competition), cannibalism and intra-guild predation. We investigated the short-term behavioral and developmental responses of the strict sit-and-wait antlion predator Myrmeleon hyalinus to sand disturbance (i.e., quantification of the impact of severe sand throwing), and to con- and hetero-specific competition by a larger sit-and-pursue antlion species Lopezus fedtschenkoi. We found that antlions subjected to sand disturbances reduced their pit construction activity and relocated less often. Furthermore, the reduction in pit construction activity was stronger among antlions subjected to disturbances prior to feeding. Almost no death occurred during the sand disturbance experiment, but as expected, disturbances caused reductions in the relative growth rates of antlions. This negative effect was stronger in the group exposed to sand disturbances prior to feeding. The presence of the sit-and-pursue competitor led to reductions both in pit construction and in relocation activities of M. hyalinus. Although the per-capita food supply was identical in both experiments, only 48% of M. hyalinus larvae survived the competition experiment, and this pattern was consistent between the con- and hetero-specific treatments. However, in the presence of hetero-specific competitors, the relative growth rate of surviving larvae was significantly lower than that measured in the presence of con-specific competitors. Our study demonstrates that investigating the different components of complex biotic interactions can markedly improve our understanding of how these different factors interact to influence the behavior and life history of organisms. PMID:20943359

  1. IAA8 Involved in Lateral Root Formation Interacts with the TIR1 Auxin Receptor and ARF Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Egusa, Mayumi; Nishimoto, Nami; Sakurai, Sumiko; Sakamoto, Naho; Kaminaka, Hironori

    2012-01-01

    The expression of auxin-responsive genes is regulated by the TIR1/AFB auxin receptor-dependent degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors, which interact with auxin-responsive factors (ARFs). Most of the 29 Aux/IAA genes present in Arabidopsis have not been functionally characterized to date. IAA8 appears to have a distinct function from the other Aux/IAA genes, due to its unique transcriptional response to auxin and the stability of its encoded protein. In this study, we characterized the function of Arabidopsis IAA8 in various developmental processes governed by auxin and in the transcriptional regulation of the auxin response. Transgenic plants expressing estrogen-inducible IAA8 (XVE::IAA8) exhibited significantly fewer lateral roots than the wild type, and an IAA8 loss-of-function mutant exhibited significantly more. Ectopic overexpression of IAA8 resulted in abnormal gravitropism. The strong induction of early auxin-responsive marker genes by auxin treatment was delayed by IAA8 overexpression. GFP-fusion analysis revealed that IAA8 localized not only to the nucleus, but, in contrast to other Aux/IAAs, also to the cytosol. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IAA8 interacts with TIR1, in an auxin-dependent fashion, and with ARF proteins, both in yeast and in planta. Taken together, our results show that IAA8 is involved in lateral root formation, and that this process is regulated through the interaction with the TIR1 auxin receptor and ARF transcription factors in the nucleus. PMID:22912871

  2. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Diverse Repertoire of Genes Involved in Prokaryote-Eukaryote Interactions within the Pseudovibrio Genus

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Stefano; Fernàndez-Guerra, Antonio; Reen, F. Jerry; Glöckner, Frank O.; Crowley, Susan P.; O'Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D.; Adams, Claire; Dobson, Alan D. W.; O'Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the Pseudovibrio genus have been detected worldwide, mainly as part of bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates, particularly sponges. This recurrent association has been considered as an indication of a symbiotic relationship between these microbes and their host. Until recently, the availability of only two genomes, belonging to closely related strains, has limited the knowledge on the genomic and physiological features of the genus to a single phylogenetic lineage. Here we present 10 newly sequenced genomes of Pseudovibrio strains isolated from marine sponges from the west coast of Ireland, and including the other two publicly available genomes we performed an extensive comparative genomic analysis. Homogeneity was apparent in terms of both the orthologous genes and the metabolic features shared amongst the 12 strains. At the genomic level, a key physiological difference observed amongst the isolates was the presence only in strain P. axinellae AD2 of genes encoding proteins involved in assimilatory nitrate reduction, which was then proved experimentally. We then focused on studying those systems known to be involved in the interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This analysis revealed that the genus harbors a large diversity of toxin-like proteins, secretion systems and their potential effectors. Their distribution in the genus was not always consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of the strains. Finally, our analyses identified new genomic islands encoding potential toxin-immunity systems, previously unknown in the genus. Our analyses shed new light on the Pseudovibrio genus, indicating a large diversity of both metabolic features and systems for interacting with the host. The diversity in both distribution and abundance of these systems amongst the strains underlines how metabolically and phylogenetically similar bacteria may use different strategies to interact with the host and find a niche within its

  3. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Diverse Repertoire of Genes Involved in Prokaryote-Eukaryote Interactions within the Pseudovibrio Genus.

    PubMed

    Romano, Stefano; Fernàndez-Guerra, Antonio; Reen, F Jerry; Glöckner, Frank O; Crowley, Susan P; O'Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D; Adams, Claire; Dobson, Alan D W; O'Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the Pseudovibrio genus have been detected worldwide, mainly as part of bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates, particularly sponges. This recurrent association has been considered as an indication of a symbiotic relationship between these microbes and their host. Until recently, the availability of only two genomes, belonging to closely related strains, has limited the knowledge on the genomic and physiological features of the genus to a single phylogenetic lineage. Here we present 10 newly sequenced genomes of Pseudovibrio strains isolated from marine sponges from the west coast of Ireland, and including the other two publicly available genomes we performed an extensive comparative genomic analysis. Homogeneity was apparent in terms of both the orthologous genes and the metabolic features shared amongst the 12 strains. At the genomic level, a key physiological difference observed amongst the isolates was the presence only in strain P. axinellae AD2 of genes encoding proteins involved in assimilatory nitrate reduction, which was then proved experimentally. We then focused on studying those systems known to be involved in the interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This analysis revealed that the genus harbors a large diversity of toxin-like proteins, secretion systems and their potential effectors. Their distribution in the genus was not always consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of the strains. Finally, our analyses identified new genomic islands encoding potential toxin-immunity systems, previously unknown in the genus. Our analyses shed new light on the Pseudovibrio genus, indicating a large diversity of both metabolic features and systems for interacting with the host. The diversity in both distribution and abundance of these systems amongst the strains underlines how metabolically and phylogenetically similar bacteria may use different strategies to interact with the host and find a niche within its

  4. Human herpesvirus 8 envelope glycoprotein K8.1A interaction with the target cells involves heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Wang, F Z; Akula, S M; Pramod, N P; Zeng, L; Chandran, B

    2001-08-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) or Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K8.1 gene encodes for two immunogenic glycoproteins, gpK8.1A and gpK8.1B, originating from spliced messages. The 228-amino-acid (aa) gpK8.1A is the predominant form associated with the virion envelope, consisting of a 167-aa region identical to gpK8.1B and a 61-aa unique region (L. Zhu, V. Puri, and B. Chandran, Virology 262:237-249, 1999). HHV-8 has a broad in vivo and in vitro cellular tropism, and our studies showed that this may be in part due to HHV-8's interaction with the ubiquitous host cell surface molecule, heparan sulfate (HS). Since HHV-8 K8.1 gene is positionally colinear to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene encoding the gp350/gp220 protein involved in EBV binding to the target cells, gpK8.1A's ability to interact with the target cells was examined. The gpK8.1A without the transmembrane and carboxyl domains (DeltaTMgpK8.1A) was expressed in a baculovirus system and purified. Radiolabeled purified DeltaTMgpK8.1A protein bound to the target cells, which was blocked by unlabeled DeltaTMgpK8.1A. Unlabeled DeltaTMgpK8.1A blocked the binding of [(3)H]thymidine-labeled purified HHV-8 to the target cells. Binding of radiolabeled DeltaTMgpK8.1A to the target cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by soluble heparin, a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) closely related to HS, but not by other GAGs such as chondroitin sulfate A and C, N-acetyl heparin and de-N-sulfated heparin. Cell surface absorbed DeltaTMgpK8.1A was displaced by soluble heparin. Radiolabeled DeltaTMgpK8.1A also bound to HS expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells, and binding to mutant CHO cell lines deficient in HS was significantly reduced. The DeltaTMgpK8.1A specifically bound to heparin-agarose beads, which was inhibited by HS and heparin, but not by other GAGs. Virion envelope-associated gpK8.1A was specifically precipitated by heparin-agarose beads. These findings suggest that gpK8.1A interaction with target cells

  5. Mapping the epitope in cadherin-like receptors involved in Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin interaction using phage display.

    PubMed

    Gómez, I; Oltean, D I; Gill, S S; Bravo, A; Soberón, M

    2001-08-01

    In susceptible lepidopteran insects, aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like proteins are the putative receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Using phage display, we identified a key epitope that is involved in toxin-receptor interaction. Three different scFv molecules that bind Cry1Ab toxin were obtained, and these scFv proteins have different amino acid sequences in the complementary determinant region 3 (CDR3). Binding analysis of these scFv molecules to different members of the Cry1A toxin family and to Escherichia coli clones expressing different Cry1A toxin domains showed that the three selected scFv molecules recognized only domain II. Heterologous binding competition of Cry1Ab toxin to midgut membrane vesicles from susceptible Manduca sexta larvae using the selected scFv molecules showed that scFv73 competed with Cry1Ab binding to the receptor. The calculated binding affinities (K(d)) of scFv73 to Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac toxins are in the range of 20-51 nm. Sequence analysis showed this scFv73 molecule has a CDR3 significantly homologous to a region present in the cadherin-like protein from M. sexta (Bt-R(1)), Bombyx mori (Bt-R(175)), and Lymantria dispar. We demonstrated that peptides of 8 amino acids corresponding to the CDR3 from scFv73 or to the corresponding regions of Bt-R(1) or Bt-R(175) are also able to compete with the binding of Cry1Ab and Cry1Aa toxins to the Bt-R(1) or Bt-R(175) receptors. Finally, we showed that synthetic peptides homologous to Bt-R(1) and scFv73 CDR3 and the scFv73 antibody decreased the in vivo toxicity of Cry1Ab to M. sexta larvae. These results show that we have identified the amino acid region of Bt-R(1) and Bt-R(175) involved in Cry1A toxin interaction.

  6. Comparative genomics of plant-associated Pseudomonas spp.: insights into diversity and inheritance of traits involved in multitrophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Loper, Joyce E; Hassan, Karl A; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Davis, Edward W; Lim, Chee Kent; Shaffer, Brenda T; Elbourne, Liam D H; Stockwell, Virginia O; Hartney, Sierra L; Breakwell, Katy; Henkels, Marcella D; Tetu, Sasha G; Rangel, Lorena I; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Wilson, Neil L; van de Mortel, Judith E; Song, Chunxu; Blumhagen, Rachel; Radune, Diana; Hostetler, Jessica B; Brinkac, Lauren M; Durkin, A Scott; Kluepfel, Daniel A; Wechter, W Patrick; Anderson, Anne J; Kim, Young Cheol; Pierson, Leland S; Pierson, Elizabeth A; Lindow, Steven E; Kobayashi, Donald Y; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Weller, David M; Thomashow, Linda S; Allen, Andrew E; Paulsen, Ian T

    2012-07-01

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of ten strains within the Pseudomonas fluorescens group including seven new genomic sequences. These strains exhibit a diverse spectrum of traits involved in biological control and other multitrophic interactions with plants, microbes, and insects. Multilocus sequence analysis placed the strains in three sub-clades, which was reinforced by high levels of synteny, size of core genomes, and relatedness of orthologous genes between strains within a sub-clade. The heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens group was reflected in the large size of its pan-genome, which makes up approximately 54% of the pan-genome of the genus as a whole, and a core genome representing only 45-52% of the genome of any individual strain. We discovered genes for traits that were not known previously in the strains, including genes for the biosynthesis of the siderophores achromobactin and pseudomonine and the antibiotic 2-hexyl-5-propyl-alkylresorcinol; novel bacteriocins; type II, III, and VI secretion systems; and insect toxins. Certain gene clusters, such as those for two type III secretion systems, are present only in specific sub-clades, suggesting vertical inheritance. Almost all of the genes associated with multitrophic interactions map to genomic regions present in only a subset of the strains or unique to a specific strain. To explore the evolutionary origin of these genes, we mapped their distributions relative to the locations of mobile genetic elements and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements in each genome. The mobile genetic elements and many strain-specific genes fall into regions devoid of REP elements (i.e., REP deserts) and regions displaying atypical tri-nucleotide composition, possibly indicating relatively recent acquisition of these loci. Collectively, the results of this study highlight the enormous heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens group and the importance of the variable genome in tailoring individual strains to

  7. Comparative genomics of plant-associated Pseudomonas spp.: insights into diversity and inheritance of traits involved in multitrophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Loper, Joyce E; Hassan, Karl A; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Davis, Edward W; Lim, Chee Kent; Shaffer, Brenda T; Elbourne, Liam D H; Stockwell, Virginia O; Hartney, Sierra L; Breakwell, Katy; Henkels, Marcella D; Tetu, Sasha G; Rangel, Lorena I; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Wilson, Neil L; van de Mortel, Judith E; Song, Chunxu; Blumhagen, Rachel; Radune, Diana; Hostetler, Jessica B; Brinkac, Lauren M; Durkin, A Scott; Kluepfel, Daniel A; Wechter, W Patrick; Anderson, Anne J; Kim, Young Cheol; Pierson, Leland S; Pierson, Elizabeth A; Lindow, Steven E; Kobayashi, Donald Y; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Weller, David M; Thomashow, Linda S; Allen, Andrew E; Paulsen, Ian T

    2012-07-01

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of ten strains within the Pseudomonas fluorescens group including seven new genomic sequences. These strains exhibit a diverse spectrum of traits involved in biological control and other multitrophic interactions with plants, microbes, and insects. Multilocus sequence analysis placed the strains in three sub-clades, which was reinforced by high levels of synteny, size of core genomes, and relatedness of orthologous genes between strains within a sub-clade. The heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens group was reflected in the large size of its pan-genome, which makes up approximately 54% of the pan-genome of the genus as a whole, and a core genome representing only 45-52% of the genome of any individual strain. We discovered genes for traits that were not known previously in the strains, including genes for the biosynthesis of the siderophores achromobactin and pseudomonine and the antibiotic 2-hexyl-5-propyl-alkylresorcinol; novel bacteriocins; type II, III, and VI secretion systems; and insect toxins. Certain gene clusters, such as those for two type III secretion systems, are present only in specific sub-clades, suggesting vertical inheritance. Almost all of the genes associated with multitrophic interactions map to genomic regions present in only a subset of the strains or unique to a specific strain. To explore the evolutionary origin of these genes, we mapped their distributions relative to the locations of mobile genetic elements and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements in each genome. The mobile genetic elements and many strain-specific genes fall into regions devoid of REP elements (i.e., REP deserts) and regions displaying atypical tri-nucleotide composition, possibly indicating relatively recent acquisition of these loci. Collectively, the results of this study highlight the enormous heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens group and the importance of the variable genome in tailoring individual strains to

  8. Comparative Genomics of Plant-Associated Pseudomonas spp.: Insights into Diversity and Inheritance of Traits Involved in Multitrophic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Loper, Joyce E.; Hassan, Karl A.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Davis, Edward W.; Lim, Chee Kent; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Stockwell, Virginia O.; Hartney, Sierra L.; Breakwell, Katy; Henkels, Marcella D.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Rangel, Lorena I.; Kidarsa, Teresa A.; Wilson, Neil L.; van de Mortel, Judith E.; Song, Chunxu; Blumhagen, Rachel; Radune, Diana; Hostetler, Jessica B.; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Durkin, A. Scott; Kluepfel, Daniel A.; Wechter, W. Patrick; Anderson, Anne J.; Kim, Young Cheol; Pierson, Leland S.; Pierson, Elizabeth A.; Lindow, Steven E.; Kobayashi, Donald Y.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Weller, David M.; Thomashow, Linda S.; Allen, Andrew E.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of ten strains within the Pseudomonas fluorescens group including seven new genomic sequences. These strains exhibit a diverse spectrum of traits involved in biological control and other multitrophic interactions with plants, microbes, and insects. Multilocus sequence analysis placed the strains in three sub-clades, which was reinforced by high levels of synteny, size of core genomes, and relatedness of orthologous genes between strains within a sub-clade. The heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens group was reflected in the large size of its pan-genome, which makes up approximately 54% of the pan-genome of the genus as a whole, and a core genome representing only 45–52% of the genome of any individual strain. We discovered genes for traits that were not known previously in the strains, including genes for the biosynthesis of the siderophores achromobactin and pseudomonine and the antibiotic 2-hexyl-5-propyl-alkylresorcinol; novel bacteriocins; type II, III, and VI secretion systems; and insect toxins. Certain gene clusters, such as those for two type III secretion systems, are present only in specific sub-clades, suggesting vertical inheritance. Almost all of the genes associated with multitrophic interactions map to genomic regions present in only a subset of the strains or unique to a specific strain. To explore the evolutionary origin of these genes, we mapped their distributions relative to the locations of mobile genetic elements and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements in each genome. The mobile genetic elements and many strain-specific genes fall into regions devoid of REP elements (i.e., REP deserts) and regions displaying atypical tri-nucleotide composition, possibly indicating relatively recent acquisition of these loci. Collectively, the results of this study highlight the enormous heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens group and the importance of the variable genome in tailoring individual strains

  9. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict drug-drug interactions involving inhibitory metabolite: a case study of amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Mao, Jialin; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2015-02-01

    Evaluation of drug-drug interaction (DDI) involving circulating inhibitory metabolites of perpetrator drugs has recently drawn more attention from regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies. Here, using amiodarone (AMIO) as an example, we demonstrate the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to assess how a potential inhibitory metabolite can contribute to clinically significant DDIs. Amiodarone was reported to increase the exposure of simvastatin, dextromethorphan, and warfarin by 1.2- to 2-fold, which was not expected based on its weak inhibition observed in vitro. The major circulating metabolite, mono-desethyl-amiodarone (MDEA), was later identified to have a more potent inhibitory effect. Using a combined "bottom-up" and "top-down" approach, a PBPK model was built to successfully simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of AMIO and MDEA, particularly their accumulation in plasma and liver after a long-term treatment. The clinical AMIO DDIs were predicted using the verified PBPK model with incorporation of cytochrome P450 inhibition from both AMIO and MDEA. The closest prediction was obtained for CYP3A (simvastatin) DDI when the competitive inhibition from both AMIO and MDEA was considered, for CYP2D6 (dextromethorphan) DDI when the competitive inhibition from AMIO and the competitive plus time-dependent inhibition from MDEA were incorporated, and for CYP2C9 (warfarin) DDI when the competitive plus time-dependent inhibition from AMIO and the competitive inhibition from MDEA were considered. The PBPK model with the ability to simulate DDI by considering dynamic change and accumulation of inhibitor (parent and metabolite) concentration in plasma and liver provides advantages in understanding the possible mechanism of clinical DDIs involving inhibitory metabolites.

  10. A gene X environment interaction between DRD2 and religiosity in the prediction of adolescent delinquent involvement in a sample of males.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Kevin M; Gibson, Chris L; Jennings, Wesley G; Ward, Jeffrey T

    2009-01-01

    Human behavioral phenotypes are the result of complex interactions between genotype and the environment. Still, much remains unknown about the gene X environmental basis to adolescent delinquent involvement. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we examine whether a polymorphism in the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene interacts with religiosity to predict variation in adolescent delinquent involvement. The results of the analyses revealed a gene X environment interaction between the A-1 allele of DRD2 and religiosity in the prediction of adolescent delinquency. Limitations are noted, and the implications of the findings are discussed.

  11. Assessment of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors for interaction with proteins involved in the immune response to infection.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ronald W; Cunningham, David; Cong, Yang; Subashi, Timothy A; Tkalcevic, George T; Lloyd, David B; Boyd, James G; Chrunyk, Boris A; Karam, George A; Qiu, Xiayang; Wang, Ing-Kae; Francone, Omar L

    2010-05-01

    The CETP inhibitor, torcetrapib, was prematurely terminated from phase 3 clinical trials due to an increase in cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality. Because nearly half of the latter deaths involved patients with infection, we have tested torcetrapib and other CETPIs to see if they interfere with lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) or bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). No effect of these potent CETPIs on LPS binding to either protein was detected. Purified CETP itself bound weakly to LPS with a Kd >or= 25 microM compared with 0.8 and 0.5 nM for LBP and BPI, respectively, and this binding was not blocked by torcetrapib. In whole blood, LPS induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha normally in the presence of torcetrapib. Furthermore, LPS had no effect on CETP activity. We conclude that the sepsis-related mortality of the ILLUMINATE trial was unlikely due to a direct effect of torcetrapib on LBP or BPI function, nor to inhibition of an interaction of CETP with LPS. Instead, we speculate that the negative outcome seen for patients with infections might be related to the changes in plasma lipoprotein composition and metabolism, or alternatively to the known off-target effects of torcetrapib, such as aldosterone elevation, which may have aggravated the effects of sepsis. PMID:19965592

  12. Cep57 is a Mis12-interacting kinetochore protein involved in kinetochore targeting of Mad1-Mad2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haining; Wang, Tianning; Zheng, Tao; Teng, Junlin; Chen, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) arrests cells in mitosis by sensing unattached kinetochores, until all chromosomes are bi-oriented by spindle microtubules. Kinetochore accumulation of the SAC component Mad1-Mad2 is crucial for SAC activation. However, the mechanism by which Mad1-Mad2 accumulation at kinetochores is regulated is not clear. Here we find that Cep57 is localized to kinetochores in human cells, and binds to Mis12, a KMN (KNL1/Mis12 complex/Ndc80 complex) network component. Cep57 also interacts with Mad1, and depletion of Cep57 results in decreased kinetochore localization of Mad1-Mad2, reduced SAC signalling and increased chromosome segregation errors. We also show that the microtubule-binding activity of Cep57 is involved in the timely removal of Mad1 from kinetochores. Thus, these findings reveal that the KMN network-binding protein Cep57 is a mitotic kinetochore component, and demonstrate the functional connection between the KMN network and the SAC. PMID:26743940

  13. Molecular change signal-to-noise criteria for interpreting experiments involving exposure of biological systems to weakly interacting electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Timothy E; Weaver, James C

    2005-05-01

    We describe an approach to aiding the design and interpretation of experiments involving biological effects of weakly interacting electromagnetic fields that range from steady (dc) to microwave frequencies. We propose that if known biophysical mechanisms cannot account for an inferred, underlying molecular change signal-to-noise ratio, (S/N)gen, of a observed result, then there are two interpretation choices: (1) there is an unknown biophysical mechanism with stronger coupling between the field exposure and the ongoing biochemical process, or (2) the experiment is responding to something other than the field exposure. Our approach is based on classical detection theory, the recognition that weakly interacting fields cannot break chemical bonds, and the consequence that such fields can only alter rates of ongoing, metabolically driven biochemical reactions, and transport processes. The approach includes both fundamental chemical noise (molecular shot noise) and other sources of competing chemical change, to be compared quantitatively to the field induced change for the basic case that the field alters a single step in a biochemical network. Consistent with pharmacology and toxicology, we estimate the molecular dose (mass associated with field induced molecular change per mass tissue) resulting from illustrative low frequency field exposures for the biophysical mechanism of voltage gated channels. For perspective, we then consider electric field-mediated delivery of small molecules across human skin and into individual cells. Specifically, we consider the examples of iontophoretic and electroporative delivery of fentanyl through skin and electroporative delivery of bleomycin into individual cells. The total delivered amount corresponds to a molecular change signal and the delivery variability corresponds to generalized chemical noise. Viewed broadly, biological effects due to nonionizing fields may include animal navigation, medical applications, and environmental

  14. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, O S

    1990-01-01

    Differentiating granule cells develop survival requirements in culture which can be met by treatment with high K+ or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and, according to our recent findings, also with low concentrations of kainic acid (KA, 50 microM). We have now attempted to elucidate the mechanism(s) underlying the trophic effect of KA. KA rescue of cells was completely suppressed by blockers of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, such as nifedipine in low concentrations (5 x 10(-7) M), indicating that the promotion of cell survival is mediated through the activation of these channels by membrane depolarization. Thus the trophic influences of KA and NMDA share a common mechanism, increased Ca2+ influx (albeit through different routes), a conclusion that is supported by the observation that the effects of these agonists at concentrations causing maximal promotion of cell survival were not additive. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors were revealed by the potentiation of the KA rescue of cells by the NMDA receptor antagonists, 2-amino 5-phosphonovalerate (APV) or (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohept-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801), which on their own failed to promote, but rather reduced cell survival. The potentiation of the KA effect by the competitive NMDA antagonist APV was counteracted by the weak NMDA agonist, quinolinic acid. These observations suggest that KA alone has both trophic and toxic effects, the latter being mediated secondarily through an NMDA-like glutamate receptor, which is distinct from the conventional NMDA, KA and quisqualate preferring subtypes.

  15. Involvement of and Interaction between WNT10A and EDA Mutations in Tooth Agenesis Cases in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hailan; Qu, Hong; Song, Shujuan; Bai, Baojing; Zhang, Zhenting

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental agenesis is the most common, often heritable, developmental anomaly in humans. Although WNT10A gene mutations are known to cause rare syndromes associated with tooth agenesis, including onycho-odontodermal dysplasia (OODD), Schöpf-Schulz-Passarge syndrome (SSPS), hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED), and more than half of the cases of isolated oligodontia recently, the genotype-phenotype correlations and the mode of inheritance of WNT10A mutations remain unclear. The phenotypic expression with WNT10A mutations shows a high degree of variability, suggesting that other genes might function with WNT10A in regulating ectodermal organ development. Moreover, the involvement of mutations in other genes, such as EDA, which is also associated with HED and isolated tooth agenesis, is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that EDA mutations interact with WNT10A mutations to play a role in tooth agenesis. Additionally, EDA, EDAR, and EDARADD encode signaling molecules in the Eda/Edar/NF-κB signaling pathways, we also checked EDAR and EDARADD in this study. Methods WNT10A, EDA, EDAR and EDARADD were sequenced in 88 patients with isolated oligodontia and 26 patients with syndromic tooth agenesis. The structure of two mutated WNT10A and two mutated EDA proteins was analyzed. Results Digenic mutations of both WNT10A and EDA were identified in 2 of 88 (2.27%) isolated oligodontia cases and 4 of 26 (15.38%) syndromic tooth agenesis cases. No mutation in EDAR or EDARADD gene was found. Conclusions WNT10A and EDA digenic mutations could result in oligodontia and syndromic tooth agenesis in the Chinese population. Moreover, our results will greatly expand the genotypic spectrum of tooth agenesis. PMID:24312213

  16. Immune complex–FcγR interaction modulates monocyte/macrophage molecules involved in inflammation and immune response

    PubMed Central

    BARRIONUEVO, P; BEIGIER-BOMPADRE, M; FERNANDEZ, G C; GOMEZ, S; ALVES-ROSA, M F; PALERMO, M S; ISTURIZ, M A

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (FcγRs) from monocytes/macrophages and immune complexes (IC) triggers regulatory and effector functions. Recently, we have demonstrated that IC exert a drastic inhibition of basal and IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II on human monocytes. Taking into account that the regulation of MHC class II molecules is a crucial event in the immune response, in this report we extend our previous studies analysing the effect of STAT-1 phosphorylation in the down-regulatory process, the fate of the intracellular pool of MHC class II molecules and the effect of complement on MHC class II down-regulation induced by IC. We also studied the effect of IC on the expression of MHC class II (I-Ad) in macrophages using a mouse model of chronic inflammation. We demonstrate that IC induce a depletion not only on surface expressed but also on intracellular MHC class II content and that IC-induced down-regulation of MHC class II is not mediated by the inhibition of STAT-1 phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effect of IC is not specific for the down-regulation of MHC class II, for it could be restricted to other molecules involved in inflammatory processes. Our experiments also show that the activation of the complement system could be a crucial step on the regulation of the effect of IC on MHC class II expression. In agreement with our in vitro experiments using human monocytes, IC treatment reduces the expression of MHC class II in a mouse model of chronic inflammation. PMID:12869025

  17. Receptor interactions involved in adenoviral-mediated gene delivery after systemic administration in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Theodore A G; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Marshall-Neff, Jennifer; Rollence, Michele L; Wright, Patrick; Kaloss, Michele; King, Laura; Mech, Christine; Dinges, Lisa; Iverson, William O; Sherer, Alfred D; Markovits, Judit E; Lyons, Russette M; Kaleko, Michael; Stevenson, Susan C

    2003-11-20

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors can bind at least three separate cell surface receptors for efficient cell entry: the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), alpha nu integrins, and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HSG). To address the role of each receptor involved in adenoviral cell entry, we mutated critical amino acids in fiber or penton to inhibit receptor interaction. A series of five adenoviral vectors was prepared and the biodistribution of each was previously characterized in mice. To evaluate possible species differences in Ad vector tropism, we characterized the effects of each detargeting mutation in non-human primates after systemic delivery to confirm our conclusions made in mice. In non-human primates, CAR was found to have minimal effects on vector delivery to all organs examined including liver and spleen. Cell-surface alpha nu integrins played a significant role in delivery of vector to the spleen, lung and kidney. The fiber shaft mutation S*, which presumably inhibits HSG binding, was found to significantly decrease delivery to all organs examined. The ability to detarget the liver corresponded with decreased elevations in liver serum enzymes (aspartate transferase [AST] and alanine transferase [ALT]) 24 hr after vector administration and also in serum interleukin (IL)-6 levels 6 hr after vector administration. The biodistribution data generated in cynomolgus monkeys correspond with those data derived from mice, demonstrating that CAR binding is not the major determinant of viral tropism in vivo. Vectors containing the fiber shaft modification may provide for a detargeted adenoviral vector on which to introduce new tropisms for the development of targeted, systemically deliverable adenoviral vectors for human clinical application.

  18. [Factors involved in host-pathogen interaction for the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma induced by Epstein Barr virus].

    PubMed

    Torres Espíndola, Luz María; Arellano Galindo, José; Velazquez Cruz, Rafael; Castillejos López, Manuel de Jesús

    2013-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a neoplasm characterized by malignant cells called Reed Sternberg and Hodgkin's cells in the lymphatic system. Such cells comprise 1% of the tumor while the remainder is made up of lymphocytes, histiocytes, eosinophils and plasma non-neoplastic cells. The annual global incidence of HL is 3-10/100,000 inhabitants and is most commonly found in young adults. The mechanism by which cell transformation is accomplished is not entirely clear; however, some evidences suggest that oncogenic viruses like the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) may have a high impact on the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferation. Genetic and environmental factors could be involved, since it has been found a high incidence of HL among members of the same family. In Mexico, there have been studies to determine the prevalence of EBV in patients with HL and found the presence of this virus in up to 64.2% of the cases. EBV has been detected in the Reed Sternberg cells and Hodgkin cells in 50% of cases of classical HL. There is not a satisfactory explanation for this, but it has been proposed that geographic and immunological variabilities play a role in the positivity of EBV in HL. However, despite recent advances in the field, there is insufficient evidence to show a clear association between host factors, environment and pathogens, and the risk of lymphoproliferation leading to the development of HL. This review aims to give an overview about the risk factors that influence the interaction of host, pathogens and environment in the etiology of HL.

  19. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  20. Roles of rifampicin in drug-drug interactions: underlying molecular mechanisms involving the nuclear pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiezhong; Raymond, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Rifampicin, an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis, is used extensively despite its broad effects on drug-drug interactions, creating serious problems. The clinical importance of such interactions includes autoinduction leading to suboptimal or failed treatment. The concomitantly administered effects of rifampicin on other drugs can result in their altered metabolism or transportation that are metabolised by cytochromes P450 or transported by p-glycoprotein in the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This review paper summarises recent findings with emphases on the molecular mechanisms used to explain these broad drug-drug interactions. In general, rifampicin can act on a pattern: rifampicin activates the nuclear pregnane X receptor that in turn affects cytochromes P450, glucuronosyltransferases and p-glycoprotein activities. This pattern of action may explain many of the rifampicin inducing drug-drug interactions. However, effects through other mechanisms have also been reported and these make any explanation of such drug-drug interactions more complex. PMID:16480505

  1. Examining the interaction of parental involvement and parenting style in predicting adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Landers, Sara E.; Friedrich, Elizabeth A.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Miller, Victoria A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study examined whether aspects of parenting style (specifically, warmth, autonomy support, and coercion) moderated the association between parental involvement and adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes. Methods Children ages 8–16 years with type 1 diabetes and a parent completed assessments of parental involvement, parenting style, and adherence. Results Parent autonomy support and coercion were associated with adherence but warmth was not. Child report of more parental involvement was associated with better adherence. Warmth, autonomy support, and coercion were not moderators. Discussion The findings underscore the importance of parental involvement, operationalized as responsibility for diabetes tasks, and parenting style, specifically coercion and autonomy support, for adherence in pediatric chronic illness management. Longitudinal research is needed to better understand how and why dimensions of involvement (e.g., responsibility, monitoring, support) vary over time and whether they impact outcomes differentially. PMID:26866945

  2. From Trust in Automation to Decision Neuroscience: Applying Cognitive Neuroscience Methods to Understand and Improve Interaction Decisions Involved in Human Automation Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Drnec, Kim; Marathe, Amar R.; Lukos, Jamie R.; Metcalfe, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Human automation interaction (HAI) systems have thus far failed to live up to expectations mainly because human users do not always interact with the automation appropriately. Trust in automation (TiA) has been considered a central influence on the way a human user interacts with an automation; if TiA is too high there will be overuse, if TiA is too low there will be disuse. However, even though extensive research into TiA has identified specific HAI behaviors, or trust outcomes, a unique mapping between trust states and trust outcomes has yet to be clearly identified. Interaction behaviors have been intensely studied in the domain of HAI and TiA and this has led to a reframing of the issues of problems with HAI in terms of reliance and compliance. We find the behaviorally defined terms reliance and compliance to be useful in their functionality for application in real-world situations. However, we note that once an inappropriate interaction behavior has occurred it is too late to mitigate it. We therefore take a step back and look at the interaction decision that precedes the behavior. We note that the decision neuroscience community has revealed that decisions are fairly stereotyped processes accompanied by measurable psychophysiological correlates. Two literatures were therefore reviewed. TiA literature was extensively reviewed in order to understand the relationship between TiA and trust outcomes, as well as to identify gaps in current knowledge. We note that an interaction decision precedes an interaction behavior and believe that we can leverage knowledge of the psychophysiological correlates of decisions to improve joint system performance. As we believe that understanding the interaction decision will be critical to the eventual mitigation of inappropriate interaction behavior, we reviewed the decision making literature and provide a synopsis of the state of the art understanding of the decision process from a decision neuroscience perspective. We forward

  3. From Trust in Automation to Decision Neuroscience: Applying Cognitive Neuroscience Methods to Understand and Improve Interaction Decisions Involved in Human Automation Interaction.

    PubMed

    Drnec, Kim; Marathe, Amar R; Lukos, Jamie R; Metcalfe, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    Human automation interaction (HAI) systems have thus far failed to live up to expectations mainly because human users do not always interact with the automation appropriately. Trust in automation (TiA) has been considered a central influence on the way a human user interacts with an automation; if TiA is too high there will be overuse, if TiA is too low there will be disuse. However, even though extensive research into TiA has identified specific HAI behaviors, or trust outcomes, a unique mapping between trust states and trust outcomes has yet to be clearly identified. Interaction behaviors have been intensely studied in the domain of HAI and TiA and this has led to a reframing of the issues of problems with HAI in terms of reliance and compliance. We find the behaviorally defined terms reliance and compliance to be useful in their functionality for application in real-world situations. However, we note that once an inappropriate interaction behavior has occurred it is too late to mitigate it. We therefore take a step back and look at the interaction decision that precedes the behavior. We note that the decision neuroscience community has revealed that decisions are fairly stereotyped processes accompanied by measurable psychophysiological correlates. Two literatures were therefore reviewed. TiA literature was extensively reviewed in order to understand the relationship between TiA and trust outcomes, as well as to identify gaps in current knowledge. We note that an interaction decision precedes an interaction behavior and believe that we can leverage knowledge of the psychophysiological correlates of decisions to improve joint system performance. As we believe that understanding the interaction decision will be critical to the eventual mitigation of inappropriate interaction behavior, we reviewed the decision making literature and provide a synopsis of the state of the art understanding of the decision process from a decision neuroscience perspective. We forward

  4. From Trust in Automation to Decision Neuroscience: Applying Cognitive Neuroscience Methods to Understand and Improve Interaction Decisions Involved in Human Automation Interaction.

    PubMed

    Drnec, Kim; Marathe, Amar R; Lukos, Jamie R; Metcalfe, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    Human automation interaction (HAI) systems have thus far failed to live up to expectations mainly because human users do not always interact with the automation appropriately. Trust in automation (TiA) has been considered a central influence on the way a human user interacts with an automation; if TiA is too high there will be overuse, if TiA is too low there will be disuse. However, even though extensive research into TiA has identified specific HAI behaviors, or trust outcomes, a unique mapping between trust states and trust outcomes has yet to be clearly identified. Interaction behaviors have been intensely studied in the domain of HAI and TiA and this has led to a reframing of the issues of problems with HAI in terms of reliance and compliance. We find the behaviorally defined terms reliance and compliance to be useful in their functionality for application in real-world situations. However, we note that once an inappropriate interaction behavior has occurred it is too late to mitigate it. We therefore take a step back and look at the interaction decision that precedes the behavior. We note that the decision neuroscience community has revealed that decisions are fairly stereotyped processes accompanied by measurable psychophysiological correlates. Two literatures were therefore reviewed. TiA literature was extensively reviewed in order to understand the relationship between TiA and trust outcomes, as well as to identify gaps in current knowledge. We note that an interaction decision precedes an interaction behavior and believe that we can leverage knowledge of the psychophysiological correlates of decisions to improve joint system performance. As we believe that understanding the interaction decision will be critical to the eventual mitigation of inappropriate interaction behavior, we reviewed the decision making literature and provide a synopsis of the state of the art understanding of the decision process from a decision neuroscience perspective. We forward

  5. Quantitative Prediction of Drug–Drug Interactions Involving Inhibitory Metabolites in Drug Development: How Can Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Help?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Mao, J; Lin, J; Yu, H; Peters, S; Shebley, M

    2016-01-01

    This subteam under the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group (Innovation and Quality Consortium) investigated the quantitative role of circulating inhibitory metabolites in drug–drug interactions using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Three drugs with major circulating inhibitory metabolites (amiodarone, gemfibrozil, and sertraline) were systematically evaluated in addition to the literature review of recent examples. The application of PBPK modeling in drug interactions by inhibitory parent–metabolite pairs is described and guidance on strategic application is provided. PMID:27642087

  6. A mammalian germ cell-specific RNA-binding protein interacts with ubiquitously expressed proteins involved in splice site selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, David J.; Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Klink, Albrecht; Stévenin, James; Cooke, Howard J.

    2000-05-01

    RNA-binding motif (RBM) genes are found on all mammalian Y chromosomes and are implicated in spermatogenesis. Within human germ cells, RBM protein shows a similar nuclear distribution to components of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. To address the function of RBM, we have used protein-protein interaction assays to test for possible physical interactions between these proteins. We find that RBM protein directly interacts with members of the SR family of splicing factors and, in addition, strongly interacts with itself. We have mapped the protein domains responsible for mediating these interactions and expressed the mouse RBM interaction region as a bacterial fusion protein. This fusion protein can pull-down several functionally active SR protein species from cell extracts. Depletion and add-back experiments indicate that these SR proteins are the only splicing factors bound by RBM which are required for the splicing of a panel of pre-mRNAs. Our results suggest that RBM protein is an evolutionarily conserved mammalian splicing regulator which operates as a germ cell-specific cofactor for more ubiquitously expressed pre-mRNA splicing activators.

  7. An ESRG-interacting protein, COXII, is involved in pro-apoptosis of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia; Ren, Caiping; Liu, Hui; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Wei; Liu, Weidong; Liu, Jie; Liu, Yanyu; Xia, Xiaomeng; Xu, Rong; Jiang, Xingjun

    2015-05-01

    Human embryonic stem cells(hESC) posses very promising application perspective in clinical transplant therapies for their characteristics of self-renewal and pluripotency. So efforts focusing on the mechanisms of the two characteristics are extremely important. ESRG, first identified by our group, is a candidate stemness gene of hESC for its much higher expression level in hESC comparing to that in 7-day embryoid bodies(EBs). Here, the proteins interacted with ESRG and its functions in hESC were explored. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening system was adopted to explore the interacting proteins of ESRG. Then Co-IP was performed to confirm the interactions between candidate proteins and ESRG. At last, the functions of validated interacting protein were explored by RNA interference(RNAi) and Western blot(WB). There were no autonomous activation and toxicity in the Y2H system, which verified its availability. Four candidate proteins, AAMP, DDT, GNB2L1 and COXII, were discovered, and the interaction between ESRG and COXII was ultimately confirmed. The expression of COXII in hESC was suppressed by siRNA, and the inhibited mitochondrial apoptosis was observed in hESC with downregulated COXII expression. Our work first validated the interaction between ESRG and COXII, and demonstrated that COXII serves as a pro-apoptotic protein in hESC. The results implied that ESRG may play an important role in regulating the apoptosis of hESC by interacting with COXII, and thus contribute a lot to the maintenance of hESC characteristics. PMID:25748575

  8. Development of a genetic system for Marinobacter adhaerens HP15 involved in marine aggregate formation by interacting with diatom cells.

    PubMed

    Sonnenschein, Eva C; Gärdes, Astrid; Seebah, Shalin; Torres-Monroy, Ingrid; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2011-11-01

    Diatom aggregation is substantial for organic carbon flux from the photic zone to deeper waters. Many heterotrophic bacteria ubiquitously found in diverse marine environments interact with marine algae and thus impact organic matter and energy cycling in the ocean. In particular, Marinobacter adhaerens HP15 induces aggregate formation while interacting with the diatom, Thalassiosira weissflogii. To study this effect at the molecular level, a genetic tool system was developed for strain HP15. The antibiotic susceptibility spectrum of this organism was determined and electroporation and conjugation protocols were established. Among various plasmids of different incompatibility groups, only two were shown to replicate in M. adhaerens. 1.4×10(-3) transconjugants per recipient were obtained for a broad-host-range vector. Electroporation efficiency corresponded to 1.1×10(5)CFU per μg of DNA. Transposon and gene-specific mutageneses were conducted for flagellum biosynthetic genes. Mutant phenotypes were confirmed by swimming assay and microscopy. Successful expression of two reporter genes in strain HP15 revealed useful tools for gene expression analyses, which will allow studying diverse bacteria-algae interactions at the molecular level and hence to gain a mechanistic understanding of micro-scale processes underlying ocean basin-scale processes. This study is the first report for the genetic manipulation of a Marinobacter species which specifically interacts with marine diatoms and serves as model to additionally analyze various previously reported Marinobacter-algae interactions in depth. PMID:21880271

  9. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided. PMID:12165187

  10. Interaction of human mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria: its involvement in the dynamics of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is a key regulator of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). TFAM interacts with itself and forms dimers; however, the precise interaction domain in vivo has not yet been determined. We herein showed that human TFAM formed oligomers in mitochondria by in situ chemical cross-linking. We used the separated fluorescent protein, monomeric Kusabira-Green, as a reporter to monitor their self-association in mitochondria. This reporter successfully detected the TFAM-TFAM interaction in cells as fluorescent signals on mitochondria. We also found that the N-terminal high-mobility group box domain was sufficient for this interaction. The expression of the dimer-defective mutant induced enlarged mtDNA nucleoids, suggesting the importance of dimerization in the distribution of mtDNA. The reporter system also supported the association and mixture between independent nucleoids through TFAM by a cell fusion assay using hemagglutinating virus of Japan. We here, for the first time, visualized the interaction of TFAM molecules in mitochondria and proposed its implications for the dynamics of mtDNA nucleoids.

  11. Development of a genetic system for Marinobacter adhaerens HP15 involved in marine aggregate formation by interacting with diatom cells.

    PubMed

    Sonnenschein, Eva C; Gärdes, Astrid; Seebah, Shalin; Torres-Monroy, Ingrid; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2011-11-01

    Diatom aggregation is substantial for organic carbon flux from the photic zone to deeper waters. Many heterotrophic bacteria ubiquitously found in diverse marine environments interact with marine algae and thus impact organic matter and energy cycling in the ocean. In particular, Marinobacter adhaerens HP15 induces aggregate formation while interacting with the diatom, Thalassiosira weissflogii. To study this effect at the molecular level, a genetic tool system was developed for strain HP15. The antibiotic susceptibility spectrum of this organism was determined and electroporation and conjugation protocols were established. Among various plasmids of different incompatibility groups, only two were shown to replicate in M. adhaerens. 1.4×10(-3) transconjugants per recipient were obtained for a broad-host-range vector. Electroporation efficiency corresponded to 1.1×10(5)CFU per μg of DNA. Transposon and gene-specific mutageneses were conducted for flagellum biosynthetic genes. Mutant phenotypes were confirmed by swimming assay and microscopy. Successful expression of two reporter genes in strain HP15 revealed useful tools for gene expression analyses, which will allow studying diverse bacteria-algae interactions at the molecular level and hence to gain a mechanistic understanding of micro-scale processes underlying ocean basin-scale processes. This study is the first report for the genetic manipulation of a Marinobacter species which specifically interacts with marine diatoms and serves as model to additionally analyze various previously reported Marinobacter-algae interactions in depth.

  12. A statistical mechanical calculation of the thermodynamic properties of interstitial solid solutions involving second nearest neighbor interactions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alex, K.; Mclellan, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    A previous calculation of the thermodynamic properties of interstitial solid solutions based on the technique of Kirkwood expansions has been extended to include the effects of second nearest neighbor solute atom mutual interactions. The error inherent in the first order (or quasi-chemical) counting of the degeneracy of the solution crystal is avoided. It is shown that, at high temperatures, even strong second nearest neighbor solute mutual interactions have a negligible effect on the entropy of the solution and a small, temperature-dependent effect on the solute partial enthalpy.

  13. Interaction of Artocarpus lectins with human IgA does not involve asparagine-linked oligosaccharide of the immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Kobayashi, K; Taniguchi, N

    1992-07-01

    In view of the controversy with respect to the interaction of jacalin with human IgA2, a study was undertaken to assess the reactivity of the Artocarpus heterophyllus lectin, as well as the lectin from Artocarpus integer (lectin C), with subclasses of human immunoglobulin A by ELISA. Our data is consistent with the view that Artocarpus lectins have no affinity for the IgA2 immunoglobulins. In further support of the findings, we have established that N-linked oligosaccharide moieties of IgA have no significant bearing in the lectin-immunoglobulin binding. Interaction was also not affected in the presence of 1% (w/v) BSA.

  14. NuMA localization, stability, and function in spindle orientation involve 4.1 and Cdk1 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Poulson, Nicholas D.; Foote, Henry P.; Lechler, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The epidermis is a multilayered epithelium that requires asymmetric divisions for stratification. A conserved cortical protein complex, including LGN, nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA), and dynein/dynactin, plays a key role in establishing proper spindle orientation during asymmetric divisions. The requirements for the cortical recruitment of these proteins, however, remain unclear. In this work, we show that NuMA is required to recruit dynactin to the cell cortex of keratinocytes. NuMA's cortical recruitment requires LGN; however, LGN interactions are not sufficient for this localization. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that the 4.1-binding domain of NuMA is important for stabilizing its interaction with the cell cortex. This is functionally important, as loss of 4.1/NuMA interaction results in spindle orientation defects, using two distinct assays. Furthermore, we observe an increase in cortical NuMA localization as cells enter anaphase. Inhibition of Cdk1 or mutation of a single residue in NuMA mimics this effect. NuMA's anaphase localization is independent of LGN and 4.1 interactions, revealing two distinct mechanisms responsible for NuMA cortical recruitment at different stages of mitosis. This work highlights the complexity of NuMA localization and reveals the importance of NuMA cortical stability for productive force generation during spindle orientation. PMID:24109598

  15. Docking and free energy simulations to predict conformational domains involved in hCG-LH receptor interactions using recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Railkar, Reema; Dighe, Rajan R

    2011-11-01

    Single chain fragment variables (ScFvs) have been extensively employed in studying the protein-protein interactions. ScFvs derived from phage display libraries have an additional advantage of being generated against a native antigen, circumventing loss of information on conformational epitopes. In the present study, an attempt has been made to elucidate human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor interactions by using a neutral and two inhibitory ScFvs against hCG. The objective was to dock a computationally derived model of these ScFvs onto the crystal structure of hCG and understand the differential roles of the mapped epitopes in hCG-LH receptor interactions. An anti-hCG ScFv, whose epitope was mapped previously using biochemical tools, served as the positive control for assessing the quality of docking analysis. To evaluate the role of specific side chains at the hCG-ScFv interface, binding free energy as well as residue interaction energies of complexes in solution were calculated using molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area method after performing the molecular dynamic simulations on the selected hCG-ScFv models and validated using biochemical and SPR analysis. The robustness of these calculations was demonstrated by comparing the theoretically determined binding energies with the experimentally obtained kinetic parameters for hCG-ScFv complexes. Superimposition of hCG-ScFv model onto a model of hCG complexed with the 51-266 residues of LH receptor revealed importance of the residues previously thought to be unimportant for hormone binding and response. This analysis provides an alternate tool for understanding the structure-function analysis of ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:21989932

  16. The Xanthomonas citri effector protein PthA interacts with citrus proteins involved in nuclear transport, protein folding and ubiquitination associated with DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Mariane Noronha; De Souza, Tiago Antonio; Cernadas, Raúl Andrés; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza Peixoto; Docena, Cássia; Farah, Chuck Shaker; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2010-09-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri utilizes the type III effector protein PthA to modulate host transcription to promote citrus canker. PthA proteins belong to the AvrBs3/PthA family and carry a domain comprising tandem repeats of 34 amino acids that mediates protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. We show here that variants of PthAs from a single bacterial strain localize to the nucleus of plant cells and form homo- and heterodimers through the association of their repeat regions. We hypothesize that the PthA variants might also interact with distinct host targets. Here, in addition to the interaction with alpha-importin, known to mediate the nuclear import of AvrBs3, we describe new interactions of PthAs with citrus proteins involved in protein folding and K63-linked ubiquitination. PthAs 2 and 3 preferentially interact with a citrus cyclophilin (Cyp) and with TDX, a tetratricopeptide domain-containing thioredoxin. In addition, PthAs 2 and 3, but not 1 and 4, interact with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex formed by Ubc13 and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant (Uev), required for K63-linked ubiquitination and DNA repair. We show that Cyp, TDX and Uev interact with each other, and that Cyp and Uev localize to the nucleus of plant cells. Furthermore, the citrus Ubc13 and Uev proteins complement the DNA repair phenotype of the yeast Deltaubc13 and Deltamms2/uev1a mutants, strongly indicating that they are also involved in K63-linked ubiquitination and DNA repair. Notably, PthA 2 affects the growth of yeast cells in the presence of a DNA damage agent, suggesting that it inhibits K63-linked ubiquitination required for DNA repair.

  17. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio; Saggio, Isabella

    2016-08-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence.

  18. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  19. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio; Saggio, Isabella

    2016-08-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  20. Older adults catch up to younger adults on a learning and memory task that involves collaborative social interaction.

    PubMed

    Derksen, B J; Duff, M C; Weldon, K; Zhang, J; Zamba, K D; Tranel, D; Denburg, N L

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory abilities tend to decline as people age. The current study examines the question of whether a learning situation that emphasises collaborative social interaction might help older persons overcome age-related learning and memory changes and thus perform similarly to younger persons. Younger and Older participants (n = 34 in each group) completed the Barrier Task (BT), a game-like social interaction where partners work together to develop labels for a set of abstract tangrams. Participants were also administered standard clinical neuropsychological measures of memory, on which the Older group showed expected inferiority to the Younger group. On the BT, the Older group performed less well than the Younger group early on, but as the task progressed, the performance of the Older group caught up and became statistically indistinguishable from that of the Younger group. These results can be taken to suggest that a learning milieu characterised by collaborative social interaction can attenuate some of the typical memory disadvantages associated with being older.

  1. OLDER ADULTS CATCH UP TO YOUNGER ADULTS ON A LEARNING AND MEMORY TASK THAT INVOLVES COLLABORATIVE SOCIAL INTERACTION

    PubMed Central

    Derksen, B.J.; Duff, M.C.; Weldon, K.; Zhang, J.; Zamba, G.; Tranel, D.; Denburg, N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory abilities tend to decline as people age. The current study examines the question of whether a learning situation that emphasizes collaborative social interaction might help older persons overcome age-related learning and memory changes and thus perform similarly to younger persons. Younger and Older participants (n = 34 in each group) completed the Barrier Task, a game-like social interaction where partners work together to develop labels for a set of abstract tangrams. Participants were also administered standard clinical neuropsychological measures of memory, on which the Older group showed expected inferiority to the Younger group. On the Barrier Task, the Older group performed less well than the Younger group early on, but as the task progressed, the performance of the Older group caught up and became statistically indistinguishable from that of the Younger group. These results can be taken to suggest that a learning milieu characterized by collaborative social interaction can attenuate some of the typical memory disadvantages associated with being older. PMID:24841619

  2. Structural and Functional Characterization of CRM1-Nup214 Interactions Reveals Multiple FG-Binding Sites Involved in Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Port, Sarah A; Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Spillner, Christiane; Hofele, Romina; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2015-10-27

    CRM1 is the major nuclear export receptor. During translocation through the nuclear pore, transport complexes transiently interact with phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats of multiple nucleoporins. On the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore, CRM1 tightly interacts with the nucleoporin Nup214. Here, we present the crystal structure of a 117-amino-acid FG-repeat-containing fragment of Nup214, in complex with CRM1, Snurportin 1, and RanGTP at 2.85 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight binding sites for Nup214 FG motifs on CRM1, with intervening stretches that are loosely attached to the transport receptor. Nup214 binds to N- and C-terminal regions of CRM1, thereby clamping CRM1 in a closed conformation and stabilizing the export complex. The role of conserved hydrophobic pockets for the recognition of FG motifs was analyzed in biochemical and cell-based assays. Comparative studies with RanBP3 and Nup62 shed light on specificities of CRM1-nucleoporin binding, which serves as a paradigm for transport receptor-nucleoporin interactions.

  3. The Thymic Orchestration Involving Aire, miRNAs, and Cell-Cell Interactions during the Induction of Central Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Passos, Geraldo Aleixo; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas; Oliveira, Ernna Hérida

    2015-01-01

    Developing thymocytes interact sequentially with two distinct structures within the thymus: the cortex and medulla. Surviving single-positive and double-positive thymocytes from the cortex migrate into the medulla, where they interact with medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). These cells ectopically express a vast set of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs), a property termed promiscuous gene expression that is associated with the presentation of PTAs by mTECs to thymocytes. Thymocyte clones that have a high affinity for PTAs are eliminated by apoptosis in a process termed negative selection, which is essential for tolerance induction. The Aire gene is an important factor that controls the expression of a large set of PTAs. In addition to PTAs, Aire also controls the expression of miRNAs in mTECs. These miRNAs are important in the organization of the thymic architecture and act as posttranscriptional controllers of PTAs. Herein, we discuss recent discoveries and highlight open questions regarding the migration and interaction of developing thymocytes with thymic stroma, the ectopic expression of PTAs by mTECs, the association between Aire and miRNAs and its effects on central tolerance.

  4. The carboxy-terminal extension of the collagen binding domain of fibronectin mediates interaction with a 165 kDa membrane protein involved in odontoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lesot, H; Fausser, J L; Akiyama, S K; Staub, A; Black, D; Kubler, M D; Ruch, J V

    1992-03-01

    Terminal differentiation of the odontoblast is characterized by an elongation and a polarization of the cell. The change in the cell shape and the reorganization of the cytoplasm involve the microfilament system. An immunological approach has previously implicated a transmembrane interaction between fibronectin and vinculin in the control of odontoblast differentiation. A 165 kDa protein localized on the cell-surface of odontoblasts mediated this interaction. In order to define the nature of the interaction of the 165 kDa protein with fibronectin, peptides were prepared by proteolytic cleavage of fibronectin with alpha-chymotrypsin. The results indicate that the 165 kDa protein interacted with a 62 kDa peptide located towards the amino-terminal extremity of fibronectin, but not with a 47 kDa related fragment. Both these 62 kDa and 47 kDa peptides included the collagen-binding domain and were retarded on a heparin-Ultrogel column. Microsequences demonstrated that the 62 kDa and 47 kDa fragments had the same amino-terminal extremity and that the larger fragment was extended in the carboxy-terminal direction. This carboxy-terminal extension of the collagen binding domain of fibronectin is implicated in the interaction of this molecule with the 165 kDa protein. On the other hand, odontoblasts differentiated normally when tooth germs were cultured in the presence of GRGDS synthetic peptide, suggesting that RGD-dependent integrins were not involved in odontoblast differentiation. Staining of dental mesenchymal cells in primary culture and of differentiated odontoblasts in situ with antibodies directed against the beta 1-subunit of integrins confirmed previous observations and showed that although beta 1 integrins are involved in the attachment of cultured dental cells, they are not implicated in the process of odontoblast differentiation. PMID:1597256

  5. Investigation of scattering processes in quantum few-body systems involving long-range interaction by the complex-rotation method

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, M. V.; Elander, N.; Yakovlev, S. L. Yarevsky, E. A.

    2013-02-15

    The complex-rotation method adapted to solving the multichannel scattering problem in the two-body system where the interaction potential contains the long-range Coulomb components is described. The scattering problem is reformulated as the problem of solving a nonhomogeneous Schroedinger equation in which the nonhomogeneous term involves a Coulomb potential cut off at large distances. The incident wave appearing in the nonhomogeneous term is a solution of the Schroedinger equation with longrange Coulomb interaction. This formulation is free from approximations associated with a direct cutoff of Coulomb interaction at large distances. The efficiency of this formalism is demonstrated by considering the example of solving scattering problems in the {alpha}-{alpha} and p-p systems.

  6. Prolactin Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with NS4B

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingbao; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakamura, Mariko; Aoyagi, Haruyo; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Arita, Minetaro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein triggers the membranous HCV replication compartment, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we screened for NS4B-associated membrane proteins by tandem affinity purification and proteome analysis and identified 202 host proteins. Subsequent screening of replicon cells with small interfering RNA identified prolactin regulatory element binding (PREB) to be a novel HCV host cofactor. The interaction between PREB and NS4B was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assays. PREB colocalized with double-stranded RNA and the newly synthesized HCV RNA labeled with bromouridine triphosphate in HCV replicon cells. Furthermore, PREB shifted to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), where HCV replication complexes reside, in the presence of NS4B expression in Huh7 cells. However, a PREB mutant lacking the NS4B-binding region (PREBd3) could not colocalize with double-stranded RNA and did not shift to the DRM in the presence of NS4B. These results indicate that PREB locates at the HCV replication complex by interacting with NS4B. PREB silencing inhibited the formation of the membranous HCV replication compartment and increased the protease and nuclease sensitivity of HCV replicase proteins and RNA in DRMs, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that PREB promotes HCV RNA replication by participating in the formation of the membranous replication compartment and by maintaining its proper structure by interacting with NS4B. Furthermore, PREB was induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into HCV host cofactors. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS4B can induce alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of a membranous web structure, which provides a platform for the HCV replication complex. The molecular mechanism by which NS4B induces the membranous HCV replication

  7. An Armadillo Motif in Ufd3 Interacts with Cdc48 and is Involved in Ubiquitin Homeostasis and Protein Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G.; Li, G; Schindelin, H; Lennarz, W

    2009-01-01

    The yeast AAA-ATPase Cdc48 and the ubiquitin fusion degradation (UFD) proteins play important, evolutionarily conserved roles in ubiquitin dependent protein degradation. The N-terminal domain of Cdc48 interacts with substrate-recruiting cofactors, whereas the C terminus of Cdc48 binds to proteins such as Ufd3 that process substrates. Ufd3 is essential for efficient protein degradation and for maintaining cellular ubiquitin levels. This protein contains an N-terminal WD40 domain, a central ubiquitin-binding domain, and a C-terminal Cdc48-binding PUL domain. The crystal structure of the PUL domain reveals an Armadillo repeat with high structural similarity to importin-a, and the Cdc48-binding site could be mapped to the concave surface of the PUL domain by biochemical studies. Alterations of the Cdc48 binding site of Ufd3 by site-directed mutagenesis resulted in a depletion of cellular ubiquitin pools and reduced activity of the ubiquitin fusion degradation pathway. Therefore, our data provide direct evidence that the functions of Ufd3 in ubiquitin homeostasis and protein degradation depend on its interaction with the C terminus of Cdc48.

  8. CNS toxicity involving methylene blue: the exemplar for understanding and predicting drug interactions that precipitate serotonin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gillman, P Ken

    2011-03-01

    Methylene blue has only recently been noted to cause severe central nervous system toxicity. Methylene blue is used for various conditions, including, intravenously, in methemoglobinemia, vasoplegia and as an aid to parathyroidectomy (at doses of 1-7.5 mg kg(-1)). This review of the current evidence concludes that 13 of 14 of the reported cases of CNS toxicity were serotonin toxicity that met the Hunter Serotonin Toxicity Criteria. That has important preventative and treatment implications. Serotonin toxicity is precipitated by the monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) property of methylene blue interacting with serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Serotonin toxicity is reviewed, using the lessons inherent in the methylene blue story and experience, to illustrate how the mechanisms and potency of serotonergic drugs interact to determine severity. Recent human data showed that an intravenous dose of only 0.75 mg kg(-1) of methylene blue produced a peak plasma concentration of 500 ng ml(-1) (1.6 µM), indicating that the concentration in the central nervous system reaches a level that inhibits monoamine oxidase A. That is consonant with the actual occurrence of severe serotonin toxicity in humans at the dose of only 1 mg kg(-1). It seems that all proposed uses of methylene blue entail levels that block monoamine oxidase, so cessation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors should be very carefully considered before using methylene blue.

  9. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants

    PubMed Central

    Hollman, Antoinesha L.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Huang, Hung-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases. PMID:27043589

  10. Interspecific interactions involving Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and Agistemus brasiliensis (Acari: Stigmaeidae) as predators of Brevipalpus phoenicis (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcos Zatti; Sato, Mário Eidi; de Oliveira, Carlos Amadeu Leite; Nicastro, Roberto Lomba

    2015-03-01

    Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) is associated with the transmission of Citrus leprosis which is considered the main viral disease for the Brazilian citrus production. Mites of the families Stigmaeidae and Phytoseiidae coexist in various agricultural crops, often promoting the biological control of pest mites. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) (Phytoseiidae) and Agistemus brasiliensis Matioli, Ueckermann & Oliveira (Stigmaeidae), in the presence or absence of B. phoenicis. Two experiments were carried out. In the first, a N. californicus female was placed in each leaf disc arena, with eggs of B. phoenicis and A. brasiliensis as food sources. In the second, an A. brasiliensis female was placed in each arena, with eggs of B. phoenicis and N. californicus as food sources. Adults of both predators were able to consume both types of eggs available as food sources, but they fed on considerably higher proportions of B. phoenicis than on eggs of the predator. Eggs of A. brasiliensis were not a suitable food source for N. californicus, which produced only 0.1 egg per female per day when only eggs of that species were present in the experimental unit. The results suggest that eggs of N. californicus were a suitable food source for A. brasiliensis, which oviposited 1.12 eggs per day, when only eggs of N. californicus were provided to the stigmaeid mite. The possible interactions among N. californicus, A. brasiliensis and B. phoenicis in citrus orchards are discussed.

  11. Interspecific interactions involving Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and Agistemus brasiliensis (Acari: Stigmaeidae) as predators of Brevipalpus phoenicis (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcos Zatti; Sato, Mário Eidi; de Oliveira, Carlos Amadeu Leite; Nicastro, Roberto Lomba

    2015-03-01

    Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) is associated with the transmission of Citrus leprosis which is considered the main viral disease for the Brazilian citrus production. Mites of the families Stigmaeidae and Phytoseiidae coexist in various agricultural crops, often promoting the biological control of pest mites. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) (Phytoseiidae) and Agistemus brasiliensis Matioli, Ueckermann & Oliveira (Stigmaeidae), in the presence or absence of B. phoenicis. Two experiments were carried out. In the first, a N. californicus female was placed in each leaf disc arena, with eggs of B. phoenicis and A. brasiliensis as food sources. In the second, an A. brasiliensis female was placed in each arena, with eggs of B. phoenicis and N. californicus as food sources. Adults of both predators were able to consume both types of eggs available as food sources, but they fed on considerably higher proportions of B. phoenicis than on eggs of the predator. Eggs of A. brasiliensis were not a suitable food source for N. californicus, which produced only 0.1 egg per female per day when only eggs of that species were present in the experimental unit. The results suggest that eggs of N. californicus were a suitable food source for A. brasiliensis, which oviposited 1.12 eggs per day, when only eggs of N. californicus were provided to the stigmaeid mite. The possible interactions among N. californicus, A. brasiliensis and B. phoenicis in citrus orchards are discussed. PMID:25524512

  12. Optimization of photosynthesis by multiple metabolic pathways involving interorganelle interactions: resource sharing and ROS maintenance as the bases.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Bobba; Talla, Sai K; Aswani, Vetcha; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2013-11-01

    The bioenergetic processes of photosynthesis and respiration are mutually beneficial. Their interaction extends to photorespiration, which is linked to optimize photosynthesis. The interplay of these three pathways is facilitated by two major phenomena: sharing of energy/metabolite resources and maintenance of optimal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The resource sharing among different compartments of plant cells is based on the production/utilization of reducing equivalents (NADPH, NADH) and ATP as well as on the metabolite exchange. The responsibility of generating the cellular requirements of ATP and NAD(P)H is mostly by the chloroplasts and mitochondria. In turn, besides the chloroplasts, the mitochondria, cytosol and peroxisomes are common sinks for reduced equivalents. Transporters located in membranes ensure the coordinated movement of metabolites across the cellular compartments. The present review emphasizes the beneficial interactions among photosynthesis, dark respiration and photorespiration, in relation to metabolism of C, N and S. Since the bioenergetic reactions tend to generate ROS, the cells modulate chloroplast and mitochondrial reactions, so as to ensure that the ROS levels do not rise to toxic levels. The patterns of minimization of ROS production and scavenging of excess ROS in intracellular compartments are highlighted. Some of the emerging developments are pointed out, such as model plants, orientation/movement of organelles and metabolomics.

  13. Intermolecular interactions involving C-H bonds, 3, Structure and energetics of the interaction between CH{sub 4} and CN{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Williams, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    On the basis of SCF and single reference MP2 calculations, the full potential energy surface of the interaction between CH{sub 4} and CN{sup {minus}} was studied using extended basis sets of up to near Hartree-Fock limit quality. Colinear arrangements C-N{sup {minus}}{hor_ellipsis}H-CH{sub 3} and N-C{sup {minus}}{hor_ellipsis}H-CH{sub 3} are found to be the only two energy minima. The binding energies of these two structures are calculated to be 2.5 and 2.1 kcal/mol, respectively, at the MP2 level. The full vibrational analyses of two structures show a red shift of about 30 cm{sup {minus}1} for the v{sub s} C-H stretching.

  14. Scale up issues involved with the ceramic waste form : ceramic-container interactions and ceramic cracking quantification.

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, K. J.; DiSanto, T.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; O'Holleran, T.; Riley, W. P., Jr.

    1999-05-03

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a process for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel to prepare the material for final disposal. Two waste streams will result from the treatment process, a stainless steel based form and a ceramic based form. The ceramic waste form will be enclosed in a stainless steel container. In order to assess the performance of the ceramic waste form in a repository two factors must be examined, the surface area increases caused by waste form cracking and any ceramic/canister interactions that may release toxic material. The results indicate that the surface area increases are less than the High Level Waste glass and any toxic releases are below regulatory limits.

  15. Identification of critical residues in Hepatitis E virus macro domain involved in its interaction with viral methyltransferase and ORF3 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anang, Saumya; Subramani, Chandru; Nair, Vidya P.; Kaul, Sheetal; Kaushik, Nidhi; Sharma, Chandresh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Ranjith-Kumar, CT; Surjit, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of hepatitis in normal and organ transplant individuals. HEV open reading frame-1 encodes a polypeptide comprising of the viral nonstructural proteins as well as domains of unknown function such as the macro domain (X-domain), V, DUF3729 and Y. The macro domain proteins are ubiquitously present from prokaryotes to human and in many positive-strand RNA viruses, playing important roles in multiple cellular processes. Towards understanding the function of the HEV macro domain, we characterized its interaction partners among other HEV encoded proteins. Here, we report that the HEV X-domain directly interacts with the viral methyltransferase and the ORF3 proteins. ORF3 association with the X-domain was mediated through two independent motifs, located within its N-terminal 35aa (amino acids) and C-terminal 63-123aa. Methyltransferase interaction domain was mapped to N-terminal 30-90aa. The X-domain interacted with both ORF3 and methyltransferase through its C-terminal region, involving 66th,67th isoleucine and 101st,102nd leucine, conserved across HEV genotypes. Furthermore, ORF3 and methyltransferase competed with each other for associating with the X-domain. These findings provide molecular understanding of the interaction between the HEV macro domain, methyltransferase and ORF3, suggesting an important role of the macro domain in the life cycle of HEV. PMID:27113483

  16. Identification of critical residues in Hepatitis E virus macro domain involved in its interaction with viral methyltransferase and ORF3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Anang, Saumya; Subramani, Chandru; Nair, Vidya P; Kaul, Sheetal; Kaushik, Nidhi; Sharma, Chandresh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Surjit, Milan

    2016-04-26

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of hepatitis in normal and organ transplant individuals. HEV open reading frame-1 encodes a polypeptide comprising of the viral nonstructural proteins as well as domains of unknown function such as the macro domain (X-domain), V, DUF3729 and Y. The macro domain proteins are ubiquitously present from prokaryotes to human and in many positive-strand RNA viruses, playing important roles in multiple cellular processes. Towards understanding the function of the HEV macro domain, we characterized its interaction partners among other HEV encoded proteins. Here, we report that the HEV X-domain directly interacts with the viral methyltransferase and the ORF3 proteins. ORF3 association with the X-domain was mediated through two independent motifs, located within its N-terminal 35aa (amino acids) and C-terminal 63-123aa. Methyltransferase interaction domain was mapped to N-terminal 30-90aa. The X-domain interacted with both ORF3 and methyltransferase through its C-terminal region, involving 66(th),67(th) isoleucine and 101(st),102(nd) leucine, conserved across HEV genotypes. Furthermore, ORF3 and methyltransferase competed with each other for associating with the X-domain. These findings provide molecular understanding of the interaction between the HEV macro domain, methyltransferase and ORF3, suggesting an important role of the macro domain in the life cycle of HEV.

  17. Detection of and Response to Signals Involved in Host-Microbe Interactions by Plant-Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brencic, Anja; Winans, Stephen C.

    2005-01-01

    Diverse interactions between hosts and microbes are initiated by the detection of host-released chemical signals. Detection of these signals leads to altered patterns of gene expression that culminate in specific and adaptive changes in bacterial physiology that are required for these associations. This concept was first demonstrated for the members of the family Rhizobiaceae and was later found to apply to many other plant-associated bacteria as well as to microbes that colonize human and animal hosts. The family Rhizobiaceae includes various genera of rhizobia as well as species of Agrobacterium. Rhizobia are symbionts of legumes, which fix nitrogen within root nodules, while Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a pathogen that causes crown gall tumors on a wide variety of plants. The plant-released signals that are recognized by these bacteria are low-molecular-weight, diffusible molecules and are detected by the bacteria through specific receptor proteins. Similar phenomena are observed with other plant pathogens, including Pseudomonas syringae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Erwinia spp., although here the signals and signal receptors are not as well defined. In some cases, nutritional conditions such as iron limitation or the lack of nitrogen sources seem to provide a significant cue. While much has been learned about the process of host detection over the past 20 years, our knowledge is far from being complete. The complex nature of the plant-microbe interactions makes it extremely challenging to gain a comprehensive picture of host detection in natural environments, and thus many signals and signal recognition systems remain to be described. PMID:15755957

  18. Proteomic analysis of ACTN4-interacting proteins reveals it's a putative involvement in mRNA metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Khotin, Mikhail; Turoverova, Lidia; Aksenova, Vasilisa; Borutinskaite, Veronika Viktorija; Vener, Alexander; Bajenova, Olga; Pinaev, George P.; Tentler, Dmitri

    2010-06-25

    Alpha-actinin 4 (ACTN4) is an actin-binding protein. In the cytoplasm, ACTN4 participates in structural organisation of the cytoskeleton via cross-linking of actin filaments. Nuclear localisation of ACTN4 has also been reported, but no clear role in the nucleus has been established. In this report, we describe the identification of proteins associated with ACTN4 in the nucleus. A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry revealed a large number of ACTN4-bound proteins that are involved in various aspects of mRNA processing and transport. The association of ACTN4 with different ribonucleoproteins suggests that a major function of nuclear ACTN4 may be regulation of mRNA metabolism and signaling.

  19. Estimation of medium effects on equilibrium constants in moderate and high ionic strength solutions at elevated temperatures by using specific interaction theory (SIT): interaction coefficients involving Cl, OH- and Ac- up to 200 degrees C and 400 bars.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a series of interaction coefficients of the Brønsted-Guggenheim-Scatchard specific interaction theory (SIT) have been estimated up to 200 degrees C and 400 bars. The interaction coefficients involving Cl- estimated include epsilon(H+, Cl-), epsilon(Na+, Cl-), epsilon(Ag+, Cl-), epsilon(Na+, AgCl2 -), epsilon(Mg2+, Cl-), epsilon(Ca2+, Cl-), epsilon(Sr2+, Cl-), epsilon(Ba2+, Cl-), epsilon(Sm3+, Cl-), epsilon(Eu3+, Cl-), epsilon(Gd3+, Cl-), and epsilon(GdAc2+, Cl-). The interaction coefficients involving OH- estimated include epsilon(Li+, OH-), epsilon(K+, OH-), epsilon(Na+, OH-), epsilon(Cs+, OH-), epsilon(Sr2+, OH-), and epsilon(Ba2+, OH-). In addition, the interaction coefficients of epsilon(Na+, Ac-) and epsilon(Ca2+, Ac-) have also been estimated. The bulk of interaction coefficients presented in this study has been evaluated from the mean activity coefficients. A few of them have been estimated from the potentiometric and solubility studies. The above interaction coefficients are tested against both experimental mean activity coefficients and equilibrium quotients. Predicted mean activity coefficients are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Predicted equilibrium quotients are in very good agreement with experimental values. Based upon its relatively rapid attainment of equilibrium and the ease of determining magnesium concentrations, this study also proposes that the solubility of brucite can be used as a pH (pcH) buffer/sensor for experimental systems in NaCl solutions up to 200 degrees C by employing the predicted solubility quotients of brucite in conjunction with the dissociation quotients of water and the first hydrolysis quotients of Mg2+, all in NaCl solutions.

  20. Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Interact with Dietary Fat Intakes to Modulate the Plasma TG Response to a Fish Oil Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard-Mercier, Annie; Rudkowska, Iwona; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    A large inter-individual variability in the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation has been observed. The objective was to examine gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response after a fish oil supplementation, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes. Two hundred and eight (208) participants were recruited in the greater Quebec City area. The participants completed a six-week fish oil supplementation (5 g fish oil/day: 1.9–2.2 g EPA and 1.1 g DHA). Dietary fat intakes were measured using three-day food records. SNPs within RXRA, CPT1A, ACADVL, ACAA2, ABCD2, ACOX1 and ACAA1 genes were genotyped using TAQMAN methodology. Gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response were observed for SNPs within RXRA (rs11185660, rs10881576 and rs12339187) and ACOX1 (rs17583163) genes. For rs11185660, fold changes in RXRA gene expression levels were different depending on SFA intakes for homozygotes T/T. Gene-diet interaction effects of SNPs within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes may be important in understanding the inter-individual variability in plasma TG levels and in the plasma TG response to a fish oil supplementation. PMID:24647074

  1. Pairwise gibbs energies of interaction involving N-alkyl-2-pyrrolidinones and related compounds in aqueous solution obtained from kinetic medium effects

    PubMed

    Apperloo; Streefland; Engberts; Blandamer

    2000-01-28

    effects of PVP polymers on the three hydrolysis reactions have been examined. The data presented enhance the understanding of pairwise hydrophobic interactions in aqueous solutions. In addition the results provide insights into the interactions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration shells as well as into the energetics of amide hydration and interactions involving amides in aqueous solution, both playing important roles in protein stabilization.

  2. Bounce-resonance wave-particle interactions involving energetic ions and 2nd-harmonic ULF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Robert; Sydorenko, Dmytro; Wang, Chengrui

    2016-07-01

    Multi-point observations from Cluster show clear evidence of acceleration of H+ and O+ ions by large azimuthal mode number ULF waves. In this paper we present a quantitative comparison between these observations and results from a numerical model. The methodology consists of large-scale test-particle simulations of bounce-resonance wave-particle interactions in fields of second harmonic standing ULF waves. The ULF waves are specified using a recently developed three-dimensional model that can take dipolar and compressed dipole magnetic field configurations. Our test particle simulations confirm the theoretical treatment of bounce-resonance developed by Southwood and Kivelson, including the resonance condition that must be satisfied, as well as a phase change of Pi in the energy spectrum. We also find strong nonlinear behaviour for m-numbers between 40-100, and for azimuthal electric field strengths of a few tens of millivolts per metre. The test-particle simulations are able to reproduce energy-dispersed ion signatures observed by Cluster, opening the possibility to more fully understand the inter-relationship between ULF waves and ion energization and transport in the inner magnetosphere.

  3. Tax is involved in up-regulation of HMGB1 expression levels by interaction with C/EBP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen-Guang; Wang, Hui; Niu, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Yin, Ming-Mei; Gao, Zhi-Tao; Hu, Li-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a multifunctional cytokine-like molecule that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of tumors. In this study, real-time polymerase chain reactions and Western blot assays indicated that HMGB1 transcriptional activity and protein level are increased in Tax+-T cells (TaxP). To clarify the mechanisms, a series of HMGB1 deletion reporter plasmids (pHLuc1 to pHLuc6) were transfected into Tax--T cells (TaxN, Jurkat) and Tax+-T cells (TaxP). We found that promoter activity in Tax+-T cells to be higher than that in Tax--T cells, indicating a significant increase in pHLuc6. Bay11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor) treatment did not block the enhancing effect. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Tax was retained on a HMGB1 promoter fragment encompassing -1163 to -975. Bioinformatics analysis showed six characteristic cis-elements for CdxA, AP-1, AML-1a, USF, v-Myb, and C/EBP in the fragment in question. Mutation of cis- elements for C/EBP reduced significant HMGB1 promoter activity induced by Tax. These findings indicate that Tax enhances the expression of HMGB1 gene at the transcriptional level, possibly by interacting with C/EBP.

  4. Tax is involved in up-regulation of HMGB1 expression levels by interaction with C/EBP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen-Guang; Wang, Hui; Niu, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Yin, Ming-Mei; Gao, Zhi-Tao; Hu, Li-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a multifunctional cytokine-like molecule that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of tumors. In this study, real-time polymerase chain reactions and Western blot assays indicated that HMGB1 transcriptional activity and protein level are increased in Tax+-T cells (TaxP). To clarify the mechanisms, a series of HMGB1 deletion reporter plasmids (pHLuc1 to pHLuc6) were transfected into Tax--T cells (TaxN, Jurkat) and Tax+-T cells (TaxP). We found that promoter activity in Tax+-T cells to be higher than that in Tax--T cells, indicating a significant increase in pHLuc6. Bay11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor) treatment did not block the enhancing effect. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Tax was retained on a HMGB1 promoter fragment encompassing -1163 to -975. Bioinformatics analysis showed six characteristic cis-elements for CdxA, AP-1, AML-1a, USF, v-Myb, and C/EBP in the fragment in question. Mutation of cis- elements for C/EBP reduced significant HMGB1 promoter activity induced by Tax. These findings indicate that Tax enhances the expression of HMGB1 gene at the transcriptional level, possibly by interacting with C/EBP. PMID:23534754

  5. Functional groups of sialic acids involved in binding to siglecs (sialoadhesins) deduced from interactions with synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Kelm, S; Brossmer, R; Isecke, R; Gross, H J; Strenge, K; Schauer, R

    1998-08-01

    The siglecs, formerly called sialoadhesins, are a family of I-type lectins binding to sialic acids on the cell surface. Five members of this family have been identified: sialoadhesin, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Schwann cell myelin protein (SMP), CD22 and CD33. We have investigated the relevance of substituents at position C-9 and in the N-acetyl group of N-acetylneuraminic acid, using a series of synthetic sialic-acid analogues either on resialylated human erythrocytes or as free alpha-glycosides in hapten inhibition. All five siglecs require the hydroxy group at C-9 for binding, suggesting hydrogen bonding of this substituent with the binding site. Remarkable differences were found among the proteins in their specificity for modifications of the N-acetyl group. Whereas sialoadhesin, MAG and SMP do not tolerate a hydroxy group as in N-glycolylneuraminic acid, they bind to halogenated acetyl residues. In the case of MAG, N-fluoroacetylneuraminic acid is bound about 17-fold better than N-acetylneuraminic acid. In contrast, human and murine CD22 both show good affinity for N-glycolylneuraminic acid, but only human CD22 bound the halogenated compounds. In conclusion, our data indicate that interactions of the hydroxy group at position 9 and the N-acyl substituent contribute significantly to the binding strength. PMID:9738906

  6. TfR1 interacts with the IKK complex and is involved in IKK-NF-κB signalling.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Mudie, Sharon; Naron, Sanne; Rocha, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    The IKK [inhibitor of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) kinase] complex has an essential role in the activation of the family of NF-κB transcription factors in response to a variety of stimuli. To identify novel IKK-interacting proteins, we performed an unbiased proteomics screen where we identified TfR1 (transferrin receptor 1). TfR1 is required for transferrin binding and internalization and ultimately for iron homoeostasis. TfR1 depletion does not lead to changes in IKK subunit protein levels; however, it does reduce the formation of the IKK complex, and inhibits TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α)-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription. We find that, in the absence of TfR1, NF-κB does not translocate to the nucleus efficiently, and there is a reduction in the binding to target gene promoters and consequentially less target gene activation. Significantly, depletion of TfR1 results in an increase in apoptosis in response to TNFα treatment, which is rescued by elevating the levels of RelA/NF-κB. Taken together, these results indicate a new function for TfR1 in the control of IKK and NF-κB. Our data indicate that IKK-NF-κB responds to changes in iron within the cell.

  7. Structural and functional characterization of interactions involving the Tfb1 subunit of TFIIH and the NER factor Rad2

    PubMed Central

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Arseneault, Geneviève; Cappadocia, Laurent; Chen, Hung-Ta; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G.

    2012-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) plays crucial roles in transcription as part of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) and in DNA repair as part of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. During NER, TFIIH recruits the 3′-endonuclease Rad2 to damaged DNA. In this manuscript, we functionally and structurally characterized the interaction between the Tfb1 subunit of TFIIH and Rad2. We show that deletion of either the PH domain of Tfb1 (Tfb1PH) or several segments of the Rad2 spacer region yield yeast with enhanced sensitivity to UV irradiation. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies demonstrate that two acidic segments of the Rad2 spacer bind to Tfb1PH with nanomolar affinity. Structure determination of a Rad2–Tfb1PH complex indicates that Rad2 binds to TFIIH using a similar motif as TFIIEα uses to bind TFIIH in the PIC. Together, these results provide a mechanistic bridge between the role of TFIIH in transcription and DNA repair. PMID:22373916

  8. Structural and functional characterization of interactions involving the Tfb1 subunit of TFIIH and the NER factor Rad2.

    PubMed

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Arseneault, Geneviève; Cappadocia, Laurent; Chen, Hung-Ta; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2012-07-01

    The general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) plays crucial roles in transcription as part of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) and in DNA repair as part of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. During NER, TFIIH recruits the 3'-endonuclease Rad2 to damaged DNA. In this manuscript, we functionally and structurally characterized the interaction between the Tfb1 subunit of TFIIH and Rad2. We show that deletion of either the PH domain of Tfb1 (Tfb1PH) or several segments of the Rad2 spacer region yield yeast with enhanced sensitivity to UV irradiation. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies demonstrate that two acidic segments of the Rad2 spacer bind to Tfb1PH with nanomolar affinity. Structure determination of a Rad2-Tfb1PH complex indicates that Rad2 binds to TFIIH using a similar motif as TFIIEα uses to bind TFIIH in the PIC. Together, these results provide a mechanistic bridge between the role of TFIIH in transcription and DNA repair. PMID:22373916

  9. A Comparison of Semiochemically Mediated Interactions Involving Specialist and Generalist Brassica-feeding Aphids and the Braconid Parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae.

    PubMed

    Blande, J D; Pickett, J A; Poppy, G M

    2007-04-01

    Diaeretiella rapae, a parasitoid that predominately specializes in the parasitism of Brassica-feeding aphids, attacks Lipaphis erysimi, a specialist feeding aphid of the Brassicaceae and other families in the Capparales, at a greater rate than the generalist-feeding aphid, Myzus persicae. In this study, we investigated the orientation behavior of D. rapae to the volatile chemicals produced when these two aphid species feed on turnip (Brassica rapa var rapifera). We showed no significant preference orientation behavior to either aphid/turnip complex over the other. Isothiocyanates are among the compounds emitted by plants of the Brassicaceae in response to insect feeding damage, including by aphids. We assessed parasitoid orientation behavior in response to laboratory-formulated isothiocyanates. We tested two formulations and discovered significant orientation toward 3-butenyl isothiocyanate. We also assessed plant and aphid glucosinolate content, and showed large levels of glucosinolate concentration in L. erysimi, whereas there was little change in plant content in response to aphid feeding. Our results suggest that during the process of host location, similar cues may be utilized for locating L. erysimi and M. persicae, whereas the acceptance of hosts and their suitability may involve aspects of nonvolatile aphid chemistry.

  10. The Arabidopsis AAA ATPase SKD1 is involved in multivesicular endosome function and interacts with its positive regulator LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN5.

    PubMed

    Haas, Thomas J; Sliwinski, Marek K; Martínez, Dana E; Preuss, Mary; Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi; Nielsen, Erik; Odorizzi, Greg; Otegui, Marisa S

    2007-04-01

    In yeast and mammals, the AAA ATPase Vps4p/SKD1 (for Vacuolar protein sorting 4/SUPPRESSOR OF K(+) TRANSPORT GROWTH DEFECT1) is required for the endosomal sorting of secretory and endocytic cargo. We identified a VPS4/SKD1 homolog in Arabidopsis thaliana, which localizes to the cytoplasm and to multivesicular endosomes. In addition, green fluorescent protein-SKD1 colocalizes on multivesicular bodies with fluorescent fusion protein endosomal Rab GTPases, such as ARA6/RabF1, RHA1/RabF2a, and ARA7/RabF2b, and with the endocytic marker FM4-64. The expression of SKD1(E232Q), an ATPase-deficient version of SKD1, induces alterations in the endosomal system of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow 2 cells and ultimately leads to cell death. The inducible expression of SKD1(E232Q) in Arabidopsis resulted in enlarged endosomes with a reduced number of internal vesicles. In a yeast two-hybrid screen using Arabidopsis SKD1 as bait, we isolated a putative homolog of mammalian LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN5 (LIP5)/SKD1 BINDING PROTEIN1 and yeast Vta1p (for Vps twenty associated 1 protein). Arabidopsis LIP5 acts as a positive regulator of SKD1 by increasing fourfold to fivefold its in vitro ATPase activity. We isolated a knockout homozygous Arabidopsis mutant line with a T-DNA insertion in LIP5. lip5 plants are viable and show no phenotypic alterations under normal growth conditions, suggesting that basal SKD1 ATPase activity is sufficient for plant development and growth.

  11. The type III protein translocation system of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli involves EspA-EspB protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hartland, E L; Daniell, S J; Delahay, R M; Neves, B C; Wallis, T; Shaw, R K; Hale, C; Knutton, S; Frankel, G

    2000-03-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), like many bacterial pathogens, use a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins across the bacterial cell wall. In EPEC, four proteins, EspA, EspB, EspD and Tir are known to be exported by a type III secretion system and to be essential for 'attaching and effacing' (A/E) lesion formation, the hallmark of EPEC pathogenicity. EspA was recently shown to be a structural protein and a major component of a large, transiently expressed, filamentous surface organelle which forms a direct link between the bacterium and the host cell. In contrast, EspB is translocated into the host cell where it is localized to both membrane and cytosolic cell fractions. EspA and EspB are required for translocation of Tir to the host cell membrane suggesting that they may both be components of the translocation apparatus. In this study, we show that EspB co-immunoprecipitates with the EspA filaments and that, during EPEC infection of HEp-2 cells, EspB localizes closely with EspA. Using a number of binding assays, we also show that EspB can bind and be copurified with EspA. Nevertheless, binding of EspA filaments to the host cell membranes occurred even in the absence of EspB. These results suggest that following initial attachment of the EspA filaments to the target cells, EspB is delivered into the host cell membrane and that the interaction between EspA and EspB may be important for protein translocation.

  12. Expression of genes involved in the embryo-maternal interaction in the early-pregnant canine uterus.

    PubMed

    Kautz, E; Gram, A; Aslan, S; Ay, S S; Selçuk, M; Kanca, H; Koldaş, E; Akal, E; Karakaş, K; Findik, M; Boos, A; Kowalewski, M P

    2014-05-01

    Although there is no acute luteolytic mechanism in the absence of pregnancy in the bitch, a precise and well-timed embryo-maternal interaction seems to be required for the initiation and maintenance of gestation. As only limited information is available about these processes in dogs, in this study, the uterine expression of possible decidualization markers was investigated during the pre-implantation stage (days 10-12) of pregnancy and in the corresponding nonpregnant controls. In addition, the expression of selected genes associated with blastocyst development and/or implantation was investigated in embryos flushed from the uteri of bitches used for this study (unhatched and hatched blastocysts). There was an upregulated expression of prolactin receptor (PRLR) and IGF2 observed pre-implantation. The expression of PRL and of IGF1 was unaffected, and neither was the expression of progesterone- or estrogen receptor β (ESR2). In contrast, (ESR1) levels were elevated during early pregnancy. Prostaglandin (PG)-system revealed upregulated expression of PGE2-synthase and its receptors, PTGER2 and PTGER4, and of the PG-transporter. Elevated levels of AKR1C3 mRNA, but not the protein itself, were noted. Expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) remained unaffected. Most of the transcripts were predominantly localized to the uterine epithelial cells, myometrium and, to a lesser extent, to the uterine stroma. PGES (PTGES) mRNA was abundantly expressed in both groups of embryos and appeared higher in the hatched ones. The expression level of IGF2 mRNA appeared higher than that of IGF1 mRNA in hatched embryos. In unhatched embryos IGF1, IGF2, and PTGS2 mRNA levels were below the detection limit.

  13. Galanin-neuropeptide Y (NPY) interactions in central cardiovascular control: involvement of the NPY Y receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Parrado, Concepción; Rivera, Alicia; de la Calle, Adelaida; Agnati, Luigi; Fuxe, Kjell; Narváez, José A

    2006-07-01

    The interactions between neuropeptide Y (NPY), specifically through NPY Y(1) and Y(2) receptor subtypes, and galanin [GAL(1-29)] have been analysed at the cardiovascular level. The cardiovascular effects of intracisternal coinjections of GAL(1-29) with NPY or NPY Y(1) or Y(2) agonists, as well as quantitative receptor autoradiography of the binding characteristics of NPY Y(1) and Y(2) receptor subtypes in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), in the presence or absence of GAL(1-29), have been investigated. The effects of coinjections of GAL(1-29) and the NPY Y(1) agonist on the expression of c-FOS immunoreactivity in the NTS were also studied. The coinjection of NPY with GAL(1-29) induced a significant vasopressor and tachycardic action with a maximum 40% increase (P < 0.001). The coinjection of the NPY Y(1) agonist and GAL(1-29) induced a similar increase in mean arterial pressure and heart rate as did NPY plus GAL(1-29), actions that were not observed with the NPY Y(2) agonist plus GAL(1-29). GAL(1-29), 3 nm, significantly and substantially (by approximately 40%) decreased NPY Y(1) agonist binding in the NTS. This effect was significantly blocked (P < 0.01) in the presence of the specific galanin antagonist M35. The NPY Y(2) agonist binding was not modified in the presence of GAL(1-29). At the c-FOS level, the coinjection of NPY Y(1) and GAL(1-29) significantly reduced the c-FOS-immunoreactive response induced by either of the two peptides. The present findings suggest the existence of a modulatory antagonistic effect of GAL(1-29) mediated via galanin receptors on the NPY Y(1) receptor subtype and its signalling within the NTS.

  14. Electrostatic Interactions Involving the Extreme C Terminus of Nuclear Export Factor CRM1 Modulate Its Affinity for Cargo*

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Abigail M.; Ciziene, Danguole; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Stewart, Murray

    2011-01-01

    The toroid-shaped nuclear protein export factor CRM1 is constructed from 21 tandem HEAT repeats, each of which contains an inner (B) and outer (A) α-helix joined by loops. Proteins targeted for export have a nuclear export signal (NES) that binds between the A-helices of HEAT repeats 11 and 12 on the outer surface of CRM1. RanGTP binding increases the affinity of CRM1 for NESs. In the absence of RanGTP, the CRM1 C-terminal helix, together with the HEAT repeat 9 loop, modulates its affinity for NESs. Here we show that there is an electrostatic interaction between acidic residues at the extreme distal tip of the C-terminal helix and basic residues on the HEAT repeat 12 B-helix that lies on the inner surface of CRM1 beneath the NES binding site. Small angle x-ray scattering indicates that the increased affinity for NESs generated by mutations in the C-terminal helix is not associated with large scale changes in CRM1 conformation, consistent with the modulation of NES affinity being mediated by a local change in CRM1 near the NES binding site. These data also suggest that in the absence of RanGTP, the C-terminal helix lies across the CRM1 toroid in a position similar to that seen in the CRM1-Snurportin crystal structure. By creating local changes that stabilize the NES binding site in its closed conformation and thereby reducing the affinity of CRM1 for NESs, the C-terminal helix and HEAT 9 loop facilitate release of NES-containing cargo in the cytoplasm and also inhibit their return to the nucleus. PMID:21708948

  15. Evolution of the syntrophic interaction between Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanosarcina barkeri: involvement of an ancient horizontal gene transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, Johannes C.; Culley, David E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2007-01-05

    The sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the methanogenic archaea Methanosarcina barkeri can grow syntrophically on lactate. In this study, three functionally unknown genes of D. vulgaris, DVU2103, DVU2104 and DVU2108, were found to be up-regulated 2-4 fold following the lifestyle shift from syntroph to sulfatereducer; moreover, none of these genes were regulated when D. vulgaris was grown alone in various pure culture conditions. These results suggest that these genes may play roles related to the lifestyle change of D. vulgaris from syntroph to sulfate reducer. This hypothesis is further supported by phylogenomic analyses showing that homologies of these genes were only narrowly present in several groups of bacteria, most of which are restricted to a syntrophic life-style, such as Pelobacter carbinolicus, Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans, Syntrophomonas wolfei and Syntrophus aciditrophicus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genes tended to be clustered with archaeal genera, and they were rooted on archaeal species in the phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they originated from an archaeal methanogen and were horizontally transferred to a common ancestor of delta- Proteobacteria, Clostridia and Thermotogae. While lost in most species during evolution, these genes appear to have been retained in bacteria capable of syntrophic relationships, probably due to their providing a selective advantage. In addition, no significant bias in codon and amino acid usages was detected between these genes and the rest of the D. vulgaris genome, suggesting these gene transfers may have occurred early in the evolutionary history so that sufficient time has elapsed to allow an adaptation to the codon and amino acid usages of D. vulgaris. This report provides novel insights into the origin and evolution of bacterial genes involved in the syntrophic lifestyle.

  16. Echinococcus multilocularis phosphoglucose isomerase (EmPGI): a glycolytic enzyme involved in metacestode growth and parasite-host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Britta; Spiliotis, Markus; Müller, Joachim; Scholl, Sabrina; Müller, Norbert; Gottstein, Bruno; Hemphill, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    In Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes, the surface-associated and highly glycosylated laminated layer, and molecules associated with this structure, is believed to be involved in modulating the host-parasite interface. We report on the molecular and functional characterisation of E. multilocularis phosphoglucose isomerase (EmPGI), which is a component of this laminated layer. The EmPGI amino acid sequence is virtually identical to that of its homologue in Echinococcus granulosus, and shares 64% identity and 86% similarity with human PGI. Mammalian PGI is a multi-functional protein which, besides its glycolytic function, can also act as a cytokine, growth factor and inducer of angiogenesis, and plays a role in tumour growth, development and metastasis formation. Recombinant EmPGI (recEmPGI) is also functionally active as a glycolytic enzyme and was found to be present, besides the laminated layer, in vesicle fluid and in germinal layer cell extracts. EmPGI is released from metacestodes and induces a humoral immune response in experimentally infected mice, and vaccination of mice with recEmPGI renders these mice more resistant towards secondary challenge infection, indicating that EmPGI plays an important role in parasite development and/or in modulating the host-parasite relationship. We show that recEmPGI stimulates the growth of isolated E. multilocularis germinal layer cells in vitro and selectively stimulates the proliferation of bovine adrenal cortex endothelial cells but not of human fibroblasts and rat hepatocytes. Thus, besides its role in glycolysis, EmPGI could also act as a factor that stimulates parasite growth and potentially induces the formation of novel blood vessels around the developing metacestode in vivo.

  17. Interaction Network and Localization of Brucella abortus Membrane Proteins Involved in the Synthesis, Transport, and Succinylation of Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Leticia S.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are periplasmic homopolysaccharides that play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. Once synthesized in the cytoplasm by the CβG synthase (Cgs), CβG are transported to the periplasm by the CβG transporter (Cgt) and succinylated by the CβG modifier enzyme (Cgm). Here, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitation techniques to study the interaction network between these three integral inner membrane proteins. Our results indicate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm can form both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Analyses carried out with Cgs mutants revealed that the N-terminal region of the protein (Cgs region 1 to 418) is required to sustain the interactions with Cgt and Cgm as well as with itself. We demonstrated by single-cell fluorescence analysis that in Brucella, Cgs and Cgt are focally distributed in the membrane, particularly at the cell poles, whereas Cgm is mostly distributed throughout the membrane with a slight accumulation at the poles colocalizing with the other partners. In summary, our results demonstrate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm form a membrane-associated biosynthetic complex. We propose that the formation of a membrane complex could serve as a mechanism to ensure the fidelity of CβG biosynthesis by coordinating their synthesis with the transport and modification. IMPORTANCE In this study, we analyzed the interaction and localization of the proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and modification of Brucella abortus cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG), which play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. We demonstrate that these proteins interact, forming a complex located mainly at the cell poles; this is the first experimental evidence of the existence of a multienzymatic complex involved in the metabolism of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria and argues for another example of pole differentiation in Brucella

  18. Identification of CXCL5/ENA-78 as a factor involved in the interaction between cholangiocarcinoma cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Hirohisa; Beppu, Toru; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Masuda, Toshiro; Otao, Ryu; Horlad, Hasita; Mima, Kosuke; Miyake, Keisuke; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Baba, Yoshifumi; Takamori, Hiroshi; Jono, Hirofumi; Shinriki, Satoru; Ando, Yukio; Baba, Hideo

    2012-11-15

    Knowledge of tumor-stromal interactions is essential for understanding tumor development. We focused on the interaction between cholangiocarcinoma and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and reported their positive interaction in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study is to identify the key protein involved in the interaction between cholangiocarcinoma cells and CAFs and its role on cholangiocarcinoma progression. Using the conditioning medium from cholangiocarcinoma cells, hepatic stellate cells and coculture of them, Protein-Chip analysis with SELDI-TOF-MS showed that the peak of an 8,360-Da protein remarkably increased in the coculture medium. This protein was identified as CXCL5/ENA78, epithelial cell-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78, by q-TOF/MS/MS analysis. Two cholangiocarcinoma cell lines, HuCCT1 and RBE, produced CXCL5 that promoted their invasion and migration in an autocrine fashion. These effects of CXCL5 significantly decreased by inhibition of CXC-receptor 2, which is the receptor for CXCL5. In addition, IL-1β produced by hepatic stellate cells induced the expression of CXCL5 in cholangiocarcinoma cells. In human tissue samples, a significant correlation was observed between CAFs and CXCL5 produced by cholangiocarcinoma cells in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (p = 0.0044). Furthermore, the high-CXCL5-expression group exhibited poor overall survival after curative hepatic resection (p = 0.027). The presence of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils expressing CD66b was associated with CXCL5 expression in tumor cells (p < 0.0001). These data suggest that CXCL5 is important for the interaction between cholangiocarcinoma and CAFs, and inhibition of tumor-stromal interactions may be a useful therapeutic approach for cholangiocarcinoma.

  19. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-09-13

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. Overall, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). As an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.

  20. A JAZ Protein in Astragalus sinicus Interacts with a Leghemoglobin through the TIFY Domain and Is Involved in Nodule Development and Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixing; Xu, Meng; Wang, Ning; Li, Youguo

    2015-01-01

    Leghemoglobins (Lbs) play an important role in legumes-rhizobia symbiosis. Lbs bind O2 and protect nitrogenase activity from damage by O2 in nodules, therefore, they are regarded as a marker of active nitrogen fixation in nodules. Additionally, Lbs are involved in the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, acting as a NO scavenger during nodule development and nitrogen fixation. However, regulators responsible for Lb expression and modulation of Lb activity have not been characterized. In our previous work, a Jasmonate-Zim-domain (JAZ) protein interacting with a Lb (AsB2510) in Astragalus sinicus was identified and designated AsJAZ1. In this study, the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 was verified using a yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro Glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays, resulting in identification of the interaction domain as a TIFY (previously known as zinc-finger protein expressed in inflorescence meristem, ZIM) domain. TIFY domain is named after the most conserved amino acids within the domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was used to confirm the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 in tobacco cells, demonstrating that AsJAZ1-AsB2510 interaction was localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, the expression patterns and the symbiotic phenotypes of AsJAZ1 were investigated. Knockdown of AsJAZ1 expression via RNA interference led to decreased number of nodules, abnormal development of bacteroids, accumulation of poly-x-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and loss of nitrogenase activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AsJAZ1 interacts with AsB2510 and participates in nodule development and nitrogen fixation. Our results provide novel insights into the functions of Lbs or JAZ proteins during legume-rhizobia symbiosis.

  1. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-09-13

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. Overall, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). As an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses. PMID:27537680

  2. A JAZ Protein in Astragalus sinicus Interacts with a Leghemoglobin through the TIFY Domain and Is Involved in Nodule Development and Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixing; Xu, Meng; Wang, Ning; Li, Youguo

    2015-01-01

    Leghemoglobins (Lbs) play an important role in legumes-rhizobia symbiosis. Lbs bind O2 and protect nitrogenase activity from damage by O2 in nodules, therefore, they are regarded as a marker of active nitrogen fixation in nodules. Additionally, Lbs are involved in the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, acting as a NO scavenger during nodule development and nitrogen fixation. However, regulators responsible for Lb expression and modulation of Lb activity have not been characterized. In our previous work, a Jasmonate-Zim-domain (JAZ) protein interacting with a Lb (AsB2510) in Astragalus sinicus was identified and designated AsJAZ1. In this study, the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 was verified using a yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro Glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays, resulting in identification of the interaction domain as a TIFY (previously known as zinc-finger protein expressed in inflorescence meristem, ZIM) domain. TIFY domain is named after the most conserved amino acids within the domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was used to confirm the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 in tobacco cells, demonstrating that AsJAZ1-AsB2510 interaction was localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, the expression patterns and the symbiotic phenotypes of AsJAZ1 were investigated. Knockdown of AsJAZ1 expression via RNA interference led to decreased number of nodules, abnormal development of bacteroids, accumulation of poly-x-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and loss of nitrogenase activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AsJAZ1 interacts with AsB2510 and participates in nodule development and nitrogen fixation. Our results provide novel insights into the functions of Lbs or JAZ proteins during legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:26460857

  3. Selection of peptide inhibitors of interactions involved in complex protein assemblies: association of the core and surface antigens of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, M R; Murray, K

    1995-01-01

    As an example for studies of contacts involved in complex biological systems, peptide ligands that bind to the core antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBcAg) have been selected from a random hexapeptide library displayed on filamentous phage. Affinity-purified phage bearing aa sequence LLGRMK, or some related sequences, bound full-length or truncated HBcAg but did not bind denatured HBcAg. The long (L), but not the short (S), hepatitis B virus envelope polypeptide, when synthesized in an in vitro system, bound firmly to HBcAg, indicating that interaction between HBcAg and the pre-S region of the L polypeptide is critical for virus morphogenesis. This interaction was inhibited by peptide ALLGRMKG, suggesting that this and related small molecules may inhibit viral assembly. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7892246

  4. Co-conservation of rRNA tetraloop sequences and helix length suggests involvement of the tetraloops in higher-order interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedenstierna, K. O.; Siefert, J. L.; Fox, G. E.; Murgola, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Terminal loops containing four nucleotides (tetraloops) are common in structural RNAs, and they frequently conform to one of three sequence motifs, GNRA, UNCG, or CUUG. Here we compare available sequences and secondary structures for rRNAs from bacteria, and we show that helices capped by phylogenetically conserved GNRA loops display a strong tendency to be of conserved length. The simplest interpretation of this correlation is that the conserved GNRA loops are involved in higher-order interactions, intramolecular or intermolecular, resulting in a selective pressure for maintaining the lengths of these helices. A small number of conserved UNCG loops were also found to be associated with conserved length helices, consistent with the possibility that this type of tetraloop also takes part in higher-order interactions.

  5. Arabidopsis ATG8-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 Is Involved in Autophagy-Dependent Vesicular Trafficking of Plastid Proteins to the Vacuole[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Simon; Honig, Arik; Levanony, Hanna; Peled-Zehavi, Hadas; Galili, Gad

    2014-01-01

    Selective autophagy has been extensively studied in various organisms, but knowledge regarding its functions in plants, particularly in organelle turnover, is limited. We have recently discovered ATG8-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 (ATI1) from Arabidopsis thaliana and showed that following carbon starvation it is localized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated bodies that are subsequently transported to the vacuole. Here, we show that following carbon starvation ATI1 is also located on bodies associating with plastids, which are distinct from the ER ATI bodies and are detected mainly in senescing cells that exhibit plastid degradation. Additionally, these plastid-localized bodies contain a stroma protein marker as cargo and were observed budding and detaching from plastids. ATI1 interacts with plastid-localized proteins and was further shown to be required for the turnover of one of them, as a representative. ATI1 on the plastid bodies also interacts with ATG8f, which apparently leads to the targeting of the plastid bodies to the vacuole by a process that requires functional autophagy. Finally, we show that ATI1 is involved in Arabidopsis salt stress tolerance. Taken together, our results implicate ATI1 in autophagic plastid-to-vacuole trafficking through its ability to interact with both plastid proteins and ATG8 of the core autophagy machinery. PMID:25281689

  6. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  7. Investigation of cyclooxygenase and signaling pathways involved in human platelet aggregation mediated by synergistic interaction of various agonists

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadia; Farooq, Ahsana Dar; Sadek, Bassem

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanism(s) of synergistic interaction of various platelet mediators such as arachidonic acid (AA) when combined with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or adenosine diphosphate (ADP) on human platelet aggregation were examined. The results demonstrated that 5-HT had no or negligible effect on aggregation but it did potentiate the aggregation response of AA. Similarly, the combination of subeffective concentrations of ADP and AA exhibited noticeable rise in platelet aggregation. Moreover, the observed synergistic effect of AA with 5-HT on platelets was inhibited by different cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, namely ibuprofen and celecoxib, with half maximal inhibitory effect (IC50) values of 18.0±1.8 and 15.6±3.4 μmol/L, respectively. Interestingly, the synergistic effect observed for AA with 5-HT was, also, blocked by the 5-HT receptor blockers cyproheptadine (IC50=22.0±7 μmol/L), ketanserin (IC50=152±23 μmol/L), phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor (U73122; IC50=6.1±0.8 μmol/L), and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor (PD98059; IC50=3.8±0.5 μmol/L). Likewise, the synergism of AA and ADP was, also, attenuated by COX inhibitors (ibuprofen; IC50=20±4 μmol/L and celecoxib; IC50=24±7 μmol/L), PLC inhibitor (U73122; IC50=3.7±0.3 μmol/L), and MAPK inhibitor (PD98059; IC50=2.8±1.1 μmol/L). Our observed data demonstrate that the combination of subthreshold concentrations of agonists amplifies platelet aggregation and that these synergistic effects largely depend on activation of COX/thromboxane A2, receptor-operated Ca2+ channels, Gq/PLC, and MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, our data revealed that inhibition of COX pathways by using both selective and/or non-selective COX inhibitors blocks not only AA metabolism and thromboxane A2 formation, but also its binding to Gq receptors and activation of receptor-operated Ca2+ channels in platelets. Overall, our results show that PLC and MAPK inhibitors proved to inhibit the

  8. Strong ferromagnetic exchange interactions in hinge-like Dy(O2Cu)2 complexes involving double oxygen bridges.

    PubMed

    Ida, Yumi; Ghosh, Soumavo; Ghosh, Ashutosh; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    Two trinuclear isomeric compounds, [{(Cu(II)(salpn))(Me(CO)Me)}2Dy(III)(NO3)3] (1) and [{Cu(II)(salpn)}2Dy(III)(H2O)(NO3)3]·MeOH (2), along with one polymeric compound, {[{Cu(II)(salpn)}2Dy(III)(NO3)3bpy]·MeOH·H2O}n (3), were synthesized using a metalloligand, [Cu(II)(salpn)], where H2salpn and bpy stand for N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine and 4,4'-bipyridine, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 were selectively prepared with two solvents: the less polar acetone led to the exclusive crystallization of 1 with a transoid trinuclear architecture, while more polar solvent methanol provided sole construction of 2 with a cisoid trinuclear architecture. Compound 3 was prepared from 1 or 2 after bpy was introduced as a bridge. The Dy and Cu ions are doubly bridged with oxygen atoms, and the core DyO2Cu skeletons are characterized by different "butterfly angles" of 140.9(1)°, 147.1(19)°, and 142.4(2)° for 1, 2, and 3, respectively. We have examined the molecular structures and magnetic properties of 1-3 using high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HF-EPR), magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility techniques. These compounds showed slow magnetization reversal in the measurements of alternating current magnetic susceptibility. We analyzed EPR frequency-field diagrams using an effective spin-Hamiltonian including only one doublet of Dy sublevels and found that the exchange couplings are ferromagnetic in all compounds. The exchange coupling parameters JDy-Cu of 1, 2, and 3 were determined as 2.25 ± 0.05, 1.82 ± 0.04, and 1.79 ± 0.04 K, respectively. These values are larger than those found in previous research using EPR analysis on [Cu(II)(L(A))(C3H6O)Dy(III)(NO3)3] (H2L(A) = N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,3-diamino-2,2-dimethylpropane) and [Dy(III)L(B)2(NO3)2{Cu(II)(CH3OH)}2](NO3)(CH3OH) (H2L(B) = 2,6-bis(acetylaceto)pyridine). The present result shows an advantage of doubly oxygen-bridged motifs to built strong ferromagnetic interactions between

  9. Strong ferromagnetic exchange interactions in hinge-like Dy(O2Cu)2 complexes involving double oxygen bridges.

    PubMed

    Ida, Yumi; Ghosh, Soumavo; Ghosh, Ashutosh; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    Two trinuclear isomeric compounds, [{(Cu(II)(salpn))(Me(CO)Me)}2Dy(III)(NO3)3] (1) and [{Cu(II)(salpn)}2Dy(III)(H2O)(NO3)3]·MeOH (2), along with one polymeric compound, {[{Cu(II)(salpn)}2Dy(III)(NO3)3bpy]·MeOH·H2O}n (3), were synthesized using a metalloligand, [Cu(II)(salpn)], where H2salpn and bpy stand for N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine and 4,4'-bipyridine, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 were selectively prepared with two solvents: the less polar acetone led to the exclusive crystallization of 1 with a transoid trinuclear architecture, while more polar solvent methanol provided sole construction of 2 with a cisoid trinuclear architecture. Compound 3 was prepared from 1 or 2 after bpy was introduced as a bridge. The Dy and Cu ions are doubly bridged with oxygen atoms, and the core DyO2Cu skeletons are characterized by different "butterfly angles" of 140.9(1)°, 147.1(19)°, and 142.4(2)° for 1, 2, and 3, respectively. We have examined the molecular structures and magnetic properties of 1-3 using high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HF-EPR), magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility techniques. These compounds showed slow magnetization reversal in the measurements of alternating current magnetic susceptibility. We analyzed EPR frequency-field diagrams using an effective spin-Hamiltonian including only one doublet of Dy sublevels and found that the exchange couplings are ferromagnetic in all compounds. The exchange coupling parameters JDy-Cu of 1, 2, and 3 were determined as 2.25 ± 0.05, 1.82 ± 0.04, and 1.79 ± 0.04 K, respectively. These values are larger than those found in previous research using EPR analysis on [Cu(II)(L(A))(C3H6O)Dy(III)(NO3)3] (H2L(A) = N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,3-diamino-2,2-dimethylpropane) and [Dy(III)L(B)2(NO3)2{Cu(II)(CH3OH)}2](NO3)(CH3OH) (H2L(B) = 2,6-bis(acetylaceto)pyridine). The present result shows an advantage of doubly oxygen-bridged motifs to built strong ferromagnetic interactions between

  10. Exo70, a subunit of the exocyst complex, interacts with SNEVhPrp19/hPso4 and is involved in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Dellago, Hanna; Löscher, Marlies; Ajuh, Paul; Ryder, Ursula; Kaisermayer, Christian; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Fortschegger, Klaus; Gross, Stefan; Gstraunthaler, Anna; Borth, Nicole; Eisenhaber, Frank; Lamond, Angus I.; Grillari, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The Cdc5L (cell division cycle 5-like) complex is a spliceosomal subcomplex that also plays a role in DNA repair. The complex contains the splicing factor hPrp19, also known as SNEV or hPso4, which is involved in cellular life-span regulation and proteasomal breakdown. In a recent large-scale proteomics analysis for proteins associated with this complex, proteins involved in transcription, cell-cycle regulation, DNA repair, the ubiquitin–proteasome system, chromatin remodelling, cellular aging, the cytoskeleton and trafficking, including four members of the exocyst complex, were identified. In the present paper we report that Exo70 interacts directly with SNEVhPrp19/hPso4 and shuttles to the nucleus, where it associates with the spliceosome. We mapped the interaction site to the N-terminal 100 amino acids of Exo70, which interfere with pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. Furthermore, Exo70 influences the splicing of a model substrate as well as of its own pre-mRNA in vivo. In addition, we found that Exo70 is alternatively spliced in a cell-type- and cell-age-dependent way. These results suggest a novel and unexpected role of Exo70 in nuclear mRNA splicing, where it might signal membrane events to the splicing apparatus. PMID:21639856

  11. Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) is involved in the anti-cancer mechanism of dovitinib in human multiple myeloma IM-9 cells.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hae Jung; Lee, Yura; Bae, Kyoung Jun; Byun, Byung Jin; Kim, Soon Ae; Kim, Jiyeon

    2016-07-01

    Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) is a member of the germinal center kinase family. TNIK was first identified as a kinase that is involved in regulating cytoskeletal organization in many types of cells, and it was recently proposed as a novel therapeutic target in several types of human cancers. Although previous studies suggest that TNIK plays a pivotal role in cancer cell survival and prognosis, its function in hematological cancer cell survival has not been investigated. Here we investigated the relationship between TNIK function and cell viability in multiple myeloma IM-9 cells using TNIK small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection and dovitinib treatment. Treatment of IM-9 cells with TNIK siRNA and dovitinib treatment reduced cell proliferation. The ATP competing kinase assay and western blot analysis showed that dovitinib strongly inhibited both the interaction of TNIK with ATP (K i, 13 nM) and the activation of Wnt signaling effectors such as β-catenin and TCF4. Dovitinib also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in IM-9 cells without significant cytotoxicity in PBMCs. Our results provide new evidence that TNIK may be involved in the proliferation of multiple myeloma IM-9 cells and in the anti-cancer activity of dovitinib via inhibition of the endogenous Wnt signaling pathway.

  12. Identification of regions interacting with ovo{sup D} mutations: Potential new genes involved in germline sex determination or differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, D.; Oliver, B.; Mahowald, A.P.

    1995-02-01

    Only a few Drosophila melanogaster germline sex determination genes are known, and there have been no systematic screens to identify new genes involved in this important biological process. The ovarian phenotypes produced by females mutant for dominant alleles of the ovo gene are modified in flies with altered doses of other loci involved in germline sex determination in Drosophila (Sex-lethal{sup +}, snas fille{sup +} and ovarian tumor{sup +}). This observation constitutes the basis for a screen to identify additional genes required for proper establishment of germline sexual identity. We tested 300 deletions, which together cover {approximately}58% of the euchromatic portion of the genome, for genetic interactions with ovo{sup D}. Hemizygosity for more than a dozen small regions show interactions that either partially suppress or enhance the ovarian phenotypes of females mutant for one or more of the three dominant ovo mutations. These regions probably contain genes whose products act in developmental heirarchies that include ovo{sup +} protein. 40 refs, 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. The Interaction between Rice ERF3 and WOX11 Promotes Crown Root Development by Regulating Gene Expression Involved in Cytokinin Signaling[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yaling; Huang, Yulan

    2015-01-01

    Crown roots are the main components of the fibrous root system in rice (Oryza sativa). WOX11, a WUSCHEL-related homeobox gene specifically expressed in the emerging crown root meristem, is a key regulator in crown root development. However, the nature of WOX11 function in crown root development has remained elusive. Here, we identified a rice AP2/ERF protein, ERF3, which interacts with WOX11 and was expressed in crown root initials and during crown root growth. Functional analysis revealed that ERF3 was essential for crown root development and acts in auxin- and cytokinin-responsive gene expression. Downregulation of ERF3 in wox11 mutants produced a more severe root phenotype. Also, increased expression of ERF3 could partially complement wox11, indicating that the two genes functioned cooperatively to regulate crown root development. ERF3 and WOX11 shared a common target, the cytokinin-responsive gene RR2. The expression of ERF3 and WOX11 only partially overlapped, underlining a spatio-temporal control of RR2 expression and crown root development. Furthermore, ERF3-regulated RR2 expression was involved in crown root initiation, while the ERF3/WOX11 interaction likely repressed RR2 during crown root elongation. These results define a mechanism regulating gene expression involved in cytokinin signaling during different stages of crown root development in rice. PMID:26307379

  14. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  15. Interactions of the Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase-α with the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase Are Involved in Interleukin-1 Signaling in Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Yongqiang; Fritz, Dominik; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling in fibroblasts is mediated through focal adhesions, organelles that are enriched with adaptor and cytoskeletal proteins that regulate signal transduction. We examined interactions of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) with protein-tyrosine phosphatase-α (PTP-α) in IL-1 signaling. In wild type and FAK knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, immunostaining, and gene silencing that FAK is required for IL-1-mediated sequestration of PTPα to focal adhesions. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays of purified proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between FAK and PTPα, which was dependent on the FAT domain of FAK and by an intact membrane-proximal phosphatase domain of PTPα. Recruitment of PTPα to focal adhesions, IL-1-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, ERK activation, and IL-6, MMP-3, and MMP-9 expression were all blocked in FAK knock-out fibroblasts. These processes were restored in FAK knock-out cells transfected with wild type FAK, FAT domain, and FRNK. Our data indicate that IL-1-induced signaling through focal adhesions involves interactions between the FAT domain of FAK and PTPα. PMID:24821720

  16. Interactions of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase-α with the focal adhesion targeting domain of focal adhesion kinase are involved in interleukin-1 signaling in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Yongqiang; Fritz, Dominik; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2014-06-27

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling in fibroblasts is mediated through focal adhesions, organelles that are enriched with adaptor and cytoskeletal proteins that regulate signal transduction. We examined interactions of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) with protein-tyrosine phosphatase-α (PTP-α) in IL-1 signaling. In wild type and FAK knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, immunostaining, and gene silencing that FAK is required for IL-1-mediated sequestration of PTPα to focal adhesions. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays of purified proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between FAK and PTPα, which was dependent on the FAT domain of FAK and by an intact membrane-proximal phosphatase domain of PTPα. Recruitment of PTPα to focal adhesions, IL-1-induced Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum, ERK activation, and IL-6, MMP-3, and MMP-9 expression were all blocked in FAK knock-out fibroblasts. These processes were restored in FAK knock-out cells transfected with wild type FAK, FAT domain, and FRNK. Our data indicate that IL-1-induced signaling through focal adhesions involves interactions between the FAT domain of FAK and PTPα.

  17. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein–protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Christian H.; Bromley, Jennifer R.; Stenbæk, Anne; Rasmussen, Randi E.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. Our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta. PMID:25326916

  18. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lund, C. H.; Bromley, J. R.; Stenbaek, A.; Rasmussen, R. E.; Scheller, H. V.; Sakuragi, Y.

    2014-10-18

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Wemore » tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. In conclusion, our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.« less

  19. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, C. H.; Bromley, J. R.; Stenbaek, A.; Rasmussen, R. E.; Scheller, H. V.; Sakuragi, Y.

    2014-10-18

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. In conclusion, our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.

  20. Binding of Yersinia enterocolitica to purified, native small intestinal mucins from rabbits and humans involves interactions with the mucin carbohydrate moiety.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Husar, S D

    1994-01-01

    Plasmid-bearing (but not plasmid-cured) Yersinia enterocolitica is known to bind to purified small intestinal mucins from rabbits and humans. This study examined which region(s) of the mucin molecule is important for bacterial adherence. Pronase digestion of mucin and removal of nonglycosylated or poorly glycosylated peptide regions had no effect on bacterial binding, suggesting that plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica interacts with mucin carbohydrate. Periodate oxidation also did not alter bacterial adherence, indicating that vicinal hydroxyl groups in the mucin sugars are not important for binding. Boiling of mucin, depolymerization by reduction of disulfide bonds, or removal of noncovalently associated lipid actually enhanced bacterial adherence, suggesting that plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica can interact with additional domains in the mucin molecule revealed by these treatments. These domains were destroyed by pronase digestion. In delipidated mucin (but not in reduced or boiled mucin), binding to these domains appeared to be hydrophobic since it could be prevented by treatment of bacteria with tetramethyl urea. Oligosaccharides obtained from both human and rabbit small intestinal mucins were capable of inhibiting attachment of plasmid-bearing (but not plasmid-cured) Y. enterocolitica to mucin. After removal of terminal and backbone sugar residues by treatment of mucin with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, binding of plasmid-bearing bacteria increased significantly when N-acetylgalactosamine, either alone or with galactose attached, was revealed, indicating that core regions of the sugar side chains are involved in bacterial binding. Adherence of plasmid-cured organisms was unaffected by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatment of mucin. We concluded that virulent Y. enterocolitica interacts with the carbohydrate moiety of native small intestinal mucin through a plasmid-mediated process. When mucin becomes denatured, binding of the organism can increase through

  1. Brain Innate Immunity in the Regulation of Neuroinflammation: Therapeutic Strategies by Modulating CD200-CD200R Interaction Involve the Cannabinoid System

    PubMed Central

    Hernangómez, Miriam; Carrillo-Salinas, Francisco J; Mecha, Miriam; Correa, Fernando; Mestre, Leyre; Loría, Frida; Feliú, Ana; Docagne, Fabian; Guaza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) innate immune response includes an arsenal of molecules and receptors expressed by professional phagocytes, glial cells and neurons that is involved in host defence and clearance of toxic and dangerous cell debris. However, any uncontrolled innate immune responses within the CNS are widely recognized as playing a major role in the development of autoimmune disorders and neurodegeneration, with multiple sclerosis (MS) Alzheimer's disease (AD) being primary examples. Hence, it is important to identify the key regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of CNS innate immunity and which could be harnessed to explore novel therapeutic avenues. Neuroimmune regulatory proteins (NIReg) such as CD95L, CD200, CD47, sialic acid, complement regulatory proteins (CD55, CD46, fH, C3a), HMGB1, may control the adverse immune responses in health and diseases. In the absence of these regulators, when neurons die by apoptosis, become infected or damaged, microglia and infiltrating immune cells are free to cause injury as well as an adverse inflammatory response in acute and chronic settings. We will herein provide new emphasis on the role of the pair CD200-CD200R in MS and its experimental models: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler’s virus induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD). The interest of the cannabinoid system as inhibitor of inflammation prompt us to introduce our findings about the role of endocannabinoids (eCBs) in promoting CD200-CD200 receptor (CD200R) interaction and the benefits caused in TMEV-IDD. Finally, we also review the current data on CD200-CD200R interaction in AD, as well as, in the aging brain. PMID:24588829

  2. Involvement of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 in ethanol glucuronidation, and interactions with common drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Al Saabi, Alaa; Allorge, Delphine; Sauvage, François-Ludovic; Tournel, Gilles; Gaulier, Jean-Michel; Marquet, Pierre; Picard, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) determination is increasingly used in clinical and forensic toxicology to document ethanol consumption. The enzymes involved in EtG production, as well as potential interactions with common drugs of abuse, have not been extensively studied. Activities of human liver (HLM), kidney (HKM), and intestinal (HIM) microsomes, as well as of 12 major human recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), toward ethanol (50 and 500 mM) were evaluated in vitro using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined for pooled microsomes and recombinant UGTs with significant activity. Individual contributions of UGTs were estimated using the relative activity factor approach, proposed for scaling activities obtained with cDNA-expressed enzymes to HLM. Interaction of morphine, codeine, lorazepam, oxazepam, nicotine, cotinine, cannabinol, and cannabidiol (5, 10, 15 mg/l) with ethanol (1.15, 4.6, 11.5 g/l; i.e., 25, 100, 250 mM) glucuronidation was assessed using pooled HLM. Ethanol glucuronidation intrinsic clearance (Cl(int)) was 4 and 12.7 times higher for HLM than for HKM and HIM, respectively. All recombinant UGTs, except UGT1A1, 1A6, and 1A10, produced EtG in detectable amounts. UGT1A9 and 2B7 were the most active enzymes, each accounting for 17 and 33% of HLM Cl(int), respectively. Only cannabinol and cannabidiol significantly affected ethanol glucuronidation. Cannabinol increased ethanol glucuronidation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas cannabidiol significantly inhibited EtG formation in a noncompetitive manner (IC(50) = 1.17 mg/l; inhibition constant (K(i)) = 3.1 mg/l). UGT1A9 and 2B7 are the main enzymes involved in ethanol glucuronidation. In addition, our results suggest that cannabinol and cannabidiol could significantly alter ethanol glucuronidation. PMID:23230132

  3. Mirror neuron and theory of mind mechanisms involved in face-to-face interactions: a functional magnetic resonance imaging approach to empathy.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Markowitsch, Hans J; Fink, Gereon R; Piefke, Martina

    2007-08-01

    Empathy allows emotional psychological inference about other person's mental states and feelings in social contexts. We aimed at specifying the common and differential neural mechanisms of "self"- and "other"-related attribution of emotional states using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects viewed faces expressing emotions with direct or averted gaze and either focused on their own emotional response to each face (self-task) or evaluated the emotional state expressed by the face (other-task). The common network activated by both tasks included the left lateral orbito-frontal and medial prefrontal cortices (MPFC), bilateral inferior frontal cortices, superior temporal sulci and temporal poles, as well as the right cerebellum. In a subset of these regions, neural activity was significantly correlated with empathic abilities. The self- (relative to the other-) task differentially activated the MPFC, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)/precuneus, and the temporo-parietal junction bilaterally. Empathy-related processing of emotional facial expressions recruited brain areas involved in mirror neuron and theory-of-mind (ToM) mechanisms. The differential engagement of the MPFC, the PCC/precuneus, and temporo-parietal regions in the self-task indicates that these structures act as key players in the evaluation of one's own emotional state during empathic face-to-face interaction. Activation of mirror neurons in a task relying on empathic abilities without explicit task-related motor components supports the view that mirror neurons are not only involved in motor cognition but also in emotional interpersonal cognition. An interplay between ToM and mirror neuron mechanisms may hold for the maintenance of a self-other distinction during empathic interpersonal face-to-face interactions. PMID:17651008

  4. Significance of ligand interactions involving Hop2-Mnd1 and the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases in homologous DNA repair and XX ovarian dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick

    2015-04-30

    The evolutionarily conserved Hop2-Mnd1 complex is a key cofactor for the meiosis-specific recombinase Dmc1. However, emerging evidence has revealed that Hop2-Mnd1 is expressed in somatic tissues, primary human fibroblasts and cell lines, and that it functions in conjunction with the Rad51 recombinase to repair damaged telomeres via the alternate lengthening of telomeres mechanism. Here, we reveal how distinct DNA-binding activities of Hop2-Mnd1 mediate the stabilization of the RAD51-ssDNA presynaptic filament or stimulate the homologous DNA pairing reaction. We have also endeavored to define the interface that governs the assembly of the higher order complex of Hop2-Mnd1 with RAD51. Unexpectedly, we find that ATP enhances the interaction between Hop2-Mnd1 and RAD51, and that both Hop2 and Mnd1 are involved in RAD51 interaction via their C-terminal regions. Importantly, mutations introduced into these Hop2 and Mnd1 domains, including the HOP2 p.del201Glu mutation present in a patient of XX ovarian dysgenesis, diminish the association and functional synergy of Hop2-Mnd1 with both RAD51 and DMC1. Our findings help delineate the intricate manner in which Hop2-Mnd1 engages and functions with RAD51 and DMC1 in mammalian cells and speak to the possible cause of XX ovarian dysgenesis.

  5. Down-Regulated Receptor Interacting Protein 140 Is Involved in Lipopolysaccharide-Preconditioning-Induced Inactivation of Kupffer Cells and Attenuation of Hepatic Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Li; Jie, Xu; Yue, Li; Kang, Yang; Jianping, Gong; Zuojin, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning is known to attenuate hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/RI); however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the role of receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) on the protective effect of LPS preconditioning in hepatic I/RI involving Kupffer cells (KCs). Methods Sprague—Dawley rats underwent 70% hepatic ischemia for 90 minutes. LPS (100 μg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 24 hours before ischemia. Hepatic injury was observed using serum and liver samples. The LPS/NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB) pathway and hepatic RIP140 expression in isolated KCs were investigated. Results LPS preconditioning significantly inhibited hepatic RIP140 expression, NF-κB activation, and serum proinflammatory cytokine expression after I/RI, with an observation of remarkably reduced serum enzyme levels and histopathologic scores. Our experiments showed that protection effects could be effectively induced in KCs by LPS preconditioning, but couldn’t when RIP140 was overexpressed in KCs. Conversely, even without LPS preconditioning, protective effects were found in KCs if RIP140 expression was suppressed with siRNA. Conclusions Down-regulated RIP140 is involved in LPS-induced inactivation of KCs and hepatic I/RI attenuation. PMID:27723769

  6. Does negative affect mediate the relationship between daily PTSD symptoms and daily alcohol involvement in female rape victims? Evidence from 14 days of interactive voice response assessment

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Amy; Hagman, Brett T.; Moore, Kathleen; Mitchell, Jessica; Ehlke, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The negative reinforcement model of addiction posits that individuals may use alcohol to reduce with negative affective (NA) distress. The current study investigated the mediating effect of daily NA on the relationship between daily PTSD symptoms and same-day and next-day alcohol involvement (consumption and desire to drink) in a sample of 54 non-treatment-seeking female rape victims who completed 14 days of interactive voice response assessment. The moderating effect of lifetime alcohol use disorder diagnosis (AUD) on daily relationships was also examined. Multilevel models suggested that NA mediated the relationship between PTSD and same-day, but not next-day alcohol involvement. NA was greater on days characterized by more severe PTSD symptoms, and alcohol consumption and desire to drink were greater on days characterized by higher NA. Further, daily PTSD symptoms and NA were more strongly associated with same-day (but not next-day) alcohol consumption and desire to drink for women with an AUD than without. Results suggest that NA plays an important role in female rape victims’ daily alcohol use. Differences between women with and without an AUD indicate the need for treatment matching to sub-types of female rape victims. PMID:24731112

  7. Ethylene-responsive transcription factors interact with promoters of ADH and PDC involved in persimmon (Diospyros kaki) fruit de-astringency.

    PubMed

    Min, Ting; Yin, Xue-ren; Shi, Yan-na; Luo, Zheng-rong; Yao, Yun-cong; Grierson, Donald; Ferguson, Ian B; Chen, Kun-song

    2012-11-01

    The persimmon fruit is a particularly good model for studying fruit response to hypoxia, in particular, the hypoxia-response ERF (HRE) genes. An anaerobic environment reduces fruit astringency by converting soluble condensed tannins (SCTs) into an insoluble form. Although the physiology of de-astringency has been widely studied, its molecular control is poorly understood. Both CO(2) and ethylene treatments efficiently removed the astringency from 'Mopan' persimmon fruit, as indicated by a decrease in SCTs. Acetaldehyde, the putative agent for causing de-astringency, accumulated during these treatments, as did activities of the key enzymes of acetaldehyde synthesis, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). Eight DkADH and DkPDC genes were isolated, and three candidates for a role in de-astringency, DkADH1, DkPDC1, and DkPDC2, were characterized by transcriptional analysis in different tissues. The significance of these specific isoforms was confirmed by principal component analysis. Transient expression in leaf tissue showed that DkPDC2 decreased SCTs. Interactions of six hypoxia-responsive ERF genes and target promoters were tested in transient assays. The results indicated that two hypoxia-responsive ERF genes, DkERF9 and DkERF10, were involved in separately regulating the DkPDC2 and DkADH1 promoters. It is proposed that a DkERF-DkADH/DkPDC cascade is involved in regulating persimmon de-astringency.

  8. Ethylene-responsive transcription factors interact with promoters of ADH and PDC involved in persimmon (Diospyros kaki) fruit de-astringency

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ting; Yin, Xue-ren; Chen, Kun-song

    2012-01-01

    The persimmon fruit is a particularly good model for studying fruit response to hypoxia, in particular, the hypoxia-response ERF (HRE) genes. An anaerobic environment reduces fruit astringency by converting soluble condensed tannins (SCTs) into an insoluble form. Although the physiology of de-astringency has been widely studied, its molecular control is poorly understood. Both CO2 and ethylene treatments efficiently removed the astringency from ‘Mopan’ persimmon fruit, as indicated by a decrease in SCTs. Acetaldehyde, the putative agent for causing de-astringency, accumulated during these treatments, as did activities of the key enzymes of acetaldehyde synthesis, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). Eight DkADH and DkPDC genes were isolated, and three candidates for a role in de-astringency, DkADH1, DkPDC1, and DkPDC2, were characterized by transcriptional analysis in different tissues. The significance of these specific isoforms was confirmed by principal component analysis. Transient expression in leaf tissue showed that DkPDC2 decreased SCTs. Interactions of six hypoxia-responsive ERF genes and target promoters were tested in transient assays. The results indicated that two hypoxia-responsive ERF genes, DkERF9 and DkERF10, were involved in separately regulating the DkPDC2 and DkADH1 promoters. It is proposed that a DkERF–DkADH/DkPDC cascade is involved in regulating persimmon de-astringency. PMID:23095993

  9. ALDH16A1 is a novel non-catalytic enzyme that may be involved in the etiology of gout via protein–protein interactions with HPRT1

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Sandoval, Monica; Backos, Donald S.; Jackson, Brian C.; Chen, Ying; Reigan, Philip; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Johnson, Richard J.; Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gout, a common form of inflammatory arthritis, is strongly associated with elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia). A recent study in Icelanders identified a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ALDH16A1 gene, ALDH16A1*2, to be associated with gout and serum uric acid levels. ALDH16A1 is a novel and rather unique member of the ALDH superfamily in relation to its gene and protein structures. ALDH16 genes are present in fish, amphibians, protista, bacteria but absent from archaea, fungi and plants. In most mammalian species, two ALDH16A1 spliced variants (ALDH16A1, long form and ALDH16A1_v2, short form) have been identified and both are expressed in HepG-2, HK-2 and HK-293 human cell lines. The ALDH16 proteins contain two ALDH domains (as opposed to one in the other members of the superfamily), four transmembrane and one coiled-coil domains. The active site of ALDH16 proteins from bacterial, frog and lower animals contain the catalytically important cysteine residue (Cys-302); this residue is absent from the mammalian and fish orthologs. Molecular modeling predicts that both the short and long forms of human ALDH16A1 protein would lack catalytic activity but may interact with the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) protein, a key enzyme involved in uric acid metabolism and gout. Interestingly, such protein-protein interactions with HPRT1 are predicted to be impaired for the long or short forms of ALDH16A1*2. These results lead to the intriguing possibility that association between ALDH16A1 and HPRT1 may be required for optimal HPRT activity with disruption of this interaction possibly contributing to the hyperuricemia seen in ALDH16A1*2 carriers. PMID:23348497

  10. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus noncoding polyadenylated nuclear RNA interacts with virus- and host cell-encoded proteins and suppresses expression of genes involved in immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Pari, Gregory S

    2011-12-01

    During lytic infection, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses a polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). This noncoding RNA (ncRNA) is localized to the nucleus and is the most abundant viral RNA during lytic infection; however, to date, the role of PAN RNA in the virus life cycle is unknown. Many examples exist where ncRNAs have a defined key regulatory function controlling gene expression by various mechanisms. Our goal for this study was to identify putative binding partners for PAN RNA in an effort to elucidate a possible function for the transcript in KSHV infection. We employed an in vitro affinity protocol where PAN RNA was used as bait for factors present in BCBL-1 cell nuclear extract to show that PAN RNA interacts with several virus- and host cell-encoded factors, including histones H1 and H2A, mitochondrial and cellular single-stranded binding proteins (SSBPs), and interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). RNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed that PAN RNA interacted with these factors in the infected cell environment. A luciferase reporter assay showed that PAN RNA expression interfered with the ability of IRF4/PU.1 to activate the interleukin-4 (IL-4) promoter, strongly suggesting a role for PAN RNA in immune modulation. Since the proteomic screen and functional data suggested a role in immune responses, we investigated if constitutive PAN RNA expression could affect other genes involved in immune responses. PAN RNA expression decreased expression of gamma interferon, interleukin-18, alpha interferon 16, and RNase L. These data strongly suggest that PAN RNA interacts with viral and cellular proteins and can function as an immune modulator. PMID:21957289

  11. A Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System (PhyNNeSS) for multimodal interactive virtual environments involving nonlinear deformable objects

    PubMed Central

    De, Suvranu; Deo, Dhannanjay; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Arikatla, Venkata S.

    2012-01-01

    Background While an update rate of 30 Hz is considered adequate for real time graphics, a much higher update rate of about 1 kHz is necessary for haptics. Physics-based modeling of deformable objects, especially when large nonlinear deformations and complex nonlinear material properties are involved, at these very high rates is one of the most challenging tasks in the development of real time simulation systems. While some specialized solutions exist, there is no general solution for arbitrary nonlinearities. Methods In this work we present PhyNNeSS - a Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System - to address this long-standing technical challenge. The first step is an off-line pre-computation step in which a database is generated by applying carefully prescribed displacements to each node of the finite element models of the deformable objects. In the next step, the data is condensed into a set of coefficients describing neurons of a Radial Basis Function network (RBFN). During real-time computation, these neural networks are used to reconstruct the deformation fields as well as the interaction forces. Results We present realistic simulation examples from interactive surgical simulation with real time force feedback. As an example, we have developed a deformable human stomach model and a Penrose-drain model used in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training tool box. Conclusions A unique computational modeling system has been developed that is capable of simulating the response of nonlinear deformable objects in real time. The method distinguishes itself from previous efforts in that a systematic physics-based pre-computational step allows training of neural networks which may be used in real time simulations. We show, through careful error analysis, that the scheme is scalable, with the accuracy being controlled by the number of neurons used in the simulation. PhyNNeSS has been integrated into SoFMIS (Software Framework for Multimodal

  12. A Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System (PhyNNeSS) for multimodal interactive virtual environments involving nonlinear deformable objects.

    PubMed

    De, Suvranu; Deo, Dhannanjay; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Arikatla, Venkata S

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND: While an update rate of 30 Hz is considered adequate for real time graphics, a much higher update rate of about 1 kHz is necessary for haptics. Physics-based modeling of deformable objects, especially when large nonlinear deformations and complex nonlinear material properties are involved, at these very high rates is one of the most challenging tasks in the development of real time simulation systems. While some specialized solutions exist, there is no general solution for arbitrary nonlinearities. METHODS: In this work we present PhyNNeSS - a Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System - to address this long-standing technical challenge. The first step is an off-line pre-computation step in which a database is generated by applying carefully prescribed displacements to each node of the finite element models of the deformable objects. In the next step, the data is condensed into a set of coefficients describing neurons of a Radial Basis Function network (RBFN). During real-time computation, these neural networks are used to reconstruct the deformation fields as well as the interaction forces. RESULTS: We present realistic simulation examples from interactive surgical simulation with real time force feedback. As an example, we have developed a deformable human stomach model and a Penrose-drain model used in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training tool box. CONCLUSIONS: A unique computational modeling system has been developed that is capable of simulating the response of nonlinear deformable objects in real time. The method distinguishes itself from previous efforts in that a systematic physics-based pre-computational step allows training of neural networks which may be used in real time simulations. We show, through careful error analysis, that the scheme is scalable, with the accuracy being controlled by the number of neurons used in the simulation. PhyNNeSS has been integrated into SoFMIS (Software Framework for Multimodal

  13. Tick capillary feeding for the study of proteins involved in tick-pathogen interactions as potential antigens for the control of tick infestation and pathogen infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ticks represent a significant health risk to animals and humans due to the variety of pathogens they can transmit during feeding. The traditional use of chemicals to control ticks has serious drawbacks, including the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and environmental contamination with chemical residues. Vaccination with the tick midgut antigen BM86 was shown to be a good alternative for cattle tick control. However, results vary considerably between tick species and geographic location. Therefore, new antigens are required for the development of vaccines controlling both tick infestations and pathogen infection/transmission. Tick proteins involved in tick-pathogen interactions may provide good candidate protective antigens for these vaccines, but appropriate screening procedures are needed to select the best candidates. Methods In this study, we selected proteins involved in tick-Anaplasma (Subolesin and SILK) and tick-Babesia (TROSPA) interactions and used in vitro capillary feeding to characterize their potential as antigens for the control of cattle tick infestations and infection with Anaplasma marginale and Babesia bigemina. Purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies were generated against recombinant SUB, SILK and TROSPA and added to uninfected or infected bovine blood to capillary-feed female Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks. Tick weight, oviposition and pathogen DNA levels were determined in treated and control ticks. Results The specificity of purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies against tick recombinant proteins was confirmed by Western blot and against native proteins in tick cell lines and tick tissues using immunofluorescence. Capillary-fed ticks ingested antibodies added to the blood meal and the effect of these antibodies on tick weight and oviposition was shown. However, no effect was observed on pathogen DNA levels. Conclusions These results highlighted the advantages and some of the disadvantages of in vitro tick capillary

  14. The cytosolic termini of the beta- and gamma-ENaC subunits are involved in the functional interactions between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Ji, H L; Chalfant, M L; Jovov, B; Lockhart, J P; Parker, S B; Fuller, C M; Stanton, B A; Benos, D J

    2000-09-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are co-localized in the apical membrane of many epithelia. These channels are essential for electrolyte and water secretion and/or reabsorption. In cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, a hyperactivated epithelial Na(+) conductance operates in parallel with defective Cl(-) secretion. Several groups have shown that CFTR down-regulates ENaC activity, but the mechanisms and the regulation of CFTR by ENaC are unknown. To test the hypothesis that ENaC and CFTR regulate each other, and to identify the region(s) of ENaC involved in the interaction between CFTR and ENaC, rENaC and its mutants were co-expressed with CFTR in Xenopus oocytes. Whole cell macroscopic sodium currents revealed that wild type (wt) alphabetagamma-rENaC-induced Na(+) current was inhibited by co-expression of CFTR, and further inhibited when CFTR was activated with a cAMP-raising mixture (CKT). Conversely, alphabetagamma-rENaC stimulated CFTR-mediated Cl(-) currents up to approximately 6-fold. Deletion mutations in the intracellular tails of the three rENaC subunits suggested that the carboxyl terminus of the beta subunit was required both for the down-regulation of ENaC by activated CFTR and the up-regulation of CFTR by ENaC. However, both the carboxyl terminus of the beta subunit and the amino terminus of the gamma subunit were essential for the down-regulation of rENaC by unstimulated CFTR. Interestingly, down-regulation of rENaC by activated CFTR was Cl(-)-dependent, while stimulation of CFTR by rENaC was not dependent on either cytoplasmic Na(+) or a depolarized membrane potential. In summary, there appear to be at least two different sites in ENaC involved in the intermolecular interaction between CFTR and ENaC. PMID:10821834

  15. Interactions of endosulfan and methoxychlor involving CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 in human HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Savary, Camille C; Jossé, Rozenn; Bruyère, Arnaud; Guillet, Fabrice; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André

    2014-08-01

    Humans are usually exposed to several pesticides simultaneously; consequently, combined actions between pesticides themselves or between pesticides and other chemicals need to be addressed in the risk assessment. Many pesticides are efficient activators of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), two major nuclear receptors that are also activated by other substrates. In the present work, we searched for interactions between endosulfan and methoxychlor, two organochlorine pesticides whose major routes of metabolism involve CAR- and PXR-regulated CYP3A4 and CYP2B6, and whose mechanisms of action in humans remain poorly understood. For this purpose, HepaRG cells were treated with both pesticides separately or in mixture for 24 hours or 2 weeks at concentrations relevant to human exposure levels. In combination they exerted synergistic cytotoxic effects. Whatever the duration of treatment, both compounds increased CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 mRNA levels while differently affecting their corresponding activities. Endosulfan exerted a direct reversible inhibition of CYP3A4 activity that was confirmed in human liver microsomes. By contrast, methoxychlor induced this activity. The effects of the mixture on CYP3A4 activity were equal to the sum of those of each individual compound, suggesting an additive effect of each pesticide. Despite CYP2B6 activity being unchanged and increased with endosulfan and methoxychlor, respectively, no change was observed with their mixture, supporting an antagonistic effect. Altogether, our data suggest that CAR and PXR activators endosulfan and methoxychlor can interact together and with other exogenous substrates in human hepatocytes. Their effects on CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 activities could have important consequences if extrapolated to the in vivo situation.

  16. Constitutive expression of IDO by dendritic cells of mesenteric lymph nodes: functional involvement of the CTLA-4/B7 and CCL22/CCR4 interactions.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Toshiharu; Jang, Myoung Ho; Guo, Zijin; Yamasaki, Mikako; Hirata, Takako; Bai, Zhongbin; Tsuji, Noriko M; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Yoshie, Osamu; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Takikawa, Osamu; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2009-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) express the immunoregulatory enzyme IDO in response to certain inflammatory stimuli, but it is unclear whether DCs express this enzyme under steady-state conditions in vivo. In this study, we report that the DCs in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) constitutively express functional IDO, which metabolizes tryptophan to kynurenine. In line with a previous report that regulatory T cells (Tregs) can induce IDO in DCs via the CTLA-4/B7 interaction, a substantial proportion of the MLN DCs were located in juxtaposition to Tregs, whereas this tendency was not observed for splenic DCs, which do not express IDO constitutively. When CTLA-4 was selectively deleted in Tregs, the frequency of IDO-expressing DCs in MLNs decreased significantly, confirming CTLA-4's role in IDO expression by MLN DCs. We also found that the MLN DCs produced CCL22, which can attract Tregs via CCR4, and that the phagocytosis of autologous apoptotic cells induced CCL22 expression in CCL22 mRNA-negative DCs. Mice genetically deficient in the receptor for CCL22, CCR4, showed markedly reduced IDO expression in MLN-DCs, supporting the involvement of the CCL22/CCR4 axis in IDO induction. Together with our previous observation that MLN DCs contain much intracytoplasmic cellular debris in vivo, these results indicate that reciprocal interactions between the DCs and Tregs via both B7/CTLA-4 and CCL22/CCR4 lead to IDO induction in MLN DCs, which may be initiated and/or augmented by the phagocytosis of autologous apoptotic cells by intestinal DCs. Such a mechanism may help induce the specific milieu in MLNs that is required for the induction of oral tolerance.

  17. Gene expression patterns in response to pathogen challenge and interaction with hemolin suggest that the Yippee protein of Antheraea pernyi is involved in the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yuxuan; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Wei, Guoqing; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2016-07-01

    Yippee was first identified as a protein that physically interacts with the Hemolin protein of Hyalophora cecropia. In this study, we identified a gene with a 366bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a 121 amino acid protein containing a conserved Yippee domain. We named this gene Ap-Yippee (Yippee gene from Antheraea pernyi), and investigated the role of the protein in the host immune response. A recombinant Ap-Yippee protein was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and polyclonal antibodies were produced against the recombinant protein. Real-time PCR and a Western blot analysis revealed that Ap-Yippee is expressed in the hemocytes, Malpighian tubules, midgut, silk gland, epidermis, and fat bodies of A. pernyi, with the highest expression level observed in Malpighian tubules. The fifth instar larvae of A. pernyi were challenged by injecting them with nucleopolyhedrovirus (AP-NPV), the Gram-negative bacterium E. coli, the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus, or the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana. These challenges with diverse pathogens resulted in differential expression patterns of the protein. A knockdown of the Ap-Yippee gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection had a significant influence on the expression of the hemolin in the pupae which was confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, a possible protein-protein interaction between Ap-Yippee and Hemolin was explored by Far-Western blotting. Therefore, our data suggest that the Ap-Yippee protein is involved in a pathway that regulates the immune response of insects. PMID:27261060

  18. Prevalence and type of drug–drug interactions involving ART in patients attending a specialist HIV outpatient clinic in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Seden, K.; Merry, C.; Hewson, R.; Siccardi, M.; Lamorde, M.; Byakika-Kibwika, P.; Laker, E.; Parkes-Ratanshi, R.; Back, D. J.; Khoo, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Scale-up of HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa has rapidly increased, necessitating evaluation of medication safety in these settings. Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) involving antiretrovirals (ARVs) in sub-Saharan Africa are poorly characterized. We evaluated the prevalence and type of ARV DDIs in Ugandan outpatients and identified the patients most at risk. Methods A total of 2000 consecutive patients receiving ARVs at the Infectious Diseases Institute, Kampala were studied. The most recent prescription for each patient was screened for clinically significant DDIs using www.hiv-druginteractions.org. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for DDIs. A screening tool was developed using significant risk factors and tested in a further 500 patients. Results Clinically significant DDIs were observed in 374 (18.7%) patients, with a total of 514 DDIs observed. Only 0.2% of DDIs involved a contraindicated combination. Comedications commonly associated with DDIs were antibiotics (4.8% of 2000 patients), anthelmintics (2.2%) and antifungals (3.5%). Patient age, gender, CD4 count and weight did not affect risk of DDIs. In multivariable analysis, the patient factors that independently increased risk of DDIs were two or more comedications (P < 0.0001), a PI-containing ARV regimen (P < 0.0001), use of an anti-infective (P < 0.0001) and WHO clinical stage 3–4 (P = 0.04). A scoring system based on having at least two of these risk factors identified between 75% and 90% of DDIs in a validation cohort. Conclusions Significant ARV DDIs occur at similar rates in resource-limited settings and developed countries; however, the comedications frequently causing DDIs differ. Development of tools that are relevant to particular settings should be a priority to assist with prevention and management of DDIs. PMID:26286575

  19. Interactive Effects of Dietary Lipid and Phenotypic Feed Efficiency on the Expression of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Involved in the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Eya, Jonathan C.; Ukwuaba, Vitalis O.; Yossa, Rodrigue; Gannam, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    A 2 × 3 factorial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid level on the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in all-female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Three practical diets with a fixed crude protein content of 40%, formulated to contain 10% (40/10), 20% (40/20) and 30% (40/30) dietary lipid, were fed to apparent satiety to triplicate groups of either low-feed efficient (F120; 217.66 ± 2.24 g initial average mass) or high-feed efficient (F136; 205.47 ± 1.27 g) full-sib families of fish, twice per day, for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, the results showed that there is an interactive effect of the dietary lipid levels and the phenotypic feed efficiency (growth rate and feed efficiency) on the expression of the mitochondrial genes nd1 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1), cytb (Cytochrome b), cox1 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1), cox2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 2) and atp6 (ATP synthase subunit 6) and nuclear genes ucp2α (uncoupling proteins 2 alpha), ucp2β (uncoupling proteins 2 beta), pparα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha), pparβ (peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor beta) and ppargc1α (proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) in fish liver, intestine and muscle, except on ppargc1α in the muscle which was affected by the diet and the family separately. Also, the results revealed that the expression of mitochondrial genes is associated with that of nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in fish liver, intestine and muscle. Furthermore, this work showed that the expression of mitochondrial genes parallels with the expression of genes encoding uncoupling proteins (UCP) in the liver and the intestine of rainbow trout. This study for the first time presents the molecular basis of the effects of dietary lipid level on mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain in fish. PMID:25853266

  20. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C ABI1 interacts with type I ACC synthases and is involved in the regulation of ozone-induced ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwików, Agnieszka; Cieśla, Agata; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Mituła, Filip; Tajdel, Małgorzata; Gałgański, Łukasz; Ziółkowski, Piotr A; Kubiak, Piotr; Małecka, Arleta; Piechalak, Aneta; Szabat, Marta; Górska, Alicja; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Ibragimow, Izabela; Sadowski, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Ethylene plays a crucial role in various biological processes and therefore its biosynthesis is strictly regulated by multiple mechanisms. Posttranslational regulation, which is pivotal in controlling ethylene biosynthesis, impacts 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) protein stability via the complex interplay of specific factors. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana protein phosphatase type 2C, ABI1, a negative regulator of abscisic acid signaling, is involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis under oxidative stress conditions. We found that ABI1 interacts with ACS6 and dephosphorylates its C-terminal fragment, a target of the stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase, MPK6. In addition, ABI1 controls MPK6 activity directly and by this means also affects the ACS6 phosphorylation level. Consistently with this, ozone-induced ethylene production was significantly higher in an ABI1 knockout strain (abi1td) than in wild-type plants. Importantly, an increase in stress-induced ethylene production in the abi1td mutant was compensated by a higher ascorbate redox state and elevated antioxidant activities. Overall, the results of this study provide evidence that ABI1 restricts ethylene synthesis by affecting the activity of ACS6. The ABI1 contribution to stress phenotype underpins its role in the interplay between the abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene signaling pathways. PMID:24637173

  1. SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) of the intestinal nematode Strongyloides ratti is involved in mucosa-associated parasite-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Anandarajah, Emmanuela M; Ditgen, Dana; Hansmann, Jan; Erttmann, Klaus D; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W

    2016-06-01

    The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), found in the excretory/secretory products of Strongyloides ratti, is most strongly expressed in parasitic females. Since SPARC proteins are involved in the modulation of cell-matrix interactions, a role of the secreted S. ratti SPARC (Sr-SPARC) in the manifestation of the parasite in the host's intestine is postulated. The full-length cDNA of Sr-SPARC was identified and the protein was recombinantly expressed. The purified protein was biologically active, able to bind calcium, and to attach to mucosa-associated human cells. Addition of Sr-SPARC to an in vitro mucosal three-dimensional-cell culture model led to a time-dependent release of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-22, IL-10 and TSLP. Of importance, exposure with Sr-SPARC fostered wound closure in an intestinal epithelial cell model. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that SPARC released from the nematode is a multifunctional protein affecting the mucosal immune system. PMID:27268729

  2. The Cell Wall Protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is Involved in Chronological Life Span, Morphogenesis, Cell Wall Regeneration, Stress Tolerance, and Host-Cell Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderon, Jose A; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M; Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-01

    Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity (CWI) and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the CWI pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a "veil growth," never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain.

  3. The Cell Wall Protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is Involved in Chronological Life Span, Morphogenesis, Cell Wall Regeneration, Stress Tolerance, and Host–Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderon, Jose A.; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-01

    Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity (CWI) and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the CWI pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a “veil growth,” never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain. PMID:26870022

  4. Protein-Protein and Peptide-Protein Interactions of NudE-Like 1 (Ndel1): A Protein Involved in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M A F; Felicori, L F; Fresqui, M A C; Yonamine, C M

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a devastating chronic mental disease determined by genetic and environmental factors, which susceptibility may involve an impaired neural migration during the neurodevelopmental process. Several candidate risk genes potentially associated with SCZ were related to the formation of protein complexes that ultimately mediate alterations in the neuroplasticity. The most studied SCZ risk gene is the Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene, which functions seem to depend on the binding with cytoskeleton proteins, as the Nuclear-distribution gene E homolog like-1 (Ndel1) protein among others. Interestingly, Ndel1 is the only binding partner of DISC1 proteins with oligopeptidase activity, besides playing roles in multiple processes, including cytoskeletal organization, cell signaling, neuron migration, and neurite outgrowth. It is still not clear if the protein-protein interaction between Ndel1 and DISC1 is enough to explain all cellular functions attributed to these proteins, but there are several lines of evidence suggesting the importance of the catalytic activity of Ndel1 for the neurite outgrowth and neuron migration during embryogenesis. Recent works of the group have demonstrated the modulation of Ndel1 activity by DISC1, which is hypothetically impaired in SCZ patients. In fact, more recently, we also showed a lower Ndel1 activity in the plasma of SCZ patients compared to control health subjects, but the physiopathological significance of this feature is still unknown. Here we discuss Ndel1 ligands involved in protein-protein complex formations related to neurodevelopmental diseases, as (1) lissencephaly or Miller-Dieker Syndrome (MDS), which is characterized by the typical craniofacial features and abnormal smooth cerebral surface, and as (2) SCZ, since they both seem to be determined by defects in neuronal migration. Although impaired lissencephaly protein Lis1 complex formation with Ndel1 is the leading cause of lissencephaly, this

  5. Protein-Protein and Peptide-Protein Interactions of NudE-Like 1 (Ndel1): A Protein Involved in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M A F; Felicori, L F; Fresqui, M A C; Yonamine, C M

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a devastating chronic mental disease determined by genetic and environmental factors, which susceptibility may involve an impaired neural migration during the neurodevelopmental process. Several candidate risk genes potentially associated with SCZ were related to the formation of protein complexes that ultimately mediate alterations in the neuroplasticity. The most studied SCZ risk gene is the Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene, which functions seem to depend on the binding with cytoskeleton proteins, as the Nuclear-distribution gene E homolog like-1 (Ndel1) protein among others. Interestingly, Ndel1 is the only binding partner of DISC1 proteins with oligopeptidase activity, besides playing roles in multiple processes, including cytoskeletal organization, cell signaling, neuron migration, and neurite outgrowth. It is still not clear if the protein-protein interaction between Ndel1 and DISC1 is enough to explain all cellular functions attributed to these proteins, but there are several lines of evidence suggesting the importance of the catalytic activity of Ndel1 for the neurite outgrowth and neuron migration during embryogenesis. Recent works of the group have demonstrated the modulation of Ndel1 activity by DISC1, which is hypothetically impaired in SCZ patients. In fact, more recently, we also showed a lower Ndel1 activity in the plasma of SCZ patients compared to control health subjects, but the physiopathological significance of this feature is still unknown. Here we discuss Ndel1 ligands involved in protein-protein complex formations related to neurodevelopmental diseases, as (1) lissencephaly or Miller-Dieker Syndrome (MDS), which is characterized by the typical craniofacial features and abnormal smooth cerebral surface, and as (2) SCZ, since they both seem to be determined by defects in neuronal migration. Although impaired lissencephaly protein Lis1 complex formation with Ndel1 is the leading cause of lissencephaly, this

  6. Taci Is a Traf-Interacting Receptor for Tall-1, a Tumor Necrosis Factor Family Member Involved in B Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xing-Zhong; Treanor, James; Senaldi, Giorgio; Khare, Sanjay D.; Boone, Tom; Kelley, Michael; Theill, Lars E.; Colombero, Anne; Solovyev, Irina; Lee, Frances; McCabe, Susan; Elliott, Robin; Miner, Kent; Hawkins, Nessa; Guo, Jane; Stolina, Marina; Yu, Gang; Wang, Judy; Delaney, John; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Boyle, William J.; Hsu, Hailing

    2000-01-01

    We and others recently reported tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and apoptosis ligand–related leukocyte-expressed ligand 1 (TALL-1) as a novel member of the TNF ligand family that is functionally involved in B cell proliferation. Transgenic mice overexpressing TALL-1 have severe B cell hyperplasia and lupus-like autoimmune disease. Here, we describe expression cloning of a cell surface receptor for TALL-1 from a human Burkitt's lymphoma RAJI cell library. The cloned receptor is identical to the previously reported TNF receptor (TNFR) homologue transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand (CAML) interactor (TACI). Murine TACI was subsequently isolated from the mouse B lymphoma A20 cells. Human and murine TACI share 54% identity overall. Human TACI exhibits high binding affinities to both human and murine TALL-1. Soluble TACI extracellular domain protein specifically blocks TALL-1–mediated B cell proliferation without affecting CD40- or lipopolysaccharide-mediated B cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, when injected into mice, soluble TACI inhibits antibody production to both T cell–dependent and –independent antigens. By yeast two-hybrid screening of a B cell library with TACI intracellular domain, we identified that, like many other TNFR family members, TACI intracellular domain interacts with TNFR-associated factor (TRAF)2, 5, and 6. Correspondingly, TACI activation in a B cell line results in nuclear factor κB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation. The identification and characterization of the receptor for TALL-1 provides useful information for the development of a treatment for B cell–mediated autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:10880535

  7. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  8. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Bmsage Is Involved in Regulation of fibroin H-chain Gene via Interaction with SGF1 in Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong-Yan; Hu, Wen-Bo; Zhou, Meng-Ting; Nie, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Yin-Xia; Peng, Zhang-Chuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qing-You

    2014-01-01

    Silk glands are specialized in the synthesis of several secretory proteins. Expression of genes encoding the silk proteins in Bombyx mori silk glands with strict territorial and developmental specificities is regulated by many transcription factors. In this study, we have characterized B. mori sage, which is closely related to sage in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. It is termed Bmsage; it encodes transcription factor Bmsage, which belongs to the Mesp subfamily, containing a basic helix–loop–helix motif. Bmsage transcripts were detected specifically in the silk glands of B. mori larvae through RT-PCR analysis. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed the Bmsage protein existed exclusively in B. mori middle and posterior silk gland cells. Bmsage has a low level of expression in the 4th instar molting stages, which increases gradually in the 5th instar feeding stages and then declines from the wandering to the pupation stages. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested the expression level of Bmsage in a high silk strain was higher compared to a lower silk strain on day 3 of the larval 5th instar. Furthermore, far western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed the Bmsage protein interacted with the fork head transcription factor silk gland factor 1 (SGF1). An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed the complex of Bmsage and SGF1 proteins bound to the A and B elements in the promoter of fibroin H-chain gene(fib-H), respectively. Luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed the complex of Bmsage and SGF1 proteins increased the expression of fib-H. Together, these results suggest Bmsage is involved in the regulation of the expression of fib-H by being together with SGF1 in B. mori PSG cells. PMID:24740008

  9. Activator- and repressor-type MYB transcription factors are involved in chilling injury induced flesh lignification in loquat via their interactions with the phenylpropanoid pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Yin, Xue-ren; Zeng, Jiao-ke; Ge, Hang; Song, Min; Xu, Chang-jie; Li, Xian; Ferguson, Ian B.; Chen, Kun-song

    2014-01-01

    Lignin biosynthesis and its transcriptional regulatory networks have been studied in model plants and woody trees. However, lignification also occurs in some fleshy fruit and has rarely been considered in this way. Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) is one such convenient tissue for exploring the transcription factors involved in regulating fruit flesh lignification. Firmness and lignin content of ‘Luoyangqing’ loquat were fund to increase during low-temperature storage as a typical symptom of chilling injury, while heat treatment (HT) and low-temperature conditioning (LTC) effectively alleviated them. Two novel EjMYB genes, EjMYB1 and EjMYB2, were isolated and were found to be localized in the nucleus. These genes responded differently to low temperature, with EjMYB1 induced and EjMYB2 inhibited at 0 °C. They also showed different temperature responses under HT and LTC conditions, and may be responsible for different regulation of flesh lignification at the transcriptional level. Transactivation assays indicated that EjMYB1 and EjMYB2 are a transcriptional activator and repressor, respectively. EjMYB1 activated promoters of both Arabidopsis and loquat lignin biosynthesis genes, while EjMYB2 countered the inductive effects of EjMYB1. This finding was also supported by transient overexpression in tobacco. Regulation of lignification by EjMYB1 and EjMYB2 is likely to be achieved via their competitive interaction with AC elements in the promoter region of lignin biosynthesis genes such as Ej4CL1. PMID:24860186

  10. The yeast nucleolar protein Cbf5p is involved in rRNA biosynthesis and interacts genetically with the RNA polymerase I transcription factor RRN3.

    PubMed Central

    Cadwell, C; Yoon, H J; Zebarjadian, Y; Carbon, J

    1997-01-01

    Yeast Cbf5p was originally isolated as a low-affinity centromeric DNA binding protein (W. Jiang, K. Middleton, H.-J. Yoon, C. Fouquet, and J. Carbon, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:4884-4893, 1993). Cbf5p also binds microtubules in vitro and interacts genetically with two known centromere-related protein genes (NDC10/CBF2 and MCK1). However, Cbf5p was found to be nucleolar and is highly homologous to the rat nucleolar protein NAP57, which coimmunoprecipitates with Nopp140 and which is postulated to be involved in nucleolar-cytoplasmic shuttling (U. T. Meier, and G. Blobel, J. Cell Biol. 127:1505-1514, 1994). The temperature-sensitive cbf5-1 mutant demonstrates a pronounced defect in rRNA biosynthesis at restrictive temperatures, while tRNA transcription and pre-rRNA and pre-tRNA cleavage processing appear normal. The cbf5-1 mutant cells are deficient in cytoplasmic ribosomal subunits at both permissive and restrictive temperatures. A high-copy-number yeast genomic library was screened for genes that suppress the cbf5-1 temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. SYC1 (suppressor of yeast cbf5-1) was identified as a multicopy suppressor of cbf5-1 and subsequently was found to be identical to RRN3, an RNA polymerase I transcription factor. A cbf5delta null mutant is not rescued by plasmid pNOY103 containing a yeast 35S rRNA gene under the control of a Pol II promoter, indicating that Cbf5p has one or more essential functions in addition to its role in rRNA transcription. PMID:9315678

  11. Renal drug metabolism in humans: the potential for drug–endobiotic interactions involving cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)

    PubMed Central

    Knights, Kathleen M; Rowland, Andrew; Miners, John O

    2013-01-01

    Although knowledge of human renal cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes and their role in xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism is limited compared with hepatic drug and chemical metabolism, accumulating evidence indicates that human kidney has significant metabolic capacity. Of the drug metabolizing P450s in families 1 to 3, there is definitive evidence for only CYP 2B6 and 3A5 expression in human kidney. CYP 1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2C19, 2D6 and 2E1 are not expressed in human kidney, while data for CYP 2C8, 2C9 and 3A4 expression are equivocal. It is further known that several P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and eicosanoids are expressed in human kidney, CYP 4A11, 4F2, 4F8, 4F11 and 4F12. With the current limited evidence of drug substrates for human renal P450s drug–endobiotic interactions arising from inhibition of renal P450s, particularly effects on arachidonic acid metabolism, appear unlikely. With respect to the UGTs, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, 1A9, 2B4, 2B7 and 2B17 are expressed in human kidney, whereas UGT 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A8, 1A10, 2B10, 2B11 and 2B15 are not. The most abundantly expressed renal UGTs are 1A9 and 2B7, which play a significant role in the glucuronidation of drugs, arachidonic acid, prostaglandins, leukotrienes and P450 derived arachidonic acid metabolites. Modulation by drug substrates (e.g. NSAIDs) of the intrarenal activity of UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 has the potential to perturb the metabolism of renal mediators including aldosterone, prostaglandins and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, thus disrupting renal homeostasis. PMID:23362865

  12. Renal drug metabolism in humans: the potential for drug-endobiotic interactions involving cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT).

    PubMed

    Knights, Kathleen M; Rowland, Andrew; Miners, John O

    2013-10-01

    Although knowledge of human renal cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes and their role in xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism is limited compared with hepatic drug and chemical metabolism, accumulating evidence indicates that human kidney has significant metabolic capacity. Of the drug metabolizing P450s in families 1 to 3, there is definitive evidence for only CYP 2B6 and 3A5 expression in human kidney. CYP 1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2C19, 2D6 and 2E1 are not expressed in human kidney, while data for CYP 2C8, 2C9 and 3A4 expression are equivocal. It is further known that several P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and eicosanoids are expressed in human kidney, CYP 4A11, 4F2, 4F8, 4F11 and 4F12. With the current limited evidence of drug substrates for human renal P450s drug-endobiotic interactions arising from inhibition of renal P450s, particularly effects on arachidonic acid metabolism, appear unlikely. With respect to the UGTs, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, 1A9, 2B4, 2B7 and 2B17 are expressed in human kidney, whereas UGT 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A8, 1A10, 2B10, 2B11 and 2B15 are not. The most abundantly expressed renal UGTs are 1A9 and 2B7, which play a significant role in the glucuronidation of drugs, arachidonic acid, prostaglandins, leukotrienes and P450 derived arachidonic acid metabolites. Modulation by drug substrates (e.g. NSAIDs) of the intrarenal activity of UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 has the potential to perturb the metabolism of renal mediators including aldosterone, prostaglandins and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, thus disrupting renal homeostasis. PMID:23362865

  13. Interaction of Phospholipase A/Acyltransferase-3 with Pex19p: A POSSIBLE INVOLVEMENT IN THE DOWN-REGULATION OF PEROXISOMES.

    PubMed

    Uyama, Toru; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Kono, Nozomu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Inoue, Tomohito; Araki, Nobukazu; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Natsuo

    2015-07-10

    Phospholipase A/acyltransferase (PLA/AT)-3 (also known as H-rev107 or AdPLA) was originally isolated as a tumor suppressor and was later shown to have phospholipase A1/A2 activity. We have also found that the overexpression of PLA/AT-3 in mammalian cells results in specific disappearance of peroxisomes. However, its molecular mechanism remained unclear. In the present study, we first established a HEK293 cell line, which stably expresses a fluorescent peroxisome marker protein (DsRed2-Peroxi) and expresses PLA/AT-3 in a tetracycline-dependent manner. The treatment with tetracycline, as expected, caused disappearance of peroxisomes within 24 h, as revealed by diffuse signals of DsRed2-Peroxi and a remarkable decrease in a peroxisomal membrane protein, PMP70. A time-dependent decrease in ether-type lipid levels was also seen. Because the activation of LC3, a marker of autophagy, was not observed, the involvement of autophagy was unlikely. Among various peroxins responsible for peroxisome biogenesis, Pex19p functions as a chaperone protein for the transportation of peroxisomal membrane proteins. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that PLA/AT-3 binds to Pex19p through its N-terminal proline-rich and C-terminal hydrophobic domains. The protein level and enzyme activity of PLA/AT-3 were increased by its coexpression with Pex19p. Moreover, PLA/AT-3 inhibited the binding of Pex19 to peroxisomal membrane proteins, such as Pex3p and Pex11βp. A catalytically inactive point mutant of PLA/AT-3 could bind to Pex19p but did not inhibit the chaperone activity of Pex19p. Altogether, these results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for peroxisome biogenesis through the interaction between Pex19p and PLA/AT-3.

  14. The modulation by neurosteroids of the scopolamine-induced learning impairment in mice involves an interaction with sigma1 (sigma1) receptors.

    PubMed

    Urani, A; Privat, A; Maurice, T

    1998-07-13

    Neurosteroids have been reported to modulate learning and memory processes in aged animals and in pharmacological models of amnesia. We report here the effects of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), pregnenolone sulfate (PREGS), and progesterone (PROG) on the learning impairment induced in mice by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, scopolamine. Spatial working memory was examined using the spontaneous alternation behavior in a Y-maze and long-term memory using place learning in a rectangular water-maze adapted for mice. Both DHEAS and PREGS (5-20 mg/kg, s.c.) prevented dose-dependently and significantly the scopolamine (2 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced alternation deficits. PROG (2-20 mg/kg, s.c.) failed to affect the scopolamine-induced deficits, but blocked, at 20 mg/kg, the beneficial effects induced by DHEAS or PREGS. In the water-maze, DHEAS (20 mg/kg) attenuated significantly the scopolamine-induced deficits, as observed during the acquisition sessions or the retention test. PROG (2, 20 mg/kg) did not affect the control or scopolamine-treated group performances, but blocked the ameliorating effect of DHEAS. Furthermore, in both tests, the selective sigma1 (sigma1) receptor antagonist NE-100 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) failed to affect the behaviors showed by the control or scopolamine-treated groups, but it blocked the ameliorating effects induced by DHEAS or PREGS. These results confirm the modulating role of neurosteroids in learning and memory processes and demonstrate that their modulation of the cholinergic systems involves an interaction with sigma1 receptors.

  15. Activator- and repressor-type MYB transcription factors are involved in chilling injury induced flesh lignification in loquat via their interactions with the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Yin, Xue-ren; Zeng, Jiao-ke; Ge, Hang; Song, Min; Xu, Chang-Jie; Li, Xian; Ferguson, Ian B; Chen, Kun-song

    2014-08-01

    Lignin biosynthesis and its transcriptional regulatory networks have been studied in model plants and woody trees. However, lignification also occurs in some fleshy fruit and has rarely been considered in this way. Loquat ( Eriobotrya japonica ) is one such convenient tissue for exploring the transcription factors involved in regulating fruit flesh lignification. Firmness and lignin content of 'Luoyangqing' loquat were fund to increase during low-temperature storage as a typical symptom of chilling injury, while heat treatment (HT) and low-temperature conditioning (LTC) effectively alleviated them. Two novel EjMYB genes, EjMYB1 and EjMYB2, were isolated and were found to be localized in the nucleus. These genes responded differently to low temperature, with EjMYB1 induced and EjMYB2 inhibited at 0 °C. They also showed different temperature responses under HT and LTC conditions, and may be responsible for different regulation of flesh lignification at the transcriptional level. Transactivation assays indicated that EjMYB1 and EjMYB2 are a transcriptional activator and repressor, respectively. EjMYB1 activated promoters of both Arabidopsis and loquat lignin biosynthesis genes, while EjMYB2 countered the inductive effects of EjMYB1. This finding was also supported by transient overexpression in tobacco. Regulation of lignification by EjMYB1 and EjMYB2 is likely to be achieved via their competitive interaction with AC elements in the promoter region of lignin biosynthesis genes such as Ej4CL1.

  16. Effects of “excessive” exciton interactions in polarized IR spectra of the hydrogen bond in 2-butynoic acid crystals: Proton transfer induced by dynamical co-operative interactions involving hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flakus, Henryk T.; Hachuła, Barbara

    2008-04-01

    In this article, we present the results of our study of polarized IR spectra of the hydrogen bond in crystals of 2-butynoic acid (CH 3C tbnd CCOOH) as well as in crystals of its deuterium derivative (CH 3C tbnd CCOOD). 2-Butynoic acid can exist in two polymorphous crystalline forms: in the "α" form, based on a classic dimer motif and in the "β" form, based on the catamer pattern of the hydrogen bond arrangement. By cooling the melted substance crystals of the "β" phase were obtained selectively. The polarized IR spectra of the hydrogen bond in the "β" form of 2-butynoic acid crystals were measured at room temperature and at the temperature of liquid nitrogen in the νO-H and νO-D band frequency ranges. In terms of the "strong-coupling" theory the fine structure patterns of the νO-H and νO-D polarized bands were quantitatively explained along with the dichroic and the H/D isotopic effects in the spectra. To interpret the main properties of the spectra the existence of a non-conventional effect concerning a self-stimulated concerted proton position rearrangements in the neighboring cells in the lattice had to be assumed. On the basis of the spectra of isotopically diluted crystalline samples of 2-butynoic acid it was suggested that a random distribution of protons and deuterons occurred in the open chains of the hydrogen bonded molecules. However, coordination in the mutual arrangement of protons and deuterons in the neighboring hydrogen bonds from the closely spaced molecular chains was found to be non-random. This fact was ascribed to dynamical co-operative interactions, most strongly involving hydrogen bonds from different chains in the modified lattice. These non-conventional interactions were responsible for appearance of the so-called H/D "self-organization" isotopic effects in the spectra.

  17. c-Fos Protects Neurons Through a Noncanonical Mechanism Involving HDAC3 Interaction: Identification of a 21-Amino Acid Fragment with Neuroprotective Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Varun; Goux, Warren; Piechaczyk, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the AP-1 family of transcription factors are known to be involved in the regulation of neuronal viability. While strides have been made to elucidate the mechanisms of how individual members regulate cell death, much remains unknown. We find that the expression of one AP-1 member, c-Fos, is reduced in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) induced to die by low potassium (LK) treatment. Restoration and increase of this expression protect CGNs against LK-induced death, whereas knockdown induces death of otherwise healthy neurons. Furthermore, forced expression can protect cortical neurons against homocysteic acid (HCA)-induced toxicity. Taken together, this suggests that c-Fos is necessary for neuronal survival and that elevating c-Fos expression has a neuroprotective effect. Consistent with this idea is the finding that c-Fos expression is reduced selectively in the striatum in two separate mouse models of Huntington’s disease and forced expression protects against neuronal death resulting from mutant huntingtin (mut-Htt) expression. Interestingly, neuroprotection by c-Fos does not require its DNA-binding, transcriptional, or heteromerization domains. However, this protective activity can be inhibited by pharmacological inhibition of c-Abl, CK-I, and MEK-ERK signaling. Additionally, expression of point mutant forms of this protein has identified that mutation of a tyrosine residue, Tyr345, can convert c-Fos from neuroprotective to neurotoxic. We show that c-Fos interacts with histone deacetylase-3 (HDAC3), a protein that contributes to mut-Htt neurotoxicity and whose overexpression is sufficient to promote neuronal death. When co-expressed, c-Fos can protect against HDAC3 neurotoxicity. Finally, our study identifies a 21-amino acid region at the C-terminus of c-Fos that is sufficient to protect neurons against death induced by LK, HCA treatment, or mut-Htt expression when expressed via a plasmid transfection or as a cell-permeable peptide. This

  18. The Dynamics of Atom-Surface Interactions Involving HELIUM(2(1)S), HELIUM(2(3)P) and Electron-Spin HELIUM(2(3)S) Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oro, David Michael

    1994-01-01

    For several years Metastable Atom Deexcitation Spectroscopy (MDS) has been employed as a probe of surface electronic structure offering unparalleled surface specificity. In MDS a thermal-energy beam of rare-gas metastable atoms is directed at the surface under study, and the energy distribution of electrons ejected as a result of metastable atom deexcitation is measured. However, correct interpretation of the data requires detailed knowledge of the dynamics of the deexcitation process. In the present work spin -labeling techniques, specifically the use of electron-spin -polarized metastable He(2^3S) atoms, coupled with spin analysis of the ejected electrons, are used to probe the dynamics of He(2^3S) deexcitation at a variety of surfaces. Such measurements, coupled with studies of the deexcitation of He(2 ^1S) and He(2^3P) atoms at Cu(100) and Au(100) show that each species deexcites exclusively through resonance ionization followed by Auger neutralization. The data also provide the first direct confirmation of spin correlation in the Auger neutralization of ions outside a paramagnetic surface. Two proposed models for spin correlation are discussed and potential experimental tests for distinguishing between them are suggested. Studies of SPMDS at surfaces comprising layers of Ar or Xe atoms frozen onto a cryogenically cooled substrate are described and exhibit behavior similar to that observed in gas phase Penning ionization studies indicating that ejection results, in part, from surface Penning ionization (SPI). For Xe, however, additional features are observed and can be attributed to resonance ionization of the incident excited atoms followed by neutralization of the resulting He^+ ions through an interaction involving neighboring Xe atoms in the film. These results provide a rare example of a surface at which the rates for resonance ionization and Auger deexcitation are comparable. Also, the data show that the electron yield from both films is substantially

  19. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  20. Teacher-Families Online Interactions and Gender Differences in Parental Involvement through School Data System: Do Mothers Want to Know More than Fathers about Their Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Ina; Hameiri, Mira

    2012-01-01

    The integration of School Systems in K-12, opens new possibilities for online interaction among teachers, students, and their parents. This paper examines three years of teacher-student and teacher-parent online interactions in seven Israeli secondary schools during the implementation of a school system called Mashov (meaning "feedback" in Hebrew,…

  1. Effects of composite and coordinated interactions between populations of particle-like individuals involving forces and internal states — A statistical-mechanical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øien, Alf H.

    2008-09-01

    In this analogue modeling of interacting species we consider in particular interactions we refer to as composite interactions between particles called “daphnicles” and “food particles” that evolve on a third particle component in the background. Other force interactions are also taken account of but they play a smaller role in this study. The states of daphnicles and food particles are not only given by their position- and velocity-variables but also by variables of internal properties they have, which we shall call “saturation” for daphnicles and “nutrition” for food particles. The “laws” of variations of all these variables, where the rates of change of saturation and nutrition take place in the central region of the force interaction range where daphnicles and food particles come close together in their movements, are coupled in the composite interactions we consider. Due to this coupling of the “outer” force interaction to the “inner” saturation-nutrition interaction the inner interaction can be raised or diminished and in this way the distribution of say saturation of daphnicles may be regulated. From an extended Liouville equation for a system of a large number of particles where in particular interactions like these are baked in on the level of individual particles we aim to derive equations for daphnicle and food particle distribution functions on a kinetic level; this derivation constitutes the main part of the paper. Proper equations on a coarser grained level of description are then found quite easily: this “mixed” kinetic/moment level is in between the kinetic- and the full moment (macroscopic) levels such that distribution of saturation and nutrition still play a role and the equations still retain essential characteristics of the composite interactions taking place on the microscopic level, besides other force interactions. Though the terminology used suites modeling of biological systems and the results may throw some

  2. Multi-Generational Perspectives: How They Interact and Impact Service to Students and Their Families in an Age of Highly-Involved Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzusin, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Although there have always been differences in how generations navigate decision-making in higher education, highly involved parents have led to conflicting inter-generational educational expectations. This research study investigated the phenomenon of parental involvement and how meanings on educational expectations vary depending on generation.…

  3. The P25 pathogenicity factor of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus targets the sugar beet 26S proteasome involved in the induction of a hypersensitive resistance response via interaction with an F-box protein.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Heike; Hleibieh, Kamal; Gilmer, David; Varrelmann, Mark

    2012-08-01

    P25, a Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) pathogenicity factor, interacts with a sugar beet protein with high homology to Arabidopsis thaliana kelch repeat containing F-box family proteins (FBK) of unknown function in yeast. FBK are members of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) complex that mediate protein degradation. Here, we confirm this sugar beet FBK-P25 interaction in vivo and in vitro and provide evidence for in planta interaction and similar subcellular distribution in Nicotiana tabacum leaf cells. P25 even interacts with an FBK from A. thaliana, a BNYVV nonhost. FBK functional classification was possible by demonstrating the interaction with A. thaliana orthologs of Skp1-like (ASK) genes, a member of the SCF E3 ligase. By means of a yeast two-hybrid bridging assay, a direct effect of P25 on SCF-complex formation involving ASK1 protein was demonstrated. FBK transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression in N. benthamiana leaves induced a hypersensitive response. The full-length F-box protein consists of one F-box domain followed by two kelch repeats, which alone were unable to interact with P25 in yeast and did not lead to cell-death induction. The results support the idea that P25 is involved in virus pathogenicity in sugar beet and suggest suppression of resistance response. PMID:22512382

  4. [Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex].

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Fen; Yu, Kang-Ying; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-25

    The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) is an important approach for regulating arterial blood pressure homeostasis instantaneously and physiologically. Activation of the central histaminergic or cholinergic systems results in CSR functional inhibitory resetting. However, it is unclear whether two systems at the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) level display cross interaction to regulate the CSR or not. In the present study, the left or right carotid sinus region was isolated from the systemic circulation in Sprague-Dawley rats (sinus nerve was reserved) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Respective intubation was conducted into one side isolated carotid sinus and into the femoral artery for recording the intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) simultaneously with pressure transducers connection in vivo. ISP was set at the level of 0 mmHg to eliminate the effect of initial internal pressure of the carotid sinus on the CSR function. To trigger CSR, the ISP was quickly elevated from 0 mmHg to 280 mmHg in a stepwise manner (40 mmHg) which was added at every step for over 4 s, and then ISP returned to 0 mmHg in similar steps. The original data of ISP and corresponding MAP were fitted to a modified logistic equation with five parameters to obtain the ISP-MAP, ISP-Gain relationship curves and the CSR characteristic parameters, which were statistically compared and analyzed separately. Under the precondition of no influence on the basic levels of the artery blood pressure, the effects and potential regulatory mechanism of preceding microinjection with different cholinoceptor antagonists, the selective cholinergic M1 receptor antagonist, i.e., pirenzepine (PRZ), the M2 receptor antagonist, i.e., methoctramine (MTR) or the N1 receptor antagonist, i.e., hexamethonium (HEX) into the NTS on the changes in function of CSR induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) in rats were observed. Meanwhile, the actions and

  5. Functional roles of a structural element involving Na+-pi interactions in the catalytic site of T1 lipase revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Tateno, Masaru

    2009-11-25

    Interactions between metal ions and pi systems (metal-pi interactions) are known to confer significant stabilization energy. However, in biological systems, few structures with metal-pi coordination have been determined; thus, its roles must still be elucidated. The cation-pi interactions are not correctly described by current molecular mechanics even when using a polarizable force field, and thus they require quantum mechanical calculations for accurate estimation. However, the huge computational costs of the latter methodologies prohibit long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Accordingly, we developed a novel scheme to obtain an effective potential for calculating the interaction energy with an accuracy comparable to that of advanced ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) levels, and with computational costs comparable to those of conventional MM calculations. Then, to elucidate the functional roles of the Na(+)-phenylalanine (Phe) complex in the catalytic site of T1 lipase, we performed MD simulations in the presence/absence of the accurate Na(+)-pi interaction energy. A comparison of these MD simulations revealed that a significantly large enthalpy gain in Na(+)-Phe16 substantially stabilizes the catalytic site, whereas a water molecule could not be substituted for Na(+) for sufficient stabilization energy. Thus, the cation-pi interaction in the lipase establishes a remarkably stable core structure by combining a hydrophobic aromatic ring and hydrophilic residues, of which the latter form the catalytic triad, thereby contributing to large structural changes from the complex with ligands to the free form of the lipase. This is the first report to elucidate the detailed functional mechanisms of Na(+)-pi interactions.

  6. An ab initio investigation of the interactions involving the aromatic group of the set of fluorinated N-(4-sulfamylbenzoyl)benzylamine inhibitors and human carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin E; Cui, Guanglei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2007-05-24

    In this work we investigate the interactions that occur between the aromatic portion of the set of fluorinated N-(4-sulfamylbenzoyl)benzylamine (SBB) inhibitors and two residues of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II (HCAII), namely Phe-131 and Pro-202. Calculations were carried out at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory and the counterpoise scheme of Boys and Bernardi was employed to account for the basis set superposition error. The most striking result obtained here is that the SBB phenyl ring interacts at least as strongly with the proline pyrrolidine ring as with the phenylalanine phenyl ring, which is surprising because aromatic-aromatic interactions have long been thought to be particularly favorable in protein and protein-ligand structure. Comparison of the MP2 binding energies to those obtained with the Hartree-Fock method indicates that the attraction between the proline pyrrolidine ring and the SBB phenyl ring is largely attributable to dispersion forces. These favorable interactions between pyrrolidine and phenyl rings may have important implications in protein structure because there is potential for proline residues to interact with phenylalanine residues in a fashion analogous to that seen here. A preliminary protein data bank search indicates that the proline-phenylalanine contacts are about 40% as common as those between two phenylalanines. It is also found here that the number and pattern of fluorine substituents on the SBB phenyl ring is much less important in determining the SBB-HCAII binding energy than the relative geometric configuration of the interacting pairs.

  7. A Scoping Analysis Of The Impact Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression Involving Core–Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the impact of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten core-concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO2.

  8. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-12-18

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701-706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711-735 and defines TFIP11's distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle-targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it's function.

  9. The Small GTPase ROP6 Interacts with NFR5 and Is Involved in Nodule Formation in Lotus japonicus1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Danxia; Fang, Qing; Chen, Chunfen; Zhu, Hui; Chen, Tao; Chang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Songli; Kang, Heng; Ma, Lian; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    Nod Factor Receptor5 (NFR5) is an atypical receptor-like kinase, having no activation loop in the protein kinase domain. It forms a heterodimer with NFR1 and is required for the early plant responses to Rhizobium infection. A Rho-like small GTPase from Lotus japonicus was identified as an NFR5-interacting protein. The amino acid sequence of this Rho-like GTPase is closest to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ROP6 and Medicago truncatula ROP6 and was designated as LjROP6. The interaction between Rop6 and NFR5 occurred both in vitro and in planta. No interaction between Rop6 and NFR1 was observed. Green fluorescent protein-tagged ROP6 was localized at the plasma membrane and cytoplasm. The interaction between ROP6 and NFR5 appeared to take place at the plasma membrane. The expression of the ROP6 gene could be detected in vascular tissues of Lotus roots. After inoculation with Mesorhizobium loti, elevated levels of ROP6 expression were found in the root hairs, root tips, vascular bundles of roots, nodule primordia, and young nodules. In transgenic hairy roots expressing ROP6 RNA interference constructs, Rhizobium entry into the root hairs did not appear to be affected, but infection thread growth through the root cortex were severely inhibited, resulting in the development of fewer nodules per plant. These data demonstrate a role of ROP6 as a positive regulator of infection thread formation and nodulation in L. japonicus. PMID:22434040

  10. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  11. A BDNF Sensitive Mechanism Is Involved in the Fear Memory Resulting from the Interaction between Stress and the Retrieval of an Established Trace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giachero, Marcelo; Bustos, Silvia G.; Calfa, Gaston; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the fear memory resulting from the interaction of a stressful experience and the retrieval of an established fear memory trace. Such a combination enhanced both fear expression and fear retention in adult Wistar rats. Likewise, midazolam intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion prior to stress attenuated the…

  12. Enthalpic nature of the CH/pi interaction involved in the recognition of carbohydrates by aromatic compounds, confirmed by a novel interplay of NMR, calorimetry, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Gualito, Karla; Alonso-Ríos, Rosa; Quiroz-García, Beatriz; Rojas-Aguilar, Aarón; Díaz, Dolores; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Cuevas, Gabriel

    2009-12-23

    Specific interactions between molecules, including those produced by a given solute, and the surrounding solvent are essential to drive molecular recognition processes. A simple molecule such as benzene is capable of recognizing and differentiating among very similar entities, such as methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside (alpha-Me(5)Gal), methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (beta-Me(5)Gal), 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-acetyl-beta-D-galactopyranose (beta-Ac(5)Gal), and methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-methyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside (alpha-Me(5)Man). In order to determine if these complexes are formed, the interaction energy between benzene and the different carbohydrates was determined, using Calvet microcalorimetry, as the enthalpy of solvation. These enthalpy values were -89.0 +/- 2.0, -88.7 +/- 5.5, -132.5 +/- 6.2, and -78.8 +/- 3.9 kJ mol(-1) for the four complexes, respectively. Characterization of the different complexes was completed by establishing the molecular region where the interaction takes place using NMR. It was determined that beta-Me(5)Gal is stabilized by the CH/pi interaction produced by the nonpolar region of the carbohydrate on the alpha face. In contrast, alpha-Me(5)Man is not specifically solvated by benzene and does not present any stacking interaction. Although alpha-Me(5)Gal has a geometry similar to that of its epimer, the obtained NMR data seem to indicate that the axial methoxy group at the anomeric position increases the distance of the benzene molecules from the pyranose ring. Substitution of the methoxy groups by acetate moieties, as in beta-Ac(5)Gal, precludes the approach of benzene to produce the CH/pi interaction. In fact, the elevated stabilization energy of beta-Ac(5)Gal is probably due to the interaction between benzene and the methyl groups of the acetyls. Therefore, methoxy and acetyl substituents have different effects on the protons of the pyranose ring. PMID:19928848

  13. The TAL effector PthA4 interacts with nuclear factors involved in RNA-dependent processes including a HMG protein that selectively binds poly(U) RNA.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Tiago Antonio; Soprano, Adriana Santos; de Lira, Nayara Patricia Vieira; Quaresma, Alexandre José Christino; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize an array of effector proteins to cause disease. Among them, transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors are unusual in the sense that they modulate transcription in the host. Although target genes and DNA specificity of TAL effectors have been elucidated, how TAL proteins control host transcription is poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the Xanthomonas citri TAL effectors, PthAs 2 and 3, preferentially targeted a citrus protein complex associated with transcription control and DNA repair. To extend our knowledge on the mode of action of PthAs, we have identified new protein targets of the PthA4 variant, required to elicit canker on citrus. Here we show that all the PthA4-interacting proteins are DNA and/or RNA-binding factors implicated in chromatin remodeling and repair, gene regulation and mRNA stabilization/modification. The majority of these proteins, including a structural maintenance of chromosomes protein (CsSMC), a translin-associated factor X (CsTRAX), a VirE2-interacting protein (CsVIP2), a high mobility group (CsHMG) and two poly(A)-binding proteins (CsPABP1 and 2), interacted with each other, suggesting that they assemble into a multiprotein complex. CsHMG was shown to bind DNA and to interact with the invariable leucine-rich repeat region of PthAs. Surprisingly, both CsHMG and PthA4 interacted with PABP1 and 2 and showed selective binding to poly(U) RNA, a property that is novel among HMGs and TAL effectors. Given that homologs of CsHMG, CsPABP1, CsPABP2, CsSMC and CsTRAX in other organisms assemble into protein complexes to regulate mRNA stability and translation, we suggest a novel role of TAL effectors in mRNA processing and translational control.

  14. Structural determinants of interaction, trafficking and function in the ClC-2/MLC1 subunit GlialCAM involved in leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Capdevila-Nortes, Xavier; Jeworutzki, Elena; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; Barrallo-Gimeno, Alejandro; Pusch, Michael; Estévez, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in the genes encoding the astrocytic protein MLC1, the cell adhesion molecule GlialCAM or the Cl− channel ClC-2 underlie human leukodystrophies. GlialCAM binds to itself, to MLC1 and to ClC-2, and directs these proteins to cell–cell contacts. In addition, GlialCAM dramatically activates ClC-2 mediated currents. In the present study, we used mutagenesis studies combined with functional and biochemical analyses to determine which parts of GlialCAM are required to perform these cellular functions. We found that the extracellular domain of GlialCAM is necessary for cell junction targeting and for mediating interactions with itself or with MLC1 and ClC-2. The C-terminus is also necessary for proper targeting to cell–cell junctions but is not required for the biochemical interaction. Finally, we identified the first three amino acids of the transmembrane segment of GlialCAM as being essential for the activation of ClC-2 currents but not for targeting or biochemical interaction. Our results provide new mechanistic insights concerning the regulation of the cell biology and function of MLC1 and ClC-2 by GlialCAM. Key points The extracellular domain of GlialCAM is necessary for its targeting to cell junctions, as well as for interactions with itself and MLC1 and ClC-2. The C-terminus of GlialCAM is not necessary for interaction but is required for targeting to cell junctions. The first three residues of the transmembrane segment of GlialCAM are required for GlialCAM-mediated ClC-2 activation. PMID:26033718

  15. Development, validation and utility of an in vitro technique for assessment of potential clinical drug-drug interactions involving P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Keogh, John P; Kunta, Jeevan R

    2006-04-01

    Regulatory interest is increasing for drug transporters generally and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) in particular, primarily in the area of drug-drug interactions. To aid in both identifying and discharging the potential liabilities associated with drug-transporter interactions, the pharmaceutical industry has a growing requirement for routine and robust non-clinical assays. An assay was designed, optimised and validated to determine the in vitro inhibitory potency of new chemical entities (NCEs) towards human Pgp-mediated transport. [3H]-Digoxin was established as a suitable probe substrate by investigating its characteristics in the in vitro system (MDCKII-MDR1 cells grown in 24-multiwell inserts). The inhibitory potencies (apparent IC50) of known Pgp inhibitors astemizole, GF120918, ketoconazole, itraconazole, quinidine, verapamil and quinine were determined over at least a 1000-fold concentration range. Validation was carried out using manual and automatic techniques. [3H]-Digoxin was found to be stable and have good mass balance in the system. In contrast to [A-->B] transport, [3H]-digoxin [B-->A] transport rates were readily measured with good reproducibility. There was no evidence of saturation of transport up to 10 microM digoxin and 30 nM digoxin was selected for routine assay use, reflecting clinical therapeutic concentrations. IC50 values ranged over approximately 100-fold with excellent reproducibility. Results from manual and automated versions were in close agreement. This method is suitable for routine use to assess the in vitro inhibitory potency of NCEs on Pgp-mediated digoxin transport. Comparison of IC50 values against clinical interaction profiles for the probe inhibitors indicated the in vitro assay is predictive of clinical digoxin-drug interactions mediated via Pgp.

  16. An Efficient Single-Molecule Resolution Method for Simulating Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Protein Interaction Networks that Involve the Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    A significant number of the cellular protein interaction networks, such as the receptor mediated signaling and vesicle trafficking pathways, includes membranes as a molecular assembly platform. Computer simulations can provide insight into the dynamics of complex formation and help identify the principles that govern recruitment and assembly on the membranes. Here, we introduce the Free-Propagator Re-weighting (FPR) algorithm, a recently developed method that efficiently simulates the spatio-temporal dynamics of multiprotein complex formation both in the solution and on the membranes. In the FPR, the position of each protein is propagated using the Brownian motion and the reactions between pairs of proteins can occur upon collisions. Depending on the dimensionality of the interaction, the association probabilities are determined by solving the Smoluchowski diffusion equations in 2D or 3D and trajectory reweighting allows us to obtain the exact association rates for all the reactive pairs. Using the FPR, in this presentation, we investigate the interaction dynamics of the receptor mediated endocytic network as a case study and discuss the possible effects of membrane binding and molecular crowding on the formation of complexes. Supported by the NIGMS/NIH under R00GM098371.

  17. DNA annealing by Redβ is insufficient for homologous recombination and the additional requirements involve intra- and inter-molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Erler, Axel; Fu, Jun; Kranz, Andrea; Tang, Jing; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Müller, Daniel; Sattler, Michael; Stewart, A. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) like Redβ initiate homologous recombination by annealing complementary DNA strands. We show that C-terminally truncated Redβ, whilst still able to promote annealing and nucleoprotein filament formation, is unable to mediate homologous recombination. Mutations of the C-terminal domain were evaluated using both single- and double stranded (ss and ds) substrates in recombination assays. Mutations of critical amino acids affected either dsDNA recombination or both ssDNA and dsDNA recombination indicating two separable functions, one of which is critical for dsDNA recombination and the second for recombination per se. As evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, the dsDNA recombination function relates to the Redα-Redβ protein-protein interaction, which requires not only contacts in the C-terminal domain but also a region near the N-terminus. Because the nucleoprotein filament formed with C-terminally truncated Redβ has altered properties, the second C-terminal function could be due to an interaction required for functional filaments. Alternatively the second C-terminal function could indicate a requirement for a Redβ-host factor interaction. These data further advance the model for Red recombination and the proposition that Redβ and RAD52 SSAPs share ancestral and mechanistic roots. PMID:27708411

  18. Conservation of functional domains involved in RNA binding and protein-protein interactions in human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae pre-mRNA splicing factor SF1.

    PubMed

    Rain, J C; Rafi, Z; Rhani, Z; Legrain, P; Krämer, A

    1998-05-01

    The modular structure of splicing factor SF1 is conserved from yeast to man and SF1 acts at early stages of spliceosome assembly in both organisms. The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain of human (h) SF1 is the major determinant for RNA binding and is essential for the activity of hSF1 in spliceosome assembly, supporting the view that binding of SF1 to RNA is essential for its function. Sequences N-terminal to the KH domain mediate the interaction between hSF1 and U2AF65, which binds to the polypyrimidine tract upstream of the 3' splice site. Moreover, yeast (y) SF1 interacts with Mud2p, the presumptive U2AF65 homologue in yeast, and the interaction domain is conserved in ySF1. The C-terminal degenerate RRMs in U2AF65 and Mud2p mediate the association with hSF1 and ySF1, respectively. Analysis of chimeric constructs of hSF1 and ySF indicates that the KH domain may serve a similar function in both systems, whereas sequences C-terminal to the KH domain are not exchangeable. Thus, these results argue for hSF1 and ySF1, as well as U2AF65 and Mud2p, being functional homologues.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of protein-protein interactions involving apoptosis regulator Diva (Boo) and the BH3 domain of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members.

    PubMed

    Santiveri, Clara M; Sborgi, Lorenzo; de Alba, Eva

    2012-12-01

    According to biochemical assays, the Bcl-2 protein Diva from mouse regulates programmed cell death by heterodimerizing with other members of the family and by interacting with the apoptotic protease-activating factor Apaf-1. In typical Bcl-2 heterodimers, peptide fragments comprising the Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3 domain) of proapoptotic members are capable of forming functional complexes with prosurvival proteins. High-resolution structural studies have revealed that the BH3 peptide forms an α-helix positioned in a canonical hydrophobic cleft of the antiapoptotic protein. Because Diva shows mutations in conserved residues within this area, it has been proposed to have a different interacting surface. However, we showed previously that Diva binds through the canonical groove the BH3 peptide of the human Bcl-2 killing member Harakiri. To further test Diva's binding capabilities, here we show Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data, indicating that Diva binds peptides derived from the BH3 domain of several other proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, including mouse Harakiri, Bid, Bak and Bmf. We have measured the binding affinities of the heterodimers, which show significant variability. Structural models of the protein-peptide complexes based on NMR chemical shift perturbation data indicate that the binding surface is analogous. These models do not rely on NMR NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Effect) data, and thus our results can only suggest that the complexes share similar intermolecular interactions. However, the observed affinity differences correlate with the α-helical population of the BH3-peptides obtained from circular dichroism experiments, which highlights a role of conformational selection in the binding mechanism. Altogether, our results shed light on important factors governing Diva-BH3 peptide molecular recognition mode.

  20. Interaction with sigma(1) protein, but not N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, is involved in the pharmacological activity of donepezil.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Tangui; Meunier, Johann; Feng, Bihua; Ieni, John; Monaghan, Daniel T

    2006-05-01

    In the present study, we examined the interaction of (+/-)-2,3-dihydro-5,6-dimethoxy-2-[[1-(phenylmethyl)-4-piperidinyl]-methyl]-1H-inden-1-one hydrochloride (donepezil), a potent cholinesterase inhibitor, with two additional therapeutically relevant targets, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and sigma(1) receptors. Donepezil blocked the responses of recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The blockade was voltage-dependent, suggesting a channel blocker mechanism of action, and was not competitive at either the l-glutamate or glycine binding sites. The low potency of donepezil (IC(50) = 0.7-3 mM) suggests that NMDA receptor blockade does not contribute to the therapeutic actions of donepezil. Of potential therapeutic relevance, donepezil binds to the sigma(1) receptor with high affinity (K(i) = 14.6 nM) in an in vitro preparation (Neurosci Lett 260:5-8, 1999). Thus, we sought to determine whether an interaction with the sigma(1) receptor may occur in vivo under physiologically relevant conditions by evaluating the sigma(1) receptor dependence effects of donepezil in behavioral tasks. Donepezil showed antidepressant-like activity in the mouse-forced swimming test as did the sigma(1) receptor agonist igmesine. This effect was not displayed by the other cholinesterase inhibitors, rivastigmine and tacrine. The donepezil and igmesine effects were blocked by preadministration of the sigma(1) receptor antagonist N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino) ethylamine (BD1047) and an in vivo antisense probe treatment. The memory-enhancing effect of donepezil was also investigated. All cholinesterase inhibitors attenuated dizocilpine-induced learning impairments. However, only the donepezil and igmesine effects were blocked by BD1047 or the antisense treatment. Therefore, donepezil behaved as an effective sigma(1) receptor agonist on these behavioral responses, and an interaction of the drug with the sigma(1) receptor must be considered in its

  1. Infrared spectrum involving forbidden transitions & coriolis interaction and identification of optically pumped far infrared laser lines in asymmetrically mono-deuterated methanol (Methanol-D1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indra

    2016-05-01

    In this paper new type of ΔK = 2 and 0 transitions have been identified in the Fourier Transform spectrum of Methanol-D1 (CH2DOH). These transitions are normally forbidden but a "Coriolis" type interaction with nearby states is believed to be contributing sufficient transition strength through intensity borrowing effect. This is the first time such forbidden transitions are reported to be identified in the excited states, in this molecule. The present conjecture is supported by observation of a many strong allowed transitions to upper terminating levels which are seen to be highly perturbed. This conclusion has been reached by comparing calculated energy levels using known molecular parameters (Pearson et al., 2012; Coudert et al., 2014; El Hilali et al., 2011; Quade et al., 1998; Richard Quade, 1998, 1999; Mukhopadhyay, 1997) and the actually observed FIR lines. The upper levels are seen to be upshifted from expected position. A closer look at the calculated energy values seems to indicate a possible interaction between the above states and other proximate torsional-rotational states could occur. The possible candidates for the interacting level manifolds are narrowed down through the presence of the forbidden transition. We also take the opportunity to propose alternate rotational quantum numbers for some of the assignments recently reported in the literature (El Hilali et al., 2011). Some ambiguities are pointed out on the data and the reported analysis. There remain too many such irregularities and we propose to gather a large body assigned transitions in a future catalog. Assignments and relevant comments on optically pumped FIR laser radiation are also made.

  2. Cytokine production by human epithelial and endothelial cells following exposure to oral viridans streptococci involves lectin interactions between bacteria and cell surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Vernier, A; Diab, M; Soell, M; Haan-Archipoff, G; Beretz, A; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the possible implication of human epithelial and endothelial cells in the pathogenesis of various diseases associated with oral viridans streptococci, we tested the immunomodulatory effects of 11 representative strains of oral viridans streptococci on human epithelial KB cells and endothelial cells. We then examined the possible role of two major adhesins from oral viridans streptococci, protein I/II and rhamnose-glucose polymers (RGPs), in this process. In this study we demonstrate that oral viridans streptococci are potent stimulators of interleukin-8 (IL-8) production from KB cells and of IL-6 and IL-8 production from endothelial cells. The ability of protein I/II and RGPs to contribute to these effects was then examined. Using biotinylated protein I/IIf and RGPs from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175, we showed that these adhesins bind to KB and endothelial cells through specific interactions and that the binding of these molecules initiates the release of IL-8 from KB cells and of IL-6 and IL-8 from endothelial cells. These results suggest that protein I/IIf and RGPs play an important role in the interactions between bacteria and KB and endothelial cells in that similar cytokine profiles are obtained when cells are stimulated with bacteria or surface components. We also provide evidence that protein I/IIf binds to and stimulates KB and endothelial cells through lectin interactions and that N-acetyl neuraminic acid (NANA) and fucose present on cell surface glycoproteins may form the recognition site since binding and cytokine release can be inhibited by dispase and periodate treatment of cells and by NANA and fucose. These results demonstrate that oral viridans streptococci, probably by engaging two cell surface adhesins, exert immunomodulatory effects on human KB and endothelial cells. PMID:8757828

  3. Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, Ed

    The paper discusses the rationale and guidelines for parent involvement in HCEEP (Handicapped Children's Early Education Program) projects. Ways of assessing parents' needs are reviewed, as are four types of services to meet the identified needs: parent education, direct participation, parent counseling, and parent provided programs. Materials and…

  4. HD2C histone deacetylase and a SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex interact and both are involved in mediating the heat stress response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Buszewicz, Daniel; Archacki, Rafał; Palusiński, Antoni; Kotliński, Maciej; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Sosnowska, Katarzyna; Kuciński, Jan; Pupel, Piotr; Olędzki, Jacek; Dadlez, Michał; Misicka, Aleksandra; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej; Koblowska, Marta Kamila

    2016-10-01

    Studies in yeast and animals have revealed that histone deacetylases (HDACs) often act as components of multiprotein complexes, including chromatin remodelling complexes (CRCs). However, interactions between HDACs and CRCs in plants have yet to be demonstrated. Here, we present evidence for the interaction between Arabidopsis HD2C deacetylase and a BRM-containing SWI/SNF CRC. Moreover, we reveal a novel function of HD2C as a regulator of the heat stress response. HD2C transcript levels were strongly induced in plants subjected to heat treatment, and the expression of selected heat-responsive genes was up-regulated in heat-stressed hd2c mutant, suggesting that HD2C acts to down-regulate heat-activated genes. In keeping with the HDAC activity of HD2C, the altered expression of HD2C-regulated genes coincided in most cases with increased histone acetylation at their loci. Microarray transcriptome analysis of hd2c and brm mutants identified a subset of commonly regulated heat-responsive genes, and the effect of the brm hd2c double mutation on the expression of these genes was non-additive. Moreover, heat-treated 3-week-old hd2c, brm and brm hd2c mutants displayed similar rates of growth retardation. Taken together, our findings suggest that HD2C and BRM act in a common genetic pathway to regulate the Arabidopsis heat stress response.

  5. Modeling the interfacial interactions between CrtS and CrtR from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous , a P450 system involved in astaxanthin production.

    PubMed

    Alcaíno, Jennifer; Fuentealba, Matías; Cabrera, Ricardo; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2012-09-01

    Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a natural source of astaxanthin, a carotenoid widely used in the food industry. In this yeast, astaxanthin is synthesized from β-carotene by a cytochrome P450, CrtS, which depends on CrtR, the four-domain cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae has an endogenous CPR (ScCPR), expression of CrtS does not result in astaxanthin production unless it is coexpressed with CrtR. Assuming that CrtS could interact with the FMN-binding domain of either CrtR or ScCPR (XdFMNbd and ScFMNbd, respectively), the aim of this work was to identify possible interaction differences between these alternative complexes by protein modeling and short molecular dynamics simulations. Considering the recently proposed membrane orientation of a mammalian P450, our CrtS-CrtR model predicts that both N-terminal ends stand adjacent to the membrane plane, allowing their anchoring. Compared with the possible interface between CrtS and both FMNbd, the Xanthophyllomyces system appears to be stabilized by more saline bridges. PMID:22897793

  6. Lone pair⋯π interactions involving carbonyl π-systems: Experimental and theoretical study of the complexes of COF2 and COFCl with dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geboes, Yannick; De Proft, Frank; Herrebout, Wouter A.

    2016-09-01

    In this theoretical and experimental study, the ability of carbonyl fluoride (COF2) and carbonyl chloride fluoride (COFCl) to form noncovalent interactions with the Lewis base dimethyl ether (DME) is assessed. From ab initio calculations, two stable complexes are found for COF2·DME, both formed through a lone pair⋯π interaction. FTIR measurements on liquefied noble gas solutions, supported by ab initio calculations, statistical thermodynamical calculations and Monte Carle Free Energy Perturbation calculations, show that a 1:1 lone pair⋯π bonded complex is found in solution, with an experimental complexation enthalpy of -14.5(3) kJ mol-1. For COFCl·DME three lone pair⋯π complexes, as well as a Cl⋯O halogen bonded complex, are found from ab initio calculations. Experimentally, clear complex bands for 1:1 lone pair⋯π complexes are observed, with an experimental complexation enthalpy of -11.4(2) kJ mol-1. Furthermore, indications of the presence of a small amount of the halogen bonded complex are also observed.

  7. The histone methylase KMTox interacts with the redox-sensor peroxiredoxin-1 and targets genes involved in Toxoplasma gondii antioxidant defences.

    PubMed

    Sautel, Céline F; Ortet, Philippe; Saksouk, Nehmé; Kieffer, Sylvie; Garin, Jérôme; Bastien, Olivier; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2009-01-01

    The ability of living cells to alter their gene expression patterns in response to environmental changes is essential for viability. Oxidative stress represents a common threat for all aerobic life. In normally growing cells, in which hydrogen peroxide generation is transient or pulsed, the antioxidant systems efficiently control its concentration. Intracellular parasites must also protect themselves against the oxidative burst imposed by the host. In this work, we have investigated the role of KMTox, a new histone lysine methyltransferase, in the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. KMTox is a nuclear protein that holds a High Mobility Group domain, which is thought to recognize bent DNA. The enzyme methylates both histones H4 and H2A in vitro with a great preference for the substrate in reduced conditions. Importantly, KMTox interacts specifically with the typical 2-cys peroxiredoxin-1 and the binding is to some extent enhanced upon oxidation. It appears that the cellular functions that are primarily regulated by the KMTox are antioxidant defences and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. KMTox may regulate gene expression in T. gondii by providing the rapid re-arrangement of chromatin domains and by interacting with the redox-sensor TgPrx1 contribute to establish the antioxidant 'firewall' in T. gondii. PMID:19017266

  8. INCURVATA2 Encodes the Catalytic Subunit of DNA Polymerase α and Interacts with Genes Involved in Chromatin-Mediated Cellular Memory in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Barrero, José María; González-Bayón, Rebeca; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2007-01-01

    Cell type–specific gene expression patterns are maintained by the stable inheritance of transcriptional states through mitosis, requiring the action of multiprotein complexes that remodel chromatin structure. Genetic and molecular interactions between chromatin remodeling factors and components of the DNA replication machinery have been identified in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, indicating that some epigenetic marks are replicated simultaneously to DNA with the participation of the DNA replication complexes. This model of epigenetic inheritance might be extended to the plant kingdom, as we report here with the positional cloning and characterization of INCURVATA2 (ICU2), which encodes the putative catalytic subunit of the DNA polymerase α of Arabidopsis thaliana. The strong icu2-2 and icu2-3 insertional alleles caused fully penetrant zygotic lethality when homozygous and incompletely penetrant gametophytic lethality, probably because of loss of DNA polymerase activity. The weak icu2-1 allele carried a point mutation and caused early flowering, leaf incurvature, and homeotic transformations of sepals into carpels and of petals into stamens. Further genetic analyses indicated that ICU2 interacts with TERMINAL FLOWER2, the ortholog of HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 of animals and yeasts, and with the Polycomb group (PcG) gene CURLY LEAF. Another PcG gene, EMBRYONIC FLOWER2, was found to be epistatic to ICU2. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses indicated that a number of regulatory genes were derepressed in the icu2-1 mutant, including genes associated with flowering time, floral meristem, and floral organ identity. PMID:17873092

  9. Effect of DNA interaction involving antioxidative 4-aminoantipyrine incorporating mixed ligand complexes having alpha-amino acid as co-ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Natarajan; Sakthivel, Arunagiri; Selvaganapathy, Muthusamy; Mitu, Liviu

    2014-02-01

    Few new mixed ligand transition metal complexes of the stoichiometry [ML(A)2], where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II), L = FFAP (furfurylidene-4-aminoantipyrine) and A = amino acid (glycine/alanine/valine), have been designed, synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of the complexes in DMF at 10-3 M concentration shows that they are non-electrolytes. The interaction of these complexes with CT-DNA indicates that the valine mixed ligand complexes are having higher binding constant than alanine and glycine mixed ligand complexes. This analysis reveals that binding constant depends on the size of the alkyl group present in the amino acid. The binding constants of valine mixed ligand complexes are in the order of 104 to 105 M-1 revealing that the complexes interact with DNA through moderate intercalation mode. The metal complexes exhibit effective cleavage of pUC19 DNA but it is not preceded via radical cleavage and superoxide anion radical. They are good antimicrobial agents than the free ligand. On comparing the IC50 values, [Ni(L)(Gly)2] is considered as a potential drug to eliminate the hydroxyl radical.

  10. Tangled web of interactions among proteins involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly as unraveled by NMR, SAXS, chemical crosslinking, and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hae; Bothe, Jameson R; Alderson, T Reid; Markley, John L

    2015-06-01

    Proteins containing iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters arose early in evolution and are essential to life. Organisms have evolved machinery consisting of specialized proteins that operate together to assemble Fe-S clusters efficiently so as to minimize cellular exposure to their toxic constituents: iron and sulfide ions. To date, the best studied system is the iron-sulfur cluster (isc) operon of Escherichia coli, and the eight ISC proteins it encodes. Our investigations over the past five years have identified two functional conformational states for the scaffold protein (IscU) and have shown that the other ISC proteins that interact with IscU prefer to bind one conformational state or the other. From analyses of the NMR spectroscopy-derived network of interactions of ISC proteins, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data, chemical crosslinking experiments, and functional assays, we have constructed working models for Fe-S cluster assembly and delivery. Future work is needed to validate and refine what has been learned about the E. coli system and to extend these findings to the homologous Fe-S cluster biosynthetic machinery of yeast and human mitochondria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  11. Candida albicans cell shaving uncovers new proteins involved in cell wall integrity, yeast to hypha transition, stress response and host-pathogen interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hernáez, María Luisa; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Solis, Norma V.; Filler, Scott G.; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    The ability to switch from yeast to hyphal growth is essential for virulence in Candida albicans. The cell surface is the initial point of contact between the fungus and the host. In this work, a free-gel proteomic strategy based on tryptic digestion of live yeast and hyphae cells and protein identification using LC-MS/MS methodology was used to identify cell surface proteins. Using this strategy, a total of 943 proteins were identified, of which 438 were in yeast and 928 were in hyphae. Of these proteins, 79 were closely related to the organization and biogenesis of the cell wall, including 28 GPI-anchored proteins, such as Hyr1 and Sod5 which were detected exclusively in hyphae, and Als2 and Sap10which were detected only in yeast. A group of 17 proteins of unknown function were subsequently studied by analysis of the corresponding deletion mutants. We found that four new proteins, Pst3, Tos1, Orf19.3060 and Orf19.5352 are involved in cell wall integrity and in C. albicans’ engulfment by macrophages. Moreover, the putative NADH-ubiquinone-related proteins, Ali1, Mci4, Orf19.287 and Orf19.7590, are also involved in osmotic and oxidative resistance, yeast to hypha transition and the ability to damage and invade oral epithelial cells. PMID:26087349

  12. N-terminal region of the large subunit of Leishmania donovani bisubunit topoisomerase I is involved in DNA relaxation and interaction with the smaller subunit.

    PubMed

    Das, Benu Brata; Sen, Nilkantha; Dasgupta, Somdeb Bose; Ganguly, Agneyo; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2005-04-22

    Leishmania donovani topoisomerase I is an unusual bisubunit enzyme. We have demonstrated earlier that the large and small subunit could be reconstituted in vitro to show topoisomerase I activity. We extend our biochemical study to evaluate the role of the large subunit in topoisomerase activity. The large subunit (LdTOP1L) shows a substantial degree of homology with the core DNA binding domain of the topoisomerase IB family. Two N-terminal truncation constructs, LdTOP1Delta39L (lacking amino acids 1-39) and LdTOP1Delta99L (lacking amino acids 1-99) of the large subunit were generated and mixed with intact small subunit (LdTOP1S). Our observations reveal that residues within amino acids 1-39 of the large subunit have significant roles in modulating topoisomerase I activity (i.e. in vitro DNA relaxation, camptothecin sensitivity, cleavage activity, and DNA binding affinity). Interestingly, the mutant LdTOP1Delta99LS was unable to show topoisomerase I activity. Investigation of the loss of activity indicates that LdTOP1Delta99L was unable to pull down glutathione S-transferase-LdTOP1S in an Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid co-immobilization experiment. For further analysis, we co-expressed LdTOP1L and LdTOP1S in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS cells. The lysate shows topoisomerase I activity. Immunoprecipitation revealed that LdTOP1L could interact with LdTOP1S, indicating the subunit interaction in bacterial cells, whereas immunoprecipitation of bacterial lysate co-expressing LdTOP1Delta99L and LdTOP1S reveals that LdTOP1Delta99L was significantly deficient at interacting with LdTOP1S to reconstitute topoisomerase I activity. This study demonstrates that heterodimerization between the large and small subunits of the bisubunit enzyme appears to be an absolute requirement for topoisomerase activity. The residue within amino acids 1-39 from the N-terminal end of the large subunit regulates DNA topology during relaxation by controlling noncovalent DNA binding or by

  13. Correlative Förster Resonance Electron Transfer-Proximity Ligation Assay (FRET-PLA) Technique for Studying Interactions Involving Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ivanusic, Daniel; Denner, Joachim; Bannert, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    This unit provides a guide and detailed protocol for studying membrane protein-protein interactions (PPI) using the acceptor-sensitized Förster resonance electron transfer (FRET) method in combination with the proximity ligation assay (PLA). The protocol in this unit is focused on the preparation of FRET-PLA samples and the detection of correlative FRET/PLA signals as well as on the analysis of FRET-PLA data and interpretation of correlative results when using cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) as a FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as a FRET acceptor. The correlative application of FRET and PLA combines two powerful tools for monitoring PPI, yielding results that are more reliable than with either technique alone. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479505

  14. Validation of the RPLUS3D Code for Supersonic Inlet Applications Involving Three-Dimensional Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code, RPLUS3D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for glancing shock wave-boundary layer interactions. Both laminar and turbulent flows were studied. A supersonic flow over a wedge mounted on a flat plate was numerically simulated. For the laminar case, the static pressure distribution, velocity vectors, and particle traces on the flat plate were obtained. For turbulent flow, both the Baldwin-Lomax and Chien two-equation turbulent models were used. The static pressure distributions, pitot pressure, and yaw angle profiles were computed. In addition, the velocity vectors and particle traces on the flat plate were also obtained from the computed solution. Overall, the computed results for both laminar and turbulent cases compared very well with the experimentally obtained data.

  15. Correlative Förster Resonance Electron Transfer-Proximity Ligation Assay (FRET-PLA) Technique for Studying Interactions Involving Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ivanusic, Daniel; Denner, Joachim; Bannert, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    This unit provides a guide and detailed protocol for studying membrane protein-protein interactions (PPI) using the acceptor-sensitized Förster resonance electron transfer (FRET) method in combination with the proximity ligation assay (PLA). The protocol in this unit is focused on the preparation of FRET-PLA samples and the detection of correlative FRET/PLA signals as well as on the analysis of FRET-PLA data and interpretation of correlative results when using cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) as a FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as a FRET acceptor. The correlative application of FRET and PLA combines two powerful tools for monitoring PPI, yielding results that are more reliable than with either technique alone. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Intersystem-crossing and phosphorescence rates in fac-Ir{sup III}(ppy){sub 3}: A theoretical study involving multi-reference configuration interaction wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, Martin; Marian, Christel M.; Wüllen, Christoph van

    2015-03-07

    We have employed combined density functional theory and multi-reference configuration interaction methods including spin–orbit coupling (SOC) effects to investigate the photophysics of the green phosphorescent emitter fac-tris-(2-phenylpyridine)iridium (fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3}). A critical evaluation of our quantum chemical approaches shows that a perturbational treatment of SOC is the method of choice for computing the UV/Vis spectrum of this heavy transition metal complex while multi-reference spin–orbit configuration interaction is preferable for calculating the phosphorescence rates. The particular choice of the spin–orbit interaction operator is found to be of minor importance. Intersystem crossing (ISC) rates have been determined by Fourier transformation of the time correlation function of the transition including Dushinsky rotations. In the electronic ground state, fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3} is C{sub 3} symmetric. The calculated UV/Vis spectrum is in excellent agreement with experiment. The effect of SOC is particularly pronounced for the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) band in the visible region of the absorption spectrum which does not only extend its spectral onset towards longer wavelengths but also experiences a blue shift of its maximum. Pseudo-Jahn-Teller interaction leads to asymmetric coordinate displacements in the lowest MLCT states. Substantial electronic SOC and a small energy gap make ISC an ultrafast process in fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3}. For the S{sub 1}↝T{sub 1} non-radiative transition, we compute a rate constant of k{sub ISC} = 6.9 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1} which exceeds the rate constant of radiative decay to the electronic ground state by more than six orders of magnitude, in agreement with the experimental observation of a subpicosecond ISC process and a triplet quantum yield close to unity. As a consequence of the geometric distortion in the T{sub 1} state, the T{sub 1} → S{sub 0} transition densities are localized on one of the

  17. Intersystem-crossing and phosphorescence rates in fac-IrIII(ppy)3: A theoretical study involving multi-reference configuration interaction wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschmidt, Martin; van Wüllen, Christoph; Marian, Christel M.

    2015-03-01

    We have employed combined density functional theory and multi-reference configuration interaction methods including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects to investigate the photophysics of the green phosphorescent emitter fac-tris-(2-phenylpyridine)iridium (fac-Ir(ppy)3). A critical evaluation of our quantum chemical approaches shows that a perturbational treatment of SOC is the method of choice for computing the UV/Vis spectrum of this heavy transition metal complex while multi-reference spin-orbit configuration interaction is preferable for calculating the phosphorescence rates. The particular choice of the spin-orbit interaction operator is found to be of minor importance. Intersystem crossing (ISC) rates have been determined by Fourier transformation of the time correlation function of the transition including Dushinsky rotations. In the electronic ground state, fac-Ir(ppy)3 is C3 symmetric. The calculated UV/Vis spectrum is in excellent agreement with experiment. The effect of SOC is particularly pronounced for the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) band in the visible region of the absorption spectrum which does not only extend its spectral onset towards longer wavelengths but also experiences a blue shift of its maximum. Pseudo-Jahn-Teller interaction leads to asymmetric coordinate displacements in the lowest MLCT states. Substantial electronic SOC and a small energy gap make ISC an ultrafast process in fac-Ir(ppy)3. For the S1↝T1 non-radiative transition, we compute a rate constant of kISC = 6.9 × 1012 s-1 which exceeds the rate constant of radiative decay to the electronic ground state by more than six orders of magnitude, in agreement with the experimental observation of a subpicosecond ISC process and a triplet quantum yield close to unity. As a consequence of the geometric distortion in the T1 state, the T1 → S0 transition densities are localized on one of the phenylpyridyl moieties. In our best quantum chemical model, we obtain phosphorescence

  18. Expression of genes involved in the salicylic acid pathway in type h1 thioredoxin transiently silenced pepper plants during a begomovirus compatible interaction.

    PubMed

    Luna-Rivero, Marianne S; Hernández-Zepeda, Cecilia; Villanueva-Alonzo, Hernán; Minero-García, Yereni; Castell-González, Salvador E; Moreno-Valenzuela, Oscar A

    2016-04-01

    The type-h thioredoxins (TRXs) play a fundamental role in oxidative stress tolerance and defense responses against pathogens. In pepper plants, type-h TRXs participate in the defense mechanism against Cucumber mosaic virus. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of the CaTRXh1-cicy gene in pepper plants during compatible interaction with a DNA virus, the Euphorbia mosaic virus-Yucatan Peninsula (EuMV-YP). The effects of a transient silencing of the CaTRXh1-cicy gene in pepper plants wëre evaluated by observing the accumulation of viral DNA and the visible symptoms of pepper plants under different treatments. The accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and the relative expression of the defense genes NPR1 and PR10 were also evaluated. Results showed that viral DNA accumulation was higher in transiently CaTRXh1-cicy silenced plants that were also infected with EuMV-YP. Symptoms in these plants were more severe compared to the non-silenced plants infected with EuMV-YP. The SA levels in the EuMV-YP-infected plants were rapidly induced at 1 h post infection (hpi) in comparison to the non-silenced plants inoculated with EuMV-YP. Additionally, in pepper plants infected with EuMV-YP, the expression of NPR1 decreased by up to 41 and 58 % at 28 days post infection (dpi) compared to the non-silenced pepper plants infected with only EuMV-YP and healthy non-inoculated pepper plants, respectively. PR10 gene expression decreased by up to 70 % at 28 dpi. Overall, the results indicate that the CaTRXh1-cicy gene participates in defense mechanisms during the compatible interaction of pepper plants with the EuMV-YP DNA virus.

  19. The Immunophilin-Interacting Protein AtFIP37 from Arabidopsis Is Essential for Plant Development and Is Involved in Trichome Endoreduplication1

    PubMed Central

    Vespa, Laurent; Vachon, Gilles; Berger, Frédéric; Perazza, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Denis; Herzog, Michel

    2004-01-01

    The FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein 12 kD) immunophilin interacts with several protein partners in mammals and is a physiological regulator of the cell cycle. In Arabidopsis, only one specific partner of AtFKBP12, namely AtFIP37 (FKBP12 interacting protein 37 kD), has been identified but its function in plant development is not known. We present here the functional analysis of AtFIP37 in Arabidopsis. Knockout mutants of AtFIP37 show an embryo-lethal phenotype that is caused by a strong delay in endosperm development and embryo arrest. AtFIP37 promoter::β-glucuronidase reporter gene constructs show that the gene is expressed during embryogenesis and throughout plant development, in undifferentiating cells such as meristem or embryonic cells as well as highly differentiating cells such as trichomes. A translational fusion with the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein indicates that AtFIP37 is a nuclear protein localized in multiple subnuclear foci that show a speckled distribution pattern. Overexpression of AtFIP37 in transgenic lines induces the formation of large trichome cells with up to six branches. These large trichomes have a DNA content up to 256C, implying that these cells have undergone extra rounds of endoreduplication. Altogether, these data show that AtFIP37 is critical for life in Arabidopsis and implies a role for AtFIP37 in the regulation of the cell cycle as shown for FKBP12 and TOR (target of rapamycin) in mammals. PMID:15047892

  20. Expression of genes involved in the salicylic acid pathway in type h1 thioredoxin transiently silenced pepper plants during a begomovirus compatible interaction.

    PubMed

    Luna-Rivero, Marianne S; Hernández-Zepeda, Cecilia; Villanueva-Alonzo, Hernán; Minero-García, Yereni; Castell-González, Salvador E; Moreno-Valenzuela, Oscar A

    2016-04-01

    The type-h thioredoxins (TRXs) play a fundamental role in oxidative stress tolerance and defense responses against pathogens. In pepper plants, type-h TRXs participate in the defense mechanism against Cucumber mosaic virus. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of the CaTRXh1-cicy gene in pepper plants during compatible interaction with a DNA virus, the Euphorbia mosaic virus-Yucatan Peninsula (EuMV-YP). The effects of a transient silencing of the CaTRXh1-cicy gene in pepper plants wëre evaluated by observing the accumulation of viral DNA and the visible symptoms of pepper plants under different treatments. The accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and the relative expression of the defense genes NPR1 and PR10 were also evaluated. Results showed that viral DNA accumulation was higher in transiently CaTRXh1-cicy silenced plants that were also infected with EuMV-YP. Symptoms in these plants were more severe compared to the non-silenced plants infected with EuMV-YP. The SA levels in the EuMV-YP-infected plants were rapidly induced at 1 h post infection (hpi) in comparison to the non-silenced plants inoculated with EuMV-YP. Additionally, in pepper plants infected with EuMV-YP, the expression of NPR1 decreased by up to 41 and 58 % at 28 days post infection (dpi) compared to the non-silenced pepper plants infected with only EuMV-YP and healthy non-inoculated pepper plants, respectively. PR10 gene expression decreased by up to 70 % at 28 dpi. Overall, the results indicate that the CaTRXh1-cicy gene participates in defense mechanisms during the compatible interaction of pepper plants with the EuMV-YP DNA virus. PMID:26606929

  1. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum – Rhizoctonia solani Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani. PMID:27540382

  2. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani.

  3. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani. PMID:27540382

  4. Assembly of the Type Two Secretion System in Aeromonas hydrophila Involves Direct Interaction between the Periplasmic Domains of the Assembly Factor ExeB and the Secretin ExeD

    PubMed Central

    Vanderlinde, Elizabeth M.; Zhong, Su; Li, Gang; Martynowski, Dariusz; Grochulski, Pawel; Howard, S. Peter

    2014-01-01

    The type two secretion system is a large, trans-envelope apparatus that secretes toxins across the outer membrane of many Gram-negative bacteria. In Aeromonas hydrophila, ExeA interacts with peptidoglycan and forms a heteromultimeric complex with ExeB that is required for assembly of the ExeD secretin of the secretion system in the outer membrane. While the peptidoglycan-ExeAB (PG-AB) complex is required for ExeD assembly, the assembly mechanism remains unresolved. We analyzed protein-protein interactions to address the hypothesis that ExeD assembly in the outer membrane requires direct interaction with the PG-AB complex. Yeast and bacterial two hybrid analyses demonstrated an interaction between the periplasmic domains of ExeB and ExeD. Two-codon insertion mutagenesis of exeD disrupted lipase secretion, and immunoblotting of whole cells demonstrated significantly reduced secretin in mutant cells. Mapping of the two-codon insertions and deletion analysis showed that the ExeB-ExeD interaction involves the N0 and N1 subdomains of ExeD. Rotational anisotropy using the purified periplasmic domains of ExeB and ExeD determined that the apparent dissociation constant of the interaction is 1.19±0.16 µM. These results contribute important support for a putative mechanism by which the PG-AB complex facilitates assembly of ExeD through direct interaction between ExeB and ExeD. Furthermore, our results provide novel insight into the assembly function of ExeB that may contribute to elucidating the role of homologous proteins in secretion of toxins from other Gram negative pathogens. PMID:25025769

  5. PprA Protein Is Involved in Chromosome Segregation via Its Physical and Functional Interaction with DNA Gyrase in Irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Devigne, Alice; Guérin, Philippe; Lisboa, Johnny; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; Bouthier de la Tour, Claire

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, was previously shown to be required for cell survival and accurate chromosome segregation after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, we used an in vivo approach to determine, by shotgun proteomics, putative PprA partners coimmunoprecipitating with PprA when cells were exposed to gamma rays. Among them, we found the two subunits of DNA gyrase and, thus, chose to focus our work on characterizing the activities of the deinococcal DNA gyrase in the presence or absence of PprA. Loss of PprA rendered cells hypersensitive to novobiocin, an inhibitor of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. We showed that treatment of bacteria with novobiocin resulted in induction of the radiation desiccation response (RDR) regulon and in defects in chromosome segregation that were aggravated by the absence of PprA. In vitro, the deinococcal DNA gyrase, like other bacterial DNA gyrases, possesses DNA negative supercoiling and decatenation activities. These two activities are inhibited in vitro by novobiocin and nalidixic acid, whereas PprA specifically stimulates the decatenation activity of DNA gyrase. Together, these results suggest that PprA plays a major role in chromosome decatenation via its interaction with the deinococcal DNA gyrase when D. radiodurans cells are recovering from exposure to ionizing radiation. IMPORTANCE D. radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. This bacterium is able to cope with high levels of DNA lesions generated by exposure to extreme doses of ionizing radiation and to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Here, we identified partners of PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, previously shown to be required for radioresistance. Our study leads to three main findings: (i) PprA interacts with DNA gyrase after irradiation, (ii) treatment of cells with novobiocin results in defects in chromosome segregation

  6. The IQGAP-related protein DGAP1 interacts with Rac and is involved in the modulation of the F-actin cytoskeleton and control of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Faix, J; Clougherty, C; Konzok, A; Mintert, U; Murphy, J; Albrecht, R; Mühlbauer, B; Kuhlmann, J

    1998-10-01

    DGAP1 of Dictyostelium discoideum is a cell cortex associated 95 kDa protein that shows homology to both RasGTPase-activating proteins (RasGAPs) and RasGAP-related proteins. When tested for RasGAP activity, recombinant DGAP1 protein did not promote the GTPase activity of human H-Ras or of Dictyostelium RasG in vitro. Instead, DGAP1 bound to Dictyostelium Rac1A and human Rac1, but not to human Cdc42. DGAP1 preferentially interacted with the activated GTP-bound forms of Rac1 and Rac1A, but did not affect the GTPase activities. Since Rho-type GTPases are implicated in the formation of specific F-actin structures and in the control of cell morphology, the microfilament system of mutants that either lack or overexpress DGAP1 has been analysed. DGAP1-null mutants showed elevated levels of F-actin that was organised in large leading edges, membrane ruffles or numerous large filopods. Expression of actin fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to monitor the actin dynamics in these cells, and revealed that the F-actin cytoskeleton of DGAP1-null cells was rapidly re-arranged to form ruffles and filopods. Conversely, in DGAP1-overexpressing cells, the formation of cellular projections containing F-actin was largely suppressed. Measurement of cell migration demonstrated that DGAP1 expression is inversely correlated with the speed of cell motility. PMID:9739079

  7. SM2PH-db: an interactive system for the integrated analysis of phenotypic consequences of missense mutations in proteins involved in human genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Anne; Garnier, Nicolas; Gagnière, Nicolas; Nguyen, Hoan; Albou, Laurent-Philippe; Biancalana, Valérie; Bettler, Emmanuel; Deléage, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Muller, Jean; Moras, Dino; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Toursel, Thierry; Moulinier, Luc; Poch, Olivier

    2010-02-01

    Understanding how genetic alterations affect gene products at the molecular level represents a first step in the elucidation of the complex relationships between genotypic and phenotypic variations, and is thus a major challenge in the postgenomic era. Here, we present SM2PH-db (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/sm2ph), a new database designed to investigate structural and functional impacts of missense mutations and their phenotypic effects in the context of human genetic diseases. A wealth of up-to-date interconnected information is provided for each of the 2,249 disease-related entry proteins (August 2009), including data retrieved from biological databases and data generated from a Sequence-Structure-Evolution Inference in Systems-based approach, such as multiple alignments, three-dimensional structural models, and multidimensional (physicochemical, functional, structural, and evolutionary) characterizations of mutations. SM2PH-db provides a robust infrastructure associated with interactive analysis tools supporting in-depth study and interpretation of the molecular consequences of mutations, with the more long-term goal of elucidating the chain of events leading from a molecular defect to its pathology. The entire content of SM2PH-db is regularly and automatically updated thanks to a computational grid data federation facilities provided in the context of the Decrypthon program.

  8. Human C4orf14 interacts with the mitochondrial nucleoid and is involved in the biogenesis of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    He, J.; Cooper, H. M.; Reyes, A.; Di Re, M.; Kazak, L.; Wood, S. R.; Mao, C. C.; Fearnley, I. M.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial homologue of C4orf14, YqeH, has been linked to assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, recombinant C4orf14 isolated from human cells, co-purified with the small, 28S subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and the endogenous protein co-fractionated with the 28S subunit in sucrose gradients. Gene silencing of C4orf14 specifically affected components of the small subunit, leading to decreased protein synthesis in the organelle. The GTPase of C4orf14 was critical to its interaction with the 28S subunit, as was GTP. Therefore, we propose that C4orf14, with bound GTP, binds to components of the 28S subunit facilitating its assembly, and GTP hydrolysis acts as the release mechanism. C4orf14 was also found to be associated with human mitochondrial nucleoids, and C4orf14 gene silencing caused mitochondrial DNA depletion. In vitro C4orf14 is capable of binding to DNA. The association of C4orf14 with mitochondrial translation factors and the mitochondrial nucleoid suggests that the 28S subunit is assembled at the mitochondrial nucleoid, enabling the direct transfer of messenger RNA from the nucleoid to the ribosome in the organelle. PMID:22447445

  9. Binding of hydrocarbons and other extremely weak ligands to transition metal complexes that coordinate hydrogen: Investigation of cis-interactions and delocalized bonding involving sigma bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J.; Luo, X.L.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the forefront of chemistry are efforts to catalytically transform the inert C-H bonds in alkanes to more useful products using metal compounds. The goal is to observe binding and cleavage of alkane C-H bonds on metals or to use related silane Si-H bonding as models, analogous to the discovery of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) binding to metals. Studies of these unique sigma complexes (M{hor_ellipsis}H-Y; Y{double_bond}H, Si, C) will aid in developing new catalysts or technologies relevant to DOE interest, e.g., new methods for tritium isotope separation. Several transition metals (Mo, W, Mn, and Pt) were found to reversibly bind and cleave H{sub 2}, silanes, and halocarbons. The first metal-SiH{sub 4} complexes, thus serving as a model for methane reactions. A second goal is to study the dynamics and energetics of H-Y bonds on metals by neutron scattering, and evidence for interactions between bound H-Y and nearby H atoms on metal complexes has been found.

  10. Attenuation of DNA damage checkpoint by PBK, a novel mitotic kinase, involves protein-protein interaction with tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Asit K; Ford, Tamara; Fleksher, Daniel; Neuman, Brian; Rapoport, Aaron P

    2007-06-22

    Pathways adopted by developing cancer cells for evasion of cellular surveillance mechanism deserve attention for therapeutic exploitation as well as for better prognosis. A novel mitotic kinase, PDZ-binding kinase or PBK, which is upregulated in a variety of neoplasms including hematological malignancies, has been the focus of our attention with a goal to understand its role in malignant conversion and to examine as a possible new therapeutic target in disparate types of cancer. Earlier, we reported that PBK expression was downregulated during macrophage differentiation of HL60 promyelocytic leukemia cells, during doxorubicin-induced growth arrest in G2/M phase and that PBK was regulated by cell cycle-specific transcription factors E2F and CREB/ATF. Here, we demonstrate that HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells become adapted to doxorubicin-induced DNA damage checkpoint upon ectopic expression of a phosphomimetic mutant of PBK as indicated by the accumulation of polyploid cells. Aberrant entry into the mitotic phase by these cells is suggested by the appearance of a mitotic phase-specific marker, MPM-2. We propose that the effect is due to downregulation of p53 caused by direct physical interaction with PBK as detected by both a biochemical means as well as by yeast two-hybrid analysis. Together, our studies provide a plausible explanation for the role of PBK augmenting tumor cell growth following transient appearance in different types of progenitor cells in vivo as reported. PMID:17482142

  11. Epistatic interactions involving DRD2, DRD4, and COMT polymorphisms and risk of substance abuse in women with binge-purge eating disturbances.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Howard; Thaler, Lea; Gauvin, Lise; Joober, Ridha; Labbe, Aurelie; Israel, Mimi; Kucer, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Substance abuse is common in individuals with bulimia-spectrum (binge-purge) eating disturbances, a co-occurrence that has been attributed to shared neurobiological substrates--notably alterations in dopaminergic activity. We examined the implications of variations of selected, dopamine-relevant polymorphisms (DRD2 Taq1A, DRD4 7R, and COMT) for risk of substance abuse in women with binge-purge eating syndromes. We genotyped 183 women (66.1% showing full-threshold BN and 33.9% showing sub-syndromic variants), and assessed lifetime presence of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, and stimulant abuse or dependence using structured interviews. Tests for main and interaction effects of various allele combinations revealed that individuals who carried high function COMT and low-function DRD4 7R alleles (a combination expected to be associated with higher risk) did indeed show more lifetime substance abuse and, specifically, more cannabis abuse. Our findings suggest that a gene combination that, in theory, codes for low levels of dopaminergic neurotransmission coincides with sensitivity to substance abuse in a sample displaying binge-purge eating-disorder variants. PMID:26950642

  12. TEF30 Interacts with Photosystem II Monomers and Is Involved in the Repair of Photodamaged Photosystem II in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bujaldon, Sandrine; Geimer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable capability of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water comes along with its vulnerability to oxidative damage. Accordingly, organisms harboring PSII have developed strategies to protect PSII from oxidative damage and to repair damaged PSII. Here, we report on the characterization of the THYLAKOID ENRICHED FRACTION30 (TEF30) protein in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is conserved in the green lineage and induced by high light. Fractionation studies revealed that TEF30 is associated with the stromal side of thylakoid membranes. By using blue native/Deriphat-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, sucrose density gradients, and isolated PSII particles, we found TEF30 to quantitatively interact with monomeric PSII complexes. Electron microscopy images revealed significantly reduced thylakoid membrane stacking in TEF30-underexpressing cells when compared with control cells. Biophysical and immunological data point to an impaired PSII repair cycle in TEF30-underexpressing cells and a reduced ability to form PSII supercomplexes after high-light exposure. Taken together, our data suggest potential roles for TEF30 in facilitating the incorporation of a new D1 protein and/or the reintegration of CP43 into repaired PSII monomers, protecting repaired PSII monomers from undergoing repeated repair cycles or facilitating the migration of repaired PSII monomers back to stacked regions for supercomplex reassembly. PMID:26644506

  13. Both epistatic and additive effects of QTLs are involved in polygenic induced resistance to disease: a case study, the interaction pepper - Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, V; Palloix, A

    1996-09-01

    To study the resistance of pepper to Phytophthora capsici, we analyzed 94 doubled-haploid (DH) lines derived from the intraspecific F1 hybrid obtained from a cross between Perennial, an Indian pungent resistant line, and Yolo Wonder, an American bell-pepper susceptible line, with 119 DNA markers. Four different criteria were used to evaluate the resistance, corresponding to different steps or mechanisms of the host-pathogen interaction: root-rot index, receptivity, inducibility and stability. Three distinct ANOVA models between DNA marker genotypes and the four disease criteria identified 13 genomic regions, distributed across several linkage groups or unlinked markers, affecting the resistance of pepper to P. capsici. Some QTLs were criterion specific, whereas others affect several criteria, so that the four resistance criteria were controlled by different combinations of QTLs. The QTLs were very different in their quantitative effect (R(2) values), including major QTLs which explained 41-55% of the phenotypic variance, intermediate QTLs with additive or/and epistatic action (17-28% of the variance explained) and minor QTLs. Favourable alleles of some minor QTLs were carried in the susceptible parent. The total phenotypic variation accounted for by QTLs reached up to 90% for receptivity, with an important part due to epistasis effects between QTLs (with or without additive effects). The relative impact of resistance QTLs in disease response is discussed. PMID:24162341

  14. Genetic and biochemical interactions involving tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) function using a collection of mutants defective in all TCA cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Przybyla-Zawislak, B; Gadde, D M; Ducharme, K; McCammon, M T

    1999-05-01

    The eight enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle are encoded by at least 15 different nuclear genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have constructed a set of yeast strains defective in these genes as part of a comprehensive analysis of the interactions among the TCA cycle proteins. The 15 major TCA cycle genes can be sorted into five phenotypic categories on the basis of their growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. We have previously reported a novel phenotype associated with mutants defective in the IDH2 gene encoding the Idh2p subunit of the NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH). Null and nonsense idh2 mutants grow poorly on glycerol, but growth can be enhanced by extragenic mutations, termed glycerol suppressors, in the CIT1 gene encoding the TCA cycle citrate synthase and in other genes of oxidative metabolism. The TCA cycle mutant collection was utilized to search for other genes that can suppress idh2 mutants and to identify TCA cycle genes that display a similar suppressible growth phenotype on glycerol. Mutations in 7 TCA cycle genes were capable of functioning as suppressors for growth of idh2 mutants on glycerol. The only other TCA cycle gene to display the glycerol-suppressor-accumulation phenotype was IDH1, which encodes the companion Idh1p subunit of NAD-IDH. These results provide genetic evidence that NAD-IDH plays a unique role in TCA cycle function.

  15. The C-Terminal Arm of the Human Papillomavirus Major Capsid Protein Is Immunogenic and Involved in Virus-Host Interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihai; Yan, Xiaodong; Yu, Hai; Wang, Daning; Song, Shuo; Li, Yunbing; He, Maozhou; Hong, Qiyang; Zheng, Qingbing; Zhao, Qinjian; Gu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Janssen, Mandy E W; Cardone, Giovanni; Olson, Norman H; Baker, Timothy S; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-06-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent malignant tumor among women worldwide. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are believed to be the major causative pathogens of mucosal epithelial cancers including cervical cancer. The HPV capsid is made up of 360 copies of major (L1) and 72 copies of minor (L2) capsid proteins. To date, limited high-resolution structural information about the HPV capsid has hindered attempts to understand details concerning the mechanisms by which HPV assembles and infects cells. In this study, we have constructed a pseudo-atomic model of the HPV59 L1-only capsid and demonstrate that the C-terminal arm of L1 participates in virus-host interactions. Moreover, when conjugated to a scaffold protein, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), this arm is immunogenic in vivo. These results provide new insights that will help elucidate HPV biology, and hence pave a way for the design of next-generation HPV vaccines. PMID:27276427

  16. The Arabidopsis SKU6/SPIRAL1 Gene Encodes a Plus End–Localized Microtubule-Interacting Protein Involved in Directional Cell ExpansionW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sedbrook, John C.; Ehrhardt, David W.; Fisher, Sarah E.; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Somerville, Chris R.

    2004-01-01

    The sku6-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits altered patterns of root and organ growth. sku6 roots, etiolated hypocotyls, and leaf petioles exhibit right-handed axial twisting, and root growth on inclined agar media is strongly right skewed. The touch-dependent sku6 root skewing phenotype is suppressed by the antimicrotubule drugs propyzamide and oryzalin, and right skewing is exacerbated by cold treatment. Cloning revealed that sku6-1 is allelic to spiral1-1 (spr1-1). However, modifiers in the Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype backgrounds mask noncomplementation in sku6-1 (Col)/spr1-1 (Ler) F1 plants. The SPR1 gene encodes a plant-specific 12-kD protein that is ubiquitously expressed and belongs to a six-member gene family in Arabidopsis. An SPR1:green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion expressed in transgenic seedlings localized to microtubules within the cortical array, preprophase band, phragmoplast, and mitotic spindle. SPR1:GFP was concentrated at the growing ends of cortical microtubules and was dependent on polymer growth state; the microtubule-related fluorescence dissipated upon polymer shortening. The protein has a repeated motif at both ends, separated by a predicted rod-like domain, suggesting that it may act as an intermolecular linker. These observations suggest that SPR1 is involved in microtubule polymerization dynamics and/or guidance, which in turn influences touch-induced directional cell expansion and axial twisting. PMID:15155883

  17. The knottin-like Blufensin family regulates genes involved in nuclear import and the secretory pathway in barley-powdery mildew interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weihui; Meng, Yan; Surana, Priyanka; Fuerst, Greg; Nettleton, Dan; Wise, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved complex regulatory mechanisms to control a multi-layered defense response to microbial attack. Both temporal and spatial gene expression are tightly regulated in response to pathogen ingress, modulating both positive and negative control of defense. BLUFENSINs, small knottin-like peptides in barley, wheat, and rice, are highly induced by attack from fungal pathogens, in particular, the obligate biotrophic fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh), causal agent of barley powdery mildew. Previous research indicated that Blufensin1 (Bln1) functions as a negative regulator of basal defense mechanisms. In the current report, we show that BLN1 and BLN2 can both be secreted to the apoplast and Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-mediated overexpression of Bln2 increases susceptibility of barley to Bgh. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays signify that BLN1 and BLN2 can interact with each other, and with calmodulin. We then used BSMV-induced gene silencing to knock down Bln1, followed by Barley1 GeneChip transcriptome analysis, to identify additional host genes influenced by Bln1. Analysis of differential expression revealed a gene set enriched for those encoding proteins annotated to nuclear import and the secretory pathway, particularly Importin α1-b and Sec61 γ subunits. Further functional analysis of these two affected genes showed that when silenced, they also reduced susceptibility to Bgh. Taken together, we postulate that Bln1 is co-opted by Bgh to facilitate transport of disease-related host proteins or effectors, influencing the establishment of Bgh compatibility on its barley host. PMID:26089830

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Small Secreted Cysteine-Rich Proteins Identifies Candidate Effector Proteins Potentially Involved in Fusarium graminearum-Wheat Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunwen; Edwards, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Pathogen-derived, small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) are known to be a common source of fungal effectors that trigger resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. This group of proteins has not been well studied in Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of wheat. We report here a comprehensive analysis of SSCPs encoded in the genome of this fungus and selection of candidate effector proteins through proteomics and sequence/transcriptional analyses. A total of 190 SSCPs were identified in the genome of F. graminearum (isolate PH-1) based on the presence of N-terminal signal peptide sequences, size (≤200 amino acids), and cysteine content (≥2%) of the mature proteins. Twenty-five (approximately 13%) SSCPs were confirmed to be true extracellular proteins by nanoscale liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) analysis of a minimal medium-based in vitro secretome. Sequence analysis suggested that 17 SSCPs harbor conserved functional domains, including two homologous to Ecp2, a known effector produced by the tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. Transcriptional analysis revealed that at least 34 SSCPs (including 23 detected in the in vitro secretome) are expressed in infected wheat heads; about half are up-regulated with expression patterns correlating with the development of FHB. This work provides a solid candidate list for SSCP-derived effectors that may play roles in mediating F. graminearum-wheat interactions. The in vitro secretome-based method presented here also may be applicable for identifying candidate effectors in other ascomycete pathogens of crop plants. PMID:26524547

  19. Maturation of blood vessels by haematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells: involvement of apelin/APJ and angiopoietin/Tie2 interactions in vessel caliber size regulation.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Nobuyuki; Kidoya, Hiroyasu

    2009-06-01

    Apelin is a recently-isolated bioactive peptide from bovine gastric extract. The gene encodes a protein of 77 amino acids, which can generate two active polypeptides, long (42-77) and short (65-77). Both peptides ligate and activate APJ, a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Although an essential role for the apelin/APJ system in blood vessel formation has been reported in Xenopus, its precise function in mammals is unclear. Blood vessel tube formation is accomplished by two main mechanisms: 1) single cell hollowing, in which a lumen forms within the cytoplasm of a single endothelial cell (EC), and 2) cord hollowing in which a luminal cavity is created de novo between ECs in a thin cylindrical cord. Molecular control of either single cell or cord hollowing has not been precisely determined. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) has been reported to induce enlargement of blood vessels. Apelin is produced from ECs upon activation of Tie2, a cognate receptor of Ang1, expressed on ECs. It has been suggested that apelin induces cord hollowing by promoting proliferation and aggregation/assembly of ECs. During angiogenesis, haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells (HPCs) are frequently observed in the perivascular region. They produce Ang1 and induce migration of ECs, resulting in a fine vascular network. Moreover, HSCs/HPCs can induce apelin production from ECs. Therefore, this review article posits that HSCs/HPCs regulate caliber size of blood vessels via apelin/APJ and Angiopoietin/Tie2 interactions.

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of Small Secreted Cysteine-Rich Proteins Identifies Candidate Effector Proteins Potentially Involved in Fusarium graminearum-Wheat Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunwen; Edwards, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Pathogen-derived, small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) are known to be a common source of fungal effectors that trigger resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. This group of proteins has not been well studied in Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of wheat. We report here a comprehensive analysis of SSCPs encoded in the genome of this fungus and selection of candidate effector proteins through proteomics and sequence/transcriptional analyses. A total of 190 SSCPs were identified in the genome of F. graminearum (isolate PH-1) based on the presence of N-terminal signal peptide sequences, size (≤200 amino acids), and cysteine content (≥2%) of the mature proteins. Twenty-five (approximately 13%) SSCPs were confirmed to be true extracellular proteins by nanoscale liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) analysis of a minimal medium-based in vitro secretome. Sequence analysis suggested that 17 SSCPs harbor conserved functional domains, including two homologous to Ecp2, a known effector produced by the tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. Transcriptional analysis revealed that at least 34 SSCPs (including 23 detected in the in vitro secretome) are expressed in infected wheat heads; about half are up-regulated with expression patterns correlating with the development of FHB. This work provides a solid candidate list for SSCP-derived effectors that may play roles in mediating F. graminearum-wheat interactions. The in vitro secretome-based method presented here also may be applicable for identifying candidate effectors in other ascomycete pathogens of crop plants.

  1. Hsp90β is involved in the development of high salt-diet-induced nephropathy via interaction with various signalling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shi-hai; Zhao, Ning-wei; Jiang, Wei-min; Wang, Xin-tong; Zhang, Si-qi; Zhu, Xuan-xuan; Zhang, Chun-bing; Gao, Yan-hong; Gao, Feng; Liu, Fu-ming; Fang, Zhu-yuan

    2016-01-01

    A high-salt diet often leads to a local intrarenal increase in renal hypoxia and oxidative stress, which are responsible for an excess production of pathogenic substances. Here, Wistar Kyoto/spontaneous hypertensive (WKY/SHR) rats fed a high-salt diet developed severe proteinuria, resulting from pronounced renal inflammation, fibrosis and tubular epithelial cell apoptosis. All these were mainly non-pressure-related effects. Hsp90β, TGF-β, HIF-1α, TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1 were shown to be highly expressed in response to salt loading. Next, we found that Hsp90β might play the key role in non-pressure-related effects of salt loading through a series of cellular signalling events, including the NF-κB, p38 activation and Bcl-2 inactivation. Hsp90β was previously proven to regulate the upstream mediators in multiple cellular signalling cascades through stabilizing and maintaining their activities. In our study, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG) or Hsp90β knockdown dramatically alleviated the high-salt-diet-induced proteinuria and renal damage without altering blood pressure significantly, when it reversed activations of NF-κB, mTOR and p38 signalling cascades. Meanwhile, Co-IP results demonstrated that Hsp90β could interact with and stabilize TAK1, AMPKα, IKKα/β, HIF-1α and Raptor, whereas Hsp90β inhibition disrupted this process. In addition, Hsp90β inhibition-mediated renal improvements also accompanied the reduction of renal oxidative stress. In conclusion, salt loading indeed exhibited non-pressure-related impacts on proteinuria and renal dysfunction in WKY/SHR rats. Hsp90β inhibition caused the destabilization of upstream mediators in various pathogenic signalling events, thereby effectively ameliorating this nephropathy owing to renal hypoxia and oxidative stress. PMID:27248656

  2. Zipper-interacting protein kinase is involved in regulation of ubiquitination of the androgen receptor, thereby contributing to dynamic transcription complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Felten, A; Brinckmann, D; Landsberg, G; Scheidtmann, K H

    2013-10-10

    We have recently identified apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), tumor-susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) as novel coactivators of the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanisms of coactivation remained obscure, however. Here we investigated the interplay and interdependence between these coactivators and the AR using the endogenous prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene as model for AR-target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that recruitment of AATF and ZIPK to the PSA enhancer was dependent on AR, whereas recruitment of TSG101 was dependent on AATF. Association of AR and its coactivators with the PSA enhancer or promoter occurred in cycles. Dissociation of AR-transcription complexes was due to degradation because inhibition of the proteasome system by MG132 caused accumulation of AR at enhancer/promoter elements. Moreover, inhibition of degradation strongly reduced transcription, indicating that continued and efficient transcription is based on initiation, degradation and reinitiation cycles. Interestingly, knockdown of ZIPK by siRNA had a similar effect as MG132, leading to reduced transcription but enhanced accumulation of AR at androgen-response elements. In addition, knockdown of ZIPK, as well as overexpression of a dominant-negative ZIPK mutant, diminished polyubiquitination of AR. Furthermore, ZIPK cooperated with the E3 ligase Mdm2 in AR-dependent transactivation, assembled into a single complex on chromatin and phosphorylated Mdm2 in vitro. These results suggest that ZIPK has a crucial role in regulation of ubiquitination and degradation of the AR, and hence promoter clearance and efficient transcription.

  3. Mechanisms underlying developmental changes in the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors in cultured cerebellar granule cells: homologous desensitization and interactive effects involving N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Aronica, E; Dell'Albani, P; Condorelli, D F; Nicoletti, F; Hack, N; Balázs, R

    1993-11-01

    Glutamate receptors coupled to polyphosphoinositide (PPI) hydrolysis (metabotropic glutamate receptors, mGluR), are highly efficient during the early stages of postnatal life and are thought to be involved in developmental plasticity. The dramatic decrease with age in mGluR activity suggests the existence of mechanisms that down-regulate this receptor after a certain stage of neuronal maturation. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons grown under conditions that promote the survival and maturation of cells (serum-containing medium with 25 mM K+), enzymatic depletion of extracellular glutamate prevented the age-dependent decrease in mGluR agonist-stimulated PPI hydrolysis that normally occurs after 4 days of maturation in vitro, suggesting that mGluR activity declines as a result of developmental changes affecting homologous desensitization. This was borne out by the observation that glutamate at low concentrations (1-10 microM) readily desensitized mGluR at 7 days but not at 4 days in culture. Furthermore, the critical period during which the high sensitivity to agonist-induced desensitization of mGluR developed coincided with the period when phorbol ester-activated protein kinase C acquired the ability to suppress mGluR activity. The developmental pattern of mGluR agonist-induced PPI hydrolysis was similar in granule cells grown under "trophic" and "nontrophic" conditions (in cultures in 25 mM K+ and in a medium containing "low" K+, in this study, 10 mM, respectively). However, the developmental decline in the response to mGluR stimulation after 4 days in vitro was not prevented in cells grown in 10 mM K+ by the removal of extracellular glutamate; rather, it could be counteracted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (EC50, approximately 4 microM), which blocked the development of mGluR desensitization. The effect was NMDA receptor mediated and required DNA transcription and protein synthesis. However, NMDA exerted a different effect in cells grown in 25 m

  4. The Identification and Functional Characterization of WxL Proteins from Enterococcus faecium Reveal Surface Proteins Involved in Extracellular Matrix Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Galloway-Peña, Jessica R.; Liang, Xiaowen; Singh, Kavindra V.; Yadav, Puja; Chang, Chungyu; La Rosa, Sabina Leanti; Shelburne, Samuel; Ton-That, Hung; Höök, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The WxL domain recently has been identified as a novel cell wall binding domain found in numerous predicted proteins within multiple Gram-positive bacterial species. However, little is known about the function of proteins containing this novel domain. Here, we identify and characterize 6 Enterococcus faecium proteins containing the WxL domain which, by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and genomic analyses, are located in three similarly organized operons, deemed WxL loci A, B, and C. Western blotting, electron microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) determined that genes of WxL loci A and C encode antigenic, cell surface proteins exposed at higher levels in clinical isolates than in commensal isolates. Secondary structural analyses of locus A recombinant WxL domain-containing proteins found they are rich in β-sheet structure and disordered segments. Using Biacore analyses, we discovered that recombinant WxL proteins from locus A bind human extracellular matrix proteins, specifically type I collagen and fibronectin. Proteins encoded by locus A also were found to bind to each other, suggesting a novel cell surface complex. Furthermore, bile salt survival assays and animal models using a mutant from which all three WxL loci were deleted revealed the involvement of WxL operons in bile salt stress and endocarditis pathogenesis. In summary, these studies extend our understanding of proteins containing the WxL domain and their potential impact on colonization and virulence in E. faecium and possibly other Gram-positive bacterial species. PMID:25512313

  5. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte–neuron interactions

    PubMed Central

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2–4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr216 being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr216 was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:27124580

  6. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte-neuron interactions.

    PubMed

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2-4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr(216) being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr(216) was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:27124580

  7. FXR-dependent and -independent interaction of glucocorticoids with the regulatory pathways involved in the control of bile acid handling by the liver.

    PubMed

    Rosales, R; Romero, M R; Vaquero, J; Monte, M J; Requena, P; Martinez-Augustin, O; Sanchez de Medina, F; Marin, J J G

    2013-03-15

    Treatment with glucocorticoids (GCs) may cause adverse effects, including cholestasis. The ability of dexamethasone, prednisolone and budesonide to affect the liver handling of bile acids (BAs) has been investigated. In rats treated with GCs for 4 days, altered serum and bile BA levels, changed conjugation pattern, and delayed and decreased ability to conjugate/secrete exogenously administered deoxycholate, were found using HPLC-MS/MS. RT-QPCR analyses revealed that GC treatment also induced a down-regulation of liver nuclear receptors (Fxr, Gr and Shp), transporters (Ntcp, Mrp4 and Bcrp) and enzymes (Cyp7a1 and Baat), whereas Bsep, Mrp2 and Cyp27a1 were up-regulated. Human HepG2 and Alexander cell lines were used as in vitro models of liver cells with and without constitutive FXR expression, respectively. In HepG2 cells, GCs induced a decreased expression of FXR and SHP, and inhibited the regulatory effect of GW4064 on FXR-target genes. In Alexander cells, only when they were transfected with FXR+RXR, GW4064 caused up-regulation of SHP and OSTβ, and a down-regulation of CYP27A1. GCs had the opposite effect on these genes, both in the absence and in the presence of FXR expression. Co-transfection of Alexander cells with IR-1-Luc and FXR+RXR revealed that GCs did not inhibit but moderately enhanced FXR activity. Moreover, GCs have a synergistic effect on GW4064-induced FXR activation, whereas chenodeoxycholate and GW4064 have an additive effect. In conclusion, GCs are able to directly or indirectly activate FXR but they also antagonize, through FXR-independent mechanisms, the expression of FXR and FXR target genes involved in the hepatic handling of BAs.

  8. Key amino acid residues involved in multi-point binding interactions between brazzein, a sweet protein, and the T1R2-T1R3 human sweet receptor

    PubMed Central

    Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Maillet, Emeline L.; Radek, James T.; Quijada, Jeniffer; Markley, John L.; Max, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    The sweet protein brazzein activates the human sweet receptor, a heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) composed of subunits T1R2 and T1R3. In order to elucidate the key amino acid(s) responsible for this interaction, we mutated residues in brazzein and each of the two subunits of the receptor. The effects of brazzein mutations were assayed by a human taste panel and by an in vitro assay involving receptor subunits expressed recombinantly in human embryonic kidney cells; the effects of the receptor mutations were assayed by the in vitro assay. We mutated surface residues of brazzein at three putative interaction sites: Site 1 (Loop43), Site 2 (N- and C-terminus and adjacent Glu36, Loop33), and Site 3 (Loop9–19). Basic residues in Site 1 and acidic residues in Site 2 were essential for positive responses from each assay. Mutation of Y39A (Site 1) greatly reduced positive responses. A bulky side chain at position 54 (Site 2), rather than a side chain with hydrogen bonding potential, was required for positive responses as was the presence of the native disulfide bond in Loop 9–19 (Site 3). Results from mutagenesis and chimeras of the receptor indicated that brazzein interacts with both T1R2 and T1R3 and that the Venus fly trap module of T1R2 is important for brazzein agonism. With one exception, all mutations of receptor residues at putative interaction sites predicted by wedge models failed to yield the expected decrease in the brazzein response. The exception, hT1R2:R217A-hT1R3, which contained a substitution in lobe 2 at the interface between the two subunits, exhibited a small selective decrease in brazzein activity. However, because the mutation was found to increase the positive cooperativity of binding by multiple ligands proposed to bind both T1R subunits (brazzein, monellin, and sucralose) but not those that bind to a single subunit (neotame and cyclamate), we suggest that this site in involved in subunit-subunit interaction rather than direct

  9. Key amino acid residues involved in multi-point binding interactions between brazzein, a sweet protein, and the T1R2-T1R3 human sweet receptor.

    PubMed

    Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Maillet, Emeline L; Radek, James T; Quijada, Jeniffer; Markley, John L; Max, Marianna

    2010-05-14

    The sweet protein brazzein [recombinant protein with sequence identical with the native protein lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate (the numbering system used has Asp2 as the N-terminal residue)] activates the human sweet receptor, a heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptor composed of subunits Taste type 1 Receptor 2 (T1R2) and Taste type 1 Receptor 3 (T1R3). In order to elucidate the key amino acid(s) responsible for this interaction, we mutated residues in brazzein and each of the two subunits of the receptor. The effects of brazzein mutations were assayed by a human taste panel and by an in vitro assay involving receptor subunits expressed recombinantly in human embryonic kidney cells; the effects of the receptor mutations were assayed by in vitro assay. We mutated surface residues of brazzein at three putative interaction sites: site 1 (Loop43), site 2 (N- and C-termini and adjacent Glu36, Loop33), and site 3 (Loop9-19). Basic residues in site 1 and acidic residues in site 2 were essential for positive responses from each assay. Mutation of Y39A (site 1) greatly reduced positive responses. A bulky side chain at position 54 (site 2), rather than a side chain with hydrogen-bonding potential, was required for positive responses, as was the presence of the native disulfide bond in Loop9-19 (site 3). Results from mutagenesis and chimeras of the receptor indicated that brazzein interacts with both T1R2 and T1R3 and that the Venus flytrap module of T1R2 is important for brazzein agonism. With one exception, all mutations of receptor residues at putative interaction sites predicted by wedge models failed to yield the expected decrease in brazzein response. The exception, hT1R2 (human T1R2 subunit of the sweet receptor):R217A/hT1R3 (human T1R3 subunit of the sweet receptor), which contained a substitution in lobe 2 at the interface between the two subunits, exhibited a small selective decrease in brazzein activity. However, because the mutation was found to increase

  10. Banana fruit NAC transcription factor MaNAC1 is a direct target of MaICE1 and involved in cold stress through interacting with MaCBF1.

    PubMed

    Shan, Wei; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Lu, Wang-Jin; Chen, Jian-Ye

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that the banana ripening-induced MaNAC1, a NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) transcription factor (TF) gene, is regulated by ethylene during fruit ripening, and propylene, a functional ethylene analogue, induces cold tolerance of banana fruits. However, the involvement of MaNAC1 in propylene-induced cold tolerance of banana fruits is not understood. In the present work, the possible involvement of MaNAC1 in cold tolerance of banana fruits was investigated. MaNAC1 was noticeably induced by cold stress or following propylene treatment during cold storage. Transient protoplast assays showed that MaNAC1 promoter was activated by cold stress and ethylene treatment. Yeast one-hybrid (Y1H), electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and transient expression assays demonstrated MaNAC1 as a novel direct target of MaICE1, and that the ability of MaICE1 binding to MaNAC1 promoter might be enhanced by MaICE1 phosphorylation and cold stress. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analyses revealed physical interaction between MaNAC1 and MaCBF1, a downstream component of inducer of C-repeat binding factor (CBF) expression 1 (ICE1) in cold signalling. Taken together, these results suggest that the cold-responsive MaNAC1 may be involved in cold tolerance of banana fruits through its interaction with ICE1-CBF cold signalling pathway, providing new insights into the regulatory activity of NAC TF. PMID:24548087

  11. Specific epitopes of domains II and III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin involved in the sequential interaction with cadherin and aminopeptidase-N receptors in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Isabel; Arenas, Iván; Benitez, Itzel; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Becerril, Baltazar; Grande, Ricardo; Almagro, Juan Carlos; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2006-11-10

    The Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are specific to different insects. In Manduca sexta cadherin (Bt-R1) and aminopeptidase-N (APN) proteins are recognized as Cry1A receptors. Previous work showed that Cry1Ab binds to Bt-R1 promoting the formation of a pre-pore oligomer that binds to APN leading to membrane insertion. In this work we characterized the binding epitopes involved in the sequential interaction of Cry1Ab with Bt-R1 and APN. A Cry1Ab immune M13 phage repertoire was constructed using antibody gene transcripts of bone marrow or spleen from a rabbit immunized with Cry1Ab. We identified antibodies that recognize domain II loop 3 (scFvL3-3) or beta16-beta22 (scFvM22) in domain III. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and toxin overlay binding competition assays in the presence of scFvL3-3, scFvM22, or synthetic peptides showed that domain II loop 3 is an important epitope for interaction with Bt-R1 receptor, whereas domain III beta16 is involved in the interaction with APN. Both scFvL3-3 and scFvM22 lowered the toxicity of Cry1Ab to M. sexta larvae indicating that interaction with both receptors is important for in vivo toxicity. scFvL3-3 and anti-loop2 scFv (scFv73) promoted the formation of the pre-pore oligomer in contrast to scFvM22. In addition, scFvL3-3 and scFv73 preferentially recognized the monomeric toxin rather than the pre-pore suggesting a conformational change in domain II loops upon oligomerization. These results indicate for the first time that both receptor molecules participate in Cry1Ab toxin action in vivo: first the monomeric toxin binds to Bt-R1 through loops 2 and 3 of domain II promoting the formation of the pre-pore inducing some structural changes, then the pre-pore interacts with APN through beta-16 of domain III promoting membrane insertion and cell death.

  12. Interaction between transactivation domain of p53 and middle part of TBP-like protein (TLP) is involved in TLP-stimulated and p53-activated transcription from the p21 upstream promoter.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Ryo; Suzuki, Hidefumi; Tanaka, Yuta; Tamura, Taka-aki

    2014-01-01

    TBP-like protein (TLP) is involved in transcriptional activation of an upstream promoter of the human p21 gene. TLP binds to p53 and facilitates p53-activated transcription from the upstream promoter. In this study, we clarified that in vitro affinity between TLP and p53 is about one-third of that between TBP and p53. Extensive mutation analyses revealed that the TLP-stimulated function resides in transcription activating domain 1 (TAD1) in the N-terminus of p53. Among the mutants, #22.23, which has two amino acid substitutions in TAD1, exhibited a typical mutant phenotype. Moreover, #22.23 exhibited the strongest mutant phenotype for TLP-binding ability. It is thus thought that TLP-stimulated and p53-dependent transcriptional activation is involved in TAD1 binding of TLP. #22.23 had a decreased transcriptional activation function, especially for the upstream promoter of the endogenous p21 gene, compared with wild-type p53. This mutant did not facilitate p53-dependent growth repression and etoposide-mediated cell-death as wild-type p53 does. Moreover, mutation analysis revealed that middle part of TLP, which is requited for p53 binding, is involved in TLP-stimulated and p53-dependent promoter activation and cell growth repression. These results suggest that activation of the p21 upstream promoter is mediated by interaction between specific regions of TLP and p53.

  13. The mRNA export factor Sus1 is involved in Spt/Ada/Gcn5 acetyltransferase-mediated H2B deubiquitinylation through its interaction with Ubp8 and Sgf11.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Alwin; Pascual-García, Pau; Llopis, Ana; Zapater, Meritxell; Posas, Francesc; Hurt, Ed; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2006-10-01

    Sus1 acts in nuclear mRNA export via its association with the nuclear pore-associated Sac3-Thp1-Cdc31 complex. In addition, Sus1 plays a role in transcription through its interaction with the Spt/Ada/Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex. Here, we have analyzed function and interaction of Sus1 within the SAGA complex. We demonstrate that Sus1 is involved in the SAGA-dependent histone H2B deubiquitinylation and maintenance of normal H3 methylation levels. By deletion analyses, we show that binding of Sus1 to SAGA depends on the deubiquitinylating enzyme Ubp8 and Sgf11. Moreover, a stable subcomplex between Sus1, Sgf11, and Ubp8 could be dissociated from SAGA under high salt conditions. In vivo recruitment of Sus1 to the activated GAL1 promoter depends on Ubp8 and vice versa. In addition, histones coenrich during SAGA purification in a Sus1-Sgf11-Ubp8-dependent way. Interestingly, sgf11 deletion enhances the mRNA export defect observed in sus1delta cells. Thus, the Sus1-Sgf11-Ubp8 module could work at the junction between SAGA-dependent transcription and nuclear mRNA export.

  14. Up-regulation and interaction of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and the 14-3-3 protein are involved in the regulation of citrate exudation from the broad bean (Vicia faba L.) under Al stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Guo, Chuan-Long; Wang, Ping; Chen, Xuan-Qin; Wu, Kong-Huan; Li, Kui-Zhi; Yu, Yong-Xiong; Chen, Li-Mei

    2013-09-01

    Our previous study showed that citrate excretion coupled with a concomitant release of protons was involved in aluminum (Al) resistance in the broad bean. Furthermore, genes encoding plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase (vha2) and the 14-3-3 protein (vf14-3-3b) were up-regulated by Al in Al-resistant (YD) broad bean roots. In this study, the roles of PM H(+)-ATPase (E.C. 3.6.3.6) and the 14-3-3 protein in the regulation of citrate secretion were further investigated in Al-resistant (YD) and Al-sensitive (AD) broad bean cultivars under Al stress. The results showed that greater citrate exudation was positively correlated with higher activities of PM H(+)-ATPase in roots of YD than AD. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that vha2 was clearly up-regulated by Al in YD but not in AD roots, whereas the transcription levels of vf14-3-3b were elevated in a time-dependent manner in both YD and AD roots. Immunoprecipitation and Western analysis suggested that phosphorylation and interaction with the vf14-3-3b protein of the VHA2 were enhanced in YD roots but not in AD roots with increasing Al treatment time. Fusicoccin or adenosine 5'-monophosphate increased or decreased the interaction between the phosphorylated VHA2 and the vf14-3-3b protein, followed by an enhancement or reduction of the PM H(+)-ATPase activity and citrate exudation in both cultivars under Al stress conditions, respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that Al enhanced the expression and interaction of the PM H(+)-ATPase and the 14-3-3 protein, which thereby led to higher activity of the PM H(+)-ATPase and more citrate exudation from YD plants.

  15. Sequence-specific interactions of minor groove binders with the 154 base pair HindIII-RsaI restriction fragment of cDNA of the human Tau 40 protein involved in pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kittler, L; Matesoi, D; Bell, A; Baguley, B C; Unger, E; Löber, G

    1997-01-01

    The DNA minor groove binders netropsin, distamycin and four structurally related bisquaternary ammonium heterocycles (BQA), SN 6999, SN 6570, SN 6132 and SN 6131, were investigated for sequence-specific interactions with the 154 base pair fragment of cDNA of the human Tau 40 protein (h Tau 40 protein), involved in pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The base sequences 5' AATCTT 3', 5' AATATT 3' and 5' TTTCAATCTTTTTATTT 3' were identified as ligand specific binding sites and demonstrate the obvious dA.dT binding preference. Footprinting titration experiments were performed to estimate sequence-specific binding constants (KA). The KA-values were in the order of 10(6)M-1 and dependent on DNA base sequence as well as ligands used. The highest values estimated were for netropsin (KA = 5.0 x 10(6)M-1) and the quinoline derivative SN 6999 (KA = 6.2 x 10(6)M-1) binding to the sequence 5' ATAAT 3'. Microscopic binding constants are determined by the base sequence rather than by the length of dA.dT stretches. In the extended dA.dT run, 5' TTTCAATCTTTTTATTT 3', netropsin and distamycin binding tolerates the presence of two dG.dC base pairs, as indicated by nearly unaffected footprints. In contrast, the failure of BQAs to form footprints demonstrates their significantly decreased binding selectivity.

  16. Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1957-06-01

    Experimental results on the non-conservation of parity and charge conservation in weak interactions are reviewed. The two-component theory of the neutrino is discussed. Lepton reactions are examined under the assumption of the law of conservation of leptons and that the neutrino is described by a two- component theory. From the results of this examination, the universal Fermi interactions are analyzed. Although reactions involving the neutrino can be described, the same is not true of reactions which do not involve the lepton, as the discussion of the decay of K mesons and hyperons shows. The question of the invariance of time reversal is next examined. (J.S.R.)

  17. Quantitative parameters and ecological implications of a specialized tritrophic interaction involving a seed-feeding tortricid, Pseudargyrotoza conwagana, a braconid parasitoid, Bracon otiosus, and the wild privet, Ligustrum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ángel; Falcó, José Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about tritrophic interactions involving seed-feeding insects, parasitoid wasps, and wild fleshy fruits. Here, we examine relationships between Pseudargyrotoza conwagana (F.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), Bracon otiosus Marshall (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), and the wild privet, Ligustrum vulgare L. (Lamiales: Oleaceae), after collecting fruits in a hedgerow habitat in northwest Spain and rearing insects indoors. No other insect species was detected in this trophic system. Each fruit contained one to four seeds, each infested fruit contained only one seed-feeding tortricid caterpillar, and each parasitized caterpillar was affected by a single braconid individual, i.e., B. otiosus was a solitary parasitoid. Almost half of the wild privet shrubs were infested by P. conwagana, and infestation ranged from 2 to 32% of fruits per infested shrub. The general effect of P.conwagana on wild privet dispersal can be considered low, as the overall rate of seed infestation was low (6% of seeds). The infestation rate was higher in wild privet shrubs with a larger number of seeds per fruit, and tortricid caterpillars that left the fruits successfully ate >80% of seeds. In total, the parasitism rate was moderate (25% of caterpillars), but varied considerably (0‒75%) among shrubs where P. conwagana infestation was detected. Parasitism only occurred in shrubs showing high infestation rates (19‒32% infested fruits), i.e., with high host densities; however, the parasitism rate was density-independent in these shrubs. The wild privets benefited from the action of B. otiosus in two ways: the tortricid caterpillar population was partly eliminated, and the caterpillars were prevented from eating more than one seed per fruit. The B. otiosus sex ratio was very balanced (1 male to 1.18 females). Winter diapause and protandry were prevalent in B. otiosus. PMID:25368072

  18. Quantitative Parameters and Ecological Implications of a Specialized Tritrophic Interaction Involving a Seed-Feeding Tortricid, Pseudargyrotoza conwagana, a Braconid Parasitoid, Bracon otiosus, and the Wild Privet, Ligustrum vulgare

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Ángel; Falcó, José Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about tritrophic interactions involving seed-feeding insects, parasitoid wasps, and wild fleshy fruits. Here, we examine relationships between Pseudargyrotoza conwagana (F.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), Bracon otiosus Marshall (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), and the wild privet, Ligustrum vulgare L. (Lamiales: Oleaceae), after collecting fruits in a hedgerow habitat in northwest Spain and rearing insects indoors. No other insect species was detected in this trophic system. Each fruit contained one to four seeds, each infested fruit contained only one seedfeeding tortricid caterpillar, and each parasitized caterpillar was affected by a single braconid individual, i.e., B. otiosus was a solitary parasitoid. Almost half of the wild privet shrubs were infested by P. conwagana, and infestation ranged from 2 to 32% of fruits per infested shrub. The general effect of P.conwagana on wild privet dispersal can be considered low, as the overall rate of seed infestation was low (6% of seeds). The infestation rate was higher in wild privet shrubs with a larger number of seeds per fruit, and tortricid caterpillars that left the fruits successfully ate >80% of seeds. In total, the parasitism rate was moderate (25% of caterpillars), but varied considerably (0–75%) among shrubs where P. conwagana infestation was detected. Parasitism only occurred in shrubs showing high infestation rates (19–32% infested fruits), i.e., with high host densities; however, the parasitism rate was densityindependent in these shrubs. The wild privets benefited from the action of B. otiosus in two ways: the tortricid caterpillar population was partly eliminated, and the caterpillars were prevented from eating more than one seed per fruit. The B. otiosus sex ratio was very balanced (1 male to 1.18 females). Winter diapause and protandry were prevalent in B. otiosus. PMID:25368072

  19. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  20. The C-Terminal Region of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Nucleoprotein Contains Distinct and Segregable Functional Domains Involved in NP-Z Interaction and Counteraction of the Type I Interferon Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans that is associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. Arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP), the most abundant viral protein in infected cells and virions, encapsidates the viral genome RNA, and this NP-RNA complex, together with the viral L polymerase, forms the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) that directs viral RNA replication and gene transcription. Formation of infectious arenavirus progeny requires packaging of vRNPs into budding particles, a process in which arenavirus matrix-like protein (Z) plays a central role. In the present study, we have characterized the NP-Z interaction for the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The LCMV NP domain that interacted with Z overlapped with a previously documented C-terminal domain that counteracts the host type I interferon (IFN) response. However, we found that single amino acid mutations that affect the anti-IFN function of LCMV NP did not disrupt the NP-Z interaction, suggesting that within the C-terminal region of NP different amino acid residues critically contribute to these two distinct and segregable NP functions. A similar NP-Z interaction was confirmed for the HF arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Notably, LCMV NP interacted similarly with both LCMV Z and LASV Z, while LASV NP interacted only with LASV Z. Our results also suggest the presence of a conserved protein domain within NP but with specific amino acid residues playing key roles in determining the specificity of NP-Z interaction that may influence the viability of reassortant arenaviruses. In addition, this NP-Z interaction represents a potential target for the development of antiviral drugs to combat human-pathogenic arenaviruses. PMID:21976642

  1. Electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Renton, P.

    1990-01-01

    The central part of the book consists of a comprehensive discussion of many scattering and decay processes involving electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. A list of topics includes electron-proton scattering, Compton scattering, muon decay, electron-positron annihilation, photon and hadron structure functions, neutrino-nucleus scattering, Cabibbo theory, tau-lepton decays, W and Z boson decays, mixing phenomena and many others. For most processes, the author presents the appropriate Feynman diagrams, first-order matrix elements and the resulting cross sections or decay rates. The last section of Electroweak Interactions discusses some of the open or unanswered questions in the standard model, including the undiscovered top quark, the Higgs mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and detailed tests involving radiative effects. The book concludes with a brief account of ideas that extend beyond the standard model, such as left-right symmetric models, grand unified theories, compositeness, supersymmetry and string theory.

  2. Home Fires Involving Grills

    MedlinePlus

    ... fires were fueled by gas while 13% used charcoal or other solid fuel. Gas grills were involved ... structure fires and 4,300 outdoor fires annually. Charcoal or other solid-fueled grills were involved in ...

  3. Affective Involvement Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K.

    1970-01-01

    The Affective Involvement Instrument (AII) describes and classifies affective involvement in the process of decision-making as it occurs during classroom activities such as role-playing or group discussions. The thirty-celled instrument behaviorizes the six processes involved in decision-making and combines them with the taxonomic levels of the…

  4. Gubernatorial Involvement in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Edward R.

    This research on 12 States' gubernatorial involvement in State educational policy formation investigates four functional stages of that involvement--issue definition, proposal formulation, support mobilization, and decision enactment. Drawing on the Educational Governance Project information and interviews, a gubernatorial involvement index was…

  5. USE OF BIOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE TO INFORM THE ANALYSIS OF GENE-GENE INTERACTIONS INVOLVED IN MODULATING VIROLOGIC FAILURE WITH EFAVIRENZ-CONTAINING TREATMENT REGIMENS IN ART-NAÏVE ACTG CLINICAL TRIALS PARTICIPANTS

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Benjamin J.; Torstenson, Eric S.; Mclaren, Paul J.; De Bakker, Paul I.W.; Haas, David W.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Gulick, Roy M.; Haubrich, Richard; Ribaudo, Heather; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a high priority for the future of health care. The idea of tailoring an individual’s wellness plan to their unique genetic code is one which we hope to realize through the use of pharmacogenomics. There have been examples of tremendous success in pharmacogenomic associations however there are many such examples in which only a small proportion of trait variance has been explained by the genetic variation. Although the increased use of GWAS could help explain more of this variation, it is likely that a significant proportion of the genetic architecture of these pharmacogenomic traits are due to complex genetic effects such as epistasis, also known as gene-gene interactions, as well as gene-drug interactions. In this study, we utilize the Biofilter software package to look for candidate epistasis contributing to risk for virologic failure with efavirenz-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in treatment-naïve participants of AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) randomized clinical trials. A total of 904 individuals from three ACTG trials with data on efavirenz treatment are analyzed after race-stratification into white, black, and Hispanic ethnic groups. Biofilter was run considering 245 candidate ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) genes and using database knowledge of gene and protein interaction networks to produce approximately 2 million SNP-SNP interaction models within each ethnic group. These models were evaluated within the PLATO software package using pair wise logistic regression models. Although no interaction model remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, an interaction between SNPs in the TAP1 and ABCC9 genes was one of the top models before correction. The TAP1 protein is responsible for intracellular transport of antigen to MHC class I molecules, while ABCC9 codes for a transporter which is part of the subfamily of ABC transporters associated with multi-drug resistance

  6. Use of biological knowledge to inform the analysis of gene-gene interactions involved in modulating virologic failure with efavirenz-containing treatment regimens in ART-naïve ACTG clinical trials participants.

    PubMed

    Grady, Benjamin J; Torstenson, Eric S; McLaren, Paul J; DE Bakker, Paul I W; Haas, David W; Robbins, Gregory K; Gulick, Roy M; Haubrich, Richard; Ribaudo, Heather; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a high priority for the future of health care. The idea of tailoring an individual's wellness plan to their unique genetic code is one which we hope to realize through the use of pharmacogenomics. There have been examples of tremendous success in pharmacogenomic associations however there are many such examples in which only a small proportion of trait variance has been explained by the genetic variation. Although the increased use of GWAS could help explain more of this variation, it is likely that a significant proportion of the genetic architecture of these pharmacogenomic traits are due to complex genetic effects such as epistasis, also known as gene-gene interactions, as well as gene-drug interactions. In this study, we utilize the Biofilter software package to look for candidate epistasis contributing to risk for virologic failure with efavirenz-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in treatment-naïve participants of AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) randomized clinical trials. A total of 904 individuals from three ACTG trials with data on efavirenz treatment are analyzed after race-stratification into white, black, and Hispanic ethnic groups. Biofilter was run considering 245 candidate ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) genes and using database knowledge of gene and protein interaction networks to produce approximately 2 million SNP-SNP interaction models within each ethnic group. These models were evaluated within the PLATO software package using pair wise logistic regression models. Although no interaction model remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, an interaction between SNPs in the TAP1 and ABCC9 genes was one of the top models before correction. The TAP1 protein is responsible for intracellular transport of antigen to MHC class I molecules, while ABCC9 codes for a transporter which is part of the subfamily of ABC transporters associated with multi-drug resistance

  7. The Arabidopsis adaptor protein AP-3μ interacts with the G-protein β subunit AGB1 and is involved in abscisic acid regulation of germination and post-germination development.

    PubMed

    Kansup, Jeeraporn; Tsugama, Daisuke; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins) have been implicated in ubiquitous signalling mechanisms in eukaryotes. In plants, G-proteins modulate hormonal and stress responses and regulate diverse developmental processes. However, the molecular mechanisms of their functions are largely unknown. A yeast two-hybrid screen was performed to identify interacting partners of the Arabidopsis G-protein β subunit AGB1. One of the identified AGB1-interacting proteins is the Arabidopsis adaptor protein AP-3µ. The interaction between AGB1 and AP-3µ was confirmed by an in vitro pull-down assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Two ap-3µ T-DNA insertional mutants were found to be hyposensitive to abscisic acid (ABA) during germination and post-germination growth, whereas agb1 mutants were hypersensitive to ABA. During seed germination, agb1/ap-3µ double mutants were more sensitive to ABA than the wild type but less sensitive than agb1 mutants. However, in post-germination growth, the double mutants were as sensitive to ABA as agb1 mutants. These data suggest that AP-3µ positively regulates the ABA responses independently of AGB1 in seed germination, while AP-3µ does require AGB1 to regulate ABA responses during post-germination growth.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Cyclic Peptidomimetics of the Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Binding Epitope That Disrupt the Protein-Protein Interaction Involving SPRY Domain-Containing Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Box Protein (SPSB) 2 and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Harjani, Jitendra R; Yap, Beow Keat; Leung, Eleanor W W; Lucke, Andrew; Nicholson, Sandra E; Scanlon, Martin J; Chalmers, David K; Thompson, Philip E; Norton, Raymond S; Baell, Jonathan B

    2016-06-23

    SPRY domain-containing suppressor of cytokine signaling box protein (SPSB) 2-deficient macrophages have been found to exhibit prolonged expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and enhanced killing of persistent pathogens, suggesting that inhibitors of the SPSB2-iNOS interaction have potential as novel anti-infectives. In this study, we describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of cyclic peptidomimetic inhibitors of the SPSB2-iNOS interaction constrained by organic linkers to improve stability and druggability. SPR, ITC, and (19)F NMR analyses revealed that the most potent cyclic peptidomimetic bound to the iNOS binding site of SPSB2 with low nanomolar affinity (KD 29 nM), a 10-fold improvement over that of the linear peptide DINNN (KD 318 nM), and showed strong inhibition of SPSB2-iNOS interaction in macrophage cell lysates. This study exemplifies a novel approach to cyclize a Type II β-turn linear peptide and provides a foundation for future development of this group of inhibitors as new anti-infectives.

  9. High Involvement Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These three papers were presented at a symposium on high-involvement work teams moderated by Michael Leimbach at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Beyond Training to the New Learning Environment: Workers on the High-Involvement Frontline" (Joseph Anthony Ilacqua, Carol Ann Zulauf) shows the link between an…

  10. Building Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Bloom, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Discussed is the rationale behind parent involvement in guidance and educational activities, together with specific suggestions for involving parents with other adults (parent advisory committees, informal coffees, Transactional analysis (groups etc.), with children (story hours, trips, demonstrations, counseling booths, testing, interviewing,…

  11. Parent Involvement Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Arna

    This handbook on parent involvement, designed to be used with preschool programs, was developed by the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado. Included are: (1) a general statement about parent involvement in an early childhood program, (2) a description of the Jefferson County Early Childhood Program, (3) a description of the…

  12. Categories of Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Jerold P.

    1994-01-01

    The growing interest in effective parent involvement has produced several ways to classify or describe ways parents are or should be involved. This article reviews and evaluates Ira Gordon's systems approach, the California-based System Development Corporation's categories, Eugenia H. Berger's parental role categories, Chavkin and Williams' parent…

  13. Commericial Involvement in Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry

    Sport in general has long had ties with commercial interests, the most popular and widespread involving publicity. Intramural sports programs, however, have not cultivated many commercial involvements in publicity. The approach in intramural sports advertising is simple. A commercial interest pays for space or time in a given communication media…

  14. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  15. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  16. Phosphorylation and Interaction with the 14-3-3 Protein of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase are Involved in the Regulation of Magnesium-Mediated Increases in Aluminum-Induced Citrate Exudation in Broad Bean (Vicia faba. L).

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Kan, Qi; Wang, Ping; Yu, Wenqian; Yu, Yuzhen; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Yongxiong; Li, Kunzhi; Chen, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have shown that external application of micromolar magnesium (Mg) can increase the resistance of legumes to aluminum (Al) stress by enhancing Al-induced citrate exudation. However, the exact mechanism underlying this regulation remains unknown. In this study, the physiological and molecular mechanisms by which Mg enhances Al-induced citrate exudation to alleviate Al toxicity were investigated in broad bean. Micromolar concentrations of Mg that alleviated Al toxicity paralleled the stimulation of Al-induced citrate exudation and increased the activity of the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase. Northern blot analysis shows that a putative MATE-like gene (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) was induced after treatment with Al for 4, 8 and 12 h, whereas the mRNA abundance of the MATE-like gene showed no significant difference between Al plus Mg and Al-only treatments during the entire treatment period. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot analyses suggest that the transcription and translation of the PM H(+)-ATPase were induced by Al but not by Mg. In contrast, immunoprecipitation suggests that Mg enhanced the phosphorylation levels of VHA2 and its interaction with the vf14-3-3b protein under Al stress. Taken together, our results suggest that micromolar concentrations of Mg can alleviate the Al rhizotoxicity by increasing PM H(+)-ATPase activity and Al-induced citrate exudation in YD roots. This enhancement is likely to be attributable to Al-induced increases in the expression of the MATE-like gene and vha2 and Mg-induced changes in the phosphorylation levels of VHA2, thus changing its interaction with the vf14-3-3b protein.

  17. Transposon Mutagenesis of the Plant-Associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 Revealed That the nfrA and RBAM17410 Genes Are Involved in Plant-Microbe-Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Dolgova, Olga; Fan, Ben; Bleiss, Wilfrid; Ziegler, Jörg; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Borriss, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 represents the prototype of Gram-positive plant growth promoting and biocontrol bacteria. In this study, we applied transposon mutagenesis to generate a transposon library, which was screened for genes involved in multicellular behavior and biofilm formation on roots as a prerequisite of plant growth promoting activity. Transposon insertion sites were determined by rescue-cloning followed by DNA sequencing. As in B. subtilis, the global transcriptional regulator DegU was identified as an activator of genes necessary for swarming and biofilm formation, and the DegU-mutant of FZB42 was found impaired in efficient root colonization. Direct screening of 3,000 transposon insertion mutants for plant-growth-promotion revealed the gene products of nfrA and RBAM_017140 to be essential for beneficial effects exerted by FZB42 on plants. We analyzed the performance of GFP-labeled wild-type and transposon mutants in the colonization of lettuce roots using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While the wild-type strain heavily colonized root surfaces, the nfrA mutant did not colonize lettuce roots, although it was not impaired in growth in laboratory cultures, biofilm formation and swarming motility on agar plates. The RBAM17410 gene, occurring in only a few members of the B. subtilis species complex, was directly involved in plant growth promotion. None of the mutant strains were affected in producing the plant growth hormone auxin. We hypothesize that the nfrA gene product is essential for overcoming the stress caused by plant response towards bacterial root colonization. PMID:24847778

  18. Two groups of amino acids interact with GABA-A receptors coupled to t-[35S]butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding sites: possible involvement with seizures associated with hereditary amino acidemias.

    PubMed

    Squires, R F; Saederup, E; Lajtha, A

    1988-09-01

    Seven L-amino acids (Trp, Arg, Lys, Met, Ile, Val, and Phe) partially (28-81%) reversed the inhibitory action of 1 microM gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on t-[35S]butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) binding to rat brain membranes, with EC50 values ranging from 5 to 120 mM. D-Trp, D-Arg, D-Lys, D-Met, D-Val, and D-Phe were approximately equipotent with their L-isomers. Tyramine, phenethylamine, and tryptamine, the decarboxylation products of the aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Phe, and Trp, respectively), reversed the inhibitory action of 1 microM GABA on [35S]TBPS binding more potently than the parent amino acids (EC50 values = 1.5-3.0 mM). Human hereditary amino acidemias involving Arg, Lys, Ile, Val, and Phe are associated with seizures, and these amino acids and/or their metabolites may block GABA-A receptors. Five other L-amino acids (ornithine, His, Glu, Pro, and Ala) as well as Gly and beta-Ala inhibited [35S]TBPS binding with IC50 values ranging from 0.1 to 37 mM, and these inhibitions were reversed by the GABA-A receptor blocker R 5135 in all cases. The inhibitory effects of L-ornithine, L-Ala, L-Glu, and L-Pro were stereospecific, because the corresponding D-isomers were considerably less inhibitory. L-His, D-His, and L-Glu gave incomplete (plateau) inhibitions. Human hereditary amino acidemias involving L-ornithine, His, Pro, Gly, and beta-Ala are also associated with seizures, and we speculate that these GABA-mimetic amino acids may desensitize GABA-A receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of Ni(II) complexes involving functionalised dithiocarbamates and triphenylphosphine: Anagostic interaction in (N-cyclopropyl-N-(4-fluorobenzyl)dithiocarbamato-S,S‧) (thiocyanato-N)(triphenylphosphine)nickel(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyaraj, E.; Srinivasan, T.; Thirumaran, S.; Velmurugan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Twelve new nickel(II) complexes namely [Ni(S2CNRR‧)2](1-6) and [Ni(S2CNRR‧)(NCS)(PPh3)](7-12) [where R = cyclopropyl (cPr); R‧ = 2HO-C6H4-CH2- (1,7), 3HO-C6H4-CH2- (2,8), 4HO-C6H4-CH2- (3,9), 4CH3O-C6H4-CH2- (4,10), 4F-C6H4-CH2- (5,11), 4Cl-C6H4-CH2- (6,12)] have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis and NMR (1H and 13C) spectroscopy. A single crystal X-ray structural analysis was carried out for (N-cyclopropyl-N-(4-fluorobenzyl)dithiocarbamato-S,S‧)(thiocyanato-N)- (triphenylphosphine)nickel(II). The increase in wavenumber of νC-N thioureide and decrease in chemical shift values of heteroleptic complexes 7-12 compared to that of homoleptic complexes 1-6 are due to the mesomeric drift of electron density from the dithiocarbamate moiety towards the metal centre, increasing the carbon-nitrogen double bond character. The increased strength of C-N bond is due to the presence of the π-accepting triphenylphosphine. Electronic spectral studies indicated square planar geometry around the nickel(II) central atom for all the complexes. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis of 11 confirms that the coordination geometry about the Ni is distorted square planar. The C-H…F interactions lead to a polymeric structure and a rare intramolecular anagostic interaction [M…H = 2.929 Å] is observed. The molecular geometry, HOMO-LUMO in the ground state and MEP have been calculated for 11 using the Hartree-Fock (HF) method with the LANL2DZ basic set. The optimized bond lengths and bond angles agree well with the experimental results. The asymmetry in the Ni-S bonds reveal the greater trans influence of triphenylphosphine compared to that of the isothiocyanate ion.

  20. Eye Involvement in TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... what we see to the brain via the optic nerve. Retinal and optic nerve involvement in TSC are well known today, ... hamartomas (non-cancerous tumors) of the retina or optic nerve. The most common type of retinal hamartoma ...

  1. DFT study and crystal structure analysis of a new nano-structure five coordinated Hg(II) complex involving C-H⋯O, N⋯O and π⋯π interactions in a supra-molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Montazerozohori, M; Musavi, S A; Masoudiasl, A; Hojjati, A; Assoud, A

    2015-08-01

    In this research, template synthesis and crystal structure of a new HgLI₂ complex are presented (L=N(1)-(4-nitrobenzylidene)-N(2)-(2-((E)-(4-nitrobenzylidene)amino)ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine). The mercury complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group of P1¯. The crystal structure of the complex shows a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the mercury(II) center; including two I and an N atoms of Schiff base ligand in equatorial plane and two iminic N atoms in axial positions. Two five membered mercury containing rings [Hg(-N-C-C-N-)] are found in the structure. Some C-H⋯O, N⋯O and π⋯π intermolecular interactions causes a supra-molecular network in the solid-state. In addition to crystal structure analysis, density functional theory (DFT) study at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory has been also performed on the structure. Thereafter some theoretical structural and spectral data were compared with experimental results. Furthermore, total energy levels of HOMO and LUMO orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential, Mullikan atomic charges, thermodynamic and polarizability properties of the complex were calculated. Finally the mercury complex was prepared in nano-structure size confirmed by SEM and XRD analyses. The particles size of the titled complex was evaluated under 40 nm based on Sherrer's formula. PMID:25835377

  2. Downregulation of Integrins in Cancer Cells and Anti-Platelet Properties Are Involved in Holothurian Glycosaminoglycan-Mediated Disruption of the Interaction of Cancer Cells and Platelets in Hematogenous Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wenhui; Tao, Li; Wang, Yingyu; Zhang, Feng; Li, Mengqiu; Huang, Shile; Wang, Aiyun; Chen, Wenxing; Yue, Zhiqiang; Chen, Lei; Liu, Yuping; Huang, Chenhu; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yao; Lu, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Activated platelets have been recognized as an accessory character in the cascade of tumor hematogenous metastasis, and intervention of tumor cell attachment to the activated platelets or microemboli formation might be a leading strategy to prevent tumor cells surviving in the blood vessels and sequential metastasis. Recently, we have demonstrated that holothurian glycosaminoglycan (hGAG), a sulfated polysaccharide with potent anticoagulant activity extracted from the sea cucumber Holothuria leucospilota Brandt, was highly efficacious against tumor metastasis. In this study, we identified the potential effects of hGAG on the disruption of interactions of cancer cells and platelets and the underlying mechanisms, which were supported by the following evidence: hGAG (1) inhibited thrombin-induced platelet activation and aggregation, (2) reduced adhesion between platelet and breast cancer cells, and abrogated platelets/cancer cells adhering to fibrinogen, (3) attenuated platelet-cancer cell complex formation (the number and size of aggregates) and (4) suppressed both mRNA and protein levels of β1 and β3 integrins, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, while increasing the expression of the MMP inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 in MDA-MB-231 cells. These results suggested that both the antiplatelet properties and mitigation of the levels of cellular adhesion molecules contributed to the anticancer effects of hGAG, and might thus be exploited for clinical adjuvant therapy to attenuate tumor hematogenous metastasis.

  3. Integrative Analyses of miRNA-mRNA Interactions Reveal let-7b, miR-128 and MAPK Pathway Involvement in Muscle Mass Loss in Sex-Linked Dwarf Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen; Lin, Shumao; Li, Guihuan; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    The sex-linked dwarf (SLD) chicken is an ideal model system for understanding growth hormone (GH)-action and growth hormone receptor (GHR) function because of its recessive mutation in the GHR gene. Skeletal muscle mass is reduced in the SLD chicken with a smaller muscle fiber diameter. Our previous study has presented the mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of the SLD chicken and normal chicken between embryo day 14 and seven weeks of age. However, the molecular mechanism of GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss is still unclear, and the key molecules and pathways underlying the GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss also remain to be illustrated. Here, by functional network analysis of the differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs between the SLD and normal chickens, we revealed that let-7b, miR-128 and the MAPK pathway might play key roles in the GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss, and that the reduced cell division and growth are potential cellular processes during the SLD chicken skeletal muscle development. Additionally, we also found some genes and miRNAs involved in chicken skeletal muscle development, through the MAPK, PI3K-Akt, Wnt and Insulin signaling pathways. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying muscle mass loss in the SLD chickens, and some regulatory networks that are crucial for chicken skeletal muscle development. PMID:26927061

  4. Interactive Planning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nippert, D. A.; Beerman, T. H.; Pittenger, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA Interactive Planning System (NIPS) assists program-planning groups at NASA Headquarters in developing long-range plans for total space effort. Functions involve meeting goals and objectives within time, budget, and resource-management and allocation problem.

  5. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Desbonnet, Charlene; Tait-Kamradt, Amelia; Garcia-Solache, Monica; Dunman, Paul; Coleman, Jeffrey; Arthur, Michel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as “cephalosporins”) is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps) PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2) of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP). Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA. Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system. PMID:27048803

  6. A novel-type phosphatidylinositol phosphate-interactive, Ca-binding protein PCaP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana: stable association with plasma membrane and partial involvement in stomata closure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Chisako; Miwa, Chika; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kato, Mariko; Suito, Momoe; Tsuchihira, Ayako; Sato, Yori; Segami, Shoji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (PCaP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a new type protein that binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates and Ca(2+)-calmodulin complex as well as free Ca(2+). Although biochemical properties, such as binding to ligands and N-myristoylation, have been revealed, the intracellular localization, tissue and cell specificity, integrity of membrane association and physiological roles of PCaP1 are unknown. We investigated the tissue and intracellular distribution of PCaP1 by using transgenic lines expressing PCaP1 linked with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) at the carboxyl terminus of PCaP1. GFP fluorescence was obviously detected in most tissues including root, stem, leaf and flower. In these tissues, PCaP1-GFP signal was observed predominantly in the plasma membrane even under physiological stress conditions but not in other organelles. The fluorescence was detected in the cytosol when the 25-residue N-terminal sequence was deleted from PCaP1 indicating essential contribution of N-myristoylation to the plasma membrane anchoring. Fluorescence intensity of PCaP1-GFP in roots was slightly decreased in seedlings grown in medium supplemented with high concentrations of iron for 1 week and increased in those grown with copper. In stomatal guard cells, PCaP1-GFP was strictly, specifically localized to the plasma membrane at the epidermal-cell side but not at the pore side. A T-DNA insertion mutant line of PCaP1 did not show marked phenotype in a life cycle except for well growth under high CO2 conditions. However, stomata of the mutant line did not close entirely even in high osmolarity, which usually induces stomata closure. These results suggest that PCaP1 is involved in the stomatal movement, especially closure process, in leaves and response to excessive copper in root and leaf as a mineral nutrient as a physiological role.

  7. Transcriptome and Metabolite Profiling of the Infection Cycle of Zymoseptoria tritici on Wheat Reveals a Biphasic Interaction with Plant Immunity Involving Differential Pathogen Chromosomal Contributions and a Variation on the Hemibiotrophic Lifestyle Definition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Jason J.; Kanyuka, Kostya; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Derbyshire, Mark; Andongabo, Ambrose; Devonshire, Jean; Lysenko, Artem; Saqi, Mansoor; Desai, Nalini M.; Powers, Stephen J.; Hooper, Juliet; Ambroso, Linda; Bharti, Arvind; Farmer, Andrew; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Dietrich, Robert A.; Courbot, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici causes Septoria tritici blotch disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Pathogen reproduction on wheat occurs without cell penetration, suggesting that dynamic and intimate intercellular communication occurs between fungus and plant throughout the disease cycle. We used deep RNA sequencing and metabolomics to investigate the physiology of plant and pathogen throughout an asexual reproductive cycle of Z. tritici on wheat leaves. Over 3,000 pathogen genes, more than 7,000 wheat genes, and more than 300 metabolites were differentially regulated. Intriguingly, individual fungal chromosomes contributed unequally to the overall gene expression changes. Early transcriptional down-regulation of putative host defense genes was detected in inoculated leaves. There was little evidence for fungal nutrient acquisition from the plant throughout symptomless colonization by Z. tritici, which may instead be utilizing lipid and fatty acid stores for growth. However, the fungus then subsequently manipulated specific plant carbohydrates, including fructan metabolites, during the switch to necrotrophic growth and reproduction. This switch coincided with increased expression of jasmonic acid biosynthesis genes and large-scale activation of other plant defense responses. Fungal genes encoding putative secondary metabolite clusters and secreted effector proteins were identified with distinct infection phase-specific expression patterns, although functional analysis suggested that many have overlapping/redundant functions in virulence. The pathogenic lifestyle of Z. tritici on wheat revealed through this study, involving initial defense suppression by a slow-growing extracellular and nutritionally limited pathogen followed by defense (hyper) activation during reproduction, reveals a subtle modification of the conceptual definition of hemibiotrophic plant infection. PMID:25596183

  8. A novel-type phosphatidylinositol phosphate-interactive, Ca-binding protein PCaP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana: stable association with plasma membrane and partial involvement in stomata closure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Chisako; Miwa, Chika; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kato, Mariko; Suito, Momoe; Tsuchihira, Ayako; Sato, Yori; Segami, Shoji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (PCaP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a new type protein that binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates and Ca(2+)-calmodulin complex as well as free Ca(2+). Although biochemical properties, such as binding to ligands and N-myristoylation, have been revealed, the intracellular localization, tissue and cell specificity, integrity of membrane association and physiological roles of PCaP1 are unknown. We investigated the tissue and intracellular distribution of PCaP1 by using transgenic lines expressing PCaP1 linked with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) at the carboxyl terminus of PCaP1. GFP fluorescence was obviously detected in most tissues including root, stem, leaf and flower. In these tissues, PCaP1-GFP signal was observed predominantly in the plasma membrane even under physiological stress conditions but not in other organelles. The fluorescence was detected in the cytosol when the 25-residue N-terminal sequence was deleted from PCaP1 indicating essential contribution of N-myristoylation to the plasma membrane anchoring. Fluorescence intensity of PCaP1-GFP in roots was slightly decreased in seedlings grown in medium supplemented with high concentrations of iron for 1 week and increased in those grown with copper. In stomatal guard cells, PCaP1-GFP was strictly, specifically localized to the plasma membrane at the epidermal-cell side but not at the pore side. A T-DNA insertion mutant line of PCaP1 did not show marked phenotype in a life cycle except for well growth under high CO2 conditions. However, stomata of the mutant line did not close entirely even in high osmolarity, which usually induces stomata closure. These results suggest that PCaP1 is involved in the stomatal movement, especially closure process, in leaves and response to excessive copper in root and leaf as a mineral nutrient as a physiological role. PMID:26979064

  9. [Pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Ohmichi, M; Hiraga, Y; Hirasawa, M

    1990-01-01

    We reported about intrathoracic changes and prognosis of 686 patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed in our hospital between 1963 and 1988. We evaluated CT findings in 135 patients with sarcoidosis and found pulmonary involvements in 81. We analyzed CT findings according to the classification by Tuengerthal which classified radiographic findings combining ILO classification of pneumoconiosis and characteristic findings of bronchovascular sheath with sarcoidosis. The CT findings were as follows: small opacities (44 out of 81 cases, 54.3%), large opacities (37 cases, 46.7%). Additional findings were as follows: peribronchial marking (42 cases, 51.9%), contraction (17 cases, 21.0%), pleural involvement (9 cases, 11.1%), bulla (5 cases, 6.2%). The characteristic CT findings of serious sarcoidosis were extasis of bronchus, thickening of the bronchial wall, unclearness of vascular shadow, atelectasis and thickening of pleura. Concerning the prognosis of pulmonary involvement, according to age, patients younger than 30 years old at initial diagnosis were better than those of 30 years and over in terms of disappearance of pulmonary involvements. According to stage, patients of stage I and stage II were better than those of stage III. Among the patients we were able to observe chest X-ray findings during five years according to the character of shadow, ill-defined shadow of small opacities and rounded shadows of large opacities had a higher disappearance rate of pulmonary involvements than irregular shadows of large opacities, atelectasis and contraction.

  10. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis*, **

    PubMed Central

    Nessrine, Akasbi; Zahra, Abourazzak Fatima; Taoufik, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause. It most commonly affects the pulmonary system but can also affect the musculoskeletal system, albeit less frequently. In patients with sarcoidosis, rheumatic involvement is polymorphic. It can be the presenting symptom of the disease or can appear during its progression. Articular involvement is dominated by nonspecific arthralgia, polyarthritis, and Löfgren's syndrome, which is defined as the presence of lung adenopathy, arthralgia (or arthritis), and erythema nodosum. Skeletal manifestations, especially dactylitis, appear mainly as complications of chronic, multiorgan sarcoidosis. Muscle involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis of rheumatic sarcoidosis is based on X-ray findings and magnetic resonance imaging findings, although the definitive diagnosis is made by anatomopathological study of biopsy samples. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis is generally relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids. In corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent forms of the disease, immunosuppressive therapy, such as treatment with methotrexate or anti-TNF-α, is employed. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the various types of osteoarticular and muscle involvement in sarcoidosis, focusing on their diagnosis and management. PMID:24831403

  11. Involve physicians in marketing.

    PubMed

    Randolph, G T; Baker, K M; Laubach, C A

    1984-01-01

    Many everyday problems in medical group practice can be attacked by a marketing approach. To be successful, however, this kind of approach must have the full support of those involved, especially the physicians, since they are the principal providers of healthcare services. When marketing is presented in a broad context, including elements such as patient mix, population distribution, and research, physicians are more likely to be interested and supportive. The members of Geisinger Medical Center's Department of Cardiovascular Medicine addressed their patient appointment backlog problem with a marketing approach. Their method is chronicled here and serves as a fine example of how physician involvement in marketing can lead to a positive outcome.

  12. The second exon-encoded factor XII region is involved in the interaction of factor XII with factor XI and does not contribute to the binding site for negatively charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Citarella, F; Fedele, G; Roem, D; Fantoni, A; Hack, C E

    1998-12-01

    XIa-C1-inhibitor complexes (50%) than full-length FXII. This impaired factor XI activation by rFXII-triangle up19a was also observed in a purified system and was independent of the presence of high molecular weight kininogen. Furthermore, the synthetic peptide 3-19, preincubated with factor XI, inhibited up to 30% activation of factor XI both in the purified system as well as in plasma. These results together indicate that amino acid residues 3-19 of FXII are involved in the activation of factor XI and do not contribute to the binding of FXII to negatively charged surfaces.

  13. Strengthening Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L., Jr.; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have verified Secretary of Education William Bennett's observation on the importance of home and family life. The most successful students are those whose parents become actively engaged in the educational process at home and at school. To capitalize on potential parent involvement, principals need to understand the kinds of…

  14. Parent Involvement. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    What are some ways in which to get parents meaningfully involved in their child's high school? According to the research, the most successful programs are those that provide a variety of ways in which parents can be actively engaged in their child's academic life. Joyce Epstein, Director of the National Network of Partnership Schools, out of Johns…

  15. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  16. 32 CFR 651.36 - Public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... considering the extent practicable of public interaction (40 CFR 1501.4(b)), factors to be weighed include: (1... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Assessment § 651.36 Public involvement. (a) The... completed EA/draft FNSI shall be made (see § 651.35) (see also AR 360-5 (Public Information)). The plan...

  17. 32 CFR 651.36 - Public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... considering the extent practicable of public interaction (40 CFR 1501.4(b)), factors to be weighed include: (1... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Assessment § 651.36 Public involvement. (a) The... completed EA/draft FNSI shall be made (see § 651.35) (see also AR 360-5 (Public Information)). The plan...

  18. 32 CFR 651.36 - Public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... considering the extent practicable of public interaction (40 CFR 1501.4(b)), factors to be weighed include: (1... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Assessment § 651.36 Public involvement. (a) The... completed EA/draft FNSI shall be made (see § 651.35) (see also AR 360-5 (Public Information)). The plan...

  19. 32 CFR 651.36 - Public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... considering the extent practicable of public interaction (40 CFR 1501.4(b)), factors to be weighed include: (1... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Assessment § 651.36 Public involvement. (a) The... completed EA/draft FNSI shall be made (see § 651.35) (see also AR 360-5 (Public Information)). The plan...

  20. 32 CFR 651.36 - Public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... considering the extent practicable of public interaction (40 CFR 1501.4(b)), factors to be weighed include: (1... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Assessment § 651.36 Public involvement. (a) The... completed EA/draft FNSI shall be made (see § 651.35) (see also AR 360-5 (Public Information)). The plan...

  1. Teacher Training in Family Involvement: An Interpersonal Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mick; Wallinga, Charlotte

    2000-01-01

    Discusses ways to develop family-school-community involvement, based on an early childhood teacher training course in family involvement. Discusses strategies for using Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs to facilitate family involvement interactions, and using student teachers' experiences for structuring reflective thought about family involvement…

  2. Differential Phytosociological Interactions Involving Male and Female Atriplex bonnevillensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Males and females of wind-pollinated dioecious plants often exhibit spatial segregation of the sexes. This partial niche separation has most often been explored using abiotic niche axes. If the sexes are truly separated in space then they are apt to encounter different species and, to the extent tha...

  3. Salmonella biofilm formation on Aspergillus niger involves cellulose - chitin interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to an...

  4. Human macrophage differentiation involves an interaction between integrins and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Laouar, A.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Collart, F.; Huberman, E.

    1996-11-15

    The authors have examined the role of the {beta}{sub 1} integrin family of adhesion receptors (VLA) and the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN) in macrophage differentiation of (1) human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and (2) human peripheral blood monocytes induced by either PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M=CSF). Increased VLA and FN gene expression was observed as early as 4 h after PMA treatment of HL-60 cells and PMA- or M-CSF-treatment of monocytes, and it preceded the manifestation of macrophage markers. Treated HL-60 cells and monocytes also released and deposited FN on the surface of the tissue culture dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in protein kinase C {beta} and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, exhibited elevated levels of the VLA antigen but failed to express the FN gene. Incubation of HL-525 cells on dishes precoated with exogenous FN resulted in a macrophage differentiation. The macrophage phenotype induced in HL-60 cells, HL-525 cells, or monocytes was attenuated to various degrees by anti-VLA or anti-FN MAbs or by exogenous RGDS, a VLA-binding motif on FN. The authors suggest that macrophage differentiation is initiated by the activation of protein kinase C, which leads to the expression of the integrin, FN and related genes. The integrins mediate cell attachment and spreading on appropriate substrates by binding to deposited extracellular proteins such as FN. This attachment and spreading, in turn, leads to the expression of genes that code for the macrophage functions.

  5. Involvement in University Classroom Discourse: Register Variation and Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbieri, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Research on the linguistic characteristics of university classroom discourse highlights the salience, in this register, of non-informational and subjective aspects of discourse. This dimension of classroom discourse, however, has not been studied systematically. Taking a corpus-based approach, this study investigates the non-informational…

  6. Endocannabinoid involvement in endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Natalia; Nagabukuro, Hiroshi; Resuehr, David; Zhang, Guohua; McAllister, Stacy L.; McGinty, Kristina A.; Mackie, Ken; Berkley, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Endometriosis is a disease common in women that is defined by abnormal extrauteral growths of uterine endometrial tissue and associated with severe pain. Partly because how the abnormal growths become associated with pain is poorly understood, the pain is difficult to alleviate without resorting to hormones or surgery, which often produce intolerable side effects or fail to help. Recent studies in a rat model and women showed that sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers sprout branches to innervate the abnormal growths. This situation, together with knowledge that the endocannabinoid system is involved in uterine function and dysfunction and that exogenous cannabinoids were once used to alleviate endometriosis-associated pain, suggests that the endocannabinoid system is involved in both endometriosis and its associated pain. Here, using a rat model, we found that CB1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed on both the somata and fibers of both the sensory and sympathetic neurons that innervate endometriosis’s abnormal growths. We further found that CB1 receptor agonists decrease, whereas CB1 receptor antagonists increase, endometriosis-associated hyperalgesia. Together these findings suggest that the endocannabinoid system contributes to mechanisms underlying both the peripheral innervation of the abnormal growths and the pain associated with endometriosis, thereby providing a novel approach for the development of badly-needed new treatments. PMID:20833475

  7. Alcohol-medical drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bankole A; Seneviratne, Chamindi

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant use of alcohol and medications may lead to potentially serious medical conditions. Increasing prescription medication abuse in today's society necessitates a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in alcohol-medication interactions in order to help prevent adverse events. Interactions of medications with alcohol result in altered bioavailability of the medication or alcohol (pharmacokinetic interactions) or modification of the effects at receptor or ion channel sites to alter behavioral or physical outcome (pharmacodynamic interactions). The nature of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions involved in alcohol-medication interactions may differ between acute and chronic alcohol use and be influenced by race, gender, or environmental or genetic factors. This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between alcohol and medications and provides examples for such interactions from replicated research studies. In conclusion, further translational research is needed to address several gaps in our current knowledge of alcohol-medication interactions, including those under various pathologic conditions.

  8. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  9. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  10. The interactive brain hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Ezequiel; De Jaegher, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Enactive approaches foreground the role of interpersonal interaction in explanations of social understanding. This motivates, in combination with a recent interest in neuroscientific studies involving actual interactions, the question of how interactive processes relate to neural mechanisms involved in social understanding. We introduce the Interactive Brain Hypothesis (IBH) in order to help map the spectrum of possible relations between social interaction and neural processes. The hypothesis states that interactive experience and skills play enabling roles in both the development and current function of social brain mechanisms, even in cases where social understanding happens in the absence of immediate interaction. We examine the plausibility of this hypothesis against developmental and neurobiological evidence and contrast it with the widespread assumption that mindreading is crucial to all social cognition. We describe the elements of social interaction that bear most directly on this hypothesis and discuss the empirical possibilities open to social neuroscience. We propose that the link between coordination dynamics and social understanding can be best grasped by studying transitions between states of coordination. These transitions form part of the self-organization of interaction processes that characterize the dynamics of social engagement. The patterns and synergies of this self-organization help explain how individuals understand each other. Various possibilities for role-taking emerge during interaction, determining a spectrum of participation. This view contrasts sharply with the observational stance that has guided research in social neuroscience until recently. We also introduce the concept of readiness to interact to describe the practices and dispositions that are summoned in situations of social significance (even if not interactive). This latter idea links interactive factors to more classical observational scenarios. PMID:22701412

  11. Stand By for Fun: Experience and Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockford, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores interactivity, and considers what should be done to create a mass market for interactive media. It is suggested that one way to do so is to examine the video game phenomenon, and a model of interactivity is proposed. The model, a "home interactive theater," would involve interaction in the telling of a story, with the…

  12. Evolving synergetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Arranz, Jordi; Du, Jinming; Zhou, Da; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-07-01

    Cooperators forgo their own interests to benefit others. This reduces their fitness and thus cooperators are not likely to spread based on natural selection. Nonetheless, cooperation is widespread on every level of biological organization ranging from bacterial communities to human society. Mathematical models can help to explain under which circumstances cooperation evolves. Evolutionary game theory is a powerful mathematical tool to depict the interactions between cooperators and defectors. Classical models typically involve either pairwise interactions between individuals or a linear superposition of these interactions. For interactions within groups, however, synergetic effects may arise: their outcome is not just the sum of its parts. This is because the payoffs via a single group interaction can be different from the sum of any collection of two-player interactions. Assuming that all interactions start from pairs, how can such synergetic multiplayer games emerge from simpler pairwise interactions? Here, we present a mathematical model that captures the transition from pairwise interactions to synergetic multiplayer ones. We assume that different social groups have different breaking rates. We show that non-uniform breaking rates do foster the emergence of synergy, even though individuals always interact in pairs. Our work sheds new light on the mechanisms underlying such synergetic interactions. PMID:27466437

  13. Evolving synergetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Arranz, Jordi; Du, Jinming; Zhou, Da; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Cooperators forgo their own interests to benefit others. This reduces their fitness and thus cooperators are not likely to spread based on natural selection. Nonetheless, cooperation is widespread on every level of biological organization ranging from bacterial communities to human society. Mathematical models can help to explain under which circumstances cooperation evolves. Evolutionary game theory is a powerful mathematical tool to depict the interactions between cooperators and defectors. Classical models typically involve either pairwise interactions between individuals or a linear superposition of these interactions. For interactions within groups, however, synergetic effects may arise: their outcome is not just the sum of its parts. This is because the payoffs via a single group interaction can be different from the sum of any collection of two-player interactions. Assuming that all interactions start from pairs, how can such synergetic multiplayer games emerge from simpler pairwise interactions? Here, we present a mathematical model that captures the transition from pairwise interactions to synergetic multiplayer ones. We assume that different social groups have different breaking rates. We show that non-uniform breaking rates do foster the emergence of synergy, even though individuals always interact in pairs. Our work sheds new light on the mechanisms underlying such synergetic interactions. PMID:27466437

  14. Interactive Projector as an Interactive Teaching Tool in the Classroom: Evaluating Teaching Efficiency and Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Li-Ying; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on a measurement that is used to investigate interactivity in the classrooms and examines the impact of integrating the interactive projector into middle school science classes on classroom interactivity and students' biology learning. A total of 126 7th grade Taiwanese students were involved in the study and quasi-experimental…

  15. Cardiac involvement in hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vinay; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hemochromatosis or primary iron-overload cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially preventable cause of heart failure. This is initially characterized by diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias and in later stages by dilated cardiomyopathy. Diagnosis of iron overload is established by elevated transferrin saturation (>55%) and elevated serum ferritin (>300 ng/mL). Genetic testing for mutations in the HFE (high iron) gene and other proteins, such as hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor, and ferroportin, should be performed if secondary causes of iron overload are ruled out. Patients should undergo comprehensive 2D and Doppler echocardiography to evaluate their systolic and diastolic function. Newer modalities like strain imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography hold promise for earlier detection of cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with measurement of T2* relaxation times can help quantify myocardial iron overload. In addition to its value in diagnosis of cardiac iron overload, response to iron reduction therapy can be assessed by serial imaging. Therapeutic phlebotomy and iron chelation are the cornerstones of therapy. The average survival is less than a year in untreated patients with severe cardiac impairment. However, if treated early and aggressively, the survival rate approaches that of the regular heart failure population.

  16. Probing interfaces involving liquids.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A L

    1987-04-10

    Last month in Washington, D.C., the National Academy of Sciences held the first of what it hopes will be a series of seminars in forefront fields of science, technology, and medicine. The idea is to bring the academy closer to the frontlines of research and to help spread the word to federal science policy-makers. The subject of the 23 and 24 March seminar was interfaces and thin films, and the talks, though tutorial in nature, contained a pleasantly large number of still unpublished results. Interfaces, such as the surface of a solid exposed to a liquid or gas, and thin films, whose properties are heavily influenced by interfaces, have long been of considerable technological importance and have always been so in biological processes, but researchers are now getting access to the experimental and theoretical tools needed to explore these complex physical systems that are neither ideally two-dimensional nor fully three-dimensional. The briefings that follow give a peek at three ways to probe interfaces involving liquids.

  17. Applying Employee Involvement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrman, Susan Albers; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of employee-involvement approaches to the management of schools is explored, describing three approaches (parallel-suggestion involvement, job involvement, and high involvement). Design issues (technology; organizational structure; leadership; organizational boundaries, customer definition, and relation to stakeholder; measures;…

  18. Exclusive Reactions Involving Pions and Nucleons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The HZETRN code requires inclusive cross sections as input. One of the methods used to calculate these cross sections requires knowledge of all exclusive processes contributing to the inclusive reaction. Conservation laws are used to determine all possible exclusive reactions involving strong interactions between pions and nucleons. Inclusive particle masses are subsequently determined and are needed in cross-section calculations for inclusive pion production.

  19. Legacy Systems Interaction Reengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ramly, Mohammad; Stroulia, Eleni; Samir, Hani

    We present a lightweight approach for reengineering the human computer interaction (HCI) and/or interaction with other software systems. While interaction reengineering can be achieved by changing the source code and design (e.g., library replacement, refactoring, etc.) resulting in a different user interface (UI), we limit the discussion to interaction reengineering methods that do not involve changing the source code or internal design of the system. Instead, we focus on methods and techniques for wrapping and packaging the existing interaction layer to reproduce it in a different format, e.g., on a different platform or to integrate the legacy system services in another application possibly under a different architecture paradigm, e.g., service-oriented architectures (SOA).

  20. 42 CFR 457.120 - Public involvement in program development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public involvement in program development. 457.120 Section 457.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ongoing public involvement once the State plan has been implemented; and (c) Ensure interaction...

  1. 42 CFR 457.120 - Public involvement in program development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public involvement in program development. 457.120 Section 457.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ongoing public involvement once the State plan has been implemented; and (c) Ensure interaction...

  2. 42 CFR 457.120 - Public involvement in program development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public involvement in program development. 457.120 Section 457.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ongoing public involvement once the State plan has been implemented; and (c) Ensure interaction...

  3. 42 CFR 457.120 - Public involvement in program development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public involvement in program development. 457.120 Section 457.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ongoing public involvement once the State plan has been implemented; and (c) Ensure interaction...

  4. Families Get Involved! Learning Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Media and Information Services.

    Noting that families who are involved in their children's education make a difference in their child's performance, this two-page information sheet encourages families to get involved by listing the benefits of family involvement on one side and the ways adult family members can help in the school on the other. As a result of family participation:…

  5. Parent Involvement: Barriers and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannan, Golam; Blackwell, Jacqueline

    1992-01-01

    Explores issues of parent involvement in light of current educational reform movements, asserts that parent involvement as a voluntary effort may not be effective, and argues that businesses and industries interested in reform are not focusing sufficiently on work-related variables that might encourage involvement of parents and other adults. (SLD)

  6. Measuring Involvement with Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Glen J.; Salmon, Charles T.

    A study applied research concepts from consumer product involvement to test a model for research on involvement with social issues. Issue involvement was defined as the state or level of perceived importance and/or interest evoked by a stimulus (issue) within a specific situation. Attitudes on four social issues--abortion, pornography, the…

  7. Youth Maltreatment and Gang Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kevin M.; Braaten-Antrim, Rhonda

    1998-01-01

    Examines whether physical and sexual maltreatment raises the risk of gang involvement among secondary school students. Findings show that maltreatment increases the probability of gang involvement, independent of demographic factors. When youth are physically and sexually abused their odds of gang involvement are four times higher than those who…

  8. Parental Involvement in High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Donna JG

    Although parental involvement is recommended at all levels of schooling, involvement of parents at the secondary level has not been well defined in the literature. This paper presents findings of a case study that examined three high schools with varying levels of parental involvement--the first, a large high school with a predominantly working…

  9. Food-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:22043389

  10. Musculoskeletal involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Randone, Silvia Bellando; Guiducci, Serena; Cerinic, Marco Matucci

    2008-04-01

    Musculoskeletal involvement is more frequent than expected in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and is a major cause of disability, even if the prognosis of the disease largely depends on visceral involvement. The most common clinical feature of musculoskeletal involvement is arthralgia; less frequent features are arthritis, flexion contractures, stiffness (affecting predominantly fingers, wrists and ankles), proximal muscle weakness (mainly of the shoulder and hip) and tendon sheath involvement. Tendon friction rubs are predictive of poor prognosis. If musculoskeletal involvement is suspected, serum creatinine phosphokinase, aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphate, rheumatoid factor and anticyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies should be checked routinely. Treatment for muscle involvement has not yet been considered adequately and, in the future, it is to be hoped that clinical trials will identify new drugs to control this aspect of SSc, which seriously compromises patients' quality of life. PMID:18455689

  11. Distinguishing Ordinal and Disordinal Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widaman, Keith F.; Helm, Jonathan L.; Castro-Schilo, Laura; Pluess, Michael; Stallings, Michael C.; Belsky, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Re-parameterized regression models may enable tests of crucial theoretical predictions involving interactive effects of predictors that cannot be tested directly using standard approaches. First, we present a re-parameterized regression model for the Linear x Linear interaction of 2 quantitative predictors that yields point and interval estimates…

  12. Chasing Ecological Interactions.

    PubMed

    Jordano, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Basic research on biodiversity has concentrated on individual species-naming new species, studying distribution patterns, and analyzing their evolutionary relationships. Yet biodiversity is more than a collection of individual species; it is the combination of biological entities and processes that support life on Earth. To understand biodiversity we must catalog it, but we must also assess the ways species interact with other species to provide functional support for the Tree of Life. Ecological interactions may be lost well before the species involved in those interactions go extinct; their ecological functions disappear even though they remain. Here, I address the challenges in studying the functional aspects of species interactions and how basic research is helping us address the fast-paced extinction of species due to human activities.

  13. Chasing Ecological Interactions.

    PubMed

    Jordano, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Basic research on biodiversity has concentrated on individual species-naming new species, studying distribution patterns, and analyzing their evolutionary relationships. Yet biodiversity is more than a collection of individual species; it is the combination of biological entities and processes that support life on Earth. To understand biodiversity we must catalog it, but we must also assess the ways species interact with other species to provide functional support for the Tree of Life. Ecological interactions may be lost well before the species involved in those interactions go extinct; their ecological functions disappear even though they remain. Here, I address the challenges in studying the functional aspects of species interactions and how basic research is helping us address the fast-paced extinction of species due to human activities. PMID:27631692

  14. Chasing Ecological Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Basic research on biodiversity has concentrated on individual species—naming new species, studying distribution patterns, and analyzing their evolutionary relationships. Yet biodiversity is more than a collection of individual species; it is the combination of biological entities and processes that support life on Earth. To understand biodiversity we must catalog it, but we must also assess the ways species interact with other species to provide functional support for the Tree of Life. Ecological interactions may be lost well before the species involved in those interactions go extinct; their ecological functions disappear even though they remain. Here, I address the challenges in studying the functional aspects of species interactions and how basic research is helping us address the fast-paced extinction of species due to human activities. PMID:27631692

  15. [Bone marrow involvement and eosinophilia in paracoccidioidomycosis].

    PubMed

    Shikanai-Yasuda, M A; Higaki, Y; Uip, D E; Mori, N S; Del Negro, G; Melo, N T; Hutzler, R U; Amato Neto, V

    1992-01-01

    The authors described three acute paracoccidioidomycosis patients with bone marrow involvement. P. brasiliensis yeast forms were observed in bone marrow smears of all them, and in one case, culture also revealed fungus growth. The mononuclear phagocytic system involvement, the blood eosinophilia and the negative skin hypersensibility responses were emphasized in all of them, as well as the severity of the disease in one case, with disseminated bone lesions and 20.260 eosinophils/mm3 in peripheral blood. The authors discuss the possible role of eosinophil in the host-parasite interaction in paracoccidioidomycosis, suggesting that TH 2 subpopulation activation and increased IL 5 and GM-CSF secretions may be responsible by eosinophilia in the most severe case. PMID:1340036

  16. Nanobiotechnology: protein-nanomaterial interactions.

    PubMed

    Kane, Ravi S; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-01-01

    We review recent research that involves the interaction of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanowires, and carbon nanotubes with proteins. We begin with a focus on the fundamentals of the structure and function of proteins on nanomaterials. We then review work in three areas that exploit these interactions: (1) sensing, (2) assembly of nanomaterials by proteins and proteins by nanomaterials, and (3) interactions with cells. We conclude with the identification of challenges and opportunities for the future. PMID:17335286

  17. CELLS INVOLVED IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Daguillard, Fritz; Richter, Maxwell

    1970-01-01

    There exists in the rabbit a population of lymphocytes carrying immunoglobulin-like receptors on their surface. These receptors interact with antigen and with anti-immunoglobulin antibodies and appear to mediate the recognition process leading to the humoral immune response. There exists in the rabbit a second population of lymphocytes capable of reacting with phytohemagglutinin. This population of lymphocytes is different from the one capable of reacting with soluble protein antigens or anti-immunoglobulin antiserum and is probably involved in the mediation of cellular immunity. PMID:5308064

  18. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  19. Parental Involvement in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machen, Sandra M.; Wilson, Janell D.; Notar, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Improving parental involvement with public schools can improve schools. Parental involvement is highly important for pushing the public school systems to higher standards. Also, research reports that engaging parents in an active role in the school curriculum can open alternative opportunities for children to succeed in academics. This report will…

  20. The Adolescent Drug Involvement Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, D. Paul; Hahn, Lori

    1991-01-01

    Developed Adolescent Drug Involvement Scale (ADIS) to measure level of drug involvement, considered as continuum ranging from no use to severe dependency, in adolescents. Administered ADIS to 453 adolescents referred for treatment. Results indicated acceptable internal consistency and provide preliminary evidence of validity. Scores correlated…

  1. Preparing Teachers for Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Daniel

    This paper examines the potential impact of parent involvement in the formal education of their children and suggests ways that teacher education can be restructured to prepare teachers to work with parents. This paper attempts to answer five questions: (1) Why should parents be involved in the formal education of their children? (2) Why should…

  2. New Directions in Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruchter, Norm; And Others

    This book presents findings of a study that identified and analyzed 18 recently developed programs or reform efforts in the United States that stress effective parental involvement. Chapter 1 provides a review of education literature and research on parent involvement from 1945 to 1985 and situates newly emerging efforts within the current climate…

  3. Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Four recent journal articles and one meeting paper on teacher involvement in curriculum development are summarized in this research bulletin. Contents include "Motivating Teacher Involvement in Professional Growth Activities," by Ruth Wright; "Teacher Participation in Curriculum Development: What Status Does It Have?" by Jean Young; "The Locus of…

  4. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  5. Employee involvement: motivation or manipulation?

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1998-03-01

    Employee involvement is subject to a great deal of verbal tribute; there is hardly a manager at work today who will not praise the value of employee input. However, many employee involvement efforts leave employees feeling more manipulated than motivated. This occurs because supervisors and managers, while expecting employees to change the way they work, are themselves either unwilling to change or remain unconscious of the need to change. The result is that, although employee input is regularly solicited in a number of forms, it is often discounted, ignored, or altered to fit the manager's preconceptions. Often the employee is left feeling manipulated. Since the opportunity for involvement can be a strong motivator, it becomes the manager's task to learn how to provide involvement opportunity in manipulative fashion. This can be accomplished by providing involvement opportunity accompanied by clear outcome expectations and allowing employees the freedom to pursue those outcomes in their own way.

  6. Propeller/wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkowski, David P.; Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The present experimental investigation of the steady-state and unsteady-state effects due to the interaction between a tractor propeller's wake and a wing employs, in the steady case, wind tunnel measurements at low subsonic speed; results are obtained which demonstrate wing performance response to variations in configuration geometry. Other steady-state results involve the propeller-hub lift and side-force due to the wing's influence on the propeller. The unsteady effects of interaction were studied through flow visualization of propeller-tip vortex distortion over a wing, again using a tractor-propeller configuration.

  7. Imagined Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeycutt, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Social scientists have been studying imagined interactions since the mid-1980s and have measured numerous physiological correlates (Honeycutt, 2010). In this commentary I assess the research reported in Crisp and Turner (May-June 2009) and highlight the underlying mechanisms of imagined interactions that have empirically been laid out across…

  8. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bilgici, Ayhan; Ulusoy, H; Kuru, O; Celenk, C; Unsal, M; Danaci, M

    2005-08-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the relationships between clinical characteristics, lung involvement, and frequency of pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFT), we prospectively evaluated 52 patients with RA (eight males and 44 females, mean age 53.6 years). The HRCT was abnormal in 35 patients (67.3%), the most frequent abnormalities being reticulonodular patterns, which were found in 22 patients (62.9%), ground-glass attenuation (20%), and bronchiectasis (17%). In this group of patients, PFT results were normal in 13 patients (37%). Titers of rheumatoid factor and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were significantly higher in abnormal HRCT presence. Higher Larsen's score, advanced age, and severe disease were significant risk factors for lung involvement (p<0.001, p<0.01, and p<0.01, respectively) and are suggested by our data to be statistically significant predictors of lung involvement in RA.

  9. Campylobacter-Acanthamoeba interactions.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Ana; Seddon, Alan M; Karlyshev, Andrey V

    2015-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne pathogen recognized as the major cause of human bacterial enteritis. Undercooked poultry products and contaminated water are considered as the most important sources of infection. Some studies suggest transmission and survival of this bacterial pathogen may be assisted by the free-living protozoa Acanthamoeba. The latter is known to play the role of a host for various pathogenic bacteria, protecting them from harsh environmental conditions. Importantly, there is a similarity between the mechanisms of bacterial survival within amoebae and macrophages, making the former a convenient tool for the investigation of the survival of pathogenic bacteria in the environment. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction between Campylobacter and Acanthamoeba are not well understood. Whilst some studies suggest the ability of C. jejuni to survive within the protozoa, the other reports support an extracellular mode of survival only. In this review, we focus on the studies investigating the interaction between Campylobacter and Acanthamoeba, address some reasons for the contradictory results, and discuss possible implications of these results for epidemiology. Additionally, as the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown, we also suggest possible factors that may be involved in this process. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of pathogen-protozoa interaction will assist in a better understanding of Campylobacter lifestyle and in the development of novel antibacterial drugs.

  10. Interaction with Machine Improvisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assayag, Gerard; Bloch, George; Cont, Arshia; Dubnov, Shlomo

    We describe two multi-agent architectures for an improvisation oriented musician-machine interaction systems that learn in real time from human performers. The improvisation kernel is based on sequence modeling and statistical learning. We present two frameworks of interaction with this kernel. In the first, the stylistic interaction is guided by a human operator in front of an interactive computer environment. In the second framework, the stylistic interaction is delegated to machine intelligence and therefore, knowledge propagation and decision are taken care of by the computer alone. The first framework involves a hybrid architecture using two popular composition/performance environments, Max and OpenMusic, that are put to work and communicate together, each one handling the process at a different time/memory scale. The second framework shares the same representational schemes with the first but uses an Active Learning architecture based on collaborative, competitive and memory-based learning to handle stylistic interactions. Both systems are capable of processing real-time audio/video as well as MIDI. After discussing the general cognitive background of improvisation practices, the statistical modelling tools and the concurrent agent architecture are presented. Then, an Active Learning scheme is described and considered in terms of using different improvisation regimes for improvisation planning. Finally, we provide more details about the different system implementations and describe several performances with the system.

  11. Interacting parasites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitism is the most popular life-style on Earth, and many vertebrates host more than one kind of parasite at a time. A common assumption is that parasite species rarely interact, because they often exploit different tissues in a host, and this use of discrete resources limits competition (1). On page 243 of this issue, however, Telfer et al. (2) provide a convincing case of a highly interactive parasite community in voles, and show how infection with one parasite can affect susceptibility to others. If some human parasites are equally interactive, our current, disease-by-disease approach to modeling and treating infectious diseases is inadequate (3).

  12. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  13. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Shihori

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have revealed that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell programming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review, the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to stem cell differentiation are discussed. PMID:26328015

  14. Multiple myeloma involving the orbit.

    PubMed

    Fay, A M; Leib, M L; Fountain, K S

    1998-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy often associated with destructive skeletal lesions. Orbital involvement in multiple myeloma is rare. Risk factors for orbital involvement have not been established, although risk may vary with immunoglobulin subtype. Early detection of orbital plasmacytoma may affect treatment and clinical course. A case is reported of multiple myeloma without elevated serum immunoglobulins that involves the orbit, and the implications of early detection are discussed. The patient was first examined by an ophthalmologist 13 months after multiple myeloma was diagnosed and 5 months after the external appearance of an orbital tumor. Urine protein electrophoresis demonstrated kappa light chains. Hypergammaglobulinemia was not detected. Plain-film roentgenography showed orbital involvement at the time of initial diagnosis. An impressive clinical response to external beam radiation therapy was seen. Attention to immunoprotein characteristics in multiple myeloma may help to identify risk factors for orbital involvement. Early detection may permit safer and equally effective treatment. All patients with multiple myeloma should undergo thorough ophthalmic examination at the time of initial diagnosis.

  15. Lupus pernio without systemic involvement

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Vora, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that can affect the pulmonary, reticulo-endothelial, skin, gastrointestinal, cardiac, musculo – skeletal, endocrine or central nervous system. Exclusive cutaneous involvement is very rare in sarcoidosis. Lupus pernio is a variant of cutaneous sarcoidosis presenting with erythematous to violaceous nodules and plaques located symmetrically over the nose, cheeks, ears and digits. We present a case of lupus pernio which showed rapid improvement with topical steroids and has yet not developed any systemic involvement even after 6 years of regular follow up. PMID:24350015

  16. Multisystem involvement in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Megan M.; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of pediatric neuromyelitis optica (NMO) with muscle and lung involvement in addition to central nervous system disease. Our patient initially presented with features of area postrema syndrome, then subsequently with optic neuritis. The patient also had recurrent hyperCKemia that responded to corticosteroids. Finally, axillary and hilar adenopathy with pulmonary consolidation were noted as well and responded to immunomodulation. Our case highlights multisystem involvement in NMO including non-infectious pulmonary findings which have not been described in the pediatric population previously. PMID:26538850

  17. A Multidimensional Examination of Parent Involvement across Child and Parent Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbacz, S. Andrew; McDowall, Philippa S.; Schaughency, Elizabeth; Sheridan, Susan M.; Welch, Greg W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify equivocal findings in the parent-involvement literature and examine novel interactions in a New Zealand context. Specifically, this study tested direct effects of school year, parent education, family structure, and child gender on parent involvement in elementary school. In addition, interactions between…

  18. Immigrant Parent Involvement in U.S. Schools: Current Practices and Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleixo, Marina Bandeira

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines how parent involvement expectations are communicated and enacted in interactions at one small urban high school. Through detailed descriptions of school interactions between supporting staff and immigrant parents, this study examines how parent involvement expectations are understood and perceived. Although scholarly…

  19. Predictors of Residence Hall Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arboleda, Ana; Wang, Yongyi; Shelley, Mack C., II; Whalen, Donald F.

    2003-01-01

    Residence hall students' (N = 1,186, 52% male, 90% White, 66% freshmen) involvement in their living community is influenced significantly by precollege student characteristics (gender, ethnicity), classification, attitudes (toward hall director, house cabinet, academic comfort, social environment, group study), and environmental variables (noise,…

  20. Corporate Involvement in C AI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Justine C.

    1978-01-01

    Historic perspective of computer manufacturers and their contribution to CAI. Corporate CAI products and services are mentioned, as is a forecast for educational involvement by computer corporations. A chart of major computer corporations shows gross sales, net earnings, products and services offered, and other corporate information. (RAO)

  1. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

  2. Parent Involvement as Ritualized Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucet, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    This article examines parent involvement (PI) as a ritual system using Turner's concept of root paradigms. Through a twofold analysis, I argue that the highly ritualized nature of PI practices creates a group identity among mainstream parents and schools that marginalizes diverse families. First, I point out three root paradigms in the ritual…

  3. Managing Parent Involvement during Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, Lynette S.

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and the Virginia Tech shooting tragedy, it is no surprise that concern for students' safety is the primary reason attributed to parents' increased involvement. Parents and university administrators share in their commitment to student safety. However, college and university staff who assume responsibility…

  4. Veterinary involvement in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Parker, Daniel

    2016-01-16

    The worldwide poultry sector is expected to grow substantially over the next few decades, as the world looks to feed a rapidly expanding population. In a further article in Veterinary Record's series looking at the state of different sectors of the veterinary profession, Daniel Parker looks at veterinary involvement in the poultry sector.

  5. Drug Involvement and Academic Striving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Malcolm; Holroyd, Kenneth

    This study attempted to clarify the relationship between drug involvement and academic accomplishments. Unlike other studies, it was controlled for aptitude and sex. In a structured interview, the College Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ) was administered to 77 male and 67 female student subjects. Based on the CBQ results three groups were identified:…

  6. Veterinary involvement in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Parker, Daniel

    2016-01-16

    The worldwide poultry sector is expected to grow substantially over the next few decades, as the world looks to feed a rapidly expanding population. In a further article in Veterinary Record's series looking at the state of different sectors of the veterinary profession, Daniel Parker looks at veterinary involvement in the poultry sector. PMID:26769809

  7. Parotid involvement by desmoplastic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Jennings, T A; Okby, N T; Schroer, K R; Wolf, B C; Mihm, M C

    1996-08-01

    Desmoplastic malignant melanoma often arises in sun damaged skin of the head and neck and shows frequent neurotropism. Although metastatic melanoma frequently involve the parotid, direct spread to the parotid has been rarely reported. We evaluated five cases of desmoplastic malignant melanoma involving the parotid gland with clinical and pathological evidence of precursor cutaneous lesions in four of the five cases. The parotid involvement in four cases was tumoural, and three of these were not clinically suspected to be melanoma. The histological appearance in all five cases was that of a sarcomatoid tumour. Immunohistochemistry and electronmicroscopy performed on three of the cases showed only evidence of schwannian differentiation: the tumour cells were positive for S-100 protein and vimentin, and negative for cytokeratin and HMB-45. Electronmicroscopy showed no evidence of melanogenesis. All five tumours showed histological evidence of prominent neurotropism with one case demonstrating extension from overlying skin along cutaneous nerves to the superficial parotid. Thus, desmoplastic malignant melanoma may involve the parotid by neurotropic spread and can be pathologically indistinguishable from malignant schwannoma, a diagnosis which may be made erroneously in the absence of clinical information. PMID:8872151

  8. Parental Involvement in Norwegian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Jan Merok

    2012-01-01

    This article examines findings on key challenges of school-parent relations in Norway. The review is based on recent large-scale studies on several issues, including formalized school-parent cooperation, parental involvement in the pedagogical discourse, and teacher perspectives on the parents' role in the school community. Findings suggest a…

  9. Orbital involvement in multifocal fibrosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, G W; Sullivan, T J; Garner, A; Moseley, I; Wright, J E

    1995-01-01

    Multifocal fibrosclerosis is a condition of unknown aetiology, characterised by fibrous lesions occurring at a variety of sites. Clinical variants include retroperitoneal fibrosis, Riedel's thyroiditis, sclerosing cholangitis, and mediastinal fibrosis. Orbital pseudotumour has been reported as a manifestation of this condition. Three patients with multifocal fibrosclerosis in whom orbital involvement was the dominant feature are described. Images PMID:7703203

  10. Systemic involvement in mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Burg, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) represents almost 50% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas and more than 70% of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Arising from preferentially skin-homing lymphocytes with genetic instability, MF evolves through stages (IA-IVB), producing inconspicuous inflammatory features in the beginning and finally resulting in a proliferation of cytomorphologic, phenotypic, and genotypic abnormal tumor cells. Over the past 200 years, there has been much confusion in the classification of lymphomas due to semantic disagreements (MF, CTCL, parapsoriasis, lymphosarcoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, and many other terms), lack of diagnostic standard criteria, and new molecular diagnostic methods. Studies on extracutaneous involvement in early stages (IA-IIA) are almost completely lacking. In advanced stages of MF (IIB-IVB), discovery of extracutaneous involvement is dependent on the methods used (physical examination, technology, molecular diagnostics, autopsy, and laparoscopy) and reveals a wide range of results. Due to the inflammation-simulating features in the beginning of