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Sample records for interactions involving ikkg

  1. Van der Waals Interactions Involving Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Charles M.; Neal, Brian L.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. Whereas the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models. with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation, and crystal growth.

  2. Van der Waals interactions involving proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, C M; Neal, B L; Lenhoff, A M

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. Whereas the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models, with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation, and crystal growth. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:8789115

  3. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions involving Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Unger, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extracts (GLEs) are popular herbal remedies for the treatment of Alzheimer's dementia, tinnitus, vertigo and peripheral arterial disease. As GLEs are taken regularly by older people who are likely to also use multiple other drugs for the treatment of, e.g. hypertension, diabetes, rheumatism or heart failure, potential herb-drug interactions are of interest. Preclinical studies of high doses/concentrations of GLEs of varying quality and standardization hinted at both an inhibition and induction of metabolic enzymes and transporters. However, in humans, positive in vitro-findings could not be replicated in vivo. At maximum recommended doses of 240 mg/day, a clinically relevant interaction potential of the standardized GLE EGb 761 could not be shown. GLE doses higher than the recommended ones led to a weak induction of the CYP2C19-mediated omeprazole 5-hydroxylation, and a weak inhibition of the CYP3A4-mediated midazolam 1'-hydroxylation, respectively. Also, the regular intake of a poorly characterized GLE at a dose of 360 mg/day slightly increased the bioavailability of talinolol, a substrate of P-glycoprotein and various organic anion-transporting polypeptides. Thus, regarding pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions, the intake of the standardized GLE, EGb 761, together with synthetic drugs appears to be safe as long as daily doses up to 240 mg are consumed. If this applies to other extracts prepared according to the European Pharmacopoeia remains uncertain. Also, a relevant potential for drug interactions cannot be excluded for poorly standardized GLEs used in many food supplements.

  4. Interaction Involvement: A Fundamental Dimension of Interpersonal Communication Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cegala, Donald J.

    E. Husserl's concept of intentionality provides a conceptual perspective of interpersonal communication that suggests a notion of face-to-face communication called "interaction involvement." Structured along dimensions of awareness and responsiveness, interaction involvement explains interpersonal communication as a transactional relationship…

  5. Student projects involving novel interaction with large displays.

    PubMed

    Dias, Paulo; Sousa, Tiago; Parracho, Joao; Cardoso, Igor; Monteiro, Andre; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    DETI-Interact is an interactive system that offers information relevant to students in the lobby of the University of Aveiro's Department of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics (DETI). The project started in 2009 with a master's thesis addressing interaction with public displays through Android smartphones. Since then, it has evolved considerably; it currently allows gesture interaction based on a Kinect sensor. Meanwhile, it has involved third-year students, master's students, and undergraduate students participating in a research initiation program.

  6. Lexical Cues of Interaction Involvement in Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Duyen T.; Fussell, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    We explore how people express and interpret lexical cues of interaction involvement in dyadic conversations via instant messaging (IM) in two studies. In Study 1, an experiment with 60 participants, we manipulated level of involvement in a conversation with a distraction task. We examined how participants' uses of verbal cues such as pronouns…

  7. Physical Interactions Involving Preschoolers and Kindergartners in a Childcare Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, Bethany; Chavajay, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    This naturalistic observational study described the similarities and differences in physical interactions involving preschoolers and kindergartners within the context of a US childcare facility. It examined patterns of touch involving the children across center and circle activities within the course of their day. Results indicated that…

  8. Methods for Mapping of Interaction Networks Involving Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Lin, Chiann Tso

    2007-11-23

    Numerous approaches have been taken to study protein interactions, such as tagged protein complex isolation followed by mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid methods, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, surface plasmon resonance, site-directed mutagenesis, and crystallography. Membrane protein interactions pose significant challenges due to the need to solubilize membranes without disrupting protein-protein interactions. Traditionally, analysis of isolated protein complexes by high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis has been the main method used to obtain an overall picture of proteome constituents and interactions. However, this method is time consuming, labor intensive, detects only abundant proteins and is not suitable for the coverage required to elucidate large interaction networks. In this review, we discuss the application of various methods to elucidate interactions involving membrane proteins. These techniques include methods for the direct isolation of single complexes or interactors as well as methods for characterization of entire subcellular and cellular interactomes.

  9. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions.

    PubMed

    Norris, Anne E; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-05-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design.

  10. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Anne E.; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design. PMID:24748718

  11. Thermodynamic signatures in macromolecular interactions involving conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Anja; Neumann, Piotr; Schwieger, Christian; Stubbs, Milton T

    2014-07-01

    The energetics of macromolecular interactions are complex, particularly where protein flexibility is involved. Exploiting serendipitous differences in the plasticity of a series of closely related trypsin variants, we analyzed the enthalpic and entropic contributions accompanying interaction with L45K-eglin C. Binding of the four variants show significant differences in released heat, although the affinities vary little, in accordance with the principle of enthalpy-entropy compensation. Binding of the most disordered variant is almost entirely enthalpically driven, with practically no entropy change. As structures of the complexes reveal negligible differences in protein-inhibitor contacts, we conclude that solvent effects contribute significantly to binding affinities.

  12. Understanding substituent effects in noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Steven E

    2013-04-16

    Noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings such as π-stacking, cation/π, and anion/π interactions are central to many areas of modern chemistry. Decades of experimental studies have provided key insights into the impact of substituents on these interactions, leading to the development of simple intuitive models. However, gas-phase computational studies have raised some doubts about the physical underpinnings of these widespread models. In this Account we review our recent efforts to unravel the origin of substituent effects in π-stacking and ion/π interactions through computational studies of model noncovalent dimers. First, however, we dispel the notion that so-called aromatic interactions depend on the aromaticity of the interacting rings by studying model π-stacked dimers in which the aromaticity of one of the monomers can be "switched off". Somewhat surprisingly, the results show that not only is aromaticity unnecessary for π-stacking interactions, but it actually hinders these interactions to some extent. Consequently, when thinking about π-stacking interactions, researchers should consider broader classes of planar molecules, not just aromatic systems. Conventional models maintain that substituent effects in π-stacking interactions result from changes in the aryl π-system. This view suggests that π-stacking interactions are maximized when one ring is substituted with electron-withdrawing groups and the other with electron donors. In contrast to these prevailing models, we have shown that substituent effects in π-stacking interactions can be described in terms of direct, local interactions between the substituents and the nearby vertex of the other arene. As a result, in polysubstituted π-stacked dimers the substituents operate independently unless they are in each other's local environment. This means that in π-stacked dimers in which one arene is substituted with electron donors and the other with electron acceptors the interactions will

  13. Profiling of small RNAs involved in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dongdong; Wang, Zhaoyun; Wang, Shune; Qiao, Lulu; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing is an important gene expression regulatory mechanism conserved in eukaryotes. Such sRNAs, first discovered in plants, are involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, sRNAs participate in many growth and developmental processes, such as embryo development, seed germination, flowering, hormone synthesis and distribution, and nutrient assimilation. However, the significance of sRNA in shaping the relationship between plants and their symbiotic microbes or pathogens has been underestimated. Recent progress in profiling sRNA, especially advances in next-generation sequencing technology, has revealed its extensive and complicated involvement in interactions between plants and viruses, bacteria, and fungi. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding sRNA in plant-pathogen interactions.

  14. Evaporative cooling feature selection for genotypic data involving interactions

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, B.A.; Reif, D.M.; White, B.C.; Crowe, J.E.; Moore, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: The development of genome-wide capabilities for genotyping has led to the practical problem of identifying the minimum subset of genetic variants relevant to the classification of a phenotype. This challenge is especially difficult in the presence of attribute interactions, noise and small sample size. Methods: Analogous to the physical mechanism of evaporation, we introduce an evaporative cooling (EC) feature selection algorithm that seeks to obtain a subset of attributes with the optimum information temperature (i.e. the least noise). EC uses an attribute quality measure analogous to thermodynamic free energy that combines Relief-F and mutual information to evaporate (i.e. remove) noise features, leaving behind a subset of attributes that contain DNA sequence variations associated with a given phenotype. Results: EC is able to identify functional sequence variations that involve interactions (epistasis) between other sequence variations that influence their association with the phenotype. This ability is demonstrated on simulated genotypic data with attribute interactions and on real genotypic data from individuals who experienced adverse events following smallpox vaccination. The EC formalism allows us to combine information entropy, energy and temperature into a single information free energy attribute quality measure that balances interaction and main effects. Availability: Open source software, written in Java, is freely available upon request. Contact: brett.mckinney@gmail.com PMID:17586549

  15. Father Involvement in Feeding Interactions with Their Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Alma D.; Chu, Lynna; Franke, Todd; Kuo, Alice A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations of father-child feeding and physical interactions with dietary practices and weight status in children. Methods A nationally representative sample of children, mothers, and fathers who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth cohort study (N = 2441) was used to explore the relationship of father-child feeding and physical activity interactions with child dietary practices and weight status. Logistic multivariable regression analyses were adjusted for child, father, mother, and socio-demographic characteristics. Results Approximately 40% of fathers reported having a great deal of influence on their preschool child’s nutrition and about 50% reported daily involvement in preparing food for their child and assisting their child with eating. Children had over 2 times the odds of consuming fast food at least once a week if fathers reported eating out with their child a few times a week compared to fathers who reported rarely or never eating out with their child (OR, 2.89; 95% CI, 1.94–4.29), adjusting for all covariates. Whether fathers reported eating out with their children was also significantly associated with children’s sweetened beverage intake. Conclusions Potentially modifiable behaviors that support healthy dietary practices in children may be supported by targeting fathers. PMID:26931754

  16. Membrane interaction of Pasteurella multocida toxin involves sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael C; Ho, Mengfei; Maharjan, Ram; Clemons, Nathan C; Bannai, Yuka; Waites, Mark A; Faulkner, Melinda J; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Blanke, Steven R; Rienstra, Chad M; Wilson, Brenda A

    2011-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is an AB toxin that causes pleiotropic effects in targeted host cells. The N-terminus of PMT (PMT-N) is considered to harbor the membrane receptor binding and translocation domains responsible for mediating cellular entry and delivery of the C-terminal catalytic domain into the host cytosol. Previous studies have implicated gangliosides as the host receptors for PMT binding. To gain further insight into the binding interactions involved in PMT binding to cell membranes, we explored the role of various membrane components in PMT binding, utilizing four different approaches: (a) TLC-overlay binding experiments with (125) I-labeled PMT, PMT-N or the C-terminus of PMT; (b) pull-down experiments using reconstituted membrane liposomes with full-length PMT; (c) surface plasmon resonance analysis of PMT-N binding to reconstituted membrane liposomes; (d) and surface plasmon resonance analysis of PMT-N binding to HEK-293T cell membranes without or with sphingomyelinase, phospholipase D or trypsin treatment. The results obtained revealed that, in our experimental system, full-length PMT and PMT-N did not bind to gangliosides, including monoasialogangliosides GM(1) , GM(2) or GM(3) , but instead bound to membrane phospholipids, primarily the abundant sphingophospholipid sphingomyelin or phosphatidylcholine with other lipid components. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the importance of sphingomyelin for PMT binding to membranes and suggest the involvement of a protein co-receptor.

  17. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  18. Identification of Protein Interactions Involved in Cellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Westermarck, Jukka; Ivaska, Johanna; Corthals, Garry L.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions drive biological processes. They are critical for all intra- and extracellular functions, and the technologies to analyze them are widely applied throughout the various fields of biological sciences. This study takes an in-depth view of some common principles of cellular regulation and provides a detailed account of approaches required to comprehensively map signaling protein-protein interactions in any particular cellular system or condition. We provide a critical review of the benefits and disadvantages of the yeast two-hybrid method and affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometric procedures for identification of signaling protein-protein interactions. In particular, we emphasize the quantitative and qualitative differences between tandem affinity and one-step purification (such as FLAG and Strep tag) methods. Although applicable to all types of interaction studies, a special section is devoted in this review to aspects that should be considered when attempting to identify signaling protein interactions that often are transient and weak by nature. Finally, we discuss shotgun and quantitative information that can be gleaned by MS-coupled methods for analysis of multiprotein complexes. PMID:23481661

  19. Differential phytosociological interactions involving male and female atriplex bonnevillensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinclair, J.; Emlen, J.M.; Rinella, M.; Snelgrove, J.; Freeman, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Wind-pollinated dioecious plants often exhibit spatial segregation of the sexes. This partial niche separation has most often been explored using abiotic niche axes. However, if the sexes are truly separated in space, then they are apt to encounter different plant species that may heavily affect growth and reproduction. Also, to the extent that their niches differ, the sexes may respond differently to the same co-occurring species. Here we examine interspecific interactions that influence male and female reproductive potential in Atriplex bonnevillensis. Using Emlen's interaction assessment, a technique which assesses species interactions based on cover classes, we show that Salsola species compete significantly with females but not males, while Halogeton glomeratus competes with males but not females. The effect of competition only became apparent when we corrected for site-specific fertility. These results imply that differential competition must be considered when studying dioecious plants that display spatial segregation of the sexes.

  20. Stages of change: interactions with treatment compliance and involvement.

    PubMed

    DiClemente, C C; Scott, C W

    1997-01-01

    Current perspectives on compliance and involvement in treatment often overlook the fact that treatment occurs in the context of a process of change and not vice versa. Each individual moves at a unique pace through a series of stages of change and in a cyclical fashion over a substantial period of time. Treatment personnel and programs should recognize the diversity of stage status in their clients and address each one in a manner compatible with the client's current stage of change, the tasks needed to move forward in the process of change, and an understanding of the course of change. Such considerations should assist the therapist in developing strategies to increase the engagement of a wide variety of clients, to improve retention of these clients in a realistic course of treatment, and to foster participation in stage-appropriate tasks that promote successful movement through the stages to sustained, long-term change.

  1. Human macrophage differentiation involves an interaction between integrins and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Laouar, A.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Collart, F.; Huberman, E.

    1997-03-14

    The authors have examined the role of integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in macrophage differentiation of (1) human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and (2) human peripheral blood monocytes induced by either PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Increased {beta}{sub 1} integrin and fibronectin (FN) gene expression was observed in PMA-treated HL-60 cells and PMA- or M-CSF-treated monocytes, even at a time preceding the manifestation of macrophage markers. Treated HL-60 cells and monocytes also released and deposited FN on the culture dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in protein kinase C {beta} (PKC{beta}) and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, failed to express FN after PMA treatment. Restoration of PKC{beta} resulted in PMA-induced FN gene expression and macrophage differentiation. The macrophage phenotype induced in HL-60 cells or monocytes was attenuated by anti-{beta}{sub 1} integrin or anti-FN MAbs. The authors suggest that macrophage differentiation involves activation of PKC and expression of specific integrins and ECM proteins. The stimulated cells, through their integrins, attach and spread on these substrates by binding to the deposited ECM proteins. This attachment and spreading in turn, through integrin signaling, leads to the macrophage phenotype.

  2. Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Christopher Robert

    2013-01-01

    Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications examines the ways that communication is structured and experienced by looking at interactions involving augmented communicators--people with severe speech disabilities who use forms of assistive technology in order to communicate…

  3. Interfacial interactions involved in the biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R; Gulati, Sahil; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    The biological assembly of Chandipura virus nucleocapsid (N) protein has been modeled and the amino acid residues involved in specific intermolecular interactions among N monomers during oligomerisation have been predicted.

  4. Heterophilic interactions of DM-GRASP: GRASP-NgCAM interactions involved in neurite extension

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    DM-GRASP is an immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecule that is expressed in both the developing nervous and immune system. Specific populations of neurons respond to DM-GRASP substrates appears to require homophilic interactions between DM-GRASP molecules. We were interested in determining whether DM-GRASP interacts heterophilically with other ligands as well. We have found that eleven proteins from embryonic chick brain membranes consistently bind to and elute from a DM-GRASP-Sepharose affinity column. One of these proteins is DM-GRASP itself, consistent with its known homophilic binding. Another protein, at 130 kD, is immunoreactive with monoclonal antibodies to NgCAM. Other neural cell adhesion molecules were not detected in the eluate. The DM- GRASP-Sepharose eluate also contains a potent neurite stimulating activity, which cannot be accounted for by either DM-GRASP or NgCAM. To investigate the interaction of DM-GRASP and NgCAM, antibodies against DM-GRASP were added to neuronal cultures extending neurites on an NgCAM substrate. The presence of antibodies to DM-GRASP decreased neurite extension on laminin, suggesting that the antibody is not toxic or generally inhibiting motility. We present two possible models for the DM-GRASP-NgCAM association and a hypothesis for neural cell adhesion function that features the dimerization of cell adhesion molecules. PMID:8636239

  5. Neural mirroring and social interaction: Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation.

    PubMed

    Endedijk, H M; Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Cillessen, A H N; Hunnius, S

    2017-01-07

    Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other's actions and is therefore considered important for social interaction. Still, to date, it is unknown whether interindividual differences in neural mirroring play a role in interpersonal coordination during different instances of social interaction. A relation between neural mirroring and interpersonal coordination has particularly relevant implications for early childhood, since successful early interaction with peers is predictive of a more favorable social development. We examined the relation between neural mirroring and children's interpersonal coordination during peer interaction using EEG and longitudinal behavioral data. Results showed that 4-year-old children with higher levels of motor system involvement during action observation (as indicated by lower beta-power) were more successful in early peer cooperation. This is the first evidence for a relation between motor system involvement during action observation and interpersonal coordination during other instances of social interaction. The findings suggest that interindividual differences in neural mirroring are related to interpersonal coordination and thus successful social interaction.

  6. An Exploratory Study to Measure Excessive Involvement in Multitasking Interaction with Smart Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yubo; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This study developed a scale measuring excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices. An online questionnaire was designed and surveyed in a sample of 380 respondents. The sample was split into two groups for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, respectively. A four-factor structure was identified with an acceptable goodness of fit. The first two factors, "Obsession and neglect" and "Problematic control," described the obsessive feelings, neglect behaviors, and behavior control problems accompanied by excessive multitasking interaction with smart devices. The latter two factors, "Multitasking preference" and "Polychronic orientation," referred to multitaskers' preference of engaging in multiple media use or interaction tasks rather than a single task from the time orientation perspective. The four-factor structure indicates that excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices shares some similarities with other behavioral addiction types, but demonstrates uniqueness compared with excessive engagement in single media use.

  7. Proteins involved in motility and sperm-egg interaction evolve more rapidly in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Alberto; Lüke, Lena; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies of spermatozoa have identified a large catalog of integral sperm proteins. Rapid evolution of these proteins may underlie adaptive changes of sperm traits involved in different events leading to fertilization, although the selective forces underlying such rapid evolution are not well understood. A variety of selective forces may differentially affect several steps ending in fertilization, thus resulting in a compartmentalized adaptation of sperm proteins. Here we analyzed the evolution of genes associated to various events in the sperm's life, from sperm formation to sperm-egg interaction. Evolutionary analyses were performed on gene sequences from 17 mouse strains whose genomes have been sequenced. Four of these are derived from wild Mus musculus, M. domesticus, M. castaneus and M. spretus. We found a higher proportion of genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection among those related to sperm motility and sperm-egg interaction. Furthermore, sperm proteins involved in sperm-egg interaction exhibited accelerated evolution in comparison to those involved in other events. Thus, we identified a large set of candidate proteins for future comparative analyses of genotype-phenotype associations in spermatozoa of species subjected to different sexual selection pressures. Adaptive evolution of proteins involved in motility could be driven by sperm competition, since this selective force is known to increase the proportion of motile sperm and their swimming velocity. On the other hand, sperm proteins involved in gamete interaction could be coevolving with their egg partners through episodes of sexual selection or sexual conflict resulting in species-specific sperm-egg interactions and barriers preventing interspecies fertilization.

  8. Metabolomics of reef benthic interactions reveals a bioactive lipid involved in coral defence.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert A; Vermeij, Mark J A; Hartmann, Aaron C; Galtier d'Auriac, Ines; Benler, Sean; Haas, Andreas; Quistad, Steven D; Lim, Yan Wei; Little, Mark; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-04-27

    Holobionts are assemblages of microbial symbionts and their macrobial host. As extant representatives of some of the oldest macro-organisms, corals and algae are important for understanding how holobionts develop and interact with one another. Using untargeted metabolomics, we show that non-self interactions altered the coral metabolome more than self-interactions (i.e. different or same genus, respectively). Platelet activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF, central inflammatory modulators in mammals, were major lipid components of the coral holobionts. When corals were damaged during competitive interactions with algae, PAF increased along with expression of the gene encoding Lyso-PAF acetyltransferase; the protein responsible for converting Lyso-PAF to PAF. This shows that self and non-self recognition among some of the oldest extant holobionts involve bioactive lipids identical to those in highly derived taxa like humans. This further strengthens the hypothesis that major players of the immune response evolved during the pre-Cambrian.

  9. Procyanidins can interact with Caco-2 cell membrane lipid rafts: involvement of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Sandra V; Jaggers, Grayson K; Fraga, Cesar G; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2013-11-01

    Large procyanidins (more than three subunits) are not absorbed at the gastrointestinal tract but could exert local effects through their interactions with membranes. We previously showed that hexameric procyanidins (Hex), although not entering cells, interact with membranes modulating cell signaling and fate. This paper investigated if Hex, as an example of large procyanidins, can selectively interact with lipid rafts which could in part explain its biological actions. This mechanism was studied in both synthetic membranes (liposomes) and Caco-2 cells. Hex promoted Caco-2 cell membrane rigidification and dehydration, effects that were abolished upon cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD). Hex prevented lipid raft structure disruption induced by cholesterol depletion/redistribution by MCD or sodium deoxycholate. Supporting the involvement of cholesterol-Hex bonding in Hex interaction with lipid rafts, the absence of cholesterol markedly decreased the capacity of Hex to prevent deoxycholate- and Triton X-100-mediated disruption of lipid raft-like liposomes. Stressing the functional relevance of this interaction, Hex mitigated lipid raft-associated activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2. Results support the capacity of a large procyanidin (Hex) to interact with membrane lipid rafts mainly through Hex-cholesterol bondings. Procyanidin-lipid raft interactions can in part explain the capacity of large procyanidins to modulate cell physiology.

  10. Interaction between Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia and the coagulation system: involvement of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Diana; Hernández, Orville; Muñoz-Cadavid, Cesar; Cano, Luz Elena; González, Angel

    2013-06-01

    The infectious process starts with an initial contact between pathogen and host. We have previously demonstrated that Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia interact with plasma proteins including fibrinogen, which is considered the major component of the coagulation system. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro capacity of P. brasiliensis conidia to aggregate with plasma proteins and compounds involved in the coagulation system. We assessed the aggregation of P. brasiliensis conidia after incubation with human serum or plasma in the presence or absence of anticoagulants, extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, metabolic and protein inhibitors, monosaccharides and other compounds. Additionally, prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times were determined after the interaction of P. brasiliensis conidia with human plasma. ECM proteins, monosaccharides and human plasma significantly induced P. brasiliensis conidial aggregation; however, anticoagulants and metabolic and protein inhibitors diminished the aggregation process. The extrinsic coagulation pathway was not affected by the interaction between P. brasiliensis conidia and plasma proteins, while the intrinsic pathway was markedly altered. These results indicate that P. brasiliensis conidia interact with proteins involved in the coagulation system. This interaction may play an important role in the initial inflammatory response, as well as fungal disease progression caused by P. brasiliensis dissemination.

  11. Do Parentese Prosody and Fathers' Involvement in Interacting Facilitate Social Interaction in Infants Who Later Develop Autism?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David; Cassel, Raquel S.; Saint-Georges, Catherine; Mahdhaoui, Ammar; Laznik, Marie-Christine; Apicella, Fabio; Muratori, Pietro; Maestro, Sandra; Muratori, Filippo; Chetouani, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether development of autism impacts the interactive process between an infant and his/her parents remains an unexplored issue. Methodology and Principal Findings Using computational analysis taking into account synchronic behaviors and emotional prosody (parentese), we assessed the course of infants' responses to parents' type of speech in home movies from typically developing (TD) infants and infants who will subsequently develop autism aged less than 18 months. Our findings indicate: that parentese was significantly associated with infant responses to parental vocalizations involving orientation towards other people and with infant receptive behaviours; that parents of infants developing autism displayed more intense solicitations that were rich in parentese; that fathers of infants developing autism spoke to their infants more than fathers of TD infants; and that fathers' vocalizations were significantly associated with intersubjective responses and active behaviours in infants who subsequently developed autism. Conclusion The parents of infants who will later develop autism change their interactive pattern of behaviour by both increasing parentese and father's involvement in interacting with infants; both are significantly associated with infant's social responses. We stress the possible therapeutic implications of these findings and its implication for Dean Falk's theory regarding pre-linguistic evolution in early hominins. PMID:23650498

  12. Dopamine/adenosine interactions involved in effort-related aspects of food motivation.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce

    2009-12-01

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine (DA) is involved in effort-related aspects of food motivation. Accumbens DA depletions reduce the tendency of rats to work for food, and alter effort-related choice, but leave other aspects of food motivation and appetite intact. DA and adenosine receptors interact to regulate effort-related processes. Adenosine A(2A) antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D(2) antagonists on effort-related choice, and intra-accumbens injections of a adenosine A(2A) agonist produce effects that are similar to those produced by accumbens DA depletion or antagonism. These studies have implications for understanding the neurochemical interactions that underlie activational aspects of motivation.

  13. Strigolactone Involvement in Root Development, Response to Abiotic Stress, and Interactions with the Biotic Soil Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones, recently discovered as plant hormones, regulate the development of different plant parts. In the root, they regulate root architecture and affect root hair length and density. Their biosynthesis and exudation increase under low phosphate levels, and they are associated with root responses to these conditions. Their signaling pathway in the plant includes protein interactions and ubiquitin-dependent repressor degradation. In the root, they lead to changes in actin architecture and dynamics as well as localization of the PIN-FORMED auxin transporter in the plasma membrane. Strigolactones are also involved with communication in the rhizosphere. They are necessary for germination of parasitic plant seeds, they enhance hyphal branching of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the Glomus and Gigaspora spp., and they promote rhizobial symbiosis. This review focuses on the role played by strigolactones in root development, their response to nutrient deficiency, and their involvement with plant interactions in the rhizosphere. PMID:25037210

  14. A Conformal Mapping Suitable for Problems Involving Interaction Between Given Geometries and Known Far Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    A conformal transformation formula using Riemann-Stieltjes integrals is derived for use with problems involving the interaction between a given finite-sized geometry and a known far field. The derivative of this transformation is non-singular in the domain considered and tends to one at infinity. A formula is derived for transformation from the unit circle to the exterior of an arbitrarily given continuous curve with bounded variation . A special case of the transformation is very similar

  15. Evolutionary History of Subtilases in Land Plants and Their Involvement in Symbiotic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alexander; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2017-03-29

    Subtilases, a family of proteases involved in a variety of developmental processes in land plants, are also involved in both mutualistic symbiosis and host-pathogen interactions in different angiosperm lineages. We examined the evolutionary history of subtilase genes across land plants through a phylogenetic analysis integrating amino acid sequence data from full genomes, transcriptomes, and characterized subtilases of 341 species of diverse green algae and land plants, along with subtilases from 12 species of other eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria. Our analysis reconstructs the subtilase gene phylogeny, and identifies eleven new gene lineages, six of which have no previously characterized members. Two large, previously unnamed subtilase gene lineages that diverged before the origin of angiosperms accounted for the majority of subtilases shown to be associated with symbiotic interactions. These lineages expanded through both whole genome and tandem duplication, with differential neofunctionalization and subfunctionalization creating paralogs associated with different symbioses, including nodulation with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizae, and pathogenesis, in different plant clades. This study for the first time demonstrates that a key gene family involved in plant-microbe interactions proliferated in size and functional diversity before the explosive radiation of angiosperms.

  16. Functional dissection of protein complexes involved in yeast chromosome biology using a genetic interaction map.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean R; Miller, Kyle M; Maas, Nancy L; Roguev, Assen; Fillingham, Jeffrey; Chu, Clement S; Schuldiner, Maya; Gebbia, Marinella; Recht, Judith; Shales, Michael; Ding, Huiming; Xu, Hong; Han, Junhong; Ingvarsdottir, Kristin; Cheng, Benjamin; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Berger, Shelley L; Hieter, Phil; Zhang, Zhiguo; Brown, Grant W; Ingles, C James; Emili, Andrew; Allis, C David; Toczyski, David P; Weissman, Jonathan S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Krogan, Nevan J

    2007-04-12

    Defining the functional relationships between proteins is critical for understanding virtually all aspects of cell biology. Large-scale identification of protein complexes has provided one important step towards this goal; however, even knowledge of the stoichiometry, affinity and lifetime of every protein-protein interaction would not reveal the functional relationships between and within such complexes. Genetic interactions can provide functional information that is largely invisible to protein-protein interaction data sets. Here we present an epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) consisting of quantitative pairwise measurements of the genetic interactions between 743 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in various aspects of chromosome biology (including DNA replication/repair, chromatid segregation and transcriptional regulation). This E-MAP reveals that physical interactions fall into two well-represented classes distinguished by whether or not the individual proteins act coherently to carry out a common function. Thus, genetic interaction data make it possible to dissect functionally multi-protein complexes, including Mediator, and to organize distinct protein complexes into pathways. In one pathway defined here, we show that Rtt109 is the founding member of a novel class of histone acetyltransferases responsible for Asf1-dependent acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56. This modification, in turn, enables a ubiquitin ligase complex containing the cullin Rtt101 to ensure genomic integrity during DNA replication.

  17. A new insight into π-π stacking involving remarkable orbital interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rundong; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2016-09-14

    For more than half a century, the phenomenon of π-π stacking has attracted much attention in several research fronts including materials science, chemical synthesis, and even drug design. Despite intense theoretical and experimental exploration, no unified description of the factors contributing to π-π stacking interactions and their weak bonding process has been proposed. In this work, based on calculations of the simplest prototype of π-π stacking, namely the benzene sandwich dimer (together with benzene-phenol, toluene and benzonitrile) using the density functional theory with dispersion correction, previously rarely studied intermolecular orbital interaction is discussed in detail and shown to involve considerable hybridizations of some of the orbitals which make a large contribution to the total interaction energy. We now propose a unified model for the often nebulous π-π stacking process and its analogs: firstly when the two monomers are too far apart, the dispersion effect will play a dominant role in bringing them together, but when they are too close, Pauli repulsion will force them apart. Secondly, at the equilibrium distance, electrostatic interaction, Pauli repulsion, dispersion and intermolecular orbital interaction are all pronounced, with part of the molecular orbitals of the two monomers interacting with each other to form a weak intermolecular bond.

  18. Is the use of diffuse functions essential for the properly description of noncovalent interactions involving anions?

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Quiñonero, David; Deyà, Pere M; Frontera, Antonio

    2013-03-28

    It is commonly assumed that theoretical DFT or ab initio calculations involving anions require the utilization of diffuse functions in order to obtain reliable results. In large systems, the use of diffuse functions in the calculations increases the computational cost and, more importantly, sometimes provokes self-consistent-field (SCF) convergence problems, especially in open shell systems. Nowadays, the popular and often used bases for studying noncovalent interactions are the correlation-consistent polarized basis sets of Dunning and co-workers, denoted as cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, etc.), and the Turbomole def2 basis set family (def2-SVP and def2-TZVP). In this paper we study the effect of the utilization of diffuse functions on the energetic and geometric features of several noncovalent complexes, including hydrogen, halogen, and pnicogen bonding, lithium bonds, anion-π interactions, and van der Waals interactions.

  19. Conserved regions of ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP are involved in interactions with its substrate.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2013-08-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a ubiquitous and essential site-specific eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein with a large catalytic RNA moiety that is closely related to the RNA component of RNase P, and multiple proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. Here, we report the results of an ultraviolet-cross-linking analysis of interactions between a photoreactive RNase MRP substrate and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP holoenzyme. The results show that the substrate interacts with phylogenetically conserved RNA elements universally found in all enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family, as well as with a phylogenetically conserved RNA region that is unique to RNase MRP, and demonstrate that four RNase MRP protein components, all shared with RNase P, interact with the substrate. Implications for the structural organization of RNase MRP and the roles of its components are discussed.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Interaction Effects of Alcohol and Hepatitis C Virus in Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Valeria R; Fassnacht, Ryan; Archer, Kellie J; Maluf, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which alcohol consumption accelerates liver disease in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) are not well understood. To identify the characteristics of molecular pathways affected by alcohol in HCV patients, we fit probe-set level linear models that included the additive effects as well as the interaction between alcohol and HCV. The study included liver tissue samples from 78 patients, 23 (29.5%) with HCV-cirrhosis, 13 (16.7%) with alcohol-cirrhosis, 23 (29.5%) with HCV/alcohol cirrhosis and 19 (24.4%) with no liver disease (no HCV/no alcohol group). We performed gene-expression profiling by using microarrays. Probe-set expression summaries were calculated by using the robust multiarray average. Probe-set level linear models were fit where probe-set expression was modeled by HCV status, alcohol status, and the interaction between HCV and alcohol. We found that 2172 probe sets (1895 genes) were differentially expressed between HCV cirrhosis versus alcoholic cirrhosis groups. Genes involved in the virus response and the immune response were the more important upregulated genes in HCV cirrhosis. Genes involved in apoptosis regulation were also overexpressed in HCV cirrhosis. Genes of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes were upregulated in alcoholic cirrhosis, and 1230 probe sets (1051 genes) had a significant interaction estimate. Cell death and cellular growth and proliferation were affected by the interaction between HCV and alcohol. Immune response and response to the virus genes were downregulated in HCV-alcohol interaction (interaction term alcohol*HCV). Alcohol*HCV in the cirrhotic tissues resulted in a strong negative regulation of the apoptosis pattern with concomitant positive regulation of cellular division and proliferation. PMID:20386865

  1. Molecular determinants of the interaction between Doa1 and Hse1 involved in endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Choi, Hoon; Lee, Sangho

    2014-03-28

    Yeast Doa1/Ufd3 is an adaptor protein for Cdc48 (p97 in mammal), an AAA type ATPase associated with endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation pathway and endosomal sorting into multivesicular bodies. Doa1 functions in the endosomal sorting by its association with Hse1, a component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) system. The association of Doa1 with Hse1 was previously reported to be mediated between PFU domain of Doa1 and SH3 of Hse1. However, it remains unclear which residues are specifically involved in the interaction. Here we report that Doa1/PFU interacts with Hse1/SH3 with a moderate affinity of 5 μM. Asn-438 of Doa1/PFU and Trp-254 of Hse1/SH3 are found to be critical in the interaction while Phe-434, implicated in ubiquitin binding via a hydrophobic interaction, is not. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements combined with molecular docking and biochemical analysis yield the solution structure of the Doa1/PFU:Hse1/SH3 complex. Taken together, our results suggest that hydrogen bonding is a major determinant in the interaction of Doa1/PFU with Hse1/SH3.

  2. Identification of Critical Paraoxonase 1 Residues Involved in High Density Lipoprotein Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaodong; Huang, Ying; Levison, Bruce S.; Gerstenecker, Gary; DiDonato, Anthony J.; Hazen, Leah B.; Lee, Joonsue; Gogonea, Valentin; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2016-01-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated protein with atherosclerosis-protective and systemic anti-oxidant functions. We recently showed that PON1, myeloperoxidase, and HDL bind to one another in vivo forming a functional ternary complex (Huang, Y., Wu, Z., Riwanto, M., Gao, S., Levison, B. S., Gu, X., Fu, X., Wagner, M. A., Besler, C., Gerstenecker, G., Zhang, R., Li, X. M., Didonato, A. J., Gogonea, V., Tang, W. H., et al. (2013) J. Clin. Invest. 123, 3815–3828). However, specific residues on PON1 involved in the HDL-PON1 interaction remain unclear. Unambiguous identification of protein residues involved in docking interactions to lipid surfaces poses considerable methodological challenges. Here we describe a new strategy that uses a novel synthetic photoactivatable and click chemistry-taggable phospholipid probe, which, when incorporated into HDL, was used to identify amino acid residues on PON1 that directly interact with the lipoprotein phospholipid surface. Several specific PON1 residues (Leu-9, Tyr-185, and Tyr-293) were identified through covalent cross-links with the lipid probes using affinity isolation coupled to liquid chromatography with on-line tandem mass spectrometry. Based upon the crystal structure for PON1, the identified residues are all localized in relatively close proximity on the surface of PON1, defining a domain that binds to the HDL lipid surface. Site-specific mutagenesis of the identified PON1 residues (Leu-9, Tyr-185, and Tyr-293), coupled with functional studies, reveals their importance in PON1 binding to HDL and both PON1 catalytic activity and stability. Specifically, the residues identified on PON1 provide important structural insights into the PON1-HDL interaction. More generally, the new photoactivatable and affinity-tagged lipid probe developed herein should prove to be a valuable tool for identifying contact sites supporting protein interactions with lipid interfaces such as found on cell membranes

  3. Identification of Critical Paraoxonase 1 Residues Involved in High Density Lipoprotein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaodong; Huang, Ying; Levison, Bruce S; Gerstenecker, Gary; DiDonato, Anthony J; Hazen, Leah B; Lee, Joonsue; Gogonea, Valentin; DiDonato, Joseph A; Hazen, Stanley L

    2016-01-22

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated protein with atherosclerosis-protective and systemic anti-oxidant functions. We recently showed that PON1, myeloperoxidase, and HDL bind to one another in vivo forming a functional ternary complex (Huang, Y., Wu, Z., Riwanto, M., Gao, S., Levison, B. S., Gu, X., Fu, X., Wagner, M. A., Besler, C., Gerstenecker, G., Zhang, R., Li, X. M., Didonato, A. J., Gogonea, V., Tang, W. H., et al. (2013) J. Clin. Invest. 123, 3815-3828). However, specific residues on PON1 involved in the HDL-PON1 interaction remain unclear. Unambiguous identification of protein residues involved in docking interactions to lipid surfaces poses considerable methodological challenges. Here we describe a new strategy that uses a novel synthetic photoactivatable and click chemistry-taggable phospholipid probe, which, when incorporated into HDL, was used to identify amino acid residues on PON1 that directly interact with the lipoprotein phospholipid surface. Several specific PON1 residues (Leu-9, Tyr-185, and Tyr-293) were identified through covalent cross-links with the lipid probes using affinity isolation coupled to liquid chromatography with on-line tandem mass spectrometry. Based upon the crystal structure for PON1, the identified residues are all localized in relatively close proximity on the surface of PON1, defining a domain that binds to the HDL lipid surface. Site-specific mutagenesis of the identified PON1 residues (Leu-9, Tyr-185, and Tyr-293), coupled with functional studies, reveals their importance in PON1 binding to HDL and both PON1 catalytic activity and stability. Specifically, the residues identified on PON1 provide important structural insights into the PON1-HDL interaction. More generally, the new photoactivatable and affinity-tagged lipid probe developed herein should prove to be a valuable tool for identifying contact sites supporting protein interactions with lipid interfaces such as found on cell membranes

  4. Annexin A2 is involved in pig (Sus scrofa)sperm-oviduct interaction.

    PubMed

    Teijeiro, Juan M; Ignotz, George G; Marini, Patricia E

    2009-04-01

    The oviduct is a dynamic organ which modulates gamete physiology. Sperm-oviduct interaction provides the formation of a sperm storage reservoir and allows the selection of sperm with certain qualities in eutherian mammals. In sows, the oviductal sperm binding glycoprotein (SBG) has been proposed to be involved in sperm selection. In this work, based on its affinity to sperm periacrosomal membrane proteins, we isolate another pig oviductal cell protein that interacts with sperm. Peptide identification by LC/MS-MS allowed the identification of this protein as annexin A2. The presence of this annexin, as well as annexin A1 and annexin A5 in sow oviductal cells was confirmed by Western blot with specific antibodies. The three proteins were localized in sow oviduct by immunohistochemistry, showing the presence of annexin A2 at the apical surface of the oviductal epithelial cells. Based on our data and the fact that annexins have been stated as candidate receptors of bovine sperm for sperm reservoir formation, we propose that this family of proteins is involved in sperm-oviduct interaction, annexin A2 being the main sperm binding isoform in pig.

  5. Banana ethylene response factors are involved in fruit ripening through their interactions with ethylene biosynthesis genes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yun-yi; Chen, Jian-ye; Kuang, Jiang-fei; Shan, Wei; Xie, Hui; Jiang, Yue-ming; Lu, Wang-jin

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factor (TF) in the transcriptional regulation of ethylene biosynthesis genes during fruit ripening remains largely unclear. In this study, 15 ERF genes, designated as MaERF1–MaERF15, were isolated and characterized from banana fruit. These MaERFs were classified into seven of the 12 known ERF families. Subcellular localization showed that MaERF proteins of five different subfamilies preferentially localized to the nucleus. The 15 MaERF genes displayed differential expression patterns and levels in peel and pulp of banana fruit, in association with four different ripening treatments caused by natural, ethylene-induced, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-delayed, and combined 1-MCP and ethylene treatments. MaERF9 was upregulated while MaERF11 was downregulated in peel and pulp of banana fruit during ripening or after treatment with ethylene. Furthermore, yeast-one hybrid (Y1H) and transient expression assays showed that the potential repressor MaERF11 bound to MaACS1 and MaACO1 promoters to suppress their activities and that MaERF9 activated MaACO1 promoter activity. Interestingly, protein–protein interaction analysis revealed that MaERF9 and -11 physically interacted with MaACO1. Taken together, these results suggest that MaERFs are involved in banana fruit ripening via transcriptional regulation of or interaction with ethylene biosynthesis genes. PMID:23599278

  6. CIPK7 is involved in cold response by interacting with CBL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Conglin; Ding, Shuo; Zhang, Hua; Du, Hang; An, Lizhe

    2011-07-01

    The family of calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins is a unique group of Ca(2+) sensors in plants. CBLs relay the calcium signal by interacting with and regulating the family of CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs). Extensive studies have demonstrated that the CBL-CIPK complexes mediate plant responses to a variety of external stresses. However, there are few reports on the CBL-CIPK involved in cold stress responses. In this study, we analyzed expression of CIPK7 and CBL1 in Arabidopsis during cold treatments. Expression of CIPK7 was induced by cold, and CIPK7 interacted with CBL1 in vitro. Moreover, affinity chromatography purification of CIPK7 from Arabidopsis plants using CBL1 suggested that CIPK7 may associate with CBL1 in vivo. Expression of CBL1 was cold inducible, and CBL1 had a role in regulating cold response. By comparing expression patterns of CIPK7 between wild-type and cbl1 mutant plants, we found the induction of CIPK7 by cold stress was influenced by CBL1. This is the first report to demonstrate that CIPK7 may play a role in cold response via its interaction with CBL1.

  7. Novel protein-protein interaction family proteins involved in chloroplast movement response.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-04-01

    To optimize photosynthetic activity, chloroplasts change their intracellular location in response to ambient light conditions; chloroplasts move toward low intensity light to maximize light capture, and away from high intensity light to avoid photodamage. Although several proteins have been reported to be involved in the chloroplast photorelocation movement response, any physical interaction among them was not found so far. We recently found a physical interaction between two plant-specific coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 (Weak Chloroplast Movement under Blue Light 1) and PMI2 (Plastid Movement Impaired 2), that were identified to regulate chloroplast movement velocity. Since the both coiled-coil regions of WEB1 and PMI2 were classified into an uncharacterized protein family having DUF827 (DUF: Domain of Unknown Function) domain, it was the first report that DUF827 proteins could mediate protein-protein interaction. In this mini-review article, we discuss regarding molecular function of WEB1 and PMI2, and also define a novel protein family composed of WEB1, PMI2 and WEB1/PMI2-like proteins for protein-protein interaction in land plants.

  8. Metabolomics of reef benthic interactions reveals a bioactive lipid involved in coral defence

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Hartmann, Aaron C.; Galtier d'Auriac, Ines; Benler, Sean; Haas, Andreas; Quistad, Steven D.; Lim, Yan Wei; Little, Mark; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-01-01

    Holobionts are assemblages of microbial symbionts and their macrobial host. As extant representatives of some of the oldest macro-organisms, corals and algae are important for understanding how holobionts develop and interact with one another. Using untargeted metabolomics, we show that non-self interactions altered the coral metabolome more than self-interactions (i.e. different or same genus, respectively). Platelet activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF, central inflammatory modulators in mammals, were major lipid components of the coral holobionts. When corals were damaged during competitive interactions with algae, PAF increased along with expression of the gene encoding Lyso-PAF acetyltransferase; the protein responsible for converting Lyso-PAF to PAF. This shows that self and non-self recognition among some of the oldest extant holobionts involve bioactive lipids identical to those in highly derived taxa like humans. This further strengthens the hypothesis that major players of the immune response evolved during the pre-Cambrian. PMID:27122568

  9. Spa2p Interacts with Cell Polarity Proteins and Signaling Components Involved in Yeast Cell Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Santos, Beatriz; Fortin, Nathalie; Costigan, Christine; Snyder, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The yeast protein Spa2p localizes to growth sites and is important for polarized morphogenesis during budding, mating, and pseudohyphal growth. To better understand the role of Spa2p in polarized growth, we analyzed regions of the protein important for its function and proteins that interact with Spa2p. Spa2p interacts with Pea2p and Bud6p (Aip3p) as determined by the two-hybrid system; all of these proteins exhibit similar localization patterns, and spa2Δ, pea2Δ, and bud6Δ mutants display similar phenotypes, suggesting that these three proteins are involved in the same biological processes. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that Spa2p and Pea2p are tightly associated with each other in vivo. Velocity sedimentation experiments suggest that a significant portion of Spa2p, Pea2p, and Bud6p cosediment, raising the possibility that these proteins form a large, 12S multiprotein complex. Bud6p has been shown previously to interact with actin, suggesting that the 12S complex functions to regulate the actin cytoskeleton. Deletion analysis revealed that multiple regions of Spa2p are involved in its localization to growth sites. One of the regions involved in Spa2p stability and localization interacts with Pea2p; this region contains a conserved domain, SHD-II. Although a portion of Spa2p is sufficient for localization of itself and Pea2p to growth sites, only the full-length protein is capable of complementing spa2 mutant defects, suggesting that other regions are required for Spa2p function. By using the two-hybrid system, Spa2p and Bud6p were also found to interact with components of two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways important for polarized cell growth. Spa2p interacts with Ste11p (MAPK kinase [MEK] kinase) and Ste7p (MEK) of the mating signaling pathway as well as with the MEKs Mkk1p and Mkk2p of the Slt2p (Mpk1p) MAPK pathway; for both Mkk1p and Ste7p, the Spa2p-interacting region was mapped to the N-terminal putative regulatory domain

  10. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  11. MCT Expression and Lactate Influx/Efflux in Tanycytes Involved in Glia-Neuron Metabolic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Elizondo, Roberto; Llanos, Paula; Uranga, Romina María; Nualart, Francisco; García, María Angeles

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic interaction via lactate between glial cells and neurons has been proposed as one of the mechanisms involved in hypothalamic glucosensing. We have postulated that hypothalamic glial cells, also known as tanycytes, produce lactate by glycolytic metabolism of glucose. Transfer of lactate to neighboring neurons stimulates ATP synthesis and thus contributes to their activation. Because destruction of third ventricle (III-V) tanycytes is sufficient to alter blood glucose levels and food intake in rats, it is hypothesized that tanycytes are involved in the hypothalamic glucose sensing mechanism. Here, we demonstrate the presence and function of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) in tanycytes. Specifically, MCT1 and MCT4 expression as well as their distribution were analyzed in Sprague Dawley rat brain, and we demonstrate that both transporters are expressed in tanycytes. Using primary tanycyte cultures, kinetic analyses and sensitivity to inhibitors were undertaken to confirm that MCT1 and MCT4 were functional for lactate influx. Additionally, physiological concentrations of glucose induced lactate efflux in cultured tanycytes, which was inhibited by classical MCT inhibitors. Because the expression of both MCT1 and MCT4 has been linked to lactate efflux, we propose that tanycytes participate in glucose sensing based on a metabolic interaction with neurons of the arcuate nucleus, which are stimulated by lactate released from MCT1 and MCT4-expressing tanycytes. PMID:21297988

  12. Genes related to antioxidant metabolism are involved in Methylobacterium mesophilicum-soybean interaction.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Welington Luiz; Santos, Daiene Souza; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Salgueiro-Londoño, Jennifer Katherine; Camargo-Neves, Aline Aparecida; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega

    2015-10-01

    The genus Methylobacterium is composed of pink-pigmented methylotrophic bacterial species that are widespread in natural environments, such as soils, stream water and plants. When in association with plants, this genus colonizes the host plant epiphytically and/or endophytically. This association is known to promote plant growth, induce plant systemic resistance and inhibit plant infection by phytopathogens. In the present study, we focused on evaluating the colonization of soybean seedling-roots by Methylobacterium mesophilicum strain SR1.6/6. We focused on the identification of the key genes involved in the initial step of soybean colonization by methylotrophic bacteria, which includes the plant exudate recognition and adaptation by planktonic bacteria. Visualization by scanning electron microscopy revealed that M. mesophilicum SR1.6/6 colonizes soybean roots surface effectively at 48 h after inoculation, suggesting a mechanism for root recognition and adaptation before this period. The colonization proceeds by the development of a mature biofilm on roots at 96 h after inoculation. Transcriptomic analysis of the planktonic bacteria (with plant) revealed the expression of several genes involved in membrane transport, thus confirming an initial metabolic activation of bacterial responses when in the presence of plant root exudates. Moreover, antioxidant genes were mostly expressed during the interaction with the plant exudates. Further evaluation of stress- and methylotrophic-related genes expression by qPCR showed that glutathione peroxidase and glutathione synthetase genes were up-regulated during the Methylobacterium-soybean interaction. These findings support that glutathione (GSH) is potentially a key molecule involved in cellular detoxification during plant root colonization. In addition to methylotrophic metabolism, antioxidant genes, mainly glutathione-related genes, play a key role during soybean exudate recognition and adaptation, the first step in

  13. Interactions involving ozone, Botrytis cinerea, and B. squamosa on onion leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Interactions involving Botrytis cinerea Pers., B. squamosa Walker, and ozone on onion (alium cepae L.) were investigated. Initially, threshold dosages of ozone required to predispose onion leaves to greater infection by B. cinerea and B. squamosa were determined under controlled conditions in an ozone-exposure chamber. Subsequent experiments supported the hypothesis that nutrients leaking out of ozone-injured cells stimulated lesion production by B. cinerea. The electrical conductivity of, and carbohydrate concentration in, dew collected from leaves of onion plants which had been exposed to ozone were greater than the electrical conductivity of, and carbohydrate concentration in, dew collected from leaves of other, non-exposed onion plants. When conidia of B. cinerea were suspended in dew collected from leaves of plants which had been exposed to ozone and the resulting suspension atomized onto leaves of non-exposed plants, more lesions were induced than on leaves of other non-exposed plants inoculated with conidia suspended in dew collected from plants which had not been exposed to ozone. EDU protected onion leaves from ozone-induced predisposition to these fungi under controlled conditions. Experiments designed to detect interaction between B. cinerea and B. squamosa in onion leaf blighting indicated that such interaction did not occur. Leaves were blighted rapidly when inoculated with B. squamosa whether B. cinerea was present or absent.

  14. Vps41, a protein involved in lysosomal trafficking, interacts with caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Pan, Xiao; He, Liangqiang; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Min; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Caspase-8 is a member of the cysteine-aspartic acid protease (caspase) family which plays a central role in apoptosis and development. We screened caspase-8 interacting proteins from mouse T-cell lymphoma and 7.5-day embryo cDNA libraries by yeast two-hybrid system and obtained eleven positive clones, including Vacuolar protein sorting 41 (Vps41), a protein involved in trafficking of proteins from the late Golgi to the vacuole. The interaction of Vps41 with caspase-8 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and co-localization studies in HEK293T cells. Co-IP experiments also showed that Vps41 binds to the p18 subunit of caspase-8 through its WD40 region and RING-finger motif. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of Vps41 promotes Fas-induced apoptosis in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. The cleavage of caspase-3, a caspase-8 downstream effector, was increased when cells were transfected with Vps41-overexpressing plasmid. Together, these results suggest a novel interaction of caspase-8 with Vps41 and provide a potential role of Vps41 beyond lysosomal trafficking.

  15. Critical amino acid residues of maurocalcine involved in pharmacology, lipid interaction and cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Kamel; Ram, Narendra; Boisseau, Sylvie; Strappazzon, Flavie; Rehaim, Amel; Sadoul, Rémy; Darbon, Hervé; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33-amino acid residue peptide that was initially identified in the Tunisian scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. This peptide triggers interest for three main reasons. First, it helps unravelling the mechanistic basis of Ca(2+) mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum because of its sequence homology with a calcium channel domain involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Second, it shows potent pharmacological properties because of its ability to activate the ryanodine receptor. Finally, it is of technological value because of its ability to carry cell-impermeable compounds across the plasma membrane. Herein, we characterized the molecular determinants that underlie the pharmacological and cell-penetrating properties of maurocalcine. We identify several key amino acid residues of the peptide that will help the design of cell-penetrating analogues devoid of pharmacological activity and cell toxicity. Close examination of the determinants underlying cell penetration of maurocalcine reveals that basic amino acid residues are required for an interaction with negatively charged lipids of the plasma membrane. Maurocalcine analogues that penetrate better have also stronger interaction with negatively charged lipids. Conversely, less effective analogues present a diminished ability to interact with these lipids. These findings will also help the design of still more potent cell penetrating analogues of maurocalcine.

  16. Numerical and Analytical Solutions of Hypersonic Interactions Involving Surface Property Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Inger, George R.

    1999-01-01

    The local viscous-inviscid interaction field generated by a wall temperature jump on a flat plate in supersonic flow and on the windside of a Reusable Launch Vehicle in hypersonic flow is studied in detail by both a Navier-Stokes numerical code and an analytical triple-deck model. Treatment of the rapid heat transfer changes both upstream and downstream of the jump is included. Closed form relationships derived from the triple-deck theory are presented. The analytically predicted pressure and heating variations including upstream influence are found to be in generally good agreement with the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) predictions. These analyses not only clarify the interactive physics involved but also are useful in preliminary design of thermal protection systems and as an insertable module to improve CFD code efficiency when applied to such small-scale interaction problems. The analyses only require conditions at the wall and boundary-layer edge which are easily extracted from a baseline, constant wall temperature, CFD solution.

  17. Probing the Sites of Interactions of Rotaviral Proteins Involved in Replication

    PubMed Central

    Viskovska, Maria; Anish, Ramakrishnan; Hu, Liya; Chow, Dar-Chone; Hurwitz, Amy M.; Brown, Nicholas G.; Palzkill, Timothy; Estes, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Replication and packaging of the rotavirus genome occur in cytoplasmic compartments called viroplasms, which form during virus infection. These processes are orchestrated by yet-to-be-understood complex networks of interactions involving nonstructural proteins (NSPs) 2, 5, and 6 and structural proteins (VPs) 1, 2, 3, and 6. The multifunctional enzyme NSP2, an octamer with RNA binding activity, is critical for viroplasm formation with its binding partner, NSP5, and for genome replication/packaging through its interactions with replicating RNA, the viral polymerase VP1, and the inner core protein VP2. Using isothermal calorimetry, biolayer interferometry, and peptide array screening, we examined the interactions between NSP2, VP1, VP2, NSP5, and NSP6. These studies provide the first evidence that NSP2 can directly bind to VP1, VP2, and NSP6, in addition to the previously known binding to NSP5. The interacting sites identified from reciprocal peptide arrays were found to be in close proximity to the RNA template entry and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) exit tunnels of VP1 and near the catalytic cleft and RNA-binding grooves of NSP2; these sites are consistent with the proposed role of NSP2 in facilitating dsRNA synthesis by VP1. Peptide screening of VP2 identified NSP2-binding sites in the regions close to the intersubunit junctions, suggesting that NSP2 binding could be a regulatory mechanism for preventing the premature self-assembly of VP2. The binding sites on NSP2 for NSP6 were found to overlap that of VP1, and the NSP5-binding sites overlap those of VP2 and VP1, suggesting that interaction of these proteins with NSP2 is likely spatially and/or temporally regulated. IMPORTANCE Replication and packaging of the rotavirus genome occur in cytoplasmic compartments called viroplasms that form during virus infection and are orchestrated by complex networks of interactions involving nonstructural proteins (NSPs) and structural proteins (VPs). A multifunctional RNA

  18. Local Area Disadvantage and Gambling Involvement and Disorder: Evidence for Gene-Environment Correlation and Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Slutske, Wendy S.; Deutsch, Arielle R.; Statham, Dixie B.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that local area characteristics (such as disadvantage and gambling outlet density) and genetic risk factors are associated with gambling involvement and disordered gambling. These two lines of research were brought together in the present study by examining the extent to which genetic contributions to individual differences in gambling involvement and disorder contributed to being exposed to, and were also accentuated by, local area disadvantage. Participants were members of the national community-based Australian Twin Registry who completed a telephone interview in which the past-year frequency of gambling and symptoms of disordered gambling were assessed. Indicators of local area disadvantage were based on census data matched to the participants' postal codes. Univariate biometric model-fitting revealed that exposure to area disadvantage was partially explained by genetic factors. Bivariate biometric model-fitting was conducted to examine the evidence for gene-environment interaction while accounting for gene-environment correlation. These analyses demonstrated that: (a) a small portion of the genetic propensity to gamble was explained by moving to or remaining in a disadvantaged area, and (b) the remaining genetic and unique environmental variation in the frequency of participating in electronic machine gambling (among men and women) and symptoms of disordered gambling (among women) was greater in more disadvantaged localities. As the gambling industry continues to grow, it will be important to take into account the multiple contexts in which problematic gambling behavior can emerge -- from genes to geography -- as well as the ways in which such contexts may interact with each other. PMID:26147321

  19. DUF581 Is Plant Specific FCS-Like Zinc Finger Involved in Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction. PMID:24901469

  20. Interactions between salinity and boron toxicity in tomato plants involve apoplastic calcium.

    PubMed

    Bastías, Elizabeth; Alcaraz-López, Carlos; Bonilla, Ildefonso; Martínez-Ballesta, M Carmen; Bolaños, Luis; Carvajal, Micaela

    2010-01-01

    The lack of consensus about the mutual relations between salinity and boron (B) toxicity with respect to the physiological response of plants necessitates investigation of the interactions of soluble B with salinity. In this investigation, the effect of B was compared with Ca in order to elucidate whether the two nutrients have similar effects and/or to elucidate a relationship under salinity. Following addition of B or Ca, salinity was applied to tomato plants and the cell wall and plasma membrane permeability, measured as water permeability and electrolyte leakage, in relation to amino acid and ion cell wall composition, were determined. As the relationship between B and salinity was complex, several hypotheses are established. The increase of aquaporin functionality due to the presence of B and Ca compared with NaCl-treated plants could be the most feasible, whereas there is currently no satisfactory explanation for the results for the cell wall amino acid composition. In addition, the elemental composition results revealed that, in addition the known interactions between B and Ca with respect to cell wall stability, Mg and Mn were also increased in NaCl+B and NaCl+Ca treatments, suggesting their possible involvement in the cell wall function necessary for plant growth.

  1. Genetic Control of Chromatin States in Humans Involves Local and Distal Chromosomal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grubert, Fabian; Zaugg, Judith B.; Kasowski, Maya; Ursu, Oana; Spacek, Damek V.; Martin, Alicia R.; Greenside, Peyton; Srivas, Rohith; Phanstiel, Doug H.; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Heidari, Nastaran; Euskirchen, Ghia; Huber, Wolfgang; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Kundaje, Anshul; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Deciphering the impact of genetic variants on gene regulation is fundamental to understanding human disease. Although gene regulation often involves long-range interactions, it is unknown to what extent non-coding genetic variants influence distal molecular phenotypes. Here, we integrate chromatin profiling for three histone marks in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 75 sequenced individuals with LCL-specific Hi-C and ChIA-PET-based chromatin contact maps to uncover one of the largest collections of local and distal histone quantitative trait loci (hQTLs). Distal QTLs are enriched within topologically associated domains and exhibit largely concordant variation of chromatin state coordinated by proximal and distal non-coding genetic variants. Histone QTLs are enriched for common variants associated with autoimmune diseases and enable identification of putative target genes of disease-associated variants from genome-wide association studies. These analyses provide insights into how genetic variation can affect human disease phenotypes by coordinated changes in chromatin at interacting regulatory elements. PMID:26300125

  2. DNA-binding protects p53 from interactions with cofactors involved in transcription-independent functions

    PubMed Central

    Lambrughi, Matteo; De Gioia, Luca; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Nussinov, Ruth; Urani, Chiara; Bruschi, Maurizio; Papaleo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Binding-induced conformational changes of a protein at regions distant from the binding site may play crucial roles in protein function and regulation. The p53 tumour suppressor is an example of such an allosterically regulated protein. Little is known, however, about how DNA binding can affect distal sites for transcription factors. Furthermore, the molecular details of how a local perturbation is transmitted through a protein structure are generally elusive and occur on timescales hard to explore by simulations. Thus, we employed state-of-the-art enhanced sampling atomistic simulations to unveil DNA-induced effects on p53 structure and dynamics that modulate the recruitment of cofactors and the impact of phosphorylation at Ser215. We show that DNA interaction promotes a conformational change in a region 3 nm away from the DNA binding site. Specifically, binding to DNA increases the population of an occluded minor state at this distal site by more than 4-fold, whereas phosphorylation traps the protein in its major state. In the minor conformation, the interface of p53 that binds biological partners related to p53 transcription-independent functions is not accessible. Significantly, our study reveals a mechanism of DNA-mediated protection of p53 from interactions with partners involved in the p53 transcription-independent signalling. This also suggests that conformational dynamics is tightly related to p53 signalling. PMID:27604871

  3. Molecular interactions involved in proton-dependent gating in KcsA potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Posson, David J.; Thompson, Ameer N.; McCoy, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial potassium channel KcsA is gated open by the binding of protons to amino acids on the intracellular side of the channel. We have identified, via channel mutagenesis and x-ray crystallography, two pH-sensing amino acids and a set of nearby residues involved in molecular interactions that influence gating. We found that the minimal mutation of one histidine (H25) and one glutamate (E118) near the cytoplasmic gate completely abolished pH-dependent gating. Mutation of nearby residues either alone or in pairs altered the channel’s response to pH. In addition, mutations of certain pairs of residues dramatically increased the energy barriers between the closed and open states. We proposed a Monod–Wyman–Changeux model for proton binding and pH-dependent gating in KcsA, where H25 is a “strong” sensor displaying a large shift in pKa between closed and open states, and E118 is a “weak” pH sensor. Modifying model parameters that are involved in either the intrinsic gating equilibrium or the pKa values of the pH-sensing residues was sufficient to capture the effects of all mutations. PMID:24218397

  4. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  5. Interaction Involvement in Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination of a Communication Process in Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Thi Thao Duyen

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores how participants express and interpret verbal cues of interaction involvement in dyadic conversations via text-based Instant Messaging (IM). Moreover, it seeks to discover differences in the way American participants and Chinese participants use verbal cues when they are highly, or lowly involved. Based on previous…

  6. Antiretroviral Drug Interactions: Overview of Interactions Involving New and Investigational Agents and the Role of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Management

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, R. Chris; Liedtke, Michelle D.

    2011-01-01

    Antiretrovirals are prone to drug-drug and drug-food interactions that can result in subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic concentrations. Interactions between antiretrovirals and medications for other diseases are common due to shared metabolism through cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes and transport by membrane proteins (e.g., p-glycoprotein, organic anion-transporting polypeptide). The clinical significance of antiretroviral drug interactions is reviewed, with a focus on new and investigational agents. An overview of the mechanistic basis for drug interactions and the effect of individual antiretrovirals on CYP450 and UGT isoforms are provided. Interactions between antiretrovirals and medications for other co-morbidities are summarized. The role of therapeutic drug monitoring in the detection and management of antiretroviral drug interactions is also briefly discussed. PMID:24309307

  7. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  8. Flavonoid-membrane interactions: involvement of flavonoid-metal complexes in raft signaling.

    PubMed

    Tarahovsky, Yury S; Kim, Yuri A; Yagolnik, Elena A; Muzafarov, Eugeny N

    2014-05-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds produced by plants and delivered to the human body through food. Although the epidemiological analyses of large human populations did not reveal a simple correlation between flavonoid consumption and health, laboratory investigations and clinical trials clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of flavonoids in the prevention of cardiovascular, carcinogenic, neurodegenerative and immune diseases, as well as other diseases. At present, the abilities of flavonoids in the regulation of cell metabolism, gene expression, and protection against oxidative stress are well-known, although certain biophysical aspects of their functioning are not yet clear. Most flavonoids are poorly soluble in water and, similar to lipophilic compounds, have a tendency to accumulate in biological membranes, particularly in lipid rafts, where they can interact with different receptors and signal transducers and influence their functioning through modulation of the lipid-phase behavior. In this study, we discuss the enhancement in the lipophilicity and antioxidative activity of flavonoids after their complexation with transient metal cations. We hypothesize that flavonoid-metal complexes are involved in the formation of molecular assemblies due to the facilitation of membrane adhesion and fusion, protein-protein and protein-membrane binding, and other processes responsible for the regulation of cell metabolism and protection against environmental hazards.

  9. Fluid-structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration.

  10. Fluid–structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration. PMID:24415796

  11. Large-scale study of the interactions between proteins involved in type IV pilus biology in Neisseria meningitidis: characterization of a subcomplex involved in pilus assembly.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Michaella; Castagnini, Marta; Karimova, Gouzel; Ladant, Daniel; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2012-06-01

    The functionally versatile type IV pili (Tfp) are one of the most widespread virulence factors in bacteria. However, despite generating much research interest for decades, the molecular mechanisms underpinning the various aspects of Tfp biology remain poorly understood, mainly because of the complexity of the system. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis for example, 23 proteins are dedicated to Tfp biology, 15 of which are essential for pilus biogenesis. One of the important gaps in our knowledge concerns the topology of this multiprotein machinery. Here we have used a bacterial two-hybrid system to identify and quantify the interactions between 11 Pil proteins from N. meningitidis. We identified 20 different binary interactions, many of which are novel. This represents the most complex interaction network between Pil proteins reported to date and indicates, among other things, that PilE, PilM, PilN and PilO, which are involved in pilus assembly, indeed interact. We focused our efforts on this subset of proteins and used a battery of assays to determine the membrane topology of PilN and PilO, map the interaction domains between PilE, PilM, PilN and PilO, and show that a widely conserved N-terminal motif in PilN is essential for both PilM-PilN interactions and pilus assembly. Finally, we show that PilP (another protein involved in pilus assembly) forms a complex with PilM, PilN and PilO. Taken together, these findings have numerous implications for understanding Tfp biology and provide a useful blueprint for future studies.

  12. The Role of Father Involvement and Marital Satisfaction in the Development of Family Interactive Abilities: A Multilevel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Alessandra; Parolin, Micol; Sacchi, Chiara; De Palo, Francesca; Vieno, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the development of family interactions from pregnancy to preschool age in a longitudinal perspective, using multilevel analysis. Also, it explored the impact of couple relationship and father involvement in childcare on the developmental trend of the quality of mother–father–child interactions. One hundred and three primiparous families were assessed at 7th month of pregnancy, 4th, 9th, and 18th months of child’s life and during preschool age (36–48th), using the observational procedure named, Lausanne Trilogue Play. Parents’ perception of marital satisfaction was assessed with the Dyadic Adjustment Scale at each point of measure; moreover, in the postnatal assessment, parents completed the Father Involvement Questionnaire. Results showed that family interactions increase over time. Secondly, a decrease of marital adjustment is associated with an improvement of the quality of family interactions. Moreover, father involvement predicts the quality of family interactions from the earliest stages of child’s life. In a longitudinal perspective, family interactions and marital quality show opposite developmental trends and father’s involvement represents a particularly important feature of the family. PMID:27872601

  13. Motor and attentional mechanisms involved in social interaction--evidence from mu and alpha EEG suppression.

    PubMed

    Perry, Anat; Stein, Libi; Bentin, Shlomo

    2011-10-01

    Mu rhythms are EEG oscillations in the 8-13 Hz recorded at sites located roughly over the sensory-motor cortex. There is reliable evidence that the amplitude of mu rhythms is reduced when the participant performs a motor act (mu suppression). Recent studies found mu suppression not only in response to actual movements but also while the participant observes actions executed by someone else. This finding putatively associates the mu suppression to the activity of a mirror neurons system which, in humans, has been suggested to contribute to social skills. In the present study we explored the effects of different levels of social interaction on mu suppression. Participants observed dynamic displays of hand gestures performing actions used in the Rock-Scissors-Paper game. In different blocks, participants passively viewed identical video clips with no game context and in the context of a game, or while being actually engaged in the game either by imagining actions or by actual playing. As a baseline for calculating mu suppression we used a dynamic display of a rolling ball. In addition, to isolate the social aspect of the actual movements, participants performed the same acts outside the game context. Mu suppression was larger while participants were engaged in the social game than when they passively looked at the "opponent" actions or when they performed movements without the game context. This effect was found while viewing the opponent play as well as while actually playing, which supports the view that mu suppression is affected not only by motion, but also by the social context of the motion. However, we did not find differences in mu suppression between perception segments in which the participant did not actually play. Furthermore, in all perception segments occipital alpha suppression was more robust than mu suppression suggesting the involvement of a strong attentional component. While actually playing, however, mu suppression was stronger than alpha

  14. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions.

  15. An Ehrlichia chaffeensis tandem repeat protein interacts with multiple host targets involved in cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wakeel, Abdul; Kuriakose, Jeeba A; McBride, Jere W

    2009-05-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that exhibits tropism for mononuclear phagocytes forming cytoplasmic membrane-bound microcolonies called morulae. To survive and replicate within phagocytes, E. chaffeensis exploits the host cell by modulating a number of host cell processes, but the ehrlichial effector proteins involved are unknown. In this study, we determined that p47, a secreted, differentially expressed, tandem repeat (TR) protein, interacts with multiple host proteins associated with cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and vesicle trafficking. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that p47 interacts with polycomb group ring finger 5 (PCGF5) protein, Src protein tyrosine kinase FYN (FYN), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 (PTPN2), and adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). p47 interaction with these proteins was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation assays and colocalization in HeLa cells transfected with p47-green fluorescent fusion protein (AcGFP1-p47). Moreover, confocal microscopy demonstrated p47-expressing dense-cored (DC) ehrlichiae colocalized with PCGF5, FYN, PTPN2, and CAP1. An amino-terminally truncated form of p47 containing TRs interacted only with PCGF5 and not with FYN, PTPN2, and CAP1, indicating differences in p47 domains that are involved in these interactions. These results demonstrate that p47 is involved in a complex network of interactions involving numerous host cell proteins. Furthermore, this study provides a new insight into the molecular and functional distinction of DC ehrlichiae, as well as the effector proteins involved in facilitating ehrlichial survival in mononuclear phagocytes.

  16. Mapping of the regions involved in self-interaction of rice stripe virus P3 protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S L; Hao, J H; Xue, Y N; Liang, C Y

    2016-03-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) protein P3 is a suppressor of RNA silencing in plants. P3 has been shown by biomolecular fluorescence complementation assay to self-interact in planta but the regions responsible for homotypic interaction have not been determined. Here we analyzed the domains for the self-interaction of P3 by using yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence experiments. The results showed that P3 was also able to interact with itself in yeast and insect cells. The domain responsible for P3-P3 interaction was mapped to amino acids 15-30 at the N-terminal region of P3. Furthermore, subcellular localization suggested that the homo-oligomerization was the prerequisite for P3 to form larger protein aggregates in the nucleus of insect cell.

  17. Comparative genomics of plant-associated Pseudomonas spp.: Insights into diversity and inheritance of traits involved in multitrophic interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group, including seven new genomic sequences for plant-associated strains. These strains exhibit a diverse spectrum of traits involved in biological control and other multitrophic interactions with plants, microbes, and ins...

  18. Interaction between the cytoplasmic domains of HIV-1 Vpu and CD4: role of Vpu residues involved in CD4 interaction and in vitro CD4 degradation.

    PubMed

    Margottin, F; Benichou, S; Durand, H; Richard, V; Liu, L X; Gomas, E; Benarous, R

    1996-09-15

    The Vpu and CD4 cytoplasmic domains were found, by using a two-hybrid assay in yeast, to interact in the absence of their membrane anchor domains. Studies on several deletion and point mutants revealed that the overall structure of the Vpu cytoplasmic domain is required for this interaction. The Vpu amino acid residues involved in the interaction with CD4 were identified. Deletion of the C-terminal residues of Vpu, required for CD4 degradation, as well as the double mutation on the casein kinase II phosphorylation sites S52N-S56N, also involved in CD4 degradation, resulted in the loss of interaction with CD4 and in the inability to induce CD4 degradation. These results suggest that the ability of Vpu to mediate the degradation of CD4 is linked to its capacity to physically interact with CD4. However, additional mutagenesis on the S52 site revealed that the interaction between the cytoplasmic domains of Vpu and CD4 is not sufficient for in vitro Vpu-mediated CD4 degradation.

  19. Collaboratives for Wildlife-Wind Turbine Interaction Research: Fostering Multistakeholder Involvement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, K.

    2013-04-01

    This poster highlights the various wildlife-wind collaboratives (specific to wildlife-wind turbine interaction research) that currently exist. Examples of collaboratives are included along with contact information, objectives, benefits, and ways to advance the knowledge base.

  20. Design, Utility, and History of the Colorado Adoption Project: Examples Involving Adjustment Interactions1

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, Sally Ann; Bricker, Josh B.; Corley, Robin P.; DeFries, John C.; Wadsworth, Sally J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP), a longitudinal study in behavioral development, and discusses how adoption studies may be used to assess genetic and environmental etiologies of individual differences for important developmental outcomes. Previous CAP research on adjustment outcomes in childhood and adolescence which found significant interactions, including gene-environment interactions, is reviewed. New research suggests mediating effects of menarche and religiosity on age at first sex in this predominantly middle-class, Caucasian sample. PMID:23833552

  1. Applying Attractor Dynamics to Infer Gene Regulatory Interactions Involved in Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ghaffarizadeh, Ahmadreza; Podgorski, Gregory J; Flann, Nicholas S

    2017-02-27

    The dynamics of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) guide cellular differentiation. Determining the ways regulatory genes control expression of their targets is essential to understand and control cellular differentiation. The way a regulatory gene controls its target can be expressed as a gene regulatory function. Manual derivation of these regulatory functions is slow, error-prone and difficult to update as new information arises. Automating this process is a significant challenge and the subject of intensive effort. This work presents a novel approach to discovering biologically plausible gene regulatory interactions that control cellular differentiation. This method integrates known cell type expression data, genetic interactions, and knowledge of the effects of gene knockouts to determine likely GRN regulatory functions. We employ a genetic algorithm to search for candidate GRNs that use a set of transcription factors that control differentiation within a lineage. Nested canalyzing functions are used to constrain the search space to biologically plausible networks. The method identifies an ensemble of GRNs whose dynamics reproduce the gene expression pattern for each cell type within a particular lineage. The method's effectiveness was tested by inferring consensus GRNs for myeloid and pancreatic cell differentiation and comparing the predicted gene regulatory interactions to manually derived interactions. We identified many regulatory interactions reported in the literature and also found differences from published reports. These discrepancies suggest areas for biological studies of myeloid and pancreatic differentiation. We also performed a study that used defined synthetic networks to evaluate the accuracy of the automated search method and found that the search algorithm was able to discover the regulatory interactions in these defined networks with high accuracy. We suggest that the GRN functions derived from the methods described here can be used to fill

  2. Deciphering Key Residues Involved in the Virulence-promoting Interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Human Plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Christophe; Terrasse, Rémi; Thielens, Nicole M; Vernet, Thierry; Gaboriaud, Christine; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie

    2017-02-10

    Bacterial pathogens recruit circulating proteins to their own surfaces, co-opting the host protein functions as a mechanism of virulence. Particular attention has focused on the binding of plasminogen (Plg) to bacterial surfaces, as it has been shown that this interaction contributes to bacterial adhesion to host cells, invasion of host tissues, and evasion of the immune system. Several bacterial proteins are known to serve as receptors for Plg including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytoplasmic enzyme that appears on the cell surface in this moonlighting role. Although Plg typically binds to these receptors via several lysine-binding domains, the specific interactions that occur have not been documented in all cases. However, identification of the relevant residues could help define strategies for mitigating the virulence of important human pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp). To shed light on this question, we have described a combination of peptide-spot array screening, competition and SPR assays, high-resolution crystallography, and mutational analyses to characterize the interaction between SpGAPDH and Plg. We identified three SpGAPDH lysine residues that were instrumental in defining the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction. Altogether, the integration of the data presented in this work allows us to propose a structural model for the molecular interaction of the SpGAPDH-Plg complex.

  3. Modelization of nanospace interaction involving a ferromagnetic atom: a spin polarization effect study by thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, K S V; Chen, Xu; Gupta, S

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio studies of ferromagnetic atom interacting with carbon nanotubes have been reported in the literature that predict when the interaction is strong, a higher hybridization with confinement effect will result in spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom. The spin polarization effect on the thermal oxidation to form its oxide is modeled here for the ferromagnetic atom and its alloy, as the above studies predict the 4s electrons are polarized in the atom. The four models developed here provide a pathway for distinguishing the type of interaction that exists in the real system. The extent of spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom has been examined by varying the amount of carbon nanotubes in the composites in the thermogravimetric experiments. In this study we report the experimental results on the CoNi alloy which appears to show selective spin polarization. The products of the thermal oxidation has been analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

  4. The role of hydrogen atoms in interactions involving imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempter, V.; Kirchner, B.

    2010-05-01

    In the first part of this report experimental results are discussed which focus onto the importance of hydrogen atoms in the interaction of imidazolium-based ionic liquids. These include examples for the cation-anion interaction in neat ionic liquids as well as the interactions between ionic liquids and their molecular environment, water in particular. Most of the studies emphasize the importance of the C(2)-H group of the imidazolium ring for the intra- and intermolecular interactions; commonly, the interactions of the type C-H … X (X =: O, halide) are attributed to "hydrogen bonding". In the second part it is analyzed whether these interactions and their consequences fulfill the criteria set by standard definitions of hydrogen bonding. Two cation-anion co-conformations at the C(2)-H group are found. One co-conformer (in-plane) often resembles a hydrogen bond while the other one (on-top) points to a non-hydrogen bonding behavior. Furthermore, the degree of hydrogen bonding for the in-plane structure is very dependent on the anion. Spatial distribution functions show that, in general, both co-conformations are occupied. However, the question of how long a particular co-conformer is populated in the liquid state has yet to be answered. Therefore, it is concluded that the term "hydrogen bond" should, at present, be treated with care to characterize the cation-anion contacts, because of the above-mentioned difficulties. Once more it must be stressed that oversimplifications and generalizations, even for this subclass of ionic liquids have to be avoided, because these liquids are more complicated than it appears from first sight.

  5. A hierarchical generalization of the acoustic reciprocity theorem involving higher-order derivatives and interaction quantities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ju; Li, Jie; Li, Xiaolei; Wang, Ning

    2016-10-01

    An acoustic reciprocity theorem is generalized, for a smoothly varying perturbed medium, to a hierarchy of reciprocity theorems including higher-order derivatives of acoustic fields. The standard reciprocity theorem is the first member of the hierarchy. It is shown that the conservation of higher-order interaction quantities is related closely to higher-order derivative distributions of perturbed media. Then integral reciprocity theorems are obtained by applying Gauss's divergence theorem, which give explicit integral representations connecting higher-order interactions and higher-order derivative distributions of perturbed media. Some possible applications to an inverse problem are also discussed.

  6. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  7. Molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of Neisseria meningitidis with cells of the human blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier.

    PubMed

    Schubert-Unkmeir, Alexandra

    2017-03-03

    Neisseria meningitidis is one of the most common aetiological agents of bacterial meningitis, affecting predominantly children and young adults. The interaction of N. meningitidis with human endothelial cells lining blood vessels of the blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier (B-CSFB) is critical for meningitis development. In recent decades, there has been a significant increase in understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of N. meningitidis with brain vascular cells. In this review, we will describe how N. meningitidis adheres to the brain vasculature, may enter inside these cells, hijack receptor signalling pathways and alter host-cell responses in order to traverse the B-CSFB.

  8. Language learning, recasts, and interaction involving AAC: background and potential for intervention.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michael T; Soto, Gloria; Nelson, Keith

    2017-03-01

    For children with typical development, language is learned through everyday discursive interaction. Adults mediate child participation in such interactions through the deployment of a range of co-constructive strategies, including repeating, questioning, prompting, expanding, and reformulating the child's utterances. Adult reformulations of child utterances, also known as recasts, have also been shown to relate to the acquisition of linguistic structures in children with language and learning disabilities and children and adults learning a foreign language. In this paper we discuss the theoretical basis and empirical evidence for the use of different types of recasts as a major language learning catalyst, and what may account for their facilitative effects. We consider the occurrence of different types of recasts in AAC-mediated interactions and their potential for language facilitation, within the typical operational and linguistic constraints of such interactions. We also consider the benefit of explicit and corrective forms of recasts for language facilitation in conversations with children who rely on AAC. We conclude by outlining future research directions.

  9. Identification of sequence motifs involved in Dengue virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Asnet Mary, J; Paramasivan, R; Shenbagarathai, R

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne virus infection, which remains a serious global public health problem. As there is no specific treatment or commercial vaccine available for effective control of the disease, the attempts on developing novel control strategies are underway. Viruses utilize the surface receptor proteins of host to enter into the cells. Though various proteins were said to be receptors of Dengue virus (DENV) using Virus Overlay Protein Binding Assay, the precise interaction between DENV and host is not explored. Understanding the structural features of domain III envelope glycoprotein would help in developing efficient antiviral inhibitors. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify the sequence motifs present in domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus. Computational analysis revealed that the NGR motif is present in the domain III envelope glycoprotein of DENV-1 and DENV-3. Similarly, DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-4 were found to contain Yxxphi motif which is a tyrosine-based sorting signal responsible for the interaction with a mu subunit of adaptor protein complex. High-throughput virtual screening resulted in five compounds as lead molecules based on glide score, which ranges from -4.664 to -6.52 kcal/Mol. This computational prediction provides an additional tool for understanding the virus-host interactions and helps to identify potential targets in the host. Further, experimental evidence is warranted to confirm the virus-host interactions and also inhibitory activity of reported lead compounds.

  10. Identification of guanine exchange factor key residues involved in exchange activity and Ras interaction.

    PubMed

    Camus, C; Hermann-Le Denmat, S; Jacquet, M

    1995-09-07

    We have carried out a functional analysis of the human HGRF55 exchange factor in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Twelve residues conserved among most of all known guanine exchange factors (GEFs) have been independently changed to alanine. Taking advantage of the ability of Hgrf55p to replace the yeast Cdc25p exchange factor, and using the two-hybrid system with RAS2ala22 allele, we have identified key residues for the interaction with Ras and/or its activation. Substitution of arginine 392 to alanine leads to a complete loss of interaction with Ras, though the protein remains stable. Substitution of Asp266 or Arg359 to alanine results in inactive proteins at 39 degrees C, still able however to interact with Ras. The other charged-to-alanine substitutions led to no detectable phenotype when present alone but most of them dramatically increased the temperature sensitive phenotype observed with [Asp266Ala] substitution. Surprisingly, the cysteine to alanine substitution in the highly conserved PCVPF/Y motif proved to be without effect, suggesting that the sulfhydryl group is not essential for stability or interaction with Ras.

  11. A Kinesthetic Model Demonstrating Molecular Interactions Involved in Anterior-Posterior Pattern Formation in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Kristin R.

    2008-01-01

    Prerequisites for the Developmental Biology course at Augustana College are introductory courses in zoology and cell biology. After introductory courses students appreciate the fact that proteins have three-dimensional structures; however, they often fail to recognize how protein interactions with other cellular components can lead to specific…

  12. NLRP7, Involved in Hydatidiform Molar Pregnancy (HYDM1), Interacts with the Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB16

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Heike; Biswas, Arijit; Nuesgen, Nicole; Oldenburg, Johannes; El-Maarri, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the maternal effect gene NLRP7 cause biparental hydatidiform mole (HYDM1). HYDM1 is characterized by abnormal growth of placenta and lack of proper embryonic development. The molar tissues are characterized by abnormal methylation patterns at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes. It is not known whether this occurs before or after fertilization, but the high specificity of this defect to the maternal allele indicates a possible maternal germ line-specific effect. To better understand the unknown molecular mechanism leading to HYDM1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen against an ovarian library using NLRP7 as bait. We identified the transcriptional repressor ZBTB16 as an interacting protein of NLRP7 and verified this interaction in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Native protein analysis detected NLRP7 and ZBTB16 in a 480kD protein complex and both proteins co-localize in the cytoplasm in juxtanuclear aggregates. HYDM1-causing mutations in NLRP7 did not show altered patterns of interaction with ZBTB16. Hence, the biological significance of the NLRP7-ZBTB16 interaction remains to be revealed. However, a clear effect of harvesting ZBTB16 to the cytoplasm when the NLRP7 protein is overexpressed may be linked to the pathology of the molar pregnancy disease. PMID:26121690

  13. Interpreters' Involvement in Multi-Party Interactions: The Nature of Participation as Listener and Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takimoto, Masato

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates two naturally occurring business interpreting situations where there are a number of participants. Unlike dialogue interpreting situations where there are only two primary interlocutors, the overall interaction shows more complexity in these multi-party situations. This, in turn, means that the interpreters' functions and…

  14. The Interactive Effects of Perceived Parental Involvement and Personality on Teacher Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chung-Kai; Hung, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the relations between teachers' perception of parental involvement and teacher satisfaction. It further aims to investigate how this relationship may be moderated by interpersonal personality traits. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire was conducted; participants were 572 classroom teachers who teach at…

  15. Controlling Involvement: A Naturalistic Study of Peer Interaction in a Bilingual, Bicultural Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Thomas F.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of 4-year-old Spanish-speaking Mexican Americans and English-speaking African Americans in Head Start revealed that, during free play, children were determined to exercise control over their involvement with others. Most significantly, Hispanic children were reluctant to enter into verbal play with English speakers and thus received…

  16. Construction of protein interaction network involved in lung adenocarcinomas using a novel algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Li, Zhu; Xu, Ning; Yu, Bo; Xu, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Pei-Ge; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Lin, Dian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Studies that only assess differentially-expressed (DE) genes do not contain the information required to investigate the mechanisms of diseases. A complete knowledge of all the direct and indirect interactions between proteins may act as a significant benchmark in the process of forming a comprehensive description of cellular mechanisms and functions. The results of protein interaction network studies are often inconsistent and are based on various methods. In the present study, a combined network was constructed using selected gene pairs, following the conversion and combination of the scores of gene pairs that were obtained across multiple approaches by a novel algorithm. Samples from patients with and without lung adenocarcinoma were compared, and the RankProd package was used to identify DE genes. The empirical Bayesian (EB) meta-analysis approach, the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins database (STRING), the weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) package and the differentially-coexpressed genes and links package (DCGL) were used for network construction. A combined network was also constructed with a novel rank-based algorithm using a combined score. The topological features of the 5 networks were analyzed and compared. A total of 941 DE genes were screened. The topological analysis indicated that the gene interaction network constructed using the WGCNA method was more likely to produce a small-world property, which has a small average shortest path length and a large clustering coefficient, whereas the combined network was confirmed to be a scale-free network. Gene pairs that were identified using the novel combined method were mostly enriched in the cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. The present study provided a novel perspective to the network-based analysis. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Compared with single methods, the combined algorithm used in the present study may provide a novel method to

  17. Gene Interactions Provide Evidence for Signaling Pathways Involved in Cleft Lip/Palate in Humans.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Aragón, J A; Alcántara-Ortigoza, M A; Estandia-Ortega, B; Reyna-Fabián, M E; Méndez-Adame, C D; González-Del Angel, A

    2016-10-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is a common craniofacial birth defect that has a complex etiology. Genome-wide association studies have recently identified new loci associated with NSCL/P, but these loci have not been analyzed in a Mexican Mestizo population. A complex etiology implies the presence of genetic interactions, but there is little available information regarding this in NSCL/P, and no signaling pathway has been clearly implicated in humans. Here, we analyzed the associations of 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with NSCL/P in a Mexican Mestizo population (133 cases, 263 controls). The multifactorial dimensionality reduction method was used to examine gene-gene and gene-folic acid consumption interactions for the 24 SNPs analyzed in this study and for 2 additional SNPs that had previously been genotyped in the same study population. Six SNPs located in paired box 7, ventral anterior homeobox 1, sprouty RTK signaling antagonist 2, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and tropomyosin 1 genes were associated with higher risks of NSCL/P (P = 0.0001 to 0.04); 2 SNPs, 1 each in netrin 1 and V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B, were associated with a lower risk of NSCL/P (P = 0.013 to 0.03); and 2 SNPs, 1 each in ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 4 (ABCA4) and noggin, showed associations with NSCL/P that approached the threshold of significance (P = 0.056 to 0.07). In addition, 6 gene-gene interactions (P = 0.0001 to 0.001) and an ABCA4-folic acid consumption interaction (P < 0.0001) were identified. On the basis of these results, combined with those of previous association studies in the literature and biological characterizations of murine models, we propose an interaction network in which interferon regulatory factor 6 plays a central role in the etiology of NSCL/P.

  18. Hsp12p and PAU genes are involved in ecological interactions between natural yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Damaríz; Berná, Luisa; Stefanini, Irene; Baruffini, Enrico; Bergerat, Agnes; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2015-08-01

    The coexistence of different yeasts in a single vineyard raises the question on how they communicate and why slow growers are not competed out. Genetically modified laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are extensively used to investigate ecological interactions, but little is known about the genes regulating cooperation and competition in ecologically relevant settings. Here, we present evidences of Hsp12p-dependent altruistic and contact-dependent competitive interactions between two natural yeast isolates. Hsp12p is released during cell death for public benefit by a fast-growing strain that also produces a killer toxin to inhibit growth of a slow grower that can enjoy the benefits of released Hsp12p. We also show that the protein Pau5p is essential in the defense against the killer effect. Our results demonstrate that the combined action of Hsp12p, Pau5p and a killer toxin is sufficient to steer a yeast community.

  19. Calculation of the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction involving relativistic hydrogenic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2017-03-01

    The program MTRDCOUL [1] calculates the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction between a charged particle and an atomic electron, ∫ ψf∗ (r) ∣ R - r∣-1ψi(r) d r. Bound-free transitions are considered, and relativistic hydrogenic wave functions are used. In this revised version a bug discovered in the F3Y CPC Program Library subprogram [2] is fixed.

  20. The effect of diet and opponent size on aggressive interactions involving caribbean crazy ants (Nylanderia fulva).

    PubMed

    Horn, Katherine C; Eubanks, Micky D; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Biotic interactions are often important in the establishment and spread of invasive species. In particular, competition between introduced and native species can strongly influence the distribution and spread of exotic species and in some cases competition among introduced species can be important. The Caribbean crazy ant, Nylanderia fulva, was recently introduced to the Gulf Coast of Texas, and appears to be spreading inland. It has been hypothesized that competition with the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, may be an important factor in the spread of crazy ants. We investigated the potential of interspecific competition among these two introduced ants by measuring interspecific aggression between Caribbean crazy ant workers and workers of Solenopsis invicta. Specifically, we examined the effect of body size and diet on individual-level aggressive interactions among crazy ant workers and fire ants. We found that differences in diet did not alter interactions between crazy ant workers from different nests, but carbohydrate level did play an important role in antagonistic interactions with fire ants: crazy ants on low sugar diets were more aggressive and less likely to be killed in aggressive encounters with fire ants. We found that large fire ants engaged in fewer fights with crazy ants than small fire ants, but fire ant size affected neither fire ant nor crazy ant mortality. Overall, crazy ants experienced higher mortality than fire ants after aggressive encounters. Our findings suggest that fire ant workers might outcompete crazy ant workers on an individual level, providing some biotic resistance to crazy ant range expansion. However, this resistance may be overcome by crazy ants that have a restricted sugar intake, which may occur when crazy ants are excluded from resources by fire ants.

  1. The Effect of Diet and Opponent Size on Aggressive Interactions Involving Caribbean Crazy Ants (Nylanderia fulva)

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Katherine C.; Eubanks, Micky D.; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Biotic interactions are often important in the establishment and spread of invasive species. In particular, competition between introduced and native species can strongly influence the distribution and spread of exotic species and in some cases competition among introduced species can be important. The Caribbean crazy ant, Nylanderia fulva, was recently introduced to the Gulf Coast of Texas, and appears to be spreading inland. It has been hypothesized that competition with the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, may be an important factor in the spread of crazy ants. We investigated the potential of interspecific competition among these two introduced ants by measuring interspecific aggression between Caribbean crazy ant workers and workers of Solenopsis invicta. Specifically, we examined the effect of body size and diet on individual-level aggressive interactions among crazy ant workers and fire ants. We found that differences in diet did not alter interactions between crazy ant workers from different nests, but carbohydrate level did play an important role in antagonistic interactions with fire ants: crazy ants on low sugar diets were more aggressive and less likely to be killed in aggressive encounters with fire ants. We found that large fire ants engaged in fewer fights with crazy ants than small fire ants, but fire ant size affected neither fire ant nor crazy ant mortality. Overall, crazy ants experienced higher mortality than fire ants after aggressive encounters. Our findings suggest that fire ant workers might outcompete crazy ant workers on an individual level, providing some biotic resistance to crazy ant range expansion. However, this resistance may be overcome by crazy ants that have a restricted sugar intake, which may occur when crazy ants are excluded from resources by fire ants. PMID:23776702

  2. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment. PMID:26500605

  3. Training in Compensatory Strategies Enhances Rapport in Interactions Involving People with Möbius Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michael, John; Bogart, Kathleen; Tylén, Kristian; Krueger, Joel; Bech, Morten; Østergaard, John Rosendahl; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the exploratory study reported here, we tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to train teenagers with Möbius syndrome (MS) to increase the use of alternative communication strategies (e.g., gestures) to compensate for their lack of facial expressivity. Specifically, we expected the intervention to increase the level of rapport experienced in social interactions by our participants. In addition, we aimed to identify the mechanisms responsible for any such increase in rapport. In the study, five teenagers with MS interacted with three naïve participants without MS before the intervention, and with three different naïve participants without MS after the intervention. Rapport was assessed by self-report and by behavioral coders who rated videos of the interactions. Individual non-verbal behavior was assessed via behavioral coders, whereas verbal behavior was automatically extracted from the sound files. Alignment was assessed using cross recurrence quantification analysis and mixed-effects models. The results showed that observer-coded rapport was greater after the intervention, whereas self-reported rapport did not change significantly. Observer-coded gesture and expressivity increased in participants with and without MS, whereas overall linguistic alignment decreased. Fidgeting and repetitiveness of verbal behavior also decreased in both groups. In sum, the intervention may impact non-verbal and verbal behavior in participants with and without MS, increasing rapport as well as overall gesturing, while decreasing alignment.

  4. Interaction of CD31 with a heterophilic counterreceptor involved in downregulation of human T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CD31 is a 130-kD glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily expressed on the surface of endothelial cells, platelets, and several leukocyte subsets. Previous reports indicated that CD31 can mediate intercellular adhesion via both homophilic and heterophilic interaction mechanisms. Using a soluble recombinant CD31-Ig fusion protein (CD31 receptor globulin [Rg]), we demonstrate here that human CD31- T lymphocytes and CD4+CD31- T cell clones express a heterophilic CD31 ligand that is upregulated 18 h after activation. Interaction of CD31Rg with CD31- T helper cell (Th) clones was divalent cation independent but could be blocked by heparin, thus indicating that the CD31 counterreceptor on T cells can be distinguished from the ligands identified on other cell types. Moreover, a single chain protein of 120 kD was precipitated by CD31Rg from the lysates of CD31- Th clones. CD31Rg completely downregulated the proliferative response and cytokine production (interleukin-4, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor- alpha) of CD31- Th clones when the cells were maximally stimulated via immobilized CD3 monoclonal antibody. These results suggest that interaction of CD31 with a heterophilic counterreceptor on T lymphocytes can interfere with a positive regulatory pathway of T cell activation, or directly signal T cells to downregulate immune function. PMID:8691148

  5. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    PubMed Central

    Pignatello, R.; Musumeci, T.; Basile, L.; Carbone, C.; Puglisi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy. PMID:21430952

  6. Coil–globule transition of a polymer involved in excluded-volume interactions with macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kenta; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-07

    Polymers adopt extended coil and compact globule states according to the balance between entropy and interaction energies. The transition of a polymer between an extended coil state and compact globule state can be induced by changing thermodynamic force such as temperature to alter the energy/entropy balance. Previously, this transition was theoretically studied by taking into account the excluded-volume interaction between monomers of a polymer chain using the partition function. For binary mixtures of a long polymer and short polymers, the coil-globule transition can be induced by changing the concentration of the shorter polymers. Here, we investigate the transition caused by short polymers by generalizing the partition function of the long polymer to include the excluded-volume effect of short polymers. The coil-globule transition is studied as a function of the concentration of mixed polymers by systematically varying Flory’s χ-parameters. We show that the transition is caused by the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction and the dispersion state of short polymers in the solvent. We also reveal that the same results can be obtained by combining the mixing entropy and elastic energy if the volume of a long polymer is properly defined.

  7. Interactions among stakehoklders involved in return to work after sick leave due to mental disorders: a meta-ethnography.

    PubMed

    Neves, Robson da Fonseca; Nunes, Mônica de Oliveira; Magalhães, Lilian

    2015-11-01

    Mental disorders cause impact in the work environment. Investigations of interaction among stakeholders who are involved in the return to work are scarce. Meta-ethnography serves to synthesize qualitative studies by means of ongoing interpretation and comparison of the ideas presented in the articles. The goal of this study is to present a meta-ethnography of the interactions among the stakeholders involved in the return to work process after leave of absence due to mental disorders. It aims: (1) to investigate the interactions among stakeholders involved in return to work; (2) to identify enablers or obstacles for the return to work. The database search found 619 articles, 16 of which met the inclusion criteria. Analysis of the articles revealed six second-order concepts that resulted in two syntheses. The first is about performance ethos in the return to work, and the second shows return to work as a catalyst of new life styles. Models that favor the worker's performance ethos, as well as a perspective oriented by psychosocial aspects may enable return to work practices after leave of absence due to mental disorders.

  8. A Fortran program to calculate the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction involving hydrogenic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2017-03-01

    The program MTRXCOUL [1] calculates the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction between a charged particle and an atomic electron, ∫ψf∗ (r) | R - r | - 1ψi(r) d r. Bound-free transitions are considered, and non-relativistic hydrogenic wave functions are used. In this revised version a bug discovered in the F3Y CPC Program Library (PL) subprogram [2] is fixed. Furthermore, the COULCC CPC PL subprogram [3] applied for the calculations of the radial wave functions of the free states and the Bessel functions is replaced by the CPC PL subprogram DCOUL [4].

  9. Features of an interactive writing discourse: conversational involvement, conventional knowledge, and internalization in "Morning Message".

    PubMed

    Mariage, T V

    2001-01-01

    This study describes how meaning potentials were constructed in the literacy event known as Morning Message. Morning Message provided teachers and students with opportunities to construct a written text around the experiences of one student. This discourse of writing allowed for the examination of how meaning was orchestrated and scaffolded between the teacher and her students. Three findings are discussed, including the function of a series of conversational involvement moves utilized by the teacher, the specific writing conventions and metamessages afforded in the Morning Message dialogue, and an examination of how the social dialogues of Morning Message may have come to guide independent action as internalized processes on several transfer measures.

  10. Interactions involved in pH protection of the alphavirus fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Whitney; Kielian, Margaret

    2015-12-15

    The alphavirus membrane protein E1 mediates low pH-triggered fusion of the viral and endosome membranes during virus entry. During virus biogenesis E1 associates as a heterodimer with the transmembrane protein p62. Late in the secretory pathway, cellular furin cleaves p62 to the mature E2 protein and a peripheral protein E3. E3 remains bound to E2 at low pH, stabilizing the heterodimer and thus protecting E1 from the acidic pH of the secretory pathway. Release of E3 at neutral pH then primes the virus for fusion during entry. Here we used site-directed mutagenesis and revertant analysis to define residues important for the interactions at the E3–E2 interface. Our data identified a key residue, E2 W235, which was required for E1 pH protection and alphavirus production. Our data also suggest additional residues on E3 and E2 that affect their interacting surfaces and thus influence the pH protection of E1 during alphavirus exit.

  11. Anion-π interactions involving [MX(n)](m-) anions: a comprehensive theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Estarellas, Carolina; Quiñonero, David; Deyà, Pere M; Frontera, Antonio

    2013-01-14

    In this manuscript we perform a systematic study on the geometric and energetic features of anion-π complexes, wherein the anion is a metal complex of variable shapes and charges. Such a study is lacking in the literature. For the calculations we used the ab initio RI-MP2/def2-TZVPP level of theory. A search in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) provides the experimental starting point that inspired the subsequent theoretical study. The influence of [MX(n)](m-) on the anion-π interaction was analyzed in terms of energetic, geometric, and charge transfer properties and Bader's theory of "atom-in-molecules" (AIM). The binding energy depends on the coordination index, geometric features and different orientations adopted by the metallic anion. The binding mode resembling a stacking interaction for linear, trigonal planar and square-planar anions is the most favorable. For tetrahedral and octahedral anions the most favorable orientation is the one with three halogen atoms pointing to the ring.

  12. Protein-protein interactions involved in the recognition of p27 by E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kui; Belunis, Charles; Chu, Wei; Weber, David; Podlaski, Frank; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Reed, Steven I; Vassilev, Lyubomir T

    2003-01-01

    The p27(Kip1) protein is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, the level of which is decreased in many common human cancers as a result of enhanced ubiquitin-dependent degradation. The multiprotein complex SCF(Skp2) has been identified as the ubiquitin ligase that targets p27, but the functional interactions within this complex are not well understood. One component, the F-box protein Skp2, binds p27 when the latter is phosphorylated on Thr(187), thus providing substrate specificity for the ligase. Recently, we and others have shown that the small cell cycle regulatory protein Cks1 plays a critical role in p27 ubiquitination by increasing the binding affinity of Skp2 for p27. Here we report the development of a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay that allows the quantification of the molecular interactions between human recombinant Skp2, Cks1 and a p27-derived peptide phosphorylated on Thr(187). Using this assay, we have determined the dissociation constant of the Skp2-Cks1 complex (K(d) 140 +/- 14 nM) and have shown that Skp2 binds phosphorylated p27 peptide with high affinity only in the presence of Cks1 (K(d) 37 +/- 2 nM). Cks1 does not bind directly to the p27 phosphopeptide or to Skp1, which confirms its suggested role as an allosteric effector of Skp2. PMID:12529174

  13. Interaction of galactoglucomannan oligosaccharides with auxin involves changes in flavonoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kučerová, Danica; Kollárová, Karin; Vatehová, Zuzana; Lišková, Desana

    2016-01-01

    Galactoglucomannan oligosaccharides (GGMOs) are signalling molecules originating from plant cell walls influencing plant growth and defence reactions. The present study focused on their interaction with exogenous IAA (indole-3-acetic acid). GGMOs acted as auxin antagonists and diminished the effect of IAA on Arabidopsis primary root growth. Their effect is associated with meristem enlargement and prolongation of the elongation zone. Reduction of the elongation zone was a consequence of the IAA action, but IAA did not affect the size of the meristem. In the absence of auxin, GGMOs stimulated root growth, meristem enlargement and elongation zone prolongation. It is assumed that the effect of GGMOs in the absence of exogenous auxin resulted from their interaction with the endogenous form. In the presence of auxin transport inhibitor GGMOs did not affect root growth. It is known that flavonoids are auxin transport modulators but this is the first study suggesting the role of flavonoids in GGMOs' signalling. The accumulation of flavonoids in the meristem and elongation zone decreased in GGMOs' treatments in comparison with the control. These oligosaccharides also diminished the effect of IAA on the flavonoids' elevation. The fact that GGMOs decreased the accumulation of flavonoids, known to be modulators of auxin transport, and the loss of GGMOs' activity in the presence of the auxin transport inhibitor indicates that the root growth stimulation caused by GGMOs could be related to changes in auxin transport, possibly mediated by flavonoids.

  14. Implication of antigenic conversion of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharides that involve interaction with surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Amano, Ken-ichi; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Kuroki, Yoshio; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2012-08-01

    We propose two antigenic types of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharides (LPS): highly antigenic epitope-carrying LPS (HA-LPS) and weakly antigenic epitope-carrying LPS (WA-LPS) based on human serum reactivity. Strains carrying WA-LPS are highly prevalent in isolates from gastric cancer patients. WA-LPS exhibits more potent biological activities compared to HA-LPS, namely, upregulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and induction of enhanced epithelial cell proliferation. The results of competitive binding assays using monosaccharides and methylglycosides, as well as binding assays using glycosidase-treated LPS, suggested that β-linked N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and β-linked D-galactose residues largely contributed to the highly antigenic epitope and the weakly antigenic epitope, respectively. WA-LPS exhibited greater binding activity to surfactant protein D (SP-D) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and this interaction was inhibited by methyl-β-D-galactoside. The biological activities of WA-LPS were markedly enhanced by the addition of SP-D. Lines of evidence suggested that removal of β-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residue, which comprises the highly antigenic epitope, results in exposure of the weakly antigenic epitope. The weakly antigenic epitope interacted preferentially with SP-D, and SP-D enhanced the biological activity of WA-LPS.

  15. The interaction between the adaptor protein APS and Enigma is involved in actin organisation.

    PubMed

    Barrès, Romain; Gonzalez, Teresa; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2005-08-15

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) is an adaptor protein phosphorylated by several tyrosine kinase receptors including the insulin receptor. To identify novel binding partners of APS, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening. We identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein that was previously shown to be associated with the actin cytoskeleton. In HEK 293 cells, Enigma interacted specifically with APS, but not with the APS-related protein SH2-B. This interaction required the NPTY motif of APS and the LIM domains of Enigma. In NIH-3T3 cells that express the insulin receptor, Enigma and APS were partially co-localised with F-actin in small ruffling structures. Insulin increased the complex formation between APS and Enigma and their co-localisation in large F-actin containing ruffles. While in NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells the co-expression of both Enigma and APS did not modify the actin cytoskeleton organisation, expression of Enigma alone led to the formation of F-actin clusters. Similar alteration in actin cytoskeleton organisation was observed in cells expressing both Enigma and APS with a mutation in the NPTY motif. These results identify Enigma as a novel APS-binding protein and suggest that the APS/Enigma complex plays a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organisation.

  16. Molecular Players Involved in the Interaction Between Beneficial Bacteria and the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Delgado, Susana; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is a very complex ecosystem, in which there is a continuous interaction between nutrients, host cells, and microorganisms. The gut microbiota comprises trillions of microbes that have been selected during evolution on the basis of their functionality and capacity to survive in, and adapt to, the intestinal environment. Host bacteria and our immune system constantly sense and react to one another. In this regard, commensal microbes contribute to gut homeostasis, whereas the necessary responses are triggered against enteropathogens. Some representatives of our gut microbiota have beneficial effects on human health. Some of the most important roles of these microbes are to help to maintain the integrity of the mucosal barrier, to provide nutrients such as vitamins, or to protect against pathogens. In addition, the interaction between commensal microbiota and the mucosal immune system is crucial for proper immune function. This process is mainly performed via the pattern recognition receptors of epithelial cells, such as Toll-like or Nod-like receptors, which are able to recognize the molecular effectors that are produced by intestinal microbes. These effectors mediate processes that can ameliorate certain inflammatory gut disorders, discriminate between beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, or increase the number of immune cells or their pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review intends to summarize the molecular players produced by probiotic bacteria, notably Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains, but also other very promising potential probiotics, which affect the human immune system. PMID:26635753

  17. Identification and characterization of a novel Fusobacterium nucleatum adhesin involved in physical interaction and biofilm formation with Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bruno P; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2017-02-07

    To successfully colonize the oral cavity, bacteria must directly or indirectly adhere to available oral surfaces. Fusobacterium nucleatum plays an important role in oral biofilm community development due to its broad adherence abilities, serving as a bridge between members of the oral biofilm that cannot directly bind to each other. In our efforts to characterize the molecular mechanisms utilized by F. nucleatum to physically bind to key members of the oral community, we investigated the involvement of F. nucleatum outer membrane proteins in its ability to bind to the pioneer biofilm colonizer, Streptococcus gordonii. Here, we present evidence that in addition to the previously characterized fusobacterial adhesin RadD, the interaction between F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 and S. gordonii V288 involves a second outer membrane protein, which we named coaggregation mediating protein A (CmpA). We also characterized the role of CmpA in dual-species biofilm formation with S. gordonii V288, evaluated growth-phase-dependent as well as biofilm expression profiles of radD and cmpA, and confirmed an important role for CmpA, especially under biofilm growth conditions. Our findings underscore the complex set of specific interactions involved in physical binding and thus community integration of interacting bacterial species. This complex set of interactions could have critical implications for the formation and maturation of the oral biofilms in vivo, and could provide clues to the mechanism behind the distribution of organisms inside the human oral cavity.

  18. Identification and characterisation of elongation factor Tu, a novel protein involved in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Caroline Maria; de Oliveira, Haroldo Cesar; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Assato, Patricia Akemi; Yamazaki, Daniella Sayuri; da Silva, Rosângela Aparecida Moraes; Santos, Cláudia Tavares; Santos-Filho, Norival Alves; Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa

    2016-11-01

    Paracoccidioides spp., which are temperature-dependent dimorphic fungi, are responsible for the most prevalent human systemic mycosis in Latin America, the paracoccidioidomycosis. The aim of this study was to characterise the involvement of elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis-host interaction. Adhesive properties were examined using recombinant PbEF-Tu proteins and the respective polyclonal anti-rPbEF-Tu antibody. Immunogold analysis demonstrated the surface location of EF-Tu in P. brasiliensis. Moreover, PbEF-Tu was found to bind to fibronectin and plasminogen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and it was determined that the binding to plasminogen is at least partly dependent on lysine residues and ionic interactions. To verify the participation of EF-Tu in the interaction of P. brasiliensis with pneumocytes, we blocked the respective protein with an anti-rPbEF-Tu antibody and evaluated the consequences on the interaction index by flow cytometry. During the interaction, we observed a decrease of 2- and 3-fold at 8 and 24 h, respectively, suggesting the contribution of EF-Tu in fungal adhesion/invasion.

  19. Chemical kinetics and interactions involved in horseradish peroxidase-mediated oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenjing; Harper, Willie F

    2012-03-10

    The primary objective of this research was to evaluate various factors that affect the reaction rate of oxidative coupling (OXC) reaction of phenolic estrogens catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Kinetic parameters were obtained for the conversion of phenol as well as natural and synthetic estrogens estrone (E(1)), 17β-estradiol (E(2)), estriol (E(3)), and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE(2)). Molecular orbital theory and Autodock software were employed to analyze chemical properties and substrate binding characteristics. Reactions were first order with respect to phenolic concentration and reaction rate constants (k(r)) were determined for phenol, E(3), E(1), E(2) and EE(2) (in increasing order). Oxidative coupling was controlled by enzyme-substrate interactions, not collision frequency. Docking simulations show that higher binding energy and a shorter binding distance both promote more favorable kinetics. This research is the first to show that the OXC of phenolics is an entropy-driven and enthalpy-retarded process.

  20. Structural analysis of pyridine-imino boronic esters involving secondary interactions on solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Portillo, Paola; Arenaza-Corona, Antonino; Hernández-Ahuactzi, Irán F.; Barba, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Twelve boronic esters (1a-1l) synthesized from 4-halo- substituted arylboronic acids (halo = F, Cl, Br, I and CF3) with 2-amino-2- alkyl (H, Me) -1,3-propanediol in presence of (3- or 4)-pyridine carboxaldehyde are described. A solvent mixture toluene/methanol 1:4 ratio was used. All compounds include both donor/acceptor functional groups, which are the necessary elements to self-assembly of the molecular species. Several secondary interactions as I⋯N, Br⋯Br, Br⋯B, F⋯B, Csbnd H⋯N, Csbnd H⋯O, Br⋯π and Csbnd H⋯π support the 1D and 2D polymeric frameworks in solid state. The coordination of the nitrogen atom from the pyridine moiety with the boron atom was not observed in either solution or solid state.

  1. Leukosialin (CD43)-major histocompatibility class I molecule interactions involved in spontaneous T cell conjugate formation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Resting T cells spontaneously adhere in a selective manner to potent accessory cells, such as dendritic cells (DC) and lymphoblastoid B blasts (LCL). Here we demonstrate that leukosialin (CD43) and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I) might play a critical role in this process. T cell conjugate formation with monocyte- derived DC (md-DC) and LCL could be strongly inhibited by either preincubating T cells with Fab fragments of CD43 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 6F5 or by preincubating md-DC or LCL with MHC-I mAb W6/32. Intact CD43 mAb 6F5, in contrast to monovalent Fab fragments, enhanced T cell adhesiveness by transactivating CD2 binding to CD58 molecules. Interestingly, induction of this proadhesive signal via CD43 with intact 6F5 mAb was found to revert mAb W6/32-mediated inhibition of T cell conjugate formation. These observations indicated that CD43 cross- linkage mimics and monovalent mAb 6F5 inhibits interaction of T cell CD43 with a stimulatory ligand on opposing cells, presumably MHC-I. For the demonstration of direct physical interaction between CD43 on T cells and MHC-I-coated beads it was necessary, however, to ligate CD2 on T cells with a stimulatory pair of CD2 mAbs (VIT13 plus TS2/18). This suggests that CD2 ligation crosswise upregulates CD43 binding avidity for MHC-I and that both adhesion molecule pairs (CD43/MHC-I and CD2/CD58) act in concert to induce and mediate T cell conjugate formation with certain cell types. PMID:8920865

  2. Modulation of pineal melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Villela, Darine; Atherino, Victoria Fairbanks; Lima, Larissa de Sá; Moutinho, Anderson Augusto; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; Peres, Rafael; Martins de Lima, Thais; Torrão, Andréa da Silva; Cipolla-Neto, José; Scavone, Cristóforo; Afeche, Solange Castro

    2013-01-01

    The glutamatergic modulation of melatonin synthesis is well known, along with the importance of astrocytes in mediating glutamatergic signaling in the central nervous system. Pinealocytes and astrocytes are the main cell types in the pineal gland. The objective of this work was to investigate the interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes as a part of the glutamate inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis. Rat pinealocytes isolated or in coculture with astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence of norepinephrine, and the melatonin content, was quantified. The expression of glutamate receptors, the intracellular calcium content and the NF- κ B activation were analyzed in astrocytes and pinealocytes. TNF- α 's possible mediation of the effect of glutamate was also investigated. The results showed that glutamate's inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis involves interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes, possibly through the release of TNF- α . Moreover, the activation of the astrocytic NF- κ B seems to be a necessary step. In astrocytes and pinealocytes, AMPA, NMDA, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were observed, as well as the intracellular calcium elevation. In conclusion, there is evidence that the modulation of melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through the activation of the astrocytic NF- κ B transcription factor and possibly by subsequent TNF- α release.

  3. Involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in the secretion of danofloxacin into milk: interaction with ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Real, R; Egido, E; Pérez, M; González-Lobato, L; Barrera, B; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I; Merino, G

    2011-08-01

    Danofloxacin, a veterinary fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug, is actively secreted into milk by an as yet unknown mechanism. One of the main determinants of active drug secretion into milk is the transporter (BCRP/ABCG2). The main purpose was to determine whether danofloxacin is an in vitro substrate for Bcrp1/BCRP and to assess its involvement in danofloxacin secretion into milk. In addition, the role of potential drug-drug interactions in this process was assessed using ivermectin. Danofloxacin was transported in vitro by Bcrp1/BCRP, and ivermectin efficiently blocked this transport. Experiments with Bcrp1(-/-) mice showed no evidence of the involvement of Bcrp1 in plasma pharmacokinetics of danofloxacin. However, the milk concentration and milk-to-plasma ratio of danofloxacin were almost twofold higher in wild-type compared with Bcrp1(-/-) mice. The in vivo interaction with ivermectin was studied in sheep after co-administration of danofloxacin (1.25 mg/kg, i.m.) and ivermectin (0.2 mg/kg, s.c.). Ivermectin had no significant effect on the plasma levels of danofloxacin but significantly decreased danofloxacin concentrations in milk by almost 40%. Concomitant administration of multiple drugs, often used in veterinary therapy, may not only affect their pharmacological activity but also their secretion into milk, because of potential drug-drug interactions mediated by BCRP.

  4. Macrofaunal involvement in the sublittoral decay of kelp debris: the detritivore community and species interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, A. P.; Moore, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The fauna associated with sea-bed accumulations of decomposing Laminaria saccharina has been studied by year-round SCUBA diving at two sites in the Clyde Sea area. Seasonal changes in density of 64 species are reported. In the autumn, large quantities of kelp are detached by storms. This weed carries with it to the sea bed a large part of its normal fauna. Additional species settle onto the weed from the plankton whilst others migrate onto it from the surrounding sea bed. Peak densities of associated species were recorded in autumn. Litter bag experiments in situ showed that, except during the summer, weed is lost from sea-bed accumulations at a faster rate when macrofaunal animals are excluded. The macrofauna therefore inhibits decomposition. The relative importance of interactive cropping by three macrodetritivores, Psammechinus miliaris (Echinodermata), Platynereis dumerilii (Polychaeta) and Gammarus locusta (Amphipoda) was studied by in situ containment of different species combinations. The presence of Gammarus with Psammechinus resulted in less weed being lost than when Psammechinus was isolated. This is because Gammarus selectively crops rotting weed, retarding frond disintegration by microbes. Platynereis retards microbial colonization of frond tissues ruptured during its feeding by repeated cropping of the same region. Weed would decompose very rapidly were it not for macrofaunal cropping. Macroalgal decay thus differs profoundly from that of vascular plants.

  5. A neuron-glia interaction involving GABA Transaminase contributes to sleep loss in sleepless mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Feng; Maguire, Sarah; Sowcik, Mallory; Luo, Wenyu; Koh, Kyunghee; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is an essential process and yet mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Loss of the Drosophila quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene increases neuronal excitability and diminishes daily sleep, providing an excellent model for exploring the underpinnings of sleep regulation. Here, we used a proteomic approach to identify proteins altered in sss brains. We report that loss of sleepless post-transcriptionally elevates the CG7433 protein, a mitochondrial γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABAT), and reduces GABA in fly brains. Loss of GABAT increases daily sleep and improves sleep consolidation, indicating that GABAT promotes wakefulness. Importantly, disruption of the GABAT gene completely suppresses the sleep phenotype of sss mutants, demonstrating that GABAT is required for loss of sleep in sss mutants. While SSS acts in distinct populations of neurons, GABAT acts in glia to reduce sleep in sss flies. Our results identify a novel mechanism of interaction between neurons and glia that is important for the regulation of sleep. PMID:24637426

  6. Self protein-protein interactions are involved in TPPP/p25 mediated microtubule bundling

    PubMed Central

    DeBonis, Salvatore; Neumann, Emmanuelle; Skoufias, Dimitrios A.

    2015-01-01

    TPPP/p25 is a microtubule-associated protein, detected in protein inclusions associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Deletion analysis data show that TPPP/p25 has two microtubule binding sites, both located in intrinsically disordered domains, one at the N-terminal and the other in the C-terminal domain. In copolymerization assays the full-length protein exhibits microtubule stimulation and bundling activity. In contrast, at the same ratio relative to tubulin, truncated forms of TPPP/p25 exhibit either lower or no microtubule stimulation and no bundling activity, suggesting a cooperative phenomenon which is enhanced by the presence of the two binding sites. The binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminally truncated proteins to taxol-stabilized microtubules are similar to the full-length protein. However, the C-terminally truncated TPPP/p25 shows a lower Bmax for microtubule binding, suggesting that it may bind to a site of tubulin that is masked in microtubules. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation assays in cells expressing combinations of various TPPP/p25 fragments, but not that of the central folded domain, resulted in the generation of a fluorescence signal colocalized with perinuclear microtubule bundles insensitive to microtubule inhibitors. The data suggest that the central folded domain of TPPP/p25 following binding to microtubules can drive s homotypic protein-protein interactions leading to bundled microtubules. PMID:26289831

  7. The dual role of autophagy under hypoxia-involvement of interaction between autophagy and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Tan, Jin; Miao, Yuyang; Lei, Ping; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Hypoxia is one of severe cellular stress and it is well known to be associated with a worse outcome since a lack of oxygen accelerates the induction of apoptosis. Autophagy, an important and evolutionarily conserved mechanism for maintaining cellular homeostasis, is closely related to the apoptosis caused by hypoxia. Generally autophagy blocks the induction of apoptosis and inhibits the activation of apoptosis-associated caspase which could reduce cellular injury. However, in special cases, autophagy or autophagy-relevant proteins may help to induce apoptosis, which could aggravate cell damage under hypoxia condition. In addition, the activation of apoptosis-related proteins-caspase can also degrade autophagy-related proteins, such as Atg3, Atg4, Beclin1 protein, inhibiting autophagy. Although the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis has been known for rather complex for more than a decade, the underlying regulatory mechanisms have not been clearly understood. This short review discusses and summarizes the dual role of autophagy and the interaction and molecular regulatory mechanisms between autophagy and apoptosis under hypoxia.

  8. Animal Models to Study Host-Bacteria Interactions Involved in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Dana T.; Kang, Jun; Andriankaja, Oelisoa; Wada, Keisuke; Rossa, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have distinct advantages because they can mimic cellular complexities that occur in humans in vivo and are often more accurate than in vitro studies that take place on plastic surfaces with limited numbers of cell types present. Furthermore, cause and effect relationships can be established by applying inhibitors or activators or through the use of genetically modified animals. Such gain or loss of function studies are often difficult to achieve in human clinical studies, particularly in obtaining target tissue due to important ethical considerations. Animal models in periodontal disease are particularly important at this point in the development of the scientific basis for understanding the predominant pathological processes. Periodontal disease can be broken down into discrete steps, each of which may be studied separately depending upon the animal model. These steps involve the development of a pathogenic biofilm, invasion of connective tissue by bacteria or their products, induction of a destructive host response in connective tissue and limitation of a repair process that follows tissue breakdown. Animal studies can test hypotheses related to each of these steps, and should be evaluated by their capacity to test a specific hypothesis rather than recapitulating all aspects of periodontal disease. Thus, each of the models described below can be adapted to test discrete components of the pathological process of periodontal disease, but not necessarily all of them. PMID:22142960

  9. The mechanism of sperm-egg interaction and the involvement of IZUMO1 in fusion.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naokazu; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    An average human ejaculate contains over 100 million sperm, but only a few succeed in accomplishing the journey to an egg by migration through the female reproductive tract. Among these few sperm, only one participates in fertilization. There might be an ingenious molecular mechanism to ensure that the very best sperm fertilize an egg. However, recent gene disruption experiments in mice have revealed that many factors previously described as important for fertilization are largely dispensable. One could argue that the fertilization mechanism is made robust against gene disruptions. However, this is not likely, as there are already six different gene-disrupted mouse lines (Calmegin, Adam1a, Adam2, Adam3, Ace and Pgap1), all of which result in male sterility. The sperm from these animals are known to have defective zona-binding ability and at the same time lose oviduct-migrating ability. Concerning sperm-zona binding, the widely accepted involvement of sugar moiety on zona pellucida 3 (ZP3) is indicated to be dispensable by gene disruption experiments. Thus, the landscape of the mechanism of fertilization is revolving considerably. In the sperm-egg fusion process, CD9 on egg and IZUMO1 on sperm have emerged as essential factors. This review focuses on the mechanism of fertilization elucidated by gene-manipulated animals.

  10. Ground- and surface-water interactions involving an abandoned underground coal mine in Pike County, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, D.; Olyphant, G.A.; Sjogren, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    Several highwall pits of an abandoned surface mine in the Springfield Coal Member (Pennsylvanian) are currently occupied by ponds with a total area of approximately 2.3 x 10{sup 4} m{sup 2}. These ponds are adjacent to an abandoned underground mine (Patoka Valley Coal and Coke Company No. 1 Mine) in the same coalbed. The mine underlies about 0.3 km{sup 2} and contains approximately 4 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} of flooded voids. Monitoring of water levels in wells that are screened in the mine and of the levels of adjacent ponds reveal that average hourly levels vary in unison across a range of less than one meter. The mean potentiometric level of the mine-aquifer, the neighboring ponds, and an artesian spring that issues through the outcrop of the coalbed, are at elevations of about 163 m above sea level. Long-term monitoring and a field experiment that involved pumping of a pond indicated that the mine was connected to two of the ponds and served to recharge, rather than discharge, the ponds. The monitoring and field experiment also allowed determination of the mine aquifers barometric efficiency (0.3) and its storativity (2 x 10{sup -3}) . A water-balance calculation indicates that the average recharge rate of the mine is about 0.1 mm/day.

  11. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning

    PubMed Central

    Fais, A.; Johnson, M.; Wilson, M.; Aguilar Soto, N.; Madsen, P. T.

    2016-01-01

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1–2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes. PMID:27340122

  12. Accurate description of intermolecular interactions involving ions using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Lao, Ka Un; Schäffer, Rainer; Jansen, Georg; Herbert, John M

    2015-06-09

    Three new data sets for intermolecular interactions, AHB21 for anion-neutral dimers, CHB6 for cation-neutral dimers, and IL16 for ion pairs, are assembled here, with complete-basis CCSD(T) results for each. These benchmarks are then used to evaluate the accuracy of the single-exchange approximation that is used for exchange energies in symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT), and the accuracy of SAPT based on wave function and density-functional descriptions of the monomers is evaluated. High-level SAPT calculations afford poor results for these data sets, and this includes the recently proposed "gold", "silver", and "bronze standards" of SAPT, namely, SAPT2+(3)-δMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ, SAPT2+/aug-cc-pVDZ, and sSAPT0/jun-cc-pVDZ, respectively [ Parker , T. M. , et al. , J. Chem. Phys. 2014 , 140 , 094106 ]. Especially poor results are obtained for symmetric shared-proton systems of the form X(-)···H(+)···X(-), for X = F, Cl, or OH. For the anionic data set, the SAPT2+(CCD)-δMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ method exhibits the best performance, with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.3 kcal/mol and a maximum error of 0.7 kcal/mol. For the cationic data set, the highest-level SAPT method, SAPT2+3-δMP2/aug-cc-pVQZ, outperforms the rest of the SAPT methods, with a MAE of 0.2 kcal/mol and a maximum error of 0.4 kcal/mol. For the ion-pair data set, the SAPT2+3-δMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ performs the best among all SAPT methods with a MAE of 0.3 kcal/mol and a maximum error of 0.9 kcal/mol. Overall, SAPT2+3-δMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ affords a small and balanced MAE (<0.5 kcal/mol) for all three data sets, with an overall MAE of 0.4 kcal/mol. Despite the breakdown of perturbation theory for ionic systems at short-range, SAPT can still be saved given two corrections: a "δHF" correction, which requires a supermolecular Hartree-Fock calculation to incorporate polarization effects beyond second order, and a "δMP2" correction, which requires a supermolecular MP2 calculation to account for higher

  13. Human anterior thalamic nuclei are involved in emotion-attention interaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lihua; Peräkylä, Jari; Polvivaara, Markus; Öhman, Juha; Peltola, Jukka; Lehtimäki, Kai; Huhtala, Heini; Hartikainen, Kaisa M

    2015-11-01

    Patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) provide an opportunity to study affective processes in humans with "lesion on demand" at key nodes in the limbic circuitries, such as at the anterior thalamic nuclei (ANT). ANT has been suggested to play a role in emotional control with its connection to the orbitofrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex. However, direct evidence for its role in emotional function in human subjects is lacking. Reported side effects of ANT-DBS in the treatment of refractory epilepsy include depression related symptoms. In line with these mood-related clinical side effects, we have previously reported that stimulating the anterior thalamus increased emotional interference in a visual attention task as indicated by prolonged reaction times due to threat-related emotional distractors. We used event-related potentials to investigate potential attentional mechanism behind this behavioural observation. We hypothesized that ANT-DBS leads to greater attention capture by threat-related distractors. We tested this hypothesis using centro-parietal N2-P3 peak-to-peak amplitude as a measure of allocated attentional resources. Six epileptic patients treated with deep brain stimulation at ANT participated in the study. Electroencephalography was recorded while the patients performed a computer based Executive-Reaction Time test with threat-related emotional distractors. During the task, either ANT or a thalamic control location was stimulated, or the stimulation was turned off. Stimulation of ANT was associated with increased centro-parietal N2-P3 amplitude and increased reaction time in the context of threat-related emotional distractors. We conclude that high frequency electric stimulation of ANT leads to greater attentional capture by emotional stimuli. This is the first study to provide direct evidence from human subjects with on-line electric manipulation of ANT for its role in emotion-attention interaction.

  14. Blood group antigen expression is involved in C. albicans interaction with buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Everest-Dass, Arun V; Kolarich, Daniel; Pascovici, Dana; Packer, Nicolle H

    2017-02-01

    Human blood group polymorphisms are known to be determined by the expression of A, B or H antigens and the Lewis antigens. Protection against microbial infections has been associated with inheritance of polymorphisms in genes encoding and regulating the expression of ABH and Lewis antigens in bodily secretions and epithelial tissue surfaces, subsequently resulting in the presentation of different glycosylated terminal antigens on the cell surface. We investigated the role of blood group antigens in diversifying the glycosylation of buccal epithelial cells (BEC) that line the oral cavity. Specifically, we characterized and statistically evaluated the expression of histo-blood group (A, B, O) antigens on N-and O-linked glycans from BEC membrane proteins of various individuals that represented different blood group type and secretor status using a porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PGC-LC-ESI-MS) based glycomics approach. From these BEC membrane proteins a total of 77 N-glycan and 96 O-glycan structures were structurally characterized from 19 individuals and relatively quantitated. The N-glycans from the secretor individuals did not express any A/B blood group determinants, but contained several terminal H-antigens. Apart from the non-secretors, the N-glycan profiles of BEC from all blood groups displayed similar glycan types, while varying in their relative intensities between individuals. However, multivariate analysis of the O-glycans from individuals displayed segregation patterns clearly associated with their blood group type and secretor status. In adhesion assays the oral pathogen Candida albicans showed a significantly higher interaction to blood group O type BECs relative to other blood groups.

  15. Family history of alcoholism interacts with alcohol to affect brain regions involved in behavioral inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kareken, David A.; Dzemidzic, Mario; Wetherill, Leah; Eiler, William; Oberlin, Brandon G.; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Wang, Yang; O’Connor, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Impulsive behavior is associated with both alcohol use disorders and a family history of alcoholism (FHA). One operational definition of impulsive behavior is the stop signal task (SST), which measures the time needed to stop a ballistic hand movement. Objective Employ functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study right frontal responses to stop signals in heavy drinking subjects with and without FHA, and as a function of alcohol exposure. Methods Twenty two family history positive (FHP; age = 22.7 years, SD= 1.9) and 18 family history negative (FHN; age = 23.7, SD= 1.8) subjects performed the SST in fMRI in two randomized visits: once during intravenous infusion of alcohol, clamped at a steady-state breath alcohol (BrAC) concentration of 60mg%, and once during infusion of placebo saline. An independent reference group (n= 13, age= 23.7, SD= 1.8) was used to identify a priori right prefrontal regions activated by successful inhibition (Inh) trials, relative to ‘Go’ trials that carried no need for inhibition (Inh > Go). Results FHA interacted with alcohol exposure in right prefrontal cortex, where alcohol reduced [Inh > Go] activation in FHN subjects, but not in FHP subjects. Within this right frontal cortical region, stop signal reaction time (SSRT) also correlated negatively with [Inh > Go] activation, suggesting that the [Inh > Go] activity was related to inhibitory behavior. Conclusions The results are consistent with the low level of response theory (Schuckit, 1980; Quinn & Fromme, 2011), with FHP being less sensitive to alcohol’s effects. PMID:23468100

  16. Involvement of NIPSNAP1, a neuropeptide nocistatin-interacting protein, in inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kazuya; Ohashi, Masaki; Ohno, Kana; Takeuchi, Arisa; Matsuoka, Etsuko; Fujisato, Kyohei; Minami, Toshiaki; Ito, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain associated with inflammation is an important clinical problem, and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. 4-Nitrophenylphosphatase domain and nonneuronal SNAP25-like protein homolog (NIPSNAP) 1, an interacting protein with neuropeptide nocistatin, is implicated in the inhibition of tactile pain allodynia. Although nocistatin inhibits some inflammatory pain responses, whether NIPSNAP1 affects inflammatory pain appears to be unclear. Here, we examined the nociceptive behavioral response of NIPSNAP1-deficient mice and the expression of NIPSNAP1 following peripheral inflammation to determine the contribution of NIPSNAP1 to inflammatory pain. Results Nociceptive behavioral response increased in phase II of the formalin test, particularly during the later stage (26–50 min) in NIPSNAP1-deficient mice, although the response during phase I (0–15 min) was not significantly different between the deficient and wild-type mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase was enhanced in the spinal dorsal horn of the deficient mice. The prolonged inflammatory pain induced by carrageenan and complete Freund’s adjuvant was exacerbated in NIPSNAP1-deficient mice. NIPSNAP1 mRNA was expressed in small- and medium-sized neurons of the dorsal root ganglion and motor neurons of the spinal cord. In the formalin test, NIPSNAP1 mRNA was slightly increased in dorsal root ganglion but not in the spinal cord. In contrast, NIPSNAP1 mRNA levels in dorsal root ganglion were significantly decreased during 24–48 h after carrageenan injection. Prostaglandin E2, a major mediator of inflammation, stimulated NIPSNAP1 mRNA expression via the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway in isolated dorsal root ganglion cells. Conclusions These results suggest that changes in NIPSNAP1 expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory pain. PMID:27030720

  17. Schwann cell-neuronal interactions in the rat involve nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Urschel, B A; Hulsebosch, C E

    1990-06-01

    To gain some insight into possible functions of nerve growth factor (NGF), we suppressed the endogenous levels of NGF in newborn rats by subcutaneous injections (3 microliters/g body weight) of rabbit antibodies to purified mouse beta-NGF (ANTI-NGF). Fiber and axonal areas and perimeters were measured for unmyelinated and myelinated sensory fibers in T9 dorsal roots (DR) in three groups of animals: 1) ANTI-NGF treated littermates, 2) preimmune sera treated littermates (PREIMM), and 3) untreated littermates (UNTR). In some rats, fibers in ventral roots (VR) were measured and, in other rats, sensory processes in peripheral nerves (PN) were measured following radical ventral rhizotomy. The only outer area and perimeter measurements that were statistically different were those in the ventral root (P less than 0.013 and P less than 0.043, respectively). However, myelin thickness was significantly thinner in the dorsal roots of the ANTI-NGF group than in the dorsal roots of the UNTR and PREIMM groups (P less than 0.000009 and P less than 10(-6), respectively). Myelin thickness in the ventral roots of the ANTI-NGF group was also statistically thinner than that in the UNTR group (P less than 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences when comparing the UNTR group to the PREIMM group. In the peripheral nerves studied, there was no significant change in the myelin thickness between the ANTI-NGF and UNTR groups of animals. These results indicate that Schwann cell-neuronal interactions are altered by the inactivation of NGF, and that 1) the central processes of sensory fibers are affected and not the peripheral processes and 2) motor fiber myelination is altered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. SpiE interacts with Corynebacterium glutamicum WhcE and is involved in heat and oxidative stress responses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Chul; Park, Joon-Song; Kim, Younhee; Kim, Pil; Kim, Eung Soo; Lee, Heung-Shick

    2016-05-01

    The gene whcE in Corynebacterium glutamicum positively responds to oxidative and heat stress. To search for proteins that interact with WhcE, we employed a two-hybrid system with WhcE as the bait. Sequencing analysis of the isolated clones revealed peptide sequences, one of which showed high sequence identity to a hydrophobe/amphiphile efflux-1 family transporter encoded by NCgl1497. The interaction of the NCgl1497-encoded protein with WhcE in vivo was verified using reporter gene expression by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The WhcE protein strongly interacted with the NCgl1497-encoded protein in the presence of oxidative and heat stress. Furthermore, purified WhcE and NCgl1497-encoded proteins interacted in vitro, especially in the presence of the oxidant diamide, and the protein-protein interaction was disrupted in the presence of the reductant dithiothreitol. In addition, the transcription of NCgl1497 was activated approximately twofold in diamide- or heat-treated cells. To elucidate the function of the NCgl497 gene, an NCgl1497-deleted mutant strain was constructed. The mutant showed decreased viability in the presence of diamide and heat stress. The mutant strain also exhibited reduced transcription of the thioredoxin reductase gene, which is known to be regulated by whcE. Based on the results, NCgl1497 was named spiE (stress protein interacting with WhcE). Collectively, our data suggest that spiE is involved in the whcE-mediated oxidative stress response pathway of C. glutamicum.

  19. Coordination polymers of Ag(I) based on iminocarbene ligands involving metal-carbon and metal-heteroatom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netalkar, Sandeep P.; Netalkar, Priya P.; Revankar, Vidyanand K.

    2016-03-01

    The reaction of Ag2O with three novel imino-NHC ligands derived from 2-chloroacetophenone with pendant N-donor functional group incorporated by reaction with methoxyamine and 1-methyl/ethyl/n-butyl-substituted imidazoles afforded one-dimensional coordination polymers with [(-NHCarbene)Ag(NHCarbene-)PF6]n formulation involving both carbon-metal and heteroatom-metal interactions, the carbon and heteroatom involved in coordination to silver being from different molecule of the ligand. The complexes as well as the ligands were characterized by spectroscopic methods as well as the solid state structures determined in case of 2a, 3a and complex 5. The iminocarbene ligands serve as non-chelating building block for supramolecular silver assemblies.

  20. Involvement of sulfates from cruzipain, a major antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi, in the interaction with immunomodulatory molecule Siglec-E.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Maximiliano R; Heins, Anja M; Soprano, Luciana L; Acosta, Diana M; Esteva, Mónica I; Jacobs, Thomas; Duschak, Vilma G

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the involvement of sulfated groups in the Trypanosoma cruzi host-parasite relationship, we studied the interaction between the major cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi, cruzipain (Cz), a sulfate-containing sialylated molecule and the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin like lectin-E (Siglec-E). To this aim, ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence assays and flow cytometry, using mouse Siglec-E-Fc fusion molecules and glycoproteins of parasites, were performed. Competition assays verified that the lectins, Maackia amurensis II (Mal II) and Siglec-E-Fc, compete for the same binding sites. Taking into account that Mal II binding remains unaltered by sulfation, we established this lectin as sialylation degree control. Proteins of an enriched microsomal fraction showed the highest binding to Siglec-E as compared with those from the other parasite subcellular fractions. ELISA assays and the affinity purification of Cz by a Siglec-E column confirmed the interaction between both molecules. The significant decrease in binding of Siglec-E-Fc to Cz and to its C-terminal domain (C-T) after desulfation of these molecules suggests that sulfates contribute to the interaction between Siglec-E-Fc and these glycoproteins. Competitive ELISA assays confirmed the involvement of sulfated epitopes in the affinity between Siglec-E and Cz, probably modified by natural protein environment. Interestingly, data from flow cytometry of untreated and chlorate-treated parasites suggested that sulfates are not primary receptors, but enhance the binding of Siglec-E to trypomastigotic forms. Altogether, our findings support the notion that sulfate-containing sialylated glycoproteins interact with Siglec-E, an ortholog protein of human Siglec-9, and might modulate the immune response of the host, favoring parasitemia and persistence of the parasite.

  1. GABAA and glutamate receptor involvement in dendrodendritic synaptic interactions from salamander olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Wellis, D P; Kauer, J S

    1993-09-01

    lateral inhibition. 6. CNQX and AP5 attenuated the optical signals within the bulb supporting the contention that in these conditions, optical signals arise mainly from granule cell dendritic activity. Furthermore, AP5 or removal of bath Mg2+ reduced or enlarged the spatial distribution of activity respectively, suggesting that in some cases the NMDA receptor may be involved in generating or stabilizing spatial patterns of activity. 7. It is concluded that in the salamander olfactory bulb, both GABAA- and glutamate receptor-mediated synaptic transmission shape the different temporal and spatial patterns of neural activity associated with olfactory coding.

  2. Molecular Basis of Gene-Gene Interaction: Cyclic Cross-Regulation of Gene Expression and Post-GWAS Gene-Gene Interaction Involved in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yufeng; Wang, Chuchu; Yao, Yufeng; Zuo, Xiaoyu; Chen, Shanshan; Xu, Chengqi; Zhang, Hongfu; Lu, Qiulun; Chang, Le; Wang, Fan; Wang, Pengxia; Zhang, Rongfeng; Hu, Zhenkun; Song, Qixue; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Cong; Li, Sisi; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yang, Qin; Yin, Dan; Wang, Xiaojing; Si, Wenxia; Li, Xiuchun; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Dan; Huang, Yuan; Luo, Chunyan; Li, Jia; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Wang, Longfei; Wang, Li; Han, Meng; Ye, Jian; Chen, Feifei; Liu, Jingqiu; Liu, Ying; Wu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yuhua; Wu, Yanxia; Ke, Tie; Chen, Qiuyun; Tu, Xin; Elston, Robert; Rao, Shaoqi; Yang, Yanzong; Xia, Yunlong; Wang, Qing K

    2015-08-01

    -gene interactions involved in genetics of complex disease traits.

  3. Analysis of the RelA:CBP/p300 Interaction Reveals Its Involvement in NF-κB-Driven Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sulakshana P.; Behar, Marcelo; Birnbaum, Harry A.; Hoffmann, Alexander; Wright, Peter E.; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB plays a vital role in cellular immune and inflammatory response, survival, and proliferation by regulating the transcription of various genes involved in these processes. To activate transcription, RelA (a prominent NF-κB family member) interacts with transcriptional co-activators like CREB-binding protein (CBP) and its paralog p300 in addition to its cognate κB sites on the promoter/enhancer regions of DNA. The RelA:CBP/p300 complex is comprised of two components—first, DNA binding domain of RelA interacts with the KIX domain of CBP/p300, and second, the transcriptional activation domain (TAD) of RelA binds to the TAZ1 domain of CBP/p300. A phosphorylation event of a well-conserved RelA(Ser276) is prerequisite for the former interaction to occur and is considered a decisive factor for the overall RelA:CBP/p300 interaction. The role of the latter interaction in the transcription of RelA-activated genes remains unclear. Here we provide the solution structure of the latter component of the RelA:CBP complex by NMR spectroscopy. The structure reveals the folding of RelA–TA2 (a section of TAD) upon binding to TAZ1 through its well-conserved hydrophobic sites in a series of grooves on the TAZ1 surface. The structural analysis coupled with the mechanistic studies by mutational and isothermal calorimetric analyses allowed the design of RelA-mutants that selectively abrogated the two distinct components of the RelA:CBP/p300 interaction. Detailed studies of these RelA mutants using cell-based techniques, mathematical modeling, and genome-wide gene expression analysis showed that a major set of the RelA-activated genes, larger than previously believed, is affected by this interaction. We further show how the RelA:CBP/p300 interaction controls the nuclear response of NF-κB through the negative feedback loop of NF-κB pathway. Additionally, chromatin analyses of RelA target gene promoters showed constitutive recruitment of CBP/p300, thus indicating a possible role

  4. Heat Stress Response in Pea Involves Interaction of Mitochondrial Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase with a Novel 86-Kilodalton Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Escobar Galvis, Martha L.; Marttila, Salla; Håkansson, Gunilla; Forsberg, Jens; Knorpp, Carina

    2001-01-01

    In this work we have further characterized the first mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase (mtNDPK) isolated from plants. The mitochondrial isoform was found to be especially abundant in reproductive and young tissues. Expression of the pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Oregon sugarpod) mtNDPK was not affected by different stress conditions. However, the pea mtNDPK was found to interact with a novel 86-kD protein, which is de novo synthesized in pea leaves upon exposure to heat. Thus, we have evidence for the involvement of mtNDPK in mitochondrial heat response in pea in vivo. Studies on oligomerization revealed that mtNDPK was found in complexes of various sizes, corresponding to the sizes of e.g. hexamers, tetramers, and dimers, indicating flexibility in oligomerization. This flexibility, also found for other NDPK isoforms, has been correlated with the ability of this enzyme to interact with other proteins. We believe that the mtNDPK is involved in heat stress response in pea, possibly as a modulator of the 86-kD protein. PMID:11351071

  5. Protein-protein interactions involving voltage-gated sodium channels: Post-translational regulation, intracellular trafficking and functional expression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongmin; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2009-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), classically known to play a central role in excitability and signalling in nerves and muscles, have also been found to be expressed in a range of 'non-excitable' cells, including lymphocytes, fibroblasts and endothelia. VGSC abnormalities are associated with various diseases including epilepsy, long-QT syndrome 3, Brugada syndrome, sudden infant death syndrome and, more recently, various human cancers. Given their pivotal role in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, regulation of functional VGSC expression has been the subject of intense study. An emerging theme is post-translational regulation and macro-molecular complexing by protein-protein interactions and intracellular trafficking, leading to changes in functional VGSC expression in plasma membrane. This partially involves endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several proteins have been shown to associate with VGSCs. Here, we review the interactions involving VGSCs and the following proteins: p11, ankyrin, syntrophin, beta-subunit of VGSC, papin, ERM and Nedd4 proteins. Protein kinases A and C, as well as Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase II that have also been shown to regulate intracellular trafficking of VGSCs by changing the balance of externalization vs. internalization, and an effort is made to separate these effects from the short-term phosphorylation of mature proteins in plasma membrane. Two further modulatory mechanisms are reciprocal interactions with the cytoskeleton and, late-stage, activity-dependent regulation. Thus, the review gives an updated account of the range of post-translational molecular mechanisms regulating functional VGSC expression. However, many details of VGSC subtype-specific regulation and pathophysiological aspects remain unknown and these are highlighted throughout for completeness.

  6. Monocyte Migration Driven by Galectin-3 Occurs through Distinct Mechanisms Involving Selective Interactions with the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Alves Toledo, Karina; Franco, Luís Henrique; Sammartino Mariano, Vânia; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Soares Bernardes, Emerson; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte migration into tissues, an important event in inflammation, requires an intricate interplay between determinants on cell surfaces and extracellular matrix (ECM). Galectin-3 is able to modulate cell-ECM interactions and is an important mediator of inflammation. In this study, we sought to investigate whether interactions established between galectin-3 and ECM glycoproteins are involved in monocyte migration, given that the mechanisms by which monocytes move across the endothelium and through the extravascular tissue are poorly understood. Using the in vitro transwell system, we demonstrated that monocyte migration was potentiated in the presence of galectin-3 plus laminin or fibronectin, but not vitronectin, and was dependent on the carbohydrate recognition domain of the lectin. Only galectin-3-fibronectin combinations potentiated the migration of monocyte-derived macrophages. In binding assays, galectin-3 did not bind to fibronectin, whereas both the full-length and the truncated forms of the lectin, which retains carbohydrate binding ability, were able to bind to laminin. Our results show that monocytes migrate through distinct mechanisms and selective interactions with the extracellular matrix driven by galectin-3. We suggest that the lectin may bridge monocytes to laminin and may also activate these cells, resulting in the positive regulation of other adhesion molecules and cell adhesion to fibronectin. PMID:24049657

  7. Interaction between RNA helicase ROOT INITIATION DEFECTIVE 1 and GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 1 is involved in female gametophyte development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dong Zi; Zhao, Xue Fang; Liu, Chang Zhen; Ma, Fang Fang; Wang, Fang; Gao, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-01-01

    ROOT INITIATION DEFECTIVE 1 (RID1) is an Arabidopsis DEAH/RHA RNA helicase. It functions in hypocotyl de-differentiation, de novo meristem formation, and cell specification of the mature female gametophyte (FG). However, it is unclear how RID1 regulates FG development. In this study, we observed that mutations to RID1 disrupted the developmental synchrony and retarded the progression of FG development. RID1 exhibited RNA helicase activity, with a preference for unwinding double-stranded RNA in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Furthermore, we found that RID1 interacts with GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 1 (GFA1), which is an integral protein of the spliceosome component U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particle. Substitution of specific RID1 amino acids (Y266F and T267I) inhibited the interaction with GFA1. In addition, the mutated RID1 could not complement the seed-abortion phenotype of the rid1 mutant. The rid1 and gfa1 mutants exhibited similar abnormalities in pre-mRNA splicing and down-regulated expression of some genes involved in FG development. Our results suggest that an interaction between RID1 and the U5 snRNP complex regulates essential pre-mRNA splicing of the genes required for FG development. This study provides new information regarding the mechanism underlying the FG developmental process. PMID:27683728

  8. Evaluating the roles of autophagy and lysosomal trafficking defects in intracellular distribution-based drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Logan, Randall; Kong, Alex; Krise, Jeffrey P

    2013-11-01

    Many currently approved drugs possess weakly basic properties that make them substrates for extensive sequestration in acidic intracellular compartments such as lysosomes through an ion trapping-type mechanism. Lysosomotropic drugs often have unique pharmacokinetic properties that stem from the extensive entrapment in lysosomes, including an extremely large volume of distribution and a long half-life. Accordingly, pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions can occur when one drug modifies lysosomal volume such that the degree of lysosomal sequestration of secondarily administered drugs is significantly altered. In this work, we have investigated potential mechanisms for drug-induced alterations in lysosomal volume that give rise to drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes. We show that eight hydrophobic amines, previously characterized as perpetrators in this type of drug-drug interaction, cause a significant expansion in lysosomal volume that was correlated with both the induction of autophagy and with decreases in the efficiency of lysosomal egress. We also show that well-known chemical inducers of autophagy caused an increase in apparent lysosomal volume and an increase in secondarily administered lysosomotropic drugs without negatively impacting vesicle-mediated lysosomal egress. These results could help rationalize how the induction of autophagy could cause variability in the pharmacokinetic properties of lysosomotropic drugs.

  9. Syndecan 4 Is Involved in Mediating HCV Entry through Interaction with Lipoviral Particle-Associated Apolipoprotein E

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Mathieu; Felmlee, Daniel J.; Parnot, Marie; Baumert, Thomas F.; Schuster, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and HCV infection represents a major health problem. HCV associates with host lipoproteins forming host/viral hybrid complexes termed lipoviral particles. Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipoprotein component that interacts with heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) to mediate hepatic lipoprotein uptake, and may likewise mediate HCV entry. We sought to define the functional regions of apoE with an aim to identify critical apoE binding partners involved in HCV infection. Using adenoviral vectors and siRNA to modulate apoE expression we show a direct correlation of apoE expression and HCV infectivity, whereas no correlation exists with viral protein expression. Mutating the HSPG binding domain (HSPG-BD) of apoE revealed key residues that are critical for mediating HCV infection. Furthermore, a novel synthetic peptide that mimics apoE’s HSPG-BD directly and competitively inhibits HCV infection. Genetic knockdown of the HSPG proteins syndecan (SDC) 1 and 4 revealed that SDC4 principally mediates HCV entry. Our data demonstrate that HCV uses apoE-SDC4 interactions to enter hepatoma cells and establish infection. Targeting apoE-SDC interactions could be an alternative strategy for blocking HCV entry, a critical step in maintaining chronic HCV infection. PMID:24751902

  10. Decreased interaction between ZO-1 and occludin is involved in alteration of tight junctions in transplanted epiphora submandibular glands.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chong; Cong, Xin; Zhang, Xue-Ming; Li, Sheng-Lin; Wu, Li-Ling; Yu, Guang-Yan

    2017-03-22

    Tight junctions (TJs) in salivary epithelium play an important role in regulating saliva secretion. Autologous transplantation of submandibular glands (SMGs) is an effective method to treat severe dry eye syndrome. However, epiphora occurs in some patients 6 months after transplantation. We previously found that the acinar TJs are enlarged in rabbit SMGs after long-term transplantation, but the exact TJ components involved in the epiphora are still unknown. Here, we found that the mRNA and protein expression of ZO-1 and occludin were increased in the transplanted SMGs obtained from epiphora patients, while other TJs were unchanged. The intensity of ZO-1 and occludin at the apicolateral membranes as well as occludin in the cytoplasm were increased in epiphora SMGs, but the interaction between ZO-1 and occludin was decreased as evidenced by both co-immunoprecipitation assay and co-immunofluorescence staining. Mechanically, the expression of casein kinase 2α (CK2α) and CK2β, which was reported to affect occludin modification and the interaction of occludin with ZO-1 in previous literatures, were increased in epiphora glands. Moreover, activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) by carbachol directly decreased the interaction between ZO-1 and occludin and increased the acinar TJ width in the freshly isolated human SMGs, whereas these effects were abolished by pretreatment with CK2 inhibitor. Taken together, our findings suggest that decreased interaction between ZO-1 and occludin might contribute to the epiphora occurred in the transplanted SMGs, and mAChR together with the intracellular molecule CK2 might be responsible for the alteration of TJs in epiphora glands.

  11. Involvement of human multidrug and toxin extrusion 1 in the drug interaction between cimetidine and metformin in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Masahiro; Terada, Tomohiro; Ueba, Miki; Sato, Tomoko; Masuda, Satohiro; Katsura, Toshiya; Inui, Ken-ichi

    2009-04-01

    In human proximal tubules, organic cations are taken up from blood into cells by human organic cation transporter 2 [hOCT2/solute carrier (SLC) 22A2] and then eliminated into the lumen by apical H(+)/organic cation antiporters, human multidrug and toxin extrusion 1 (hMATE1/SLC47A1) and hMATE2-K (SLC47A2). To evaluate drug interactions of cationic drugs in the secretion process, epithelial cells engineered to express both hOCT2 and hMATE transporters are required to simultaneously evaluate drug interactions with renal basolateral and apical organic cation transporters. In the present study, therefore, we assessed the drug interaction between cimetidine and metformin with double-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells stably expressing both hOCT2 and hMATE1 as an in vitro model of the proximal tubular epithelial cells. The basolateral-to-apical transport and intracellular accumulation of [(14)C]metformin by a double transfectant were markedly inhibited by 1 mM cimetidine at the basolateral side. On the other hand, 1 microM cimetidine at the basolateral side moderately decreased the basolateral-to-apical transport of [(14)C]metformin and significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [(14)C]metformin from the basolateral side, suggesting that cimetidine at a low concentration inhibits apical hMATE1, rather than basolateral hOCT2. Actually, in concentration-dependent inhibition studies by a single transporter expression system, such as human embryonic kidney 293 stably expressing hMATE1, hMATE2-K, or hOCT2, cimetidine showed higher affinity for hMATEs than for hOCT2. These results suggest that apical hMATE1 is involved in drug interactions between cimetidine and cationic compounds in the proximal tubular epithelial cells.

  12. Seasonal phenology of interactions involving short-lived annual plants, a multivoltine herbivore and its endoparasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Fei, Minghui; Gols, Rieta; Harvey, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial-temporal realism is often missing in many studies of multitrophic interactions, which are conducted at a single time frame and/or involving interactions between insects with a single species of plant. In this scenario, an underlying assumption is that the host-plant species is ubiquitous throughout the season and that the insects always interact with it. We studied interactions involving three naturally occurring wild species of cruciferous plants, Brassica rapa, Sinapis arvensis and Brassica nigra, that exhibit different seasonal phenologies, and a multivoltine herbivore, the large cabbage white butterfly, Pieris brassicae, and its gregarious endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia glomerata. The three plants have very short life cycles. In central Europe, B. rapa grows in early spring, S. arvensis in late spring and early summer, and B. nigra in mid to late summer. P. brassicae generally has three generations per year, and C. glomerata at least two. This means that different generations of the insects must find and exploit different plant species that may differ in quality and which may be found some distance from one another. Insects were either reared on each of the three plant species for three successive generations or shifted between generations from B. rapa to S. arvensis to B. nigra. Development time from neonate to pupation and pupal fresh mass were determined in P. brassicae and egg-to-adult development time and body mass in C. glomerata. Overall, herbivores performed marginally better on S. arvensis and B. nigra plants than on B. rapa plants. Parasitoids performance was closely tailored with that of the host. Irrespective as to whether the insects were shifted to a new plant in successive generations or not, development time of P. brassicae and C. glomerata decreased dramatically over time. Our results show that there were some differences in insect development on different plant species and when transferred from one species to another. However, all three

  13. SLXL1, a Novel Acrosomal Protein, Interacts with DKKL1 and Is Involved in Fertilization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xin-jie; Hou, Xiao-jun; Liao, Shang-Ying; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Cooke, Howard J.; Zhang, Ming; Han, Chunsheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Spermatogenesis is a complex cellular developmental process which involves diverse families of genes. The Xlr (X-linked, lymphocyte regulated) family includes multiple members, only a few of which have reported functions in meiosis, post-meiotic maturation, and fertilization of germ cells. Slx-like1 (Slxl1) is a member of the Xlr family, whose expression and function in spermatogenesis need to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings The mRNA and protein expression and localization of Slxl1 were investigated by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry in different tissues and at different stages of spermatogenesis. The interacting partner of SLXL1 was examined by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization. Assessment of the role of SLXL1 in capacitation, acrosome reaction, zona pellucida binding/penetration, and fertilization was carried out in vitro using blocking antisera. The results showed that Slxl1 mRNA and protein were specifically expressed in the testis. SLXL1 was exclusively located in the acrosome of post-meiotic germ cells and interacts with DKKL1 (Dickkopf-like1), which is an acrosome-associated protein and plays an important role in fertilization. The rates of zona pellucida binding/penetration and fertilization were significantly reduced by the anti-SLXL1 polyclonal antiserum. Conclusions/Significance SLXL1 is the first identified member of the XLR family that is associated with acrosome and is involved in zona pellucid binding/penetration and subsequent fertilization. These results, together with previous studies, suggest that Xlr family members participate in diverse processes from meiosis to fertilization during spermatogenesis. PMID:21698294

  14. Global MHD modeling of an ICME focused on the physics involved in an ICME interacting with a solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Jun-Mo; Magara, Tetsuya; Inoue, Satoshi; Hayashi, Keiji; Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code to investigate the structure of a solar wind, the properties of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the interaction between them. This MHD code is based on the finite volume method incorporating total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme with an unstructured grid system. In particular, this grid system can avoid the singularity at the north and south poles and relax tight CFL conditions around the poles, both of which would arise in a spherical coordinate system (Tanaka 1994). In this model, we first apply an MHD tomographic method (Hayashi et al. 2003) to interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observational data and derive a solar wind from the physical values obtained at 50 solar radii away from the Sun. By comparing the properties of this solar wind to observational data obtained near the Earth orbit, we confirmed that our model captures the velocity, temperature and density profiles of a solar wind near the Earth orbit. We then insert a spheromak-type CME (Kataoka et al. 2009) into the solar wind to reproduce an actual CME event occurred on 29 September 2013. This has been done by introducing a time-dependent boundary condition to the inner boundary of our simulation domain (50rs < r < 300rs). On the basis of a comparison between the properties of a simulated CME and observations near the Earth, we discuss the physics involved in an ICME interacting with a solar wind.

  15. The cyanobacterial Fluorescence Recovery Protein has two distinct activities: Orange Carotenoid Protein amino acids involved in FRP interaction.

    PubMed

    Thurotte, Adrien; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Wilson, Adjélé; Talbot, Léa; Cot, Sandrine; López-Igual, Rocio; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2017-04-01

    To deal with fluctuating light condition, cyanobacteria have developed a photoprotective mechanism which, under high light conditions, decreases the energy arriving at the photochemical centers. It relies on a photoswitch, the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP). Once photoactivated, OCP binds to the light harvesting antenna, the phycobilisome (PBS), and triggers the thermal dissipation of the excess energy absorbed. Deactivation of the photoprotective mechanism requires the intervention of a third partner, the Fluorescence Recovery Protein (FRP). FRP by interacting with the photoactivated OCP accelerates its conversion to the non-active form and its detachment from the phycobilisome. We have studied the interaction of FRP with free and phycobilisome-bound OCP. Several OCP variants were constructed and characterized. In this article we show that OCP amino acid F299 is essential and D220 important for OCP deactivation mediated by FRP. Mutations of these amino acids did not affect FRP activity as helper to detach OCP from phycobilisomes. In addition, while mutated R60L FRP is inactive on OCP deactivation, its activity on the detachment of the OCP from the phycobilisomes is not affected. Thus, our results demonstrate that FRP has two distinct activities: it accelerates OCP detachment from phycobilisomes and then it helps deactivation of the OCP. They also suggest that different OCP and FRP amino acids could be involved in these two activities.

  16. Rydberg and valence state excitation dynamics: a velocity map imaging study involving the E-V state interaction in HBr.

    PubMed

    Zaouris, Dimitris; Kartakoullis, Andreas; Glodic, Pavle; Samartzis, Peter C; Rafn Hróðmarsson, Helgi; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-04-28

    Photoexcitation dynamics of the E((1)Σ(+)) (v' = 0) Rydberg state and the V((1)Σ(+)) (v') ion-pair vibrational states of HBr are investigated by velocity map imaging (VMI). H(+) photoions, produced through a number of vibrational and rotational levels of the two states were imaged and kinetic energy release (KER) and angular distributions were extracted from the data. In agreement with previous work, we found the photodissociation channels forming H*(n = 2) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) to be dominant. Autoionization pathways leading to H(+) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) via either HBr(+)((2)Π3/2) or HBr(+)*((2)Π1/2) formation were also present. The analysis of KER and angular distributions and comparison with rotationally and mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra revealed the excitation transition mechanisms and characteristics of states involved as well as the involvement of the E-V state interactions and their v' and J' dependence.

  17. Ligand requirements for involvement of PKCε in synergistic analgesic interactions between spinal μ and δ opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, D J; Metcalf, M D; Kitto, K F; Messing, R O; Fairbanks, C A; Wilcox, G L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We recently found that PKCε was required for spinal analgesic synergy between two GPCRs, δ opioid receptors and α2A adrenoceptors, co-located in the same cellular subpopulation. We sought to determine if co-delivery of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists would similarly result in synergy requiring PKCε. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Combinations of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists were co-administered intrathecally by direct lumbar puncture to PKCε-wild-type (PKCε-WT) and -knockout (PKCε-KO) mice. Antinociception was assessed using the hot-water tail-flick assay. Drug interactions were evaluated by isobolographic analysis. KEY RESULTS All agonists produced comparable antinociception in both PKCε-WT and PKCε-KO mice. Of 19 agonist combinations that produced analgesic synergy, only 3 required PKCε for a synergistic interaction. In these three combinations, one of the agonists was morphine, although not all combinations involving morphine required PKCε. Morphine + deltorphin II and morphine + deltorphin I required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + deltorphin, did not. Additionally, morphine + oxymorphindole required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + oxycodindole, did not. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We discovered biased agonism for a specific signalling pathway at the level of spinally co-delivered opioid agonists. As the bias is only revealed by an appropriate ligand combination and cannot be accounted for by a single drug, it is likely that the receptors these agonists act on are interacting with each other. Our results support the existence of μ and δ opioid receptor heteromers at the spinal level in vivo. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24827408

  18. p75 neurotrophin receptor and its novel interaction partner, NIX, are involved in neuronal apoptosis after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiabing; Chen, Xiaomei; Li, Hongmei; Wang, Yang; Huo, Keke; Ke, Kaifu

    2017-04-01

    Recently, NIX, a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, was found to be a novel p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) binding protein by screening a human fetal brain two-hybrid library in our laboratory. We further study the interaction of these two proteins and the possible roles of p75(NTR) and NIX in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced neuronal death. Using the split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the "Copper" domain in p75(NTR) and the TM region in NIX were sufficient for the interaction of these two proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding assays demonstrated the direct interaction between p75(NTR) and NIX. NIX protein was stabilized by p75(NTR) at post-translational levels. Moreover, p75(NTR) was able to work together with NIX to promote apoptosis and affected the NIX-induced JNK-p53-Bax pathway in neuronal PC12 cells. Previous work has indicated that p75(NTR) and NIX are induced in neurons in human ICH and the rat ICH model, respectively. We confirm that both p75(NTR) and NIX levels were up-regulated in glutamate-treated primary cortical neurons (a cellular in vitro model for ICH) and in the rat ICH model. Glutamate exposure increased the association between p75(NTR) and NIX and elevated the activation of the JNK-p53-Bax pathway and neuronal apoptosis; all of these observations were similar in the rat ICH model. Importantly, p75(NTR) and NIX appeared to be involved in cortical neuronal apoptosis, because knockdown of p75(NTR) or NIX not only inhibited the JNK pathway but also impaired neuronal apoptosis. Thus, p75(NTR) and NIX may play critical roles in ICH-induced neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Analysis of mixed DNA-bisnaphthalimide interactions involving groove association and intercalation with surface-based and solution methodologies.

    PubMed

    González-Bulnes, Luis; Gallego, José

    2012-12-01

    The bisnaphthalimide cytotoxic agent elinafide exhibits a mixed DNA binding mode including groove-association and intercalation. We have compared the interaction of elinafide and two bisnaphthalimide analogues with various natural and modified DNA sequences using solution NMR and UV-melting methods and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments at different pH conditions. The combined data obtained with these techniques established a high-affinity binding mode comprising intercalation and strong electrostatic contacts with guanine bases in the major groove, and a weaker interaction with A·T pairs likely involving groove association. However, the SPR binding constants and the NMR and UV-melting binding parameters responded differently to variations in DNA bases and ligand intercalating moieties. The rates and equilibrium constants determined by SPR clearly responded to changes in pH and DNA groove composition, but were rather insensitive to alterations in drug rings and DNA bases affecting the intercalation process. Conversely, the intermolecular stacking interactions detected by NMR and the ligand-induced thermal stabilizations measured by UV depended on both sets of factors and were controlled by the sequence-dependent properties of the DNA helices, indicating that these data were modulated by naphthalimide stacking in addition to groove association. A two-step binding process where a groove-bound state is required prior to intercalation is proposed as an explanation for these observations. These findings may be useful for studying other classes of DNA- and RNA-binding drugs, which frequently combine groove-binding and stacking moieties.

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Diverse Repertoire of Genes Involved in Prokaryote-Eukaryote Interactions within the Pseudovibrio Genus

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Stefano; Fernàndez-Guerra, Antonio; Reen, F. Jerry; Glöckner, Frank O.; Crowley, Susan P.; O'Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D.; Adams, Claire; Dobson, Alan D. W.; O'Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the Pseudovibrio genus have been detected worldwide, mainly as part of bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates, particularly sponges. This recurrent association has been considered as an indication of a symbiotic relationship between these microbes and their host. Until recently, the availability of only two genomes, belonging to closely related strains, has limited the knowledge on the genomic and physiological features of the genus to a single phylogenetic lineage. Here we present 10 newly sequenced genomes of Pseudovibrio strains isolated from marine sponges from the west coast of Ireland, and including the other two publicly available genomes we performed an extensive comparative genomic analysis. Homogeneity was apparent in terms of both the orthologous genes and the metabolic features shared amongst the 12 strains. At the genomic level, a key physiological difference observed amongst the isolates was the presence only in strain P. axinellae AD2 of genes encoding proteins involved in assimilatory nitrate reduction, which was then proved experimentally. We then focused on studying those systems known to be involved in the interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This analysis revealed that the genus harbors a large diversity of toxin-like proteins, secretion systems and their potential effectors. Their distribution in the genus was not always consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of the strains. Finally, our analyses identified new genomic islands encoding potential toxin-immunity systems, previously unknown in the genus. Our analyses shed new light on the Pseudovibrio genus, indicating a large diversity of both metabolic features and systems for interacting with the host. The diversity in both distribution and abundance of these systems amongst the strains underlines how metabolically and phylogenetically similar bacteria may use different strategies to interact with the host and find a niche within its

  1. Mother-child and father-child interaction with their 24-month-old children during feeding, considering paternal involvement and the child's temperament in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Cerniglia, Luca; Cimino, Silvia; Ballarotto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    The article aims to study mother-child and father-child interactions with 24-month-old children during feeding, considering the possible influence of time spent by the parent with the child, the infantile temperament, and the parental psychological profile. The families were recruited from 12 preschools in Italy (N = 77 families). Through an observation of the feeding [Scala di Valutazione dell'Interazione Alimentare (SVIA - Feeding Scale; I. Chatoor et al., ; L. Lucarelli et al., )], self-reporting [Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R; L.R. Derogatis, ), and report-form questionnaires [Italian Questionnaires on Temperament (QUIT; G. Axia, )], and information provided by the parents about the amount of time spent with their children, results showed that the overall quality of father-child interactions during feeding is lower than that of mother-child interactions. Fathers showed higher psychological symptoms than did mothers. No associations were found between the fathers' psychopathological risk and the quality of interactions with their children during feeding. Mothers' psychopathological risks predicted less contingent exchanges interactions with their children during feeding. Children's temperaments significantly influence mother-child interactions, but no association exists between maternal involvement and the quality of interactions with their children. Paternal involvement predicts a better quality of father-infant interactions when associated with a child's higher scores on Social Orientation. The quality of parents' interactions with their children during feeding are impacted by different issues originating from the parent's psychological profile, the degree of involvement, and from the child's temperament.

  2. Comparative Genomics of Plant-Associated Pseudomonas spp.: Insights into Diversity and Inheritance of Traits Involved in Multitrophic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Loper, Joyce E.; Hassan, Karl A.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Davis, Edward W.; Lim, Chee Kent; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Stockwell, Virginia O.; Hartney, Sierra L.; Breakwell, Katy; Henkels, Marcella D.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Rangel, Lorena I.; Kidarsa, Teresa A.; Wilson, Neil L.; van de Mortel, Judith E.; Song, Chunxu; Blumhagen, Rachel; Radune, Diana; Hostetler, Jessica B.; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Durkin, A. Scott; Kluepfel, Daniel A.; Wechter, W. Patrick; Anderson, Anne J.; Kim, Young Cheol; Pierson, Leland S.; Pierson, Elizabeth A.; Lindow, Steven E.; Kobayashi, Donald Y.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Weller, David M.; Thomashow, Linda S.; Allen, Andrew E.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of ten strains within the Pseudomonas fluorescens group including seven new genomic sequences. These strains exhibit a diverse spectrum of traits involved in biological control and other multitrophic interactions with plants, microbes, and insects. Multilocus sequence analysis placed the strains in three sub-clades, which was reinforced by high levels of synteny, size of core genomes, and relatedness of orthologous genes between strains within a sub-clade. The heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens group was reflected in the large size of its pan-genome, which makes up approximately 54% of the pan-genome of the genus as a whole, and a core genome representing only 45–52% of the genome of any individual strain. We discovered genes for traits that were not known previously in the strains, including genes for the biosynthesis of the siderophores achromobactin and pseudomonine and the antibiotic 2-hexyl-5-propyl-alkylresorcinol; novel bacteriocins; type II, III, and VI secretion systems; and insect toxins. Certain gene clusters, such as those for two type III secretion systems, are present only in specific sub-clades, suggesting vertical inheritance. Almost all of the genes associated with multitrophic interactions map to genomic regions present in only a subset of the strains or unique to a specific strain. To explore the evolutionary origin of these genes, we mapped their distributions relative to the locations of mobile genetic elements and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements in each genome. The mobile genetic elements and many strain-specific genes fall into regions devoid of REP elements (i.e., REP deserts) and regions displaying atypical tri-nucleotide composition, possibly indicating relatively recent acquisition of these loci. Collectively, the results of this study highlight the enormous heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens group and the importance of the variable genome in tailoring individual strains

  3. AMPA Receptors Are Involved in Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Interact with STIM Proteins in Rat Primary Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczynska-Biegala, Joanna; Sladowska, Maria; Kuznicki, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    The process of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) leads to refilling the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with calcium ions (Ca2+) after their release into the cytoplasm. Interactions between (ER)-located Ca2+ sensors (stromal interaction molecule 1 [STIM1] and STIM2) and plasma membrane-located Ca2+ channel-forming protein (Orai1) underlie SOCE and are well described in non-excitable cells. In neurons, however, SOCE appears to be more complex because of the importance of Ca2+ influx via voltage-gated or ionotropic receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. We found that the SOCE inhibitors ML-9 and SKF96365 reduced α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-induced [Ca2+]i amplitude by 80% and 53%, respectively. To assess the possible involvement of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in SOCE, we used their specific inhibitors. As estimated by Fura-2 acetoxymethyl (AM) single-cell Ca2+ measurements in the presence of CNQX or NBQX, thapsigargin (TG)-induced Ca2+ influx decreased 2.2 or 3.7 times, respectively. These results suggest that under experimental conditions of SOCE when Ca2+ stores are depleted, Ca2+ can enter neurons also through AMPARs. Using specific antibodies against STIM proteins or GluA1/GluA2 AMPAR subunits, co-immunoprecipitation assays indicated that when Ca2+ levels are low in the neuronal ER, a physical association occurs between endogenous STIM proteins and endogenous AMPAR receptors. Altogether, our data suggest that STIM proteins in neurons can control AMPA-induced Ca2+ entry as a part of the mechanism of SOCE. PMID:27826230

  4. Non-additive interactions involving two distinct elements mediate sloppy-paired regulation by pair-rule transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Prazak, Lisa; Fujioka, Miki; Gergen, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    The relatively simple combinatorial rules responsible for establishing the initial metameric expression of sloppy-paired-1 (slp1) in the Drosophila blastoderm embryo make this system an attractive model for investigating the mechanism of regulation by pair rule transcription factors. This investigation of slp1 cis-regulatory architecture identifies two distinct elements, a proximal early stripe element (PESE) and a distal early stripe element (DESE) located from −3.1 kb to −2.5 kb and from −8.1 kb to −7.1 kb upstream of the slp1 promoter, respectively, that mediate this early regulation. The proximal element expresses only even-numbered stripes and mediates repression by Even-skipped (Eve) as well as by the combination of Runt and Fushi-tarazu (Ftz). A 272 basepair sub-element of PESE retains Eve-dependent repression, but is expressed throughout the even-numbered parasegments due to the loss of repression by Runt and Ftz. In contrast, the distal element expresses both odd and even-numbered stripes and also drives inappropriate expression in the anterior half of the odd-numbered parasegments due to an inability to respond to repression by Eve. Importantly, a composite reporter gene containing both early stripe elements recapitulates pair-rule gene-dependent regulation in a manner beyond what is expected from combining their individual patterns. These results indicate interactions involving distinct cis-elements contribute to the proper integration of pair-rule regulatory information. A model fully accounting for these results proposes that metameric slp1 expression is achieved through the Runt-dependent regulation of interactions between these two pair-rule response elements and the slp1 promoter. PMID:20435028

  5. Evidence that intramolecular interactions are involved in masking the activation domain of transcriptional activator Leu3p.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Hu, Y; Zheng, F; Zhou, K; Kohlhaw, G B

    1997-08-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates the expression of genes involved in branched chain amino acid biosynthesis and in ammonia assimilation. It is modulated by alpha-isopropylmalate, an intermediate in leucine biosynthesis. In the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate, Leu3p is a transcriptional activator. In the absence of the signal molecule, the activation domain is masked, and Leu3p acts as a repressor. The recent discovery that Leu3p retains its regulatory properties when expressed in mammalian cells (Guo, H., and Kohlhaw, G. B. (1996) FEBS Lett. 390, 191-195) suggests that masking and unmasking of the activation domain occur without the participation of auxiliary proteins. Here we present experimental support for this notion and address the mechanism of masking. We show that modulation of Leu3p is exceedingly sensitive to mutations in the activation domain. An activation domain double mutant (D872N/D874N; designated Leu3-dd) was constructed that has the characteristics of a permanently masked activator. Using separately expressed segments containing either the DNA binding domain-middle region or the activation domain of wild type Leu3p (or Leu3-dd) in a modified yeast two-hybrid system, we provide direct evidence for alpha-isopropylmalate-dependent interaction between these segments. Finally, we use the phenotype of Leu3-dd-containing cells (slow growth in the absence of added leucine) to select for suppressor mutations that map to the middle region of Leu3-dd. The properties of nine such suppressors further support the idea that masking is an intramolecular process and suggest a means for mapping the surface involved in masking.

  6. Three-color FRET expands the ability to quantify the interactions of several proteins involved in actin filament nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallrabe, Horst; Sun, Yuansheng; Fang, Xiaolan; Periasamy, Ammasi; Bloom, George

    2012-03-01

    With traditional 2-color Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) microscopy, valuable quantitative analyses can be conducted. Correlations of donor (D), acceptor (A) and their ratios (D:A) with energy transfer efficiency (E%) or distance (r) allows measurement of changes between control and experimental samples; also, clustered vs. random assembly of cellular components can be differentiated. Essentially, only the above three parameters D, A and D:A vs. E% are the basis for these deductions. 3-color FRET uses the same basic parameters, but exponentially expands the opportunities to quantify interrelationships among 3 cellular components. We investigated a number of questions based on the results of a triple combination (F1-F2-F3) of TFPNWASP/ Venus-IQGAP1/mCherry-Actin - all involved in the nucleation of actin - to apply the extensive analysis assay possible with 3-color FRET. How do changing N-WASP or IQGAP1 fluorescence levels affect actin fluorescence? What is the effect on E% of NWASP-actin by IQGAP1 or E% of IQGAP1-actin by N-WASP? These and other questions are explored in the context of all proteins of interest being in FRET distance vs. any two in the absence of the third. 4 cases are compared based on bleed-through corrected FRET: (1) all 3 interact, (2) only F1- F3 and F2-F3 [not F1-F2], (3) only F1-F2 and F2-F3 interact [not F1-F3], (4) only F1-F2 and F1-F3 interact [not F2-F3]. Other than describing the methodology in detail, several biologically relevant results are presented showing how E% (i.e. distance), fluorescence levels and ratios are affected in each of the cases. These correlations can only be observed in a 3-fluorophore combination. 3-color FRET will greatly expand the investigative range of quantitative analysis for the life-science researcher.

  7. Regional repression of a Drosophila POU box gene in the endoderm involves inductive interactions between germ layers.

    PubMed

    Affolter, M; Walldorf, U; Kloter, U; Schier, A F; Gehring, W J

    1993-04-01

    An induction process occurring between the mesodermal and the endodermal germ layers has recently been described in the regulation of the Drosophila homeotic gene labial (lab). We report here that proper spatial regulation of the Drosophila POU box gene pdm-1 products also involves interaction between these two germ layers. pdm-1 transcripts are initially present in both the anterior and the posterior endodermal midgut primordia. Upon fusion of the two primordia, transcripts disappear from two regions in the endoderm, a central domain and an anterior domain. The anterior repression domain of pdm-1 is independent of the expression of known homeotic genes and genes encoding secreted signalling molecules in the visceral mesoderm, both for its positioning and its repression. Repression in the central domain requires both the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Both of these genes are also required for lab induction. However, the analysis of pdm-1 expression in various mutant backgrounds indicates that the regulation of lab and pdm-1 across germ layers is controlled by different genetic cascades. Our study indicates that dpp is not the signal that dictates central pdm-1 repression across germ layers and suggests that in the same midgut region, different signalling pathways result in the differential activation or repression of potential transcription factors.

  8. Molecular change signal-to-noise criteria for interpreting experiments involving exposure of biological systems to weakly interacting electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Timothy E; Weaver, James C

    2005-05-01

    We describe an approach to aiding the design and interpretation of experiments involving biological effects of weakly interacting electromagnetic fields that range from steady (dc) to microwave frequencies. We propose that if known biophysical mechanisms cannot account for an inferred, underlying molecular change signal-to-noise ratio, (S/N)gen, of a observed result, then there are two interpretation choices: (1) there is an unknown biophysical mechanism with stronger coupling between the field exposure and the ongoing biochemical process, or (2) the experiment is responding to something other than the field exposure. Our approach is based on classical detection theory, the recognition that weakly interacting fields cannot break chemical bonds, and the consequence that such fields can only alter rates of ongoing, metabolically driven biochemical reactions, and transport processes. The approach includes both fundamental chemical noise (molecular shot noise) and other sources of competing chemical change, to be compared quantitatively to the field induced change for the basic case that the field alters a single step in a biochemical network. Consistent with pharmacology and toxicology, we estimate the molecular dose (mass associated with field induced molecular change per mass tissue) resulting from illustrative low frequency field exposures for the biophysical mechanism of voltage gated channels. For perspective, we then consider electric field-mediated delivery of small molecules across human skin and into individual cells. Specifically, we consider the examples of iontophoretic and electroporative delivery of fentanyl through skin and electroporative delivery of bleomycin into individual cells. The total delivered amount corresponds to a molecular change signal and the delivery variability corresponds to generalized chemical noise. Viewed broadly, biological effects due to nonionizing fields may include animal navigation, medical applications, and environmental

  9. Binding of human fibroblast interferon to concanavalin A-agarose. Involvement of carbohydrate recognition and hydrophobic interaction.

    PubMed

    Davey, M W; Sulkowski, E; Carter, W A

    1976-02-10

    Human fibroblast interferon binds to a concanavalin A-agarose (Con A-Sepharose) equilibrated with methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside, or levan; in contrast, it is only partially retarded on a similar column equilibrated with ethylene glycol. Interferon does not bind, however, to a lectin column equilibrated with both methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside and ethylene glycol. Thus, a hydrophobic interaction between fibroblast interferon and the immobilized lectin seems to account for a large portion of the binding forces involved. Other hydrophobic solutes, such as dioxane, 1, 2-propanediol, and tetraethylammonium chloride, were found equally or more efficient than ethylene glycol in displacing interferon from the lectin column. The elution pattern of interferon from a concanavalin A-agarose (Con A-Sepharose) column, at a constant ehtylene glycol concentration and with an increasing mannoside concentration, reveals the existence of four distinct interferon components. The selective adsorption to and elution from a concanavalin A-agarose (Con A-Sepharose) column resulted in about a 3000-fold purification of human fibroblast interferon and complete recovery of activity. The specific activity of the partially purified interferon preparation is about 5 X 10(7) units per mg of protein. The chromatographic behavior of human leukocyte interferon is remarkable in that it does not bind to concanavalin A-agarose at all indicating the absence of carbohydrate moieties recognizable by the lectin, or if present, their masked status. When concanavalin A was coupled to an agarose matrix (cyanogen bromide activated) at pH 8.0 and 6.0 human fibroblast interferon bound to both lectin-agarose adsorbents and could be recovered with methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside. Concanavalin A, immobilized directly on agarose matrix at pH 8.0 and 6.0, thus displays only carbohydrate recognition toward interferon. By contrast, unless a hydrophobic solute was included in the solvent containing methyl mannoside

  10. Immune complex–FcγR interaction modulates monocyte/macrophage molecules involved in inflammation and immune response

    PubMed Central

    BARRIONUEVO, P; BEIGIER-BOMPADRE, M; FERNANDEZ, G C; GOMEZ, S; ALVES-ROSA, M F; PALERMO, M S; ISTURIZ, M A

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (FcγRs) from monocytes/macrophages and immune complexes (IC) triggers regulatory and effector functions. Recently, we have demonstrated that IC exert a drastic inhibition of basal and IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II on human monocytes. Taking into account that the regulation of MHC class II molecules is a crucial event in the immune response, in this report we extend our previous studies analysing the effect of STAT-1 phosphorylation in the down-regulatory process, the fate of the intracellular pool of MHC class II molecules and the effect of complement on MHC class II down-regulation induced by IC. We also studied the effect of IC on the expression of MHC class II (I-Ad) in macrophages using a mouse model of chronic inflammation. We demonstrate that IC induce a depletion not only on surface expressed but also on intracellular MHC class II content and that IC-induced down-regulation of MHC class II is not mediated by the inhibition of STAT-1 phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effect of IC is not specific for the down-regulation of MHC class II, for it could be restricted to other molecules involved in inflammatory processes. Our experiments also show that the activation of the complement system could be a crucial step on the regulation of the effect of IC on MHC class II expression. In agreement with our in vitro experiments using human monocytes, IC treatment reduces the expression of MHC class II in a mouse model of chronic inflammation. PMID:12869025

  11. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-07

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  12. Children's Responses to the Interactivity of Storybook Apps in Family Shared Reading Events Involving the iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aliagas, Cristina; Margallo, Ana María

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on some data on the effects of screen-based interactivity on children's engagement with storybook apps during family shared book reading that were gathered in a 2-year, small-scale ethnographic case study in Spain. Data analysis focuses on the complex interplay between the storybook app's interactive features and the children's…

  13. GAS, a new glutamate-rich protein, interacts differentially with SRCs and is involved in oestrogen receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) exert profound effects on animal development and physiology. Genetic ablation experiments indicate that various SRC proteins might have differential physiological roles; however, clear evidence of functional specificity has not yet been shown at the molecular level. Here we report the identification of a new SRC1 interacting protein, glutamate-rich coactivator interacting with SRC1 (GAS), which contains a central glutamate-rich region and has transactivation activity. Interestingly, GAS interacts only with SRC1, and not with glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) or amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), the other two members of the SRC family. It interacts with oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) and participates in both oestrogen receptor-regulated gene transcription and oestrogen-stimulated G1/S cell-cycle transition. Our data thus indicate that GAS is a new transcription cofactor and that different SRCs are associated with distinct secondary cofactors. PMID:19039327

  14. Roles of rifampicin in drug-drug interactions: underlying molecular mechanisms involving the nuclear pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiezhong; Raymond, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Rifampicin, an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis, is used extensively despite its broad effects on drug-drug interactions, creating serious problems. The clinical importance of such interactions includes autoinduction leading to suboptimal or failed treatment. The concomitantly administered effects of rifampicin on other drugs can result in their altered metabolism or transportation that are metabolised by cytochromes P450 or transported by p-glycoprotein in the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This review paper summarises recent findings with emphases on the molecular mechanisms used to explain these broad drug-drug interactions. In general, rifampicin can act on a pattern: rifampicin activates the nuclear pregnane X receptor that in turn affects cytochromes P450, glucuronosyltransferases and p-glycoprotein activities. This pattern of action may explain many of the rifampicin inducing drug-drug interactions. However, effects through other mechanisms have also been reported and these make any explanation of such drug-drug interactions more complex. PMID:16480505

  15. Roles of rifampicin in drug-drug interactions: underlying molecular mechanisms involving the nuclear pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Raymond, Kenneth

    2006-02-15

    Rifampicin, an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis, is used extensively despite its broad effects on drug-drug interactions, creating serious problems. The clinical importance of such interactions includes autoinduction leading to suboptimal or failed treatment. The concomitantly administered effects of rifampicin on other drugs can result in their altered metabolism or transportation that are metabolised by cytochromes P450 or transported by p-glycoprotein in the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This review paper summarises recent findings with emphases on the molecular mechanisms used to explain these broad drug-drug interactions. In general, rifampicin can act on a pattern: rifampicin activates the nuclear pregnane X receptor that in turn affects cytochromes P450, glucuronosyltransferases and p-glycoprotein activities. This pattern of action may explain many of the rifampicin inducing drug-drug interactions. However, effects through other mechanisms have also been reported and these make any explanation of such drug-drug interactions more complex.

  16. Examining the interaction of parental involvement and parenting style in predicting adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Landers, Sara E.; Friedrich, Elizabeth A.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Miller, Victoria A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study examined whether aspects of parenting style (specifically, warmth, autonomy support, and coercion) moderated the association between parental involvement and adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes. Methods Children ages 8–16 years with type 1 diabetes and a parent completed assessments of parental involvement, parenting style, and adherence. Results Parent autonomy support and coercion were associated with adherence but warmth was not. Child report of more parental involvement was associated with better adherence. Warmth, autonomy support, and coercion were not moderators. Discussion The findings underscore the importance of parental involvement, operationalized as responsibility for diabetes tasks, and parenting style, specifically coercion and autonomy support, for adherence in pediatric chronic illness management. Longitudinal research is needed to better understand how and why dimensions of involvement (e.g., responsibility, monitoring, support) vary over time and whether they impact outcomes differentially. PMID:26866945

  17. Beta-actin interacts with the E2 protein and is involved in the early replication of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Ling, Lijun; Liao, Yajin; Li, Su; Han, Wen; Zhao, Bibo; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-01-22

    The E2 glycoprotein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is involved in viral infection and induction of neutralizing antibodies. Little is known about how E2 interacts with host cells. To understand the cellular factors involved in viral replication cycle, E2 was used as bait in yeast two-hybrid screens, resulting in the identification of β-actin as a potential E2-interacting partner. E2-β-actin interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pulldown, laser confocal and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. The E2-interacting domain of β-actin was mapped to amino acids (aa) 95-188 and two β-actin-interacting regions were identified in E2 (aa 182-261 and aa 262-341). Knockdown of β-actin by RNA interference and disruption of filamentous β-actin with cytochalasin D at 4h post-infection caused a significant reduction of viral RNA copies and titers. Collectively, the results indicated that β-actin is involved in the early replication of CSFV.

  18. A Novel Functional Domain of Tab2 Involved in the Interaction with Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reineri, Stefania; Agati, Silvia; Miano, Valentina; Sani, Monica; Berchialla, Paola; Ricci, Laura; Iannello, Andrea; Coscujuela Tarrero, Lucia; Cutrupi, Santina; De Bortoli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Tab2, originally described as a component of the inflammatory pathway, has been implicated in phenomena of gene de-repression in several contexts, due to its ability to interact with the NCoR corepressor. Tab2 interacts also with steroid receptors and dismisses NCoR from antagonist-bound Estrogen and Androgen Receptors on gene regulatory regions, thus modifying their transcriptional activity and leading to pharmacological resistance in breast and prostate cancer cells. We demonstrated previously that either Tab2 knock-down, or a peptide mimicking the Estrogen Receptor alpha domain interacting with Tab2, restore the antiproliferative response to Tamoxifen in Tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. In this work, we map the domain of Tab2 responsible of Estrogen Receptor alpha interaction. First, using both co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down with recombinant proteins, we found that the central part of Tab2 is primarily responsible for this interaction, and that this region also interacts with Androgen Receptor. Then, we narrowed down the essential interaction region by means of competition assays using recombinant protein pull-down. The interaction motif was finally identified as a small region adjacent to, but not overlapping, the Tab2 MEKK1 phosphorylation sites. A synthetic peptide mimicking this motif efficiently displaced Tab2 from interacting with recombinant Estrogen Receptor alpha in vitro, prompting us to test its efficacy using derivatives of the MCF7 breast carcinoma cell lines that are spontaneously resistant to Tamoxifen. Indeed, we observed that this mimic peptide, made cell-permeable by addition of the TAT minimal carrier domain, reduced the growth of Tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cells in the presence of Tamoxifen. These data indicate a novel functional domain of the Tab2 protein with potential application in drug design. PMID:27992601

  19. From Trust in Automation to Decision Neuroscience: Applying Cognitive Neuroscience Methods to Understand and Improve Interaction Decisions Involved in Human Automation Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Drnec, Kim; Marathe, Amar R.; Lukos, Jamie R.; Metcalfe, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Human automation interaction (HAI) systems have thus far failed to live up to expectations mainly because human users do not always interact with the automation appropriately. Trust in automation (TiA) has been considered a central influence on the way a human user interacts with an automation; if TiA is too high there will be overuse, if TiA is too low there will be disuse. However, even though extensive research into TiA has identified specific HAI behaviors, or trust outcomes, a unique mapping between trust states and trust outcomes has yet to be clearly identified. Interaction behaviors have been intensely studied in the domain of HAI and TiA and this has led to a reframing of the issues of problems with HAI in terms of reliance and compliance. We find the behaviorally defined terms reliance and compliance to be useful in their functionality for application in real-world situations. However, we note that once an inappropriate interaction behavior has occurred it is too late to mitigate it. We therefore take a step back and look at the interaction decision that precedes the behavior. We note that the decision neuroscience community has revealed that decisions are fairly stereotyped processes accompanied by measurable psychophysiological correlates. Two literatures were therefore reviewed. TiA literature was extensively reviewed in order to understand the relationship between TiA and trust outcomes, as well as to identify gaps in current knowledge. We note that an interaction decision precedes an interaction behavior and believe that we can leverage knowledge of the psychophysiological correlates of decisions to improve joint system performance. As we believe that understanding the interaction decision will be critical to the eventual mitigation of inappropriate interaction behavior, we reviewed the decision making literature and provide a synopsis of the state of the art understanding of the decision process from a decision neuroscience perspective. We forward

  20. From Trust in Automation to Decision Neuroscience: Applying Cognitive Neuroscience Methods to Understand and Improve Interaction Decisions Involved in Human Automation Interaction.

    PubMed

    Drnec, Kim; Marathe, Amar R; Lukos, Jamie R; Metcalfe, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    Human automation interaction (HAI) systems have thus far failed to live up to expectations mainly because human users do not always interact with the automation appropriately. Trust in automation (TiA) has been considered a central influence on the way a human user interacts with an automation; if TiA is too high there will be overuse, if TiA is too low there will be disuse. However, even though extensive research into TiA has identified specific HAI behaviors, or trust outcomes, a unique mapping between trust states and trust outcomes has yet to be clearly identified. Interaction behaviors have been intensely studied in the domain of HAI and TiA and this has led to a reframing of the issues of problems with HAI in terms of reliance and compliance. We find the behaviorally defined terms reliance and compliance to be useful in their functionality for application in real-world situations. However, we note that once an inappropriate interaction behavior has occurred it is too late to mitigate it. We therefore take a step back and look at the interaction decision that precedes the behavior. We note that the decision neuroscience community has revealed that decisions are fairly stereotyped processes accompanied by measurable psychophysiological correlates. Two literatures were therefore reviewed. TiA literature was extensively reviewed in order to understand the relationship between TiA and trust outcomes, as well as to identify gaps in current knowledge. We note that an interaction decision precedes an interaction behavior and believe that we can leverage knowledge of the psychophysiological correlates of decisions to improve joint system performance. As we believe that understanding the interaction decision will be critical to the eventual mitigation of inappropriate interaction behavior, we reviewed the decision making literature and provide a synopsis of the state of the art understanding of the decision process from a decision neuroscience perspective. We forward

  1. Quantitative Prediction of Drug–Drug Interactions Involving Inhibitory Metabolites in Drug Development: How Can Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Help?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Mao, J; Lin, J; Yu, H; Peters, S; Shebley, M

    2016-01-01

    This subteam under the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group (Innovation and Quality Consortium) investigated the quantitative role of circulating inhibitory metabolites in drug–drug interactions using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Three drugs with major circulating inhibitory metabolites (amiodarone, gemfibrozil, and sertraline) were systematically evaluated in addition to the literature review of recent examples. The application of PBPK modeling in drug interactions by inhibitory parent–metabolite pairs is described and guidance on strategic application is provided. PMID:27642087

  2. The interaction between the hepatitis C proteins NS4B and NS5A is involved in viral replication.

    PubMed

    David, Naama; Yaffe, Yakey; Hagoel, Lior; Elazar, Menashe; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Hirschberg, Koret; Sklan, Ella H

    2015-01-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in membrane associated, highly ordered replication complexes (RCs). These complexes include viral and host proteins necessary for viral RNA genome replication. The interaction network among viral and host proteins underlying the formation of these RCs is yet to be thoroughly characterized. Here, we investigated the association between NS4B and NS5A, two critical RC components. We characterized the interaction between these proteins using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and a mammalian two-hybrid system. Specific tryptophan residues within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of NS4B were shown to mediate this interaction. Domain I of NS5A, was sufficient to mediate its interaction with NS4B. Mutations in the NS4B CTD tryptophan residues abolished viral replication. Moreover, one of these mutations also affected NS5A hyperphosphorylation. These findings provide new insights into the importance of the NS4B-NS5A interaction and serve as a starting point for studying the complex interactions between the replicase subunits.

  3. A mammalian germ cell-specific RNA-binding protein interacts with ubiquitously expressed proteins involved in splice site selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, David J.; Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Klink, Albrecht; Stévenin, James; Cooke, Howard J.

    2000-05-01

    RNA-binding motif (RBM) genes are found on all mammalian Y chromosomes and are implicated in spermatogenesis. Within human germ cells, RBM protein shows a similar nuclear distribution to components of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. To address the function of RBM, we have used protein-protein interaction assays to test for possible physical interactions between these proteins. We find that RBM protein directly interacts with members of the SR family of splicing factors and, in addition, strongly interacts with itself. We have mapped the protein domains responsible for mediating these interactions and expressed the mouse RBM interaction region as a bacterial fusion protein. This fusion protein can pull-down several functionally active SR protein species from cell extracts. Depletion and add-back experiments indicate that these SR proteins are the only splicing factors bound by RBM which are required for the splicing of a panel of pre-mRNAs. Our results suggest that RBM protein is an evolutionarily conserved mammalian splicing regulator which operates as a germ cell-specific cofactor for more ubiquitously expressed pre-mRNA splicing activators.

  4. The interaction between the Hepatitis C proteins NS4B and NS5A is involved in viral replication

    PubMed Central

    David, Naama; Yaffe, Yakey; Hagoel, Lior; Elazar, Menashe; Glenn, Jeffrey S.; Hirschberg, Koret; Sklan, Ella H.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in membrane associated, highly ordered replication complexes (RCs). These complexes include viral and host proteins necessary for viral RNA genome replication. The interaction network among viral and host proteins underlying the formation of these RCs is yet to be thoroughly characterized. Here, we investigated the association between NS4B and NS5A, two critical RC components. We characterized the interaction between these proteins using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and a mammalian two-hybrid system. Specific tryptophan residues within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of NS4B were shown to mediate this interaction. Domain I of NS5A, was sufficient to mediate its interaction with NS4B. Mutations in the NS4B CTD tryptophan residues abolished viral replication. Moreover, one of these mutations also affected NS5A hyperphosphorylation. These findings provide new insights into the importance of the NS4B–NS5A interaction and serve as a starting point for studying the complex interactions between the replicase subunits. PMID:25462354

  5. Mapping the interaction network of key proteins involved in histone mRNA generation - a hydrogen/deuterium exchange study

    PubMed Central

    Skrajna, Aleksandra; Yang, Xiao-cui; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Fituch, Kinga; Marzluff, William F.; Dominski, Zbigniew; Dadlez, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Histone pre-mRNAs are cleaved at the 3′ end by a complex that contains U7 snRNP, the FLICE-Associated Huge protein (FLASH) and Histone pre-mRNA Cleavage Complex (HCC) consisting of several polyadenylation factors. Within the complex, the N-terminus of FLASH interacts with the N-terminus of the U7 snRNP protein Lsm11 and together they recruit the HCC. FLASH through its distant C-terminus independently interacts with the C-terminal SANT/Myb-like domain of Nuclear Protein, Ataxia-Telangiectasia locus (NPAT), a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of histone genes in S-phase. To gain structural information on these interactions, we used mass spectrometry to monitor hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange in various regions of FLASH, Lsm11 and NPAT alone or in the presence of their respective binding partners. Our results indicate that the FLASH-interacting domain in Lsm11 is highly dynamic, while the more downstream region required for recruiting the HCC exchanges deuterium slowly and likely folds into a stable structure. In FLASH, a stable structure is adopted by the domain that interacts with Lsm11 and this domain is further stabilized by binding Lsm11. Notably, both H/D exchange experiments and in vitro binding assays demonstrate that Lsm11, in addition to interacting with the N-terminal region of FLASH, also contacts the C-terminal SANT/Myb-like domain of FLASH, the same region that binds NPAT. However, while NPAT stabilizes this domain, Lsm11 causes its partial relaxation. These competing reactions may play a role in regulating histone gene expression in vivo. PMID:26860583

  6. Structural, energetic, spectroscopic and QTAIM analyses of cation-π interactions involving mono- and bi-cyclic ring fused benzene systems.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ayorinde; Dinadayalane, Tandabany C; Grabowski, Sławomir J; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-12-28

    The effect of increasing the number of monocyclic six-membered rings or bicyclic rings of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexenyl fused to benzene on cation-π interactions involving alkali metal ions (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) has been investigated. The binding energy data at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level clearly indicate that the binding affinity of the metal ion with benzene is enhanced by increasing the number of rings fused irrespective of a monocyclic or a bicyclic ring. Calculated binding energies are in good agreement with the available experimental results. The binding strength of cations with ligands decreases in the order Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). Our study establishes that trisannelation of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexene to benzene facilitates a very strong interaction between benzene and cations. Infrared (IR) frequencies and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts are shown to be valuable in characterizing cation-π interactions. The C-C bonds of the central six-membered rings are weakened due to metal ion binding. Based on the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM), we have observed the presence of stabilizing H∙∙∙H interactions in two of the considered systems as opposed to the frequent description of these interactions as non-bonded repulsive interactions. Alkali metal ion binding with those two ligands slightly reduces the strength of such H∙∙∙H interactions.

  7. The in vitro interaction of Sporothrix schenckii with human endothelial cells is modulated by cytokines and involves endothelial surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Camila Castro; De Lima, Osana Cunha; De Carvalho, Laís; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria; Morandi, Verônica

    2004-04-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis that can evolve to systemic complications in immunocompromised patients. Interactions with endothelium are thought to be essential for systemic infections. In the present work, we studied the interaction between S. schenckii and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). S. schenckii interacts with HUVECs in a time-dependent manner. Morphological analysis showed that yeasts locate to interendothelial junctions. Ultrastructural studies showed that internalized yeasts were found inside endocytic vacuoles as early as 2 h, without causing any detectable damage to HUVECs after 24 h of infection. The viability of infected HUVECs was confirmed by the MTT assay. When HUVECs were treated with different concentrations of Interleukin-1beta or transforming growth factor-beta, a significant dose-dependent increase in cell-associated yeasts was observed. The preliminary analysis of the endothelial surface ligands for S. schenckii cells revealed two major molecules, with Mr of approximately 90 and 135 kDa. The interaction of endothelial cell surface molecules with S. schenckii yeast cells was modulated by divalent cations. This is the first demonstration that S. schenckii is able to adhere and invade endothelial cells without significantly affect cellular integrity. Our results suggest the contribution of cytokine-modulated calcium-dependent molecules to this process.

  8. NuMA localization, stability, and function in spindle orientation involve 4.1 and Cdk1 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Poulson, Nicholas D.; Foote, Henry P.; Lechler, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The epidermis is a multilayered epithelium that requires asymmetric divisions for stratification. A conserved cortical protein complex, including LGN, nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA), and dynein/dynactin, plays a key role in establishing proper spindle orientation during asymmetric divisions. The requirements for the cortical recruitment of these proteins, however, remain unclear. In this work, we show that NuMA is required to recruit dynactin to the cell cortex of keratinocytes. NuMA's cortical recruitment requires LGN; however, LGN interactions are not sufficient for this localization. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that the 4.1-binding domain of NuMA is important for stabilizing its interaction with the cell cortex. This is functionally important, as loss of 4.1/NuMA interaction results in spindle orientation defects, using two distinct assays. Furthermore, we observe an increase in cortical NuMA localization as cells enter anaphase. Inhibition of Cdk1 or mutation of a single residue in NuMA mimics this effect. NuMA's anaphase localization is independent of LGN and 4.1 interactions, revealing two distinct mechanisms responsible for NuMA cortical recruitment at different stages of mitosis. This work highlights the complexity of NuMA localization and reveals the importance of NuMA cortical stability for productive force generation during spindle orientation. PMID:24109598

  9. Peer Interactions in a Computer Lab: Reflections on Results of a Case Study Involving Web-Based Dynamic Geometry Sketches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Margaret P.

    2005-01-01

    A case study, originally set up to identify and describe some benefits and limitations of using dynamic web-based geometry sketches, provided an opportunity to examine peer interactions in a lab. Since classes were held in a computer lab, teachers and pairs faced the challenges of working and communicating in a lab environment. Research has shown…

  10. Involving the Parents of English Language Learners in a Rural Area: Focus on the Dynamics of Teacher-Parent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Jenna M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the author suggests that the current ELL parental involvement model often overlooks the structural aspects and power asymmetry of parent-teacher relationships that can hinder productive collaboration. In doing so, the author uses postcolonial theory as a conceptual lens to investigate the dynamics of ELL parent-teacher interactions…

  11. Moroccan Mothers' Involvement in Dialogic Literary Gatherings in a Catalan Urban Primary School: Increasing Educative Interactions and Improving Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Botton, Lena; Girbés, Sandra; Ruiz, Laura; Tellado, Itxaso

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses a case study on Moroccan mothers' involvement in the Dialogic Literary Gathering (DLG) in an urban primary school in Catalonia (Spain). DLG is a dialogic learning environment that improves reading skills and communicative abilities and promotes school-community links. This activity has been identified in previous European…

  12. Chromatin Insulator Factors Involved in Long-Range DNA Interactions and Their Role in the Folding of the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dejardin, Stephanie; Allemand, Frederic; Gamot, Adrien; Labesse, Gilles; Cuvier, Olivier; Nègre, Nicolas; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Margeat, Emmanuel; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are genetic elements implicated in the organization of chromatin and the regulation of transcription. In Drosophila, different insulator types were characterized by their locus-specific composition of insulator proteins and co-factors. Insulators mediate specific long-range DNA contacts required for the three dimensional organization of the interphase nucleus and for transcription regulation, but the mechanisms underlying the formation of these contacts is currently unknown. Here, we investigate the molecular associations between different components of insulator complexes (BEAF32, CP190 and Chromator) by biochemical and biophysical means, and develop a novel single-molecule assay to determine what factors are necessary and essential for the formation of long-range DNA interactions. We show that BEAF32 is able to bind DNA specifically and with high affinity, but not to bridge long-range interactions (LRI). In contrast, we show that CP190 and Chromator are able to mediate LRI between specifically-bound BEAF32 nucleoprotein complexes in vitro. This ability of CP190 and Chromator to establish LRI requires specific contacts between BEAF32 and their C-terminal domains, and dimerization through their N-terminal domains. In particular, the BTB/POZ domains of CP190 form a strict homodimer, and its C-terminal domain interacts with several insulator binding proteins. We propose a general model for insulator function in which BEAF32/dCTCF/Su(HW) provide DNA specificity (first layer proteins) whereas CP190/Chromator are responsible for the physical interactions required for long-range contacts (second layer). This network of organized, multi-layer interactions could explain the different activities of insulators as chromatin barriers, enhancer blockers, and transcriptional regulators, and suggest a general mechanism for how insulators may shape the organization of higher-order chromatin during cell division. PMID:25165871

  13. Identification of Regions Interacting with Ovo(d) Mutations: Potential New Genes Involved in Germline Sex Determination or Differentiation in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, D.; Oliver, B.; Mahowald, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    Only a few Drosophila melanogaster germline sex determination genes are known, and there have been no systematic screens to identify new genes involved in this important biological process. The ovarian phenotypes produced by females mutant for dominant alleles of the ovo gene are modified in flies with altered doses of other loci involved in germline sex determination in Drosophila (Sex-lethal(+), sans fille(+) and ovarian tumor(+)). This observation constitutes the basis for a screen to identify additional genes required for proper establishment of germline sexual identity. We tested 300 deletions, which together cover ~58% of the euchromatic portion of the genome, for genetic interactions with ovo(D). Hemizygosity for more than a dozen small regions show interactions that either partially suppress or enhance the ovarian phenotypes of females mutant for one or more of the three dominant ovo mutations. These regions probably contain genes whose products act in developmental hierarchies that include ovo(+) protein. PMID:7713427

  14. Pregenual Anterior Cingulate Gyrus Involvement in Spontaneous Social Interactions in Primates—Evidence from Behavioral, Pharmacological, Neuropsychiatric, and Neurophysiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Can Van; Araujo, Mariana F. P.; Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Tran, Ahn Hai; Hori, Etsuro; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been implicated in different aspects of cognition and decision making, including social cognition. Several studies suggest that this region is actually formed by sub-regions concerned with distinct cognitive functions. The ACC is usually divided in its rostro-caudal axis, with the caudal ACC playing a major role in processing own actions, and the rostral ACC being related to social cognition. Recently, it has been suggested that the ACC can also be functionally divided in its dorso-ventral axis into ACC gyrus (ACCg) and ACC sulcus (ACCs), with the ACCg having a central role in processing social information. In this context, we propose that the pregenual ACCg might be especially important for engaging in social interactions. We discuss previous findings that support this hypothesis and present evidence suggesting that the activity of pregenual ACCg neurons is modulated during spontaneous social interactions. PMID:28203143

  15. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  16. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio; Saggio, Isabella

    2016-08-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence.

  17. Structural and Functional Characterization of CRM1-Nup214 Interactions Reveals Multiple FG-Binding Sites Involved in Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Port, Sarah A; Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Spillner, Christiane; Hofele, Romina; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2015-10-27

    CRM1 is the major nuclear export receptor. During translocation through the nuclear pore, transport complexes transiently interact with phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats of multiple nucleoporins. On the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore, CRM1 tightly interacts with the nucleoporin Nup214. Here, we present the crystal structure of a 117-amino-acid FG-repeat-containing fragment of Nup214, in complex with CRM1, Snurportin 1, and RanGTP at 2.85 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight binding sites for Nup214 FG motifs on CRM1, with intervening stretches that are loosely attached to the transport receptor. Nup214 binds to N- and C-terminal regions of CRM1, thereby clamping CRM1 in a closed conformation and stabilizing the export complex. The role of conserved hydrophobic pockets for the recognition of FG motifs was analyzed in biochemical and cell-based assays. Comparative studies with RanBP3 and Nup62 shed light on specificities of CRM1-nucleoporin binding, which serves as a paradigm for transport receptor-nucleoporin interactions.

  18. Older adults catch up to younger adults on a learning and memory task that involves collaborative social interaction.

    PubMed

    Derksen, B J; Duff, M C; Weldon, K; Zhang, J; Zamba, K D; Tranel, D; Denburg, N L

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory abilities tend to decline as people age. The current study examines the question of whether a learning situation that emphasises collaborative social interaction might help older persons overcome age-related learning and memory changes and thus perform similarly to younger persons. Younger and Older participants (n = 34 in each group) completed the Barrier Task (BT), a game-like social interaction where partners work together to develop labels for a set of abstract tangrams. Participants were also administered standard clinical neuropsychological measures of memory, on which the Older group showed expected inferiority to the Younger group. On the BT, the Older group performed less well than the Younger group early on, but as the task progressed, the performance of the Older group caught up and became statistically indistinguishable from that of the Younger group. These results can be taken to suggest that a learning milieu characterised by collaborative social interaction can attenuate some of the typical memory disadvantages associated with being older.

  19. Nucleocapsid Interacts with NPM1 and Protects it from Proteolytic Cleavage, Enhancing Cell Survival, and is Involved in PEDV Growth

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Da; Shi, Hongyan; Sun, Dongbo; Chen, Jianfei; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Jialin; Ji, Zhaoyang; Liu, Jianbo; Cao, Liyan; Zhu, Xiangdong; Yuan, Jing; Dong, Hui; Wang, Xin; Chang, Tiecheng; Liu, Ye; Feng, Li

    2017-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) replicates in the cytoplasm of infected cells, but its nucleocapsid (N) protein localizes specifically to the nucleolus. The mechanism of nuclear translocation, and whether N protein associates with particular nucleolar components, is unknown. In this study, we confirm that a nucleolar phosphoprotein nucleophosmin (NPM1) interacts and co-localizes with the N protein in the nucleolus. In vitro binding studies indicated that aa 148–294 of N and aa 118–188 of NPM1 were required for binding. Interestingly, N protein importation into the nucleolus is independent of the ability of NPM1 to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Furthermore, overexpression of NPM1 promoted PEDV growth, while knockdown of NPM1 suppressed PEDV growth. In addition, binding of N protein to NPM1 protects it from proteolytic degradation by caspase-3, leading to increased cell survival. Taken together, our studies demonstrate a specific interaction of the N protein with the host cell protein NPM1 in the nucleolus. The results suggest potential linkages among viral strategies for the regulation of cell survival activities, possibly through an interaction of N protein with NPM1 which prevents its proteolytic cleavage and enhances cell survival, thus ultimately promoting the replication of PEDV. PMID:28045037

  20. NMR Identification of the Binding Surfaces Involved in the Salmonella and Shigella Type III Secretion Tip-Translocon Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    McShan, Andrew C.; Kaur, Kawaljit; Chatterjee, Srirupa; Knight, Kevin M.; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2017-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacteria including Salmonella and Shigella, which together are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide each year. The structural component of the T3SS consists of the needle apparatus, which is assembled in part by the protein-protein interaction between the tip and the translocon. The atomic detail of the interaction between the tip and the translocon proteins is currently unknown. Here, we used NMR methods to identify that the N-terminal domain of the Salmonella SipB translocon protein interacts with the SipD tip protein at a surface at the distal region of the tip formed by the mixed α/β domain and a portion of its coiled-coil domain. Likewise, the Shigella IpaB translocon protein and the IpaD tip protein interact with each other using similar surfaces identified for the Salmonella homologs. Furthermore, removal of the extreme N-terminal residues of the translocon protein, previously thought to be important for the interaction, had little change on the binding surface. Finally, mutations at the binding surface of SipD reduced invasion of Salmonella into human intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these results reveal the binding surfaces involved in the tip-translocon protein-protein interaction and advance our understanding of the assembly of the T3SS needle apparatus. PMID:27093649

  1. IgG4-related epididymo-orchitis associated with bladder cancer: possible involvement of BAFF/BAFF-R interaction in IgG4-related urogenital disease.

    PubMed

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Miyashita, Taiichiro; Mizuno, Aya; Jiuchi, Yuka; Ito, Masahiro; Matsuo, Manabu; Izumi, Yasumori; Takeoka, Atsushi; Nishino, Ayako; Hayashi, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    We describe herein a patient who presented with immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) involving the testis and prostate as well as the submandibular glands. Massive infiltration of IgG4-expressing plasma cells was observed in testis and prostate tissues. Serum concentrations of B cell activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) were elevated in parallel with serum IgG4 concentrations, and infiltration of BAFF-receptor (BAFF-R)-expressing B cells and BAFF-expressing lymphoid cells was observed around the ectopic lymphoid foci in the affected urogenital tissues. To date, testicular involvement in a patient diagnosed with IgG4-RD had not been reported, making this the first reported case of IgG4-related epididymo-orchitis. These findings suggest that the immune mechanism underlying ectopic lymphoneogenesis in IgG4-RD may involve enhanced BAFF/BAFF-R interactions among lymphoid cells.

  2. Toward Molecular Magnets of Organic Origin via Anion-π Interaction Involving m-Aminyl Diradical: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debojit; Shil, Suranjan; Misra, Anirban; Bytautas, Laimutis; Klein, Douglas J

    2016-11-17

    Here we study a set of novel magnetic organic molecular species with different halide ions (fluoride, chloride, bromide) absorbed ∼2 Å above or below the center of an aromatic π-ring in an m-aminyl diradical. Focus is on the nature of anion-π interaction and its impact on magnetic properties, specifically on magnetic anisotropy and on intramolecular magnetic exchange coupling. In the development of single molecule magnets, magnetic anisotropy is considered to be the most influential factor. A new insight regarding the magnetic anisotropy that determines the barrier height for relaxation of magnetization of m-aminyl diradical-derived anionic complexes is obtained from calculations of the axial zero-field-splitting (ZFS) parameter D. The noncovalent anion-π interaction strongly influences magnetic anisotropy in m-aminyl-halide diradical complexes. In particular, the change of D values from positive (for the m-aminyl diradical, m-aminyl diradical/fluoride, and m-aminyl diradical/chloride complexes) to negative D-values in m-aminyl diradical complexes containing bromide signals a change from oblate to prolate type of spin-density distribution. Furthermore, the noncovalent halide-π interactions lead to large values of intramolecular magnetic exchange coupling coefficients J exhibiting a ferromagnetic sign. The magnitude of J steadily increases going from anionic complexes containing fluoride to chloride and then to bromide. Relations are sought between the magnetic exchange coupling coefficients J and aromaticity, namely structural HOMA (harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity) and magnetic NICS (nucleus independent chemical shift) aromaticity indices, in particular, the NICSzz(+1) component. Finally, possible numerical checks on the conditions relating to validity of the well-known Yamaguchi's formula for calculating the exchange coupling coefficient J in diradical systems are discussed.

  3. Prolactin Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with NS4B

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingbao; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakamura, Mariko; Aoyagi, Haruyo; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Arita, Minetaro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein triggers the membranous HCV replication compartment, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we screened for NS4B-associated membrane proteins by tandem affinity purification and proteome analysis and identified 202 host proteins. Subsequent screening of replicon cells with small interfering RNA identified prolactin regulatory element binding (PREB) to be a novel HCV host cofactor. The interaction between PREB and NS4B was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assays. PREB colocalized with double-stranded RNA and the newly synthesized HCV RNA labeled with bromouridine triphosphate in HCV replicon cells. Furthermore, PREB shifted to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), where HCV replication complexes reside, in the presence of NS4B expression in Huh7 cells. However, a PREB mutant lacking the NS4B-binding region (PREBd3) could not colocalize with double-stranded RNA and did not shift to the DRM in the presence of NS4B. These results indicate that PREB locates at the HCV replication complex by interacting with NS4B. PREB silencing inhibited the formation of the membranous HCV replication compartment and increased the protease and nuclease sensitivity of HCV replicase proteins and RNA in DRMs, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that PREB promotes HCV RNA replication by participating in the formation of the membranous replication compartment and by maintaining its proper structure by interacting with NS4B. Furthermore, PREB was induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into HCV host cofactors. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS4B can induce alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of a membranous web structure, which provides a platform for the HCV replication complex. The molecular mechanism by which NS4B induces the membranous HCV replication

  4. A lattice Boltzmann-finite element model for two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction problems involving shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a numerical method for the modeling of shallow waters interacting with slender elastic structures is presented. The fluid domain is modeled through the lattice Boltzmann method, while the solid domain is idealized by corotational beam finite elements undergoing large displacements. Structure dynamics is predicted by using the time discontinuous Galerkin method and the fluid-structure interface conditions are handled by the Immersed Boundary method. An explicit coupling strategy to combine the adopted numerical methods is proposed and its effectiveness is tested by computing the error in terms of the energy that is artificially introduced at the fluid-solid interface.

  5. Assembly of ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) inward rectifier K+ channel subunits involves multiple interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Koster, J C; Bentle, K A; Nichols, C G; Ho, K

    1998-04-01

    The ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) channel is formed by a tetrameric complex of subunits, each characterized by cytoplasmic N- and C-termini and a core region of two transmembrane helices flanking a pore-forming segment. To delineate the general regions mediating the assembly of ROMK1 subunits we constructed epitope-tagged N-terminal, C-terminal, and transmembrane segment deletion mutants. Nonfunctional subunits with N-terminal, core region, and C-terminal deletions had dominant negative effects when coexpressed with wild-type ROMK1 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, coexpression of these nonfunctional subunits with Kv 2.1 (DRK1) did not suppress Kv 2.1 currents in control oocytes. Interactions between epitope-tagged mutant and wild-type ROMK1 subunits were studied in parallel by immunoprecipitating [35S]-labeled oocyte membrane proteins. Complexes containing both wild-type and mutant subunits that retained H5, M2, and C-terminal regions were coimmunoprecipitated to a greater extent than complexes consisting of wild-type and mutant subunits with core region and/or C-terminal deletions. The present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple interaction sites located in the core region and cytoplasmic termini of ROMK1 subunits mediate homomultimeric assembly.

  6. Assembly of ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) inward rectifier K+ channel subunits involves multiple interaction sites.

    PubMed Central

    Koster, J C; Bentle, K A; Nichols, C G; Ho, K

    1998-01-01

    The ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) channel is formed by a tetrameric complex of subunits, each characterized by cytoplasmic N- and C-termini and a core region of two transmembrane helices flanking a pore-forming segment. To delineate the general regions mediating the assembly of ROMK1 subunits we constructed epitope-tagged N-terminal, C-terminal, and transmembrane segment deletion mutants. Nonfunctional subunits with N-terminal, core region, and C-terminal deletions had dominant negative effects when coexpressed with wild-type ROMK1 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, coexpression of these nonfunctional subunits with Kv 2.1 (DRK1) did not suppress Kv 2.1 currents in control oocytes. Interactions between epitope-tagged mutant and wild-type ROMK1 subunits were studied in parallel by immunoprecipitating [35S]-labeled oocyte membrane proteins. Complexes containing both wild-type and mutant subunits that retained H5, M2, and C-terminal regions were coimmunoprecipitated to a greater extent than complexes consisting of wild-type and mutant subunits with core region and/or C-terminal deletions. The present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple interaction sites located in the core region and cytoplasmic termini of ROMK1 subunits mediate homomultimeric assembly. PMID:9545044

  7. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants

    PubMed Central

    Hollman, Antoinesha L.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Huang, Hung-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases. PMID:27043589

  8. Interspecific interactions involving Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and Agistemus brasiliensis (Acari: Stigmaeidae) as predators of Brevipalpus phoenicis (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcos Zatti; Sato, Mário Eidi; de Oliveira, Carlos Amadeu Leite; Nicastro, Roberto Lomba

    2015-03-01

    Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) is associated with the transmission of Citrus leprosis which is considered the main viral disease for the Brazilian citrus production. Mites of the families Stigmaeidae and Phytoseiidae coexist in various agricultural crops, often promoting the biological control of pest mites. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) (Phytoseiidae) and Agistemus brasiliensis Matioli, Ueckermann & Oliveira (Stigmaeidae), in the presence or absence of B. phoenicis. Two experiments were carried out. In the first, a N. californicus female was placed in each leaf disc arena, with eggs of B. phoenicis and A. brasiliensis as food sources. In the second, an A. brasiliensis female was placed in each arena, with eggs of B. phoenicis and N. californicus as food sources. Adults of both predators were able to consume both types of eggs available as food sources, but they fed on considerably higher proportions of B. phoenicis than on eggs of the predator. Eggs of A. brasiliensis were not a suitable food source for N. californicus, which produced only 0.1 egg per female per day when only eggs of that species were present in the experimental unit. The results suggest that eggs of N. californicus were a suitable food source for A. brasiliensis, which oviposited 1.12 eggs per day, when only eggs of N. californicus were provided to the stigmaeid mite. The possible interactions among N. californicus, A. brasiliensis and B. phoenicis in citrus orchards are discussed.

  9. Divergent interactions involving the oxidosqualene cyclase and the steroid-3-ketoreductase in the sterol biosynthetic pathway of mammals and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Taramino, Silvia; Teske, Brian; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Bard, Martin; Balliano, Gianni

    2010-11-01

    In mammals and yeasts, oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) catalyzes the formation of lanosterol, the first cyclic intermediate in sterol biosynthesis. We used a murine myeloma cell line (NS0), deficient in the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 7 (HSD17B7), as a model to study the potential interaction of the HSD17B7 with the OSC in mammals. HSD17B7 is the orthologue of the yeast steroid-3-ketoreductase (ERG27), an enzyme of ergosterol biosynthesis that plays a protective role towards OSC. Tracer experiments with NS0 cells showed that OSC is fully active in these mammalian cells, suggesting that in mammals the ketosteroid reductase is not required for OSC activity. Mouse and human HSD17B7 were overexpressed in ERG27-deletant yeast cells, and recombinant strains were tested for (i) the ability to grow on different media, (ii) steroid-3-ketoreductase activity, and (iii) OSC activity. Recombinant strains grew more slowly than the control yeast ERG27-overexpressing strain on sterol-deficient media, whereas the growth rate was normal on media supplemented with a 3-ketoreductase substrate. The full enzymatic functionality of mammalian steroid-3-ketoreductase expressed in yeast along with the lack of (yeast) OSC activity point to an inability of the mammalian reductase to assist yeast OSC. Results demonstrate that in mammals, unlike in yeast, OSC and steroid-3-ketoreductase are non-interacting proteins.

  10. Intermolecular interactions involving C-H bonds, 3, Structure and energetics of the interaction between CH{sub 4} and CN{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Williams, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    On the basis of SCF and single reference MP2 calculations, the full potential energy surface of the interaction between CH{sub 4} and CN{sup {minus}} was studied using extended basis sets of up to near Hartree-Fock limit quality. Colinear arrangements C-N{sup {minus}}{hor_ellipsis}H-CH{sub 3} and N-C{sup {minus}}{hor_ellipsis}H-CH{sub 3} are found to be the only two energy minima. The binding energies of these two structures are calculated to be 2.5 and 2.1 kcal/mol, respectively, at the MP2 level. The full vibrational analyses of two structures show a red shift of about 30 cm{sup {minus}1} for the v{sub s} C-H stretching.

  11. Identification of critical residues in Hepatitis E virus macro domain involved in its interaction with viral methyltransferase and ORF3 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anang, Saumya; Subramani, Chandru; Nair, Vidya P.; Kaul, Sheetal; Kaushik, Nidhi; Sharma, Chandresh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Ranjith-Kumar, CT; Surjit, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of hepatitis in normal and organ transplant individuals. HEV open reading frame-1 encodes a polypeptide comprising of the viral nonstructural proteins as well as domains of unknown function such as the macro domain (X-domain), V, DUF3729 and Y. The macro domain proteins are ubiquitously present from prokaryotes to human and in many positive-strand RNA viruses, playing important roles in multiple cellular processes. Towards understanding the function of the HEV macro domain, we characterized its interaction partners among other HEV encoded proteins. Here, we report that the HEV X-domain directly interacts with the viral methyltransferase and the ORF3 proteins. ORF3 association with the X-domain was mediated through two independent motifs, located within its N-terminal 35aa (amino acids) and C-terminal 63-123aa. Methyltransferase interaction domain was mapped to N-terminal 30-90aa. The X-domain interacted with both ORF3 and methyltransferase through its C-terminal region, involving 66th,67th isoleucine and 101st,102nd leucine, conserved across HEV genotypes. Furthermore, ORF3 and methyltransferase competed with each other for associating with the X-domain. These findings provide molecular understanding of the interaction between the HEV macro domain, methyltransferase and ORF3, suggesting an important role of the macro domain in the life cycle of HEV. PMID:27113483

  12. Identification of new protein-protein interactions involving the products of the chromosome- and plasmid-encoded type IV secretion loci of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Alegria, Marcos C; Souza, Diorge P; Andrade, Maxuel O; Docena, Cassia; Khater, Leticia; Ramos, Carlos H I; da Silva, Ana C R; Farah, Chuck S

    2005-04-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri contains two virB gene clusters, one on the chromosome and one on a 64-kb plasmid, each of which codes for a previously uncharacterized type IV secretion system (T4SS). Here we used a yeast two-hybrid assay to identify protein-protein interactions in these two systems. Our results revealed interactions between known T4SS components as well as previously uncharacterized interactions involving hypothetical proteins coded by open reading frames in the two X. axonopodis pv. citri virB loci. Our results indicate that both loci may code for previously unidentified VirB7 proteins, which we show interact with either VirB6 or VirB9 or with a hypothetical protein coded by the same locus. Furthermore, a set of previously uncharacterized Xanthomonas proteins have been found to interact with VirD4, whose gene is adjacent to the chromosomal virB locus. The gene for one member of this family is found within the chromosomal virB locus. All these uncharacterized proteins possess a conserved 120-amino-acid domain in their C termini and may represent a family of cofactors or substrates of the Xanthomonas T4SS.

  13. Identification of critical residues in Hepatitis E virus macro domain involved in its interaction with viral methyltransferase and ORF3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Anang, Saumya; Subramani, Chandru; Nair, Vidya P; Kaul, Sheetal; Kaushik, Nidhi; Sharma, Chandresh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Surjit, Milan

    2016-04-26

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of hepatitis in normal and organ transplant individuals. HEV open reading frame-1 encodes a polypeptide comprising of the viral nonstructural proteins as well as domains of unknown function such as the macro domain (X-domain), V, DUF3729 and Y. The macro domain proteins are ubiquitously present from prokaryotes to human and in many positive-strand RNA viruses, playing important roles in multiple cellular processes. Towards understanding the function of the HEV macro domain, we characterized its interaction partners among other HEV encoded proteins. Here, we report that the HEV X-domain directly interacts with the viral methyltransferase and the ORF3 proteins. ORF3 association with the X-domain was mediated through two independent motifs, located within its N-terminal 35aa (amino acids) and C-terminal 63-123aa. Methyltransferase interaction domain was mapped to N-terminal 30-90aa. The X-domain interacted with both ORF3 and methyltransferase through its C-terminal region, involving 66(th),67(th) isoleucine and 101(st),102(nd) leucine, conserved across HEV genotypes. Furthermore, ORF3 and methyltransferase competed with each other for associating with the X-domain. These findings provide molecular understanding of the interaction between the HEV macro domain, methyltransferase and ORF3, suggesting an important role of the macro domain in the life cycle of HEV.

  14. Competition between Halogen Bonding and π-Hole Interactions Involving Various Donors: The Role of Dispersion Effects.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2015-10-05

    In this study several σ- and π-hole complexes between IF and pnicogen ZO2 F (Z=P, As), chalcogen ChO3 (Ch=S, Se) and tetrel TrOF2 (Tr=Si, Ge) -bearing compounds were optimized at the RI-MP2/def2-TZVPD level of theory. All complexes were characterized as minima by frequency analysis calculations. In addition, a comparative CCSD(T) and DFT (with and without dispersion correction) study using the BP86, B3LYP and M06-2X method was done in order to analyze the role of dispersion effects in the σ-/π-hole binding. Finally the Bader's AIM analysis of several complexes was performed to further characterize the interactions discussed herein.

  15. Identification of YbeY-Protein Interactions Involved in 16S rRNA Maturation and Stress Regulation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Shen, Yang; Proulx, Sandra; Ghosal, Anubrata; Davies, Bryan W.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT YbeY is part of a core set of RNases in Escherichia coli and other bacteria. This highly conserved endoribonuclease has been implicated in several important processes such as 16S rRNA 3′ end maturation, 70S ribosome quality control, and regulation of mRNAs and small noncoding RNAs, thereby affecting cellular viability, stress tolerance, and pathogenic and symbiotic behavior of bacteria. Thus, YbeY likely interacts with numerous protein or RNA partners that are involved in various aspects of cellular physiology. Using a bacterial two-hybrid system, we identified several proteins that interact with YbeY, including ribosomal protein S11, the ribosome-associated GTPases Era and Der, YbeZ, and SpoT. In particular, the interaction of YbeY with S11 and Era provides insight into YbeY’s involvement in the 16S rRNA maturation process. The three-way association between YbeY, S11, and Era suggests that YbeY is recruited to the ribosome where it could cleave the 17S rRNA precursor endonucleolytically at or near the 3′ end maturation site. Analysis of YbeY missense mutants shows that a highly conserved beta-sheet in YbeY—and not amino acids known to be important for YbeY’s RNase activity—functions as the interface between YbeY and S11. This protein-interacting interface of YbeY is needed for correct rRNA maturation and stress regulation, as missense mutants show significant phenotypic defects. Additionally, structure-based in silico prediction of putative interactions between YbeY and the Era-30S complex through protein docking agrees well with the in vivo results. PMID:27834201

  16. Syntectonic Fluid-Rock Interactions Involving Surficial Waters in the Sevier Thrust Belt, Tendoy Mountains, Southwest Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. C.; Anastasio, D. J.; Bebout, G. E.

    2002-05-01

    Calcite veins and Mississippian carbonates from the Sevier thrust front record syntectonic meteoric fluid infiltration and hydrocarbon migration. The Tendoy and Four Eyes Canyon thrust sheets were emplaced onto the western margin of the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway \\{WIS\\}. Low salinity \\{Tice = -0.6° C to +3.6° C\\} and low temperature \\{110° C +/- 10\\} fluids interacted with hanging-wall carbonates at a depth of 5km. Most veins have single or multiple generations of varying apertures, composed predominately of large euhedral crystals with some finer grained layers and protolith inclusions. Orientation analysis of mutually cross-cutting, high-angle vein sets suggest development concurrent with Four Eyes Canyon thrusting but prior to Tendoy thrusting. These vein sets are generally cut by later synfolding bed-parallel shear veins. Reactivation of both the bed-parallel and bed-perpendicular vein sets \\{strike parallel and strike perpendicular\\} in the Four Eyes Canyon thrust sheet occurred subsequent to Sevier compression, creating wide, coarse crystalline veins that often transect Sevier structures. Oxygen and Carbon isotope analyses of veins allow for reconstruction of fluid-rock interactions during thrust sheet emplacement and later reactivation. All veins and variably deformed host-rocks were microsampled and analyzed for δ 18OV-SMOW and δ 13CV-PDB. Small Tendoy veins \\{1mm-1cm wide\\} have calcite δ 18O values of +8.9 to +28.8‰ and calculated fluid \\{as H2O\\} of -8.3 to +11.6‰ \\{100° C\\}, -7.3 to +12.6‰ \\{110° C\\}, and -6.3 to +13.6‰ \\{120° C\\}. Four Eyes Canyon veins \\{1cm-3m wide\\} have calcite δ 18O values of +5.9 to +17.0‰ and calculated fluid of -11.3 to -0.2‰ \\{100° C\\}, -10.3 to +0.8‰ \\{110° C\\}, and -9.3 to +1.8‰ \\{120° C\\}. While there is significant variation in δ 18O there is relatively little systematic variation seen in δ 13C. Protolith carbonate has δ 18O values of +22.2‰ +/- 3

  17. Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Interact with Dietary Fat Intakes to Modulate the Plasma TG Response to a Fish Oil Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard-Mercier, Annie; Rudkowska, Iwona; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    A large inter-individual variability in the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation has been observed. The objective was to examine gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response after a fish oil supplementation, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes. Two hundred and eight (208) participants were recruited in the greater Quebec City area. The participants completed a six-week fish oil supplementation (5 g fish oil/day: 1.9–2.2 g EPA and 1.1 g DHA). Dietary fat intakes were measured using three-day food records. SNPs within RXRA, CPT1A, ACADVL, ACAA2, ABCD2, ACOX1 and ACAA1 genes were genotyped using TAQMAN methodology. Gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response were observed for SNPs within RXRA (rs11185660, rs10881576 and rs12339187) and ACOX1 (rs17583163) genes. For rs11185660, fold changes in RXRA gene expression levels were different depending on SFA intakes for homozygotes T/T. Gene-diet interaction effects of SNPs within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes may be important in understanding the inter-individual variability in plasma TG levels and in the plasma TG response to a fish oil supplementation. PMID:24647074

  18. Structural basis of the interaction between the putative adhesion-involved and iron-regulated FrpD and FrpC proteins of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Sviridova, Ekaterina; Rezacova, Pavlina; Bondar, Alexey; Veverka, Vaclav; Novak, Petr; Schenk, Gundolf; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana; Bumba, Ladislav

    2017-01-01

    The iron-regulated protein FrpD from Neisseria meningitidis is an outer membrane lipoprotein that interacts with very high affinity (Kd ~ 0.2 nM) with the N-terminal domain of FrpC, a Type I-secreted protein from the Repeat in ToXin (RTX) protein family. In the presence of Ca2+, FrpC undergoes Ca2+ -dependent protein trans-splicing that includes an autocatalytic cleavage of the Asp414-Pro415 peptide bond and formation of an Asp414-Lys isopeptide bond. Here, we report the high-resolution structure of FrpD and describe the structure-function relationships underlying the interaction between FrpD and FrpC1-414. We identified FrpD residues involved in FrpC1-414 binding, which enabled localization of FrpD within the low-resolution SAXS model of the FrpD-FrpC1-414 complex. Moreover, the trans-splicing activity of FrpC resulted in covalent linkage of the FrpC1-414 fragment to plasma membrane proteins of epithelial cells in vitro, suggesting that formation of the FrpD-FrpC1-414 complex may be involved in the interaction of meningococci with the host cell surface. PMID:28084396

  19. A BDNF sensitive mechanism is involved in the fear memory resulting from the interaction between stress and the retrieval of an established trace.

    PubMed

    Giachero, Marcelo; Bustos, Silvia G; Calfa, Gaston; Molina, Victor A

    2013-04-15

    The present study investigates the fear memory resulting from the interaction of a stressful experience and the retrieval of an established fear memory trace. Such a combination enhanced both fear expression and fear retention in adult Wistar rats. Likewise, midazolam intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion prior to stress attenuated the enhancement of fear memory thus suggesting the involvement of a stress-induced reduction of the GABAergic transmission in BLA in the stress-induced enhancing effect. It has been suggested that, unlike the immediate-early gene Zif268 which is related to the reconsolidation process, the expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is highly correlated with consolidation. We therefore evaluate the relative contribution of these two neurobiological processes to the fear memory resulting from the above-mentioned interaction. Intra-dorsal hippocampus (DH) infusions of either the antisense Zif268 or the inhibitor of the protein degradation (Clasto-Lactacystin β-Lactone), suggested to be involved in the retrieval-dependent destabilization process, did not affect the resulting contextual memory. In contrast, the knockdown of hippocampal BDNF mitigated the stress-induced facilitating influence on fear retention. In addition, the retrieval experience elevated BDNF level in DH at 60 min after recall exclusively in stressed animals. These findings suggest the involvement of a hippocampal BDNF sensitive mechanism in the stress-promoting influence on the fear memory following retrieval.

  20. Identification and cloning of differentially expressed genes involved in the interaction between potato and Phytophthora infestans using a subtractive hybridization and cDNA-AFLP combinational approach.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Maria Antonia; Daayf, Fouad

    2010-05-01

    Using a subtractive hybridization (SH)/cDNA-AFLP combinational approach, differentially expressed genes involved in the potato-Phytophthora infestans interaction were identified. These included genes potentially controlling pathogenesis or avr genes in P. infestans as well as those potentially involved in potato resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Forty-one differentially expressed transcript-derived fragments (TDFs), resulting from the interaction, were cloned and sequenced. Two TDFs, suggested as potential pathogenicity factors, have sequence similarity to N-succinyl diaminopimelate aminotransferase and a transcriptional regulator, TetR family gene, respectively. Two other TDFs, suggested as potential avr genes, have sequence similarity to an EST sequence from Avr4/Cf-4/Avr9/Cf-9 and a P. infestans avirulence-associated gene, respectively. Genes' expression and origin were confirmed using Southern blots, Northern blots and qRT-PCR. I.e., potential resistance gene DL81 was induced at 12 hpi in the moderately resistant cultivar, whereas it was down-regulated as early as 6 hpi in the susceptible cultivar. On the other hand, DL21 was induced at 6 hpi (3.38-fold) in response to the highly aggressive isolate (US8) and strongly up-regulated thereafter (25.13-fold at 120 hpi.), whereas it was only slightly up-regulated in response to the weakly aggressive isolate US11 (3.82-fold at 96 hpi), suggesting its potential involvement as a susceptibility gene.

  1. Expression of COX-2 in platelet-monocyte interactions occurs via combinatorial regulation involving adhesion and cytokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Dan A.; Tolley, Neal D.; Bemis-Standoli, Kristi; Martinez, Mark L.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Morrow, Jason D.; Prescott, Stephen M.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    Tight regulation of COX-2 expression is a key feature controlling eicosanoid production in atherosclerosis and other inflammatory syndromes. Adhesive interactions between platelets and monocytes occur in these conditions and deliver specific signals that trigger inflammatory gene expression. Using a cellular model of monocyte signaling induced by activated human platelets, we identified the central posttranscriptional mechanisms that regulate timing and magnitude of COX-2 expression. Tethering of monocytes to platelets and to purified P-selectin, a key adhesion molecule displayed by activated platelets, induces NF-κB activation and COX-2 promoter activity. Nevertheless, COX-2 mRNA is rapidly degraded, leading to aborted protein synthesis. Time-dependent signaling of monocytes induces a second phase of transcript accumulation accompanied by COX-2 enzyme synthesis and eicosanoid production. Here, generation of IL-1β, a proinflammatory cytokine, promoted stabilization of COX-2 mRNA by silencing of the AU-rich mRNA decay element (ARE) in the 3′-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the mRNA. Consistent with observed mRNA stabilization, activated platelets or IL-1β treatment induced cytoplasmic accumulation and enhanced ARE binding of the mRNA stability factor HuR in monocytes. These findings demonstrate that activated platelets induce COX-2 synthesis in monocytes by combinatorial signaling to transcriptional and posttranscriptional checkpoints. These checkpoints may be altered in disease and therefore useful as targets for antiinflammatory intervention. PMID:16998585

  2. Structural basis of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase amyloid fibril formation involves interaction of multiple peptide core regions.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masataka; Ando, Mizuho; Adachi, Masayuki; Tanaka, Asumi; Machida, Kodai; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Yamakawa, Miho Yoshida; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), an enzyme implicated in the progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS), forms amyloid fibrils under certain experimental conditions. As part of our efforts to understand ALS pathogenesis, in this study we found that reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bond destabilized the tertiary structure of metal free wild-type SOD1 and greatly enhanced fibril formation in vitro. We also identified fibril core peptides that are resistant to protease digestion by using mass spectroscopy and Edman degradation analyses. Three regions dispersed throughout the sequence were detected as fibril core sequences of SOD1. Interestingly, by using three synthetic peptides that correspond to these identified regions, we determined that each region was capable of fibril formation, either alone or in a mixture containing multiple peptides. It was also revealed that by reducing the disulfide bond and causing a decrease in the structural stability, the amyloid fibril formation of a familial mutant SOD1 G93A was accelerated even under physiological conditions. These results demonstrate that by destabilizing the structure of SOD1 by removing metal ions and breaking the intramolecular disulfide bridge, multiple fibril-forming core regions are exposed, which then interact with each another and form amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions.

  3. Toward a refined view of aggressive fantasy as a risk factor for aggression: interaction effects involving cognitive and situational variables.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig E; Fischer, Kurt W; Watson, Malcolm W

    2009-01-01

    Over three decades of research have established a positive connection between fantasizing about aggression and enacting aggression. Such findings have provided strong evidence against the catharsis view of aggressive fantasy. However, little attention has been paid to the potentially nuanced nature of the link between fantasy aggression and actual aggression. In the present article, we examined the influence of four variables in the aggressive fantasy-aggressive behavior link: gender, exposure to violence, fantasy absorption, and level of fantasy about harm befalling loved ones and the self (dysphoric fantasy). Using data from a diverse, community-based sample of 7-14-year olds and their mothers, we replicated the general finding that aggressive fantasy is positively associated with real-world aggressive behavior. However, we also found that the interaction of aggressive fantasy and exposure to violence related significantly to aggression, as did the relation between aggressive fantasy and dysphoric fantasy. When exposure to violence was low, even high levels of aggressive fantasizing did not predict aggressive behavior, and, when aggressive fantasizing was low, even high levels of exposure to violence did not predict aggressive behavior. Similarly, when dysphoric fantasy was high, the connection between fantasy aggression and real aggression was markedly attenuated. The implications of these findings for intervention efforts and future research are considered.

  4. Cytochrome P450 and P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Interactions Involving African Herbs Indicated for Common Noncommunicable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kikete, Siambi; Liang, Rongjia; Wang, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Herbal remedies are regularly used to complement conventional therapies in the treatment of various illnesses in Africa. This may be because they are relatively cheap and easily accessible and are believed by many to be safe, cause fewer side effects, and are less likely to cause dependency. On the contrary, many herbs have been shown to alter the pharmacokinetics of coadministered allopathic medicines and can either synergize or antagonize therapeutic effects as well as altering the toxicity profiles of these drugs. Current disease burden data point towards epidemiological transitions characterised by increasing urbanization and changing lifestyles, risk factors for chronic diseases like hypertension, diabetes, and cancer which often present as multimorbidities. As a result, we highlight African herb-drug interactions (HDIs) modulated via cytochrome P450 enzyme family (CYP) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the consequences thereof in relation to antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and anticancer drugs. CYPs are enzymes which account for to up to 70% of drug metabolism while P-gp is an efflux pump that extrudes drug substrates out of cells. Consequently, regulation of the relative activity of both CYP and P-gp by African herbs influences the effective drug concentration at the site of action and modifies therapeutic outcomes. PMID:28250793

  5. Structural basis of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase amyloid fibril formation involves interaction of multiple peptide core regions

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Masataka; Ando, Mizuho; Adachi, Masayuki; Tanaka, Asumi; Machida, Kodai; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Yamakawa, Miho Yoshida; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), an enzyme implicated in the progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS), forms amyloid fibrils under certain experimental conditions. As part of our efforts to understand ALS pathogenesis, in this study we found that reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bond destabilized the tertiary structure of metal free wild-type SOD1 and greatly enhanced fibril formation in vitro. We also identified fibril core peptides that are resistant to protease digestion by using mass spectroscopy and Edman degradation analyses. Three regions dispersed throughout the sequence were detected as fibril core sequences of SOD1. Interestingly, by using three synthetic peptides that correspond to these identified regions, we determined that each region was capable of fibril formation, either alone or in a mixture containing multiple peptides. It was also revealed that by reducing the disulfide bond and causing a decrease in the structural stability, the amyloid fibril formation of a familial mutant SOD1 G93A was accelerated even under physiological conditions. These results demonstrate that by destabilizing the structure of SOD1 by removing metal ions and breaking the intramolecular disulfide bridge, multiple fibril-forming core regions are exposed, which then interact with each another and form amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions. PMID:26319711

  6. TEF30 Interacts with Photosystem II Monomers and Is Involved in the Repair of Photodamaged Photosystem II in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Ligia Segatto; Rütgers, Mark; Bujaldon, Sandrine; Heublein, Anja; Geimer, Stefan; Wollman, Francis-André; Schroda, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The remarkable capability of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water comes along with its vulnerability to oxidative damage. Accordingly, organisms harboring PSII have developed strategies to protect PSII from oxidative damage and to repair damaged PSII. Here, we report on the characterization of the THYLAKOID ENRICHED FRACTION30 (TEF30) protein in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is conserved in the green lineage and induced by high light. Fractionation studies revealed that TEF30 is associated with the stromal side of thylakoid membranes. By using blue native/Deriphat-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, sucrose density gradients, and isolated PSII particles, we found TEF30 to quantitatively interact with monomeric PSII complexes. Electron microscopy images revealed significantly reduced thylakoid membrane stacking in TEF30-underexpressing cells when compared with control cells. Biophysical and immunological data point to an impaired PSII repair cycle in TEF30-underexpressing cells and a reduced ability to form PSII supercomplexes after high-light exposure. Taken together, our data suggest potential roles for TEF30 in facilitating the incorporation of a new D1 protein and/or the reintegration of CP43 into repaired PSII monomers, protecting repaired PSII monomers from undergoing repeated repair cycles or facilitating the migration of repaired PSII monomers back to stacked regions for supercomplex reassembly.

  7. Large-scale screening of transcription factor-promoter interactions in spruce reveals a transcriptional network involved in vascular development.

    PubMed

    Duval, Isabelle; Lachance, Denis; Giguère, Isabelle; Bomal, Claude; Morency, Marie-Josée; Pelletier, Gervais; Boyle, Brian; MacKay, John J; Séguin, Armand

    2014-06-01

    This research aimed to investigate the role of diverse transcription factors (TFs) and to delineate gene regulatory networks directly in conifers at a relatively high-throughput level. The approach integrated sequence analyses, transcript profiling, and development of a conifer-specific activation assay. Transcript accumulation profiles of 102 TFs and potential target genes were clustered to identify groups of coordinately expressed genes. Several different patterns of transcript accumulation were observed by profiling in nine different organs and tissues: 27 genes were preferential to secondary xylem both in stems and roots, and other genes were preferential to phelloderm and periderm or were more ubiquitous. A robust system has been established as a screening approach to define which TFs have the ability to regulate a given promoter in planta. Trans-activation or repression effects were observed in 30% of TF-candidate gene promoter combinations. As a proof of concept, phylogenetic analysis and expression and trans-activation data were used to demonstrate that two spruce NAC-domain proteins most likely play key roles in secondary vascular growth as observed in other plant species. This study tested many TFs from diverse families in a conifer tree species, which broadens the knowledge of promoter-TF interactions in wood development and enables comparisons of gene regulatory networks found in angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  8. Single-Cell Transcriptional Analysis Reveals Novel Neuronal Phenotypes and Interaction Networks Involved in the Central Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Park, James; Zhu, Haisun; O'Sullivan, Sean; Ogunnaike, Babatunde A.; Weaver, David R.; Schwaber, James S.; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell heterogeneity confounds efforts to understand how a population of cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function. This complexity is prominent in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Here, individual neurons exhibit a remarkable amount of asynchronous behavior and transcriptional heterogeneity. However, SCN neurons are able to generate precisely coordinated synaptic and molecular outputs that synchronize the body to a common circadian cycle by organizing into cellular networks. To understand this emergent cellular network property, it is important to reconcile single-neuron heterogeneity with network organization. In light of recent studies suggesting that transcriptionally heterogeneous cells organize into distinct cellular phenotypes, we characterized the transcriptional, spatial, and functional organization of 352 SCN neurons from mice experiencing phase-shifts in their circadian cycle. Using the community structure detection method and multivariate analytical techniques, we identified previously undescribed neuronal phenotypes that are likely to participate in regulatory networks with known SCN cell types. Based on the newly discovered neuronal phenotypes, we developed a data-driven neuronal network structure in which multiple cell types interact through known synaptic and paracrine signaling mechanisms. These results provide a basis from which to interpret the functional variability of SCN neurons and describe methodologies toward understanding how a population of heterogeneous single cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function. PMID:27826225

  9. The Arabidopsis AAA ATPase SKD1 is involved in multivesicular endosome function and interacts with its positive regulator LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN5.

    PubMed

    Haas, Thomas J; Sliwinski, Marek K; Martínez, Dana E; Preuss, Mary; Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi; Nielsen, Erik; Odorizzi, Greg; Otegui, Marisa S

    2007-04-01

    In yeast and mammals, the AAA ATPase Vps4p/SKD1 (for Vacuolar protein sorting 4/SUPPRESSOR OF K(+) TRANSPORT GROWTH DEFECT1) is required for the endosomal sorting of secretory and endocytic cargo. We identified a VPS4/SKD1 homolog in Arabidopsis thaliana, which localizes to the cytoplasm and to multivesicular endosomes. In addition, green fluorescent protein-SKD1 colocalizes on multivesicular bodies with fluorescent fusion protein endosomal Rab GTPases, such as ARA6/RabF1, RHA1/RabF2a, and ARA7/RabF2b, and with the endocytic marker FM4-64. The expression of SKD1(E232Q), an ATPase-deficient version of SKD1, induces alterations in the endosomal system of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow 2 cells and ultimately leads to cell death. The inducible expression of SKD1(E232Q) in Arabidopsis resulted in enlarged endosomes with a reduced number of internal vesicles. In a yeast two-hybrid screen using Arabidopsis SKD1 as bait, we isolated a putative homolog of mammalian LYST-INTERACTING PROTEIN5 (LIP5)/SKD1 BINDING PROTEIN1 and yeast Vta1p (for Vps twenty associated 1 protein). Arabidopsis LIP5 acts as a positive regulator of SKD1 by increasing fourfold to fivefold its in vitro ATPase activity. We isolated a knockout homozygous Arabidopsis mutant line with a T-DNA insertion in LIP5. lip5 plants are viable and show no phenotypic alterations under normal growth conditions, suggesting that basal SKD1 ATPase activity is sufficient for plant development and growth.

  10. Interaction Network and Localization of Brucella abortus Membrane Proteins Involved in the Synthesis, Transport, and Succinylation of Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Leticia S.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are periplasmic homopolysaccharides that play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. Once synthesized in the cytoplasm by the CβG synthase (Cgs), CβG are transported to the periplasm by the CβG transporter (Cgt) and succinylated by the CβG modifier enzyme (Cgm). Here, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitation techniques to study the interaction network between these three integral inner membrane proteins. Our results indicate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm can form both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Analyses carried out with Cgs mutants revealed that the N-terminal region of the protein (Cgs region 1 to 418) is required to sustain the interactions with Cgt and Cgm as well as with itself. We demonstrated by single-cell fluorescence analysis that in Brucella, Cgs and Cgt are focally distributed in the membrane, particularly at the cell poles, whereas Cgm is mostly distributed throughout the membrane with a slight accumulation at the poles colocalizing with the other partners. In summary, our results demonstrate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm form a membrane-associated biosynthetic complex. We propose that the formation of a membrane complex could serve as a mechanism to ensure the fidelity of CβG biosynthesis by coordinating their synthesis with the transport and modification. IMPORTANCE In this study, we analyzed the interaction and localization of the proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and modification of Brucella abortus cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG), which play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. We demonstrate that these proteins interact, forming a complex located mainly at the cell poles; this is the first experimental evidence of the existence of a multienzymatic complex involved in the metabolism of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria and argues for another example of pole differentiation in Brucella

  11. Ethanol and Caffeine Effects on Social Interaction and Recognition in Mice: Involvement of Adenosine A2A and A1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Laura; San-Miguel, Noemí; Bayarri, Pilar; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercé

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and caffeine are frequently consumed in combination and have opposite effects on the adenosine system: ethanol metabolism leads to an increase in adenosine levels, while caffeine is a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist. These receptors are highly expressed in striatum and olfactory tubercle, brain areas involved in exploration and social interaction in rodents. Ethanol modulates social interaction processes, but the role of adenosine in social behavior is still poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to study the impact of ethanol, caffeine and their combination on social behavior, and to explore the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors on those actions. Male CD1 mice were evaluated in a social interaction three-chamber paradigm, for preference of conspecific vs. object, and also for long-term recognition memory of familiar vs. novel conspecific. Ethanol showed a biphasic effect, with low doses (0.25 g/kg) increasing social contact and higher doses (1.0-1.5 g/kg) reducing social interaction. However, no dose changed social preference; mice always spent more time sniffing the conspecific than the object, independently of the ethanol dose. Ethanol, even at doses that did not change social exploration, produced amnestic effects on social recognition the following day. Caffeine reduced social contact (15.0-60.0 mg/kg), and even blocked social preference at higher doses (30.0-60.0 mg/kg). The A1 antagonist Cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT; 3-9 mg/kg) did not modify social contact or preference on its own, and the A2A antagonist MSX-3 (1.5-6 mg/kg) increased social interaction at all doses. Ethanol at intermediate doses (0.5-1.0 g/kg) was able to reverse the reduction in social exploration induced by caffeine (15.0-30.0 mg/kg). Although there was no interaction between ethanol and CPT or MSX-3 on social exploration in the first day, MSX-3 blocked the amnestic effects of ethanol observed on the following day. Thus, ethanol impairs the

  12. Ethanol and Caffeine Effects on Social Interaction and Recognition in Mice: Involvement of Adenosine A2A and A1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Laura; San-Miguel, Noemí; Bayarri, Pilar; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E.; Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercé

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and caffeine are frequently consumed in combination and have opposite effects on the adenosine system: ethanol metabolism leads to an increase in adenosine levels, while caffeine is a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist. These receptors are highly expressed in striatum and olfactory tubercle, brain areas involved in exploration and social interaction in rodents. Ethanol modulates social interaction processes, but the role of adenosine in social behavior is still poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to study the impact of ethanol, caffeine and their combination on social behavior, and to explore the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors on those actions. Male CD1 mice were evaluated in a social interaction three-chamber paradigm, for preference of conspecific vs. object, and also for long-term recognition memory of familiar vs. novel conspecific. Ethanol showed a biphasic effect, with low doses (0.25 g/kg) increasing social contact and higher doses (1.0–1.5 g/kg) reducing social interaction. However, no dose changed social preference; mice always spent more time sniffing the conspecific than the object, independently of the ethanol dose. Ethanol, even at doses that did not change social exploration, produced amnestic effects on social recognition the following day. Caffeine reduced social contact (15.0–60.0 mg/kg), and even blocked social preference at higher doses (30.0–60.0 mg/kg). The A1 antagonist Cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT; 3–9 mg/kg) did not modify social contact or preference on its own, and the A2A antagonist MSX-3 (1.5–6 mg/kg) increased social interaction at all doses. Ethanol at intermediate doses (0.5–1.0 g/kg) was able to reverse the reduction in social exploration induced by caffeine (15.0–30.0 mg/kg). Although there was no interaction between ethanol and CPT or MSX-3 on social exploration in the first day, MSX-3 blocked the amnestic effects of ethanol observed on the following day. Thus, ethanol

  13. Light modulated activity of root alkaline/neutral invertase involves the interaction with 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; van Kleeff, Paula J M; Oecking, Claudia; Li, Ka Wan; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K; de Boer, Albertus H

    2014-12-01

    Alkaline/neutral invertases (A/N-Invs) are now recognized as essential proteins in plant life. They catalyze the irreversible breakdown of sucrose into glucose and fructose and thus supply the cells with energy as well as signaling molecules. In this study we report on a mechanism that affects the activity of the cytosolic invertase AtCINV1 (At-A/N-InvG or AT1G35580). We demonstrate that Ser547 at the extreme C-terminus of the AtCINV1 protein is a substrate of calcium-dependent kinases (CPK3 and 21) and that phosphorylation creates a high-affinity binding site for 14-3-3 proteins. The invertase as such has basal activity, but we provide evidence that interaction with 14-3-3 proteins enhances its activity. The analysis of three quadruple 14-3-3 mutants generated from six T-DNA insertion mutants of the non-epsilon family shows both specificity as well as redundancy for this function of 14-3-3 proteins. The strong reduction in hexose levels in the roots of one 14-3-3 quadruple mutant plant is in line with the activating function of 14-3-3 proteins. The physiological relevance of this mechanism that affects A/N-invertase activity is underscored by the light-induced activation and is another example of the central role of 14-3-3 proteins in mediating dark/light signaling. The nature of the light-induced signal that travels from the shoot to root and the question whether this signal is transmitted via cytosolic Ca(++) changes that activate calcium-dependent kinases, await further study.

  14. The inhibition of human multidrug and toxin extrusion 1 is involved in the drug-drug interaction caused by cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Soichiro; Maeda, Kazuya; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Ohta, Kin-ya; Yuasa, Hiroaki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Nakayama, Hideki; Horita, Shigeru; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2009-03-01

    Cimetidine is known to cause drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with organic cations in the kidney, and a previous clinical study showed that coadministration of cimetidine or probenecid with fexofenadine (FEX) decreased its renal clearance. FEX was taken up into human kidney by human organic anion transporter (hOAT) 3 (SLC22A8), but the mechanism of its luminal efflux has not been clarified. The present study examined the molecular mechanism of these DDIs. Saturable uptake of FEX was observed in human kidney slices, with K(m) and V(max) values of 157+/-7 microM and 418+/-16 nmol/15 min/g kidney, respectively. Cimetidine only slightly inhibited its uptake even at 100 microM, far greater than its clinically relevant concentration, whereas 10 microM probenecid markedly inhibited its uptake. As candidate transporters for the luminal efflux of FEX, we focused on human multidrug and toxin extrusions MATE1 (SLC47A1) and MATE2-K (SLC47A2). Saturable uptake of FEX could be observed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing human MATE1 (hMATE1), whereas hMATE2-K-specific uptake of FEX was too small to conduct its further kinetic analysis. The hMATE1-mediated uptake clearance of FEX was inhibited by cimetidine in a concentration-dependent manner, and it was decreased to 60% of the control value in the presence of 3 microM cimetidine. Taken together, our results suggest that the DDI of FEX with probenecid can be explained by the inhibition of renal uptake mediated by hOAT3, whereas the DDI with cimetidine is mainly caused by the inhibition of hMATE1-mediated efflux of FEX rather than the inhibition of its renal uptake process.

  15. Evolution of the syntrophic interaction between Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanosarcina barkeri: involvement of an ancient horizontal gene transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, Johannes C.; Culley, David E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2007-01-05

    The sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the methanogenic archaea Methanosarcina barkeri can grow syntrophically on lactate. In this study, three functionally unknown genes of D. vulgaris, DVU2103, DVU2104 and DVU2108, were found to be up-regulated 2-4 fold following the lifestyle shift from syntroph to sulfatereducer; moreover, none of these genes were regulated when D. vulgaris was grown alone in various pure culture conditions. These results suggest that these genes may play roles related to the lifestyle change of D. vulgaris from syntroph to sulfate reducer. This hypothesis is further supported by phylogenomic analyses showing that homologies of these genes were only narrowly present in several groups of bacteria, most of which are restricted to a syntrophic life-style, such as Pelobacter carbinolicus, Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans, Syntrophomonas wolfei and Syntrophus aciditrophicus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genes tended to be clustered with archaeal genera, and they were rooted on archaeal species in the phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they originated from an archaeal methanogen and were horizontally transferred to a common ancestor of delta- Proteobacteria, Clostridia and Thermotogae. While lost in most species during evolution, these genes appear to have been retained in bacteria capable of syntrophic relationships, probably due to their providing a selective advantage. In addition, no significant bias in codon and amino acid usages was detected between these genes and the rest of the D. vulgaris genome, suggesting these gene transfers may have occurred early in the evolutionary history so that sufficient time has elapsed to allow an adaptation to the codon and amino acid usages of D. vulgaris. This report provides novel insights into the origin and evolution of bacterial genes involved in the syntrophic lifestyle.

  16. Identification and localization of the sperm CRISP family protein CiUrabin involved in gamete interaction in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Saito, Takako; Yamada, Lixy; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Harada, Yoshito; Sawada, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Ascidians are hermaphrodites, and most release sperm and eggs nearly simultaneously. Many species, including Halocynthia roretzi and Ciona intestinalis, are self-sterile. We previously reported that the interaction between a 12 EGF-like repeat-containing vitelline-coat (VC) protein, HrVC70, and a sperm GPI-anchored CRISP, HrUrabin, in lipid rafts plays a key role in self-/nonself-recognizable gamete interaction in H. roretzi. On the other hand, we recently identified two pairs of polymorphic genes responsible for self-incompatibility in C. intestinalis by positional cloning: The sperm polycystin 1-like receptors s-Themis-A/B and its fibrinogen-like ligand v-Themis-A/B on the VC. However, it is not known if the orthologs of HrVC70 and HrUrabin also participate in gamete interaction in C. intestinalis since they are from different orders. Here, we tested for a C. intestinalis ortholog (CiUrabin) of HrUrabin by searching the genome database and proteomes of sperm lipid rafts. The identified CiUrabin belongs to the CRISP family, with a PR domain and a GPI-anchor-attachment site. CiUrabin appears to be specifically expressed in the testis and localized at the surface of the sperm head, as revealed by Northern blotting and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The specific interaction between CiVC57, a C. intestinalis ortholog of HrVC70, and CiUrabin was confirmed by Far Western analysis, similarly to the interaction between HrVC70 and HrUrabin. The molecular interaction between CiVC57 and CiUrabin may be involved in the primary binding of sperm to the VC prior to the allorecognition process, mediated by v-Themis-A/B and s-Themis-A/B, during fertilization of C. intestinalis.

  17. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-09-13

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. Overall, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). As an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.

  18. A JAZ Protein in Astragalus sinicus Interacts with a Leghemoglobin through the TIFY Domain and Is Involved in Nodule Development and Nitrogen Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yixing; Xu, Meng; Wang, Ning; Li, Youguo

    2015-01-01

    Leghemoglobins (Lbs) play an important role in legumes-rhizobia symbiosis. Lbs bind O2 and protect nitrogenase activity from damage by O2 in nodules, therefore, they are regarded as a marker of active nitrogen fixation in nodules. Additionally, Lbs are involved in the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, acting as a NO scavenger during nodule development and nitrogen fixation. However, regulators responsible for Lb expression and modulation of Lb activity have not been characterized. In our previous work, a Jasmonate-Zim-domain (JAZ) protein interacting with a Lb (AsB2510) in Astragalus sinicus was identified and designated AsJAZ1. In this study, the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 was verified using a yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro Glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays, resulting in identification of the interaction domain as a TIFY (previously known as zinc-finger protein expressed in inflorescence meristem, ZIM) domain. TIFY domain is named after the most conserved amino acids within the domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was used to confirm the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 in tobacco cells, demonstrating that AsJAZ1-AsB2510 interaction was localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, the expression patterns and the symbiotic phenotypes of AsJAZ1 were investigated. Knockdown of AsJAZ1 expression via RNA interference led to decreased number of nodules, abnormal development of bacteroids, accumulation of poly-x-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and loss of nitrogenase activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AsJAZ1 interacts with AsB2510 and participates in nodule development and nitrogen fixation. Our results provide novel insights into the functions of Lbs or JAZ proteins during legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:26460857

  19. Co-conservation of rRNA tetraloop sequences and helix length suggests involvement of the tetraloops in higher-order interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedenstierna, K. O.; Siefert, J. L.; Fox, G. E.; Murgola, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Terminal loops containing four nucleotides (tetraloops) are common in structural RNAs, and they frequently conform to one of three sequence motifs, GNRA, UNCG, or CUUG. Here we compare available sequences and secondary structures for rRNAs from bacteria, and we show that helices capped by phylogenetically conserved GNRA loops display a strong tendency to be of conserved length. The simplest interpretation of this correlation is that the conserved GNRA loops are involved in higher-order interactions, intramolecular or intermolecular, resulting in a selective pressure for maintaining the lengths of these helices. A small number of conserved UNCG loops were also found to be associated with conserved length helices, consistent with the possibility that this type of tetraloop also takes part in higher-order interactions.

  20. Involvement of the interaction between p21 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen for the maintenance of G2/M arrest after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ando, T; Kawabe, T; Ohara, H; Ducommun, B; Itoh, M; Okamoto, T

    2001-11-16

    Although a major effect of p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is considered to be exerted during G(1) phase of the cell cycle, p21 gene knock-out studies suggested its involvement in G(2)/M checkpoint as well. Here we demonstrate evidence that p21 is required for the cell cycle arrest at G(2) upon DNA damage. We found that expression of wild-type p21 (p21(WT)), not mutant p21 (p21(PCNA-)) lacking the interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), caused G(2) cell cycle arrest in p53-deficient DLD1 colon cancer cell line after the DNA damage by treatment with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II). We also found that p21(WT) was associated with Cdc2/cyclin B1 together with PCNA. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that PCNA interacted with Cdc25C at the G(2)/M transition, and this interaction was abolished when p21(WT) was expressed presumably due to the competition between p21(WT) and Cdc25C in the binding to PCNA. These findings suggest that p21 plays a regulatory role in the maintenance of cell cycle arrest at G(2) by blocking the interaction of Cdc25C with PCNA.

  1. The COOH termini of NBC3 and the 56-kDa H+-ATPase subunit are PDZ motifs involved in their interaction.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Muronets, Vladimir; Sassani, Pejvak; Tatishchev, Sergei; Kurtz, Ira

    2003-03-01

    The electroneutral sodium bicarbonate cotransporter 3 (NBC3) coimmunoprecipitates from renal lysates with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. In renal type A and B intercalated cells, NBC3 colocalizes with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. The involvement of the COOH termini of NBC3 and the 56-kDa subunit of the proton pump in the interaction of these proteins was investigated. The intact and modified COOH termini of NBC3 and the 56-kDa subunit of the proton pump were synthesized, coupled to Sepharose beads, and used to pull down kidney membrane proteins. Both the 56- and the 70-kDa subunits of the proton pump, as well as a PDZ domain containing protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1), were bound to the intact 18 amino acid NBC3 COOH terminus. A peptide truncated by five COOH-terminal amino acids did not bind these proteins. Replacement of the COOH-terminal leucine with glycine blocked binding of both the proton pump subunits but did not affect binding of NHERF-1. The 18 amino acid COOH terminus of the 56-kDa subunit of the proton pump bound NHERF-1 and NBC3, but the truncated and modified peptide did not. A complex of NBC3, the 56-kDa subunit of the proton pump, and NHERF-1 was identified in rat kidney. The data indicate that the COOH termini of NBC3 and the 56-kDa subunit of the vacuolar proton pump are PDZ-interacting motifs that are necessary for the interaction of these proteins. NHERF-1 is involved in the interaction of NBC3 and the vacuolar proton pump.

  2. USP8, a regulator of endosomal sorting, is involved in mouse acrosome biogenesis through interaction with the spermatid ESCRT-0 complex and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Berruti, Giovanna; Ripolone, Michela; Ceriani, Michela

    2010-05-01

    Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that works as a regulator of endosomal sorting and vesicle morphology in cultured cells. Its function in vivo is, however, unknown as USP8 gene deletion leads to embryonic lethality. Previously, we have shown that USP8 is highly expressed in male germ cells. These cells develop a peculiar acidic vesicle that is indispensable for fertilization, the acrosome; USP8 might be involved in vivo in acrosomogenesis. The objective of this study was to test this hypothesis by determining if selective components of the early endosomal machinery interact functionally with USP8 during acrosomogenesis using protein-protein interaction assays and double/triple immunolabeling. Moreover, by exploiting the characteristic of USP8 that exhibits a microtubule interacting and trafficking/transport (MIT) domain, we verified whether USP8 effectively associates with spermatid microtubules by microtubule cosedimentation and binding assays. USP8 was able to interact with spermatid ESCRT-0 (endosomal-sorting complex required for transport-0) and microtubule structures; USP8/ESCRT-0-labeled vesicles, monitored by fluorescence microscopy, were found to contribute to acrosome formation while USP8 can directly link, via its MIT domain, the labeled vesicles/developing acrosome to microtubules, which could favor both acrosome assembly and shaping. VPS54, the vacuolar-sorting protein responsible for early endocytic retrograde transport, was here detected for the first time in male germ cells; VPS54 followed the intracellular route of USP8/ESCRT-0-labeled vesicles during acrosomogenesis. We concluded that in vivo USP8 has a role strongly associated with acrosome biogenesis and that the early endosome pathway is significantly involved in the process, which suggests that the acrosome could be a novel lysosome-related organelle.

  3. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  4. The Interaction between Rice ERF3 and WOX11 Promotes Crown Root Development by Regulating Gene Expression Involved in Cytokinin Signaling[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yaling; Huang, Yulan

    2015-01-01

    Crown roots are the main components of the fibrous root system in rice (Oryza sativa). WOX11, a WUSCHEL-related homeobox gene specifically expressed in the emerging crown root meristem, is a key regulator in crown root development. However, the nature of WOX11 function in crown root development has remained elusive. Here, we identified a rice AP2/ERF protein, ERF3, which interacts with WOX11 and was expressed in crown root initials and during crown root growth. Functional analysis revealed that ERF3 was essential for crown root development and acts in auxin- and cytokinin-responsive gene expression. Downregulation of ERF3 in wox11 mutants produced a more severe root phenotype. Also, increased expression of ERF3 could partially complement wox11, indicating that the two genes functioned cooperatively to regulate crown root development. ERF3 and WOX11 shared a common target, the cytokinin-responsive gene RR2. The expression of ERF3 and WOX11 only partially overlapped, underlining a spatio-temporal control of RR2 expression and crown root development. Furthermore, ERF3-regulated RR2 expression was involved in crown root initiation, while the ERF3/WOX11 interaction likely repressed RR2 during crown root elongation. These results define a mechanism regulating gene expression involved in cytokinin signaling during different stages of crown root development in rice. PMID:26307379

  5. Identification of regions interacting with ovo{sup D} mutations: Potential new genes involved in germline sex determination or differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, D.; Oliver, B.; Mahowald, A.P.

    1995-02-01

    Only a few Drosophila melanogaster germline sex determination genes are known, and there have been no systematic screens to identify new genes involved in this important biological process. The ovarian phenotypes produced by females mutant for dominant alleles of the ovo gene are modified in flies with altered doses of other loci involved in germline sex determination in Drosophila (Sex-lethal{sup +}, snas fille{sup +} and ovarian tumor{sup +}). This observation constitutes the basis for a screen to identify additional genes required for proper establishment of germline sexual identity. We tested 300 deletions, which together cover {approximately}58% of the euchromatic portion of the genome, for genetic interactions with ovo{sup D}. Hemizygosity for more than a dozen small regions show interactions that either partially suppress or enhance the ovarian phenotypes of females mutant for one or more of the three dominant ovo mutations. These regions probably contain genes whose products act in developmental heirarchies that include ovo{sup +} protein. 40 refs, 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke K.; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-01-01

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5+/−, Osr1+/−, Osr1−/− and Tbx5+/−/Osr1+/− mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene–gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny. PMID:26744331

  7. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke K; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-03-15

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5(+/) (-), Osr1(+/-), Osr1(-/-) and Tbx5(+/-)/Osr1(+/-) mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene-gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny.

  8. Identification of the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of cisapride: in vitro studies of potential co-medication interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bohets, H; Lavrijsen, K; Hendrickx, J; van Houdt, J; van Genechten, V; Verboven, P; Meuldermans, W; Heykants, J

    2000-01-01

    Cisapride is a prokinetic drug that is widely used to facilitate gastrointestinal tract motility.Structurally, cisapride is a substituted piperidinyl benzamide that interacts with 5-hydroxytryptamine-4 receptors and which is largely without central depressant or antidopaminergic side-effects.The aims of this study were to investigate the metabolism of cisapride in human liver microsomes and to determine which cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isoenzyme(s) are involved in cisapride biotransformation. Additionally, the effects of various drugs on the metabolism of cisapride were investigated.The major in vitro metabolite of cisapride was formed by oxidative N-dealkylation at the piperidine nitrogen, leading to the production of norcisapride.By using competitive inhibition data, correlation studies and heterologous expression systems, it was demonstrated that CYP3A4 was the major CYP involved. CYP2A6 also contributed to the metabolism of cisapride, albeit to a much lesser extent.The mean apparent Km against cisapride was 8.6±3.5 μM (n=3). The peak plasma levels of cisapride under normal clinical practice are approximately 0.17 μM; therefore it is unlikely that cisapride would inhibit the metabolism of co-administered drugs.In this in vitro study the inhibitory effects of 44 drugs were tested for any effect on cisapride biotransformation. In conclusion, 34 of the drugs are unlikely to have a clinically relevant interaction; however, the antidepressant nefazodone, the macrolide antibiotic troleandomycin, the HIV-1 protease inhibitors ritonavir and indinavir and the calcium channel blocker mibefradil inhibited the metabolism of cisapride and these interactions are likely to be of clinical relevance. Furthermore, the antimycotics ketoconazole, miconazole, hydroxy-itraconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole, when administered orally or intravenously, would inhibit cisapride metabolism. PMID:10780971

  9. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis1

    PubMed Central

    Pesaresi, Paolo; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  10. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes.

  11. The Arabidopsis SET-domain protein ASHR3 is involved in stamen development and interacts with the bHLH transcription factor ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS).

    PubMed

    Thorstensen, Tage; Grini, Paul E; Mercy, Inderjit S; Alm, Vibeke; Erdal, Sigrid; Aasland, Rein; Aalen, Reidunn B

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains more than 30 genes encoding SET-domain proteins that are thought to be epigenetic regulators of gene expression and chromatin structure. SET-domain proteins can be divided into subgroups, and members of the Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) have been shown to be important regulators of development. Both in animals and plants some of these proteins are components of multimeric protein complexes. Here, we have analyzed the Arabidopsis trxG protein ASHR3 which has a SET domain and pre- and post-SET domains similar to that of Ash1 in Drosophila. In addition to the SET domain, a divergent PHD finger is found in the N-terminus of the ASHR3 protein. As expected from SET-domain proteins involved in transcriptional activation, ASHR3 (coupled to GFP) localizes to euchromatin. A yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that the ASHR3 protein interacts with the putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS), which is involved in anther and stamen development in Arabidopsis. Deletion mapping indicated that both the PHD finger and the SET domain mediate the interaction between the two proteins. Overexpression of ASHR3 led in general to growth arrest, and specifically to degenerated anthers and male sterility. Expression analyses demonstrated that ASHR3 like AMS is expressed in the anther and in stamen filaments. We therefore propose that AMS can target ASHR3 to chromatin and regulate genes involved in stamen development and function.

  12. Proteomic analysis of Fasciola hepatica excretory and secretory products (FhESPs) involved in interacting with host PBMCs and cytokines by shotgun LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Huang, Si-Yang; Yue, Dong-Mei; Wang, Jin-Lei; Wang, Yujian; Li, Xiangrui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-02-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a helminth parasite with a worldwide distribution, which can cause chronic liver disease, fasciolosis, leading to economic losses in the livestock and public health in many countries. Control is mostly reliant on the use of drugs, and as a result, drug resistance has now emerged. The identification of F. hepatica genes involved in interaction between the parasite and host immune system is utmost important to elucidate the evasion mechanisms of the parasite and develop more effective strategies against fasciolosis. In this study, we aimed to identify molecules in F. hepatica excretory and secretory products (FhESPs) interacting with the host peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), Th1-like cytokines (IL2 and IFN-γ), and Th17-like cytokines (IL17) by Co-IP combined with tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that 14, 16, and 9 proteins in FhESPs could bind with IL2, IL17, and IFN-γ, respectively, which indicated that adult F. hepatica may evade the host immune responses through directly interplaying with cytokines. In addition, nine proteins in FhESPs could adhere to PBMCs. Our findings provided potential targets as immuno-regulators, and will be helpful to elucidate the molecular basis of host-parasite interactions and search for new potential proteins as vaccine and drug target candidates.

  13. Phosphoserines of the carboxy terminal domain of RNA polymerase II are involved in the interaction with transcription-associated proteins (TAPs).

    PubMed

    Vidyalakshmi, Subramanian; Ramamurthy, Viraraghavan

    2013-03-01

    Generation of productive transcripts of protein coding genes in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process centrally controlled by the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) complex. The carboxy terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of the enzyme is designed to be modified by differential phosphorylation, and plays a key role in orchestrating the multiple events of the process by interacting with a host of transcription-associated proteins (TAPs) at different stages. We analyzed, in silico, the role of serine phosphorylation of CTD in relation to molecular interaction between different TAPs and a representative part of the CTD repeat structure. Using molecular docking, we investigated eight different proteins involved in capping, elongation, splicing, 3' end cleavage, or polyadenylation functions during the transcription process. Among the different phosphorylated forms of CTD, the form found to have the most affinity for a particular protein was also the form that is predominant during that process, the only exception being the equally high affinity of S2PCTD to Spt4, although S5PCTD is the known active form during elongation. The unique phosphoserine of the CTD forms associated with the TAPs was an important participant in the association between both the molecules. These studies have also identified other residues of TAPs interacting with CTD which in previous studies have not been recognized as being functionally significant. These findings add to an emerging body of literature on the regulatory aspects of genomics and proteomics and thus, might catalyze future applications for discovery and translational omics science.

  14. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, C. H.; Bromley, J. R.; Stenbaek, A.; ...

    2014-10-18

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Wemore » tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. In conclusion, our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.« less

  15. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, C. H.; Bromley, J. R.; Stenbaek, A.; Rasmussen, R. E.; Scheller, H. V.; Sakuragi, Y.

    2014-10-18

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. In conclusion, our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.

  16. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Lund, Christian H; Bromley, Jennifer R; Stenbæk, Anne; Rasmussen, Randi E; Scheller, Henrik V; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. Our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.

  17. The involvement of coordinative interactions in the binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase to titanium dioxide-Localization of a putative binding site.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Avraham; Babin, Gilad; Ganoth, Assaf; Kayouf, Nivin Samir; Nitoker Eliaz, Neta; Mukkala, Srijana; Tsfadia, Yossi; Fleminger, Gideon

    2017-02-28

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are widely used in orthodontic and orthopedic implants by virtue to their high biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and high resistance to corrosion. Biointegration of the implants with the tissue requires strong interactions, which involve biological molecules, proteins in particular, with metal oxide surfaces. An exocellular high-affinity titanium dioxide (TiO2 )-binding protein (TiBP), purified from Rhodococcus ruber, has been previously studied in our lab. This protein was shown to be homologous with the orthologous cytoplasmic rhodococcal dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (rhDLDH). We have found that rhDLDH and its human homolog (hDLDH) share the TiO2 -binding capabilities with TiBP. Intrigued by the unique TiO2 -binding properties of hDLDH, we anticipated that it may serve as a molecular bridge between Ti-based medical structures and human tissues. The objective of the current study was to locate the region and the amino acids of the protein that mediate the protein-TiO2 surface interaction. We demonstrated the role of acidic amino acids in the nonelectrostatic enzyme/dioxide interactions at neutral pH. The observation that the interaction of DLDH with various metal oxides is independent of their isoelectric values strengthens this notion. DLDH does not lose its enzymatic activity upon binding to TiO2 , indicating that neither the enzyme undergoes major conformational changes nor the TiO2 binding site is blocked. Docking predictions suggest that both rhDLDH and hDLDH bind TiO2 through similar regions located far from the active site and the dimerization sites. The putative TiO2 -binding regions of both the bacterial and human enzymes were found to contain a CHED (Cys, His, Glu, Asp) motif, which has been shown to participate in metal-binding sites in proteins.

  18. Brain Innate Immunity in the Regulation of Neuroinflammation: Therapeutic Strategies by Modulating CD200-CD200R Interaction Involve the Cannabinoid System

    PubMed Central

    Hernangómez, Miriam; Carrillo-Salinas, Francisco J; Mecha, Miriam; Correa, Fernando; Mestre, Leyre; Loría, Frida; Feliú, Ana; Docagne, Fabian; Guaza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) innate immune response includes an arsenal of molecules and receptors expressed by professional phagocytes, glial cells and neurons that is involved in host defence and clearance of toxic and dangerous cell debris. However, any uncontrolled innate immune responses within the CNS are widely recognized as playing a major role in the development of autoimmune disorders and neurodegeneration, with multiple sclerosis (MS) Alzheimer's disease (AD) being primary examples. Hence, it is important to identify the key regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of CNS innate immunity and which could be harnessed to explore novel therapeutic avenues. Neuroimmune regulatory proteins (NIReg) such as CD95L, CD200, CD47, sialic acid, complement regulatory proteins (CD55, CD46, fH, C3a), HMGB1, may control the adverse immune responses in health and diseases. In the absence of these regulators, when neurons die by apoptosis, become infected or damaged, microglia and infiltrating immune cells are free to cause injury as well as an adverse inflammatory response in acute and chronic settings. We will herein provide new emphasis on the role of the pair CD200-CD200R in MS and its experimental models: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler’s virus induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD). The interest of the cannabinoid system as inhibitor of inflammation prompt us to introduce our findings about the role of endocannabinoids (eCBs) in promoting CD200-CD200 receptor (CD200R) interaction and the benefits caused in TMEV-IDD. Finally, we also review the current data on CD200-CD200R interaction in AD, as well as, in the aging brain. PMID:24588829

  19. Involvement of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 in ethanol glucuronidation, and interactions with common drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Al Saabi, Alaa; Allorge, Delphine; Sauvage, François-Ludovic; Tournel, Gilles; Gaulier, Jean-Michel; Marquet, Pierre; Picard, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) determination is increasingly used in clinical and forensic toxicology to document ethanol consumption. The enzymes involved in EtG production, as well as potential interactions with common drugs of abuse, have not been extensively studied. Activities of human liver (HLM), kidney (HKM), and intestinal (HIM) microsomes, as well as of 12 major human recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), toward ethanol (50 and 500 mM) were evaluated in vitro using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined for pooled microsomes and recombinant UGTs with significant activity. Individual contributions of UGTs were estimated using the relative activity factor approach, proposed for scaling activities obtained with cDNA-expressed enzymes to HLM. Interaction of morphine, codeine, lorazepam, oxazepam, nicotine, cotinine, cannabinol, and cannabidiol (5, 10, 15 mg/l) with ethanol (1.15, 4.6, 11.5 g/l; i.e., 25, 100, 250 mM) glucuronidation was assessed using pooled HLM. Ethanol glucuronidation intrinsic clearance (Cl(int)) was 4 and 12.7 times higher for HLM than for HKM and HIM, respectively. All recombinant UGTs, except UGT1A1, 1A6, and 1A10, produced EtG in detectable amounts. UGT1A9 and 2B7 were the most active enzymes, each accounting for 17 and 33% of HLM Cl(int), respectively. Only cannabinol and cannabidiol significantly affected ethanol glucuronidation. Cannabinol increased ethanol glucuronidation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas cannabidiol significantly inhibited EtG formation in a noncompetitive manner (IC(50) = 1.17 mg/l; inhibition constant (K(i)) = 3.1 mg/l). UGT1A9 and 2B7 are the main enzymes involved in ethanol glucuronidation. In addition, our results suggest that cannabinol and cannabidiol could significantly alter ethanol glucuronidation.

  20. Interaction of the GTP-binding and GTPase-activating domains of ARD1 involves the effector region of the ADP-ribosylation factor domain.

    PubMed

    Vitale, N; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1997-02-14

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and members of the Ras superfamily, originally identified and purified by their ability to enhance the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and more recently recognized as critical participants in vesicular trafficking pathways and phospholipase D activation. ARD1 is a 64-kDa protein with an 18-kDa carboxyl-terminal ARF domain (p3) and a 46-kDa amino-terminal extension (p5) that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. Using recombinant proteins, we showed that p5, the amino-terminal domain of ARD1, stimulates the GTPase activity of p3, the ARF domain, and appears to be the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) component of this bifunctional protein, whereas in other members of the Ras superfamily a separate GAP molecule interacts with the effector region of the GTP-binding protein. p5 stimulated the GTPase activity of p3 but not of ARF1, which differs from p3 in several amino acids in the effector domain. After substitution of 7 amino acids from p3 in the appropriate position in ARF1, the chimeric protein ARF1(39-45p3) bound to p5, which increased its GTPase activity. Specifically, after Gly40 and Thr45 in the putative effector domain of ARF1 were replaced with the equivalent Asp and Pro, respectively, from p3, functional interaction of the chimeric ARF1 with p5 was increased. Thus, Asp25 and Pro30 of the ARF domain (p3) of ARD1 are involved in its functional and physical interaction with the GTPase-activating (p5) domain of ARD1. After deletion of the amino-terminal 15 amino acids from ARF1(39-45p3), its interaction with p5 was essentially equivalent to that of p3, suggesting that the amino terminus of ARF1(39-45p3) may interfere with binding to p5. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the GAP domain of ARD1 interacts with the effector region of the ARF domain and thereby stimulates GTP hydrolysis.

  1. Human mesenchymal stem cells promote growth of osteosarcoma: involvement of interleukin-6 in the interaction between human mesenchymal stem cells and Saos-2.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhen-Yu; Fan, Qi-Ming; Li, Gang; Xu, Wen-Ting; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2010-12-01

    Our previous study showed that exogenous human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) targeted established osteosarcoma and promoted its growth and pulmonary metastasis in vivo. As a follow-up, the present study aimed to investigate how hMSCs would interact with Saos-2 through autocrine/paracrine communication. The results showed that co-injection of hMSCs with Saos-2 into the proximal tibia of nude mice could promote tumor growth and progression. In vitro, the proliferation of Saos-2 and hMSCs was promoted by each other's conditioned medium, in which interleukin-6 (IL-6) played an important role. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs could be inhibited by conditioned medium of Saos-2, in which IL-6 was also involved. Furthermore, decreased IL-6 secretion by hMSCs during its osteogenesis and increased IL-6 secretion in response to conditioned medium of Saos-2 were observed. Based on these data, we suggest that there was a positive feedback loop of IL-6 in the interaction between hMSCs and Saos-2.

  2. Determination of molecular groups involved in the interaction of annexin A5 with lipid membrane models at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Fezoua-Boubegtiten, Zahia; Desbat, Bernard; Brisson, Alain; Lecomte, Sophie

    2010-06-01

    Annexin A5 (AnxA5) is a member of a family of homologous proteins sharing the ability to bind to negatively charged phospholipid membranes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In this paper, we used polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PMIRRAS), Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and ellipsometry to investigate changes both in the structure of AnxA5 and phospholipid head groups associated with membrane binding. We found that the secondary structure of AnxA5 in the AnxA5/Ca(2+)/lipid ternary complex is conserved, mainly in alpha-helices and the average orientation of the alpha-helices of the protein is slightly tilted with respect to the normal to the phospholipid monolayer. Upon interaction between AnxA5 and phospholipids, a shift of the nu(as) PO(2)(-) band is observed by PMIRRAS. This reveals that the phosphate group is the main group involved in the binding of AnxA5 to phospholipids via Ca(2+) ions, even when some carboxylate groups are accessible (PS). PMIRRAS spectra also indicate a change of carboxylate orientation in the aspartate and glutamate residues implicated in the association of the AnxA5, which could be linked to the 2D crystallization of protein under the phospholipid monolayer. Finally, we demonstrated that the interaction of AnxA5 with pure carboxylate groups of an oleic acid monolayer is possible, but the orientation of the protein under the lipid is completely different.

  3. Dbp9p, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase involved in 60S-ribosomal-subunit biogenesis, functionally interacts with Dbp6p.

    PubMed Central

    Daugeron, M C; Kressler, D; Linder, P

    2001-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a highly complex process and constitutes a major cellular activity. The biogenesis of this ribonucleoprotein assembly requires a multitude of protein trans-acting factors including several putative ATP-dependent RNA helicases of the DEAD-box and related protein families. Here we show that the previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YLR276C, hereafter named DBP9 (DEAD-box protein 9), encodes an essential nucleolar protein involved in 60S-ribosomal-subunit biogenesis. Genetic depletion of Dbp9p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. This terminal phenotype is likely due to the instability of early pre-ribosomal particles, as evidenced by the low steady-state levels and the decreased synthesis of the 27S precursors to mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs. In agreement with a role of Dbp9p in 60S subunit synthesis, we find that increased Dbp9p dosage efficiently suppresses certain dbp6 alleles and that dbp6/dbp9 double mutants show synthetic lethality. Furthermore, Dbp6p and Dbp9p weakly interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Altogether, our findings indicate an intimate functional interaction between Dbp6p and Dbp9p during the process of 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly. PMID:11565753

  4. Early Steps of Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus-Mediated Cell Transformation Involve the Interaction between Env and the RALBP1 Cellular Protein

    PubMed Central

    Monot, Margaux; Erny, Alexandra; Gineys, Barbara; Desloire, Sophie; Dolmazon, Christine; Aublin-Gex, Anne; Lotteau, Vincent; Archer, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma is a naturally occurring lung cancer in sheep induced by the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). Its envelope glycoprotein (Env) carries oncogenic properties, and its expression is sufficient to induce in vitro cell transformation and in vivo lung adenocarcinoma. The identification of cellular partners of the JSRV envelope remains crucial for deciphering mechanisms leading to cell transformation. We initially identified RALBP1 (RalA binding protein 1; also known as RLIP76 or RIP), a cellular protein implicated in the ras pathway, as a partner of JSRV Env by yeast two-hybrid screening and confirmed formation of RALBP1/Env complexes in mammalian cells. Expression of the RALBP1 protein was repressed in tumoral lungs and in tumor-derived alveolar type II cells. Through its inhibition using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA), we showed that RALBP1 was involved in envelope-induced cell transformation and in modulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin)/p70S6K pathway by the retroviral envelope. IMPORTANCE JSRV-induced lung adenocarcinoma is of importance for the sheep industry. While the envelope has been reported as the oncogenic determinant of the virus, the cellular proteins directly interacting with Env are still not known. Our report on the formation of RALBP/Env complexes and the role of this interaction in cell transformation opens up a new hypothesis for the dysregulation observed upon virus infection in sheep. PMID:26041289

  5. Studies on the intermolecular forces involved in the antibody-antigen interactions, using V3 synthetic peptides and sera from HIV1 seropositive patients.

    PubMed

    Măgureanu, C G; Diaconu, C; Alexandrescu, R; Tirdei, G; Cernescu, C

    1994-01-01

    The nature of physical forces responsible for the antibody-antigen (Ab-Ag) reaction was analyzed in an original system, represented by synthetic peptides derived from the V3 consensus sequences of some HIV1 subtypes gp 120 and HIV1 positive human serum. For locating antigenic determines, flexibility, hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity profiles of the V3 peptides were analysed. The hydrophilicity indicates that V3 apex borders are involved in the first stage of the reaction. The flexibility and hydrophobicity suggest that the apex of the V3 loop (GPGR/Q) is involved in the stabilization of the complex by hydrophobic interactions. Further, we followed up the influence of the dielectric constant and of the pH upon the forces established between Ab and Ag. Modifications in the dielectric constant and pH reveal a significant contribution of electrostatic and van der Waals forces in securing the intermolecular complementarity. D2O produces the highest augmentation of the antibody affinity for the most hydrophilic peptides, while a very slight one was recorded for the most hydrophobic sequence. A high affinity of antibodies for the peptides MN, R and Z was registered at an acid pH, when their His residue was protonated. On the contrary, no influence was recorded in the case of the peptide A, which does not contain any His residue.

  6. Ethylene-responsive transcription factors interact with promoters of ADH and PDC involved in persimmon (Diospyros kaki) fruit de-astringency.

    PubMed

    Min, Ting; Yin, Xue-ren; Shi, Yan-na; Luo, Zheng-rong; Yao, Yun-cong; Grierson, Donald; Ferguson, Ian B; Chen, Kun-song

    2012-11-01

    The persimmon fruit is a particularly good model for studying fruit response to hypoxia, in particular, the hypoxia-response ERF (HRE) genes. An anaerobic environment reduces fruit astringency by converting soluble condensed tannins (SCTs) into an insoluble form. Although the physiology of de-astringency has been widely studied, its molecular control is poorly understood. Both CO(2) and ethylene treatments efficiently removed the astringency from 'Mopan' persimmon fruit, as indicated by a decrease in SCTs. Acetaldehyde, the putative agent for causing de-astringency, accumulated during these treatments, as did activities of the key enzymes of acetaldehyde synthesis, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). Eight DkADH and DkPDC genes were isolated, and three candidates for a role in de-astringency, DkADH1, DkPDC1, and DkPDC2, were characterized by transcriptional analysis in different tissues. The significance of these specific isoforms was confirmed by principal component analysis. Transient expression in leaf tissue showed that DkPDC2 decreased SCTs. Interactions of six hypoxia-responsive ERF genes and target promoters were tested in transient assays. The results indicated that two hypoxia-responsive ERF genes, DkERF9 and DkERF10, were involved in separately regulating the DkPDC2 and DkADH1 promoters. It is proposed that a DkERF-DkADH/DkPDC cascade is involved in regulating persimmon de-astringency.

  7. Does negative affect mediate the relationship between daily PTSD symptoms and daily alcohol involvement in female rape victims? Evidence from 14 days of interactive voice response assessment

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Amy; Hagman, Brett T.; Moore, Kathleen; Mitchell, Jessica; Ehlke, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The negative reinforcement model of addiction posits that individuals may use alcohol to reduce with negative affective (NA) distress. The current study investigated the mediating effect of daily NA on the relationship between daily PTSD symptoms and same-day and next-day alcohol involvement (consumption and desire to drink) in a sample of 54 non-treatment-seeking female rape victims who completed 14 days of interactive voice response assessment. The moderating effect of lifetime alcohol use disorder diagnosis (AUD) on daily relationships was also examined. Multilevel models suggested that NA mediated the relationship between PTSD and same-day, but not next-day alcohol involvement. NA was greater on days characterized by more severe PTSD symptoms, and alcohol consumption and desire to drink were greater on days characterized by higher NA. Further, daily PTSD symptoms and NA were more strongly associated with same-day (but not next-day) alcohol consumption and desire to drink for women with an AUD than without. Results suggest that NA plays an important role in female rape victims’ daily alcohol use. Differences between women with and without an AUD indicate the need for treatment matching to sub-types of female rape victims. PMID:24731112

  8. A computational approach identifies two regions of Hepatitis C Virus E1 protein as interacting domains involved in viral fusion process

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Roberto; Costantino, Angela; Tritarelli, Elena; Marcantonio, Cinzia; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Rapicetta, Maria; El Sawaf, Gamal; Giuliani, Alessandro; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita

    2009-01-01

    Background The E1 protein of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) can be dissected into two distinct hydrophobic regions: a central domain containing an hypothetical fusion peptide (FP), and a C-terminal domain (CT) comprising two segments, a pre-anchor and a trans-membrane (TM) region. In the currently accepted model of the viral fusion process, the FP and the TM regions are considered to be closely juxtaposed in the post-fusion structure and their physical interaction cannot be excluded. In the present study, we took advantage of the natural sequence variability present among HCV strains to test, by purely sequence-based computational tools, the hypothesis that in this virus the fusion process involves the physical interaction of the FP and CT regions of E1. Results Two computational approaches were applied. The first one is based on the co-evolution paradigm of interacting peptides and consequently on the correlation between the distance matrices generated by the sequence alignment method applied to FP and CT primary structures, respectively. In spite of the relatively low random genetic drift between genotypes, co-evolution analysis of sequences from five HCV genotypes revealed a greater correlation between the FP and CT domains than respect to a control HCV sequence from Core protein, so giving a clear, albeit still inconclusive, support to the physical interaction hypothesis. The second approach relies upon a non-linear signal analysis method widely used in protein science called Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA). This method allows for a direct comparison of domains for the presence of common hydrophobicity patterns, on which the physical interaction is based upon. RQA greatly strengthened the reliability of the hypothesis by the scoring of a lot of cross-recurrences between FP and CT peptides hydrophobicity patterning largely outnumbering chance expectations and pointing to putative interaction sites. Intriguingly, mutations in the CT region of E1, reducing the

  9. FLO11 Gene Is Involved in the Interaction of Flor Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a Biofilm-Promoting Synthetic Hexapeptide.

    PubMed

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Carmona, Lourdes; Zara, Severino; Marcos, Jose F

    2013-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae "flor" yeasts have the ability to form a buoyant biofilm at the air-liquid interface of wine. The formation of biofilm, also called velum, depends on FLO11 gene length and expression. FLO11 encodes a cell wall mucin-like glycoprotein with a highly O-glycosylated central domain and an N-terminal domain that mediates homotypic adhesion between cells. In the present study, we tested previously known antimicrobial peptides with different mechanisms of antimicrobial action for their effect on the viability and ability to form biofilm of S. cerevisiae flor strains. We found that PAF26, a synthetic tryptophan-rich cationic hexapeptide that belongs to the class of antimicrobial peptides with cell-penetrating properties, but not other antimicrobial peptides, enhanced biofilm formation without affecting cell viability in ethanol-rich medium. The PAF26 biofilm enhancement required a functional FLO11 but was not accompanied by increased FLO11 expression. Moreover, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that the PAF26 peptide binds flor yeast cells and that a flo11 gene knockout mutant lost the ability to bind PAF26 but not P113, a different cell-penetrating antifungal peptide, demonstrating that the FLO11 gene is selectively involved in the interaction of PAF26 with cells. Taken together, our data suggest that the cationic and hydrophobic PAF26 hexapeptide interacts with the hydrophobic and negatively charged cell wall, favoring Flo11p-mediated cell-to-cell adhesion and thus increasing biofilm biomass formation. The results are consistent with previous data that point to glycosylated mucin-like proteins at the fungal cell wall as potential interacting partners for antifungal peptides.

  10. A Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System (PhyNNeSS) for multimodal interactive virtual environments involving nonlinear deformable objects.

    PubMed

    De, Suvranu; Deo, Dhannanjay; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Arikatla, Venkata S

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND: While an update rate of 30 Hz is considered adequate for real time graphics, a much higher update rate of about 1 kHz is necessary for haptics. Physics-based modeling of deformable objects, especially when large nonlinear deformations and complex nonlinear material properties are involved, at these very high rates is one of the most challenging tasks in the development of real time simulation systems. While some specialized solutions exist, there is no general solution for arbitrary nonlinearities. METHODS: In this work we present PhyNNeSS - a Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System - to address this long-standing technical challenge. The first step is an off-line pre-computation step in which a database is generated by applying carefully prescribed displacements to each node of the finite element models of the deformable objects. In the next step, the data is condensed into a set of coefficients describing neurons of a Radial Basis Function network (RBFN). During real-time computation, these neural networks are used to reconstruct the deformation fields as well as the interaction forces. RESULTS: We present realistic simulation examples from interactive surgical simulation with real time force feedback. As an example, we have developed a deformable human stomach model and a Penrose-drain model used in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training tool box. CONCLUSIONS: A unique computational modeling system has been developed that is capable of simulating the response of nonlinear deformable objects in real time. The method distinguishes itself from previous efforts in that a systematic physics-based pre-computational step allows training of neural networks which may be used in real time simulations. We show, through careful error analysis, that the scheme is scalable, with the accuracy being controlled by the number of neurons used in the simulation. PhyNNeSS has been integrated into SoFMIS (Software Framework for Multimodal

  11. Interactions of endosulfan and methoxychlor involving CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 in human HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Savary, Camille C; Jossé, Rozenn; Bruyère, Arnaud; Guillet, Fabrice; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André

    2014-08-01

    Humans are usually exposed to several pesticides simultaneously; consequently, combined actions between pesticides themselves or between pesticides and other chemicals need to be addressed in the risk assessment. Many pesticides are efficient activators of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), two major nuclear receptors that are also activated by other substrates. In the present work, we searched for interactions between endosulfan and methoxychlor, two organochlorine pesticides whose major routes of metabolism involve CAR- and PXR-regulated CYP3A4 and CYP2B6, and whose mechanisms of action in humans remain poorly understood. For this purpose, HepaRG cells were treated with both pesticides separately or in mixture for 24 hours or 2 weeks at concentrations relevant to human exposure levels. In combination they exerted synergistic cytotoxic effects. Whatever the duration of treatment, both compounds increased CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 mRNA levels while differently affecting their corresponding activities. Endosulfan exerted a direct reversible inhibition of CYP3A4 activity that was confirmed in human liver microsomes. By contrast, methoxychlor induced this activity. The effects of the mixture on CYP3A4 activity were equal to the sum of those of each individual compound, suggesting an additive effect of each pesticide. Despite CYP2B6 activity being unchanged and increased with endosulfan and methoxychlor, respectively, no change was observed with their mixture, supporting an antagonistic effect. Altogether, our data suggest that CAR and PXR activators endosulfan and methoxychlor can interact together and with other exogenous substrates in human hepatocytes. Their effects on CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 activities could have important consequences if extrapolated to the in vivo situation.

  12. Proteomic analysis of wild-type and mutant huntingtin-associated proteins in mouse brains identifies unique interactions and involvement in protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Culver, Brady P; Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung K; Choi, Jeong H; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O; Yates, John R; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-06-22

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-type and Mutant Huntingtin-associated Proteins in Mouse Brains Identifies Unique Interactions and Involvement in Protein Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Park, Sung K.; Choi, Jeong H.; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O.; Yates, John R.; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis. PMID:22556411

  14. Aip3p/Bud6p, a yeast actin-interacting protein that is involved in morphogenesis and the selection of bipolar budding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Amberg, D C; Zahner, J E; Mulholland, J W; Pringle, J R; Botstein, D

    1997-01-01

    A search for Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins that interact with actin in the two-hybrid system and a screen for mutants that affect the bipolar budding pattern identified the same gene, AIP3/BUD6. This gene is not essential for mitotic growth but is necessary for normal morphogenesis. MATa/alpha daughter cells lacking Aip3p place their first buds normally at their distal poles but choose random sites for budding in subsequent cell cycles. This suggests that actin and associated proteins are involved in placing the bipolar positional marker at the division site but not at the distal tip of the daughter cell. In addition, although aip3 mutant cells are not obviously defective in the initial polarization of the cytoskeleton at the time of bud emergence, they appear to lose cytoskeletal polarity as the bud enlarges, resulting in the formation of cells that are larger and rounder than normal. aip3 mutant cells also show inefficient nuclear migration and nuclear division, defects in the organization of the secretory system, and abnormal septation, all defects that presumably reflect the involvement of Aip3p in the organization and/or function of the actin cytoskeleton. The sequence of Aip3p is novel but contains a predicted coiled-coil domain near its C terminus that may mediate the observed homo-oligomerization of the protein. Aip3p shows a distinctive localization pattern that correlates well with its likely sites of action: it appears at the presumptive bud site prior to bud emergence, remains near the tips of small bund, and forms a ring (or pair of rings) in the mother-bud neck that is detectable early in the cell cycle but becomes more prominent prior to cytokinesis. Surprisingly, the localization of Aip3p does not appear to require either polarized actin or the septin proteins of the neck filaments. Images PMID:9247651

  15. DNA double-strand break repair is involved in desiccation resistance of Sinorhizobium meliloti, but is not essential for its symbiotic interaction with Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Pierre; Gourion, Benjamin; Sauviac, Laurent; Bruand, Claude

    2016-11-23

    The soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of legume plants, is exposed to numerous stress conditions in nature, some of which cause the formation of harmful DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In particular, the reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species produced during symbiosis, and the desiccation occurring in dry soils, are conditions which induce DSB. Two major systems of DSB repair are known in S. meliloti: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, their role in the resistance to ROS, RNS and desiccation has never been examined in this bacterial species, and the importance of DSB repair in the symbiotic interaction has not been properly evaluated. Here, we constructed S. meliloti strains deficient in HR (by deleting the recA gene) or in NHEJ (by deleting the four ku genes) or both. Interestingly, we observed that ku and/or recA genes are involved in S. meliloti resistance to ROS and RNS. Nevertheless, a S. meliloti strain deficient in both HR and NHEJ was not altered in its ability to establish and maintain an efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with Medicago truncatula, showing that rhizobial DSB repair is not essential for this process. This result suggests either that DSB formation in S. meliloti is efficiently prevented during symbiosis, or that DSB are not detrimental for symbiosis efficiency. In contrast, we found for the first time that both recA and ku genes are involved in S. meliloti resistance to desiccation, suggesting that DSB repair could be important for rhizobium persistence in the soil.

  16. Interaction of HmC1q with leech microglial cells: involvement of C1qBP-related molecule in the induction of cell chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In invertebrates, the medicinal leech is considered to be an interesting and appropriate model to study neuroimmune mechanisms. Indeed, this non-vertebrate animal can restore normal function of its central nervous system (CNS) after injury. Microglia accumulation at the damage site has been shown to be required for axon sprouting and for efficient regeneration. We characterized HmC1q as a novel chemotactic factor for leech microglial cell recruitment. In mammals, a C1q-binding protein (C1qBP alias gC1qR), which interacts with the globular head of C1q, has been reported to participate in C1q-mediated chemotaxis of blood immune cells. In this study, we evaluated the chemotactic activities of a recombinant form of HmC1q and its interaction with a newly characterized leech C1qBP that acts as its potential ligand. Methods Recombinant HmC1q (rHmC1q) was produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Chemotaxis assays were performed to investigate rHmC1q-dependent microglia migration. The involvement of a C1qBP-related molecule in this chemotaxis mechanism was assessed by flow cytometry and with affinity purification experiments. The cellular localization of C1qBP mRNA and protein in leech was investigated using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization techniques. Results rHmC1q-stimulated microglia migrate in a dose-dependent manner. This rHmC1q-induced chemotaxis was reduced when cells were preincubated with either anti-HmC1q or anti-human C1qBP antibodies. A C1qBP-related molecule was characterized in leech microglia. Conclusions A previous study showed that recruitment of microglia is observed after HmC1q release at the cut end of axons. Here, we demonstrate that rHmC1q-dependent chemotaxis might be driven via a HmC1q-binding protein located on the microglial cell surface. Taken together, these results highlight the importance of the interaction between C1q and C1qBP in microglial activation leading to nerve repair in the medicinal leech. PMID:22356764

  17. Attenuation of cell motility observed with high doses of sphingosine 1-phosphate or phosphorylated FTY720 involves RGS2 through its interactions with the receptor S1P.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takayuki; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) stimulation enhances cell motility via the G-protein coupled S1P receptor S1P1. This ligand-induced, receptor-mediated cell motility follows a typical bell-shaped dose-response curve, that is, stimulation with low concentrations of S1P enhances cell motility, whereas excess ligand stimulation does not enhance it. So far, the attenuation of the response at higher ligand concentrations has not been explained. We report here that S1P1 interacts with the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-2 protein, which is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for heterotrimeric G proteins, in a concentration dependent manner. The RGS2-S1P1 complex dissociated at higher ligand concentrations, yet it was unaffected at low concentrations, suggesting that the dissociated RGS2 is involved in the concurrent decrease of cell motility. In RGS2 knockdown cells, the decrease of cell motility induced by high ligand concentrations was rescued. S1P1 internalization was not implicated in the attenuation of the response. Similar results were observed upon stimulation with the phosphorylated form of FTY720 (FTYP), which is an S1P1 agonist. In conclusion, the suppressed response in cell motility induced by excess S1P or FTYP via S1P1 is regulated by RGS2 functioning through a mechanism that is independent of S1P1 internalization.

  18. Theory of ultra dense matter and the dynamics of high energy interactions involving nuclei. Progress report, December 15, 1993--December 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1994-09-12

    This report summarizes the progress made during the second year of the three year DOE agreement DE-FG02-93ER40764 on theoretical nuclear physics research performed at the Columbia University and presents a detailed budget adjustment for the third year period December 15, 1994 to December 14, 1995. Sections 1.1 to 1.8 highlight the technical progress made on the following general areas: Multiple scattering and radiative processes in QCD; the quark-gluon plasma transition in nuclear matter; QCD transport theory and dissipative mechanism in dense matter; phenomenological models of high energy interactions involving nuclei; signatures of quark-gluon plasma formation in A+A; neurocomputation theory. Section 2 contains a bibliography of published papers and invited conference papers. Section 3 lists the Columbia nuclear theory members for the December 15, 1994 to December 14, 1995 period. Finally, the budget adjustment requesting $319,830 for the third year relative to the original $320,000 is presented in section 6. Copies of the research papers accompany this report.

  19. The involvement of hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition of human spinal glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deliang; Wang, Li; Zhou, Yi; Zhao, Xinjun; Xiong, Hui

    2016-05-01

    To date, hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein (HPIP), a co-repressor for the transcription factor PBX, has been involved into the initiation and onset in a wide variety of cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HPIP-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the spinal glioblastoma have been under investigation. In the present study, spinal glioblastoma tissues, U87, and U251 cell lines were used and subjected to in vitro assays, such as RT-PCR, and Western blot. Here, in vitro assays revealed that HPIP mRNA and protein were highly expressed in five cases of spinal glioblastoma tissues, compared with non-tumor tissues. Subsequently, in vitro experiments demonstrated HPIP promoted the U87 and U251 cell growth and regulated the G1/S phase transitions in U87 and U251 cell cycle, respectively, accompanied by the increased expression of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1. Furthermore, HPIP increased the expression of N-cadherin, Slug, and MMP2, and decreased the expression of E-cadherin. By contrast, knockdown of HPIP reversed HPIP-induced EMT biomarkers, migration, and invasion in U87 and U251 cells. In conclusion, our findings identified HPIP plays an important role in the progression and EMT of spinal glioblastoma, by which cell growth is improved. Thus, HPIP gene or protein could act as a useful target in the clinical practice.

  20. The prognostic relevance of interactions between venous invasion, lymph node involvement and distant metastases in renal cell carcinoma after radical nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zubac, Dragomir P; Bostad, Leif; Seidal, Tomas; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Haukaas, Svein A

    2008-01-01

    Background To investigate a possible prognostic significance of interactions between lymph node invasion (LNI), synchronous distant metastases (SDM), and venous invasion (VI) adjusted for mode of detection, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and tumour size (TS) in 196 patients with renal cell carcinoma treated with radical nephrectomy. Methods Median follow-up was 5.5 years (mean 6.9 years; range 0.01–19.4). The mode of detection, ECOG PS, ESR and TS were obtained from the patients' records. Vena cava invasion and distant metastases were detected by preoperative imaging. The surgical specimens were examined for pathological stage, LNI and VI. Results The univariate analyses showed significant impact of VI, LNI, SDM, ESR and TS (p < 0.001), as well as mode of detection (p = 0.003) and ECOG PS (p = 0.002) on cancer specific survival. In multivariate analyses LNI was significantly associated with survival only in patients without SDM or VI (p < 0.001) with a hazard ratio of 9.0. LNI lost its prognostic significance when SDM or VI was present. Conclusion Our findings underline the prognostic importance of the status of the lymph nodes. LNI, SDM, ESR, and VI were independently associated with cancer specific survival after radical nephrectomy. LNI provided the strongest prognostic information for patients without SDM or VI whereas SDM and VI had strongest impact on survival when there was no nodal involvement. PMID:19099564

  1. Involvement of a region near valine-69 of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 in the interaction with matrix metalloproteinase 3 (stromelysin 1).

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, H; Suzuki, K; Cawston, T E; Brew, K

    1997-01-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by forming a 1:1 stoichiometric complex, but the inhibition mechanism of these inhibitors is not known. Here we have investigated the reactive site of TIMP-1 by its proteinase susceptibility before and after forming a complex with MMP-3 (stromelysin 1). When TIMP-1 was allowed to react with human neutrophil elastase, its inhibitory activity was destroyed. This resulted from cleavage of the Val69-Cys70 bond. However, cleavage of this bond by neutrophil elastase was prevented when TIMP-1 formed a complex with the catalytic domain of MMP-3, and full TIMP-1 activity was restored after dissociation of the complex at pH 3.0 in the presence of EDTA. These results indicate that the region around Val69 closely associates with an active MMP. The three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of TIMP-2 elucidated by NMR studies [Williamson, Martorell, Carr, Murphy, Docherty, Freedman and Feeney (1994) Biochemistry 33, 11745-11759] reveals that Val69 and Cys70 form part of an extended ridge that also includes the N-terminal section of the inhibitor. This region is probably involved in the interaction with the catalytic domains of MMPs. PMID:9224642

  2. Analysis of protein-protein interactions involved in the activation of the Shc/Grb-2 pathway by the ErbB-2 kinase.

    PubMed

    Ricci, A; Lanfrancone, L; Chiari, R; Belardo, G; Pertica, C; Natali, P G; Pelicci, P G; Segatto, O

    1995-10-19

    In murine fibroblasts activation of the Shc/Grb-2 pathway by the ErbB-2 kinase involves tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc products and the formation of Shc/ErbB-2, Shc/Grb-2 and Grb-2/ErbB-2 complexes. Tyr 1139 of ErbB-2 bound to the Grb-2 SH2 domain in vitro as well as in intact cells. Tyr 1221 and 1248 are binding sites of gp185ErbB-2 for Shc SH2 domain in vitro whereas Tyr 1196 and 1248 are major binding sites of ErbB-2 for Shc PTB domain. Inhibition of Shc/ErbB-2 complex formation in intact cells was obtained by simultaneous mutational inactivation of Shc SH2 and Shc PTB binding sites of gp185ErbB-2. Shc/ErbB-2 complexes are formed upon activation of the ErbB-2 kinase and tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc proteins; they are located in both cytosol and cellular membranes. ErbB-2 activation induces also translocation of Grb-2 from cytosol to membranes. This network of protein-protein interactions may reflect the ability of the Shc/Grb-2 pathway to act as a molecular switch controlling different cellular functions regulated by RTK activation. In fact the Ras GDP exchanger mSOS was recruited in Grb-2/ErbB-2 complexes; furthermore besides mSOS, other polypeptides present in either cytosolic or membrane preparations were able to complex in vitro with Grb-2 SH3 domains.

  3. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  4. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Bmsage is involved in regulation of fibroin H-chain gene via interaction with SGF1 in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Chun; Li, Qiong-Yan; Hu, Wen-Bo; Zhou, Meng-Ting; Nie, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Yin-Xia; Peng, Zhang-Chuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qing-You

    2014-01-01

    Silk glands are specialized in the synthesis of several secretory proteins. Expression of genes encoding the silk proteins in Bombyx mori silk glands with strict territorial and developmental specificities is regulated by many transcription factors. In this study, we have characterized B. mori sage, which is closely related to sage in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. It is termed Bmsage; it encodes transcription factor Bmsage, which belongs to the Mesp subfamily, containing a basic helix-loop-helix motif. Bmsage transcripts were detected specifically in the silk glands of B. mori larvae through RT-PCR analysis. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed the Bmsage protein existed exclusively in B. mori middle and posterior silk gland cells. Bmsage has a low level of expression in the 4th instar molting stages, which increases gradually in the 5th instar feeding stages and then declines from the wandering to the pupation stages. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested the expression level of Bmsage in a high silk strain was higher compared to a lower silk strain on day 3 of the larval 5th instar. Furthermore, far western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed the Bmsage protein interacted with the fork head transcription factor silk gland factor 1 (SGF1). An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed the complex of Bmsage and SGF1 proteins bound to the A and B elements in the promoter of fibroin H-chain gene(fib-H), respectively. Luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed the complex of Bmsage and SGF1 proteins increased the expression of fib-H. Together, these results suggest Bmsage is involved in the regulation of the expression of fib-H by being together with SGF1 in B. mori PSG cells.

  5. Consumer Involvement in Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Susan

    1976-01-01

    With the emphasis on consumer involvement in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, changes in the counseling relationship must occur. This article discusses new interaction patterns for consumer and counselor. (Author)

  6. Teacher-Families Online Interactions and Gender Differences in Parental Involvement through School Data System: Do Mothers Want to Know More than Fathers about Their Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Ina; Hameiri, Mira

    2012-01-01

    The integration of School Systems in K-12, opens new possibilities for online interaction among teachers, students, and their parents. This paper examines three years of teacher-student and teacher-parent online interactions in seven Israeli secondary schools during the implementation of a school system called Mashov (meaning "feedback"…

  7. Effects of composite and coordinated interactions between populations of particle-like individuals involving forces and internal states — A statistical-mechanical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øien, Alf H.

    2008-09-01

    In this analogue modeling of interacting species we consider in particular interactions we refer to as composite interactions between particles called “daphnicles” and “food particles” that evolve on a third particle component in the background. Other force interactions are also taken account of but they play a smaller role in this study. The states of daphnicles and food particles are not only given by their position- and velocity-variables but also by variables of internal properties they have, which we shall call “saturation” for daphnicles and “nutrition” for food particles. The “laws” of variations of all these variables, where the rates of change of saturation and nutrition take place in the central region of the force interaction range where daphnicles and food particles come close together in their movements, are coupled in the composite interactions we consider. Due to this coupling of the “outer” force interaction to the “inner” saturation-nutrition interaction the inner interaction can be raised or diminished and in this way the distribution of say saturation of daphnicles may be regulated. From an extended Liouville equation for a system of a large number of particles where in particular interactions like these are baked in on the level of individual particles we aim to derive equations for daphnicle and food particle distribution functions on a kinetic level; this derivation constitutes the main part of the paper. Proper equations on a coarser grained level of description are then found quite easily: this “mixed” kinetic/moment level is in between the kinetic- and the full moment (macroscopic) levels such that distribution of saturation and nutrition still play a role and the equations still retain essential characteristics of the composite interactions taking place on the microscopic level, besides other force interactions. Though the terminology used suites modeling of biological systems and the results may throw some

  8. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  9. Multi-Generational Perspectives: How They Interact and Impact Service to Students and Their Families in an Age of Highly-Involved Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzusin, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Although there have always been differences in how generations navigate decision-making in higher education, highly involved parents have led to conflicting inter-generational educational expectations. This research study investigated the phenomenon of parental involvement and how meanings on educational expectations vary depending on generation.…

  10. Far3p domains involved in the interactions of Far proteins and pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Lai, Fenju; Wu, Rentian; Wang, Jiafeng; Li, Chunming; Zou, Lan; Lu, Yongjun; Liang, Chun

    2011-02-01

    Far3p (factor arrest), a protein that interacts with Far7-11p, is required for the pheromone-mediated cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. We used a combination of computational and experimental strategies to identify the Far3p self-association, to map the Far3p domains that interact with Far3p itself and with other Far proteins, and to reveal the importance of the two coiled-coil motifs of Far3p in the integrity and function of the Far complex. We show that Far3p self-associates through its central region and its C-terminal coiled-coil domain, that the amino acid 61-100 region of Far3p interacts with Far7p, and that the Far3p N-terminal coiled-coil domain interacts with Far9p and Far10p. Mutation of the N-terminal coiled coil disrupts the interactions of Far3p with Far9p and Far10p, and mutation of the C-terminal domain weakens the Far3p self-interaction. Although the N- and C-terminal coiled-coil mutants reserve some of the interactions with itself and some other Far proteins, both mutants are defective in the pheromone-mediated G1 arrest, indicating that both coiled-coil motifs of Far3p are essential for the integrity and the function of the Far complex.

  11. Identification of Cdc6 protein domains involved in interaction with Mcm2 protein and Cdc4 protein in budding yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jang, S W; Elsasser, S; Campbell, J L; Kim, J

    2001-01-01

    The Cdc6 protein (Cdc6p) has essential roles in regulating initiation of DNA replication. Cdc6p is recruited to origins of replication by the origin recognition complex (ORC) late in mitosis; Cdc6p in turn recruits minichromosome maintenance (Mcm) proteins to form the pre-replicative complex. Cdc6p is thought to interact with one or more Mcm proteins but this point has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study we observed that Cdc6p interacted significantly only with Mcm2p out of six Mcm proteins in yeast two-hybrid cells. Our results indicate that the interaction of Cdc6p with Mcm2p is specific, although we cannot exclude the possibility that the interaction might not be direct. In attempts to identify domains of Cdc6p important for interaction with Mcm2p, we tested interactions of various deleted versions of Cdc6p with Mcm2p and also with Cdc4p, which was previously known to interact with Cdc6p. The portion of Cdc6p from amino acid residues 51 to 394 was able to interact with Mcm2p. During the course of the studies we also discovered a previously undetected Cdc4p interaction domain between residues 51 and 394. Interestingly, when all six putative Cdc28 phosphorylation sites in Cdc6p were changed to alanine, a 6-7-fold increase in binding to Mcm2p was observed. This result suggests that unphosphorylated Cdc6p has higher affinity than phosphorylated Cdc6p for Mcm2p; this might partly explain the previous observation that Cdc6p failed to load Mcm proteins on replication origins during S phase when the cyclin-dependent protein kinase was active, thus helping to prevent the reinitiation of activated replicons. PMID:11237870

  12. Cis-element, oriR, involved in the initiation of (-) strand poliovirus RNA: a quasi-globular multi-domain RNA structure maintained by tertiary ('kissing') interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Pilipenko, E V; Poperechny, K V; Maslova, S V; Melchers, W J; Slot, H J; Agol, V I

    1996-01-01

    The key steps in the replication of the poliovirus genome, initiation of (-) and (+) strands, require two different cis-acting elements, oriR and oriL, respectively. It has been proposed that the spatial organization of these elements is maintained by tertiary ('kissing') interactions between the loops of two constituent hairpins. Here, the putative partners of the kissing interaction within the oriR of the full-length poliovirus RNA were modified by site-directed mutagenesis. The destabilization of this interaction resulted in a severe suppression of the viral RNA synthesis, but the mutant transcripts proved to be infectious. With a single exception, the potential for the kissing interaction within the oriR of the recovered viruses was partially or completely restored due to either true reversions or second-site compensatory mutations. There was a good correlation between the restoration of this potential and the phenotypic properties of the viruses. It was concluded that the kissing interaction in the poliovirus oriR is functionally important. Using the above experimental data, a three-dimensional structure was derived by molecular modeling techniques, which demonstrated the overall feasibility of the proposed interactions and displayed the poliovirus oriR as a quasi-globular multi-domain structure. Images PMID:8895586

  13. [Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex].

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Fen; Yu, Kang-Ying; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-25

    The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) is an important approach for regulating arterial blood pressure homeostasis instantaneously and physiologically. Activation of the central histaminergic or cholinergic systems results in CSR functional inhibitory resetting. However, it is unclear whether two systems at the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) level display cross interaction to regulate the CSR or not. In the present study, the left or right carotid sinus region was isolated from the systemic circulation in Sprague-Dawley rats (sinus nerve was reserved) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Respective intubation was conducted into one side isolated carotid sinus and into the femoral artery for recording the intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) simultaneously with pressure transducers connection in vivo. ISP was set at the level of 0 mmHg to eliminate the effect of initial internal pressure of the carotid sinus on the CSR function. To trigger CSR, the ISP was quickly elevated from 0 mmHg to 280 mmHg in a stepwise manner (40 mmHg) which was added at every step for over 4 s, and then ISP returned to 0 mmHg in similar steps. The original data of ISP and corresponding MAP were fitted to a modified logistic equation with five parameters to obtain the ISP-MAP, ISP-Gain relationship curves and the CSR characteristic parameters, which were statistically compared and analyzed separately. Under the precondition of no influence on the basic levels of the artery blood pressure, the effects and potential regulatory mechanism of preceding microinjection with different cholinoceptor antagonists, the selective cholinergic M1 receptor antagonist, i.e., pirenzepine (PRZ), the M2 receptor antagonist, i.e., methoctramine (MTR) or the N1 receptor antagonist, i.e., hexamethonium (HEX) into the NTS on the changes in function of CSR induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) in rats were observed. Meanwhile, the actions and

  14. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 Interacts with a Diverse Array of Eukaryotic Proteins Involved in Transcription, Signaling, and Cytoskeleton Organization ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tian; Kuriakose, Jeeba A.; Zhu, Bing; Wakeel, Abdul; McBride, Jere W.

    2011-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that exhibits tropism for mononuclear phagocytes and survives by evading host cell defense mechanisms. Recently, molecular interactions between E. chaffeensis 47-kDa tandem repeat (TR) protein (TRP47) and the eukaryotic host cell have been described. In this investigation, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that E. chaffeensis-secreted tandem repeat protein 120 (TRP120) interacts with a diverse group of host cell proteins associated with major biological processes, including transcription and regulation, cell signaling, protein trafficking, and actin cytoskeleton organization. Twelve target proteins with the highest frequency of interaction with TRP120 were confirmed by cotransformation in yeast. Host targets, including human immunoglobulin lambda locus (IGL), cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2), Golgi-associated gamma adaptin ear-containing ARF binding protein 1 (GGA1), polycomb group ring finger 5 (PCGF5), actin gamma 1 (ACTG1), and unc-13 homolog D (UNC13D; Caenorhabditis elegans), colocalized strongly with TRP120 in HeLa cells and with E. chaffeensis dense-cored morulae and areas adjacent to morulae in the host cytoplasm. The TR domain of TRP120 interacted only with PCGF5, indicating that distinct TRP120 domains contribute to specific host target interactions and that multiple domains are required to reconstitute TRP120 interactions with other host targets. Three previously defined molecular interactions between TRP47 and host proteins, PCGF5, IGLL1, and CAP1, were also associated with TRP120, demonstrating that molecular cross talk occurs between Ehrlichia TRPs and host targets. These findings further support the role of TRPs as effectors that reprogram the host cell. PMID:21859857

  15. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…

  16. Optimized Cocktail Phenotyping Study Protocol Using Physiological Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and In silico Assessment of Metabolic Drug–Drug Interactions Involving Modafinil

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Angela; Mangoni, Arduino A.; Hopkins, Ashley; Sorich, Michael J.; Rowland, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In vivo cocktail pathway phenotyping (ICPP) is routinely used to assess the metabolic drug–drug interaction (mDDI) potential of new drug candidates (NDC) during drug development. However, there are a number of potential limitations to this approach and the use of validated drug cocktails and study protocols is essential. Typically ICPP mDDI studies assess only the impact of interactions following multiple postulated perpetrator doses and hence the emphasis in terms of validation of these studies has been ensuring that there are no interactions between probe substrates. Studies assessing the comparative impact of single and multiple doses of the postulated perpetrator have the potential to provide richer information regarding both the clinical impact and mechanism of mDDIs. Using modafinil as a model compound, we sought to develop an optimized ICPP mDDI study protocol to evaluate the potential magnitude and clinical relevance of mDDIs using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach. PMID:28082902

  17. A Scoping Analysis Of The Impact Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression Involving Core–Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the impact of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten core-concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO2.

  18. A BDNF Sensitive Mechanism Is Involved in the Fear Memory Resulting from the Interaction between Stress and the Retrieval of an Established Trace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giachero, Marcelo; Bustos, Silvia G.; Calfa, Gaston; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the fear memory resulting from the interaction of a stressful experience and the retrieval of an established fear memory trace. Such a combination enhanced both fear expression and fear retention in adult Wistar rats. Likewise, midazolam intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion prior to stress attenuated the…

  19. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  20. Optimization of competitor poly(dI-dC).poly(dI-dC) levels is advised in DNA-protein interaction studies involving enriched nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Larouche, K; Bergeron, M J; Leclerc, S; Guérin, S L

    1996-03-01

    Procedures used for investigating DNA-protein interactions, such as the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) or DNasel footprinting, require that exogenous nucleic acids (or synthetic equivalents) be added to the reaction mixture to prevent or reduce the nonspecific interaction of nuclear proteins with the labeled probe of choice, especially when proteins are obtained from crude nuclear extracts. One of the most potent, and likely the most widely used, non-specific competitor is the synthetic polymer poly(dI-dC).poly(dI-dC). Its addition to the reaction mixture prior to crude nuclear proteins has unquestionably proven very efficient in reducing nonspecific interactions by facilitating detection of the complexes of interest. However, in certain instances, the use of crude extracts alone does not provide adequate answers and the need to further enrich such extracts becomes absolutely necessary. In this study, we provide evidence that amounts of poly(dI-dC).poly(dI-dC) well below those currently described in the literature substantially impair, or even totally prevent, the detection of specific DNA-protein complexes in EMSA when enriched, gel-fractionated or commercially purified nuclear proteins are used, therefore indicating the need to precisely optimize the amount of such a competitor in DNA-protein interaction studies.

  1. Genetic and molecular interactions of the Erv41p-Erv46p complex involved in transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Leah M; Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Boone, Charles; Jensen, Ole N; Otte, Stefan

    2006-11-15

    Erv41p and Erv46p are integral membrane proteins conserved across species. They were originally identified as abundant constituents of COPII-coated vesicles, and form a complex which cycles between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Yeast strains lacking these proteins are viable but display subtle secretory phenotypes. In order to obtain information about possible biological roles of this protein complex in endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport, we employed the Synthetic Genetic Array approach to screen for synthetic genetic interactions with the erv46 null mutation. We identified synthetic interactions with vma12, vma21, vma22 and vps1 deletion mutations. The vma21Delta mutation exacerbates transport defects caused by the erv46Delta mutation. Unexpectedly, yeast strains lacking Vma21p fail to sort the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi v-SNARE, Bos1p, efficiently into COPII vesicles, yet these vesicles are fully fusion competent. In addition, we set out to identify, by a biochemical approach, proteins interacting with the Erv41p-Erv46p complex. We report a strong interaction between the Erv41p-Erv46p complex and endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase II. Strains lacking a cycling Erv41p-Erv46p complex display a mild glycoprotein processing defect.

  2. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-12-18

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701-706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711-735 and defines TFIP11's distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle-targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it's function.

  3. The TAL effector PthA4 interacts with nuclear factors involved in RNA-dependent processes including a HMG protein that selectively binds poly(U) RNA.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Tiago Antonio; Soprano, Adriana Santos; de Lira, Nayara Patricia Vieira; Quaresma, Alexandre José Christino; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize an array of effector proteins to cause disease. Among them, transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors are unusual in the sense that they modulate transcription in the host. Although target genes and DNA specificity of TAL effectors have been elucidated, how TAL proteins control host transcription is poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the Xanthomonas citri TAL effectors, PthAs 2 and 3, preferentially targeted a citrus protein complex associated with transcription control and DNA repair. To extend our knowledge on the mode of action of PthAs, we have identified new protein targets of the PthA4 variant, required to elicit canker on citrus. Here we show that all the PthA4-interacting proteins are DNA and/or RNA-binding factors implicated in chromatin remodeling and repair, gene regulation and mRNA stabilization/modification. The majority of these proteins, including a structural maintenance of chromosomes protein (CsSMC), a translin-associated factor X (CsTRAX), a VirE2-interacting protein (CsVIP2), a high mobility group (CsHMG) and two poly(A)-binding proteins (CsPABP1 and 2), interacted with each other, suggesting that they assemble into a multiprotein complex. CsHMG was shown to bind DNA and to interact with the invariable leucine-rich repeat region of PthAs. Surprisingly, both CsHMG and PthA4 interacted with PABP1 and 2 and showed selective binding to poly(U) RNA, a property that is novel among HMGs and TAL effectors. Given that homologs of CsHMG, CsPABP1, CsPABP2, CsSMC and CsTRAX in other organisms assemble into protein complexes to regulate mRNA stability and translation, we suggest a novel role of TAL effectors in mRNA processing and translational control.

  4. Schwannomin-interacting Protein 1 Isoform IQCJ-SCHIP1 Is a Multipartner Ankyrin- and Spectrin-binding Protein Involved in the Organization of Nodes of Ranvier.

    PubMed

    Martin, Pierre-Marie; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Devaux, Jérôme; Garcia, Marta; Bureau, Jocelyne; Thomasseau, Sylvie; Klingler, Esther; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Goutebroze, Laurence

    2017-02-10

    The nodes of Ranvier are essential regions for action potential conduction in myelinated fibers. They are enriched in multimolecular complexes composed of voltage-gated Nav and Kv7 channels associated with cell adhesion molecules. Cytoskeletal proteins ankyrin-G (AnkG) and βIV-spectrin control the organization of these complexes and provide mechanical support to the plasma membrane. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is a cytoplasmic protein present in axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier. It interacts with AnkG and is absent from nodes and axon initial segments of βIV-spectrin and AnkG mutant mice. Here, we show that IQCJ-SCHIP1 also interacts with βIV-spectrin and Kv7.2/3 channels and self-associates, suggesting a scaffolding role in organizing nodal proteins. IQCJ-SCHIP1 binding requires a βIV-spectrin-specific domain and Kv7 channel 1-5-10 calmodulin-binding motifs. We then investigate the role of IQCJ-SCHIP1 in vivo by studying peripheral myelinated fibers in Schip1 knock-out mutant mice. The major nodal proteins are normally enriched at nodes in these mice, indicating that IQCJ-SCHIP1 is not required for their nodal accumulation. However, morphometric and ultrastructural analyses show an altered shape of nodes similar to that observed in βIV-spectrin mutant mice, revealing that IQCJ-SCHIP1 contributes to nodal membrane-associated cytoskeleton organization, likely through its interactions with the AnkG/βIV-spectrin network. Our work reveals that IQCJ-SCHIP1 interacts with several major nodal proteins, and we suggest that it contributes to a higher organizational level of the AnkG/βIV-spectrin network critical for node integrity.

  5. An Efficient Single-Molecule Resolution Method for Simulating Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Protein Interaction Networks that Involve the Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    A significant number of the cellular protein interaction networks, such as the receptor mediated signaling and vesicle trafficking pathways, includes membranes as a molecular assembly platform. Computer simulations can provide insight into the dynamics of complex formation and help identify the principles that govern recruitment and assembly on the membranes. Here, we introduce the Free-Propagator Re-weighting (FPR) algorithm, a recently developed method that efficiently simulates the spatio-temporal dynamics of multiprotein complex formation both in the solution and on the membranes. In the FPR, the position of each protein is propagated using the Brownian motion and the reactions between pairs of proteins can occur upon collisions. Depending on the dimensionality of the interaction, the association probabilities are determined by solving the Smoluchowski diffusion equations in 2D or 3D and trajectory reweighting allows us to obtain the exact association rates for all the reactive pairs. Using the FPR, in this presentation, we investigate the interaction dynamics of the receptor mediated endocytic network as a case study and discuss the possible effects of membrane binding and molecular crowding on the formation of complexes. Supported by the NIGMS/NIH under R00GM098371.

  6. DNA annealing by Redβ is insufficient for homologous recombination and the additional requirements involve intra- and inter-molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Erler, Axel; Fu, Jun; Kranz, Andrea; Tang, Jing; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Müller, Daniel; Sattler, Michael; Stewart, A. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) like Redβ initiate homologous recombination by annealing complementary DNA strands. We show that C-terminally truncated Redβ, whilst still able to promote annealing and nucleoprotein filament formation, is unable to mediate homologous recombination. Mutations of the C-terminal domain were evaluated using both single- and double stranded (ss and ds) substrates in recombination assays. Mutations of critical amino acids affected either dsDNA recombination or both ssDNA and dsDNA recombination indicating two separable functions, one of which is critical for dsDNA recombination and the second for recombination per se. As evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, the dsDNA recombination function relates to the Redα-Redβ protein-protein interaction, which requires not only contacts in the C-terminal domain but also a region near the N-terminus. Because the nucleoprotein filament formed with C-terminally truncated Redβ has altered properties, the second C-terminal function could be due to an interaction required for functional filaments. Alternatively the second C-terminal function could indicate a requirement for a Redβ-host factor interaction. These data further advance the model for Red recombination and the proposition that Redβ and RAD52 SSAPs share ancestral and mechanistic roots. PMID:27708411

  7. Human Platelets Recognize a Novel Surface Protein, PadA, on Streptococcus gordonii through a Unique Interaction Involving Fibrinogen Receptor GPIIbIIIa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Helen J.; Keane, Ciara; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Jesionowski, Amy; Waterhouse, Janet C.; Cox, Dermot; Kerrigan, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of an infectious agent playing a role in cardiovascular disease is slowly gaining attention. Among several pathogens identified, the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii has been implicated as a plausible agent. Platelet adhesion and subsequent aggregation are critical events in the pathogenesis and dissemination of the infective process. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a novel cell wall-anchored surface protein, PadA (397 kDa), of S. gordonii DL1 that binds to the platelet fibrinogen receptor GPIIbIIIa. Wild-type S. gordonii cells induced platelet aggregation and supported platelet adhesion in a GPIIbIIIa-dependent manner. Deletion of the padA gene had no effect on platelet aggregation by S. gordonii but significantly reduced (>75%) platelet adhesion to S. gordonii. Purified N-terminal PadA recombinant polypeptide adhered to platelets. The padA mutant was unaffected in production of other platelet-interactive surface proteins (Hsa, SspA, and SspB), and levels of adherence of the mutant to fetuin or platelet receptor GPIb were unaffected. Wild-type S. gordonii, but not the padA mutant, bound to Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with GPIIbIIIa, and this interaction was ablated by addition of GPIIbIIIa inhibitor Abciximab. These results highlight the growing complexity of interactions between S. gordonii and platelets and demonstrate a new mechanism by which the bacterium could contribute to unwanted thrombosis. PMID:19884334

  8. MiR-27a rs895819 is involved in increased atrophic gastritis risk, improved gastric cancer prognosis and negative interaction with Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Tie-jun; He, Cai-yun; Sun, Li-ping; Liu, Jing-wei; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    MiR-27a rs895819 is a loop-stem structure single nucleotide polymorphism affecting mature miR-27a function. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis about the association of rs895819 with gastric cancer risk and prognosis, atrophic gastritis risk, as well as the interactions with environmental factors. A total of 939 gastric cancer patients, 1,067 atrophic gastritis patients and 1,166 healthy controls were screened by direct sequencing and MALDI-TOF-MS. The association of rs895819 with clinical pathological parameters and prognostic survival in 357 gastric cancer patients was also been analyzed. The rs895819 variant genotype increased the risk for atrophic gastritis (1.58-fold) and gastric cancer (1.24-fold). While in stratified analysis, the risk effect was demonstrated more significantly in the female, age >60y, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and non-drinker subgroups. Rs895819 and H. pylori showed an interaction effect for atrophic gastritis risk. In the survival analysis, the rs895819 AG heterozygosis was associated with better survival than the AA wild-type in the TNM stage I–II subgroup. In vitro study by overexpressing miR-27a, cells carrying polymorphic-type G allele expressed lower miR-27a than wild-type A allele. In conclusion, miR-27a rs895819 is implicated as a biomarker for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk, and interacts with H. pylori in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:28150722

  9. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri surface proteome by 2D-DIGE: Ferric enterobactin receptor and other outer membrane proteins potentially involved in citric host interaction.

    PubMed

    Carnielli, Carolina Moretto; Artier, Juliana; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques

    2017-01-16

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XAC) is the causative agent of citrus canker, a disease of great economic impact around the world. Understanding the role of proteins on XAC cellular surface can provide new insights on pathogen-plant interaction. Surface proteome was performed in XAC grown in vivo (infectious) and in vitro (non-infectious) conditions, by labeling intact cells followed by cellular lysis and direct 2D-DIGE analysis. Seventy-nine differential spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Highest relative abundance for in vivo condition was observed for spots containing DnaK protein, 60kDa chaperonin, conserved hypothetical proteins, malate dehydrogenase, phosphomannose isomerase, and ferric enterobactin receptors. Elongation factor Tu, OmpA-related proteins, Oar proteins and some Ton-B dependent receptors were found in spots decreased in vivo. Some proteins identified on XAC's surface in infectious condition and predicted to be cytoplasmic, such as DnaK and 60KDa chaperonin, have also been previously found at cellular surface in other microorganisms. This is the first study on XAC surface proteome and results point to mediation of molecular chaperones in XAC-citrus interaction. The approach utilized here can be applied to other pathogen-host interaction systems and help to achieve new insights in bacterial pathogenicity toward promising targets of biotechnological interest.

  10. Functional Organization of the Yeast SAGA Complex: Distinct Components Involved in Structural Integrity, Nucleosome Acetylation, and TATA-Binding Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sterner, David E.; Grant, Patrick A.; Roberts, Shannon M.; Duggan, Laura J.; Belotserkovskaya, Rimma; Pacella, Lisa A.; Winston, Fred; Workman, Jerry L.; Berger, Shelley L.

    1999-01-01

    SAGA, a recently described protein complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is important for transcription in vivo and possesses histone acetylation function. Here we report both biochemical and genetic analyses of members of three classes of transcription regulatory factors contained within the SAGA complex. We demonstrate a correlation between the phenotypic severity of SAGA mutants and SAGA structural integrity. Specifically, null mutations in the Gcn5/Ada2/Ada3 or Spt3/Spt8 classes cause moderate phenotypes and subtle structural alterations, while mutations in a third subgroup, Spt7/Spt20, as well as Ada1, disrupt the complex and cause severe phenotypes. Interestingly, double mutants (gcn5Δ spt3Δ and gcn5Δ spt8Δ) causing loss of a member of each of the moderate classes have severe phenotypes, similar to spt7Δ, spt20Δ, or ada1Δ mutants. In addition, we have investigated biochemical functions suggested by the moderate phenotypic classes and find that first, normal nucleosomal acetylation by SAGA requires a specific domain of Gcn5, termed the bromodomain. Deletion of this domain also causes specific transcriptional defects at the HIS3 promoter in vivo. Second, SAGA interacts with TBP, the TATA-binding protein, and this interaction requires Spt8 in vitro. Overall, our data demonstrate that SAGA harbors multiple, distinct transcription-related functions, including direct TBP interaction and nucleosomal histone acetylation. Loss of either of these causes slight impairment in vivo, but loss of both is highly detrimental to growth and transcription. PMID:9858534

  11. HBx-dependent cell cycle deregulation involves interaction with cyclin E/A-cdk2 complex and destabilization of p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Atish; Janbandhu, Vaibhao C; Kumar, Vijay

    2007-01-01

    The HBx (X protein of hepatitis B virus) is a promiscuous transactivator implicated to play a key role in hepatocellular carcinoma. However, HBx-regulated molecular events leading to deregulation of cell cycle or establishment of a permissive environment for hepatocarcinogenesis are not fully understood. Our cell culture-based studies suggested that HBx had a profound effect on cell cycle progression even in the absence of serum. HBx presence led to an early and sustained level of cyclin-cdk2 complex during the cell cycle combined with increased protein kinase activity of cdk2 heralding an early proliferative signal. The increased cdk2 activity also led to an early proteasomal degradation of p27(Kip1) that could be reversed by HBx-specific RNA interference and blocked by a chemical inhibitor of cdk2 or the T187A mutant of p27. Further, our co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding studies with recombinant proteins suggested a direct interaction between HBx and the cyclin E/A-cdk2 complex. Interference with different signalling cascades known to be activated by HBx suggested a constitutive requirement of Src kinases for the association of HBx with these complexes. Notably, the HBx mutant that did not interact with cyclin E/A failed to destabilize p27(Kip1) or deregulate the cell cycle. Thus HBx appears to deregulate the cell cycle by interacting with the key cell cycle regulators independent of its well-established role in transactivation.

  12. Infrared spectrum involving forbidden transitions & coriolis interaction and identification of optically pumped far infrared laser lines in asymmetrically mono-deuterated methanol (Methanol-D1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indra

    2016-05-01

    In this paper new type of ΔK = 2 and 0 transitions have been identified in the Fourier Transform spectrum of Methanol-D1 (CH2DOH). These transitions are normally forbidden but a "Coriolis" type interaction with nearby states is believed to be contributing sufficient transition strength through intensity borrowing effect. This is the first time such forbidden transitions are reported to be identified in the excited states, in this molecule. The present conjecture is supported by observation of a many strong allowed transitions to upper terminating levels which are seen to be highly perturbed. This conclusion has been reached by comparing calculated energy levels using known molecular parameters (Pearson et al., 2012; Coudert et al., 2014; El Hilali et al., 2011; Quade et al., 1998; Richard Quade, 1998, 1999; Mukhopadhyay, 1997) and the actually observed FIR lines. The upper levels are seen to be upshifted from expected position. A closer look at the calculated energy values seems to indicate a possible interaction between the above states and other proximate torsional-rotational states could occur. The possible candidates for the interacting level manifolds are narrowed down through the presence of the forbidden transition. We also take the opportunity to propose alternate rotational quantum numbers for some of the assignments recently reported in the literature (El Hilali et al., 2011). Some ambiguities are pointed out on the data and the reported analysis. There remain too many such irregularities and we propose to gather a large body assigned transitions in a future catalog. Assignments and relevant comments on optically pumped FIR laser radiation are also made.

  13. Identification of Novel Inhibitory Peptides of Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in DNA Repair as Potential Drugs in Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    harboring genes whose products are known to interact (as fusions with the Gal 4 DNA binding domain and Gal 4-activation domain) the yeast will be able to grow...reverse two hybrid system. The specific aims of this part were: 1. To develop yeast clones containing plasmids expressing Rad51 as a fusion protein with...Gal4 activation domain (RAD51 AD) and Gal4 DNA binding Domain (RAD51 DB). The clones expressing RAD51 fusion proteins would be tested to determine the

  14. Calcium signaling in lymphocytes and ELF fields. Evidence for an electric field metric and a site of interaction involving the calcium ion channel.

    PubMed

    Liburdy, R P

    1992-04-13

    Calcium influx increased during mitogen-activated signal transduction in thymic lymphocytes exposed to a 22 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field (E induced = 1.7 mV/cm, 37 degrees C, 60 min). To distinguish between an electric or a magnetic field dependence a special multi-ring annular cell culture plate based on Faraday's Law of Induction was employed. Studies show a dependence on the strength of the induced electric field at constant magnetic flux density. Moreover, exposure to a pure 60 Hz electric field or to a magnetically-induced electric field of identical strength resulted in similar changes in calcium transport. The first real-time monitoring of [Ca2+]i during application of a 60 Hz electric field revealed an increase in [Ca2+]i observed 100 s after mitogen stimulation; this suggests that the plateau phase rather than the early phase of calcium signaling was influenced. The hypothesis was tested by separating, in time, the early release of calcium from intracellular stores from the influx of extracellular calcium. In calcium-free buffer, 60 Hz field exerted little influence on the early release of calcium from intracellular stores. In contrast, addition of extracellular calcium during exposure enhanced calcium influx through the plasma membrane. Alteration of the plateau phase of calcium signaling implicates the calcium channel as a site of field interaction. In addition, an electric field exposure metric is mechanistically consistent with a cell-surface interaction site.

  15. Lone pair⋯π interactions involving carbonyl π-systems: Experimental and theoretical study of the complexes of COF2 and COFCl with dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geboes, Yannick; De Proft, Frank; Herrebout, Wouter A.

    2016-09-01

    In this theoretical and experimental study, the ability of carbonyl fluoride (COF2) and carbonyl chloride fluoride (COFCl) to form noncovalent interactions with the Lewis base dimethyl ether (DME) is assessed. From ab initio calculations, two stable complexes are found for COF2·DME, both formed through a lone pair⋯π interaction. FTIR measurements on liquefied noble gas solutions, supported by ab initio calculations, statistical thermodynamical calculations and Monte Carle Free Energy Perturbation calculations, show that a 1:1 lone pair⋯π bonded complex is found in solution, with an experimental complexation enthalpy of -14.5(3) kJ mol-1. For COFCl·DME three lone pair⋯π complexes, as well as a Cl⋯O halogen bonded complex, are found from ab initio calculations. Experimentally, clear complex bands for 1:1 lone pair⋯π complexes are observed, with an experimental complexation enthalpy of -11.4(2) kJ mol-1. Furthermore, indications of the presence of a small amount of the halogen bonded complex are also observed.

  16. The extracellular phage-host interactions involved in the bacteriophage LL-H infection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis ATCC 15808.

    PubMed

    Munsch-Alatossava, Patricia; Alatossava, Tapani

    2013-12-24

    The complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus bacteriophage LL-H was determined in 1996. Accordingly, LL-H has been used as a model phage for the infection of dairy Lactobacillus, specifically for thermophilic Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis host strains, such as ATCC 15808. One of the major goals of phage LL-H research consisted of the characterization of the first phage-host interactions at the level of phage adsorption and phage DNA injection steps to determine effective and practical methods to minimize the risks associated with the appearance and attack of phages in the manufacture of yogurt, and Swiss or Italian hard type cheeses, which typically use thermophilic lactic acid bacteria starter cultures containing L. delbrueckii strains among others. This mini review article summarizes the present data concerning (i) the special features, particle structure, and components of phage LL-H and (ii) the structure and properties of lipoteichoic acids (LTAs), which are the phage LL-H receptor components of L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis host strains. Moreover, a model of the first, extracellular, phage-host interactions for the infection of L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis ATCC 15808 by phage LL-H is presented and further discussed.

  17. Controllable Rashba spin-orbit interaction in artificially engineered superlattices involving the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5.

    PubMed

    Shimozawa, M; Goh, S K; Endo, R; Kobayashi, R; Watashige, T; Mizukami, Y; Ikeda, H; Shishido, H; Yanase, Y; Terashima, T; Shibauchi, T; Matsuda, Y

    2014-04-18

    By using a molecular beam epitaxy technique, we fabricate a new type of superconducting superlattices with controlled atomic layer thicknesses of alternating blocks between the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5, which exhibits a strong Pauli pair-breaking effect, and nonmagnetic metal YbCoIn5. The introduction of the thickness modulation of YbCoIn5 block layers breaks the inversion symmetry centered at the superconducting block of CeCoIn5. This configuration leads to dramatic changes in the temperature and angular dependence of the upper critical field, which can be understood by considering the effect of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction arising from the inversion symmetry breaking and the associated weakening of the Pauli pair-breaking effect. Since the degree of thickness modulation is a design feature of this type of superlattices, the Rashba interaction and the nature of pair breaking are largely tunable in these modulated superlattices with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  18. The histone methylase KMTox interacts with the redox-sensor peroxiredoxin-1 and targets genes involved in Toxoplasma gondii antioxidant defences.

    PubMed

    Sautel, Céline F; Ortet, Philippe; Saksouk, Nehmé; Kieffer, Sylvie; Garin, Jérôme; Bastien, Olivier; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2009-01-01

    The ability of living cells to alter their gene expression patterns in response to environmental changes is essential for viability. Oxidative stress represents a common threat for all aerobic life. In normally growing cells, in which hydrogen peroxide generation is transient or pulsed, the antioxidant systems efficiently control its concentration. Intracellular parasites must also protect themselves against the oxidative burst imposed by the host. In this work, we have investigated the role of KMTox, a new histone lysine methyltransferase, in the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. KMTox is a nuclear protein that holds a High Mobility Group domain, which is thought to recognize bent DNA. The enzyme methylates both histones H4 and H2A in vitro with a great preference for the substrate in reduced conditions. Importantly, KMTox interacts specifically with the typical 2-cys peroxiredoxin-1 and the binding is to some extent enhanced upon oxidation. It appears that the cellular functions that are primarily regulated by the KMTox are antioxidant defences and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. KMTox may regulate gene expression in T. gondii by providing the rapid re-arrangement of chromatin domains and by interacting with the redox-sensor TgPrx1 contribute to establish the antioxidant 'firewall' in T. gondii.

  19. Removal of sulfamethoxazole sulfonamide antibiotic from water by high silica zeolites: a study of the involved host-guest interactions by a combined structural, spectroscopic, and computational approach.

    PubMed

    Blasioli, Sonia; Martucci, Annalisa; Paul, Geo; Gigli, Lara; Cossi, Maurizio; Johnston, Cliff T; Marchese, Leonardo; Braschi, Ilaria

    2014-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are persistent pollutants present in surface and subsurface waters in both agricultural and urban environments. Sulfonamides are of particular concern in the environment because they are known to induce high levels of bacterial resistance. Adsorption of sulfamethoxazole sulfonamide antibiotic into three high silica zeolites (Y, mordenite, and ZSM-5) with pore opening sizes comparable to sulfamethoxazole dimensions is reported. Sulfamethoxazole was almost completely removed from water by zeolite Y and MOR in a few minutes. Adsorption onto ZSM-5 showed an increased kinetics with increasing temperature. Antibiotic sorption was largely irreversible with little antibiotic desorbed. Sulfamethoxazole incorporation and localization into the pore of each zeolite system was defined along with medium-weak and cooperative host-guest interactions in which water molecules play a certain role only in zeolite Y and mordenite.

  20. Intersystem-crossing and phosphorescence rates in fac-Ir{sup III}(ppy){sub 3}: A theoretical study involving multi-reference configuration interaction wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, Martin; Marian, Christel M.; Wüllen, Christoph van

    2015-03-07

    We have employed combined density functional theory and multi-reference configuration interaction methods including spin–orbit coupling (SOC) effects to investigate the photophysics of the green phosphorescent emitter fac-tris-(2-phenylpyridine)iridium (fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3}). A critical evaluation of our quantum chemical approaches shows that a perturbational treatment of SOC is the method of choice for computing the UV/Vis spectrum of this heavy transition metal complex while multi-reference spin–orbit configuration interaction is preferable for calculating the phosphorescence rates. The particular choice of the spin–orbit interaction operator is found to be of minor importance. Intersystem crossing (ISC) rates have been determined by Fourier transformation of the time correlation function of the transition including Dushinsky rotations. In the electronic ground state, fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3} is C{sub 3} symmetric. The calculated UV/Vis spectrum is in excellent agreement with experiment. The effect of SOC is particularly pronounced for the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) band in the visible region of the absorption spectrum which does not only extend its spectral onset towards longer wavelengths but also experiences a blue shift of its maximum. Pseudo-Jahn-Teller interaction leads to asymmetric coordinate displacements in the lowest MLCT states. Substantial electronic SOC and a small energy gap make ISC an ultrafast process in fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3}. For the S{sub 1}↝T{sub 1} non-radiative transition, we compute a rate constant of k{sub ISC} = 6.9 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1} which exceeds the rate constant of radiative decay to the electronic ground state by more than six orders of magnitude, in agreement with the experimental observation of a subpicosecond ISC process and a triplet quantum yield close to unity. As a consequence of the geometric distortion in the T{sub 1} state, the T{sub 1} → S{sub 0} transition densities are localized on one of the

  1. Validation of the RPLUS3D Code for Supersonic Inlet Applications Involving Three-Dimensional Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code, RPLUS3D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for glancing shock wave-boundary layer interactions. Both laminar and turbulent flows were studied. A supersonic flow over a wedge mounted on a flat plate was numerically simulated. For the laminar case, the static pressure distribution, velocity vectors, and particle traces on the flat plate were obtained. For turbulent flow, both the Baldwin-Lomax and Chien two-equation turbulent models were used. The static pressure distributions, pitot pressure, and yaw angle profiles were computed. In addition, the velocity vectors and particle traces on the flat plate were also obtained from the computed solution. Overall, the computed results for both laminar and turbulent cases compared very well with the experimentally obtained data.

  2. SRPK2: A Differentially Expressed SR Protein-specific Kinase Involved in Mediating the Interaction and Localization of Pre-mRNA Splicing Factors in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan-You; Lin, Wen; Dyck, Jacqueline A.; Yeakley, Joanne M.; Songyang, Zhou; Cantley, Lewis C.; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    1998-01-01

    Abstract. Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role in pre-mRNA splicing in mammalian cells. Two kinases, SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK1) and Clk/Sty, have been shown to phosphorylate the SR family of splicing factors. We report here the cloning and characterization of SRPK2, which is highly related to SRPK1 in sequence, kinase activity, and substrate specificity. Random peptide selection for preferred phosphorylation sites revealed a stringent preference of SRPK2 for SR dipeptides, and the consensus derived may be used to predict potential phosphorylation sites in candidate arginine and serine-rich (RS) domain–containing proteins. Phosphorylation of an SR protein (ASF/SF2) by either SRPK1 or 2 enhanced its interaction with another RS domain–containing protein (U1 70K), and overexpression of either kinase induced specific redistribution of splicing factors in the nucleus. These observations likely reflect the function of the SRPK family of kinases in spliceosome assembly and in mediating the trafficking of splicing factors in mammalian cells. The biochemical and functional similarities between SRPK1 and 2, however, are in contrast to their differences in expression. SRPK1 is highly expressed in pancreas, whereas SRPK2 is highly expressed in brain, although both are coexpressed in other human tissues and in many experimental cell lines. Interestingly, SRPK2 also contains a proline-rich sequence at its NH2 terminus, and a recent study showed that this NH2-terminal sequence has the capacity to interact with a WW domain protein in vitro. Together, our studies suggest that different SRPK family members may be uniquely regulated and targeted, thereby contributing to splicing regulation in different tissues, during development, or in response to signaling. PMID:9472028

  3. IL1 receptor accessory protein like, a protein involved in X-linked mental retardation, interacts with Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 and regulates exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Nadia; Friocourt, Gaelle; Carrié, Alain; Graham, Margaret E; Weiss, Jamie L; Chafey, Philippe; Fauchereau, Fabien; Burgoyne, Robert D; Chelly, Jamel

    2003-06-15

    Previously, human genetics-based approaches allowed us to show that mutations in the IL-1 receptor accessory protein-like gene (IL1RAPL) are responsible for a non-specific form of X-linked mental retardation. This gene encodes a predicted protein of 696 amino acids that belongs to a novel class of the IL-1/Toll receptor family. In addition to the extracellular portion consisting of three Ig-like domains and the intracellular TIR domain characteristic of the IL-1/Toll receptor family, IL1RAPL contains a specific 150 amino acid carboxy terminus that has no significant homology with any protein of known function. In order to begin to elucidate the function of this IL-1/Toll receptor-like protein, we have assessed the effect of recombinant IL1RAPL on the binding affinity of type I IL-1R for its ligands IL-1alpha and beta and searched for proteins interacting with the specific carboxy terminus domain of IL1RAPL. Our results show that IL1RAPL is not a protein receptor for IL-1. In addition we present here the identification of Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS-1) as an IL1RAPL interactor. Remarkably, although NCS-1 and its non-mammalian homologue, frequenin, are members of a highly conserved EF-hand Ca(2+) binding protein family, our data show that IL1RAPL interacts only with NCS-1 through its specific C-terminal domain. The functional relevance of IL1RAPL activity was further supported by the inhibitory effect on exocytosis in PC12 cells overexpressing IL1RAPL. Taken together, our data suggest that IL1RAPL may regulate calcium-dependent exocytosis and provide insight into the understanding of physiopathological mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment resulting from IL1RAPL dysfunction.

  4. Human VAP-B is involved in hepatitis C virus replication through interaction with NS5A and NS5B.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Itsuki; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Okamoto, Toru; Aizaki, Hideki; Liu, Minyi; Mori, Yoshio; Abe, Takayuki; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Lai, Michael M C; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Moriishi, Kohji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2005-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein (NS) 5A is a phosphoprotein that associates with various cellular proteins and participates in the replication of the HCV genome. Human vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP) subtype A (VAP-A) is known to be a host factor essential for HCV replication by binding to both NS5A and NS5B. To obtain more information on the NS5A protein in HCV replication, we screened human brain and liver libraries by a yeast two-hybrid system using NS5A as bait and identified VAP-B as an NS5A-binding protein. Immunoprecipitation and mutation analyses revealed that VAP-B binds to both NS5A and NS5B in mammalian cells and forms homo- and heterodimers with VAP-A. VAP-A interacts with VAP-B through the transmembrane domain. NS5A interacts with the coiled-coil domain of VAP-B via 70 residues in the N-terminal and 341 to 344 amino acids in the C-terminal polyproline cluster region. NS5A was colocalized with VAP-B in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. The specific antibody to VAP-B suppressed HCV RNA replication in a cell-free assay. Overexpression of VAP-B, but not of a mutant lacking its transmembrane domain, enhanced the expression of NS5A and NS5B and the replication of HCV RNA in Huh-7 cells harboring a subgenomic replicon. In the HCV replicon cells, the knockdown of endogenous VAP-B by small interfering RNA decreased expression of NS5B, but not of NS5A. These results suggest that VAP-B, in addition to VAP-A, plays an important role in the replication of the HCV genome.

  5. Low Potential of Basimglurant to Be Involved in Drug-Drug Interactions: Influence of Non-Michaelis-Menten P450 Kinetics on Fraction Metabolized.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Stephen; Guerini, Elena; Qiu, NaHong; Cleary, Yumi; Parrott, Neil; Greig, Gerard; Mallalieu, Navita L

    2017-01-01

    Basimglurant, a novel mGlu5-negative allosteric modulator under development for the treatment of major depressive disorder, is cleared via cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated oxidative metabolism. Initial enzyme phenotyping studies indicated that CYP3A4/5 dominates basimglurant metabolism and highlights a risk for drug-drug interactions when it is comedicated with strong CYP3A4/5 inhibitors or inactivators; however, a clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) study using the potent and selective CYP3A4/5 inhibitor ketoconazole resulted in an area under the curve (AUC) AUCi/AUC ratio of only 1.24. A further study using the CYP3A4 inducer carbamazepine resulted in an AUCi/AUC ratio of 0.69. More detailed in vitro enzyme phenotyping and kinetics studies showed that, at the low concentrations attained clinically, basimglurant metabolic clearance is catalyzed mainly by CYP1A2. The relative contributions of the enzymes were estimated as 70:30 CYP1A2:CYP3A4/5. Using this information, a clinical study using the CYP1A2 inhibitor fluvoxamine was performed, resulting in an AUCi/AUC ratio of 1.60, confirming the role of CYP1A2 and indicating a balanced DDI risk profile. Basimglurant metabolism kinetics show enzyme dependency: CYP1A2-mediated metabolism follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, whereas CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 follow sigmoidal kinetics [with similar constant (KM) and S50 values]. The interplay of the different enzyme kinetics leads to changing fractional enzyme contributions to metabolism with substrate concentration, even though none of the metabolic enzymes is saturated. This example demonstrates the relevance of non-Michaelis-Menten P450 enzyme kinetics and highlights the need for a thorough understanding of metabolism enzymology to make accurate predictions for human metabolism in vivo.

  6. Genetic analyses involving interactions between the ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes, lanosterol synthase (Erg7p) and 3-ketoreductase (Erg27p), in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Teske, B.; Taramino, S.; Bhuiyan, M. S. A.; Kumaraswami, N. S.; Randall, S. K.; Barbuch, R.; Eckstein, J.; Balliano, G.; Bard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein interaction studies in the S. cerevisiae ergosterol biosynthetic pathway suggest that enzymes in this pathway may act as an integrated multienzyme complex. The yeast sterol 3-ketoreductase (Erg27p) required for C-4 demethylation of sterols has previously been shown to also be required for the function of the upstream oxidosqualene cyclase/lanosterol synthase (Erg7p); thus, erg27 mutants accumulate oxidosqualenes as precursors rather than 3-ketosterones. In the present study, we have created various mutations in the ERG27 gene. These mutations include 5 C-terminal truncations, 6 internal deletions, and 32 point mutants of which 14 were obtained by site directed mutagenesis and 18 by random mutagenesis. We have characterized these ERG27 mutations by determining the following: Erg27 and Erg7 enzyme activities, presence of Erg27p as determined by western immunoblots, ability to grow on various sterol substrates and GC sterol profiles. Mutations of the predicted catalytic residues, Y202F and K206A, resulted in the endogenous accumulation of 3-ketosterones rather than oxidosqualenes suggesting retention of Erg7 enzyme activity. This novel phenotype demonstrated that the catalytic function of Erg27p can be separated from its Erg7p chaperone ability. Other erg27 mutations resulted in proteins that were present, as determined by western immunoblotting, but unable to interact with the Erg7 protein. We also classify Erg27p as belonging to the SDR (short chain dehydrogenase/reductase) family of enzymes and demonstrate the possibility of homo -or hetero-dimerization of the protein. This study provides new insights into the role of Erg27p in sterol biosynthesis. PMID:18555807

  7. Viral cystatin evolution and three-dimensional structure modelling: A case of directional selection acting on a viral protein involved in a host-parasitoid interaction

    PubMed Central

    Serbielle, Céline; Chowdhury, Shafinaz; Pichon, Samuel; Dupas, Stéphane; Lesobre, Jérôme; Purisima, Enrico O; Drezen, Jean-Michel; Huguet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background In pathogens, certain genes encoding proteins that directly interact with host defences coevolve with their host and are subject to positive selection. In the lepidopteran host-wasp parasitoid system, one of the most original strategies developed by the wasps to defeat host defences is the injection of a symbiotic polydnavirus at the same time as the wasp eggs. The virus is essential for wasp parasitism success since viral gene expression alters the immune system and development of the host. As a wasp mutualist symbiont, the virus is expected to exhibit a reduction in genome complexity and evolve under wasp phyletic constraints. However, as a lepidopteran host pathogenic symbiont, the virus is likely undergoing strong selective pressures for the acquisition of new functions by gene acquisition or duplication. To understand the constraints imposed by this particular system on virus evolution, we studied a polydnavirus gene family encoding cyteine protease inhibitors of the cystatin superfamily. Results We show that cystatins are the first bracovirus genes proven to be subject to strong positive selection within a host-parasitoid system. A generated three-dimensional model of Cotesia congregata bracovirus cystatin 1 provides a powerful framework to position positively selected residues and reveal that they are concentrated in the vicinity of actives sites which interact with cysteine proteases directly. In addition, phylogenetic analyses reveal two different cystatin forms which evolved under different selective constraints and are characterized by independent adaptive duplication events. Conclusion Positive selection acts to maintain cystatin gene duplications and induces directional divergence presumably to ensure the presence of efficient and adapted cystatin forms. Directional selection has acted on key cystatin active sites, suggesting that cystatins coevolve with their host target. We can strongly suggest that cystatins constitute major virulence

  8. Expression of genes involved in the salicylic acid pathway in type h1 thioredoxin transiently silenced pepper plants during a begomovirus compatible interaction.

    PubMed

    Luna-Rivero, Marianne S; Hernández-Zepeda, Cecilia; Villanueva-Alonzo, Hernán; Minero-García, Yereni; Castell-González, Salvador E; Moreno-Valenzuela, Oscar A

    2016-04-01

    The type-h thioredoxins (TRXs) play a fundamental role in oxidative stress tolerance and defense responses against pathogens. In pepper plants, type-h TRXs participate in the defense mechanism against Cucumber mosaic virus. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of the CaTRXh1-cicy gene in pepper plants during compatible interaction with a DNA virus, the Euphorbia mosaic virus-Yucatan Peninsula (EuMV-YP). The effects of a transient silencing of the CaTRXh1-cicy gene in pepper plants wëre evaluated by observing the accumulation of viral DNA and the visible symptoms of pepper plants under different treatments. The accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and the relative expression of the defense genes NPR1 and PR10 were also evaluated. Results showed that viral DNA accumulation was higher in transiently CaTRXh1-cicy silenced plants that were also infected with EuMV-YP. Symptoms in these plants were more severe compared to the non-silenced plants infected with EuMV-YP. The SA levels in the EuMV-YP-infected plants were rapidly induced at 1 h post infection (hpi) in comparison to the non-silenced plants inoculated with EuMV-YP. Additionally, in pepper plants infected with EuMV-YP, the expression of NPR1 decreased by up to 41 and 58 % at 28 days post infection (dpi) compared to the non-silenced pepper plants infected with only EuMV-YP and healthy non-inoculated pepper plants, respectively. PR10 gene expression decreased by up to 70 % at 28 dpi. Overall, the results indicate that the CaTRXh1-cicy gene participates in defense mechanisms during the compatible interaction of pepper plants with the EuMV-YP DNA virus.

  9. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani.

  10. Differential expression of genes involved in alternative glycolytic pathways, phosphorus scavenging and recycling in response to aluminum and phosphorus interactions in Citrus roots.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Qi, Yi-Ping; Chen, Li-Song

    2012-05-01

    The objective was to determine the possible links between the expression levels of genes involved in alternative glycolytic pathways, phosphorus (P) scavenging and recycling and Citrus tolerance to aluminum (Al) and/or P-deficiency. 'Xuegan' (Citrus sinensis) and 'Sour pummelo' (Citrus grandis) seedlings were irrigated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 0 and 1.2 mM AlCl(3)·6H(2)O × 0, 50 and 200 μM KH(2)PO(4). C. sinensis displayed more tolerant to Al and P-deficiency than C. grandis. Under Al stress, C. sinensis accumulated more Al in roots and less Al in shoots than C. grandis. P concentration was higher in C. sinensis shoots and roots than in C. grandis ones. C. sinensis roots secreted more malate and citrate than C. grandis ones when exposed to Al. Al-induced-secretion of malate and citrate by excised roots from Al-treated seedlings decreased with increasing P supply. Al-induced-secretion of malate and citrate from roots and Al precipitation by P in roots might be responsible for Al-tolerance of C. sinensis. qRT-PCR analysis showed that Al-activated malate transporter (ALMT1), ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ATP-PFK), pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK), tonoplast adenosine-triphosphatase subunit A (V-ATPase A), tonoplast pyrophosphatase (V-PPiase), pyruvate kinase (PK), acid phosphatase (APase), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malic enzyme (ME) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) genes might contribute to the tolerance of Citrus to Al and/or P-deficiency, but any single gene could not explain the differences between the two species. Citrus tolerance to Al and/or P-deficiency might be caused by the coordinated regulation of gene expression involved in alternative glycolytic pathways, P scavenging and recycling.

  11. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum – Rhizoctonia solani Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani. PMID:27540382

  12. DAP-like kinase interacts with the rat homolog of Schizosaccharomyces pombe CDC5 protein, a factor involved in pre-mRNA splicing and required for G2/M phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Engemann, Harry; Heinzel, Volker; Page, Grit; Preuss, Ute; Scheidtmann, Karl Heinz

    2002-01-01

    DAP-like kinase (Dlk, also termed ZIP kinase) is a leucine zipper-containing serine/threonine-specific protein kinase with as yet unknown biological function(s). Interaction partners so far identified are either transcription factors or proteins that can support or counteract apoptosis. Thus, Dlk might be involved in regulating transcription or, more generally, survival or apoptosis. Here we report on a new interaction partner, the rat homolog of Schizosaccharomyces pombe CDC5 protein, a presumptive transcription and splicing factor involved in the G2/M transition. In vitro, rat CDC5 forms complexes with, but is not phosphorylated by, Dlk. Rather, it was phosphorylated by an associated kinase which was identified as CK2. The interaction domain of Dlk was mapped to the leucine zipper, while that of CDC5 was mapped to the C-terminal region between residues 500 and 802. In vivo, both proteins co-localize perfectly in distinct speckle-like structures in the nucleus, some of which overlap with promyelocytic leukemia protein. Interestingly, splicing factor SC35, which also resides in speckles, was partially displaced upon overexpression of either CDC5 or Dlk, perhaps due to phosphorylation by Dlk. Together with previous data, these results suggest that Dlk might play a role in coordinating specific transcription and splicing events. PMID:11884640

  13. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Interacting with Th17 Cells May Be Involved in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Damage in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Haibo; Yang, Yuhua; Zhang, Ying; Song, Shoujun; Zhang, Li; Ma, Lei; Yang, Tingting; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the possible role of MIF and Th17 cells in the thyroid-specific autoimmune damage of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Material and Methods. We enrolled 40 HT patients and 30 healthy controls and divided HT patients into euthyroid subset (n = 22) and subclinical or overt hypothyroidism subset (n = 18). The percentages of Th17 cells and expressions of MIF, interleukin 17A (IL-17A) mRNA in PBMCs, as well as serum concentrations of MIF, and IL-17A, and thyroid functions, and thyroid-specific autoantibodies (TPOAb, TgAb) were detected by flow cytometry, real-time RT-PCR, ELISA, and ECLIA in all subjects. Results. MIF mRNA, IL-17A mRNA expressions and Th17 cells percentages, serum MIF, and IL-17A protein levels were all significantly higher in HT patients, even in euthyroid subgroup. Additionally, the differences became more obvious in dysfunction subgroup. Importantly, both MIF levels and Th17 cells percentage were positively correlated with serum TPOAb, TgAb, and thyrotropin (TSH) levels in HT patients. Conclusions. These data suggest that MIF and Th17 cells increased dynamically and positively correlated with the markers of thyroid autoimmune damage, which indicated that interaction between MIF and Th17 cells may participate in the pathogenesis and development of thyroid-specific autoimmunity in HT. PMID:25861163

  14. Epistatic interactions involving DRD2, DRD4, and COMT polymorphisms and risk of substance abuse in women with binge-purge eating disturbances.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Howard; Thaler, Lea; Gauvin, Lise; Joober, Ridha; Labbe, Aurelie; Israel, Mimi; Kucer, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Substance abuse is common in individuals with bulimia-spectrum (binge-purge) eating disturbances, a co-occurrence that has been attributed to shared neurobiological substrates--notably alterations in dopaminergic activity. We examined the implications of variations of selected, dopamine-relevant polymorphisms (DRD2 Taq1A, DRD4 7R, and COMT) for risk of substance abuse in women with binge-purge eating syndromes. We genotyped 183 women (66.1% showing full-threshold BN and 33.9% showing sub-syndromic variants), and assessed lifetime presence of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, and stimulant abuse or dependence using structured interviews. Tests for main and interaction effects of various allele combinations revealed that individuals who carried high function COMT and low-function DRD4 7R alleles (a combination expected to be associated with higher risk) did indeed show more lifetime substance abuse and, specifically, more cannabis abuse. Our findings suggest that a gene combination that, in theory, codes for low levels of dopaminergic neurotransmission coincides with sensitivity to substance abuse in a sample displaying binge-purge eating-disorder variants.

  15. Developmental control of apoptosis by the immunophilin aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) involves mitochondrial import of the survivin protein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byoung Heon; Xia, Fang; Pop, Ramona; Dohi, Takehiko; Socolovsky, Merav; Altieri, Dario C

    2011-05-13

    Survivin is a multifunctional protein with essential roles in cell division and inhibition of apoptosis, but the molecular underpinnings of its cytoprotective properties are poorly understood. Here we show that homozygous deletion of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP), a survivin-associated immunophilin, causes embryonic lethality in mice by embryonic day 13.5-14, increased apoptosis of Ter119(-)/CD71(-) early erythropoietic progenitors, and loss of survivin expression in its cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments in vivo. In import assays using recombinant proteins, AIP directly mediated the import of survivin to mitochondria, thus enabling its anti-apoptotic function, whereas a survivin 1-141 mutant that does not bind AIP was not imported to mitochondria and failed to inhibit apoptosis. AIP-directed mitochondrial import of survivin did not affect cell division, was independent of the organelle transmembrane potential, did not require the chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90), and was inhibited by cytosolic factor(s) present in normal cells. shRNA knockdown of the mitochondrial import receptor Tom20 abolished mitochondrial import of survivin and sensitized tumor cells to apoptosis, whereas silencing of Tom70 had no effect. Therefore, an AIP-Tom20 recognition contributes to cell survival in development and cancer by mediating the mitochondrial import of survivin.

  16. Functional analysis of endo-1,4-β-glucanases in response to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae reveals their involvement in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Finiti, I; Leyva, M O; López-Cruz, J; Calderan Rodrigues, B; Vicedo, B; Angulo, C; Bennett, A B; Grant, M; García-Agustín, P; González-Bosch, C

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell wall modification is a critical component in stress responses. Endo-1,4-β-glucanases (EGs) take part in cell wall editing processes, e.g. elongation, ripening and abscission. Here we studied the infection response of Solanum lycopersicum and Arabidopsis thaliana with impaired EGs. Transgenic TomCel1 and TomCel2 tomato antisense plants challenged with Pseudomonas syringae showed higher susceptibility, callose priming and increased jasmonic acid pathway marker gene expression. These two EGs could be resistance factors and may act as negative regulators of callose deposition, probably by interfering with the defence-signalling network. A study of a set of Arabidopsis EG T-DNA insertion mutants challenged with P. syringae and Botrytis cinerea revealed that the lack of other EGs interferes with infection phenotype, callose deposition, expression of signalling pathway marker genes and hormonal balance. We conclude that a lack of EGs could alter plant response to pathogens by modifying the properties of the cell wall and/or interfering with signalling pathways, contributing to generate the appropriate signalling outcomes. Analysis of microarray data demonstrates that EGs are differentially expressed upon many different plant-pathogen challenges, hormone treatments and many abiotic stresses. We found some Arabidopsis EG mutants with increased tolerance to osmotic and salt stress. Our results show that impairing EGs can alter plant-pathogen interactions and may contribute to appropriate signalling outcomes in many different biotic and abiotic plant stress responses.

  17. TEF30 Interacts with Photosystem II Monomers and Is Involved in the Repair of Photodamaged Photosystem II in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bujaldon, Sandrine; Geimer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable capability of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water comes along with its vulnerability to oxidative damage. Accordingly, organisms harboring PSII have developed strategies to protect PSII from oxidative damage and to repair damaged PSII. Here, we report on the characterization of the THYLAKOID ENRICHED FRACTION30 (TEF30) protein in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is conserved in the green lineage and induced by high light. Fractionation studies revealed that TEF30 is associated with the stromal side of thylakoid membranes. By using blue native/Deriphat-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, sucrose density gradients, and isolated PSII particles, we found TEF30 to quantitatively interact with monomeric PSII complexes. Electron microscopy images revealed significantly reduced thylakoid membrane stacking in TEF30-underexpressing cells when compared with control cells. Biophysical and immunological data point to an impaired PSII repair cycle in TEF30-underexpressing cells and a reduced ability to form PSII supercomplexes after high-light exposure. Taken together, our data suggest potential roles for TEF30 in facilitating the incorporation of a new D1 protein and/or the reintegration of CP43 into repaired PSII monomers, protecting repaired PSII monomers from undergoing repeated repair cycles or facilitating the migration of repaired PSII monomers back to stacked regions for supercomplex reassembly. PMID:26644506

  18. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-12-04

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation.

  19. Site-directed mutations and kinetic studies show key residues involved in alkylammonium interactions and reveal two sites for phosphorylcholine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Otero, Lisandro H; Boetsch, Cristhian; Domenech, Carlos E; González-Nilo, Fernado D; Lisa, Angela T

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine (Pcho) to produce choline and inorganic phosphate. PchP belongs to the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily (HAD) and possesses the three characteristic motifs of this family: motif I ((31)D and (33)D), motif II ((166)S), and motif III ((242)K, (261)G, (262)D and (267)D), which fold to form the catalytic site that binds the metal ion and the phosphate moiety of Pcho. Based on comparisons to the PHOSPHO1 and PHOSPHO2 human enzymes and the choline-binding proteins of Gram-(+) bacteria, we selected residues (42)E and (43)E and the aromatic triplet (82)YYY(84) for site-directed mutagenesis to study the interactions with Pcho and p-nitrophenylphosphate as substrates of PchP. Because mutations in (42)E, (43)E and the three tyrosine residues affect both the substrate affinity and the inhibitory effect produced by high Pcho concentrations, we postulate that two sites, one catalytic and one inhibitory, are present in PchP and that they are adjacent and share residues.

  20. Involvement of a novel genistein-inducible multidrug efflux pump of Bradyrhizobium japonicum early in the interaction with Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Keisuke; Hidaka, Tatsuo; Wei, Min; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Itakura, Manabu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Saeki, Kazuhiko; Oomori, Hirofumi; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Uchiumi, Toshiki; Abe, Mikiko; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Ohwada, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    The early molecular dialogue between soybean and the bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum is crucial for triggering their symbiotic interaction. Here we found a single large genomic locus that is widely separated from the symbiosis island and was conspicuously induced within minutes after the addition of genistein. This locus (named BjG30) contains genes for the multidrug efflux pump, TetR family transcriptional regulator, and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism. The induction of BjG30 by genistein was competitively inhibited by daidzein, although both genistein and daidzein are soybean-derived inducers of nodulation (nod) genes. Such a differential expression pattern is also observed in some legume-derived flavonoids, which structurally differ in the hydroxy/deoxy group at the 5-position. In addition, not only did the induction start far in advance of nodW and nodD1 after the addition of genistein, but the levels showed distinct concentration dependence, indicating that the induction pattern of BjG30 is completely different from that of nod genes. The deletion of genes encoding either the multidrug efflux pump or PHB metabolism, especially the former, resulted in defective nodulation performance and nitrogen-fixing capability. Taken together, these results indicate that BjG30, and especially its multidrug efflux pump, may play a key role in the early stage of symbiosis by balancing the dual functions of genistein as both a nod gene inducer and toxicant.

  1. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation. PMID:26429916

  2. Fission yeast pak1+ encodes a protein kinase that interacts with Cdc42p and is involved in the control of cell polarity and mating.

    PubMed Central

    Ottilie, S; Miller, P J; Johnson, D I; Creasy, C L; Sells, M A; Bagrodia, S; Forsburg, S L; Chernoff, J

    1995-01-01

    A STE20/p65pak homolog was isolated from fission yeast by PCR. The pak1+ gene encodes a 72 kDa protein containing a putative p21-binding domain near its amino-terminus and a serine/threonine kinase domain near its carboxyl-terminus. The Pak1 protein autophosphorylates on serine residues and preferentially binds to activated Cdc42p both in vitro and in vivo. This binding is mediated through the p21 binding domain on Pak1p and the effector domain on Cdc42p. Overexpression of an inactive mutant form of pak1 gives rise to cells with markedly abnormal shape with mislocalized actin staining. Pak1 overexpression does not, however, suppress lethality associated with cdc42-null cells or the morphologic defeat caused by overexpression of mutant cdc42 alleles. Gene disruption of pak1+ establishes that, like cdc42+, pak1+ function is required for cell viability. In budding yeast, pak1+ expression restores mating function to STE20-null cells and, in fission yeast, overexpression of an inactive form of Pak inhibits mating. These results indicate that the Pak1 protein is likely to be an effector for Cdc42p or a related GTPase, and suggest that Pak1p is involved in the maintenance of cell polarity and in mating. Images PMID:8846783

  3. Synergistic Interaction of Light Alcohol Administration in the Presence of Mild Iron Overload in a Mouse Model of Liver Injury: Involvement of Triosephosphate Isomerase Nitration and Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wanxia; Zhao, Jie; Gao, Zhonghong

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that iron overload promotes alcoholic liver injury, but the doses of iron or alcohol used in studies are usually able to induce liver injury independently. Little attention has been paid to the coexistence of low alcohol consumption and mild iron overload when either of them is insufficient to cause obvious liver damage, although this situation is very common among some people. We studied the interactive effects and the underlining mechanism of mild doses of iron and alcohol on liver injury in a mouse model. Forty eight male Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, iron (300 mg/kg iron dextran, i.p.), alcohol (2 g/kg/day ethanol for four weeks i.g.), and iron plus alcohol group. After 4 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed and blood and livers were collected for biochemical analysis. Protein nitration level in liver tissue was determined by immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis. Although neither iron overload nor alcohol consumption at our tested doses can cause severe liver injury, it was found that co-administration of the same doses of alcohol and iron resulted in liver injury and hepatic dysfunction, accompanied with elevated ratio of NADH/NAD+, reduced antioxidant ability, increased oxidative stress, and subsequent elevated protein nitration level. Further study revealed that triosephosphate isomerase, an important glycolytic enzyme, was one of the targets to be oxidized and nitrated, which was responsible for its inactivation. These data indicate that even under low alcohol intake, a certain amount of iron overload can cause significant liver oxidative damage, and the modification of triosephosphate isomerasemight be the important underlining mechanism of hepatic dysfunction. PMID:28103293

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyl 126 affects expression of genes involved in stress-immune interaction in primary cultures of rainbow trout anterior kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Quabius, Elgar Susanne; Krupp, Guido; Secombes, Christopher J

    2005-12-01

    Stress and immune function are linked in all vertebrates, including teleost fish. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are immunotoxic and impair the ability of fish to respond to additional stressors. In this study, we investigated the effects of PCB126 on stress and immune function and the interaction of these systems in fish using primary cultures of rainbow trout anterior kidney cells as a model. Gene expression levels of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. These genes play important roles in detoxification and immune and stress homeostasis, respectively. Incubation with PCB126 led to increased IL-1beta expression between 30 min and 2 h of exposure, with expression back to basal levels after 6 h. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) incubation evoked normal IL-1beta responses after 2 and 24 h PCB incubation. Gene expression levels of GR and CYP1A increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner, reaching a plateau after 12 h of incubation. Preincubation with cortisol resulted in decreased IL-1beta expression, increased expression of CYP1A and GR, and was accompanied by an abolished PCB responsiveness after more than 4 h of cortisol incubation. We conclude that PCB126 exposure is not "stressful," as increased cortisol levels would result in depressed IL-1beta expression. Incubation with PCB126 evokes a transient stimulation rather than permanent damage of the immune system, as LPS stimulation resulted in increased IL-1beta expression after PCB incubation. Prolonged cortisol preincubation, resembling a chronic stress paradigm, negatively affects the immune responsiveness of the cells as well as their capacity for toxicant metabolization.

  5. Hsp90β is involved in the development of high salt-diet-induced nephropathy via interaction with various signalling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shi-hai; Zhao, Ning-wei; Jiang, Wei-min; Wang, Xin-tong; Zhang, Si-qi; Zhu, Xuan-xuan; Zhang, Chun-bing; Gao, Yan-hong; Gao, Feng; Liu, Fu-ming; Fang, Zhu-yuan

    2016-01-01

    A high-salt diet often leads to a local intrarenal increase in renal hypoxia and oxidative stress, which are responsible for an excess production of pathogenic substances. Here, Wistar Kyoto/spontaneous hypertensive (WKY/SHR) rats fed a high-salt diet developed severe proteinuria, resulting from pronounced renal inflammation, fibrosis and tubular epithelial cell apoptosis. All these were mainly non-pressure-related effects. Hsp90β, TGF-β, HIF-1α, TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1 were shown to be highly expressed in response to salt loading. Next, we found that Hsp90β might play the key role in non-pressure-related effects of salt loading through a series of cellular signalling events, including the NF-κB, p38 activation and Bcl-2 inactivation. Hsp90β was previously proven to regulate the upstream mediators in multiple cellular signalling cascades through stabilizing and maintaining their activities. In our study, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG) or Hsp90β knockdown dramatically alleviated the high-salt-diet-induced proteinuria and renal damage without altering blood pressure significantly, when it reversed activations of NF-κB, mTOR and p38 signalling cascades. Meanwhile, Co-IP results demonstrated that Hsp90β could interact with and stabilize TAK1, AMPKα, IKKα/β, HIF-1α and Raptor, whereas Hsp90β inhibition disrupted this process. In addition, Hsp90β inhibition-mediated renal improvements also accompanied the reduction of renal oxidative stress. In conclusion, salt loading indeed exhibited non-pressure-related impacts on proteinuria and renal dysfunction in WKY/SHR rats. Hsp90β inhibition caused the destabilization of upstream mediators in various pathogenic signalling events, thereby effectively ameliorating this nephropathy owing to renal hypoxia and oxidative stress. PMID:27248656

  6. KCNJ6 is associated with adult alcohol dependence and involved in gene × early life stress interactions in adolescent alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Toni-Kim; Laucht, Manfred; Ridinger, Monika; Wodarz, Norbert; Rietschel, Marcella; Maier, Wolfgang; Lathrop, Mark; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Schumann, Gunter

    2011-05-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence have proven to be complex genetic traits that are influenced by environmental factors. Primate and human studies have shown that early life stress increases the propensity for alcohol abuse in later life. The reinforcing properties of alcohol are mediated by dopaminergic signaling; however, there is little evidence to indicate how stress alters alcohol reinforcement. KCNJ6 (the gene encoding G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel 2 (GIRK2)) is a brain expressed potassium channel with inhibitory effects on dopaminergic tone. The properties of GIRK2 have been shown to be enhanced by the stress peptide corticotrophin-releasing hormone. Therefore, we sought to examine the role of KCNJ6 polymorphisms in adult alcohol dependence and stress-related alcohol abuse in adolescents. We selected 11 SNPs in the promoter region of KCNJ6, which were genotyped in 1152 adult alcohol dependents and 1203 controls. One SNP, rs2836016, was found to be associated with alcohol dependence (p=0.01, false discovery rate). We then assessed rs2836016 in an adolescent sample of 261 subjects, which were characterized for early life stress and adolescent hazardous drinking, defined using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), to examine gene-environment interactions. In the adolescent sample, the risk genotype of rs2836016 was significantly associated with increased AUDIT scores, but only in those individuals exposed to high levels of psychosocial stress in early life (p=0.01). Our findings show that KCNJ6 is associated with alcohol dependence and may moderate the effect of early psychosocial stress on risky alcohol drinking in adolescents. We have identified a candidate gene for future studies investigating a possible functional link between the response to stress and alcohol reinforcement.

  7. Homing of neural stem cells from the venous compartment into a brain infarct does not involve conventional interactions with vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Valentina; Das, Shreyasi; Niles, Walter; Schraufstatter, Ingrid; Wong, Aaron K; Povaly, Tatiana; Wakeman, Dustin; Miller, Leonard; Snyder, Evan Y; Khaldoyanidi, Sophia K

    2014-02-01

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) hold great potential for treatment of a wide variety of neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic conditions. Heretofore, administration has been through intracranial injection or implantation of cells. Because neural stem cells are capable of migrating to the injured brain from the intravascular space, it seemed feasible to administer them intravenously if their ability to circumvent the blood-brain barrier was enhanced. In the present studies, we found that interactions of hNSCs in vitro on the luminal surface of human umbilical vein endothelial cells was enhanced following enforced expression of cutaneous lymphocyte antigen on cell surface moieties by incubation of hNSCs with fucosyltransferase VI and GDP-fucose (fhNSCs). Interestingly, ex vivo fucosylation of hNSCs not only did not improve the cells homing into the brain injured by stroke following intravenous administration but also increased mortality of rats compared with the nonfucosylated hNSC group. Efforts to explain these unexpected findings using a three-dimensional flow chamber device revealed that transmigration of fhNSCs (under conditions of physiological shear stress) mediated by stromal cell-derived factor 1α was significantly decreased compared with controls. Further analysis revealed that hNSCs poorly withstand physiological shear stress, and their ability is further decreased following fucosylation. In addition, fhNSCs demonstrated a higher frequency of cellular aggregate formation as well as a tendency for removal of fucose from the cell surface. In summary, our findings suggest that the behavior of hNSCs in circulation is different from that observed with other cell types and that, at least for stroke, intravenous administration is a suboptimal route, even when the in vitro rolling ability of hNSCs is optimized by enforced fucosylation.

  8. The knottin-like Blufensin family regulates genes involved in nuclear import and the secretory pathway in barley-powdery mildew interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weihui; Meng, Yan; Surana, Priyanka; Fuerst, Greg; Nettleton, Dan; Wise, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved complex regulatory mechanisms to control a multi-layered defense response to microbial attack. Both temporal and spatial gene expression are tightly regulated in response to pathogen ingress, modulating both positive and negative control of defense. BLUFENSINs, small knottin-like peptides in barley, wheat, and rice, are highly induced by attack from fungal pathogens, in particular, the obligate biotrophic fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh), causal agent of barley powdery mildew. Previous research indicated that Blufensin1 (Bln1) functions as a negative regulator of basal defense mechanisms. In the current report, we show that BLN1 and BLN2 can both be secreted to the apoplast and Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-mediated overexpression of Bln2 increases susceptibility of barley to Bgh. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays signify that BLN1 and BLN2 can interact with each other, and with calmodulin. We then used BSMV-induced gene silencing to knock down Bln1, followed by Barley1 GeneChip transcriptome analysis, to identify additional host genes influenced by Bln1. Analysis of differential expression revealed a gene set enriched for those encoding proteins annotated to nuclear import and the secretory pathway, particularly Importin α1-b and Sec61 γ subunits. Further functional analysis of these two affected genes showed that when silenced, they also reduced susceptibility to Bgh. Taken together, we postulate that Bln1 is co-opted by Bgh to facilitate transport of disease-related host proteins or effectors, influencing the establishment of Bgh compatibility on its barley host. PMID:26089830

  9. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte–neuron interactions

    PubMed Central

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2–4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr216 being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr216 was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:27124580

  10. V-H+ -ATPase translocation during blood alkalosis in dogfish gills: interaction with carbonic anhydrase and involvement in the postfeeding alkaline tide.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Wood, Chris M; Goss, Greg G

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the involvement of carbonic anhydrase (CA) in mediating V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane in gills of alkalotic Squalus acanthias. Immunolabeling revealed that CA is localized in the same cells as V-H(+)-ATPase. Blood plasma from dogfish injected with acetazolamide [30 mg/kg at time (t) = 0 and 6 h] and infused with NaHCO(3) for 12 h (1,000 microeq.kg(-1).h(-1)) had significantly higher plasma HCO(3)(-) concentration than fish that were infused with NaHCO(3) alone (28.72 +/- 0.41 vs. 6.57 +/- 2.47 mmol/l, n = 3), whereas blood pH was similar in both treatments (8.03 +/- 0.11 vs. 8.04 +/- 0.11 pH units at t = 12 h). CA inhibition impaired V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane, as estimated from immunolabeled gill sections and Western blotting on gill cell membranes (0.24 +/- 0.08 vs. 1.00 +/- 0.28 arbitrary units, n = 3; P < 0.05). We investigated V-H(+)-ATPase translocation during a postfeeding alkalosis ("alkaline tide"). Gill samples were taken 24-26 h after dogfish were fed to satiety in a natural-like feeding regime. Immunolabeled gill sections revealed that V-H(+)-ATPase translocated to the basolateral membrane in the postfed fish. Confirming this result, V-H(+)-ATPase abundance was twofold higher in gill cell membranes of the postfed fish than in fasted fish (n = 4-5; P < 0.05). These results indicate that 1) intracellular H(+) or HCO(3)(-) produced by CA (and not blood pH or HCO(3)(-)) is likely the stimulus that triggers the V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane in alkalotic fish and 2) V-H(+)-ATPase translocation is important for enhanced HCO(3)(-) secretion during a naturally occurring postfeeding alkalosis.

  11. Membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase is involved in migration of human monocytes and is regulated through their interaction with fibronectin or endothelium.

    PubMed

    Matías-Román, Salomón; Gálvez, Beatriz G; Genís, Laura; Yáñez-Mó, María; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Arroyo, Alicia G

    2005-05-15

    Membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is involved in endothelial and tumor-cell migration, but its putative role in leukocyte migration has not been characterized yet. Here, we demonstrate that anti-MT1-MMP monoclonal antibody (mAb) impaired monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1)-stimulated monocyte migration on fibronectin (FN), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In addition, monocyte transmigration through tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-activated endothelium is also inhibited by anti-MT1-MMP mAb. Therefore, regulation of MT1-MMP in human peripheral blood monocytes was investigated. First, MT1-MMP clustering was observed at motility-associated membrane protrusions of MCP-1-stimulated monocytes migrating on FN, VCAM-1, or ICAM-1 and at the leading edge, together with profilin, of monocytes transmigrating through activated endothelial cells. In addition, up-regulation of MT1-MMP expression was induced in human monocytes upon attachment to FN in a manner dependent on alpha4beta1 and alpha5beta1 integrins. Binding of monocytes to TNF-alpha-activated human endothelial cells as well as to VCAM-1 or ICAM-1 also resulted in an increase of MT1-MMP expression. These findings correlated with an enhancement of MT1-MMP fibrinolytic activity in monocytes bound to FN, VCAM-1, or ICAM-1. Our data show that MT1-MMP is required during human monocyte migration and endothelial transmigration and that MT1-MMP localization, expression, and activity are regulated in monocytes upon contact with FN or endothelial ligands, pointing to a key role of MT1-MMP in monocyte recruitment during inflammation.

  12. [Involvement of tissue interaction between cranial neural crest cells, their pathways lateral to the midbrain hindbrain border and the buccopharyngeal membrane in Meckel's cartilage formation in avian embryos].

    PubMed

    Imai, Hajime

    2012-03-01

    Cranial neural crest cells migrate to the craniofacial primordia and differentiate into skeletal tissues of the jaw such as Meckel's cartilage. It has not been clearly demonstrated how neural crest cells are committed to differentiate into these tissues. In this study, the conditions that are required for the formation of Meckel's cartilage were investigated. In situ hybridization in chick embryos indicated that Fgf8 and Shh involved in the pattern formation of limb cartilages were expressed in the neural tube of the midbrain-hindbrain border, the buccopharyngeal membrane and the oro-proximal site of the 1st branchial arch (oro-proximal BA1). Cell-tracing with DiI confirmed that the neural crest cells derived from both the posterior midbrain and rhombomere 1 migrated to the buccopharyngeal membrane, which subsequently forms oro-proximal BA1, by passing through the mesenchyme lateral to the midbrain-hindbrain boundary. Based on the above results, we carried out two types of ectopic transplantation experiments by chick-quail chimera The graft of oro-proximal BA1, the complex of epithelium and mesenchyme, formed a Meckel's cartilage-like structure in a self-differentiation manner, whereas neither epithelium only nor mesenchyme formed any elongated cartilage. The ectopic transplant of the buccopharyngeal membrane into the mesenchyme lateral to the neural tube of the mid-hindbrain border in which neural crest cells were migrating formed a Meckel's cartilage-like structure. These results suggest that the cranial neural crest cells derived from the mid-hindbrain region are committed to the cell fate during migration, and receive further signaling to differentiate into Meckel's cartilage in their destination.

  13. Nuclear Import of Adenovirus DNA Involves Direct Interaction of Hexon with an N-Terminal Domain of the Nucleoporin Nup214

    PubMed Central

    Ragues, Jessica; Guan, Tinglu; Bégu, Dominique; Wodrich, Harald; Kann, Michael; Nemerow, Glen R.; Gerace, Larry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we characterized the molecular basis for binding of adenovirus (AdV) to the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a key step during delivery of the viral genome into the nucleus. We used RNA interference (RNAi) to deplete cells of either Nup214 or Nup358, the two major Phe-Gly (FG) repeat nucleoporins localized on the cytoplasmic side of the NPC, and evaluated the impact on hexon binding and AdV infection. The accumulation of purified hexon trimers or partially disassembled AdV at the nuclear envelope (NE) was observed in digitonin-permeabilized cells in the absence of cytosolic factors. Both in vitro hexon binding and in vivo nuclear import of the AdV genome were strongly reduced in Nup214-depleted cells but still occurred in Nup358-depleted cells, suggesting that Nup214 is a major binding site of AdV during infection. The expression of an NPC-targeted N-terminal domain of Nup214 in Nup214-depleted cells restored the binding of hexon at the NE and the nuclear import of protein VII (pVII), indicating that this region is sufficient to allow AdV binding. We further narrowed the binding site to a 137-amino-acid segment in the N-terminal domain of Nup214. Together, our results have identified a specific region within the N terminus of Nup214 that acts as a direct NPC binding site for AdV. IMPORTANCE AdVs, which have the largest genome of nonenveloped DNA viruses, are being extensively explored for use in gene therapy, especially in alternative treatments for cancers that are refractory to traditional therapies. In this study, we characterized the molecular basis for binding of AdV to the cytoplasmic face of the NPC, a key step for delivery of the viral genome into the nucleus. Our data indicate that a 137-amino-acid region of the nucleoporin Nup214 is a binding site for the major AdV capsid protein, hexon, and that this interaction is required for viral DNA import. These findings provide additional insight on how AdV exploits the

  14. Interaction between complement regulators and Streptococcus pyogenes: binding of C4b-binding protein and factor H/factor H-like protein 1 to M18 strains involves two different cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero, David; García-Laorden, Isabel; Cortés, Guadalupe; Wessels, Michael R; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Albertí, Sebastián

    2004-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus, is one of the most frequent causes of pharyngitis and skin infections in humans. Many virulence mechanisms have been suggested to be involved in the infectious process. Among them is the binding to the bacterial cell surface of the complement regulatory proteins factor H, factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), and C4b-binding protein. Previous studies indicate that binding of these three regulators to the streptococcal cell involves the M protein encoded by the emm gene. M-type 18 strains are prevalent among clinical isolates and have been shown to interact with all three complement regulators simultaneously. Using isogenic strains lacking expression of the Emm18 or the Enn18 proteins, we demonstrate in this study that, in contradistinction to previously described S. pyogenes strains, M18 strains bind the complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, and C4b-binding protein through two distinct cell surface proteins. Factor H and FHL-1 bind to the Emm18 protein, while C4BP binds to the Enn18 protein. We propose that expression of two distinct surface structures that bind complement regulatory proteins represents a unique adaptation of M18 strains that enhances their resistance to opsonization by human plasma and increases survival of this particular S. pyogenes strain in the human host. These new findings illustrate that S. pyogenes has evolved diverse mechanisms for recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface to evade immune clearance in the human host.

  15. Up-regulation and interaction of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and the 14-3-3 protein are involved in the regulation of citrate exudation from the broad bean (Vicia faba L.) under Al stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Guo, Chuan-Long; Wang, Ping; Chen, Xuan-Qin; Wu, Kong-Huan; Li, Kui-Zhi; Yu, Yong-Xiong; Chen, Li-Mei

    2013-09-01

    Our previous study showed that citrate excretion coupled with a concomitant release of protons was involved in aluminum (Al) resistance in the broad bean. Furthermore, genes encoding plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase (vha2) and the 14-3-3 protein (vf14-3-3b) were up-regulated by Al in Al-resistant (YD) broad bean roots. In this study, the roles of PM H(+)-ATPase (E.C. 3.6.3.6) and the 14-3-3 protein in the regulation of citrate secretion were further investigated in Al-resistant (YD) and Al-sensitive (AD) broad bean cultivars under Al stress. The results showed that greater citrate exudation was positively correlated with higher activities of PM H(+)-ATPase in roots of YD than AD. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that vha2 was clearly up-regulated by Al in YD but not in AD roots, whereas the transcription levels of vf14-3-3b were elevated in a time-dependent manner in both YD and AD roots. Immunoprecipitation and Western analysis suggested that phosphorylation and interaction with the vf14-3-3b protein of the VHA2 were enhanced in YD roots but not in AD roots with increasing Al treatment time. Fusicoccin or adenosine 5'-monophosphate increased or decreased the interaction between the phosphorylated VHA2 and the vf14-3-3b protein, followed by an enhancement or reduction of the PM H(+)-ATPase activity and citrate exudation in both cultivars under Al stress conditions, respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that Al enhanced the expression and interaction of the PM H(+)-ATPase and the 14-3-3 protein, which thereby led to higher activity of the PM H(+)-ATPase and more citrate exudation from YD plants.

  16. Anion induced formation of supramolecular associations involving lone pair-π and anion-π interactions in Co(II) malonate complexes: experimental observations, Hirshfeld surface analyses and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    Manna, Prankrishna; Seth, Saikat Kumar; Das, Amrita; Hemming, Joanna; Prendergast, Richard; Helliwell, Madeleine; Choudhury, Somnath Ray; Frontera, Antonio; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2012-03-19

    Three Co(II)-malonate complexes, namely, (C(5)H(7)N(2))(4)[Co(C(3)H(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](NO(3))(2) (1), (C(5)H(7)N(2))(4)[Co(C(3)H(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (2), and (C(5)H(7)N(2))(4)[Co(C(3)H(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](PF(6))(2) (3) [C(5)H(7)N(2) = protonated 2-aminopyridine, C(3)H(4)O(4) = malonic acid, NO(3)(-) = nitrate, ClO(4)(-) = perchlorate, PF(6)(-) = hexafluorophosphate], have been synthesized from purely aqueous media, and their crystal structures have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. A thorough analysis of Hirshfeld surfaces and fingerprint plots facilitates a comparison of intermolecular interactions in 1-3, which are crucial in building supramolecular architectures. When these complexes are structurally compared with their previously reported analogous Ni(II) or Mg(II) compounds, a very interesting feature regarding the role of counteranions has emerged. This phenomenon can be best described as anion-induced formation of extended supramolecular networks of the type lone pair-π/π-π/π-anion-π/π-lone pair and lone pair-π/π-π/π-anion involving various weak forces like lone pair-π, π-π, and anion-π interactions. The strength of these π contacts has been estimated using DFT calculations (M06/6-31+G*), and the formation energy of the supramolecular networks has been also evaluated. The influence of the anion (NO(3)(-), ClO(4)(-), and PF(6)(-)) on the total interaction energy of the assembly is also studied.

  17. The Rice E3-Ubiquitin Ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE1 Modulates the Expression of ROOT MEANDER CURLING, a Gene Involved in Root Mechanosensing, through the Interaction with Two ETHYLENE-RESPONSE FACTOR Transcription Factors1

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Tiago F.; Serra, Tânia S.; Cordeiro, André M.; Swanson, Sarah J.; Gilroy, Simon; Saibo, Nelson J.M.; Oliveira, M. Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots can sense and respond to a wide diversity of mechanical stimuli, including touch and gravity. However, little is known about the signal transduction pathways involved in mechanical stimuli responses in rice (Oryza sativa). This work shows that rice root responses to mechanical stimuli involve the E3-ubiquitin ligase rice HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE1 (OsHOS1), which mediates protein degradation through the proteasome complex. The morphological analysis of the roots in transgenic RNA interference::OsHOS1 and wild-type plants, exposed to a mechanical barrier, revealed that the OsHOS1 silencing plants keep a straight root in contrast to wild-type plants that exhibit root curling. Moreover, it was observed that the absence of root curling in response to touch can be reverted by jasmonic acid. The straight root phenotype of the RNA interference::OsHOS1 plants was correlated with a higher expression rice ROOT MEANDER CURLING (OsRMC), which encodes a receptor-like kinase characterized as a negative regulator of rice root curling mediated by jasmonic acid. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, we showed that OsHOS1 interacts with two ETHYLENE-RESPONSE FACTOR transcription factors, rice ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (OsEREBP1) and rice OsEREBP2, known to regulate OsRMC gene expression. In addition, we showed that OsHOS1 affects the stability of both transcription factors in a proteasome-dependent way, suggesting that this E3-ubiquitin ligase targets OsEREBP1 and OsEREBP2 for degradation. Our results highlight the function of the proteasome in rice response to mechanical stimuli and in the integration of these signals, through hormonal regulation, into plant growth and developmental programs. PMID:26381316

  18. KIN241: a gene involved in cell morphogenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia reveals a novel protein family of cyclophilin-RNA interacting proteins (CRIPs) conserved from fission yeast to man.

    PubMed

    Krzywicka, A; Beisson, J; Keller, A M; Cohen, J; Jerka-Dziadosz, M; Klotz, C

    2001-10-01

    In this study, we report cloning, by functional complementation of the KIN241 gene involved in Paramecium cell morphogenesis, cortical organization and nuclear reorganization. This gene is predicted to encode a protein of a novel type, comprising a cyclophilin-type, peptidyl-prolyl isomerase domain, an RNA recognition motif, followed by a region rich in glutamate and lysine (EK domain) and a C-terminal string of serines. As homologues of this protein are present in the genomes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens, the Kin241p predicted sequence defines a new family of proteins that we propose to call 'CRIP', for cyclophilin-RNA interacting protein. We demonstrate that, in Paramecium, Kin241p is localized in the nucleus and that deletion of some nuclear localization signals (NLSs) decreases transport of the protein into the nucleus. No Kin241-1 protein is present in mutant cells, suggesting that the C-terminal serine-rich region is responsible for protein stability.

  19. Microcin J25 uptake: His5 of the MccJ25 lariat ring is involved in interaction with the inner membrane MccJ25 transporter protein SbmA.

    PubMed

    de Cristóbal, Ricardo E; Solbiati, Jose O; Zenoff, Ana M; Vincent, Paula A; Salomón, Raul A; Yuzenkova, Julia; Severinov, Konstantin; Farías, Ricardo N

    2006-05-01

    Escherichia coli microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a plasmid-encoded antibiotic peptide consisting of 21 L-amino acid residues (G1-G-A-G-H5-V-P-E-Y-F10-V-G-I-G-T15-P-I-S-F-Y20-G). E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the intracellular target of MccJ25. MccJ25 enters cells after binding to specific membrane transporters: FhuA in the outer membrane and SbmA in the inner membrane. Here, we studied MccJ25 mutants carrying a substitution of His5 by Lys, Arg, or Ala. The inhibitory effects on cellular growth and in vitro RNAP activity were determined for each mutant microcin. The results show that all mutants inhibited RNAP in vitro. However, the mutants were defective in their ability to inhibit cellular growth. Experiments in which the FhuA protein was bypassed showed that substitutions of MccJ25 His5 affected the SbmA-dependent transport. Our results thus suggest that MccJ25 His5 located in the lariat ring is involved, directly or indirectly, in specific interaction with SbmA and is not required for MccJ25 inhibition of RNAP.

  20. The Ruler Protein EscP of the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Is Involved in Calcium Sensing and Secretion Hierarchy Regulation by Interacting with the Gatekeeper Protein SepL

    PubMed Central

    Shaulov, Lihi; Gershberg, Jenia; Deng, Wanyin; Finlay, B. Brett

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a multiprotein complex that plays a central role in the virulence of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. To ensure that effector proteins are efficiently translocated into the host cell, bacteria must be able to sense their contact with the host cell. In this study, we found that EscP, which was previously shown to function as the ruler protein of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli T3SS, is also involved in the switch from the secretion of translocator proteins to the secretion of effector proteins. In addition, we demonstrated that EscP can interact with the gatekeeper protein SepL and that the EscP-SepL complex dissociates upon a calcium concentration drop. We suggest a model in which bacterial contact with the host cell is accompanied by a drop in the calcium concentration that causes SepL-EscP complex dissociation and triggers the secretion of effector proteins. PMID:28049143

  1. Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1957-06-01

    Experimental results on the non-conservation of parity and charge conservation in weak interactions are reviewed. The two-component theory of the neutrino is discussed. Lepton reactions are examined under the assumption of the law of conservation of leptons and that the neutrino is described by a two- component theory. From the results of this examination, the universal Fermi interactions are analyzed. Although reactions involving the neutrino can be described, the same is not true of reactions which do not involve the lepton, as the discussion of the decay of K mesons and hyperons shows. The question of the invariance of time reversal is next examined. (J.S.R.)

  2. Quantitative Parameters and Ecological Implications of a Specialized Tritrophic Interaction Involving a Seed-Feeding Tortricid, Pseudargyrotoza conwagana, a Braconid Parasitoid, Bracon otiosus, and the Wild Privet, Ligustrum vulgare

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Ángel; Falcó, José Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about tritrophic interactions involving seed-feeding insects, parasitoid wasps, and wild fleshy fruits. Here, we examine relationships between Pseudargyrotoza conwagana (F.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), Bracon otiosus Marshall (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), and the wild privet, Ligustrum vulgare L. (Lamiales: Oleaceae), after collecting fruits in a hedgerow habitat in northwest Spain and rearing insects indoors. No other insect species was detected in this trophic system. Each fruit contained one to four seeds, each infested fruit contained only one seedfeeding tortricid caterpillar, and each parasitized caterpillar was affected by a single braconid individual, i.e., B. otiosus was a solitary parasitoid. Almost half of the wild privet shrubs were infested by P. conwagana, and infestation ranged from 2 to 32% of fruits per infested shrub. The general effect of P.conwagana on wild privet dispersal can be considered low, as the overall rate of seed infestation was low (6% of seeds). The infestation rate was higher in wild privet shrubs with a larger number of seeds per fruit, and tortricid caterpillars that left the fruits successfully ate >80% of seeds. In total, the parasitism rate was moderate (25% of caterpillars), but varied considerably (0–75%) among shrubs where P. conwagana infestation was detected. Parasitism only occurred in shrubs showing high infestation rates (19–32% infested fruits), i.e., with high host densities; however, the parasitism rate was densityindependent in these shrubs. The wild privets benefited from the action of B. otiosus in two ways: the tortricid caterpillar population was partly eliminated, and the caterpillars were prevented from eating more than one seed per fruit. The B. otiosus sex ratio was very balanced (1 male to 1.18 females). Winter diapause and protandry were prevalent in B. otiosus. PMID:25368072

  3. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  4. Eye Involvement in TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Eyes Campbell (1905) first described the eye involvement in ... some form of eye involvement. Nonretinal and Retinal Eye Findings Facial angiofibromas may involve the eyelids of ...

  5. The C-Terminal Region of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Nucleoprotein Contains Distinct and Segregable Functional Domains Involved in NP-Z Interaction and Counteraction of the Type I Interferon Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans that is associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. Arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP), the most abundant viral protein in infected cells and virions, encapsidates the viral genome RNA, and this NP-RNA complex, together with the viral L polymerase, forms the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) that directs viral RNA replication and gene transcription. Formation of infectious arenavirus progeny requires packaging of vRNPs into budding particles, a process in which arenavirus matrix-like protein (Z) plays a central role. In the present study, we have characterized the NP-Z interaction for the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The LCMV NP domain that interacted with Z overlapped with a previously documented C-terminal domain that counteracts the host type I interferon (IFN) response. However, we found that single amino acid mutations that affect the anti-IFN function of LCMV NP did not disrupt the NP-Z interaction, suggesting that within the C-terminal region of NP different amino acid residues critically contribute to these two distinct and segregable NP functions. A similar NP-Z interaction was confirmed for the HF arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Notably, LCMV NP interacted similarly with both LCMV Z and LASV Z, while LASV NP interacted only with LASV Z. Our results also suggest the presence of a conserved protein domain within NP but with specific amino acid residues playing key roles in determining the specificity of NP-Z interaction that may influence the viability of reassortant arenaviruses. In addition, this NP-Z interaction represents a potential target for the development of antiviral drugs to combat human-pathogenic arenaviruses. PMID:21976642

  6. Zwitterionic pi-radical involving EDT-TTF-imidazole and F4TCNQ: redox properties and self-assembled structure by hydrogen-bonds and multiple S...S interactions.

    PubMed

    Murata, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yasushi; Yakiyama, Yumi; Nishimura, Yoshie; Ise, Tomoaki; Shiomi, Daisuke; Sato, Kazunobu; Takui, Takeji; Nakasuji, Kazuhiro

    2007-10-21

    The reaction between an imidazole-functionalized EDT-TTF and F(4)TCNQ produced a zwitterionic pi-radical, which formed a self-assembled structure by the cooperation of hydrogen-bonds and multiple S...S interactions and exhibited three-step oxidation processes and a high electrical conductivity as a single-component organic molecule.

  7. Use of biological knowledge to inform the analysis of gene-gene interactions involved in modulating virologic failure with efavirenz-containing treatment regimens in ART-naïve ACTG clinical trials participants.

    PubMed

    Grady, Benjamin J; Torstenson, Eric S; McLaren, Paul J; DE Bakker, Paul I W; Haas, David W; Robbins, Gregory K; Gulick, Roy M; Haubrich, Richard; Ribaudo, Heather; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a high priority for the future of health care. The idea of tailoring an individual's wellness plan to their unique genetic code is one which we hope to realize through the use of pharmacogenomics. There have been examples of tremendous success in pharmacogenomic associations however there are many such examples in which only a small proportion of trait variance has been explained by the genetic variation. Although the increased use of GWAS could help explain more of this variation, it is likely that a significant proportion of the genetic architecture of these pharmacogenomic traits are due to complex genetic effects such as epistasis, also known as gene-gene interactions, as well as gene-drug interactions. In this study, we utilize the Biofilter software package to look for candidate epistasis contributing to risk for virologic failure with efavirenz-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in treatment-naïve participants of AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) randomized clinical trials. A total of 904 individuals from three ACTG trials with data on efavirenz treatment are analyzed after race-stratification into white, black, and Hispanic ethnic groups. Biofilter was run considering 245 candidate ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) genes and using database knowledge of gene and protein interaction networks to produce approximately 2 million SNP-SNP interaction models within each ethnic group. These models were evaluated within the PLATO software package using pair wise logistic regression models. Although no interaction model remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, an interaction between SNPs in the TAP1 and ABCC9 genes was one of the top models before correction. The TAP1 protein is responsible for intracellular transport of antigen to MHC class I molecules, while ABCC9 codes for a transporter which is part of the subfamily of ABC transporters associated with multi-drug resistance

  8. USE OF BIOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE TO INFORM THE ANALYSIS OF GENE-GENE INTERACTIONS INVOLVED IN MODULATING VIROLOGIC FAILURE WITH EFAVIRENZ-CONTAINING TREATMENT REGIMENS IN ART-NAÏVE ACTG CLINICAL TRIALS PARTICIPANTS

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Benjamin J.; Torstenson, Eric S.; Mclaren, Paul J.; De Bakker, Paul I.W.; Haas, David W.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Gulick, Roy M.; Haubrich, Richard; Ribaudo, Heather; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a high priority for the future of health care. The idea of tailoring an individual’s wellness plan to their unique genetic code is one which we hope to realize through the use of pharmacogenomics. There have been examples of tremendous success in pharmacogenomic associations however there are many such examples in which only a small proportion of trait variance has been explained by the genetic variation. Although the increased use of GWAS could help explain more of this variation, it is likely that a significant proportion of the genetic architecture of these pharmacogenomic traits are due to complex genetic effects such as epistasis, also known as gene-gene interactions, as well as gene-drug interactions. In this study, we utilize the Biofilter software package to look for candidate epistasis contributing to risk for virologic failure with efavirenz-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in treatment-naïve participants of AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) randomized clinical trials. A total of 904 individuals from three ACTG trials with data on efavirenz treatment are analyzed after race-stratification into white, black, and Hispanic ethnic groups. Biofilter was run considering 245 candidate ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) genes and using database knowledge of gene and protein interaction networks to produce approximately 2 million SNP-SNP interaction models within each ethnic group. These models were evaluated within the PLATO software package using pair wise logistic regression models. Although no interaction model remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, an interaction between SNPs in the TAP1 and ABCC9 genes was one of the top models before correction. The TAP1 protein is responsible for intracellular transport of antigen to MHC class I molecules, while ABCC9 codes for a transporter which is part of the subfamily of ABC transporters associated with multi-drug resistance

  9. Home Fires Involving Grills

    MedlinePlus

    ... fires were fueled by gas while 13% used charcoal or other solid fuel. Gas grills were involved ... structure fires and 4,300 outdoor fires annually. Charcoal or other solid-fueled grills were involved in ...

  10. A general strategy to characterize calmodulin-calcium complexes involved in CaM-target recognition: DAPK and EGFR calmodulin binding domains interact with different calmodulin-calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rania; Peng, Shan; Gioria, Sophie; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Zimmermann, Michael; Pigault, Claire; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca(2+) sensor regulating many biochemical processes in eukaryotic cells. Its interaction with a great variety of different target proteins has led to the fundamental question of its mechanism of action. CaM exhibits four "EF hand" type Ca(2+) binding sites. One way to explain CaM functioning is to consider that the protein interacts differently with its target proteins depending on the number of Ca(2+) ions bound to it. To test this hypothesis, the binding properties of three entities known to interact with CaM (a fluorescent probe and two peptide analogs to the CaM binding sites of death associated protein kinase (DAPK) and of EGFR) were investigated using a quantitative approach based on fluorescence polarization (FP). Probe and peptide interactions with CaM were studied using a titration matrix in which both CaM and calcium concentrations were varied. Experiments were performed with SynCaM, a hybrid CaM able to activate CaM dependent enzymes from mammalian and plant cells. Results show that the interaction between CaM and its targets is regulated by the number of calcium ions bound to the protein, namely one for the DAPK peptide, two for the probe and four for the EGFR peptide. The approach used provides a new tool to elaborate a typology of CaM-targets, based on their recognition by the various CaM-Ca(n) (n=0-4) complexes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  11. Involving Parents at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Joel R.

    2008-01-01

    This working paper explores reasons to encourage parents of English language learners (ELLs) to be involved in the learning process at the middle school level. Barriers to parental involvement of language minority students will be identified and successful, research-based strategies to increase parental involvement will be introduced. Five…

  12. Involving Faculty in Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Lloyd D.

    1979-01-01

    Firm planning objectives, clearly stated relationships to overall institutional objectives, faculty involvement, and active leadership are advocated for successful academic planning. Faculty involvement is dependent on the strength of the technical, marketing, and budgeting staffs, and involvement in the planning process may kindle faculty…

  13. Gubernatorial Involvement in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Edward R.

    This research on 12 States' gubernatorial involvement in State educational policy formation investigates four functional stages of that involvement--issue definition, proposal formulation, support mobilization, and decision enactment. Drawing on the Educational Governance Project information and interviews, a gubernatorial involvement index was…

  14. Anti-idiotypic antibody D12 and superantigen SPA both interact with human VH3-encoded antibodies on the external face of the heavy chain involving FR1, CDR2 and FR3.

    PubMed

    Potter, K N; Li, Y; Mageed, R A; Jefferis, R; Capra, J D

    1998-12-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) D12 specifically binds in the variable region (idiotype) of human V(H)3 encoded antibodies. We used mutational analysis to determine the subregions of a V(H)3 encoded antibody which effect the interaction with mAb D12. Recombinant antibodies composed of mutant heavy chains were produced using the baculovirus expression system. The results of this topographical study indicate that the combined conformations of FRI, CDR2 and FR3 are critical for mAb D12 binding. MAb D12 binding was not effected either by the heavy chain CDR3 sequence nor by the light chain. We previously demonstrated that structures within the same three subregions are required for the B cell superantigen Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) binding to V(H)3 encoded antibodies. Thus, some anti-idiotypic antibodies can interact with antibodies in a similar fashion to superantigens.

  15. A highly conserved interaction involving the middle residue of the SXN active-site motif is crucial for function of class B penicillin-binding proteins: mutational and computational analysis of PBP 2 from N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Tomberg, Joshua; Temple, Brenda; Fedarovich, Alena; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A

    2012-04-03

    Insertion of an aspartate residue at position 345a in penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2), which lowers the rate of penicillin acylation by ~6-fold, is commonly observed in penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Here, we show that insertions of other amino acids also lower the penicillin acylation rate of PBP 2, but none supported growth of N. gonorrhoeae, indicating loss of essential transpeptidase activity. The Asp345a mutation likely acts by altering the interaction between its adjacent residue, Asp346, in the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and Ser363, the middle residue of the SXN active site motif. Because the adjacent aspartate creates ambiguity in the position of the insertion, we also examined if insertions at position 346a could confer decreased susceptibility to penicillin. However, only aspartate insertions were identified, indicating that only an Asp-Asp couple can confer resistance and retain transpeptidase function. The importance of the Asp346-Ser363 interaction was assessed by mutation of each residue to Ala. Although both mutants lowered the acylation rate of penicillin G by 5-fold, neither could support growth of N. gonorrhoeae, again indicating loss of transpeptidase function. Interaction between a residue in the equivalent of the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and the middle residue of the SXN motif is observed in crystal structures of other Class B PBPs, and its importance is also supported by multisequence alignments. Overall, these results suggest that this conserved interaction can be manipulated (e.g., by insertion) to lower the acylation rate by β-lactam antibiotics and increase resistance, but only if essential transpeptidase activity is preserved.

  16. Schwannomin-interacting Protein 1 Isoform IQCJ-SCHIP1 Is a Multipartner Ankyrin- and Spectrin-binding Protein Involved in the Organization of Nodes of Ranvier*♦

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Pierre-Marie; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Devaux, Jérôme; Garcia, Marta; Bureau, Jocelyne; Thomasseau, Sylvie; Klingler, Esther; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Goutebroze, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The nodes of Ranvier are essential regions for action potential conduction in myelinated fibers. They are enriched in multimolecular complexes composed of voltage-gated Nav and Kv7 channels associated with cell adhesion molecules. Cytoskeletal proteins ankyrin-G (AnkG) and βIV-spectrin control the organization of these complexes and provide mechanical support to the plasma membrane. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is a cytoplasmic protein present in axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier. It interacts with AnkG and is absent from nodes and axon initial segments of βIV-spectrin and AnkG mutant mice. Here, we show that IQCJ-SCHIP1 also interacts with βIV-spectrin and Kv7.2/3 channels and self-associates, suggesting a scaffolding role in organizing nodal proteins. IQCJ-SCHIP1 binding requires a βIV-spectrin-specific domain and Kv7 channel 1-5-10 calmodulin-binding motifs. We then investigate the role of IQCJ-SCHIP1 in vivo by studying peripheral myelinated fibers in Schip1 knock-out mutant mice. The major nodal proteins are normally enriched at nodes in these mice, indicating that IQCJ-SCHIP1 is not required for their nodal accumulation. However, morphometric and ultrastructural analyses show an altered shape of nodes similar to that observed in βIV-spectrin mutant mice, revealing that IQCJ-SCHIP1 contributes to nodal membrane-associated cytoskeleton organization, likely through its interactions with the AnkG/βIV-spectrin network. Our work reveals that IQCJ-SCHIP1 interacts with several major nodal proteins, and we suggest that it contributes to a higher organizational level of the AnkG/βIV-spectrin network critical for node integrity. PMID:27979964

  17. Local NH-π interactions involving aromatic residues of proteins: influence of backbone conformation and ππ* excitation on the π H-bond strength, as revealed from studies of isolated model peptides.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Woon Yong; Brenner, Valérie; Gloaguen, Eric; Mons, Michel

    2016-11-02

    Conformer-selective IR gas phase spectroscopy and high level quantum chemistry methods have been used to characterise the diversity of local NH-π interactions between the π ring of a phenylalanine aromatic residue and the nearby main chain amide groups. The study of model systems shows how the amide NH stretch vibrational features, in the 3410-3460 cm(-1) frequency range, can be used to monitor the strength of these local π H-bonds, which is found to depend on both the backbone conformation and the aromatic side chain orientation. This is rationalized in terms of partial electron transfer between the π cloud and the main chain NH bonds, with the help of analysis tools based on Natural Bonding Orbitals and Non-Covalent Interactions plots. The experimental study, extended to the NH-π interactions when the Phe residue is excited in its first ππ* electronic state, also demonstrates the principle of the ππ* labelling technique, i.e. a selective labelling of those NH bonds in a peptide molecule that are in close contact with an aromatic ring, as an elegant tool for IR spectroscopic assignments. The validation of theoretical predictions against experimental data (frequency change upon excitation) eventually qualifies the use of the CC2 method for the description of the ππ* excited states of systems having a phenyl ring, both in terms of structure, vibrational modes and nature of excited states.

  18. Integrin-dependent translocation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase to the cytoskeleton of thrombin-activated platelets involves specific interactions of p85 alpha with actin filaments and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Thrombin-induced accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P2) but not of PtdIns(3,4,5,)P3 is strongly correlated with the relocation to the cytoskeleton of 29% of the p85 alpha regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PtdIns 3-kinase) and is accompanied by a significant increase in PtdIns 3-kinase activity in this subcellular fraction. Actually, PtdIns(3,4)P2 accumulation and PtdIns 3-kinase, pp60c-src, and p125FAK translocations as well as aggregation were concomitant events occurring with a distinct lag after actin polymerization. The accumulation of PtdIns(3,4)P2 and the relocalization of PtdIns 3-kinase to the cytoskeleton were both dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation, integrin signaling, and aggregation. Furthermore, although p85 alpha was detected in anti- phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates obtained from the cytoskeleton of thrombin-activated platelets, we failed to demonstrate tyrosine phosphorylation of cytoskeletal p85 alpha. Tyrphostin treatment clearly reduced its presence in this subcellular fraction, suggesting a physical interaction of p85 alpha with a phosphotyrosyl protein. These data led us to investigate the proteins that are able to interact with PtdIns 3-kinase in the cytoskeleton. We found an association of this enzyme with actin filaments: this interaction was spontaneously restored after one cycle of actin depolymerization-repolymerization in vitro. This association with F-actin appeared to be at least partly indirect, since we demonstrated a thrombin-dependent interaction of p85 alpha with a proline-rich sequence of the tyrosine-phosphorylated cytoskeletal focal adhesion kinase, p125FAK. In addition, we show that PtdIns 3-kinase is significantly activated by the p125FAK proline-rich sequence binding to the src homology 3 domain of p85 alpha subunit. This interaction may represent a new mechanism for PtdIns 3-kinase activation at very specific areas of the cell and indicates that the focal contact-like areas

  19. Interactions between magnetohydrodynamical discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, W.; Woodward, P.R. )

    1994-11-01

    Interactions between magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) discontinuities are studied through numerical simulations for the set of one-dimensional MHD equations. The interactions include the impact of a shock on a contact discontinuity, the collision of two shocks, and the catchup of a shock over another shock. The shocks involved in the interactions may be very strong. Each shock in an interaction may be either a fast or a slow shock.

  20. Integrative computational in-depth analysis of dysregulated miRNA-mRNA interactions in drug-resistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells: an attempt to obtain new potential gene-miRNA pathways involved in response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh; Mojtabavi Naeini, Marjan; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Honardoost, Mohammad Amin

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major neoplasia type among children. Despite the tremendous success of current treatment strategies, drug resistance still remains a major cause of chemotherapy failure and relapse in pediatric patients. Overwhelming evidence illustrates that microRNAs (miRNAs) act as post-transcriptional regulators of drug-resistance-related genes. The current study was aimed at how dysregulated miRNA-mRNA-signaling pathway interaction networks mediate resistance to four commonly used chemotherapy agents in pediatric ALL, including asparaginase, daunorubicin, prednisolone, and vincristine. Using public expression microarray datasets, a holistic in silico approach was utilized to investigate candidate drug resistance miRNA-mRNA-signaling pathway interaction networks in pediatric ALL. Our systems biology approach nominated significant drug resistance and cross-resistance miRNAs, mRNAs, and cell signaling pathways based on anti-correlative relationship between miRNA and mRNA expression pattern. To sum up, our systemic analysis disclosed either a new potential role of miRNAs, or a possible mechanism of cellular drug resistance, in chemotherapy resistance of pediatric ALL. The current study may shed light on predicting drug response and overcoming drug resistance in childhood ALL for subsequent generations of chemotherapies.

  1. Virtual Clinical Trial Toward Polytherapy Safety Assessment: Combination of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic-Based Modeling and Simulation Approach With Drug-Drug Interactions Involving Terfenadine as an Example.

    PubMed

    Wiśniowska, Barbara; Polak, Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    A Quantitative Systems Pharmacology approach was utilized to predict the cardiac consequences of drug-drug interaction (DDI) at the population level. The Simcyp in vitro-in vivo correlation and physiologically based pharmacokinetic platform was used to predict the pharmacokinetic profile of terfenadine following co-administration of the drug. Electrophysiological effects were simulated using the Cardiac Safety Simulator. The modulation of ion channel activity was dependent on the inhibitory potential of drugs on the main cardiac ion channels and a simulated free heart tissue concentration. ten Tusscher's human ventricular cardiomyocyte model was used to simulate the pseudo-ECG traces and further predict the pharmacodynamic consequences of DDI. Consistent with clinical observations, predicted plasma concentration profiles of terfenadine show considerable intra-subject variability with recorded Cmax values below 5 ng/mL for most virtual subjects. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of inhibitors were predicted with reasonable accuracy. In all cases, a combination of the physiologically based pharmacokinetic and physiology-based pharmacodynamic models was able to differentiate between the terfenadine alone and terfenadine + inhibitor scenario. The range of QT prolongation was comparable in the clinical and virtual studies. The results indicate that mechanistic in vitro-in vivo correlation can be applied to predict the clinical effects of DDI even without comprehensive knowledge on all mechanisms contributing to the interaction.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is up-regulated by CCL19/CCR7 interaction via PI3K/Akt pathway and is involved in CCL19-driven BMSCs migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tu, Guanjun; Lv, Chen; Long, Jun; Cong, Lin; Han, Yaxin

    2014-08-22

    C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and its ligands CCL19 contributes to the directional migration of certain cancer cell lines, but its role in the migration of BMSCs remains vague. The aim of this study was to determine the possible interaction between CCL19-induced conditions and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP9) expression in BMSCs. Cell migration using Transwell assay indicated that activation of CCR7 by its specific ligand, exogenous chemokine ligand 19 (CCL19), was associated with a significant linear increase. Western blot and real-time PCR indicated that CCL19/CCR7 significantly upregulated expression of MMP9, which is related to metastasis-associated genes. The CCL19/CCR7 interaction significantly enhanced phosphorylation of Akt, as measured by Western blot. P-Akt and MMP9 protein expression exhibited a time-dependent pattern, and the peak was at 48h. LY294002 significantly abolished the effects of exogenous CCL19. These results suggest that CCL19/CCR7 contributes to the migration of BMSCs by upregulating MMP9 potentially via the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  3. 42 CFR 457.120 - Public involvement in program development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...— (a) Involve the public in both the design and initial implementation of the program; (b) Ensure ongoing public involvement once the State plan has been implemented; and (c) Ensure interaction...

  4. Involving LEP Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garate, Dama; And Others

    Four community liaisons for public school programs for limited- English-proficient (LEP) populations discuss briefly aspects of parent involvement. Dama Garate describes the populations served by the Trinity-Arlington Project in the Arlington (Virginia) Public Schools and suggests issues to be considered in parent involvement efforts. Pirun Sen of…

  5. High Involvement Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These three papers were presented at a symposium on high-involvement work teams moderated by Michael Leimbach at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Beyond Training to the New Learning Environment: Workers on the High-Involvement Frontline" (Joseph Anthony Ilacqua, Carol Ann Zulauf) shows the link between…

  6. [Families Involved in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Nicole, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Community Update" focuses on families involved in learning. The first article briefly discusses the "Ready to Read, Ready to Learn" White House summit that highlighted new research on early childhood learning. The center spread of this issue offers "Priming the Primary Educator: A Look at L. A. County's Parent Involvement Programs"…

  7. Categories of Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Jerold P.

    1994-01-01

    The growing interest in effective parent involvement has produced several ways to classify or describe ways parents are or should be involved. This article reviews and evaluates Ira Gordon's systems approach, the California-based System Development Corporation's categories, Eugenia H. Berger's parental role categories, Chavkin and Williams' parent…

  8. Commericial Involvement in Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry

    Sport in general has long had ties with commercial interests, the most popular and widespread involving publicity. Intramural sports programs, however, have not cultivated many commercial involvements in publicity. The approach in intramural sports advertising is simple. A commercial interest pays for space or time in a given communication media…

  9. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  10. Phosphorylation and Interaction with the 14-3-3 Protein of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase are Involved in the Regulation of Magnesium-Mediated Increases in Aluminum-Induced Citrate Exudation in Broad Bean (Vicia faba. L).

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Kan, Qi; Wang, Ping; Yu, Wenqian; Yu, Yuzhen; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Yongxiong; Li, Kunzhi; Chen, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have shown that external application of micromolar magnesium (Mg) can increase the resistance of legumes to aluminum (Al) stress by enhancing Al-induced citrate exudation. However, the exact mechanism underlying this regulation remains unknown. In this study, the physiological and molecular mechanisms by which Mg enhances Al-induced citrate exudation to alleviate Al toxicity were investigated in broad bean. Micromolar concentrations of Mg that alleviated Al toxicity paralleled the stimulation of Al-induced citrate exudation and increased the activity of the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase. Northern blot analysis shows that a putative MATE-like gene (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) was induced after treatment with Al for 4, 8 and 12 h, whereas the mRNA abundance of the MATE-like gene showed no significant difference between Al plus Mg and Al-only treatments during the entire treatment period. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot analyses suggest that the transcription and translation of the PM H(+)-ATPase were induced by Al but not by Mg. In contrast, immunoprecipitation suggests that Mg enhanced the phosphorylation levels of VHA2 and its interaction with the vf14-3-3b protein under Al stress. Taken together, our results suggest that micromolar concentrations of Mg can alleviate the Al rhizotoxicity by increasing PM H(+)-ATPase activity and Al-induced citrate exudation in YD roots. This enhancement is likely to be attributable to Al-induced increases in the expression of the MATE-like gene and vha2 and Mg-induced changes in the phosphorylation levels of VHA2, thus changing its interaction with the vf14-3-3b protein.

  11. Possible signaling cascades involved in attenuation of alloxan-induced oxidative stress and hyperglycemia in mice by ethanolic extract of Syzygium jambolanum: drug-DNA interaction with calf thymus DNA as target.

    PubMed

    Samadder, Asmita; Chakraborty, Debrup; De, Arnab; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Bhadra, Kakali; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2011-10-09

    We injected alloxan (100 mg/kg b.w.) in mice (Mus musculus) intra-peritoneally to induce hyperglycemia and divided the hyperglycemic mice into two sub-groups: one was fed ethanolic extract of Syzygium jambolanum (EESJ) (20 mg/kg b.w. for 8 weeks) and the other 85% ethyl alcohol ("vehicle"-control). Chromatographic and mass spectroscopic studies of EESJ revealed two principal components, one corresponding to an iridoid glycoside. We estimated blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, glucokinase, and fructosamine and analyzed the expression of marker proteins like insulin, GLUT2, and GLUT4. We also studied anti-oxidant biomarkers like lipid peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, total thiole and catalase. We assayed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and several inflammatory and apoptotic signal proteins like NFkB, IFNγ, iNOS, Bcl(2,) Bax, STAT1 and Caspase3. We further evaluated the effects of hyperglycemia on DNA through comet assay and DNA fragmentation study and assessed drug-DNA interaction by comparative analysis of circular dichroism (CD) spectral data and melting temperature profiles (T(m)) of calf thymus DNA treated with or without EESJ. We observed an elevation of all biomarkers for oxidative stress, generation of ROS and activation of NFkB and down regulation in expression of insulin, GLUT2 and glucokinase in hyperglycemic mice. Administration of EESJ reversed these changes. Histo-pathological observations of pancreas, liver and kidney also revealed relevant changes. Data of CD and (T(m)) indicated an interaction of EESJ with calf thymus DNA, indicating change in structure and conformation. Thus, EESJ has anti-oxidant as well as anti-hyperglycemic activities in diabetic mice, and potentially useful in management of hyperglycemia.

  12. Prediction of the overall renal tubular secretion and hepatic clearance of anionic drugs and a renal drug-drug interaction involving organic anion transporter 3 in humans by in vitro uptake experiments.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takao; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Tomoko; Debori, Yasuyuki; Maeda, Kazuya; Kondo, Tsunenori; Nakayama, Hideki; Horita, Shigeru; Ogilvie, Brian W; Parkinson, Andrew; Hu, Zhuohan; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2011-06-01

    The present study investigated prediction of the overall renal tubular secretion and hepatic clearances of anionic drugs based on in vitro transport studies. The saturable uptake of eight drugs, most of which were OAT3 substrates (rosuvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, valsartan, olmesartan, trichlormethiazide, p-aminohippurate, and benzylpenicillin) by freshly prepared human kidney slices underestimated the overall intrinsic clearance of the tubular secretion; therefore, a scaling factor of 10 was required for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. We examined the effect of gemfibrozil and its metabolites, gemfibrozil glucuronide and the carboxylic metabolite, gemfibrozil M3, on pravastatin uptake by human kidney slices. The inhibition study using human kidney slices suggests that OAT3 plays a predominant role in the renal uptake of pravastatin. Comparison of unbound concentrations and K(i) values (1.5, 9.1, and 4.0 μM, for gemfibrozil, gemfibrozil glucuronide, and gemfibrozil M3, respectively) suggests that the mechanism of the interaction is due mainly to inhibition by gemfibrozil and gemfibrozil glucuronide. Furthermore, extrapolation of saturable uptake by cryopreserved human hepatocytes predicts clearance comparable with the observed hepatic clearance although fluvastatin and rosuvastatin required a scaling factor of 11 and 6.9, respectively. This study suggests that in vitro uptake assays using human kidney slices and hepatocytes provide a good prediction of the overall tubular secretion and hepatic clearances of anionic drugs and renal drug-drug interactions. It is also recommended that in vitro-in vivo extrapolation be performed in animals to obtain more reliable prediction.

  13. Polyvalent GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and Galbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (T alpha) as the most potent recognition factors involved in Maclura pomifera agglutinin-glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert M

    2005-01-01

    The agglutinin isolated from the seeds of Maclura pomifera (MPA) recognizes a mucin-type disaccharide sequence, Galbeta1-->3GalNAc (T) on a human erythrocyte membrane. We have utilized the enzyme-linked lectinosorbent assay (ELLSA) and inhibition assay to more systematically analyze the carbohydrate specificity of MPA with glyco-recognition factors and mammalian Gal/GalNAc structural units in lectin-glycoform interactions. From the results, it is concluded that the high densities of polyvalent GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and Galbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (T(alpha)) glycotopes in macromolecules are the most critical factors for MPA binding, being on a nanogram basis 2.0 x 10(5), 4.6 x 10(4) and 3.9 x 10(4) more active than monovalent Gal, monomeric T and Tn glycotope, respectively. Other carbohydrate structural units in mammalian glycoconjugates, such as human blood group Sd (a+) related disaccharide (GalNAcbeta1-->4Gal) and Pk/P1 active disaccharide (Galalpha1-->4Gal) were inactive. These results demonstrate that the configurations of carbon-4 and carbon-2 are essential for MPA binding and establish the importance of affinity enhancement by high-density polyvalencies of Tn/T glycotopes in MPA-glycan interactions. The overall binding profile of MPA can be defined in decreasing order as high density of polyvalent Tn/T(alpha) (M.W. > 4.0 x 10(4)) > Tn-containing glycopeptides (M.W. < 3.0 x 10(3)) > monomeric T/Tn and P (GalNAcbeta1-->3Gal) > GalNAc > Gal > Man, L: ARA: , D: Fuc and Glc (inactive). Our findings should aid in the selection of this lectin for elucidating functions of carbohydrate chains in life processes and for applications in the biomedical sciences.

  14. Transposon Mutagenesis of the Plant-Associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 Revealed That the nfrA and RBAM17410 Genes Are Involved in Plant-Microbe-Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Dolgova, Olga; Fan, Ben; Bleiss, Wilfrid; Ziegler, Jörg; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Borriss, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 represents the prototype of Gram-positive plant growth promoting and biocontrol bacteria. In this study, we applied transposon mutagenesis to generate a transposon library, which was screened for genes involved in multicellular behavior and biofilm formation on roots as a prerequisite of plant growth promoting activity. Transposon insertion sites were determined by rescue-cloning followed by DNA sequencing. As in B. subtilis, the global transcriptional regulator DegU was identified as an activator of genes necessary for swarming and biofilm formation, and the DegU-mutant of FZB42 was found impaired in efficient root colonization. Direct screening of 3,000 transposon insertion mutants for plant-growth-promotion revealed the gene products of nfrA and RBAM_017140 to be essential for beneficial effects exerted by FZB42 on plants. We analyzed the performance of GFP-labeled wild-type and transposon mutants in the colonization of lettuce roots using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While the wild-type strain heavily colonized root surfaces, the nfrA mutant did not colonize lettuce roots, although it was not impaired in growth in laboratory cultures, biofilm formation and swarming motility on agar plates. The RBAM17410 gene, occurring in only a few members of the B. subtilis species complex, was directly involved in plant growth promotion. None of the mutant strains were affected in producing the plant growth hormone auxin. We hypothesize that the nfrA gene product is essential for overcoming the stress caused by plant response towards bacterial root colonization. PMID:24847778

  15. Involvement of an Arginine Triplet in M1 Matrix Protein Interaction with Membranes and in M1 Recruitment into Virus-Like Particles of the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Moncorgé, Olivier; Panthu, Baptiste; Prchal, Jan; Décimo, Didier; Ohlmann, Théophile; Lina, Bruno; Favard, Cyril; Decroly, Etienne; Ottmann, Michèle; Roingeard, Philippe; Muriaux, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus caused the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. In this study, we wanted to decipher the role of conserved basic residues of the viral M1 matrix protein in virus assembly and release. M1 plays many roles in the influenza virus replication cycle. Specifically, it participates in viral particle assembly, can associate with the viral ribonucleoprotein complexes and can bind to the cell plasma membrane and/or the cytoplasmic tail of viral transmembrane proteins. M1 contains an N-terminal domain of 164 amino acids with two basic domains: the nuclear localization signal on helix 6 and an arginine triplet (R76/77/78) on helix 5. To investigate the role of these two M1 basic domains in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus molecular assembly, we analyzed M1 attachment to membranes, virus-like particle (VLP) production and virus infectivity. In vitro, M1 binding to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), which contain negatively charged lipids, decreased significantly when the M1 R76/77/78 motif was mutated. In cells, M1 alone was mainly observed in the nucleus (47%) and in the cytosol (42%). Conversely, when co-expressed with the viral proteins NS1/NEP and M2, M1 was relocated to the cell membranes (55%), as shown by subcellular fractionation experiments. This minimal system allowed the production of M1 containing-VLPs. However, M1 with mutations in the arginine triplet accumulated in intracellular clusters and its incorporation in VLPs was strongly diminished. M2 over-expression was essential for M1 membrane localization and VLP production, whereas the viral trans-membrane proteins HA and NA seemed dispensable. These results suggest that the M1 arginine triplet participates in M1 interaction with membranes. This R76/77/78 motif is essential for M1 incorporation in virus particles and the importance of this motif was confirmed by reverse genetic demonstrating that its mutation is lethal for the virus. These results highlight the molecular

  16. Involvement of alpha-PAK-interacting exchange factor in the PAK1-c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 activation and apoptosis induced by benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, S; Tanaka, M; Otsuki, Y; Fujiyama, T; Kataoka, H; Arai, H; Hanai, H; Sugimura, H

    2001-10-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene [B(a)P], a potent procarcinogen found in combustion products such as diesel exhaust and cigarette smoke, has been recently shown to activate the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and induce caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in Hepa1c1c7 cells. However, the molecules of the signaling pathway that control the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades induced by B(a)P and the interaction between those and apoptosis by B(a)P have not been well defined. We report here that B(a)P promoted Cdc42/Rac1, p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), and JNK1 activities in 293T and HeLa cells. Moreover, alpha-PAK-interacting exchange factor (alpha PIX) mRNA and its protein expression were upregulated by B(a)P. While overexpression of an active mutant of alpha PIX (DeltaCH) facilitated B(a)P-induced activation of Cdc42/Rac1, PAK1, and JNK1, overexpression of mutated alphaPIX (L383R, L384S), which lacks guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, SH3 domain-deleted alphaPIX (Delta SH3), which lacks the ability to bind PAK, kinase-negative PAK1 (K299R), and kinase-negative SEK1 (K220A, K224L) inhibited B(a)P-triggered JNK1 activation. Interestingly, overexpression of alphaPIX (Delta CH) and a catalytically active mutant PAK1 (T423E) accelerated B(a)P-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, whereas alphaPIX (Delta SH3), PAK1 (K299R), and SEK 1 (K220A, K224L) inhibited B(a)P-initiated apoptosis. Finally, a preferential caspase inhibitor, Z-Asp-CH2-DCB, strongly blocked the alphaPIX (Delta CH)-enhanced apoptosis in cells treated with B(a)P but did not block PAK1/JNK1 activation. Taken together, these results indicate that alphaPIX plays a crucial role in B(a)P-induced apoptosis through activation of the JNK1 pathway kinases.

  17. DFT study and crystal structure analysis of a new nano-structure five coordinated Hg(II) complex involving C-H⋯O, N⋯O and π⋯π interactions in a supra-molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Montazerozohori, M; Musavi, S A; Masoudiasl, A; Hojjati, A; Assoud, A

    2015-08-05

    In this research, template synthesis and crystal structure of a new HgLI₂ complex are presented (L=N(1)-(4-nitrobenzylidene)-N(2)-(2-((E)-(4-nitrobenzylidene)amino)ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine). The mercury complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group of P1¯. The crystal structure of the complex shows a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the mercury(II) center; including two I and an N atoms of Schiff base ligand in equatorial plane and two iminic N atoms in axial positions. Two five membered mercury containing rings [Hg(-N-C-C-N-)] are found in the structure. Some C-H⋯O, N⋯O and π⋯π intermolecular interactions causes a supra-molecular network in the solid-state. In addition to crystal structure analysis, density functional theory (DFT) study at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory has been also performed on the structure. Thereafter some theoretical structural and spectral data were compared with experimental results. Furthermore, total energy levels of HOMO and LUMO orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential, Mullikan atomic charges, thermodynamic and polarizability properties of the complex were calculated. Finally the mercury complex was prepared in nano-structure size confirmed by SEM and XRD analyses. The particles size of the titled complex was evaluated under 40 nm based on Sherrer's formula.

  18. Expression of a P-selectin ligand in zona pellucida of porcine oocytes and P-selectin on acrosomal membrane of porcine sperm cells. Potential implications for their involvement in sperm-egg interactions.

    PubMed

    Geng, J G; Raub, T J; Baker, C A; Sawada, G A; Ma, L; Elhammer, A P

    1997-05-05

    The selectin family of cell adhesion molecules mediates initial leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelial cells at sites of inflammation. O-glycan structural similarities between oligosaccharides from human leukocyte P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and from zona pellucida glycoproteins of porcine oocytes indicate the possible existence of a P-selectin ligand in the zona pellucida. Here, using biochemical as well as morphological approaches, we demonstrate that a P-selectin ligand is expressed in the porcine zona pellucida. In addition, a search for a specific receptor for this ligand leads to the identification of P-selectin on the acrosomal membrane of porcine sperm cells. In vitro binding of porcine acrosome-reacted sperm cells to oocytes was found to be Ca2+ dependent and inhibitable with either P-selectin, P-selectin receptor-globulin, or leukocyte adhesion blocking antibodies against P-selectin and PSGL-1. Moreover, porcine sperm cells were found to be capable of binding to human promyeloid cell line HL-60. Taken together, our findings implicate a potential role for the oocyte P-selectin ligand and the sperm P-selectin in porcine sperm-egg interactions.

  19. DFT study and crystal structure analysis of a new nano-structure five coordinated Hg(II) complex involving C-H⋯O, N⋯O and π⋯π interactions in a supra-molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazerozohori, M.; Musavi, S. A.; Masoudiasl, A.; Hojjati, A.; Assoud, A.

    2015-08-01

    In this research, template synthesis and crystal structure of a new HgLI2 complex are presented (L = N1-(4-nitrobenzylidene)-N2-(2-((E)-(4-nitrobenzylidene)amino)ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine). The mercury complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group of P 1 bar . The crystal structure of the complex shows a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the mercury(II) center; including two I and an N atoms of Schiff base ligand in equatorial plane and two iminic N atoms in axial positions. Two five membered mercury containing rings [Hg(-N-C-C-N-)] are found in the structure. Some C-H⋯O, N⋯O and π⋯π intermolecular interactions causes a supra-molecular network in the solid-state. In addition to crystal structure analysis, density functional theory (DFT) study at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory has been also performed on the structure. Thereafter some theoretical structural and spectral data were compared with experimental results. Furthermore, total energy levels of HOMO and LUMO orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential, Mullikan atomic charges, thermodynamic and polarizability properties of the complex were calculated. Finally the mercury complex was prepared in nano-structure size confirmed by SEM and XRD analyses. The particles size of the titled complex was evaluated under 40 nm based on Sherrer's formula.

  20. Integrative Analyses of miRNA-mRNA Interactions Reveal let-7b, miR-128 and MAPK Pathway Involvement in Muscle Mass Loss in Sex-Linked Dwarf Chickens.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Lin, Shumao; Li, Guihuan; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-02-24

    The sex-linked dwarf (SLD) chicken is an ideal model system for understanding growth hormone (GH)-action and growth hormone receptor (GHR) function because of its recessive mutation in the GHR gene. Skeletal muscle mass is reduced in the SLD chicken with a smaller muscle fiber diameter. Our previous study has presented the mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of the SLD chicken and normal chicken between embryo day 14 and seven weeks of age. However, the molecular mechanism of GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss is still unclear, and the key molecules and pathways underlying the GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss also remain to be illustrated. Here, by functional network analysis of the differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs between the SLD and normal chickens, we revealed that let-7b, miR-128 and the MAPK pathway might play key roles in the GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss, and that the reduced cell division and growth are potential cellular processes during the SLD chicken skeletal muscle development. Additionally, we also found some genes and miRNAs involved in chicken skeletal muscle development, through the MAPK, PI3K-Akt, Wnt and Insulin signaling pathways. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying muscle mass loss in the SLD chickens, and some regulatory networks that are crucial for chicken skeletal muscle development.

  1. Integrative Analyses of miRNA-mRNA Interactions Reveal let-7b, miR-128 and MAPK Pathway Involvement in Muscle Mass Loss in Sex-Linked Dwarf Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen; Lin, Shumao; Li, Guihuan; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    The sex-linked dwarf (SLD) chicken is an ideal model system for understanding growth hormone (GH)-action and growth hormone receptor (GHR) function because of its recessive mutation in the GHR gene. Skeletal muscle mass is reduced in the SLD chicken with a smaller muscle fiber diameter. Our previous study has presented the mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of the SLD chicken and normal chicken between embryo day 14 and seven weeks of age. However, the molecular mechanism of GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss is still unclear, and the key molecules and pathways underlying the GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss also remain to be illustrated. Here, by functional network analysis of the differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs between the SLD and normal chickens, we revealed that let-7b, miR-128 and the MAPK pathway might play key roles in the GHR-deficient induced muscle mass loss, and that the reduced cell division and growth are potential cellular processes during the SLD chicken skeletal muscle development. Additionally, we also found some genes and miRNAs involved in chicken skeletal muscle development, through the MAPK, PI3K-Akt, Wnt and Insulin signaling pathways. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying muscle mass loss in the SLD chickens, and some regulatory networks that are crucial for chicken skeletal muscle development. PMID:26927061

  2. [Heart involvement in sarcoglycanopathies].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2012-11-01

    Sarcoglycanopathies (SG) are autosomic recessive muscular dystrophies, secondary to mutations of the sarcoglycan complex. Clinical pictures include muscle weakness affecting mainly the proximal limb girdle musculature. We review heart involvement in this group of disease.

  3. Vasculitis and gastrointestinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Casella, G; Bronzino, B; Cutrino, L; Montani, N; Somma, A; Baldini, V

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal involvement is relatively observed in patients with vasculitis processes. Vasculitis can be primary (necrotising or hypersensitivity) or secondary to another primary disease. Gastrointestinal involvement is present in up to 50% of the various forms of systemic vasculitis. Primary or secondary vasculitic process, according to the classification in necrotizing and hypersensitivity vasculitis, are described in this paper. A review of the literature on the the subject is also presented.

  4. The stimulus-dependent co-localization of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase (Sgk) and Erk/MAPK in mammary tumor cells involves the mutual interaction with the importin-alpha nuclear import protein

    SciTech Connect

    Buse, Patricia; Maiyar, Anita C.; Failor, Kim L.; Tran, Susan; Leong, Meredith L.L.; Firestone, Gary L.

    2007-09-10

    In Con8 rat mammary epithelial tumor cells, indirect immunofluorescence revealed that Sgk (serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase) and Erk/MAPK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase) co-localized to the nucleus in serum-treated cells and to the cytoplasmic compartment in cells treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Moreover, the subcellular distribution of the importin-alpha nuclear transport protein was similarly regulated in a signal-dependent manner. In vitro GST-pull down assays revealed the direct interaction of importin-alpha with either Sgk or Erk/MAPK, while RNA interference knockdown of importin-alpha expression disrupted the localization of both Sgk and Erk into the nucleus of serum-treated cells. Wild type or kinase dead forms of Sgk co-immunoprecipitated with Erk/MAPK from either serum- or dexamethasone-treated mammary tumor cells, suggesting the existence of a protein complex containing both kinases. In serum-treated cells, nucleus residing Sgk and Erk/MAPK were both hyperphosphorylated, indicative of their active states, whereas, in dexamethasone-treated cells Erk/MAPK, but not Sgk, was in its inactive hypophosphorylated state. Treatment with a MEK inhibitor, which inactivates Erk/MAPK, caused the relocalization of both Sgk and ERK to the cytoplasm. We therefore propose that the signal-dependent co-localization of Sgk and Erk/MAPK mediated by importin-alpha represents a new pathway of signal integration between steroid and serum/growth factor-regulated pathways.

  5. A novel-type phosphatidylinositol phosphate-interactive, Ca-binding protein PCaP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana: stable association with plasma membrane and partial involvement in stomata closure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Chisako; Miwa, Chika; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kato, Mariko; Suito, Momoe; Tsuchihira, Ayako; Sato, Yori; Segami, Shoji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (PCaP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a new type protein that binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates and Ca(2+)-calmodulin complex as well as free Ca(2+). Although biochemical properties, such as binding to ligands and N-myristoylation, have been revealed, the intracellular localization, tissue and cell specificity, integrity of membrane association and physiological roles of PCaP1 are unknown. We investigated the tissue and intracellular distribution of PCaP1 by using transgenic lines expressing PCaP1 linked with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) at the carboxyl terminus of PCaP1. GFP fluorescence was obviously detected in most tissues including root, stem, leaf and flower. In these tissues, PCaP1-GFP signal was observed predominantly in the plasma membrane even under physiological stress conditions but not in other organelles. The fluorescence was detected in the cytosol when the 25-residue N-terminal sequence was deleted from PCaP1 indicating essential contribution of N-myristoylation to the plasma membrane anchoring. Fluorescence intensity of PCaP1-GFP in roots was slightly decreased in seedlings grown in medium supplemented with high concentrations of iron for 1 week and increased in those grown with copper. In stomatal guard cells, PCaP1-GFP was strictly, specifically localized to the plasma membrane at the epidermal-cell side but not at the pore side. A T-DNA insertion mutant line of PCaP1 did not show marked phenotype in a life cycle except for well growth under high CO2 conditions. However, stomata of the mutant line did not close entirely even in high osmolarity, which usually induces stomata closure. These results suggest that PCaP1 is involved in the stomatal movement, especially closure process, in leaves and response to excessive copper in root and leaf as a mineral nutrient as a physiological role.

  6. Characterization of the interaction of hemolytic lectin CEL-III from the marine invertebrate, Cucumaria echinata, with artificial lipid membranes: involvement of neutral sphingoglycolipids in the pore-forming process.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, T; Sato, T; Taira, E; Kuwahara, H; Niidome, T; Aoyagi, H

    1999-02-01

    The hemolytic lectin, CEL-III, is a Ca2+-dependent, galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific lectin purified from the marine invertebrate, Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea). After binding to specific carbohydrates on the erythrocyte surface, CEL-III forms ion-permeable pores by oligomerizing in the membrane, which leads to colloid osmotic rupture of the cells. When incubated with liposomes composed of total lipids from the human erythrocyte membrane, CEL-III efficiently induced the leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) trapped in the vesicles, suggesting the presence of its receptor in the membrane lipids. The rate of CF-leakage increased with increasing temperature, although the hemolytic activity of CEL-III had been found to be much higher at lower temperatures (around 10 degrees C). Identification of the receptor for CEL-III was performed by examining the ability of individual lipids from human erythrocytes to induce CF-leakage from DOPC-liposomes. As a result, the most effective receptor was found to be lactosyl ceramide (LacCer), while globoside (Gb4Cer) also showed slight induction of CF-leakage. On the other hand, a binding assay involving CEL-III-horseradish peroxidase conjugate indicated that CEL-III exhibits similar affinity for LacCer and Gb4Cer, suggesting that the structure or length of the carbohydrate portion of sphingoglycolipids is also relevant as to their ability to induce CF-leakage in addition to their affinity. Electron micrographs of CEL-III-treated liposomes revealed that CEL-III induced considerable morphological changes in the vesicles, while a clearly distinguishable oligomeric structure of the protein was not observed.

  7. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Desbonnet, Charlene; Tait-Kamradt, Amelia; Garcia-Solache, Monica; Dunman, Paul; Coleman, Jeffrey; Arthur, Michel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as “cephalosporins”) is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps) PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2) of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP). Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA. Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system. PMID:27048803

  8. Transcriptome and Metabolite Profiling of the Infection Cycle of Zymoseptoria tritici on Wheat Reveals a Biphasic Interaction with Plant Immunity Involving Differential Pathogen Chromosomal Contributions and a Variation on the Hemibiotrophic Lifestyle Definition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Jason J.; Kanyuka, Kostya; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Derbyshire, Mark; Andongabo, Ambrose; Devonshire, Jean; Lysenko, Artem; Saqi, Mansoor; Desai, Nalini M.; Powers, Stephen J.; Hooper, Juliet; Ambroso, Linda; Bharti, Arvind; Farmer, Andrew; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Dietrich, Robert A.; Courbot, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici causes Septoria tritici blotch disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Pathogen reproduction on wheat occurs without cell penetration, suggesting that dynamic and intimate intercellular communication occurs between fungus and plant throughout the disease cycle. We used deep RNA sequencing and metabolomics to investigate the physiology of plant and pathogen throughout an asexual reproductive cycle of Z. tritici on wheat leaves. Over 3,000 pathogen genes, more than 7,000 wheat genes, and more than 300 metabolites were differentially regulated. Intriguingly, individual fungal chromosomes contributed unequally to the overall gene expression changes. Early transcriptional down-regulation of putative host defense genes was detected in inoculated leaves. There was little evidence for fungal nutrient acquisition from the plant throughout symptomless colonization by Z. tritici, which may instead be utilizing lipid and fatty acid stores for growth. However, the fungus then subsequently manipulated specific plant carbohydrates, including fructan metabolites, during the switch to necrotrophic growth and reproduction. This switch coincided with increased expression of jasmonic acid biosynthesis genes and large-scale activation of other plant defense responses. Fungal genes encoding putative secondary metabolite clusters and secreted effector proteins were identified with distinct infection phase-specific expression patterns, although functional analysis suggested that many have overlapping/redundant functions in virulence. The pathogenic lifestyle of Z. tritici on wheat revealed through this study, involving initial defense suppression by a slow-growing extracellular and nutritionally limited pathogen followed by defense (hyper) activation during reproduction, reveals a subtle modification of the conceptual definition of hemibiotrophic plant infection. PMID:25596183

  9. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis*, **

    PubMed Central

    Nessrine, Akasbi; Zahra, Abourazzak Fatima; Taoufik, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause. It most commonly affects the pulmonary system but can also affect the musculoskeletal system, albeit less frequently. In patients with sarcoidosis, rheumatic involvement is polymorphic. It can be the presenting symptom of the disease or can appear during its progression. Articular involvement is dominated by nonspecific arthralgia, polyarthritis, and Löfgren's syndrome, which is defined as the presence of lung adenopathy, arthralgia (or arthritis), and erythema nodosum. Skeletal manifestations, especially dactylitis, appear mainly as complications of chronic, multiorgan sarcoidosis. Muscle involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis of rheumatic sarcoidosis is based on X-ray findings and magnetic resonance imaging findings, although the definitive diagnosis is made by anatomopathological study of biopsy samples. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis is generally relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids. In corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent forms of the disease, immunosuppressive therapy, such as treatment with methotrexate or anti-TNF-α, is employed. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the various types of osteoarticular and muscle involvement in sarcoidosis, focusing on their diagnosis and management. PMID:24831403

  10. Consumer Involvement in Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thursz, Daniel

    A new approach to rehabilitation of the disabled and disadvantaged is necessary, but the problem of how to involve consumers and how to organize groups for community action is a big one. Moreover, citizen participation cannot be a substitute for basic improvement in the quality of service. Service agencies need to be decentralized and staff…

  11. Getting Parents Involved.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Vickie; Finch, Patty A.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a parental involvement program in reading, writing, and human education. The project consists of caring for Clifford, a stuffed toy dog, on a rotated basis by first grade students. Books and pet care items accompany Clifford and provide an opportunity for parent and child to work together. (ML)

  12. Parent Involvement. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    What are some ways in which to get parents meaningfully involved in their child's high school? According to the research, the most successful programs are those that provide a variety of ways in which parents can be actively engaged in their child's academic life. Joyce Epstein, Director of the National Network of Partnership Schools, out of Johns…

  13. Rethinking Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandergrift, Judith A.; Greene, Andrea L.

    1992-01-01

    Arizona At-Risk Pilot Project results suggest most effective means to involve parents are those that establish personal rapport between someone from the school and a parent and do not initially require high levels of commitment or participation. The "ideal" parent may be hard to find, but getting to know parents individually and…

  14. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  15. Understanding of Multiplicative Contexts Involving Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardiman, Pamela Thibodeau; Mestre, Jose P.

    Numerous studies indicate that performance in solving single step multiplicative word problems is influenced by both problem structure and the types of numbers involved in the problem. For example, including numbers less than one often increases the difficulty of a problem. What remains unclear is how problem structure and number type interact in…

  16. Human macrophage differentiation involves an interaction between integrins and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Laouar, A.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Collart, F.; Huberman, E.

    1996-11-15

    The authors have examined the role of the {beta}{sub 1} integrin family of adhesion receptors (VLA) and the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN) in macrophage differentiation of (1) human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and (2) human peripheral blood monocytes induced by either PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M=CSF). Increased VLA and FN gene expression was observed as early as 4 h after PMA treatment of HL-60 cells and PMA- or M-CSF-treatment of monocytes, and it preceded the manifestation of macrophage markers. Treated HL-60 cells and monocytes also released and deposited FN on the surface of the tissue culture dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in protein kinase C {beta} and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, exhibited elevated levels of the VLA antigen but failed to express the FN gene. Incubation of HL-525 cells on dishes precoated with exogenous FN resulted in a macrophage differentiation. The macrophage phenotype induced in HL-60 cells, HL-525 cells, or monocytes was attenuated to various degrees by anti-VLA or anti-FN MAbs or by exogenous RGDS, a VLA-binding motif on FN. The authors suggest that macrophage differentiation is initiated by the activation of protein kinase C, which leads to the expression of the integrin, FN and related genes. The integrins mediate cell attachment and spreading on appropriate substrates by binding to deposited extracellular proteins such as FN. This attachment and spreading, in turn, leads to the expression of genes that code for the macrophage functions.

  17. Involvement in University Classroom Discourse: Register Variation and Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbieri, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Research on the linguistic characteristics of university classroom discourse highlights the salience, in this register, of non-informational and subjective aspects of discourse. This dimension of classroom discourse, however, has not been studied systematically. Taking a corpus-based approach, this study investigates the non-informational…

  18. Salmonella biofilm formation on Aspergillus niger involves cellulose - chitin interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to an...

  19. Investigations of Optical Limiting Involving Light-Matter Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-27

    infomatics, medical imaging, laser damage, photonic crystals and industrial devices. Therefore it has potential uses in both the military and civilian...induced micro fabrication. This may lead to improved methods for making nanostructures such as photonic crystals . 17 x 10 x10 3 x 10,3 x 10 .a 1.5 3...non-linearity for an array of semiconductor quantum dots in an organic host and show that it leads to large two- photon absorption. The calculated two

  20. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  1. The interactive brain hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Ezequiel; De Jaegher, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Enactive approaches foreground the role of interpersonal interaction in explanations of social understanding. This motivates, in combination with a recent interest in neuroscientific studies involving actual interactions, the question of how interactive processes relate to neural mechanisms involved in social understanding. We introduce the Interactive Brain Hypothesis (IBH) in order to help map the spectrum of possible relations between social interaction and neural processes. The hypothesis states that interactive experience and skills play enabling roles in both the development and current function of social brain mechanisms, even in cases where social understanding happens in the absence of immediate interaction. We examine the plausibility of this hypothesis against developmental and neurobiological evidence and contrast it with the widespread assumption that mindreading is crucial to all social cognition. We describe the elements of social interaction that bear most directly on this hypothesis and discuss the empirical possibilities open to social neuroscience. We propose that the link between coordination dynamics and social understanding can be best grasped by studying transitions between states of coordination. These transitions form part of the self-organization of interaction processes that characterize the dynamics of social engagement. The patterns and synergies of this self-organization help explain how individuals understand each other. Various possibilities for role-taking emerge during interaction, determining a spectrum of participation. This view contrasts sharply with the observational stance that has guided research in social neuroscience until recently. We also introduce the concept of readiness to interact to describe the practices and dispositions that are summoned in situations of social significance (even if not interactive). This latter idea links interactive factors to more classical observational scenarios. PMID:22701412

  2. Endocannabinoid involvement in endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Natalia; Nagabukuro, Hiroshi; Resuehr, David; Zhang, Guohua; McAllister, Stacy L.; McGinty, Kristina A.; Mackie, Ken; Berkley, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Endometriosis is a disease common in women that is defined by abnormal extrauteral growths of uterine endometrial tissue and associated with severe pain. Partly because how the abnormal growths become associated with pain is poorly understood, the pain is difficult to alleviate without resorting to hormones or surgery, which often produce intolerable side effects or fail to help. Recent studies in a rat model and women showed that sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers sprout branches to innervate the abnormal growths. This situation, together with knowledge that the endocannabinoid system is involved in uterine function and dysfunction and that exogenous cannabinoids were once used to alleviate endometriosis-associated pain, suggests that the endocannabinoid system is involved in both endometriosis and its associated pain. Here, using a rat model, we found that CB1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed on both the somata and fibers of both the sensory and sympathetic neurons that innervate endometriosis’s abnormal growths. We further found that CB1 receptor agonists decrease, whereas CB1 receptor antagonists increase, endometriosis-associated hyperalgesia. Together these findings suggest that the endocannabinoid system contributes to mechanisms underlying both the peripheral innervation of the abnormal growths and the pain associated with endometriosis, thereby providing a novel approach for the development of badly-needed new treatments. PMID:20833475

  3. Evolving synergetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Arranz, Jordi; Du, Jinming; Zhou, Da; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Cooperators forgo their own interests to benefit others. This reduces their fitness and thus cooperators are not likely to spread based on natural selection. Nonetheless, cooperation is widespread on every level of biological organization ranging from bacterial communities to human society. Mathematical models can help to explain under which circumstances cooperation evolves. Evolutionary game theory is a powerful mathematical tool to depict the interactions between cooperators and defectors. Classical models typically involve either pairwise interactions between individuals or a linear superposition of these interactions. For interactions within groups, however, synergetic effects may arise: their outcome is not just the sum of its parts. This is because the payoffs via a single group interaction can be different from the sum of any collection of two-player interactions. Assuming that all interactions start from pairs, how can such synergetic multiplayer games emerge from simpler pairwise interactions? Here, we present a mathematical model that captures the transition from pairwise interactions to synergetic multiplayer ones. We assume that different social groups have different breaking rates. We show that non-uniform breaking rates do foster the emergence of synergy, even though individuals always interact in pairs. Our work sheds new light on the mechanisms underlying such synergetic interactions. PMID:27466437

  4. Interactive Projector as an Interactive Teaching Tool in the Classroom: Evaluating Teaching Efficiency and Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Li-Ying; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on a measurement that is used to investigate interactivity in the classrooms and examines the impact of integrating the interactive projector into middle school science classes on classroom interactivity and students' biology learning. A total of 126 7th grade Taiwanese students were involved in the study and quasi-experimental…

  5. The tyrosine-sorting motif of the vacuolar sorting receptor VSR4 from Arabidopsis thaliana, which is involved in the interaction between VSR4 and AP1M2, μ1-adaptin type 2 of clathrin adaptor complex 1 subunits, participates in the post-Golgi sorting of VSR4.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kohji; Matsunami, Erika; Yoshida, Shohei; Kohata, Shuhei; Yamauchi, Junji; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Nagaya, Tsutomu; Yokota, Kazushige; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    μ1-Adaptin of adaptor protein (AP) 1 complex, AP1M, is generally accepted to load cargo proteins into clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) at the trans-Golgi network through its binding to cargo-recognition sequences (CRSs). Plant vacuolar-sorting receptors (VSRs) function in sorting vacuolar proteins, which are reportedly mediated by CCV. We herein investigated the involvement of CRSs of Arabidopsis thaliana VSR4 in the sorting of VSR4. The results obtained showed the increased localization of VSR4 at the plasma membrane or vacuoles by mutations in CRSs including the tyrosine-sorting motif YMPL or acidic dileucine-like motif EIRAIM, respectively. Interaction analysis using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) system, V10-BiFC, which we developed, indicated an interaction between VSR4 and AP1M2, AP1M type 2, which was attenuated by a YMPL mutation, but not influenced by an EIRAIM mutation. These results demonstrated the significance of the recognition of YMPL in VSR4 by AP1M2 for the post-Golgi sorting of VSR4.

  6. Studies on human eRF3-PABP interaction reveal the influence of eRF3a N-terminal glycin repeat on eRF3-PABP binding affinity and the lower affinity of eRF3a 12-GGC allele involved in cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jerbi, Soumaya; Jolles, Béatrice; Bouceba, Tahar; Jean-Jean, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) has been involved in the control of mRNA degradation through its association with the cytoplasmic Poly(A) Binding Protein, PABP. In mammals, eRF3 N-terminal domain contains two overlapping PAM2 motifs which specifically recognize the MLLE domain of PABP. In humans, eRF3a/GSPT1 gene contains a stable GGC repeat encoding a repeat of glycine residues in eRF3a N-terminus. There are five known eRF3a/GSPT1 alleles in the human population, encoding 7, 9, 10, 11 and 12 glycines. Several studies have reported that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele is correlated with an increased risk of cancer development. Using surface plasmon resonance, we have studied the interaction of the various allelic forms of eRF3a with PABP alone or poly(A)-bound PABP. We found that the N-terminal glycine repeat of eRF3a influences eRF3a-PABP interaction and that eRF3a 12-GGC allele has a decreased binding affinity for PABP. Our comparative analysis on eRF3a alleles suggests that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele could modify the coupling between translation termination and mRNA deadenylation. PMID:26818177

  7. Microstructural lines involving luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-01

    Japanese National Printing Bureau has been focused upon the development of anti-copy lines for many years. The basic concept with regard to security measure lies in the merge of art and technology. On this basis, our originally developed anti-copy lines show flexibility to various security designs. Our newest anti-copy lines comprising from the Tri-Branched and Divided Lines shows clearer latent image effect compared to that of our other developed anti-copy lines. However, the anti-copy effect of security printing lines with microstructure is deteriorating due to the emergence of digital image techniques with higher resolution. In this situation, this paper introduces a new security measure comprising from luminescence and security printing lines with microstructure. It gives rise to a latent image effect under UV light due to the characteristic microstructure while visually same density. The principle advantage is that the combination of the anti-copy and luminescent feature strongly enhances its secure effect in documents. There is no necessity of two kinds of inks and any specially designed equipment to produce security documents with microstructural lines involving luminescence.

  8. Applying Employee Involvement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrman, Susan Albers; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of employee-involvement approaches to the management of schools is explored, describing three approaches (parallel-suggestion involvement, job involvement, and high involvement). Design issues (technology; organizational structure; leadership; organizational boundaries, customer definition, and relation to stakeholder; measures;…

  9. Multidrug toxicity involving sumatriptan.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Jessica L; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Hughes, Rhome L; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-01-01

    A multidrug fatality involving sumatriptan is reported. Sumatriptan is a tryptamine derivative that acts at 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and is used for the treatment of migraines. The decedent was a 21-year-old white female found dead in bed by her spouse. No signs of physical trauma were observed and a large number of prescription medications were discovered at the scene. Toxicological analysis of the central blood revealed sumatriptan at a concentration of 1.03 mg/L. Following therapeutic dosing guidelines, sumatriptan concentrations do not exceed 0.095 mg/L. Sumatriptan was isolated by solid-phase extraction and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. A tissue distribution study was completed with the following concentrations measured: 0.61 mg/L in femoral blood, 0.56 mg/L in iliac blood, 5.01 mg/L in urine, 0.51 mg/kg in liver, 3.66 mg/kg in kidney, 0.09 mg/kg in heart, 0.32 mg/kg in spleen, 0.01 mg/kg in brain, 15.99 mg/kg in lung and 78.54 mg/45 mL in the stomach contents. Carisoprodol, meprobamate, fluoxetine, doxylamine, orphenadrine, dextromethorphan and hydroxyzine were also present in the blood at the following concentrations: 3.35, 2.36, 0.63, 0.19, 0.06, 0.55 and 0.16 mg/L. The medical examiner ruled the cause of death as acute mixed drug toxicity and the manner of death as accident.

  10. Exclusive Reactions Involving Pions and Nucleons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The HZETRN code requires inclusive cross sections as input. One of the methods used to calculate these cross sections requires knowledge of all exclusive processes contributing to the inclusive reaction. Conservation laws are used to determine all possible exclusive reactions involving strong interactions between pions and nucleons. Inclusive particle masses are subsequently determined and are needed in cross-section calculations for inclusive pion production.

  11. Food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-03-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient.

  12. Adolescent girls' parasocial interactions with media figures.

    PubMed

    Theran, Sally A; Newberg, Emily M; Gleason, Tracy R

    2010-01-01

    We examined aspects of adolescent girls' parasocial interactions in the context of typical development. Parasocial interactions are defined as symbolic, one-sided quasi-interactions between a viewer and a media figure. In total, 107 adolescent girls were examined; 94% reported engaging in parasocial interactions to some degree. Preoccupied attachment style predicted the degree of involvement in and emotional intensity of parasocial interactions. Results suggest that parasocial interactions are characteristic of girls with preoccupied attachment, but are also part of normative development.

  13. Nail involvement in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Engineer, L; Norton, L A; Ahmed, A R

    2000-09-01

    Nail involvement in pemphigus vulgaris is relatively rare. We describe a case of severe pemphigus involving both the skin and oral mucosa in which an acute exacerbation was preceded by the onset of nail involvement of all 4 extremities. Nail involvement occurred in the form of hemorrhagic paronychia of multiple digits. Oral, cutaneous, and nail manifestations of the disease were all well controlled by systemic therapy. A review of the literature on nail involvement in pemphigus reveals that this involvement may be manifested in multiple ways, with chronic paronychia and onychomadesis being the most common. Involvement of the nail occurs most frequently either as part of the initial presentation, or just before or concurrent with a flare of pre-existing disease. Nail involvement, when it occurs, is usually present when the disease is severe. Topical therapy is insufficient, and systemic therapy is warranted. In the majority of cases, nail recovery is complete, with no residual damage.

  14. Measuring Parent Involvement Program Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Lisa S.

    1994-01-01

    Investigates implementation of the 1990-91 New York City Parent Involvement Program. The first section summarizes the research underlying development of methodology for measuring parent involvement program implementation across diverse program sites. The second section outlines a six-step data collection and measurement methodology involving site…

  15. Measuring Involvement with Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Glen J.; Salmon, Charles T.

    A study applied research concepts from consumer product involvement to test a model for research on involvement with social issues. Issue involvement was defined as the state or level of perceived importance and/or interest evoked by a stimulus (issue) within a specific situation. Attitudes on four social issues--abortion, pornography, the…

  16. Parental Involvement in High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Donna JG

    Although parental involvement is recommended at all levels of schooling, involvement of parents at the secondary level has not been well defined in the literature. This paper presents findings of a case study that examined three high schools with varying levels of parental involvement--the first, a large high school with a predominantly working…

  17. Families Get Involved! Learning Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Media and Information Services.

    Noting that families who are involved in their children's education make a difference in their child's performance, this two-page information sheet encourages families to get involved by listing the benefits of family involvement on one side and the ways adult family members can help in the school on the other. As a result of family participation:…

  18. Collisional and dissociative processes involving molecular free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.; Alexander, Millard H.

    1995-04-01

    A collaborative experimental and theoretical study of a number of elementary collisional processes involving small molecular free radicals of importance in combustion and in the decomposition of propellants has been carried out. These have involved chemical reactions and photodissociation, as well as nonreactive collision-induced rotational and electronic transitions. Information on non-bonding interactions involving free radicals was also obtained from analysis of the electronic spectrum of van der Waals complexes of these species.

  19. Josef Alber's "Interaction of Color": From Print to Interactive Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, Jerry; Roberts, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of interactive, multimedia courseware based on Josef Alber's book, "Interaction of Color." Alber's ideas and teachings on the perceptions of color are explained, and steps involving computer graphics, hardware, and software that resulted in the use of CD-ROM and videodisc with an Apple Macintosh II are detailed.…

  20. Interactive Cultural Cultivating in FLT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Youwen

    2010-01-01

    Culture cultivating in foreign language teaching (FLT) is usually conducted through factual introductions in the form of articles, books, seminars, lectures or workshops. This approach regards L2 learners as passive receivers of cultural knowledge without their interaction involved. This paper aims at raising an interactive approach to develop L2…

  1. Distinguishing Ordinal and Disordinal Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widaman, Keith F.; Helm, Jonathan L.; Castro-Schilo, Laura; Pluess, Michael; Stallings, Michael C.; Belsky, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Re-parameterized regression models may enable tests of crucial theoretical predictions involving interactive effects of predictors that cannot be tested directly using standard approaches. First, we present a re-parameterized regression model for the Linear x Linear interaction of 2 quantitative predictors that yields point and interval estimates…

  2. Chasing Ecological Interactions.

    PubMed

    Jordano, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Basic research on biodiversity has concentrated on individual species-naming new species, studying distribution patterns, and analyzing their evolutionary relationships. Yet biodiversity is more than a collection of individual species; it is the combination of biological entities and processes that support life on Earth. To understand biodiversity we must catalog it, but we must also assess the ways species interact with other species to provide functional support for the Tree of Life. Ecological interactions may be lost well before the species involved in those interactions go extinct; their ecological functions disappear even though they remain. Here, I address the challenges in studying the functional aspects of species interactions and how basic research is helping us address the fast-paced extinction of species due to human activities.

  3. Chasing Ecological Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Basic research on biodiversity has concentrated on individual species—naming new species, studying distribution patterns, and analyzing their evolutionary relationships. Yet biodiversity is more than a collection of individual species; it is the combination of biological entities and processes that support life on Earth. To understand biodiversity we must catalog it, but we must also assess the ways species interact with other species to provide functional support for the Tree of Life. Ecological interactions may be lost well before the species involved in those interactions go extinct; their ecological functions disappear even though they remain. Here, I address the challenges in studying the functional aspects of species interactions and how basic research is helping us address the fast-paced extinction of species due to human activities. PMID:27631692

  4. Anal involvement in pemphigus vularis.

    PubMed

    Khezri, Somayeh; Mahmoudi, Hamid-Reza; Masoom, Seyedeh Nina; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Balighi, Kamran; Hosseini, S Hamed; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucosa. Anal mucosa may be involved in PV, but the frequency and clinical profile are not fully ascertained. Objective. The aim was to investigate the involvement of the anal area in newly diagnosed PV patients. Patients and Methods. A total of 168 consecutive newly diagnosed PV patients were enrolled. Anal symptoms and signs, involvement of other body sites, and severity of disease were recorded. Results. A total of 47 out of 168 patients (27.9%) had involvement of the anal area. Anal involvement was significantly associated with PV lesions in ophthalmic (P = 0.03), nasal (P = 0.02), and genital mucosa (P < 0.001) but not the oral cavity (P = 0.24). There was a significant association between number of involved mucosal sites and anal involvement (P < 0.001). Anal involvement was associated with oral severity (P = 0.02). Constipation was the most frequent symptom (73.8%) followed by pain on defecation (50%). Seventeen patients (36%) were symptom-free. Erosion was the most frequent sign (91.5%). Conclusion. Anal involvement in PV seems to be more frequent than previously assumed. Routine anal examination is recommended even in asymptomatic patients as anal involvement appears to correlate with the severity of PV.

  5. Sacroiliac joint involvement in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kaçar, Cahit; Sezer, Ilhan; Kocabaş, Hilal; Cay, Hasan Fatih; Cevikol, Can; Alpsoy, Erkan; Melikoğlu, Meltem Alkan; Akman, Ayşe

    2010-07-01

    Psoriasis is a skin disorder that is associated with arthritis. Sacroiliac joint involvement is considered to be less frequent than the other types of psoriatic arthritis. Additionally, the psoriatic sacroiliitis is considered to be asymmetric in general. We aimed to define the frequency and type of sacroiliac involvement in patients with psoriasis. Patients with psoriasis were included the study. Characteristics of skin, nail and articular involvement were noted. Psoriasis area and severity index was calculated. Antero-posterior pelvic X-rays were obtained and graded by two rheumatologists and a radiologist independently. One hundred and thirty-three patients were included. Thirty-seven of patients (27%) have articular involvement symptomatically. The sacroiliac joint involvement was observed in 34 (26%) of patients. More than one-half of sacroiliac involvement was bilateral while less than one-half was in symptomatic patients regarding sacroiliitis. Fifty-seven percentages of all patients have psoriatic nail involvement. Sacroiliac joint involvement did not show any significant association with psoriatic nail involvement or the severity of skin disease. We found higher frequency of sacroiliac joint involvement and bilateral sacroiliitis in patients with psoriasis. This is in contrast to present information about the association of psoriasis and sacroiliitis. These findings need confirmation by further studies and with more sophisticated techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Monoarticular Hip Involvement in Pseudogout

    PubMed Central

    Kocyigit, Figen; Kuyucu, Ersin; Kocyigit, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Pseudogout is the acutest form of arthritis in the elderly. Although clinical manifestations vary widely, polyarticular involvement is typical mimicking osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Monoarticular involvement is relatively rare and is generally provoked by another medical condition. There are reported cases of hip involvement by pseudogout in monoarticular form. However, all of the cases were presented as septic arthritis. In this report, we present a case of monoarticular hip involvement mimicking soft tissue abscess. We confirmed the pseudogout diagnosis after ultrasonographic evaluation of the involved hip joint and pathological and biochemical analysis of synovial fluid analysis. Diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary medical and surgical treatment in cases of the bizarre involvement of hip in pseudogout. PMID:25838961

  7. Interacting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Nixon, C. W.; Rotevatn, A.; Sanderson, D. J.; Zuluaga, L. F.

    2017-04-01

    The way that faults interact with each other controls fault geometries, displacements and strains. Faults rarely occur individually but as sets or networks, with the arrangement of these faults producing a variety of different fault interactions. Fault interactions are characterised in terms of the following: 1) Geometry - the spatial arrangement of the faults. Interacting faults may or may not be geometrically linked (i.e. physically connected), when fault planes share an intersection line. 2) Kinematics - the displacement distributions of the interacting faults and whether the displacement directions are parallel, perpendicular or oblique to the intersection line. Interacting faults may or may not be kinematically linked, where the displacements, stresses and strains of one fault influences those of the other. 3) Displacement and strain in the interaction zone - whether the faults have the same or opposite displacement directions, and if extension or contraction dominates in the acute bisector between the faults. 4) Chronology - the relative ages of the faults. This characterisation scheme is used to suggest a classification for interacting faults. Different types of interaction are illustrated using metre-scale faults from the Mesozoic rocks of Somerset and examples from the literature.

  8. Propeller/wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkowski, David P.; Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The present experimental investigation of the steady-state and unsteady-state effects due to the interaction between a tractor propeller's wake and a wing employs, in the steady case, wind tunnel measurements at low subsonic speed; results are obtained which demonstrate wing performance response to variations in configuration geometry. Other steady-state results involve the propeller-hub lift and side-force due to the wing's influence on the propeller. The unsteady effects of interaction were studied through flow visualization of propeller-tip vortex distortion over a wing, again using a tractor-propeller configuration.

  9. Imagined Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeycutt, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Social scientists have been studying imagined interactions since the mid-1980s and have measured numerous physiological correlates (Honeycutt, 2010). In this commentary I assess the research reported in Crisp and Turner (May-June 2009) and highlight the underlying mechanisms of imagined interactions that have empirically been laid out across…

  10. Preparing Teachers for Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Daniel

    This paper examines the potential impact of parent involvement in the formal education of their children and suggests ways that teacher education can be restructured to prepare teachers to work with parents. This paper attempts to answer five questions: (1) Why should parents be involved in the formal education of their children? (2) Why should…

  11. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  12. Parent Involvement: Support or Stress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Carol

    1985-01-01

    Argues for a reexamination of goals and methods of traditional parent involvement which has revolved around the welfare of children rather than emphasizing the benefits for parents themselves. Calls for a reconceptualization of parent involvement based on: (1) being sensitive to family needs, (2) offering real support for families, and (3)…

  13. A Handbook for Community Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Administrative Services.

    To help Georgia school administrators, educators, and community members, this handbook suggests ideas and plans for strengthening school-community relations and increasing community involvement in schools. The first section lays out the four steps district administrators should take in developing a systemwide community involvement program,…

  14. Employee involvement: motivation or manipulation?

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1998-03-01

    Employee involvement is subject to a great deal of verbal tribute; there is hardly a manager at work today who will not praise the value of employee input. However, many employee involvement efforts leave employees feeling more manipulated than motivated. This occurs because supervisors and managers, while expecting employees to change the way they work, are themselves either unwilling to change or remain unconscious of the need to change. The result is that, although employee input is regularly solicited in a number of forms, it is often discounted, ignored, or altered to fit the manager's preconceptions. Often the employee is left feeling manipulated. Since the opportunity for involvement can be a strong motivator, it becomes the manager's task to learn how to provide involvement opportunity in manipulative fashion. This can be accomplished by providing involvement opportunity accompanied by clear outcome expectations and allowing employees the freedom to pursue those outcomes in their own way.

  15. Interaction with Machine Improvisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assayag, Gerard; Bloch, George; Cont, Arshia; Dubnov, Shlomo

    We describe two multi-agent architectures for an improvisation oriented musician-machine interaction systems that learn in real time from human performers. The improvisation kernel is based on sequence modeling and statistical learning. We present two frameworks of interaction with this kernel. In the first, the stylistic interaction is guided by a human operator in front of an interactive computer environment. In the second framework, the stylistic interaction is delegated to machine intelligence and therefore, knowledge propagation and decision are taken care of by the computer alone. The first framework involves a hybrid architecture using two popular composition/performance environments, Max and OpenMusic, that are put to work and communicate together, each one handling the process at a different time/memory scale. The second framework shares the same representational schemes with the first but uses an Active Learning architecture based on collaborative, competitive and memory-based learning to handle stylistic interactions. Both systems are capable of processing real-time audio/video as well as MIDI. After discussing the general cognitive background of improvisation practices, the statistical modelling tools and the concurrent agent architecture are presented. Then, an Active Learning scheme is described and considered in terms of using different improvisation regimes for improvisation planning. Finally, we provide more details about the different system implementations and describe several performances with the system.

  16. Ocular involvement in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Akhyani, Maryam; Keshtkar-Jafari, Alireza; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda; Lajevardi, Vahide; Beigi, Sara; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Rayati Damavandi, Maede; Arami, Shabnam

    2014-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disorder affecting the skin and mucous membranes. Ocular involvement in PV has been reported but its prevalence and clinical characteristics are not well defined. This prospective cross-sectional study of 103 PV patients was designed to determine the prevalence, clinical types and epidemiological trends of ocular involvement in a population of Iranian patients with PV. Ocular involvement was present in 17 (16.5%) patients. Conjunctivitis was the most prevalent type of ocular involvement (9/17, 52.9%), followed by erosion of the palpebral conjunctiva (7/17, 41.2%). Erosion of the bulbar conjunctiva was noted in only one patient (5.9%). The most commonly reported symptoms were eye irritation (76.5%) and redness (76.5%). No significant relation was found between ocular involvement and disease activity (partial remission or relapse). Mucoid discharge was significantly more common in patients with conjunctival erosions as compared to patients with conjunctivitis (P = 0.038). We conclude that ocular involvement is not rare in PV; 16.5% of PV patients develop ocular disease independent of the disease activity and extension. Conjunctivitis is the most common type of involvement, however, palpebral conjunctival erosion is more frequent than previously realized.

  17. Interacting parasites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitism is the most popular life-style on Earth, and many vertebrates host more than one kind of parasite at a time. A common assumption is that parasite species rarely interact, because they often exploit different tissues in a host, and this use of discrete resources limits competition (1). On page 243 of this issue, however, Telfer et al. (2) provide a convincing case of a highly interactive parasite community in voles, and show how infection with one parasite can affect susceptibility to others. If some human parasites are equally interactive, our current, disease-by-disease approach to modeling and treating infectious diseases is inadequate (3).

  18. Magnetoreception through Cryptochrome May Involve Superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the last decades, it has been demonstrated that many animal species orient in the Earth magnetic field. One of the best-studied examples is the use of the geomagnetic field by migratory birds for orientation and navigation. However, the biophysical mechanism underlying animal magnetoreception is still not understood. One theory for magnetoreception in birds invokes the so-called radical-pair model. This mechanism involves a pair of reactive radicals, whose chemical fate can be influenced by the orientation with respect to the magnetic field of the Earth through Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. The fact that the geomagnetic field is weak, i.e., ∼0.5 G, puts a severe constraint on the radical pair that can establish the magnetic compass sense. For a noticeable change of the reaction yield in a redirected geomagnetic field, the hyperfine interaction has to be as weak as the Earth field Zeeman interaction, i.e., unusually weak for an organic compound. Such weak hyperfine interaction can be achieved if one of the radicals is completely devoid of this interaction as realized in a radical pair containing an oxygen molecule as one of the radicals. Accordingly, we investigate here a possible radical pair-based reaction in the photoreceptor cryptochrome that reduces the protein's flavin group from its signaling state FADH• to the inactive state FADH– (which reacts to the likewise inactive FAD) by means of the superoxide radical, O2•–. We argue that the spin dynamics in the suggested reaction can act as a geomagnetic compass and that the very low physiological concentration (nM-μM) of otherwise toxic O2•– is sufficient, even favorable, for the biological function. PMID:19527640

  19. 2009 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  20. EPA Community Involvement Training Conferences

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  1. 2013 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  2. 2011 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  3. 2015 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  4. Community Involvement During Emergency Responses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Involvement occurs in different forms, but is always geared towards improving the public's understanding of the presence of hazardous substances in the community, and how to address any issues that may arise.

  5. 2007 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  6. Public Involvement in BOSC Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA policy and the Federal Advisory Committee Act provide for public involvement in committee activities primarily by open access to meetings and records and by providing the public an opportunity to submit comments to the committee.

  7. 2017 Community Involvement Training Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training event that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs, t

  8. Public involvement in research: making sense of the diversity.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Sandy; Liabo, Kristin; Stewart, Ruth; Rees, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a coherent framework for designing and evaluating public involvement in research by drawing on an extensive literature and the authors' experience. The framework consists of three key interrelated dimensions: the drivers for involvement; the processes for involvement and the impact of involvement. The pivotal point in this framework is the opportunity for researchers and others to exchange ideas. This opportunity results from the processes which bring them together and which support their debates and decisions. It is also the point at which research that is in the public interest is open to public influence and the point at which the interaction can also influence anyone directly involved. Judicious choice of methods for bringing people together, and supporting their debate and decisions, depends upon the drivers of those involved; these vary with their characteristics, particularly their degree of enthusiasm and experience, and their motivation.

  9. Polymer-Nucleic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhuang-Lin; Xia, Yi-Qi; Yang, Qiu-Song; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Gene therapy is an important therapeutic strategy in the treatment of a wide range of genetic disorders. Polymers forming stable complexes with nucleic acids (NAs) are non-viral gene carriers. The self-assembly of polymers and nucleic acids is typically a complex process that involves many types of interaction at different scales. Electrostatic interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and hydrogen bonds are three important and prevalent interactions in the polymer/nucleic acid system. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds are the main driving forces for the condensation of nucleic acids, while hydrophobic interactions play a significant role in the cellular uptake and endosomal escape of polymer-nucleic acid complexes. To design high-efficiency polymer candidates for the DNA and siRNA delivery, it is necessary to have a detailed understanding of the interactions between them in solution. In this chapter, we survey the roles of the three important interactions between polymers and nucleic acids during the formation of polyplexes and summarize recent understandings of the linear polyelectrolyte-NA interactions and dendrimer-NA interactions. We also review recent progress optimizing the gene delivery system by tuning these interactions.

  10. [Neurological involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis].

    PubMed

    Asakura, Kunihiko; Muto, Tatsuro

    2013-11-01

    Abstract Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare autoimmune disease associated with granulomatous inflammation and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small vessel vasculitis. Following the discovery of ANCA, ANCA-associated vasculitis is established as a disease entity of Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. Clinical and experimental studies have provided evidences that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3), which are major antigenic targets for ANCA in neutrophils, are not only disease markers but also involved in the pathogenesis. In addition, recent studies have revealed another potential antigen for ANCA, lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2). Though nervous system manifestations of Wegener's granulomatosis are less frequent than classical manifestations in the lungs and kidneys, 20-50% of patients demonstrate neurological involvements. Peripheral nervous system involvement (in generalized Wegener's granulomatosis) is more frequent than central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Multiple mononeuropathy and multiple cranial neuropathy are the most prevalent symptoms. CNS manifestations include cerebrovascular events, pachymeningitis, seizures, and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Here we discuss the pathogenic mechanism of ANCA and review the literature regarding neurological involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis.

  11. Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karsch, F.; Vogelsang, V.

    2009-09-29

    We will give here an overview of our theory of the strong interactions, Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and its properties. We will also briefly review the history of the study of the strong interactions, and the discoveries that ultimately led to the formulation of QCD. The strong force is one of the four known fundamental forces in nature, the others being the electromagnetic, the weak and the gravitational force. The strong force, usually referred to by scientists as the 'strong interaction', is relevant at the subatomic level, where it is responsible for the binding of protons and neutrons to atomic nuclei. To do this, it must overcome the electric repulsion between the protons in an atomic nucleus and be the most powerful force over distances of a few fm (1fm=1 femtometer=1 fermi=10{sup -15}m), the typical size of a nucleus. This property gave the strong force its name.