Science.gov

Sample records for interactive influence diagrams

  1. Markov Influence Diagrams.

    PubMed

    Díez, Francisco J; Yebra, Mar; Bermejo, Iñigo; Palacios-Alonso, Miguel A; Calleja, Manuel Arias; Luque, Manuel; Pérez-Martín, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    Markov influence diagrams (MIDs) are a new type of probabilistic graphical model that extends influence diagrams in the same way that Markov decision trees extend decision trees. They have been designed to build state-transition models, mainly in medicine, and perform cost-effectiveness analyses. Using a causal graph that may contain several variables per cycle, MIDs can model various patient characteristics without multiplying the number of states; in particular, they can represent the history of the patient without using tunnel states. OpenMarkov, an open-source tool, allows the decision analyst to build and evaluate MIDs-including cost-effectiveness analysis and several types of deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis-with a graphical user interface, without writing any code. This way, MIDs can be used to easily build and evaluate complex models whose implementation as spreadsheets or decision trees would be cumbersome or unfeasible in practice. Furthermore, many problems that previously required discrete event simulation can be solved with MIDs; i.e., within the paradigm of state-transition models, in which many health economists feel more comfortable.

  2. Influence Diagrams: Automated Analysis with Dynamic Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    demonstrating both the efficiency of the dynamic programming features and the limitations of influence diagrams in modeling problems with significant...Introduction 1.1 General Background Influence diagrams are a -eccntly developed graphical modeling tool for repre- senting both the conceptual elements and the...the model [9:10]. The types of node included in basic influence diagrams are (see Figure 1): Chance Node The chance node represents a random variable

  3. CADDIS Volume 5. Causal Databases: Interactive Conceptual Diagrams (ICDs)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In Interactive Conceptual Diagram (ICD) section of CADDIS allows users to create conceptual model diagrams, search a literature-based evidence database, and then attach that evidence to their diagrams.

  4. Medical Reasoning with Rough-Set Influence Diagrams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Hui

    2015-08-01

    There are several advantages to evaluating a problem using influence diagram operations. The analyst can use a representation that is natural to the decision maker, since the algorithm executes all of the inference and analysis automatically. The influence diagram solution procedure can also result in significant gains in efficiency. Conditional independence is clearly exhibited in the diagram, so the size of intermediate calculations can be reduced, resulting in considerable reductions in both processing time and memory requirements. However, when imprecise knowledge from data sets is involved in the systems, how to reason from approximate information becomes a main issue in evaluating influence diagrams effectively. This study develops an alternative knowledge model, rough-set influence diagrams (RSID), which combine rough-set decision rules and graphical structures of influence diagrams in medical settings. The proposed RSID provides a comprehensive schema for knowledge representation and decision support.

  5. Influence diagrams as oil spill decision science tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    Making inferences on risks to ecosystem services (ES) from ecological crises can be more reliably handled using decision science tools. Influence diagrams (IDs) are probabilistic networks that explicitly represent the decisions related to a problem and evidence of their influence...

  6. Influence diagrams as oil spill decision science tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    Making inferences on risks to ecosystem services (ES) from ecological crises can be more reliably handled using decision science tools. Influence diagrams (IDs) are probabilistic networks that explicitly represent the decisions related to a problem and evidence of their influence...

  7. Influence Diagram Use With Respect to Technology Planning and Investment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel J. H.; DeHoff, Bryan; Rhodes, Russel E.

    2009-01-01

    Influence diagrams are relatively simple, but powerful, tools for assessing the impact of choices or resource allocations on goals or requirements. They are very general and can be used on a wide range of problems. They can be used for any problem that has defined goals, a set of factors that influence the goals or the other factors, and a set of inputs. Influence diagrams show the relationship among a set of results and the attributes that influence them and the inputs that influence the attributes. If the results are goals or requirements of a program, then the influence diagram can be used to examine how the requirements are affected by changes to technology investment. This paper uses an example to show how to construct and interpret influence diagrams, how to assign weights to the inputs and attributes, how to assign weights to the transfer functions (influences), and how to calculate the resulting influences of the inputs on the results. A study is also presented as an example of how using influence diagrams can help in technology planning and investment. The Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) used this technique to examine the impact of R&D spending on the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) of a space transportation system. The question addressed was the effect on the recurring and the non-recurring portions of LCC of the proportion of R&D resources spent to impact technology objectives versus the proportion spent to impact operational dependability objectives. The goals, attributes, and the inputs were established. All of the linkages (influences) were determined. The weighting of each of the attributes and each of the linkages was determined. Finally the inputs were varied and the impacts on the LCC determined and are presented. The paper discusses how each of these was accomplished both for credibility and as an example for future studies using influence diagrams for technology planning and investment planning.

  8. Phase diagram of two interacting helical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raul A.; Gutman, D. B.; Carr, Sam T.

    2016-06-01

    We consider two coupled time-reversal-invariant helical edge modes of the same helicity, such as would occur on two stacked quantum spin Hall insulators. In the presence of interaction, the low-energy physics is described by two collective modes, one corresponding to the total current flowing around the edge and the other one describing relative fluctuations between the two edges. We find that quite generically, the relative mode becomes gapped at low temperatures, but only when tunneling between the two helical modes is nonzero. There are two distinct possibilities for the gapped state depending on the relative size of different interactions. If the intraedge interaction is stronger than the interedge interaction, the state is characterized as a spin-nematic phase. However, in the opposite limit, when the interaction between the helical edge modes is strong compared to the interaction within each mode, a spin-density wave forms, with emergent topological properties. First, the gap protects the conducting phase against localization by weak nonmagnetic impurities; second, the protected phase hosts localized zero modes on the ends of the edge that may be created by sufficiently strong nonmagnetic impurities.

  9. Phase diagram and critical end point for strongly interacting quarks.

    PubMed

    Qin, Si-xue; Chang, Lei; Chen, Huan; Liu, Yu-xin; Roberts, Craig D

    2011-04-29

    We introduce a method based on chiral susceptibility, which enables one to draw a phase diagram in the chemical-potential-temperature plane for strongly interacting quarks whose interactions are described by any reasonable gap equation, even if the diagrammatic content of the quark-gluon vertex is unknown. We locate a critical end point at (μ(E),T(E))∼(1.0,0.9)T(c), where T(c) is the critical temperature for chiral-symmetry restoration at μ=0, and find that a domain of phase coexistence opens at the critical end point whose area increases as a confinement length scale grows.

  10. Phase diagrams of hard spheres with algebraic attractive interactions.

    PubMed

    Camp, Philip J

    2003-01-01

    The phase diagrams of systems made up of hard spheres interacting with attractive potentials of the form -1/r(3+sigma) are calculated using Monte Carlo simulations, second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, and an augmented van der Waals theory. In simulations of the systems with sigma=0.1, 1, and 3, fluid-solid coexistence results are obtained using the Gibbs-Duhem integration technique; simulation data for the vapor-liquid coexistence envelopes and critical points are taken from previously published work [P. J. Camp and G. N. Patey, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 399 (2001)]. It is shown that the agreement between the theoretical and simulated phase diagrams improves as the range of the potential is increased, reflecting the decreasing role of short-range correlations in determining the bulk thermodynamics. In the extreme case of sigma=0.1 both theories are in excellent agreement with simulations. Phase diagrams for systems with sigma=4, 5, and 6 are computed using second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory. The results indicate that the vapor-liquid transition becomes metastable with respect to freezing when sigma > or approximately equal to 5, in broad agreement with results for the hard-sphere attractive Yukawa system which is commonly used to model colloidal particles, globular proteins, and nanoparticles.

  11. Phase diagram and entanglement of two interacting topological Kitaev chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herviou, Loïc; Mora, Christophe; Le Hur, Karyn

    2016-04-01

    A superconducting wire described by a p -wave pairing and a Kitaev Hamiltonian exhibits Majorana fermions at its edges and is topologically protected by symmetry. We consider two Kitaev wires (chains) coupled by a Coulomb-type interaction and study the complete phase diagram using analytical and numerical techniques. A topological superconducting phase with four Majorana fermions occurs until moderate interactions between chains. For large interactions, both repulsive and attractive, by analogy with the Hubbard model, we identify Mott phases with Ising-type magnetic order. For repulsive interactions, the Ising antiferromagnetic order favors the occurrence of orbital currents spontaneously breaking time-reversal symmetry. By strongly varying the chemical potentials of the two chains, quantum phase transitions towards fully polarized (empty or full) fermionic chains occur. In the Kitaev model, the quantum critical point separating the topological superconducting phase and the polarized phase belongs to the universality class of the critical Ising model in two dimensions. When increasing the Coulomb interaction between chains, then we identify an additional phase corresponding to two critical Ising theories (or two chains of Majorana fermions). We confirm the existence of such a phase from exact mappings and from the concept of bipartite fluctuations. We show the existence of negative logarithmic corrections in the bipartite fluctuations, as a reminiscence of the quantum critical point in the Kitaev model. Other entanglement probes such as bipartite entropy and entanglement spectrum are also used to characterize the phase diagram. The limit of large interactions can be reached in an equivalent setup of ultracold atoms and Josephson junctions.

  12. Phase diagram of the interacting Majorana chain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Armin; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Franz, Marcel; Affleck, Ian

    2015-12-01

    The Hubbard and spinless fermion chains are paradigms of strongly correlated systems, very well understood using the Bethe ansatz, density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), and field theory/renormalization group (RG) methods. They have been applied to one-dimensional materials and have provided important insights for understanding higher-dimensional cases. Recently, an interacting fermion model has been introduced, with possible applications to topological materials. It has a single Majorana fermion operator on each lattice site and interactions with the shortest possible range that involve four sites. We present a thorough analysis of the phase diagram of this model in one dimension using field-theory/RG and DMRG methods. It includes a gapped supersymmetric region and a gapless phase with coexisting Luttinger liquid and Ising degrees of freedom. In addition to a first-order transition, three critical points occur: tricritical Ising, Lifshitz, and a generalization of the commensurate-incommensurate transition. We also survey various gapped phases of the system that arise when the translation symmetry is broken by dimerization and find both trivial and topological phases with 0, 1, and 2 Majorana zero modes bound to the edges of the chain with open boundary conditions.

  13. Using Bayesian influence diagrams to assess organizational performance in 4 California county health departments, April-July 2009.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Louise K; Scheinert, Steve; Yeo, Jungwon; Schuh, Russell; Duran, Luis; Potter, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    A Bayesian influence diagram is used to analyze interactions among operational units of county health departments. This diagram, developed using Bayesian network analysis, represents a novel method of analyzing the internal performance of county health departments that were operating under the simultaneous constraints of budget cuts and increased demand for services during the H1N1 threat in California, April-July 2009. This analysis reveals the interactions among internal organizational units that degrade performance under stress or, conversely, enable a county health department to manage heavy demands effectively.

  14. Phase diagram and thermal properties of strong-interaction matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Chen, Jing; Liu, Yu-Xin; Qin, Si-Xue; Roberts, Craig D.; Schmidt, Sebastian M.

    2016-05-20

    We introduce a novel method for computing the (μ, T)-dependent pressure in continuum QCD, from which we obtain a complex phase diagram and predictions for thermal properties of the dressed-quark component of the system, providing the in-medium behavior of the related trace anomaly, speed of sound, latent heat, and heat capacity.

  15. Phase diagram and thermal properties of strong-interaction matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Chen, Jing; Liu, Yu-Xin; Qin, Si-Xue; Roberts, Craig D.; Schmidt, Sebastian M.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a novel method for computing the (μ , T )-dependent pressure in continuum QCD, from which we obtain a complex phase diagram and predictions for thermal properties of the dressed-quark component of the system, providing the in-medium behavior of the related trace anomaly, speed of sound, latent heat, and heat capacity.

  16. Phase diagram of harmonically confined one-dimensional fermions with attractive and repulsive interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, V. L. Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2005-12-15

    We construct the complete U-{mu} phase diagram for harmonically confined ultracold fermionic atoms with repulsive and attractive interactions({mu} is the chemical potential and U the interaction strength). Our approach is based on density-functional theory, and employs analytical expressions for the kinetic and correlation energy functionals, permitting us to obtain closed expressions for all phase boundaries and characteristic lines of the phase diagram, both for repulsive and attractive interactions.

  17. Influence Diagrams as Decision-Making Tools for Pesticide Risk Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pesticide policy arena is filled with discussion of probabilistic approaches to assess ecological risk, however, similar discussions about implementing formal probabilistic methods in pesticide risk decision making are less common. An influence diagram approach is proposed f...

  18. Influence Diagrams as Decision-Making Tools for Pesticide Risk Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pesticide policy arena is filled with discussion of probabilistic approaches to assess ecological risk, however, similar discussions about implementing formal probabilistic methods in pesticide risk decision making are less common. An influence diagram approach is proposed f...

  19. Interactive Land-Use Optimization Using Laguerre Voronoi Diagram with Dynamic Generating Point Allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaidee, S.; Pakawanwong, P.; Suppakitpaisarn, V.; Teerasawat, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we devise an efficient method for the land-use optimization problem based on Laguerre Voronoi diagram. Previous Voronoi diagram-based methods are more efficient and more suitable for interactive design than discrete optimization-based method, but, in many cases, their outputs do not satisfy area constraints. To cope with the problem, we propose a force-directed graph drawing algorithm, which automatically allocates generating points of Voronoi diagram to appropriate positions. Then, we construct a Laguerre Voronoi diagram based on these generating points, use linear programs to adjust each cell, and reconstruct the diagram based on the adjustment. We adopt the proposed method to the practical case study of Chiang Mai University's allocated land for a mixed-use complex. For this case study, compared to other Voronoi diagram-based method, we decrease the land allocation error by 62.557 %. Although our computation time is larger than the previous Voronoi-diagram-based method, it is still suitable for interactive design.

  20. Interacting Weyl fermions: Phases, phase transitions, and global phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bitan; Goswami, Pallab; Juričić, Vladimir

    2017-05-01

    We study the effects of short-range interactions on a generalized three-dimensional Weyl semimetal, where the band touching points act as the (anti)monopoles of Abelian Berry curvature of strength n . We show that any local interaction has a negative scaling dimension -2 /n . Consequently, all Weyl semimetals are stable against weak short-range interactions. For sufficiently strong interactions, we demonstrate that the Weyl semimetal either undergoes a first-order transition into a band insulator or a continuous transition into a symmetry breaking phase. A translational symmetry breaking axion insulator and a rotational symmetry breaking semimetal are two prominent candidates for the broken symmetry phase. At the one-loop order, the correlation length exponent for continuous transitions is ν =n /2 , indicating their non-Gaussian nature for any n >1 . We also discuss the scaling of the thermodynamic and transport quantities in general Weyl semimetals as well as inside broken symmetry phases.

  1. Water Mediated Interactions and the Protein Folding Phase Diagram in the Temperature-Pressure Plane.

    PubMed

    Sirovetz, Brian J; Schafer, Nicholas P; Wolynes, Peter G

    2015-08-27

    The temperature-pressure behavior of two proteins, ubiquitin and λ-repressor, is explored using a realistically coarse-grained physicochemical model, the associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM). The phase diagram across the temperature-pressure plane is obtained by perturbing the water mediated interactions in the Hamiltonian systematically. The phase diagrams calculated with direct simulations along with an extended bridge sampling estimator show the main features found experimentally, including both cold- and pressure-denaturation. The denatured ensembles in different parts of the phase diagram are characterized and found to be structurally distinct. The protein energy landscape is found to be funneled throughout the phase diagram, but modest changes in the entropy and free energy of the water are found to drive both cold and pressure induced denaturation.

  2. Minimizing risks from spilled oil to ecosystem services using influence diagrams: The Deepwater Horizon spill response

    EPA Science Inventory

    Making inferences on risks to ecosystem services (ES) from ecological crises may be improved using decision science tools. Influence diagrams (IDs) are probabilistic networks that explicitly represent the decisions related to a problem and evidence of their influence on desired o...

  3. Minimizing risks from spilled oil to ecosystem services using influence diagrams: The Deepwater Horizon spill response

    EPA Science Inventory

    Making inferences on risks to ecosystem services (ES) from ecological crises may be improved using decision science tools. Influence diagrams (IDs) are probabilistic networks that explicitly represent the decisions related to a problem and evidence of their influence on desired o...

  4. Low-momentum NN interactions and all-order summation of ring diagrams of symmetric nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, L.-W.; Holt, J. W.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Brown, G. E.

    2009-05-01

    We study the equation of state for symmetric nuclear matter using a ring-diagram approach in which the particle-particle hole-hole (pphh) ring diagrams within a momentum model space of decimation scale Λ are summed to all orders. The calculation is carried out using the renormalized low-momentum nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction Vlow-k, which is obtained from a bare NN potential by integrating out the high-momentum components beyond Λ. The bare NN potentials of CD-Bonn, Nijmegen, and Idaho have been employed. The choice of Λ and its influence on the single particle spectrum are discussed. Ring-diagram correlations at intermediate momenta (k≃2fm-1) are found to be particularly important for nuclear saturation, suggesting the necessity of using a sufficiently large decimation scale so that the above momentum region is not integrated out. Using Vlow-k with Λ~3fm-1, we perform a ring-diagram computation with the above potentials, which all yield saturation energies E/A and Fermi momenta kF(0) considerably larger than the empirical values. On the other hand, similar computations with the medium-dependent Brown-Rho scaled NN potentials give satisfactory results of E/A≃-15 MeV and kF(0)≃1.4fm-1. The effect of this medium dependence is well reproduced by an empirical three-body force of the Skyrme type.

  5. Effects of interactions between depletants in phase diagrams of binary hard-sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, A.; Yoshimori, A.; Akiyama, R.

    2016-11-01

    Fluid-solid phase diagrams for binary hard-sphere systems were calculated to study the effects of interactions between depletants. Two effective potentials between large hard spheres were examined. One was the Asakura-Oosawa (AO) potential, and the other was an effective potential obtained by using an integral equation theory (IE potential). The IE potential has oscillations caused by the interactions between depletants, whereas in the AO potential, the inter-depletant correlation is ignored. The phase diagrams were obtained by using the thermodynamic perturbation theory with the density functional theory. The phase diagrams for the IE potential systems differed from those for the AO potential systems because of the inter-depletant correlation. The differences in the present calculation were caused by the first minimum of the effective potential.

  6. Phase diagram of interacting spinless fermions on the honeycomb lattice.

    PubMed

    Capponi, Sylvain

    2017-02-01

    Fermions hopping on a hexagonal lattice represent one of the most active research fields in condensed matter since the discovery of graphene in 2004 and its numerous applications. Another exciting aspect of the interplay between geometry and quantum mechanical effects is given by the Haldane model (Haldane 1988 Phys. Rev. Lett. 61 2015), where spinless fermions experiencing a certain flux pattern on the honeycomb lattice leads to the stabilization of a topological phase of matter, distinct from a Mott insulator and nowadays dubbed Chern insulator. In this context, it is crucial to understand the role of interactions and this review will describe recent results that have been obtained for a minimal model, namely spinless fermions with nearest and next-nearest neighbour density-density interactions on the honeycomb lattice at half-filling. Topics addressed include an introduction of the minimal model and a discussion of the possible instabilities of the Dirac semimetal, a presentation of various theoretical and numerical approaches, and a summary of the results with a particular emphasis on the stability or not of some exotic quantum phases such as charge ordered ones (similar to Wigner crystals) and spontaneous Chern insulator phases.

  7. Phase diagram of interacting spinless fermions on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Sylvain

    2017-02-01

    Fermions hopping on a hexagonal lattice represent one of the most active research fields in condensed matter since the discovery of graphene in 2004 and its numerous applications. Another exciting aspect of the interplay between geometry and quantum mechanical effects is given by the Haldane model (Haldane 1988 Phys. Rev. Lett. 61 2015), where spinless fermions experiencing a certain flux pattern on the honeycomb lattice leads to the stabilization of a topological phase of matter, distinct from a Mott insulator and nowadays dubbed Chern insulator. In this context, it is crucial to understand the role of interactions and this review will describe recent results that have been obtained for a minimal model, namely spinless fermions with nearest and next-nearest neighbour density-density interactions on the honeycomb lattice at half-filling. Topics addressed include an introduction of the minimal model and a discussion of the possible instabilities of the Dirac semimetal, a presentation of various theoretical and numerical approaches, and a summary of the results with a particular emphasis on the stability or not of some exotic quantum phases such as charge ordered ones (similar to Wigner crystals) and spontaneous Chern insulator phases.

  8. Solving Algebra Problems with Interactive Diagrams: Demonstration and Construction of Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naftaliev, Elena; Yerushalmy, Michal

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how students use the representation of data in a given example appearing in an interactive diagram (ID) and how they create additional examples with the ID. Students who worked with the ID that offered limited representations and tools ("illustrating ID") looked for ways to bypass the designed constraints: they changed the…

  9. Minimizing risks from spilled oil to ecosystem services using influence diagrams: the Deepwater Horizon spill response.

    PubMed

    Carriger, John F; Barron, Mace G

    2011-09-15

    Decision science tools can be used in evaluating response options and making inferences on risks to ecosystem services (ES) from ecological disasters. Influence diagrams (IDs) are probabilistic networks that explicitly represent the decisions related to a problem and their influence on desired or undesired outcomes. To examine how IDs might be useful in probabilistic risk management for spill response efforts, an ID was constructed to display the potential interactions between exposure events and the trade-offs between costs and ES impacts from spilled oil and response decisions in the DWH spill event. Quantitative knowledge was not formally incorporated but an ID platform for doing this was examined. Probabilities were assigned for conditional relationships in the ID and scenarios examining the impact of different response actions on components of spilled oil were investigated in hypothetical scenarios. Given the structure of the ID, potential knowledge gaps included understanding of the movement of oil, the ecological risk of different spill-related stressors to key receptors (e.g., endangered species, fisheries), and the need for stakeholder valuation of the ES benefits that could be impacted by a spill. Framing the Deepwater Horizon problem domain in an ID conceptualized important variables and relationships that could be optimally accounted for in preparing and managing responses in future spills. These features of the developed IDs may assist in better investigating the uncertainty, costs, and the trade-offs if large-scale, deep ocean spills were to occur again.

  10. Three body interaction effects on the phase diagram of spinor bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Sk Noor; Basu, Saurabh

    2016-10-01

    We include a three body density interaction in the Bose Hubbard model and study its effects on the phase diagram for spinor (S = 1) bosons on an optical lattice via a mean field theory. The Mott insulating (MI) phases are noted to stabilize, in the sense that the MI phases extend to larger values of the system parameters alongwith widening of the particle-hole excitation spectrum as the three body interaction term is included for both the polar (spin dependent interaction being positive) and the ferromagnetic (spin dependent interaction being negative) cases. Another remarkable feature emerges as the phase diagram corresponding to the ferromagnetic case becomes distinct from that of its spinless variant, which in the absence of the three body term is indistinguishable from that of the scalar particles. A strong coupling perturbation theory is employed to provide analytical support to the above results.

  11. AZTECA, a y-y diagram oriented interactive computer program for optical system design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo

    1995-09-01

    The Centro de Investigaciones en Optica is developing the AZTECA optical design program to exploit the full synthesis capabilities intrinsic to Delano's y-y method. Both the y- y diagram and its dual the (omega) -(omega) diagram, are manipulated in real time to introduce changes at any point or line in those diagrams. These changes result in altered new versions of the optical system by means of a specialized subroutine that incorporates the fundamental synthesis equations for those diagrams. To display results on the computer's screen as the optimization process progress, AZTECA makes wide use of the fact that the y-y and the (omega) -(omega) diagrams display graphically all the first order attributes of an optical system. This program adjoins to these features the calculation of Buchdahl's 3rd, 5th, and 7th order aberration coefficients to the output. This results in a real time display of the system's paraxial and aberrational behavior. Efficient graphic displays, the program's modular structure and an interactive mode of operation, also contribute to make the AZTECA a versatile platform. It will be further developed as a new tool for efficient optical system design.

  12. A global genetic interaction network maps a wiring diagram of cellular function.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Michael; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Koch, Elizabeth N; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Pons, Carles; Tan, Guihong; Wang, Wen; Usaj, Matej; Hanchard, Julia; Lee, Susan D; Pelechano, Vicent; Styles, Erin B; Billmann, Maximilian; van Leeuwen, Jolanda; van Dyk, Nydia; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Kuzmin, Elena; Nelson, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Srikumar, Tharan; Bahr, Sondra; Chen, Yiqun; Deshpande, Raamesh; Kurat, Christoph F; Li, Sheena C; Li, Zhijian; Usaj, Mojca Mattiazzi; Okada, Hiroki; Pascoe, Natasha; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Sharifpoor, Sara; Shuteriqi, Emira; Simpkins, Scott W; Snider, Jamie; Suresh, Harsha Garadi; Tan, Yizhao; Zhu, Hongwei; Malod-Dognin, Noel; Janjic, Vuk; Przulj, Natasa; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Stagljar, Igor; Xia, Tian; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Raught, Brian; Boutros, Michael; Steinmetz, Lars M; Moore, Claire L; Rosebrock, Adam P; Caudy, Amy A; Myers, Chad L; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2016-09-23

    We generated a global genetic interaction network for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, constructing more than 23 million double mutants, identifying about 550,000 negative and about 350,000 positive genetic interactions. This comprehensive network maps genetic interactions for essential gene pairs, highlighting essential genes as densely connected hubs. Genetic interaction profiles enabled assembly of a hierarchical model of cell function, including modules corresponding to protein complexes and pathways, biological processes, and cellular compartments. Negative interactions connected functionally related genes, mapped core bioprocesses, and identified pleiotropic genes, whereas positive interactions often mapped general regulatory connections among gene pairs, rather than shared functionality. The global network illustrates how coherent sets of genetic interactions connect protein complex and pathway modules to map a functional wiring diagram of the cell.

  13. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-25

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.

  14. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N.; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-01

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.

  15. Tuning the phase diagram of colloid-polymer mixtures via Yukawa interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González García, Álvaro; Tuinier, Remco

    2016-12-01

    Theory that predicts the phase behavior of interacting Yukawa spheres in a solution containing nonadsorbing polymer is presented. Our approach accounts for multiple overlap of depletion zones. It is found that additional Yukawa interactions beyond hard core interactions strongly affect the location and presence of coexistence regions and phase states. The theoretical phase diagrams are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between the two approaches supports the validity of the theoretical approximations made and confirms that, by choosing the parameters of the interaction potentials, tuning of the binodals is possible. The critical end point characterizes the phase diagram topology. It is demonstrated how an additional Yukawa interaction shifts this point with respect to the hard sphere case. Provided a certain depletant-to-colloid size ratio for which a stable colloidal gas-liquid phase coexistence takes place for hard spheres, added direct interactions turn this into a metastable gas-liquid equilibrium. The opposite case, the induction of a stable gas-liquid coexistence where only fluid-solid was present for hard spheres, is also reported.

  16. Tuning the phase diagram of colloid-polymer mixtures via Yukawa interactions.

    PubMed

    González García, Álvaro; Tuinier, Remco

    2016-12-01

    Theory that predicts the phase behavior of interacting Yukawa spheres in a solution containing nonadsorbing polymer is presented. Our approach accounts for multiple overlap of depletion zones. It is found that additional Yukawa interactions beyond hard core interactions strongly affect the location and presence of coexistence regions and phase states. The theoretical phase diagrams are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between the two approaches supports the validity of the theoretical approximations made and confirms that, by choosing the parameters of the interaction potentials, tuning of the binodals is possible. The critical end point characterizes the phase diagram topology. It is demonstrated how an additional Yukawa interaction shifts this point with respect to the hard sphere case. Provided a certain depletant-to-colloid size ratio for which a stable colloidal gas-liquid phase coexistence takes place for hard spheres, added direct interactions turn this into a metastable gas-liquid equilibrium. The opposite case, the induction of a stable gas-liquid coexistence where only fluid-solid was present for hard spheres, is also reported.

  17. The diagram of phase-field crystal structures: an influence of model parameters in a two-mode approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankudinov, V.; Galenko, P. K.

    2017-04-01

    Effect of phase-field crystal model (PFC-model) parameters on the structure diagram is analyzed. The PFC-model is taken in a two-mode approximation and the construction of structure diagram follows from the free energy minimization and Maxwell thermodynamic rule. The diagram of structure’s coexistence for three dimensional crystal structures [Body-Centered-Cubic (BCC), Face-Centered-Cubic (FCC) and homogeneous structures] are constructed. An influence of the model parameters, including the stability parameters, are discussed. A question about the structure diagram construction using the two-mode PFC-model with the application to real materials is established.

  18. Self-assembly of colloidal particles from evaporating droplets: role of DLVO interactions and proposition of a phase diagram.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Fang, Xiaohua; Somasundaran, Ponisseril; Attinger, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    The shape of deposits obtained from drying drops containing colloidal particles matters for technologies such as inkjet printing, microelectronics, and bioassay manufacturing. In this work, the formation of deposits during the drying of nanoliter drops containing colloidal particles is investigated experimentally with microscopy and profilometry, and theoretically with an in-house finite-element code. The system studied involves aqueous drops containing titania nanoparticles evaporating on a glass substrate. Deposit shapes from spotted drops at different pH values are measured using a laser profilometer. Our results show that the pH of the solution influences the dried deposit pattern, which can be ring-like or more uniform. The transition between these patterns is explained by considering how DLVO interactions such as the electrostatic and van der Waals forces modify the particle deposition process. Also, a phase diagram is proposed to describe how the shape of a colloidal deposit results from the competition among three flow patterns: a radial flow driven by evaporation at the wetting line, a Marangoni recirculating flow driven by surface tension gradients, and the transport of particles toward the substrate driven by DLVO interactions. This phase diagram explains three types of deposits commonly observed experimentally, such as a peripheral ring, a small central bump, or a uniform layer. Simulations and experiments are found in very good agreement.

  19. Influence of finite volume and magnetic field effects on the QCD phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdy, Niseem; Csanád, M.; Lacey, Roy A.

    2017-02-01

    The 2 + 1 SU(3) Polyakov linear sigma model is used to investigate the respective influence of a finite volume and a magnetic field on the quark-hadron phase boundary in the plane of baryon chemical potential ({μ }B) versus temperature (T) of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram. The calculated results indicate sizable shifts of the quark-hadron phase boundary to lower values of ({μ }B {and} T) for increasing magnetic field strength, and an opposite shift to higher values of ({μ }B {and} T) for decreasing system volume. Such shifts could have important implications for the extraction of the thermodynamic properties of the QCD phase diagram from heavy ion data.

  20. Folded diagrams and 1s-Od effective interactions derived from Reid and Paris nucleon-nucleon potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurpin, J.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Strottman, D.

    1983-10-01

    The sd-shell effective-interaction matrix elements are derived from the Paris and Reid potentials using a microscopic folded-diagram effective-interaction theory. A comparison of these matrix elements is carried out by calculating spectra and energy centroids for nuclei of mass 18 to 24. The folded diagrams were included by both solving for the energy-dependent effective interaction self-consistently and by including the folded diagrams explicitly. In the latter case the folded diagrams were grouped either according to the number of folds or as prescribed by the Lee and Suzuki iteration technique; the Lee-Suzuki method was found to converge better and yield the more reliable results. Special attention was given to the proper treatment of one-body connected diagrams in the calculation of the two-body effective interaction. We first calculate the (energy-dependent) G-matrix appropriate for the sd-shell for both potentials using a momentum-space matrix-inversion method which treats the Pauli exclusion operator essentially exactly. This G-matrix interaction is then used to calculate the irreducible and non- folded diagrams contained in the Q̂- box. The effective-interaction matrix elements are obtained by evaluating a Q̂- box folded diagram series. We considered four approximations for the basic Q̂- box. These were (C1) the inclusion of diagrams up to 2nd order in G, (C2) 2nd order plus hole-hole phonons, (C3) 2nd order plus (bare TDA) particle-hole phonons, and (C4) 2nd order plus both hole-hole and particle-hole phonons. The contribution of the folded diagrams was found to be quite large, typically about 30%, and to weaken the interaction. Also, due to the greater energy dependence of higher-order diagrams, the effect of folded diagrams was much greater in higher orders. That is, the contribution from higher-order diagrams for most cases was greatly reduced by the folded diagrams. The convergence of the folded-diagram series deteriorates with the inclusion of

  1. Does the process map influence the outcome of quality improvement work? A comparison of a sequential flow diagram and a hierarchical task analysis diagram.

    PubMed

    Colligan, Lacey; Anderson, Janet E; Potts, Henry W W; Berman, Jonathan

    2010-01-07

    Many quality and safety improvement methods in healthcare rely on a complete and accurate map of the process. Process mapping in healthcare is often achieved using a sequential flow diagram, but there is little guidance available in the literature about the most effective type of process map to use. Moreover there is evidence that the organisation of information in an external representation affects reasoning and decision making. This exploratory study examined whether the type of process map - sequential or hierarchical - affects healthcare practitioners' judgments. A sequential and a hierarchical process map of a community-based anti coagulation clinic were produced based on data obtained from interviews, talk-throughs, attendance at a training session and examination of protocols and policies. Clinic practitioners were asked to specify the parts of the process that they judged to contain quality and safety concerns. The process maps were then shown to them in counter-balanced order and they were asked to circle on the diagrams the parts of the process where they had the greatest quality and safety concerns. A structured interview was then conducted, in which they were asked about various aspects of the diagrams. Quality and safety concerns cited by practitioners differed depending on whether they were or were not looking at a process map, and whether they were looking at a sequential diagram or a hierarchical diagram. More concerns were identified using the hierarchical diagram compared with the sequential diagram and more concerns were identified in relation to clinical work than administrative work. Participants' preference for the sequential or hierarchical diagram depended on the context in which they would be using it. The difficulties of determining the boundaries for the analysis and the granularity required were highlighted. The results indicated that the layout of a process map does influence perceptions of quality and safety problems in a process. In

  2. Does the process map influence the outcome of quality improvement work? A comparison of a sequential flow diagram and a hierarchical task analysis diagram

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many quality and safety improvement methods in healthcare rely on a complete and accurate map of the process. Process mapping in healthcare is often achieved using a sequential flow diagram, but there is little guidance available in the literature about the most effective type of process map to use. Moreover there is evidence that the organisation of information in an external representation affects reasoning and decision making. This exploratory study examined whether the type of process map - sequential or hierarchical - affects healthcare practitioners' judgments. Methods A sequential and a hierarchical process map of a community-based anti coagulation clinic were produced based on data obtained from interviews, talk-throughs, attendance at a training session and examination of protocols and policies. Clinic practitioners were asked to specify the parts of the process that they judged to contain quality and safety concerns. The process maps were then shown to them in counter-balanced order and they were asked to circle on the diagrams the parts of the process where they had the greatest quality and safety concerns. A structured interview was then conducted, in which they were asked about various aspects of the diagrams. Results Quality and safety concerns cited by practitioners differed depending on whether they were or were not looking at a process map, and whether they were looking at a sequential diagram or a hierarchical diagram. More concerns were identified using the hierarchical diagram compared with the sequential diagram and more concerns were identified in relation to clinical work than administrative work. Participants' preference for the sequential or hierarchical diagram depended on the context in which they would be using it. The difficulties of determining the boundaries for the analysis and the granularity required were highlighted. Conclusions The results indicated that the layout of a process map does influence perceptions of quality

  3. Exact solutions and topological phase diagram in interacting dimerized Kitaev topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2017-09-01

    It was recently shown that an interacting Kitaev topological superconductor model is exactly solvable based on two-step Jordan-Wigner transformations together with one spin rotation. We generalize this model by including the dimerization, which is shown also to be exactly solvable. We analytically determine the topological phase diagram containing seven distinct phases. It is argued that the system is topological when a fermionic many-body Majorana zero-energy edge state emerges. It is intriguing that there are two tetracritical points, at each of which four distinct phases touch.

  4. Predicting the phase diagram of two-dimensional colloidal systems with long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Rosales, Sergio J; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro; Ivlev, Boris I; Ruiz-García, Jaime

    2006-11-09

    The phase diagram of a two-dimensional model system for colloidal particles at the air-water interface was determined using Monte Carlo computer simulations in the isothermic-isobaric ensemble. The micrometer-range binary colloidal interaction has been modeled by hard disklike particles interacting via a secondary minimum followed by a weaker longer-range repulsive maximum, both of the order of kBT. The repulsive part of the potential drives the clustering of particles at low densities and low temperatures. Pinned voids are formed at higher densities and intermediate values of the surface pressure. The analysis of isotherms, translational and orientational correlation functions as well as structure factor gives clear evidence of the presence of a melting first-order transition. However, the melting process can be also followed by a metastable route through a hexatic phase at low surface pressures and low temperatures, before crystalization occurs at higher surface pressure.

  5. Computational analysis of RNA-protein interaction interfaces via the Voronoi diagram.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Sedigheh; Mohades, Ali; Salehzadeh Yazdi, Ali; Jahandideh, Samad; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2012-01-21

    Cellular functions are mediated by various biological processes including biomolecular interactions, such as protein-protein, DNA-protein and RNA-protein interactions in which RNA-Protein interactions are indispensable for many biological processes like cell development and viral replication. Unlike the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, accurate mechanisms and structures of the RNA-Protein complexes are not fully understood. A large amount of theoretical evidence have shown during the past several years that computational geometry is the first pace in understanding the binding profiles and plays a key role in the study of intricate biological structures, interactions and complexes. In this paper, RNA-Protein interaction interface surface is computed via the weighted Voronoi diagram of atoms. Using two filter operations provides a natural definition for interface atoms as classic methods. Unbounded parts of Voronoi facets that are far from the complex are trimmed using modified convex hull of atom centers. This algorithm is implemented to a database with different RNA-Protein complexes extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB). Afterward, the features of interfaces have been computed and compared with classic method. The results show high correlation coefficients between interface size in the Voronoi model and the classical model based on solvent accessibility, as well as high accuracy and precision in comparison to classical model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase diagram and non-Abelian symmetry locking for fermionic mixtures with unequal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto Barros, Joao C.; Lepori, Luca; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The realization of experiments in ultracold multicomponent mixtures, also involving more atomic species, opened the way to the study of exotic quantum phases and unconventional superfluidity, as, for instance non-Abelian superfluid phases. In this paper we study the occurrence of non-Abelian symmetry-locked superfluid states in ultracold fermionic mixtures with four components, showing that such states can be studied in current day experiments with 171Yb-173Yb isotopes. We study the phase diagram in the presence of an attractive interaction between the species of two pairs of the mixture, and general (also repulsive) interactions between the species of each pair. This system can be physically realized, e.g., in mixtures of two different earth-alkaline species, both of them with two hyperfine levels selectively populated. We find an extended region of the diagram exhibiting a two-flavors superfluid symmetry-locking (TFSL) phase. The locking corresponds to the presence of a order parameter involving—in all the possible and distinct permitted ways—two fermions, one of them belonging to the first pair and the second to the other one. This TSFL phase is present also for not too large repulsive intrapair interactions and it is characterized by a global non-Abelian symmetry group obtained by locking together two independent invariance groups of the corresponding normal state. Explicit estimates are reported for the mixture of the fermionic isotopes 171Yb-173Yb , indicating that the TFSL phase can be achieved also without tuning the interactions between Yb atoms.

  7. Influence diagram of physiological and environmental factors affecting heart rate variability: an extended literature overview.

    PubMed

    Fatisson, Julien; Oswald, Victor; Lalonde, François

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) corresponds to the adaptation of the heart to any stimulus. In fact, among the pathologies affecting HRV the most, there are the cardiovascular diseases and depressive disorders, which are associated with high medical cost in Western societies. Consequently, HRV is now widely used as an index of health. In order to better understand how this adaptation takes place, it is necessary to examine which factors directly influence HRV, whether they have a physiological or environmental origin. The primary objective of this research is therefore to conduct a literature review in order to get a comprehensive overview of the subject. The system of these factors affecting HRV can be divided into the following five categories: physiological and pathological factors, environmental factors, lifestyle factors, non-modifiable factors and effects. The direct interrelationships between these factors and HRV can be regrouped into an influence diagram. This diagram can therefore serve as a basis to improve daily clinical practice as well as help design even more precise research protocols.

  8. Use of Influence Diagrams and Fuzzy Theory to Develop Assessment Method of Organizational Influences on Component Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Yoonik Kim; Kwang-Won Ahn; Chang-Hyun Chung; Kil Yoo Kim; Joon-Eon Yang

    2002-07-01

    Organization can make influences on all the systems. Especially in case of nuclear power plants in which safety is established to be one of the most important operating goals, there have been a lot of research efforts for the hardware advancement. However in recent years, it has been widely recognized that organizational factors in nuclear power plants have an important influence on the safety attitudes and the safe behavior of individuals. Until now, any means to include assessments of organizational structure in probabilistic risk assessments have not been universally accepted. The objective of this work is to develop a method to assess organizational influences on component maintenance. Influence diagrams are introduced in this method as a decision making tool and fuzzy theory is used to reflect the vagueness in considering relevance of human activities in maintenance tasks. Introducing fuzzy theory to assess the organizational factors is deemed to a somewhat new trial, which makes it possible to convert linguistic vague descriptions into mathematical ones. Fuzzy linguistic descriptions offer an alternative and often complementary language to conventional, i.e., analytic approaches to modeling systems. Among the existing methodologies to assess organizational factors, the concept of the {omega}-factor model is utilized and the mechanism that organizational factors have influences on component maintenance is evaluated through composing influence diagrams. These influences go to failure rates and eventually affect component unavailability. Further study will make it possible that the influences of organizational factors on human error probabilities are incorporated into human reliability analysis and furthermore probabilistic safety assessment. (authors)

  9. [Comparison of film-screen combination in a contrast detail diagram and with interactive image analysis. 1: Contrast detail diagram].

    PubMed

    Hagemann, G; Eichbaum, G

    1997-07-01

    The following three film-screen combinations were compared: a) a combination of anticrossover film and UV-light emitting screens, b) a combination of blue-light emitting screens and film, and c) a conventional green fluorescing screen film combination. Radiographs of a specially designed plexiglass phantom (0.2 x 0.2 x 0.12 m3) were obtained that contained bar patterns of lead and plaster (calcium sulfate) to test high and intermediate contrast resolution and bar patterns of air to test low contrast resolution, respectively. An aluminum step wedge was integrated to evaluate dose-density curves of the radiographs. The dose values for the various step thicknesses were measured as percentage of the dose value in air for 60, 81, and 117 kV. Exposure conditions were the following: 12 pulse generator, 0.6 mm focus size, 4.7 mm aluminum prefilter, a grid with 40 lines/cm (12:1), and a focus-detector distance of 1.15 m. The thresholds of visible bars of the various pattern materials were assessed by seven radiologists, one technician, and the authors. The resulting contrast detail diagram could not prove any significant differences between the three tested screen film combinations. The pairwise comparison, however, found 8 of the 18 paired differences to be statistically significant between the conventional and the two new screen-film combinations. The authors concluded that subjective visual assessment of the threshold in a contrast detail study alone is of only limited value to grade image quality if no well-defined criteria are used (BIR report 20 [1989] 137-139). The statistical approach of paired differences of the estimated means appeared to be more appropriate.

  10. DETERMINATION OF THE CREEP–FATIGUE INTERACTION DIAGRAM FOR ALLOY 617

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. K.; Carroll, L. J.; Sham, T. -L.; Lybeck, N. J.; Wright, R. N.

    2016-08-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an intermediate heat exchanger for the very high temperature reactor. To evaluate the behavior of this material in the expected service conditions, creep-fatigue testing was performed. Testing has been performed primarily on a single heat of material at 850 and 950°C for total strain ranges of 0.3 to 1% and tensile hold times as long as 240 minutes. At 850°C, increases in the tensile hold duration degraded the creep fatigue resistance, at least to the investigated strain-controlled hold time of up to 60 minutes at the 0.3% strain range and 240 minutes at the 1.0% strain range. At 950°C, the creep-fatigue cycles to failure becomes constant with increasing hold times, indicating saturation occurs at relatively short hold times. The creep and fatigue damage fractions have been calculated and plotted on a creep-fatigue interaction D-diagram. Results from earlier creep-fatigue tests at 800 and 1000°C on an additional heat of Alloy 617 are also plotted on the D-diagram. The methodology for calculating the damage fractions will be presented, and the effects of strain rate, strain range, temperature, hold time, and strain profile (i.e. holds in tension, compression or both) on the creep-fatigue damage will be explored.

  11. Two-dimensional Ising model with competing interactions: Phase diagram and low-temperature remanent disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hare, A.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Kugel, K. I.

    2009-01-01

    The two-dimensional Ising model with competing nearest-neighbor and diagonal interactions on the square lattice is studied by the transfer-matrix technique and by the Monte Carlo simulations. The phase diagram of this model is constructed with a special emphasis to the analysis of a glassy state arising as an order to disorder transition at low temperatures. Evidence of the glassy state (based, in particular, on the calculation of the average length of domain walls and on the Edwards-Anderson order parameter) and its characteristics are presented. It was shown that, in the frustrated Ising model, the domain-wall length correlates to the onset of the glassy state, that is, it may play the role of the order parameter for the Ising glass or for glasslike states in other frustrated magnetic systems.

  12. Phase diagram of weakly coupled Heisenberg spin chains subject to a uniform Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wen; Starykh, Oleg A.

    2017-06-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on spin chain materials K2CuSO4Cl2 and K2CuSO4Br2 , we theoretically investigate the problem of weakly coupled spin chains (chain exchange J , interchain J') subject to a staggered between chains, but uniform within a given chain, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction of magnitude D . In the experimentally relevant limit J'≪D ≪J of the strong DM interaction the spins on the neighboring chains are forced to rotate in opposite directions, effectively resulting in a cancellation of the interchain interaction between components of spins in the plane normal to the vector D . This has the effect of promoting a two-dimensional collinear spin density wave state, which preserves U(1) symmetry of rotations about the D axis. We also investigate response of this interesting system to an external magnetic field h and obtain the h-D phase diagrams for the two important configurations h ∥D and h ⊥D .

  13. Using Student Interactions to Foster Rule-Diagram Mapping during Problem Solving in an Intelligent Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Kirsten R.; Aleven, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    In many domains, problem solving involves the application of general domain principles to specific problem representations. In 3 classroom studies with an intelligent tutoring system, we examined the impact of (learner-generated) interactions and (tutor-provided) visual cues designed to facilitate rule-diagram mapping (where students connect…

  14. Using Student Interactions to Foster Rule-Diagram Mapping during Problem Solving in an Intelligent Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Kirsten R.; Aleven, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    In many domains, problem solving involves the application of general domain principles to specific problem representations. In 3 classroom studies with an intelligent tutoring system, we examined the impact of (learner-generated) interactions and (tutor-provided) visual cues designed to facilitate rule-diagram mapping (where students connect…

  15. Influence of V-Diagrams on 10th Grade Turkish Students' Achievement in the Subject of Mechanical Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekes, Hanife; Gonen, Selahattin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how the use of V-diagrams one of the learning techniques used in laboratory studies in experiments conducted regarding the 10th grade lesson unit of "waves" influenced students' achievements. In the study, a quasi-experimental design with a pretest and posttest control group was used. The…

  16. Interaction of yttrium with nickel and phosphorus: Phase diagram and structural chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhak, Olga; Stoyko, Stanislav; Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Shved, Olena; Oryshchyn, Stepan; Hoch, Constantin

    2013-11-15

    The interaction between the components of the ternary Y–Ni–P system has been investigated by means of electron probe microanalysis, X-ray phase and structure analyses, and the isothermal section of the phase diagram at 1070 K has been constructed for the first time. Existence of the earlier reported eight ternary phosphides of yttrium and nickel was confirmed, among them seven ternaries are daltonide compounds: YNi{sub 4}P{sub 2} (ZrFe{sub 4}Si{sub 2}-type structure), Y{sub 2}Ni{sub 12}P{sub 7} (Zr{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}P{sub 7}-type structure), Y{sub 6}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 13} (Zr{sub 6}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 13}-type structure), Y{sub 6}Ni{sub 14.9}P{sub 10.18} (own structure type), Y{sub 20}Ni{sub 42}P{sub 30.34} (Sm{sub 20}Ni{sub 41.6}P{sub 30}-type structure), Y{sub 15}Ni{sub 28}P{sub 21} (Tb{sub 15}Ni{sub 28}P{sub 21}-type structure), and YNiP (Tb{sub 1−x}NiP-type structure), whereas YNi{sub 1.66−1.78}P{sub 2} (ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure) is a berthollide compound with small homogeneity range. The crystal structures of the some ternary phosphides have been determined by X-ray powder diffraction (YNi{sub 4}P{sub 2} and YNi{sub 1.66−1.78}P{sub 2}) and single crystal diffraction (Y{sub 2}Ni{sub 12}P{sub 7}) techniques. - Graphical abstract: Structure block with the composition Ln{sub 10}M{sub 21}X{sub 15} of the homologous series of the compounds (Ln,M){sub ∼2}X. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The phase diagram of Y–Ni–P at 1070 K has been constructed. • Existence of the eight ternary phosphides of yttrium and nickel has been confirmed. • The crystal structures of YNi{sub 4}P{sub 2} and YNi{sub 1.66-1.78}P{sub 2} have been determined by powder X-ray diffraction. • The crystal structure of Y{sub 2}Ni{sub 12}P{sub 7} has been established by single crystal diffraction.

  17. An influence diagram for assessing GVHD prophylaxis after bone marrow transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Quaglini, S; Bellazzi, R; Locatelli, F; Stefanelli, M; Salvaneschi, C

    1994-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) represents one of the major complications of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Nevertheless, the occurrence of mild GVHD could be desirable in high-risk leukemic patients, due to a relapse-preventing effect known as the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. Given that different prophylactic interventions are available to prevent GVHD development, the decision problem consists in assessing both type and dosage of the drugs in order to avoid or induce GVHD, according to the specific patient's condition. The decision problem can be represented and solved by using an influence diagram. The choice of this formalism allows using new available methods for building and updating the model of the decision problem. The qualitative structure of the model and the conditional probabilities were first derived by combining literature results with a medical expert's judgement. More specifically, probabilities were initially assigned as ranges rather than as point values. Then, conditional probabilities were updated, by using a learning algorithm, as new cases became available. The authors analyzed 50 cases of pediatric patients affected by either malignant or nonmalignant diseases, undergoing BMT and receiving GVHD prophylaxis. They used the first 25 cases to adjust the initially assigned conditional probabilities, then checked the model obtained on the remaining patients. The overall performance for GVHD prediction was about 80%.

  18. Phase diagram for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with 't Hooft and eight-quark interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, B.; Moreira, J.; Osipov, A. A.; Blin, A. H.

    2010-06-01

    It is shown that the end point of the first-order transition line, which merges into a crossover regime in the phase diagram of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, extended to include the six-quark ’t Hooft and eight-quark interaction Lagrangians, is pushed toward vanishing chemical potential and higher temperatures with increasing strength of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-violating eight-quark interactions. We clarify the connection between the location of the end point in the phase diagram and the mechanism of chiral symmetry breaking at the quark level. We show how the 8q interactions affect the number of effective quark degrees of freedom. We are able to obtain the correct asymptotics for this number at large temperatures by using the Pauli-Villars regularization.

  19. Crystalline-amorphous interaction in relation to the phase diagrams of binary polymer blends containing a crystalline constituent.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Pankaj; Huang, Tsang-Min; Dayal, Pratyush; Kyu, Thein

    2008-05-22

    The present article describes an equilibrium theory for determining binary phase diagrams of various crystalline-amorphous polymer blends by taking into account the contributions from both liquid-liquid phase separation between the constituents and solid-liquid phase transition of the crystalline component. An analytical expression for determining a crystal-amorphous interaction parameter is deduced based on the solid-liquid transition, involving the solidus and liquidus lines in conjunction with the coexistence curve of an upper critical solution temperature type. Of particular importance is that the crystalline-amorphous interaction parameter can be determined directly from the melting point depression data. The present analysis is therefore different from the conventional Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, which is associated with the liquid-liquid phase separation. The validity of the present theory is tested with the experimental phase diagrams of blends of poly(ethylene oxide)/diacrylate and poly(vinyl alcohol)/cellulose.

  20. The phase diagram of a directed polymer in random media with p-spin ferromagnetic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedagedera, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We consider a directed polymer model with an additive p-spin (p>2) ferromagnetic term in the Hamiltonian. We give a rigorous proof for the specific free energy and derive the phase diagram. This model was proposed previously, and a detailed proof was given in the case p = 2, while the main result was only stated for p > 2. We give a detailed proof of the main result and show the behavior of the model as p → ∞ by constructing the phase diagram also in this case. These results are important in many applications, for instance, in telecommunication and immunology. Our major finding is that in the phase diagram for p > 2, a new transition curve (absent for p = 2) emerges between the paramagnetic region and the so-called mixed region and that the ferromagnetic region diminishes as p → ∞.

  1. On the phase diagram of the extended Hubbard model with intersite density-density interactions in the atomic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapcia, Konrad Jerzy; Robaszkiewicz, Stanisław

    2016-11-01

    The charge ordering is a phenomenon associated with inhomogeneous distribution of electron density occurring mostly in strongly correlated materials such as transition metal oxides or organic conductors. The extended Hubbard model (EHM) is one of the simplest model for description of this phenomenon. The full phase diagram of the EHM with intersite density-density interactions W1 and W2 (nearest- and next-nearest-neighbour, respectively) in the atomic limit as a function of the chemical potential has been derived in the variational approach, which treats the on-site interaction exactly and the intersite interactions within mean-field approximation. The results for arbitrary values of model parameters (in the two-sublattice assumption) reveal that the diagram has very complex structure including various (multi-)critical points. A variety of the transitions between different phases, in particular with long-range charge-order, has been found to occur on the diagram. The results presented are rigorous ones in the high-dimension limit for any W1 and W2 ≤ 0.

  2. Teaching Electron--Positron--Photon Interactions with Hands-on Feynman Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontokostas, George; Kalkanis, George

    2013-04-01

    Feynman diagrams are introduced in many physics textbooks, such as those by Alonso and Finn 1 and Serway,2 and their use in physics education has been discussed by various authors.3-5 They have an appealing simplicity and can give insight into events in the microworld. Yet students often do not understand their significance and often cannot combine the basic units of interaction—points where the world lines of two fermions and one boson meet—to construct diagrams for observed processes.

  3. Teaching Electron--Positron--Photon Interactions with Hands-on Feynman Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontokostas, George; Kalkanis, George

    2013-01-01

    Feynman diagrams are introduced in many physics textbooks, such as those by Alonso and Finn and Serway, and their use in physics education has been discussed by various authors. They have an appealing simplicity and can give insight into events in the microworld. Yet students often do not understand their significance and often cannot combine the…

  4. Teaching Electron--Positron--Photon Interactions with Hands-on Feynman Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontokostas, George; Kalkanis, George

    2013-01-01

    Feynman diagrams are introduced in many physics textbooks, such as those by Alonso and Finn and Serway, and their use in physics education has been discussed by various authors. They have an appealing simplicity and can give insight into events in the microworld. Yet students often do not understand their significance and often cannot combine the…

  5. How Different Variants of Orbit Diagrams Influence Student Explanations of the Seasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victor R.

    2010-01-01

    The cause of the seasons is often associated with a very particular alternative conception: That the earth's orbit around the sun is highly elongated, and the differences in distance result in variations in temperature. It has been suggested that the standard diagrams used to depict the earth's orbit may be in some way responsible for the initial…

  6. How Different Variants of Orbit Diagrams Influence Student Explanations of the Seasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victor R.

    2010-01-01

    The cause of the seasons is often associated with a very particular alternative conception: That the earth's orbit around the sun is highly elongated, and the differences in distance result in variations in temperature. It has been suggested that the standard diagrams used to depict the earth's orbit may be in some way responsible for the initial…

  7. Phase diagram of bosons in a two-dimensional optical lattice with infinite-range cavity-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flottat, T.; de Parny, L. de Forges; Hébert, F.; Rousseau, V. G.; Batrouni, G. G.

    2017-04-01

    A high-finesse optical cavity allows the establishment of long-range interactions between bosons in an optical lattice when most cold-atom experiments are restricted to short-range interactions. Supersolid phases have recently been experimentally observed in such systems. Using both exact quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the Gutzwiller approximation, we study the ground-state phase diagrams of a two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with infinite-range interactions which describes such experiments. In addition to superfluid and insulating Mott phases, the infinite-range checkerboard interactions introduce charge-density waves and supersolid phases. We study here the system at various particle densities, elucidate the nature of the phases and quantum phase transitions, and discuss the stability of the phases with respect to phase separation. In particular we confirm the existence and stability of a supersolid phase detected experimentally.

  8. Cancer risk and the complexity of the interactions between environmental and host factors: HENVINET interactive diagrams as simple tools for exploring and understanding the scientific evidence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of graphical/visual presentations of cancer etiology caused by environmental stressors is a process that requires combining the complex biological interactions between xenobiotics in living and occupational environment with genes (gene-environment interaction) and genomic and non-genomic based disease specific mechanisms in living organisms. Traditionally, presentation of causal relationships includes the statistical association between exposure to one xenobiotic and the disease corrected for the effect of potential confounders. Methods Within the FP6 project HENVINET, we aimed at considering together all known agents and mechanisms involved in development of selected cancer types. Selection of cancer types for causal diagrams was based on the corpus of available data and reported relative risk (RR). In constructing causal diagrams the complexity of the interactions between xenobiotics was considered a priority in the interpretation of cancer risk. Additionally, gene-environment interactions were incorporated such as polymorphisms in genes for repair and for phase I and II enzymes involved in metabolism of xenobiotics and their elimination. Information on possible age or gender susceptibility is also included. Diagrams are user friendly thanks to multistep access to information packages and the possibility of referring to related literature and a glossary of terms. Diagrams cover both chemical and physical agents (ionizing and non-ionizing radiation) and provide basic information on the strength of the association between type of exposure and cancer risk reported by human studies and supported by mechanistic studies. Causal diagrams developed within HENVINET project represent a valuable source of information for professionals working in the field of environmental health and epidemiology, and as educational material for students. Introduction Cancer risk results from a complex interaction of environmental exposures with inherited gene

  9. Influence of thermophysical properties of working fluid on the design of cryogenic turboexpanders using nsds diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Ashish A.; Ghosh, Parthasarathi

    2015-12-01

    Cryogenic turboexpanders are an essential part of liquefaction and refrigeration plants. The thermodynamic efficiency of these plants depends upon the efficiency of the turboexpander, which is the main cold generating component of these plants, and therefore, they should be designed for high thermodynamic efficiencies. Balje's [1] nsdschart, which is a contour of isentropic efficiencies plotted against specific speed and specific diameter, is commonly used for the preliminary design of cryogenic turboexpanders. But, these charts were developed based on calculations for a specific heat ratio (γ) of 1.4, and studies show that care should be taken while implementing the same for gases which have a higher γ of 1.67. Hence there is a need to investigate the extent of applicability of nsds diagram in designing expansion turbines for higher specific heat ratios. In this paper, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of cryogenic turboexpanders was carried out using Ansys CFX®. The turboexpanders were designed based on the methodologies prescribed by Kun and Sentz [2] following the nsds diagram of Balje and Hasselgruber's technique for generating blade profile. The computational results of the two cases were analysed to investigate the applicability of Balje's nsds diagram for the design of turboexpanders for refrigeration and liquefaction cycles.

  10. Generating functionals for harmonic expectation values of paths with fixed end points: Feynman diagrams for nonpolynomial interactions.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, H; Pelster, A; Bachmann, M

    1999-09-01

    We introduce a general class of generating functionals for the calculation of quantum-mechanical expectation values of arbitrary functionals of fluctuating paths with fixed end points in configuration or momentum space. The generating functionals are calculated explicitly for the harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency, and used to derive a smearing formula for correlation functions of polynomial and nonpolynomial functions of time-dependent positions and momenta. This formula summarizes the effect of quantum fluctuations, and serves to derive generalized Wick rules and Feynman diagrams for perturbation expansions of nonpolynomial interactions.

  11. Low temperature energy phase diagram for adsorption on Fcc(112) stepped surfaces with attractive first neighbor interactions.

    PubMed

    Phares, Alain J; Grumbine, David W; Wunderlich, Francis J

    2009-12-01

    The transfer matrix method developed for the study of monomer adsorption on terraces and nanotubes is applied to on top adsorption on fcc(112) stepped surfaces. The effect due to the step is taken into account by considering adsorbate-substrate interaction on step sites to be different from that on the other bulk sites. We also consider first- and second- neighbor adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, with attractive first-neighbors, thus completing the work published three years ago on repulsive first-neighbors. In the three-dimensional, low temperature energy phase diagram, other than empty and full coverage, there are eight phases: three cluster formations consisting of 4, 5, and 6 adatoms, and five stripe patterns parallel to the steps. Of the thirty-seven phases reported in the repulsive case, none exhibits clusters, and only four of them have stripes that match the ones found in the attractive case. These and other selection rules allow one to predict whether first-neighbors are attractive or repulsive, while the energy phase diagram can be used as a guide to obtain additional information on the remaining interaction energies.

  12. Third-order particle-hole ring diagrams with contact-interactions and one-pion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, N.

    2017-05-01

    The third-order particle-hole ring diagrams are evaluated for a NN-contact interaction of the Skyrme type. The pertinent four-loop coefficients in the energy per particle \\bar{E}(kf) ˜ kf^{5+2n} are reduced to double integrals over cubic expressions in Euclidean polarization functions. Dimensional regularization of divergent integrals is performed by subtracting power divergences and the validity of this method is checked against the known analytical results at second order. The complete \\mathcal{O}(p2) NN-contact interaction is obtained by adding two tensor terms and their third-order ring contributions are also calculated in detail. The third-order ring energy arising from long-range 1π -exchange is computed and it is found that direct and exchange contributions are all attractive. The very large size of the three-ring energy due to point-like 1π-exchange, \\bar{E}(k_{f0}) ˜eq -92 MeV at saturation density, is however in no way representative for that of realistic chiral NN-potentials. Moreover, the third-order (particle-particle and hole-hole) ladder diagrams are evaluated with the full \\mathcal{O}(p2) contact interaction, and the simplest three-ring contributions to the isospin-asymmetry energy A(kf)˜ kf5 are studied.

  13. Flow Effects on the Flammability Diagrams of Solid Fuels: Microgravity Influence on Ignition Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, J. L.; Walther, D. C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Steinhaus, T.; Torero, J. L.; Quintere, J. G.; Ross, H. D.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of an accidental fire in space-based facilities is a primary concern of space exploration programs. Spacecraft environments generally present low velocity air currents produced by ventilation and heating systems (of the order of 0.1 m/s), and fluctuating oxygen concentrations around that of air due to CO2 removal systems. Recent experiments of flame spread in microgravity show the spread rate to be faster and the limiting oxygen concentration lower than in normal-gravity. To date, there is not a material flammability-testing protocol that specifically addresses issues related to microgravity conditions. The present project (FIST) aims to establish a testing methodology that is suitable for the specific conditions of reduced gravity. The concepts underlying the operation of the LIFT apparatus, ASTM-E 1321-93, have been used to develop the Forced-flow Ignition and flame-Spread Test (FIST). As in the LIFT, the FIST is used to obtain the flammability diagrams of the material, i.e., graphs of ignition delay time and flame spread rate as a function of the externally applied radiant flux, but under forced flow rather than natural convection conditions, and for different oxygen concentrations. Although the flammability diagrams are similar, the flammability properties obtained with the FIST are found to depend on the flow characteristics. A research program is currently underway with the purpose of implementing the FIST as a protocol to characterize the flammability performance of solid materials to be used in microgravity facilities. To this point, tests have been performed with the FIST apparatus in both normal-gravity and microgravity conditions to determine the effects of oxidizer flow characteristics on the flammability diagrams of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) fuel samples. The experiments are conducted at reduced gravity in a KC- 135 aircraft following a parabolic flight trajectory that provides up to 25 seconds of low gravity. The objective of the

  14. Influence of trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Giampaolo, S.M.; Illuminati, F.; Mazzarella, G.; De Siena, S.

    2004-12-01

    We study the effect of external trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We introduce a generalized Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that includes the structure of the energy levels of the trapping potential, and show that these levels are in general populated both at finite and zero temperature. We characterize the properties of the superfluid transition for this situation and compare them with those of the standard Bose-Hubbard description. We briefly discuss similar behaviors for fermionic systems.

  15. MIDAS, prototype Multivariate Interactive Digital Analysis System, phase 1. Volume 3: Wiring diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegler, F. J.; Christenson, D.; Gordon, M.; Kistler, R.; Lampert, S.; Marshall, R.; Mclaughlin, R.

    1974-01-01

    The Midas System is a third-generation, fast, multispectral recognition system able to keep pace with the large quantity and high rates of data acquisition from present and projected sensors. A principal objective of the MIDAS Program is to provide a system well interfaced with the human operator and thus to obtain large overall reductions in turn-around time and significant gains in throughput. The hardware and software generated in Phase I of the overall program are described. The system contains a mini-computer to control the various high-speed processing elements in the data path and a classifier which implements an all-digital prototype multivariate-Gaussian maximum likelihood decision algorithm operating at 2 x 100,000 pixels/sec. Sufficient hardware was developed to perform signature extraction from computer-compatible tapes, compute classifier coefficients, control the classifier operation, and diagnose operation. The MIDAS construction and wiring diagrams are given.

  16. Study of the influence of Type Ia supernovae environment on the Hubble diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henne, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    The observational cosmology with distant Type Ia supernovae as standard candles claims that the Universe is in accelerated expansion, caused by a large fraction of dark energy. In this report we investigated SNe Ia environment, studying the impact of the nature of their host galaxies and their distance to the host galactic center on the Hubble diagram fitting. The supernovae used in the analysis were extracted from Joint-Light-curves-Analysis compilation of high-redshift and nearby supernovae. The analysis are based on the empirical fact that SN Ia luminosities depend on their light curve shapes and colors. No conclusive correlation between SN Ia light curve parameters and galocentric distance were identified. Concerning the host morphology, we showed that the stretch parameter of Type Ia supernovae is correlated with the host galaxy type. The supernovae with lower stretch mainly exploded in elliptical and lenticular galaxies. The studies show that into old star population and low dust environment, supernovae are fainter. We did not find any significant correlation between Type Ia supernovae color and host morphology. We confirm that supernova properties depend on their environment and propose to incorporate a host galaxy term into the Hubble diagram fit in the future cosmological analysis.

  17. Investigation of the distinction between van der Waals interaction and chemical bonding based on the PAEM-MO diagram.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2014-05-15

    In recent years, the basic problem of understanding chemical bonding, nonbonded, and/or van der Waals interactions has been intensively debated in terms of various theoretical methods. We propose and construct the potential acting on one electron in a molecule-molecular orbital (PAEM-MO) diagram, which draws the PAEM inserted the MO energy levels with their major atomic orbital components. PAEM-MO diagram is able to show clear distinction of chemical bonding from nonbonded and/or vdW interactions. The rule for this is as follows. Along the line connecting two atoms in a molecule or a complex, the existence of chemical bonding between these two atoms needs to satisfy two conditions: (a) a critical point of PAEM exists and (b) PAEM barrier between the two atoms is lower in energy than the occupied major valence-shell bonding MO which contains in-phase atomic components (positive overlap) of the two considered atoms. In contrast to the chemical bonding, for a nonbonded interaction or van der Waals interaction between two atoms, both conditions (a) and (b) do not be satisfied at the same time. This is demonstrated and discussed by various typical cases, particularly those related to helium atom and H-H bonding in phenanthrene. There are helium bonds in HHeF and HeBeO molecules, whereas no H-H bonding in phenanthrene. The validity and limitation for this rule is demonstrated through the investigations of the curves of the PAEM barrier top and MO energies versus the internuclear distances for He2 , H2 , and He2 (+) systems. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Use of an influence diagram and fuzzy probability for evaluating accident management in a boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D. . Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Dept.)

    1994-06-01

    A new approach is presented for evaluating the uncertainties inherent in severe accident management strategies. At first, this analysis considers accident management as a decision problem (i.e., applying a strategy compared with do nothing) and uses an influence diagram. To evaluate imprecise node probabilities in the influence diagram, the analysis introduces the concept of a fuzzy probability. When fuzzy logic is applied, fuzzy probabilities are easily propagated to obtain results. In addition, the results obtained provide not only information similar to the classical approach, which uses point-estimate values, but also additional information regarding the impact of using imprecise input data. As an illustrative example, the proposed methodology is applied to the evaluation of the drywell flooding strategy for a long-term station blackout sequence at the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant. The results show that the drywell flooding strategy is beneficial for preventing reactor vessel breach. It is also effective for reducing the probability of containment failure for both liner melt-through and late overpressurization. Even though uncertainty exists in the results, flooding is preferred to do nothing when evaluated in terms of two risk measures: early and late fatalities.

  19. Phase diagram of the extended Hubbard chain with charge-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torio, M. E.; Aligia, A. A.; Hallberg, K.; Ceccatto, H. A.

    2000-09-01

    We consider a modified extended Hubbard model (EHM) which, in addition to the on-site repulsion U and nearest-neighbor repulsion V, includes polarization effects in second-order perturbation theory. The model is equivalent to an EHM with renormalized U plus a next-nearest-neighbor repulsion term. Using a method based on topological quantum numbers (charge and spin Berry phases), we generalize to finite hopping t the quantum phase diagram in one dimension constructed by van den Brink et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 4658 (1995)]. At hopping t=0 there are two charge density-wave phases, one spin density-wave phase, and one intermediate phase with charge and spin ordering, depending on the parameter values. At t≠0 the nature of each phase is confirmed by studying correlation functions. However, in addition to the strong-coupling phases, a small region with bond ordering appears. The region occupied by the intermediate phase first increases and then decreases with increasing t, until it finally disappears for t of the order but larger than U. For small t, the topological transitions agree with the results of second-order perturbation theory.

  20. Particles, Feynman Diagrams and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Quantum fields are introduced in order to give students an accurate qualitative understanding of the origin of Feynman diagrams as representations of particle interactions. Elementary diagrams are combined to produce diagrams representing the main features of the Standard Model.

  1. Particles, Feynman Diagrams and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Quantum fields are introduced in order to give students an accurate qualitative understanding of the origin of Feynman diagrams as representations of particle interactions. Elementary diagrams are combined to produce diagrams representing the main features of the Standard Model.

  2. Study of grain interactions in perpendicular magnetic recording media using first order reversal curve diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papusoi, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Acharya, R.

    2011-10-01

    It is demonstrated that, for perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media, first order reversal curve analysis can independently measure the grain coercive field distribution (or switching field distribution) and the strength of grain interactions, i.e., the demagnetization (mean-field) factor and the dispersion of grain interaction fields around the mean-field. The coercive field distribution is used to determine the intrinsic anisotropy field distribution of PMR media. The temperature dependence of the demagnetization factor shows that the strength of inter-granular exchange coupling is increasing with increasing medium thickness and it is decreasing with increasing temperature.

  3. Interaction of tantalum, chromium, and phosphorus at 1070 K: Phase diagram and structural chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lomnytska, Ya.; Babizhetskyy, V.; Oliynyk, A.; Toma, O.; Dzevenko, M.; Mar, A.

    2016-03-15

    The phase diagram of Ta–Cr–P at 1070 K has been constructed. • New ternary compounds Ta{sub 0.92(2)}Cr{sub 0.08(2)}P{sub 2} and Ta{sub 0.93(3)}Ti{sub 0.07(3)}P{sub 2} were established. • Ta{sub 1.0−0.8}Cr{sub 1.0−1.2}P and Ta{sub 0.86+x}Ti{sub 0.15-x}P{sub 2}(x= 0−0.07) exhibit homogeneity ranges. • The binary compounds reveal homogeneity ranges by Ta/Cr and Cr/Ta substitutions.

  4. Ultracold bosons with cavity-mediated long-range interactions: A local mean-field analysis of the phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederle, Astrid E.; Morigi, Giovanna; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-09-01

    Ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices self-organize into a variety of structural and quantum phases when placed into a single-mode cavity and pumped by a laser. Cavity optomechanical effects induce an atom density modulation at the cavity-mode wavelength that competes with the optical lattice arrangement. Simultaneously short-range interactions via particle hopping promote superfluid order such that a variety of structural and quantum coherent phases can occur. We analyze the emerging phase diagram in two dimensions by means of an extended Bose-Hubbard model using a local mean-field approach combined with a superfluid cluster analysis. For commensurate ratios of the cavity and external lattice wavelengths, the Mott insulator-superfluid transition is modified by the appearance of charge density wave and supersolid phases, at which the atomic density supports the buildup of a cavity field. For incommensurate ratios, the optomechanical forces induce the formation of Bose-glass and superglass phases, namely, nonsuperfluid and superfluid phases, respectively, displaying quasiperiodic density modulations, which in addition can exhibit structural and superfluid stripe formation. The onset of such structures is constrained by the on-site interaction and is favorable at fractional densities. Experimental observables are identified and discussed.

  5. Magnetic phase diagram of the two-dimensional random mixture with competing exchange interactions K 2Cu xCo 1- xF 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, M.; Yamada, I.; Ishizuka, M.; Amaya, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Koga, K.; Motoya, K.

    1990-12-01

    From the measurement of susceptibility, we have determined a critical temperature versus concentration phase diagram of the random mixture K 2Cu xCo 1- xF 4 with competing exchange interactions and anisotropies. The behavior of the two-dimensional Ising spin glass freezing has been observed in intermediate concentrations.

  6. The Influence of the Diameter Ratio on the Characteristics Diagram of the Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, B.; Pflueger, F.; Weinig, F.

    1948-01-01

    With the further development of axial blowers into highly loaded flow machines, the influence of the diameter ratio upon air output and efficiency gains in significance. Clarification of this matter is important for single-stage axial compressors, and is of still greater importance for multistage ones, and particularly for aircraft power plants. Tests with a single-stage axial blower gave a decrease in the attainable maximum pressure coefficient and optimum efficiency as the diameter ratio increased. The decrease must be ascribed chiefly to the guide surface of the hub and housing between the blades increasing with the diameter ratio.

  7. Interface-roughening phase diagram of the three-dimensional Ising model for all interaction anisotropies from hard-spin mean-field theory.

    PubMed

    Cağlar, Tolga; Berker, A Nihat

    2011-11-01

    The roughening phase diagram of the d=3 Ising model with uniaxially anisotropic interactions is calculated for the entire range of anisotropy, from decoupled planes to the isotropic model to the solid-on-solid model, using hard-spin mean-field theory. The phase diagram contains the line of ordering phase transitions and, at lower temperatures, the line of roughening phase transitions, where the interface between ordered domains roughens. Upon increasing the anisotropy, roughening transition temperatures settle after the isotropic case, whereas the ordering transition temperature increases to infinity. The calculation is repeated for the d=2 Ising model for the full range of anisotropy, yielding no roughening transition.

  8. Influence of Computer-Assisted Roundhouse Diagrams on High School 9th Grade Students' Understanding the Subjects of "Force and Motion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocakaya, F.; Gönen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Main aim of this study is to examine the influence of computer-assisted roundhouse diagrams on high school 9th grade students' academic achievements in the subjects of "Force and Motion". The study was carried out in a public high school in Diyarbakir the province in the Southeast of Turkey. In the study, the "pre-test-post-test…

  9. Investigations on the Phase Diagram and Interaction Parameter of Poly(styrene-b-1,3-cyclohexadiene) Copolymers

    DOE PAGES

    Misichronis, Konstantinos; Chen, Jihua; Imel, Adam; ...

    2017-03-15

    A series of linear diblock copolymers containing polystyrene (PS) and poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) with high 1,4-microstructure (>87%) was synthesized by anionic polymerization and high vacuum techniques. Microphase separation in the bulk was examined in this paper by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and compared to computational analysis of the predicted morphological phase diagram for this system. Because of the high conformational asymmetry between PS and PCHD, these materials self-assemble into typical morphologies expected for linear diblock copolymer systems and atypical structures. Rheological measurements were conducted and revealed order–disorder transition temperatures (TODT), for the first time for PS-b-PCHDmore » copolymers, resulting in a working expression for the effective interaction parameter χeff = 32/T – 0.016. Furthermore, we performed computational studies that coincide with the experimental results. Finally, these copolymers exhibit well-ordered structures even at high temperatures (~260 °C) therefore providing a better insight concerning their microphase separation at the nanoscale which is important for their potential use in nanotechnology and/or nanolithography applications.« less

  10. The Hubble diagram for a system within dark energy: influence of some relevant quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, J.; Teerikorpi, P.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We study the influence of relevant quantities, including the density of dark energy (DE), to the predicted Hubble outflow around a system of galaxies. In particular, we are interested in the difference between two models: 1) the standard ΛCDM model, with the everywhere constant DE density, and 2) the "Swiss cheese model", where the Universe is as old as the standard model and the DE density is zero on short scales, including the environment of the system. Methods: We calculated the current predicted outflow patterns of dwarf galaxies around the Local Group-like system, using different values for the mass of the group, the local DE density, and the time of ejection of the dwarf galaxies, which are treated as test particles. These results are compared with the observed Hubble flow around the Local Group. Results: The predicted distance-velocity relations around galaxy groups are not very sensitive indicators of the DE density, owing to the observational scatter and the uncertainties caused by the mass used for the group and a range in the ejection times. In general, the Local Group outflow data agree with the local DE density being equal to the global one, if the Local Group mass is about 4 × 1012 M⊙; a lower mass ≲ 2 × 1012 M⊙ could suggest a zero local DE density. The dependence of the inferred DE density on the mass is a handicap in this and other common dynamical methods. This emphasizes the need to use different approaches together, for constraining the local DE density.

  11. Using Influence Diagrams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    probability function. We can use Figure 2.2 again to illustrate these ideas. Suppose a crime has been committed and z denotes the blood type of a...blood stain found at the scene of the crime. A suspect is in hand. Let y be the suspect’s blood type . For convenience we consider only two blood types , say...type 1 and type. 2. Let p(y=l) = 0 where 0 is the frequency of blood type I in the generil population. Let I if the suspect is guilty 0 otherwise

  12. Thermodynamic Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaston, Scot

    1999-02-01

    Thermodynamic data such as equilibrium constants, standard cell potentials, molar enthalpies of formation, and standard entropies of substances can be a very useful basis for an organized presentation of knowledge in diverse areas of applied chemistry. Thermodynamic data can become particularly useful when incorporated into thermodynamic diagrams that are designed to be easy to recall, to serve as a basis for reconstructing previous knowledge, and to determine whether reactions can occur exergonically or only with the help of an external energy source. Few students in our chemistry-based courses would want to acquire the depth of knowledge or rigor of professional thermodynamicists. But they should nevertheless learn how to make good use of thermodynamic data in their professional occupations that span the chemical, biological, environmental, and medical laboratory fields. This article discusses examples of three thermodynamic diagrams that have been developed for this purpose. They are the thermodynamic energy account (TEA), the total entropy scale, and the thermodynamic scale diagrams. These diagrams help in the teaching and learning of thermodynamics by bringing the imagination into the process of developing a better understanding of abstract thermodynamic functions, and by allowing the reader to keep track of specialist thermodynamic discourses in the literature.

  13. Hubble Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Initially introduced as a way to demonstrate the expansion of the universe, and subsequently to determine the expansion rate (the HUBBLE CONSTANT H0), the Hubble diagram is one of the classical cosmological tests. It is a plot of apparent fluxes (usually expressed as magnitudes) of some types of objects at cosmological distances, against their REDSHIFTS. It is used as a tool to measure the glob...

  14. Synchronization can influence trust following virtual interaction.

    PubMed

    Launay, Jacques; Dean, Roger T; Bailes, Freya

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization has recently received attention as a form of interpersonal interaction that may affect the affiliative relationships of those engaged in it. While there is evidence to suggest that synchronized movements lead to increased affiliative behavior (Hove & Risen, 2009; Valdesolo & DeSteno, 2011; Wiltermuth & Heath, 2009), the influence of other interpersonal cues has yet to be fully controlled. The current study controls for these features by using computer algorithms to replace human partners. By removing genuine interpersonal interaction, it also tests whether sounds alone can influence affiliative relationships, when it appears that another human agent has triggered those sounds. Results suggest that subjective experience of synchrony had a positive effect on a measure of trust, but task success was a similarly good predictor. An objective measure of synchrony was only related to trust in conditions where participants were instructed to move at the same time as stimuli.

  15. Phase Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew S.; Fruehan, Richard J.

    2014-08-01

    The thermodynamics of several aspects of the carbothermic reduction of alumina have been examined. In Part I, the results of measuring the evolved CO from the reaction between Al2O3 and C mixtures were used to determine the temperature and carbon contents for carbide formation at alumina saturation and at carbide saturation in the Al2O3-Al4C3 system. In this part of the paper, results are presented for a thermogravimetric study of the reactions of Al2O3 with carbon, as well as those for the determination of the Al2O3 liquidus line and the Al2O3-Al4O4C eutectic in the Al2O3-Al4C3 phase diagram. The critical temperature for Al2O3 and C to react, producing gas at 1 atm., was in agreement with that predicted from thermodynamics and measured in Part I of this paper. However, the Al2O3 liquidus appeared to be steeper and the eutectic temperature lower than the predicted phase diagram.

  16. Determination of protein phase diagrams by microbatch experiments: exploring the influence of precipitants and pH.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Kai; Galm, Lara; Nötzold, Juliane; Sigloch, Heike; Morgenstern, Josefine; Schleining, Kristina; Suhm, Susanna; Oelmeier, Stefan A; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of protein phase behavior is essential for downstream process design in the biopharmaceutical industry. Proteins can either be soluble, crystalline or precipitated. Additionally liquid-liquid phase separation, gelation and skin formation can occur. A method to generate phase diagrams in high throughput on an automated liquid handling station in microbatch scale was developed. For lysozyme from chicken egg white, human lysozyme, glucose oxidase and glucose isomerase phase diagrams were generated at four different pH values – pH 3, 5, 7 and 9. Sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, polyethylene glycol 300 and polyethylene glycol 1000 were used as precipitants. Crystallizing conditions could be found for lysozyme from chicken egg white using sodium chloride, for human lysozyme using sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate and glucose isomerase using ammonium sulfate. PEG caused destabilization of human lysozyme and glucose oxidase solutions or a balance of stabilizing and destabilizing effects for glucose isomerase near the isoelectric point. This work presents a systematic generation and extensive study of phase diagrams of proteins. Thus, it adds to the general understanding of protein behavior in liquid formulation and presents a convenient methodology applicable to any protein solution.

  17. Effect of the Long-Range Coulomb Interaction on the Phase Diagram of the Kohn-Luttinger Superconducting State in Idealized Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Mitskan, V. A.; Korovushkin, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of the long-range Coulomb interaction on the formation of the Kohn-Luttinger superconductivity in monolayer doped graphene is studied disregarding the Van der Waals potential of the substrate and both magnetic and non-magnetic impurities. It is shown that the allowance for the Kohn-Luttinger renormalizations up to the second order in perturbation theory in the on-site Hubbard interaction inclusively, as well as in the intersite Coulomb interaction, significantly affects the interplay between the superconducting phases with the f-wave, p+ip-wave, and d + id-wave symmetries of the order parameter. It is demonstrated that taking Coulomb repulsion of electrons located at the next-nearest neighboring atoms in such a system into account changes qualitatively the phase diagram and enhances the critical temperature of the transition to the superconducting phase.

  18. Extremely asymmetric phase diagram of homopolymer-monotethered nanoparticles: Competition between chain conformational entropy and particle steric interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiancai; Fu, Chao; Yang, Yingzi; Qiu, Feng

    2017-02-01

    The phase behaviors of homopolymer-monotethered nanoparticles (HMNs) in melt are investigated via a theoretical method combining self-consistent field theory for polymers and density functional theory for hard spheres. An extremely asymmetric phase diagram is observed: (i) microphases are only possible for the volume fraction of the tethered polymer fA > 0.35; (ii) in addition to lamellar phase, the system can only self-assemble into various morphologies with a polymer-rich matrix, including gyroid phase, cylindrical phase, and spherical phase. In the frame of this theory, the critical point for HMNs' microphase separation is significantly lower than that of linear diblock copolymers. Furthermore, the characteristic length of microphase-separated structures of HMNs is much smaller than that of linear diblock copolymers with the same molecular weight. Our calculation results on morphologies and characteristic length agree well with recent simulations and experimental observations.

  19. Entropy, vortex interactions and the phase diagram of heavy-ion irradiated Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Beek, C. J.; Konczykowski, M.; Drost, R. J.; Kes, P. H.; Samoilov, A. V.; Chikumoto, N.; Bouffard, S.; Feigel'man, M. V.

    2000-05-01

    Using dynamic and thermodynamic magnetization measurements, we analyze the phase diagram of Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ δ single crystals containing amorphous columnar defects created by heavy-ion irradiation. Reversible magnetization experiments yield the respective magnitudes of the pinning energy and entropy contributions to the free energy of the vortex lattice. It appears that the entropy contribution in the London regime is relatively minor in both unirradiated and irradiated crystals, except in the case of high density of columns and inductions B that are smaller than the interaction field Hint≈ Bφ/6. The dependence of the entropy contribution on vortex and defect density correlates well with measurements of the irreversibility line (IRL) Hirr( T), which shows a sharp increase at Hint.

  20. Ion mixing and phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. S.; Liu, B. X.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1983-05-01

    Interactions induced by ion irradiation are generally considered to be non-equilibrium processes, whereas phase diagrams are determined by phase equilibria. These two entities are seemingly unrelated. However, if one assumes that quasi-equilibrium conditions prevail after the prompt events, subsequent reactions are driven toward equilibrium by thermodynamical forces. Under this assumption, ion-induced reactions are related to equilibrium and therefore to phase diagrams. This relationship can be seen in the similarity that exists in thin films between reactions induced by ion irradiation and reactions induced by thermal annealing. In the latter case, phase diagrams have been used to predict the phase sequence of stable compound formation, notably so in cases of silicide formation. Ion-induced mixing not only can lead to stable compound formation, but also to metastable alloy formation. In some metal-metal systems, terminal solubilities can be greatly extended by ion mixing. In other cases, where the two constituents of the system have different crystal structures, extension of terminal solubility from both sides of the phase diagram eventually becomes structurally incompatible and a glassy (amorphous) mixture can form. The composition range where this bifurcation is likely to occur is in the two-phase regions of the phase diagram. These concepts are potentially useful guides in selecting metal pairs that from metallic glasses by ion mixing. In this report, phenomenological correlation between stable (and metastable) phase formation and phase diagram is discussed in terms of recent experimental data.

  1. The influence of random slowdown process and lock-step effect on the fundamental diagram of the nonlinear pedestrian dynamics: An estimating-correction cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhijian; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Yanqiu; Gong, Junhui; Peng, Fei; Yan, Zidan; Zhang, Taolin; Yang, Lizhong

    2015-03-01

    Random slowdown process and lock-step effect, observed from real-life observation and the experiments of other researchers, were investigated in the view of the pedestrian microscopic behaviors. Due to the limited controllability, repeatability and randomness of the pedestrian experiments, a new estimating-correction cellular automaton was established to research the influence of random slowdown process and lock-step effect on the fundamental diagram. The first step of the model is to estimate the next time-step status of the neighbor cell in front of the tracked pedestrian. The second step is to correct the status and confirm the position of the tracked pedestrian in the next time-step. It is found that the random slowdown process and lock-step have significant influence on the curve configuration and the characteristic parameters, including the concavity-convexity, the inflection point, the maximum flow rate and the critical density etc. The random slowdown process reduces the utilization of the available space between two adjacent pedestrians in the longitudinal direction, especially in the region of intermediate density. However, the lock-step effect enhances the utilization of the available space, especially in the region of high density.

  2. Interactions among symbionts operate across scales to influence parasite epidemics.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Fletcher W; Umbanhowar, James; Mitchell, Charles E

    2017-10-01

    Parasite epidemics may be influenced by interactions among symbionts, which can depend on past events at multiple spatial scales. Within host individuals, interactions can depend on the sequence in which symbionts infect a host, generating priority effects. Across host individuals, interactions can depend on parasite phenology. To test the roles of parasite interactions and phenology in epidemics, we embedded multiple cohorts of sentinel plants, grown from seeds with and without a vertically transmitted symbiont, into a wild host population, and tracked foliar infections caused by three common fungal parasites. Within hosts, parasite growth was influenced by coinfections, but coinfections were often prevented by priority effects among symbionts. Across hosts, parasite phenology altered host susceptibility to secondary infections, symbiont interactions and ultimately the magnitude of parasite epidemics. Together, these results indicate that parasite phenology can influence parasite epidemics by altering the sequence of infection and interactions among symbionts within host individuals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  3. A Regime Diagram for Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegman, D. R.; Farrington, R.; Capitanio, F. A.; Schellart, W. P.

    2009-12-01

    Regime diagrams and associated scaling relations have profoundly influenced our understanding of planetary dynamics. Previous regime diagrams characterized the regimes of stagnant-lid, small viscosity contrast, transitional, and no-convection for temperature-dependent (Moresi and Solomatov, 1995), and non-linear power law rheologies (Solomatov and Moresi, 1997) as well as stagnant-lid, sluggish-lid, and mobile-lid regimes once the finite strength of rock was considered (Moresi and Solomatov, 1998). Scalings derived from such models have been the cornerstone for parameterized models of thermal evolution of rocky planets and icy moons for the past decade. While such a theory can predict the tectonic state of a planetary body, it is still rather incomplete in regards to predicting tectonics. For example, the mobile-lid regime is unspecific as to how continuous lithospheric recycling should occur on a terrestrial planet. Towards this goal, Gerya et al., (2008) advanced a new regime diagram aiming to characterize when subduction would manifest itself as a one-sided or two-sided downwelling and either symmetric or asymmetric. Here, we present a regime diagram for the case of a single-sided, asymmetric type of subduction (most Earth-like type). Using a 3-D numerical model of a free subduction, we describe a total of 5 different styles of subduction that can possibly occur. Each style is distinguished by its upper mantle slab morphology resulting from the sinking kinematics. We provide movies to illustrate the different styles and their progressive time-evolution. In each regime, subduction is accommodated by a combination of plate advance and slab rollback, with associated motions of forward plate velocity and trench retreat, respectively. We demonstrate that the preferred subduction mode depends upon two essential controlling factors: 1) buoyancy of the downgoing plate and 2) strength of plate in resisting bending at the hinge. We propose that a variety of subduction

  4. Interpersonal Influence in Cross-Cultural Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    being decisive , disciplined, and obedient. These implied characteristics are then used in the ensuing identification process . One result of this...To achieve successful interaction and negotiation, knowledge and training about these processes are essential. Therefore, this paper aims to...does not suffice (Girndt & Poortinga, 1997; Shiraev & Levy, 2004). What is necessary is an understanding of the generic psychological processes

  5. Diagrams Benefit Symbolic Problem-Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Junyi; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany; Fyfe, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The format of a mathematics problem often influences students' problem-solving performance. For example, providing diagrams in conjunction with story problems can benefit students' understanding, choice of strategy, and accuracy on story problems. However, it remains unclear whether providing diagrams in conjunction with symbolic…

  6. Caution: Venn Diagrams Ahead!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmins, Dovie L.; Winters, J. Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Two perspectives of the term "Venn diagram" reflect the typical differences in the uses of Venn diagrams in the subject areas of mathematics and language arts. These differences are subtle; nevertheless, they can potentially be confusing. In language arts, the circles in a Venn diagram typically represent things that can be compared and…

  7. Caution: Venn Diagrams Ahead!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmins, Dovie L.; Winters, J. Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Two perspectives of the term "Venn diagram" reflect the typical differences in the uses of Venn diagrams in the subject areas of mathematics and language arts. These differences are subtle; nevertheless, they can potentially be confusing. In language arts, the circles in a Venn diagram typically represent things that can be compared and…

  8. Influence of radioactivity on surface interaction forces.

    PubMed

    Walker, M E; McFarlane, J; Glasgow, D C; Chung, E; Taboada-Serrano, P; Yiacoumi, S; Tsouris, C

    2010-10-15

    Although some differences have been observed, the transport behavior of radioactive aerosol particles has often been assumed to be analogous to the behavior of nonradioactive aerosols in dispersion models. However, radioactive particles can become electrostatically charged as a result of the decay process. Theories have been proposed to describe this self-charging phenomenon, which may have a significant effect on how these particles interact with one another and with charged surfaces in the environment. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to quantify surface forces between a particle and a planar surface and to compare measurements with and without the involvement of radioactivity. The main objective of this work is to assess directly the effects of radioactivity on the surface interactions of radioactive aerosols via the measurement of the adhesion force. The adhesion force between a silicon nitride AFM tip and an activated gold substrate was measured so that any possible effects due to radioactivity could be observed. The adhesion force between the tip and the gold surface increased significantly when the gold substrate (25 mm(2) surface area) was activated to a level of approximately 0.6 mCi. The results of this investigation will prompt further work into the effects of radioactivity in particle-surface interactions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of Radioactivity on Surface Interaction Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; McFarlane, Joanna; Glasgow, David C; Chung, Eunhyea; Taboada Serrano, Patricia L; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Although some differences have been observed, the transport behavior of radioactive aerosol particles has often been assumed to be analogous to the behavior of nonradioactive aerosols in dispersion models. However, radioactive particles can become electrostatically charged as a result of the decay process. Theories have been proposed to describe this self-charging phenomenon, which may have a significant effect on how these particles interact with one another and with charged surfaces in the environment. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to quantify surface forces between a particle and a planar surface and to compare measurements with and without the involvement of radioactivity. The main objective of this work is to assess directly the effects of radioactivity on the surface interactions of radioactive aerosols via the measurement of the adhesion force. The adhesion force between a silicon nitride AFM tip and an activated gold substrate was measured so that any possible effects due to radioactivity could be observed. The adhesion force between the tip and the gold surface increased significantly when the gold substrate (25 mm{sup 2} surface area) was activated to a level of approximately 0.6 mCi. The results of this investigation will prompt further work into the effects of radioactivity in particle-surface interactions.

  10. Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 31 NIST/ACerS Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database (PC database for purchase)   The Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database contains commentaries and more than 21,000 diagrams for non-organic systems, including those published in all 21 hard-copy volumes produced as part of the ACerS-NIST Phase Equilibria Diagrams Program (formerly titled Phase Diagrams for Ceramists): Volumes I through XIV (blue books); Annuals 91, 92, 93; High Tc Superconductors I & II; Zirconium & Zirconia Systems; and Electronic Ceramics I. Materials covered include oxides as well as non-oxide systems such as chalcogenides and pnictides, phosphates, salt systems, and mixed systems of these classes.

  11. European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) availability stochastic model: integrating failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), influence diagram, and Bayesian network together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verzichelli, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    An Availability Stochastic Model for the E-ELT has been developed in GeNIE. The latter is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) for the Structural Modeling, Inference, and Learning Engine (SMILE), originally distributed by the Decision Systems Laboratory from the University of Pittsburgh, and now being a product of Bayes Fusion, LLC. The E-ELT will be the largest optical/near-infrared telescope in the world. Its design comprises an Alt-Azimuth mount reflecting telescope with a 39-metre-diameter segmented primary mirror, a 4-metre-diameter secondary mirror, a 3.75-metre-diameter tertiary mirror, adaptive optics and multiple instruments. This paper highlights how a Model has been developed for an earlier on assessment of the Telescope Avail- ability. It also describes the modular structure and the underlying assumptions that have been adopted for developing the model and demonstrates the integration of FMEA, Influence Diagram and Bayesian Network elements. These have been considered for a better characterization of the Model inputs and outputs and for taking into account Degraded-based Reliability (DBR). Lastly, it provides an overview of how the information and knowledge captured in the model may be used for an earlier on definition of the Failure, Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) Control Strategy and the Telescope Minimum Master Equipment List (T-MMEL).

  12. Anthocyanins influence tannin-cell wall interactions.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Martínez-Hernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gil-Muñoz, Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-09-01

    The rate of tannin extraction was studied in a vinification of red grapes and the results compared with another vinification made with white grapes fermented as for typical red wine, in the presence of skins and seeds. Even though the grapes presented a quite similar skin and seed tannin content, the differences in tannin concentration between both vinifications was very large, despite the fact that the only apparent difference between the phenolic composition of both wines was the anthocyanin content. This suggests that anthocyanins play an important role in tannin extractability, perhaps because they affect the extent of the tannin-cell wall interaction, a factor that largely controls the resulting quantity of tannins in wines. To confirm this observation, the effect of anthocyanins on the tannin extractability from grape seeds and skin and on the interaction between tannins and grape cell walls suspended in model solutions were studied. The results indicated that anthocyanins favored skin and seed tannin extraction and that there is a competition for the adsorption sites between anthocyanins and tannins that increases the tannin content when anthocyanins are present.

  13. The Influence of Proxemic Variables on Dyadic Interaction Between Peers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Michael; Keys, Christopher

    This study addresses three issues: (1) the influence of proxemic variables (distance, furniture presence) on dyadic interaction; (2) the consistency between measures of self-disclosure; and (3) the applicability of reciprocity and distance-equilibrium views of dyadic interaction. Dyads of male college students were randomly assigned to one of four…

  14. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams of natural and cultured biogenic magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Amy P.; Egli, Ramon; Moskowitz, Bruce M.

    2007-08-01

    First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams are rapidly becoming a standard tool for characterizing magnetic particles because they simultaneously incorporate information regarding magnetostatic interaction and domain states. The simplest interpretation of FORC diagrams of single-domain (SD) particles is based on the Neel interpretation of Preisach theory, which predicts that the FORC function is the product of a coercivity and an interaction field distribution. Although the underlying assumptions of this interpretation are not correct, a strictly quantitative model of weakly interacting SD grains proves that the distributions of coercivities and interaction fields can be retrieved from a FORC diagram. To test this model, we present the possibility of a quantitative interpretation of FORC diagrams, and we present measurements of samples containing magnetosomes from cultures of magnetotactic bacteria and from a lake sediment. Two samples are investigated under the electron microscope to characterize the geometrical arrangement of the particles. We find that the clustering of otherwise similar particles has a strong influence on FORC diagrams. We also obtained a crude estimate of packing densities form the FORC diagrams, which were consistent with transmission electron microscopy observations and measurements of the anhysteretic remanent magnetization.

  15. Pressure-temperature phase diagrams of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Smeller, László

    2002-03-25

    The pressure-temperature phase diagram of various biomolecules is reviewed. Special attention is focused on the elliptic phase diagram of proteins. The phenomenological thermodynamic theory describing this diagram explains the heat, cold and pressure denaturations in a unified picture. The limitations and possible developments of this theory are discussed as well. It is pointed out that a more complex diagram can be obtained when the intermolecular interactions are also taken into account. In this case metastable states appear on the pressure-temperature (p-T) diagram due to intermolecular interactions. Pressure-temperature phase diagrams of other biopolymers are also discussed. While the p-T diagrams of helix-coil transition of nucleic acids and of gel-liquid crystal transition of lipid bilayers are non-elliptical, those of gelatinization of starch and of phase separation of some synthetic polymers show an elliptic profile, similar to that of proteins. Finally, the p-T diagram of bacterial inactivation is shown to be elliptic. From the point of view of basic science, this fact shows that the key factor of inactivation should be the protein type, and from the viewpoint of practical applications, it serves as the theoretical basis of pressure treatment of biosystems.

  16. The influence of nanostructured materials on biointerfacial interactions.

    PubMed

    Koegler, Peter; Clayton, Andrew; Thissen, Helmut; Santos, Gil Nonato C; Kingshott, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Control over biointerfacial interactions in vitro and in vivo is the key to many biomedical applications: from cell culture and diagnostic tools to drug delivery, biomaterials and regenerative medicine. The increasing use of nanostructured materials is placing a greater demand on improving our understanding of how these new materials influence biointerfacial interactions, including protein adsorption and subsequent cellular responses. A range of nanoscale material properties influence these interactions, and material toxicity. The ability to manipulate both material nanochemistry and nanotopography remains challenging in its own right, however, a more in-depth knowledge of the subsequent biological responses to these new materials must occur simultaneously if they are ever to be affective in the clinic. We highlight some of the key technologies used for fabrication of nanostructured materials, examine how nanostructured materials influence the behavior of proteins and cells at surfaces and provide details of important analytical techniques used in this context.

  17. Triangular Diagrams Teach Steady and Dynamic Behaviour of Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klusacek, K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates how triangular diagrams can aid in presenting some of the rather complex transient interactions that occur among gas and surface species during heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The basic equations and numerical examples are described. Classroom use of the triangular diagram is discussed. Several diagrams and graphs are provided. (YP)

  18. Phase diagram and structures in mixtures of poly(styrenesulfonate anion) and alkyltrimethylammonium cations in water: significance of specific hydrophobic interaction.

    PubMed

    Sitar, Simona; Goderis, Bart; Hansson, Per; Kogej, Ksenija

    2012-04-19

    Mixtures of polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants show very rich phase behavior that is influenced by surfactant-ion and polyion properties and by water content. A general feature is associative phase separation as a result of strong electrostatic interactions, whereas the effect of eventual more specific interactions (e.g., hydrophobic) has not been thoroughly investigated. In this paper, we report a detailed study on phase behavior and structures in poly(styrenesulfonate anion) (PSS(-))-cetyltrimethylammonium cation (CTA(+))-water mixtures that are characterized by a hydrophobic interaction between the styrene groups of PSS(-) and the micelle interior. Structures of various phases were determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, and results indicated the presence of a disordered micellar and an ordered hexagonal phase; no cubic phase was found. The general conclusion is that the highlighted hydrophobic interaction promotes dissolution of CTAPSS when the polyion salt is added and provides further stabilization of the dense phase when the surfactant salt is added.

  19. Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiosi, C.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HR-diagram), pioneered independently by EJNAR HERTZSPRUNG and HENRY NORRIS RUSSELL, is a plot of the star luminosity versus the surface temperature. It stems from the basic relation for an object emitting thermal radiation as a black body: ...

  20. Massive basketball diagram for a thermal scalar field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jens O.; Braaten, Eric; Strickland, Michael

    2000-08-01

    The ``basketball diagram'' is a three-loop vacuum diagram for a scalar field theory that cannot be expressed in terms of one-loop diagrams. We calculate this diagram for a massive scalar field at nonzero temperature, reducing it to expressions involving three-dimensional integrals that can be easily evaluated numerically. We use this result to calculate the free energy for a massive scalar field with a φ4 interaction to three-loop order.

  1. Construction of drug-polymer thermodynamic phase diagrams using Flory-Huggins interaction theory: identifying the relevance of temperature and drug weight fraction to phase separation within solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yiwei; Booth, Jonathan; Meehan, Elizabeth; Jones, David S; Li, Shu; Andrews, Gavin P

    2013-01-07

    Amorphous drug-polymer solid dispersions have the potential to enhance the dissolution performance and thus bioavailability of BCS class II drug compounds. The principle drawback of this approach is the limited physical stability of amorphous drug within the dispersion. Accurate determination of the solubility and miscibility of drug in the polymer matrix is the key to the successful design and development of such systems. In this paper, we propose a novel method, based on Flory-Huggins theory, to predict and compare the solubility and miscibility of drug in polymeric systems. The systems chosen for this study are (1) hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate HF grade (HPMCAS-HF)-felodipine (FD) and (2) Soluplus (a graft copolymer of polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol)-FD. Samples containing different drug compositions were mixed, ball milled, and then analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The value of the drug-polymer interaction parameter χ was calculated from the crystalline drug melting depression data and extrapolated to lower temperatures. The interaction parameter χ was also calculated at 25 °C for both systems using the van Krevelen solubility parameter method. The rank order of interaction parameters of the two systems obtained at this temperature was comparable. Diagrams of drug-polymer temperature-composition and free energy of mixing (ΔG(mix)) were constructed for both systems. The maximum crystalline drug solubility and amorphous drug miscibility may be predicted based on the phase diagrams. Hyper-DSC was used to assess the validity of constructed phase diagrams by annealing solid dispersions at specific drug loadings. Three different samples for each polymer were selected to represent different regions within the phase diagram.

  2. Phase diagrams of pseudo-binary phospholipid systems. II. Selected calorimetric studies on the influence of branching on the mixing properties of phosphatidylcholines.

    PubMed

    Dörfler, H D; Miethe, P

    1990-04-01

    The miscibility properties of branched phosphatidylcholines in mixtures of aqueous dispersions were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry. The phase diagrams of four pseudo-binary systems from mixing type unbranched phosphatidylcholine/branched phosphatidylcholine/water (50 wt. % water) were investigated and discussed. The unbranched dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine acts as a reference component of the mixtures. The phase diagrams of these four pseudo-binary phosphatidylcholine systems showed some connections between chain structure of the branched phosphatidylcholines and miscibility of the components. A change of the phase diagram type has been observed according to the branching and/or chain length differences of the phosphatidylcholines: complete miscibility and peritectic mixing behaviour. Generally we observed complete miscibility in the high-temperature phase (La-phase) and demixing in the low-temperature phases (gel phase). This is dependent on the branching and chain length differences of the mixing components.

  3. Reliability block diagrams to model disease management.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, A; Inadomi, J M; Bauerfeind, P

    1999-01-01

    Studies of diagnostic or therapeutic procedures in the management of any given disease tend to focus on one particular aspect of the disease and ignore the interaction between the multitude of factors that determine its final outcome. The present article introduces a mathematical model that accounts for the joint contribution of various medical and non-medical components to the overall disease outcome. A reliability block diagram is used to model patient compliance, endoscopic screening, and surgical therapy for dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus. The overall probability of a patient with a Barrett's esophagus to comply with a screening program, be correctly diagnosed with dysplasia, and undergo successful therapy is 37%. The reduction in the overall success rate, despite the fact that the majority of components are assumed to function with reliability rates of 80% or more, is a reflection of the multitude of serial subsystems involved in disease management. Each serial component influences the overall success rate in a linear fashion. Building multiple parallel pathways into the screening program raises its overall success rate to 91%. Parallel arrangements render systems less sensitive to diagnostic or therapeutic failures. A reliability block diagram provides the means to model the contributions of many heterogeneous factors to disease outcome. Since no medical system functions perfectly, redundancy provided by parallel subsystems assures a greater overall reliability.

  4. Physicochemical interaction and its influence on deep bed filtration process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-long; Meng, Jun; Li, Gui-ping; Luan, Zhao-kun; Tang, Hong-xiao

    2004-01-01

    The capillary model was used to analyze the hydraulic conditions in the deep bed filtration process. The physicochemical interaction forces between the filter media and suspended particles and their influence on deep bed filtration process were also studied theoretically. Through the comparison of the hydraulic and physicochemical forces, the key influencing factors on the filtration process were proposed and investigated. Pilot study of the microflocculation deep bed filtration was carried out in the No. 9 Potable Water Treatment Plant of Beijing, and the experimental results of hydraulic head loss, particle distribution and entrapment were presented. The theoretical prediction was reasonably consistent with the experimental results under different conditions, which indicated that the regulation and control of micro-flocculation and deep bed filtration could be realized by the evaluation of the physicochemical interactions. Further theoretical and experimental research should be carried out to investigate the interaction mechanism and its application in the deep bed filtration and other cases.

  5. Influence of vane sweep on rotor-stator interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Envia, Edmane; Kerschen, Edward J.

    1990-12-01

    The influence of vane sweep in rotor-stator interaction noise is investigated. In an analytical approach, the interaction of a convected gust representing the rotor viscous wake, with a cascade of cascade of finite span swept airfoils, representing the stator, is analyzed. The analysis is based on the solution of the exact linearized equations of motion. High frequency convected gusts for which noise generation is concentrated near the leading edge of airfoils is considered. In a preliminary study, the problem of an isolated finite span swept airfoil interacting with a convected gust is analyzed. Results indicate that sweep can substantially reduce the farfield noise levels for a single airfoil. Using the single airfoil model, an approximate solution to the problem of noise radiation from a cascade of finite span swept airfoils interacting with a convected gust is derived. A parametric study of noise generated by gust cascade interaction is carried out to assess the effectiveness of vane sweep in reducing rotor-stator interaction noise. The results show that sweep is beneficial in reducing noise levels. Rotor wake twist or circumferential lean substantially influences the effectiveness of vane sweep. The orientation of vane sweep must be chosen to enhance the natural phase lag caused by wake lean, in which case rather small sweep angles substantially reduce the noise levels.

  6. Influence of vane sweep on rotor-stator interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Kerschen, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of vane sweep in rotor-stator interaction noise is investigated. In an analytical approach, the interaction of a convected gust representing the rotor viscous wake, with a cascade of cascade of finite span swept airfoils, representing the stator, is analyzed. The analysis is based on the solution of the exact linearized equations of motion. High frequency convected gusts for which noise generation is concentrated near the leading edge of airfoils is considered. In a preliminary study, the problem of an isolated finite span swept airfoil interacting with a convected gust is analyzed. Results indicate that sweep can substantially reduce the farfield noise levels for a single airfoil. Using the single airfoil model, an approximate solution to the problem of noise radiation from a cascade of finite span swept airfoils interacting with a convected gust is derived. A parametric study of noise generated by gust cascade interaction is carried out to assess the effectiveness of vane sweep in reducing rotor-stator interaction noise. The results show that sweep is beneficial in reducing noise levels. Rotor wake twist or circumferential lean substantially influences the effectiveness of vane sweep. The orientation of vane sweep must be chosen to enhance the natural phase lag caused by wake lean, in which case rather small sweep angles substantially reduce the noise levels.

  7. Inductively generating Euler diagrams.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Gem; Rodgers, Peter; Howse, John; Zhang, Leishi

    2011-01-01

    Euler diagrams have a wide variety of uses, from information visualization to logical reasoning. In all of their application areas, the ability to automatically layout Euler diagrams brings considerable benefits. In this paper, we present a novel approach to Euler diagram generation. We develop certain graphs associated with Euler diagrams in order to allow curves to be added by finding cycles in these graphs. This permits us to build Euler diagrams inductively, adding one curve at a time. Our technique is adaptable, allowing the easy specification, and enforcement, of sets of well-formedness conditions; we present a series of results that identify properties of cycles that correspond to the well-formedness conditions. This improves upon other contributions toward the automated generation of Euler diagrams which implicitly assume some fixed set of well-formedness conditions must hold. In addition, unlike most of these other generation methods, our technique allows any abstract description to be drawn as an Euler diagram. To establish the utility of the approach, a prototype implementation has been developed.

  8. Influence of global magnetic state on chemical interactions in high-pressure high-temperature synthesis of B2 Fe{sub 2}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomareva, A. V.; Ruban, A. V.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2009-05-04

    We show that effective chemical interactions in an alloy can be tuned by its global magnetic state, which opens exciting possibilities for materials synthesis. Using first-principles theory we demonstrate that at pressure of 20 GPa and at high temperatures, the effective chemical interactions in paramagnetic Fe-Si system are strongly influenced by the magnetic disorder favoring a formation of cubic Fe{sub 2}Si phase with B2 structure, which is not present in the alloy phase diagram. Our experiments confirm theoretical predictions, and the B2 Fe{sub 2}Si alloy is synthesized from Fe-Si mixture using multianvil press.

  9. Square Source Type Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, N.; Ohta, K.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation in a small volume of earth interior is expressed by a symmetric moment tensor located on a point source. The tensor contains information of characteristic directions, source amplitude, and source types such as isotropic, double-couple, or compensated-linear-vector-dipole (CLVD). Although we often assume a double couple as the source type of an earthquake, significant non-double-couple component including isotropic component is often reported for induced earthquakes and volcanic earthquakes. For discussions on source types including double-couple and non-double-couple components, it is helpful to display them using some visual diagrams. Since the information of source type has two degrees of freedom, it can be displayed onto a two-dimensional flat plane. Although the diagram developed by Hudson et al. [1989] is popular, the trace corresponding to the mechanism combined by two mechanisms is not always a smooth line. To overcome this problem, Chapman and Leaney [2012] developed a new diagram. This diagram has an advantage that a straight line passing through the center corresponds to the mechanism obtained by a combination of an arbitrary mechanism and a double-couple [Tape and Tape, 2012], but this diagram has some difficulties in use. First, it is slightly difficult to produce the diagram because of its curved shape. Second, it is also difficult to read out the ratios among isotropic, double-couple, and CLVD components, which we want to obtain from the estimated moment tensors, because they do not appear directly on the horizontal or vertical axes. In the present study, we developed another new square diagram that overcomes the difficulties of previous diagrams. This diagram is an orthogonal system of isotropic and deviatoric axes, so it is easy to get the ratios among isotropic, double-couple, and CLVD components. Our diagram has another advantage that the probability density is obtained simply from the area within the diagram if the probability density

  10. Influence of dissipation on two-atom dispersion interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcellona, Pablo; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2015-03-01

    We consider the dispersion interaction between two neutral, ground-state atoms at zero and finite temperature by means of a dynamical approach. Our result differs from the previous ones obtained with time-independent perturbation theory because it correctly accounts for the influence of dissipation via the atomic decay rates. Modern measurements of Casimir force seem to suggest a suppressed influence of dissipation. Our new result shows similar features and can hence help resolve the Drude-plasma debate. We also consider the interaction between a ground-state atom and an excited atom. There are discordant results in the literature for the retarded potential: one oscillating and one monotonous. Our dynamical result uniquely leads to the oscillating result when taking into account the decay rates. This work was supported by the DFG (Grant BU 1803/3-1).

  11. Influence of interstitial Fe to the phase diagram of Fe1+yTe1‑xSex single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yue; Yamada, Tatsuhiro; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Superconductivity (SC) with the suppression of long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is observed in the parent compounds of both iron-based and cuprate superconductors. The AFM wave vectors are bicollinear (π, 0) in the parent compound FeTe different from the collinear AFM order (π, π) in most iron pnictides. Study of the phase diagram of Fe1+yTe1‑xSex is the most direct way to investigate the competition between bicollinear AFM and SC. However, presence of interstitial Fe affects both magnetism and SC of Fe1+yTe1‑xSex, which hinders the establishment of the real phase diagram. Here, we report the comparison of doping-temperature (x-T) phase diagrams for Fe1+yTe1‑xSex (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.43) single crystals before and after removing interstitial Fe. Without interstitial Fe, the AFM state survives only for x < 0.05, and bulk SC emerges from x = 0.05, and does not coexist with the AFM state. The previously reported spin glass state, and the coexistence of AFM and SC may be originated from the effect of the interstitial Fe. The phase diagram of Fe1+yTe1‑xSex is found to be similar to the case of the “1111” system such as LaFeAsO1‑xFx, and is different from that of the “122” system.

  12. Influence of interstitial Fe to the phase diagram of Fe1+yTe1−xSex single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Yamada, Tatsuhiro; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Superconductivity (SC) with the suppression of long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is observed in the parent compounds of both iron-based and cuprate superconductors. The AFM wave vectors are bicollinear (π, 0) in the parent compound FeTe different from the collinear AFM order (π, π) in most iron pnictides. Study of the phase diagram of Fe1+yTe1−xSex is the most direct way to investigate the competition between bicollinear AFM and SC. However, presence of interstitial Fe affects both magnetism and SC of Fe1+yTe1−xSex, which hinders the establishment of the real phase diagram. Here, we report the comparison of doping-temperature (x-T) phase diagrams for Fe1+yTe1−xSex (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.43) single crystals before and after removing interstitial Fe. Without interstitial Fe, the AFM state survives only for x < 0.05, and bulk SC emerges from x = 0.05, and does not coexist with the AFM state. The previously reported spin glass state, and the coexistence of AFM and SC may be originated from the effect of the interstitial Fe. The phase diagram of Fe1+yTe1−xSex is found to be similar to the case of the “1111” system such as LaFeAsO1−xFx, and is different from that of the “122” system. PMID:27577047

  13. The f-spin physics of rare-earth iron pnictides: influence of d-electron antiferromagnetic order on heavy fermion phase diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jian-xin; Dai, Jianhui; Si, Qimiao

    2009-01-01

    Some of the high {Tc} iron pnictides contain rare-earth elements, raising the question of how the existence and tunability of a d-electron antiferromagnetic order influences the heavy fermion behavior of the f-moments. With CeOFeP and CeOFeAs in mind as prototypes, we derive an extended Anderson lattice model appropriate for these quaternary systems. We show that the Kondo screening of the f-moments are efficiently suppressed by the d-electron ordering. We also argue that, inside the d-electron ordered state (as in CeOFeAs), the f-moments provide a rare realization of a quantum frustrated magnet with competing J{sub 1}-J{sub 2}-J{sub 3} interactions in an effective square lattice. Implications ofr the heavy fermion physics in broader contexts are also discussed.

  14. Phase Diagrams of Electric-Fduced Aggregation in Conducting Colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khusid, B.; Acrivos, A.

    1999-01-01

    Under the application of a sufficiently strong electric field, a suspension may undergo reversible phase transitions from a homogeneous random arrangement of particles into a variety of ordered aggregation patterns. The surprising fact about electric-field driven phase transitions is that the aggregation patterns, that are observed in very diverse systems of colloids, display a number of common structural features and modes of evolution thereby implying that a universal mechanism may exist to account for these phenomena. It is now generally believed that this mechanism emanates from the presence of the long-range anisotropic interactions between colloidal particles due to their polarization in an applied field. But, in spite of numerous applications of the electric-field-driven phenomena in biotechnology, separation, materials engineering, chemical analysis, etc. our understanding of these phenomena is far from complete. Thus, it is the purpose of the proposed research to develop a theory and then test experimentally, under normal- and low-gravity conditions, the accuracy of the theoretical predictions regarding the effect of the synergism of the interparticle electric and hydrodynamic interactions on the phase diagram of a suspension. The main results from our theoretical studies performed to-date enable one to trace how the variations of the electrical properties of the constituent materials influence the topology of the suspension phase diagram and then, by using an appropriate phase diagram, to evaluate how the electric-field-induced transformations will depend on the frequency and the strength of the applied field.

  15. Human agency beliefs influence behaviour during virtual social interactions.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Nathan; Spirou, Dean; Brock, Jon

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, with the emergence of relatively inexpensive and accessible virtual reality technologies, it is now possible to deliver compelling and realistic simulations of human-to-human interaction. Neuroimaging studies have shown that, when participants believe they are interacting via a virtual interface with another human agent, they show different patterns of brain activity compared to when they know that their virtual partner is computer-controlled. The suggestion is that users adopt an "intentional stance" by attributing mental states to their virtual partner. However, it remains unclear how beliefs in the agency of a virtual partner influence participants' behaviour and subjective experience of the interaction. We investigated this issue in the context of a cooperative "joint attention" game in which participants interacted via an eye tracker with a virtual onscreen partner, directing each other's eye gaze to different screen locations. Half of the participants were correctly informed that their partner was controlled by a computer algorithm ("Computer" condition). The other half were misled into believing that the virtual character was controlled by a second participant in another room ("Human" condition). Those in the "Human" condition were slower to make eye contact with their partner and more likely to try and guide their partner before they had established mutual eye contact than participants in the "Computer" condition. They also responded more rapidly when their partner was guiding them, although the same effect was also found for a control condition in which they responded to an arrow cue. Results confirm the influence of human agency beliefs on behaviour in this virtual social interaction context. They further suggest that researchers and developers attempting to simulate social interactions should consider the impact of agency beliefs on user experience in other social contexts, and their effect on the achievement of the application's goals.

  16. Human agency beliefs influence behaviour during virtual social interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Jon

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, with the emergence of relatively inexpensive and accessible virtual reality technologies, it is now possible to deliver compelling and realistic simulations of human-to-human interaction. Neuroimaging studies have shown that, when participants believe they are interacting via a virtual interface with another human agent, they show different patterns of brain activity compared to when they know that their virtual partner is computer-controlled. The suggestion is that users adopt an “intentional stance” by attributing mental states to their virtual partner. However, it remains unclear how beliefs in the agency of a virtual partner influence participants’ behaviour and subjective experience of the interaction. We investigated this issue in the context of a cooperative “joint attention” game in which participants interacted via an eye tracker with a virtual onscreen partner, directing each other’s eye gaze to different screen locations. Half of the participants were correctly informed that their partner was controlled by a computer algorithm (“Computer” condition). The other half were misled into believing that the virtual character was controlled by a second participant in another room (“Human” condition). Those in the “Human” condition were slower to make eye contact with their partner and more likely to try and guide their partner before they had established mutual eye contact than participants in the “Computer” condition. They also responded more rapidly when their partner was guiding them, although the same effect was also found for a control condition in which they responded to an arrow cue. Results confirm the influence of human agency beliefs on behaviour in this virtual social interaction context. They further suggest that researchers and developers attempting to simulate social interactions should consider the impact of agency beliefs on user experience in other social contexts, and their effect on the achievement

  17. Weyl card diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Gregory; Wang, John E.

    2005-06-15

    To capture important physical properties of a spacetime we construct a new diagram, the card diagram, which accurately draws generalized Weyl spacetimes in arbitrary dimensions by encoding their global spacetime structure, singularities, horizons, and some aspects of causal structure including null infinity. Card diagrams draw only nontrivial directions providing a clearer picture of the geometric features of spacetimes as compared to Penrose diagrams, and can change continuously as a function of the geometric parameters. One of our main results is to describe how Weyl rods are traversable horizons and the entirety of the spacetime can be mapped out. We review Weyl techniques and as examples we systematically discuss properties of a variety of solutions including Kerr-Newman black holes, black rings, expanding bubbles, and recent spacelike-brane solutions. Families of solutions will share qualitatively similar cards. In addition we show how card diagrams not only capture information about a geometry but also its analytic continuations by providing a geometric picture of analytic continuation. Weyl techniques are generalized to higher dimensional charged solutions and applied to generate perturbations of bubble and S-brane solutions by Israel-Khan rods.

  18. A pseudo-haptic knot diagram interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Weng, Jianguang; Hanson, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    To make progress in understanding knot theory, we will need to interact with the projected representations of mathematical knots which are of course continuous in 3D but significantly interrupted in the projective images. One way to achieve such a goal would be to design an interactive system that allows us to sketch 2D knot diagrams by taking advantage of a collision-sensing controller and explore their underlying smooth structures through a continuous motion. Recent advances of interaction techniques have been made that allow progress to be made in this direction. Pseudo-haptics that simulates haptic effects using pure visual feedback can be used to develop such an interactive system. This paper outlines one such pseudo-haptic knot diagram interface. Our interface derives from the familiar pencil-and-paper process of drawing 2D knot diagrams and provides haptic-like sensations to facilitate the creation and exploration of knot diagrams. A centerpiece of the interaction model simulates a "physically" reactive mouse cursor, which is exploited to resolve the apparent conflict between the continuous structure of the actual smooth knot and the visual discontinuities in the knot diagram representation. Another value in exploiting pseudo-haptics is that an acceleration (or deceleration) of the mouse cursor (or surface locator) can be used to indicate the slope of the curve (or surface) of whom the projective image is being explored. By exploiting these additional visual cues, we proceed to a full-featured extension to a pseudo-haptic 4D visualization system that simulates the continuous navigation on 4D objects and allows us to sense the bumps and holes in the fourth dimension. Preliminary tests of the software show that main features of the interface overcome some expected perceptual limitations in our interaction with 2D knot diagrams of 3D knots and 3D projective images of 4D mathematical objects.

  19. Dynamic tactile diagram simplification on refreshable displays.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ravi; Pawluk, Dianne T V

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of visual diagrams in educational and work environments, and even our daily lives, has created obstacles for individuals who are blind or visually impaired to independently access the information they represent. Although physical tactile pictures can be created to convey the visual information, it is typically a slow, cumbersome, and costly process. Refreshable haptic displays, which interact with computers, promise to make this access quicker, easier, and cheaper. One important aspect in converting visual to tactile diagrams is to simplify the diagram as otherwise it can be too difficult to interpret with touch. Enabling this to be under user control in an interactive environment, such as with refreshable displays, could allow users to avoid being overwhelmed by the diagrams at any instant in time while still retaining access to all information in "storage". Through this article the authors investigate whether two types of diagram simplification--boundary simplification and contextual simplification--showed potential utility in an interactive environment. Boundary simplification was found to be significantly helpful in answering general questions about borders on a geographic map, and contextual simplification was helpful in answering relational questions, as compared to using the original map unchanged.

  20. Influence of airfoil thickness on convected gust interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, E. J.; Tsai, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    The case of a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack is considered in order to determine the influence of airfoil thickness on sound generated by interaction with convected gusts. The analysis is based on a linearization of the Euler equations about the subsonic mean flow past the airfoil. Primary sound generation is found to occur in a local region surrounding the leading edge, with the size of the local region scaling on the gust wavelength. For a parabolic leading edge, moderate leading edge thickness is shown to decrease the noise level in the low Mach number limit.

  1. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists. These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams, energy bar charts, electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and…

  2. Understanding Network Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Robert

    A survey of a range of introductory university level textbooks in the social sciences found little use of network diagrams (NDs), i.e., graphic representations of processes, organizations, systems, and mechanisms. NDs can be viewed as a text/picture hybrid medium with titles and captions serving to qualify and identify the meaning and status of…

  3. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists. These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams, energy bar charts, electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and…

  4. Elementary diagrams in nuclear and neutron matter

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    Variational calculations of nuclear and neutron matter are currently performed using a diagrammatic cluster expansion with the aid of nonlinear integral equations for evaluating expectation values. These are the Fermi hypernetted chain (FHNC) and single-operator chain (SOC) equations, which are a way of doing partial diagram summations to infinite order. A more complete summation can be made by adding elementary diagrams to the procedure. The simplest elementary diagrams appear at the four-body cluster level; there is one such E{sub 4} diagram in Bose systems, but 35 diagrams in Fermi systems, which gives a level of approximation called FHNC/4. We developed a novel technique for evaluating these diagrams, by computing and storing 6 three-point functions, S{sub xyz}(r{sub 12}, r{sub 13}, r{sub 23}), where xyz (= ccd, cce, ddd, dde, dee, or eee) denotes the exchange character at the vertices 1, 2, and 3. All 35 Fermi E{sub 4} diagrams can be constructed from these 6 functions and other two-point functions that are already calculated. The elementary diagrams are known to be important in some systems like liquid {sup 3}He. We expect them to be small in nuclear matter at normal density, but they might become significant at higher densities appropriate for neutron star calculations. This year we programmed the FHNC/4 contributions to the energy and tested them in a number of simple model cases, including liquid {sup 3}He and Bethe`s homework problem. We get reasonable, but not exact agreement with earlier published work. In nuclear and neutron matter with the Argonne v{sub 14} interaction these contributions are indeed small corrections at normal density and grow to only 5-10 MeV/nucleon at 5 times normal density.

  5. Time-temperature-transformation diagrams with more than one nose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The structures of time-temperature-transformation diagrams of glasses which crystallize the combined homogeneous and heterogeneous crystallization mechanisms are examined. Considerations are given to the factors which might produce more than one extremum in such diagrams. Specific nucleation and growth models are used, and the influence of the parameters which appear in the nucleation and growth rate expressions upon the structure of the diagrams is evaluated.

  6. Thermodynamic and topological phase diagrams of correlated topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdulski, Damian; Byczuk, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    A definition of topological phases of density matrices is presented. The topological invariants in case of both noninteracting and interacting systems are extended to nonzero temperatures. The influence of electron interactions on topological insulators at finite temperatures is investigated. A correlated topological insulator is described by the Kane-Mele model, which is extended by the interaction term of the Falicov-Kimball type. Within the Hartree-Fock and the Hubbard I approximations, thermodynamic and topological phase diagrams are determined where the long-range order is included. The results show that correlation effects lead to a strong suppression of the existence of the nontrivial topological phase. In the homogeneous phase, we find a purely correlation driven phase transition into the topologically trivial Mott insulator.

  7. Bow-tie diagrams for risk management in anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Culwick, M D; Merry, A F; Clarke, D M; Taraporewalla, K J; Gibbs, N M

    2016-11-01

    Bow-tie analysis is a risk analysis and management tool that has been readily adopted into routine practice in many high reliability industries such as engineering, aviation and emergency services. However, it has received little exposure so far in healthcare. Nevertheless, its simplicity, versatility, and pictorial display may have benefits for the analysis of a range of healthcare risks, including complex and multiple risks and their interactions. Bow-tie diagrams are a combination of a fault tree and an event tree, which when combined take the shape of a bow tie. Central to bow-tie methodology is the concept of an undesired or 'Top Event', which occurs if a hazard progresses past all prevention controls. Top Events may also occasionally occur idiosyncratically. Irrespective of the cause of a Top Event, mitigation and recovery controls may influence the outcome. Hence the relationship of hazard to outcome can be viewed in one diagram along with possible causal sequences or accident trajectories. Potential uses for bow-tie diagrams in anaesthesia risk management include improved understanding of anaesthesia hazards and risks, pre-emptive identification of absent or inadequate hazard controls, investigation of clinical incidents, teaching anaesthesia risk management, and demonstrating risk management strategies to third parties when required.

  8. Influence of salt purity on Na+ and palmitic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zishuai; Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2013-12-19

    The influence of salt purity on the interactions between Na(+) ions and the carboxylate (COO(-)) head group of palmitic acid (PA) monolayers is studied in the COO(-) and OH stretching regions using broad-band vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Ultrapure (UP) and ACS grade NaCl salts are used for aqueous solution preparation after proper pretreatment. The time evolution of VSFG spectra of PA monolayers on solutions made from these two grades of salts is different, which reveals that the salt purity has a significant impact on the interactions between Na(+) ions and the COO(-) group of PA. The trace metal impurities in ACS grade salt, which are more abundant than those in UP grade salt, are responsible for this difference due to their stronger affinity for the carboxylate group relative to Na(+) and further affects the interfacial water structure. These results suggest that the alkali salt grade even after pretreatment is critical in the studies of alkali cation-carboxylate interactions and comparison of relative binding affinities of different cations.

  9. Pathway collages: personalized multi-pathway diagrams.

    PubMed

    Paley, Suzanne; O'Maille, Paul E; Weaver, Daniel; Karp, Peter D

    2016-12-13

    Metabolic pathway diagrams are a classical way of visualizing a linked cascade of biochemical reactions. However, to understand some biochemical situations, viewing a single pathway is insufficient, whereas viewing the entire metabolic network results in information overload. How do we enable scientists to rapidly construct personalized multi-pathway diagrams that depict a desired collection of interacting pathways that emphasize particular pathway interactions? We define software for constructing personalized multi-pathway diagrams called pathway-collages using a combination of manual and automatic layouts. The user specifies a set of pathways of interest for the collage from a Pathway/Genome Database. Layouts for the individual pathways are generated by the Pathway Tools software, and are sent to a Javascript Pathway Collage application implemented using Cytoscape.js. That application allows the user to re-position pathways; define connections between pathways; change visual style parameters; and paint metabolomics, gene expression, and reaction flux data onto the collage to obtain a desired multi-pathway diagram. We demonstrate the use of pathway collages in two application areas: a metabolomics study of pathogen drug response, and an Escherichia coli metabolic model. Pathway collages enable facile construction of personalized multi-pathway diagrams.

  10. Discourse Genre and Linguistic Mode: Interpreter Influences in Visual and Tactile Interpreted Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Melanie; Fleetwood, Earl; Collins, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors investigate visual and tactile ASL-English interpreters' influences on interactive discourse through an interactional sociolinguistic analysis of videotaped, interpreted interactions. They examine the participation framework of each of the interactions to determine whether the interpreters' utterances influence the…

  11. Influence of Expectation and Campus Racial Climate on Undergraduates' Interracial Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamam, Ezhar; Idris, Fazilah; Tien, Wendy Yee Mei; Ahmad, Mona Alkauthar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors examine the influence of interracial interaction expectation and campus racial climate perception on attitudes toward interracial interaction which, in turn, influences the levels of interracial interaction among students at a multicultural university in Malaysia. Interaction across race is fundamental to students'…

  12. Influence of Expectation and Campus Racial Climate on Undergraduates' Interracial Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamam, Ezhar; Idris, Fazilah; Tien, Wendy Yee Mei; Ahmad, Mona Alkauthar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors examine the influence of interracial interaction expectation and campus racial climate perception on attitudes toward interracial interaction which, in turn, influences the levels of interracial interaction among students at a multicultural university in Malaysia. Interaction across race is fundamental to students'…

  13. Tectonic discrimination diagrams revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2006-06-01

    The decision boundaries of most tectonic discrimination diagrams are drawn by eye. Discriminant analysis is a statistically more rigorous way to determine the tectonic affinity of oceanic basalts based on their bulk-rock chemistry. This method was applied to a database of 756 oceanic basalts of known tectonic affinity (ocean island, mid-ocean ridge, or island arc). For each of these training data, up to 45 major, minor, and trace elements were measured. Discriminant analysis assumes multivariate normality. If the same covariance structure is shared by all the classes (i.e., tectonic affinities), the decision boundaries are linear, hence the term linear discriminant analysis (LDA). In contrast with this, quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) allows the classes to have different covariance structures. To solve the statistical problems associated with the constant-sum constraint of geochemical data, the training data must be transformed to log-ratio space before performing a discriminant analysis. The results can be mapped back to the compositional data space using the inverse log-ratio transformation. An exhaustive exploration of 14,190 possible ternary discrimination diagrams yields the Ti-Si-Sr system as the best linear discrimination diagram and the Na-Nb-Sr system as the best quadratic discrimination diagram. The best linear and quadratic discrimination diagrams using only immobile elements are Ti-V-Sc and Ti-V-Sm, respectively. As little as 5% of the training data are misclassified by these discrimination diagrams. Testing them on a second database of 182 samples that were not part of the training data yields a more reliable estimate of future performance. Although QDA misclassifies fewer training data than LDA, the opposite is generally true for the test data. Therefore LDA is a cruder but more robust classifier than QDA. Another advantage of LDA is that it provides a powerful way to reduce the dimensionality of the multivariate geochemical data in a similar

  14. Fluctuations and the QCD Phase Diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Volker; Bzdak, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Here, we will discuss how the study of various fluctuation observables may be used to explore the phase diagram of the strong interaction. Furthermore, we will briefly summarize the present study of experimental and theoretical research in this area. We will then discuss various corrections and issues which need to be understood and applied for a meaningful comparison of experimental measurements with theoretical predictions.

  15. TEP process flow diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, R Scott; Carlson, Bryan; Coons, James; Kubic, William

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes the development of the proposed Process Flow Diagram (PFD) for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP) of ITER. A brief review of design efforts leading up to the PFD is followed by a description of the hydrogen-like, air-like, and waterlike processes. Two new design values are described; the mostcommon and most-demanding design values. The proposed PFD is shown to meet specifications under the most-common and mostdemanding design values.

  16. Spinning Witten diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleight, Charlotte; Taronna, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    We develop a systematic framework to compute the conformal partial wave expansions (CPWEs) of tree-level four-point Witten diagrams with totally symmetric external fields of arbitrary mass and integer spin in AdS d+1. As an intermediate step, we identify convenient bases of three-point bulk and boundary structures to invert linear map between spinning three-point conformal structures and spinning cubic couplings in AdS. Given a CFT d , this provides the complete holographic reconstruction of all cubic couplings involving totally symmetric fields in the putative dual theory on AdS d+1. Employing this framework, we determine the CPWE of a generic four-point exchange Witten diagram with spinning exchanged field. As a concrete application, we compute all four-point exchange Witten diagrams in the type A higher-spin gauge theory on AdS d+1, which is conjectured to be dual to the free scalar O ( N ) model.

  17. Influence of ultradisperse additives on interaction of incompatible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, M. D.; Adrianova, O. A.; Popov, S. N.

    1998-11-01

    The influence of ultradisperse additives of β-sialon and molybdenum disulfide on the interfacial boundary conditions of nitrile rubber containing 17-20% of acrylonitrile (SKN-18) and ultrahigh molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is studied. The additives were introduced into the nonpolar UHMWPE, and then the modified composition was introduced into a crude rubber stock based on SKN-18. X-ray diffractometry, electron microscopy, and dynamic testing methods were used for studying the phase and supramolecular structure of the composition. A complex of physical and mechanical tests including the study of the wear and oil and cold resistance characteristics of the elastomeric compositions were carried out. It is shown that the use of ultradisperse additives allows us to improve the interaction at the SKN-18/UHMWPE interface and the operating properties of the materials.

  18. Gene–environment interactions influence ecological consequences of transgenic animals

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, L. F.; Lõhmus, M.; Tymchuk, W. E.; Devlin, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Production of transgenic animals has raised concern regarding their potential ecological impact should they escape or be released to the natural environment. This concern has arisen mainly from research on laboratory-reared animals and theoretical modeling exercises. In this study, we used biocontained naturalized stream environments and conventional hatchery environments to show that differences in phenotype between transgenic and wild genotypes depend on rearing conditions and, critically, that such genotype-by-environment interactions may influence subsequent ecological effects in nature. Genetically wild and growth hormone transgenic coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were reared from the fry stage under either standard hatchery conditions or under naturalized stream conditions. When reared under standard hatchery conditions, the transgenic fish grew almost three times longer than wild conspecifics and had (under simulated natural conditions) stronger predation effects on prey than wild genotypes (even after compensation for size differences). In contrast, when fish were reared under naturalized stream conditions, transgenic fish were only 20% longer than the wild fish, and the magnitude of difference in relative predation effects was much reduced. These data show that genotype-by-environment interactions can influence the relative phenotype of transgenic and wild-type organisms and that extrapolations of ecological consequences from phenotypes developed in the unnatural laboratory environment may lead to an overestimation or underestimation of ecological risk. Thus, for transgenic organisms that may not be released to nature, the establishment of a range of highly naturalized environments will be critical for acquiring reliable experimental data to be used in risk assessments. PMID:17360448

  19. Albumin's Influence on Carprofen Enantiomers-Hymecromone Interaction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjie; Guo, Yanjie; Gao, Youshui; Tang, Chao; Dang, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Zubin; Sun, Yuqiang; Wang, Kunzheng

    2016-03-01

    Hymecromone is an important coumarin drug, and carprofen is one of the most important nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The present study aims to determine the influence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the carprofen-hymecromone interaction. The inhibition of carprofen enantiomers on the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7-catalyzed glucuronidation of hymecromone was investigated in the UGTs incubation system with and without BSA. The inhibition capability of increased by 20% (P < 0.001) of (R)-carprofen after the addition of 0.5% BSA in the incubation mixture. In contrast, no significant difference was observed for the inhibition of (S)-carprofen on UGT2B7 activity in the absence or presence of 0.5% BSA in the incubation system. The Lineweaver-Burk plot showed that the intersection point was located in the vertical axis, indicating the competitive inhibition of (R)-carprofen on UGT2B7 in the incubation system with BSA, which is consistent with the inhibition kinetic type of (R)-carprofen on UGT2B7 in the incubation system without BSA. Furthermore, the second plot using the slopes from the Lineweaver-Burk versus the concentrations of (R)-carprofen showed that the fitting equation was y=39.997x+50. Using this equation, the inhibition kinetic parameter was calculated to be 1.3 μM. For (S)-carprofen, the intersection point was located in the horizontal axis in the Lineweaver-Burk plot for the incubation system with BSA, indicating the noncompetitive inhibition of (S)-carprofen on the activity of UGT2B7. The fitting plot of the second plot was y=24.6x+180, and the inhibition kinetic parameter was 7.3 μM. In conclusion, the present study gives a short summary of BSA's influence on the carprofen enantiomers-hymecromone interaction, which will guide the clinical application of carprofen and hymecromone.

  20. Calcium interacts with temperature to influence Daphnia movement rates

    PubMed Central

    Roszell, Jordan; Heyland, Andreas; Fryxell, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the ecological responses to climate change is particularly challenging, because organisms might be affected simultaneously by the synergistic effects of multiple environmental stressors. Global warming is often accompanied by declining calcium concentration in many freshwater ecosystems. Although there is growing evidence that these changes in water chemistry and thermal conditions can influence ecosystem dynamics, little information is currently available about how these synergistic environmental stressors could influence the behaviour of aquatic organisms. Here, we tested whether the combined effects of calcium and temperature affect movement parameters (average speed, mean turning frequency and mean-squared displacement) of the planktonic Daphnia magna, using a full factorial design and exposing Daphnia individuals to a range of realistic levels of temperature and calcium concentration. We found that movement increased with both temperature and calcium concentration, but temperature effects became considerably weaker when individuals were exposed to calcium levels close to survival limits documented for several Daphnia species, signalling a strong interaction effect. These results support the notion that changes in water chemistry might have as strong an effect as projected changes in temperature on movement rates of Daphnia, suggesting that even sublethal levels of calcium decline could have a considerable impact on the dynamics of freshwater ecosystems. PMID:28083097

  1. Massive basketball diagram for a thermal scalar field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Braaten, Eric; Strickland, Michael

    2000-08-15

    The ''basketball diagram'' is a three-loop vacuum diagram for a scalar field theory that cannot be expressed in terms of one-loop diagrams. We calculate this diagram for a massive scalar field at nonzero temperature, reducing it to expressions involving three-dimensional integrals that can be easily evaluated numerically. We use this result to calculate the free energy for a massive scalar field with a {phi}{sup 4} interaction to three-loop order. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. J.L. Meijering's contribution to the calculation of phase diagrams — A personal perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Larry

    1981-01-01

    During the 1950s the present author had the benefit of studying with Wagner, Chipman, and Cohen, reading the work of Zener, Kubaschewski, Darken and Meijering, and having student colleagues such as Hillert, Hilliard and Cahn wiht whom one could argue and disagree. Notwithstanding the fact that all of these individuals contributed substantially to the author's appreciation of the interaction between thermochemistry and phase diagrams, none had a greater impact than J.L. Meijering. Although I did not meet him in person until 1967, I found that his 1950-1963 papers (listed below) and the extensive correspondence we conducted on lattice stability had the most profound influence on my own perception of the importance of phase diagram calculations. In this brief paper I hope to review Meijering's contribution to the development of our understanding of binary phase diagram characteristics, synthesis of ternary phase diagrams from the components binary diagrams, miscibility gap phenomena, magnetic contributions, and lattice stability. I will try to convince you of my own opinion that Meijering has been the most successful disciple of Van Laar in our time in enhancing the tradition of the Dutch school of thermodynamicists.

  3. Phase diagram of Hertzian spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pàmies, Josep C.; Cacciuto, Angelo; Frenkel, Daan

    2009-07-01

    We report the phase diagram of interpenetrating Hertzian spheres. The Hertz potential is purely repulsive, bounded at zero separation, and decreases monotonically as a power law with exponent 5/2, vanishing at the overlapping threshold. This simple functional describes the elastic interaction of weakly deformable bodies and, therefore, it is a reliable physical model of soft macromolecules, like star polymers and globular micelles. Using thermodynamic integration and extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we computed accurate free energies of the fluid phase and a large number of crystal structures. For this, we defined a general primitive unit cell that allows for the simulation of any lattice. We found multiple re-entrant melting and first-order transitions between crystals with cubic, trigonal, tetragonal, and hexagonal symmetries.

  4. Wilson Loop Diagrams and Positroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Susama; Marin-Amat, Eloi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we study a new application of the positive Grassmannian to Wilson loop diagrams (or MHV diagrams) for scattering amplitudes in N= 4 Super Yang-Mill theory ( N = 4 SYM). There has been much interest in studying this theory via the positive Grassmannians using BCFW recursion. This is the first attempt to study MHV diagrams for planar Wilson loop calculations (or planar amplitudes) in terms of positive Grassmannians. We codify Wilson loop diagrams completely in terms of matroids. This allows us to apply the combinatorial tools in matroid theory used to identify positroids (non-negative Grassmannians) to Wilson loop diagrams. In doing so, we find that certain non-planar Wilson loop diagrams define positive Grassmannians. While non-planar diagrams do not have physical meaning, this finding suggests that they may have value as an algebraic tool, and deserve further investigation.

  5. Petersen diagram revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, Radoslaw; Dziembowski, Wojciech; Moskalik, Pawel; Netzel, Henryka; Prudil, Zdenek; Skarka, Marek; Soszynski, Igor

    2017-09-01

    Over the recent years, the Petersen diagram for classical pulsators, Cepheids and RR Lyr stars, populated with a few hundreds of new multiperiodic variables. We review our analyses of the OGLE data, which resulted in a significant extension of the known, and in the discovery of a few new and distinct forms of multiperiodic pulsation. The showcase includes not only radial mode pulsators, but also radial-non-radial pulsators and stars with significant modulation observed on top of the beat pulsation. First theoretical models explaining the new forms of stellar variability are briefly discussed.

  6. Prey type, vibrations and handling interactively influence spider silk expression.

    PubMed

    Blamires, S J; Chao, I-C; Tso, I-M

    2010-11-15

    The chemical and mechanical properties of spider major ampullate (MA) silks vary in response to different prey, mostly via differential expression of two genes - MaSp1 and MaSp2 - although the spinning process exerts additional influence over the mechanical properties of silk. The prey cues that initiate differential gene expression are unknown. Prey nutrients, vibratory stimuli and handling have been suggested to be influential. We performed experiments to decouple the vibratory stimuli and handling associated with high and low kinetic energy prey (crickets vs flies) from their prey nutrients to test the relative influence of each as inducers of silk protein expression in the orb web spider Nephila pilipes. We found that the MA silks from spiders feeding on live crickets had greater percentages of glutamine, serine, alanine and glycine than those from spiders feeding on live flies. Proline composition of the silks was unaffected by feeding treatment. Increases in alanine and glycine in the MA silks of the live-cricket-feeding spiders indicate a probable increase in MaSp1 gene expression. The amino acid compositions of N. pilipes feeding on crickets with fly stimuli and N. pilipes feeding on flies with cricket stimuli did not differ from each other or from pre-treatment responses, so these feeding treatments did not induce differential MaSp expression. Our results indicate that cricket vibratory stimuli and handling interact with nutrients to induce N. pilipes to adjust their gene expression to produce webs with mechanical properties appropriate for the retention of this prey. This shows that spiders can genetically alter their silk chemical compositions and, presumably, mechanical properties upon exposure to different prey types. The lack of any change in proline composition with feeding treatment in N. pilipes suggests that the MaSp model determined for Nephila clavipes is not universally applicable to all Nephila.

  7. Warped penguin diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Csaki, Csaba; Grossman, Yuval; Tanedo, Philip; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2011-04-01

    We present an analysis of the loop-induced magnetic dipole operator in the Randall-Sundrum model of a warped extra dimension with anarchic bulk fermions and an IR brane-localized Higgs. These operators are finite at one-loop order and we explicitly calculate the branching ratio for {mu}{yields}e{gamma} using the mixed position/momentum space formalism. The particular bound on the anarchic Yukawa and Kaluza-Klein (KK) scales can depend on the flavor structure of the anarchic matrices. It is possible for a generic model to either be ruled out or unaffected by these bounds without any fine-tuning. We quantify how these models realize this surprising behavior. We also review tree-level lepton flavor bounds in these models and show that these are on the verge of tension with the {mu}{yields}e{gamma} bounds from typical models with a 3 TeV Kaluza-Klein scale. Further, we illuminate the nature of the one-loop finiteness of these diagrams and show how to accurately determine the degree of divergence of a five-dimensional loop diagram using both the five-dimensional and KK formalism. This power counting can be obfuscated in the four-dimensional Kaluza-Klein formalism and we explicitly point out subtleties that ensure that the two formalisms agree. Finally, we remark on the existence of a perturbative regime in which these one-loop results give the dominant contribution.

  8. Spin wave Feynman diagram vertex computation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Alexander; Javernick, Philip; Datta, Trinanjan

    Spin wave theory is a well-established theoretical technique that can correctly predict the physical behavior of ordered magnetic states. However, computing the effects of an interacting spin wave theory incorporating magnons involve a laborious by hand derivation of Feynman diagram vertices. The process is tedious and time consuming. Hence, to improve productivity and have another means to check the analytical calculations, we have devised a Feynman Diagram Vertex Computation package. In this talk, we will describe our research group's effort to implement a Mathematica based symbolic Feynman diagram vertex computation package that computes spin wave vertices. Utilizing the non-commutative algebra package NCAlgebra as an add-on to Mathematica, symbolic expressions for the Feynman diagram vertices of a Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet are obtained. Our existing code reproduces the well-known expressions of a nearest neighbor square lattice Heisenberg model. We also discuss the case of a triangular lattice Heisenberg model where non collinear terms contribute to the vertex interactions.

  9. Daunomycin, an antitumor DNA intercalator, influences histone–DNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Krzysztof; Zarębski, Mirosław; Cossarizza, Andrea; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2013-01-01

    Although daunomycin and adriamycin are considered effective antitumor drugs and have been used in the clinic for over 40 years, their mechanism of action is still a matter of debate. We investigated the influence of daunomycin on interaction between linker or core histones and DNA in live HeLa cells in vitro, using image and flow cytometry. Exposure to daunomycin at clinically relevant concentrations (25–250 nM) caused dissociation of wild-type H1.1 as well as 4 H1 point mutants from DNA, followed by their accumulation in nucleoli and aggregation of chromatin. A detectable dissociation of H2B core histones occurred only at much higher concentrations of the drug (500 nM). Replication of DNA and synthesis of RNA were not halted by daunomycin (up to 2500 nM); however the characteristic subnuclear distribution of sites of transcription and replication was lost. Dissociation of the H1.1 linker histones and subsequent loss of higher order chromatin structures may constitute an important component of the mechanism of cytotoxicity of daunomycin. PMID:23792590

  10. Situational influences on rhythmicity in speech, music, and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Sarah

    2014-12-19

    Brain processes underlying the production and perception of rhythm indicate considerable flexibility in how physical signals are interpreted. This paper explores how that flexibility might play out in rhythmicity in speech and music. There is much in common across the two domains, but there are also significant differences. Interpretations are explored that reconcile some of the differences, particularly with respect to how functional properties modify the rhythmicity of speech, within limits imposed by its structural constraints. Functional and structural differences mean that music is typically more rhythmic than speech, and that speech will be more rhythmic when the emotions are more strongly engaged, or intended to be engaged. The influence of rhythmicity on attention is acknowledged, and it is suggested that local increases in rhythmicity occur at times when attention is required to coordinate joint action, whether in talking or music-making. Evidence is presented which suggests that while these short phases of heightened rhythmical behaviour are crucial to the success of transitions in communicative interaction, their modality is immaterial: they all function to enhance precise temporal prediction and hence tightly coordinated joint action. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Situational influences on rhythmicity in speech, music, and their interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Brain processes underlying the production and perception of rhythm indicate considerable flexibility in how physical signals are interpreted. This paper explores how that flexibility might play out in rhythmicity in speech and music. There is much in common across the two domains, but there are also significant differences. Interpretations are explored that reconcile some of the differences, particularly with respect to how functional properties modify the rhythmicity of speech, within limits imposed by its structural constraints. Functional and structural differences mean that music is typically more rhythmic than speech, and that speech will be more rhythmic when the emotions are more strongly engaged, or intended to be engaged. The influence of rhythmicity on attention is acknowledged, and it is suggested that local increases in rhythmicity occur at times when attention is required to coordinate joint action, whether in talking or music-making. Evidence is presented which suggests that while these short phases of heightened rhythmical behaviour are crucial to the success of transitions in communicative interaction, their modality is immaterial: they all function to enhance precise temporal prediction and hence tightly coordinated joint action. PMID:25385776

  12. Daunomycin, an antitumor DNA intercalator, influences histone-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Krzysztof; Zarębski, Mirosław; Cossarizza, Andrea; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2013-09-01

    Although daunomycin and adriamycin are considered effective antitumor drugs and have been used in the clinic for over 40 years, their mechanism of action is still a matter of debate. We investigated the influence of daunomycin on interaction between linker or core histones and DNA in live HeLa cells in vitro, using image and flow cytometry. Exposure to daunomycin at clinically relevant concentrations (25-250 nM) caused dissociation of wild-type H1.1 as well as 4 H1 point mutants from DNA, followed by their accumulation in nucleoli and aggregation of chromatin. A detectable dissociation of H2B core histones occurred only at much higher concentrations of the drug (500 nM). Replication of DNA and synthesis of RNA were not halted by daunomycin (up to 2500 nM); however the characteristic subnuclear distribution of sites of transcription and replication was lost. Dissociation of the H1.1 linker histones and subsequent loss of higher order chromatin structures may constitute an important component of the mechanism of cytotoxicity of daunomycin.

  13. Program Synthesizes UML Sequence Diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program called "Rational Sequence" generates Universal Modeling Language (UML) sequence diagrams of a target Java program running on a Java virtual machine (JVM). Rational Sequence thereby performs a reverse engineering function that aids in the design documentation of the target Java program. Whereas previously, the construction of sequence diagrams was a tedious manual process, Rational Sequence generates UML sequence diagrams automatically from the running Java code.

  14. Band diagram of strained graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Sanjay; Melnik, Roderick; Bonilla, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The influence of ripple waves on the band diagram of zigzag strained graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is analyzed by utilizing the finite element method. Such waves have their origin in electromechanical effects. With a novel model, we demonstrate that electron-hole band diagrams of GNRs are highly influenced (i.e. level crossing of the bands are possible) by two combined effects: pseudo-magnetic fields originating from electroelasticity theory and external magnetic fields. In particular, we show that the level crossing point can be observed at large external magnetic fields (B ≈ 100T ) in strained GNRs, when the externally applied tensile edge stress is on the order of -100 eV/nm and the amplitude of the out-of-plane ripple waves is on the order of 1nm.

  15. Influence of drugs on albumin and bilirubin interaction.

    PubMed

    Funato, M; Lee, Y; Onishi, S; Cashore, W J

    1989-02-01

    Twenty-eight drugs, including cephem antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents currently used or considered potentially useful in neonatal intensive care nurseries in Japan, were examined to determine their influence on albumin and bilirubin interaction by means of a glucose oxidase - peroxidase method, using an automated analyzer (Arrows) for unbound bilirubin (U.B.). The apparent binding constant for drugs to the high-affinity site on albumin (KD) was determined. Of cephem antibiotics, latamoxef sodium (LMOX) and cefazolin sodium (CEZ) were found to displace bilirubin from albumin (KD = 5.9 x 10(3) M-1 and 4.5 x 10(3) M-1, respectively) as strongly as Na salicylate (KD = 6.8 x 10(3) M-1). Mephenamate and indomethacin, which are used for medical closure of patent ductus arteriosus in premature infants, were also found to be stronger bilirubin displacers (KD = 1.3 x 10(5) M-1 and 1.2 x 10(5) M-1, respectively) than sulfisoxazole (KD = 1.6 x 10(4) M-1). Maximal displacement factors (MDF's) were also estimated in reference to protein binding (%) and effective serum concentration (M) of each drug in human adults. Of these drugs, mephenamate showed a higher risk of bilirubin displacement (MDF = 3.79) than sulfisoxazole (MDF = 2.58) and LMOX had a higher risk of displacement (MDF = 1.97) than Na salicylate (MDF = 1.85). On the other hand, indomethacin and CEZ showed minimal effects on displacement at therapeutic levels (MDF = 1.03 and 1.00, respectively). At therapeutic serum levels, mephenamate and LMOX may possess the potential for displacing bilirubin from albumin and increasing the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy, in a manner similar to sulfisoxazole.

  16. Consumer trait variation influences tritrophic interactions in salt marsh communities

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Anne Randall; Hanley, Torrance C; Orozco, Nohelia P; Zerebecki, Robyn A

    2015-01-01

    The importance of intraspecific variation has emerged as a key question in community ecology, helping to bridge the gap between ecology and evolution. Although much of this work has focused on plant species, recent syntheses have highlighted the prevalence and potential importance of morphological, behavioral, and life history variation within animals for ecological and evolutionary processes. Many small-bodied consumers live on the plant that they consume, often resulting in host plant-associated trait variation within and across consumer species. Given the central position of consumer species within tritrophic food webs, such consumer trait variation may play a particularly important role in mediating trophic dynamics, including trophic cascades. In this study, we used a series of field surveys and laboratory experiments to document intraspecific trait variation in a key consumer species, the marsh periwinkle Littoraria irrorata, based on its host plant species (Spartina alterniflora or Juncus roemerianus) in a mixed species assemblage. We then conducted a 12-week mesocosm experiment to examine the effects of Littoraria trait variation on plant community structure and dynamics in a tritrophic salt marsh food web. Littoraria from different host plant species varied across a suite of morphological and behavioral traits. These consumer trait differences interacted with plant community composition and predator presence to affect overall plant stem height, as well as differentially alter the density and biomass of the two key plant species in this system. Whether due to genetic differences or phenotypic plasticity, trait differences between consumer types had significant ecological consequences for the tritrophic marsh food web over seasonal time scales. By altering the cascading effects of the top predator on plant community structure and dynamics, consumer differences may generate a feedback over longer time scales, which in turn influences the degree of trait

  17. Consumer trait variation influences tritrophic interactions in salt marsh communities.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Anne Randall; Hanley, Torrance C; Orozco, Nohelia P; Zerebecki, Robyn A

    2015-07-01

    The importance of intraspecific variation has emerged as a key question in community ecology, helping to bridge the gap between ecology and evolution. Although much of this work has focused on plant species, recent syntheses have highlighted the prevalence and potential importance of morphological, behavioral, and life history variation within animals for ecological and evolutionary processes. Many small-bodied consumers live on the plant that they consume, often resulting in host plant-associated trait variation within and across consumer species. Given the central position of consumer species within tritrophic food webs, such consumer trait variation may play a particularly important role in mediating trophic dynamics, including trophic cascades. In this study, we used a series of field surveys and laboratory experiments to document intraspecific trait variation in a key consumer species, the marsh periwinkle Littoraria irrorata, based on its host plant species (Spartina alterniflora or Juncus roemerianus) in a mixed species assemblage. We then conducted a 12-week mesocosm experiment to examine the effects of Littoraria trait variation on plant community structure and dynamics in a tritrophic salt marsh food web. Littoraria from different host plant species varied across a suite of morphological and behavioral traits. These consumer trait differences interacted with plant community composition and predator presence to affect overall plant stem height, as well as differentially alter the density and biomass of the two key plant species in this system. Whether due to genetic differences or phenotypic plasticity, trait differences between consumer types had significant ecological consequences for the tritrophic marsh food web over seasonal time scales. By altering the cascading effects of the top predator on plant community structure and dynamics, consumer differences may generate a feedback over longer time scales, which in turn influences the degree of trait

  18. Diagonal Slices of 3D Young Diagrams in the Approach of Maya Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li-Qiang; Wang, Li-Fang; Wu, Ke; Yang, Jie

    2014-09-01

    According to the correspondence between 2D Young diagrams and Maya diagrams and the relation between 2D and 3D Young diagrams, we construct 3D Young diagrams in the approach of Maya diagrams. Moreover, we formulate the generating function of 3D Young diagrams, which is the MacMahon function in terms of Maya diagrams.

  19. Potential-pH Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    1982-01-01

    Potential-pH diagrams show the domains of redoxpotential and pH in which major species are most stable. Constructing such diagrams provides students with opportunities to decide what species must be considered, search literature for equilibrium constants and free energies of formation, and practice in using the Nernst equation. (Author/JN)

  20. Potential-pH Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    1982-01-01

    Potential-pH diagrams show the domains of redoxpotential and pH in which major species are most stable. Constructing such diagrams provides students with opportunities to decide what species must be considered, search literature for equilibrium constants and free energies of formation, and practice in using the Nernst equation. (Author/JN)

  1. Developmentally Delayed Children's Influence Attempts with Mothers Predict Interactions with Peers over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Connor, Robert T.; Neville, Brian; Hammond, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether influence attempts of 4-6 year-old children with mild developmental delays occurring when interacting with their mothers predicted children's interactions with peers two years later. Hierarchical regressions controlling for relevant child characteristics and a measure of direct parental actions to influence their children's…

  2. Genus Ranges of Chord Diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jonathan; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    2015-01-01

    A chord diagram consists of a circle, called the backbone, with line segments, called chords, whose endpoints are attached to distinct points on the circle. The genus of a chord diagram is the genus of the orientable surface obtained by thickening the backbone to an annulus and attaching bands to the inner boundary circle at the ends of each chord. Variations of this construction are considered here, where bands are possibly attached to the outer boundary circle of the annulus. The genus range of a chord diagram is the genus values over all such variations of surfaces thus obtained from a given chord diagram. Genus ranges of chord diagrams for a fixed number of chords are studied. Integer intervals that can be, and those that cannot be, realized as genus ranges are investigated. Computer calculations are presented, and play a key role in discovering and proving the properties of genus ranges. PMID:26478650

  3. Genus Ranges of Chord Diagrams.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jonathan; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    2015-04-01

    A chord diagram consists of a circle, called the backbone, with line segments, called chords, whose endpoints are attached to distinct points on the circle. The genus of a chord diagram is the genus of the orientable surface obtained by thickening the backbone to an annulus and attaching bands to the inner boundary circle at the ends of each chord. Variations of this construction are considered here, where bands are possibly attached to the outer boundary circle of the annulus. The genus range of a chord diagram is the genus values over all such variations of surfaces thus obtained from a given chord diagram. Genus ranges of chord diagrams for a fixed number of chords are studied. Integer intervals that can be, and those that cannot be, realized as genus ranges are investigated. Computer calculations are presented, and play a key role in discovering and proving the properties of genus ranges.

  4. Pedestrian ascent and descent fundamental diagram on stairway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juan; Lo, S. M.; Ma, Jian

    2017-08-01

    Due to the interaction among individuals, pedestrian walking speeds in relatively dense crowds when descending and ascending stairs may present different features from a single pedestrian moving freely. Thus, to obtain a large range of densities, a series of single-file pedestrian movement experiments under laboratory conditions were performed. The trends of the fundamental diagram in a wide pedestrian density range for staircase movement are captured. Detailed features of pedestrian speed with the increase of pedestrian density, headway, and the influence of pedestrians’ lateral sway are further discussed. It is found that with the increase of pedestrian density, the speed decrease rate varies. Meanwhile, the decrease of headway, leads to two speed regimes, i.e. free movement and linear constrained movement. We show that pedestrian speed can be described by counting the number of steps separating pedestrians in longitudinal direction. These enrichments can benefit pedestrian modelling and improve the evaluation of the evacuation performance of a staircase.

  5. The Factors Influencing Young Children's Social Interaction in Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Eun Mee

    2015-01-01

    When technology integration is accomplished successfully in early childhood education settings, children tend to interact more with one another and exchange information related to computer tasks as well as the overall classroom on-going curriculum themes. Therefore, to explore how young children are interacting in computer areas when using…

  6. Influence of dipolar interactions on hyperthermia properties of ferromagnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serantes, D.; Baldomir, D.; Martinez-Boubeta, C.; Simeonidis, K.; Angelakeris, M.; Natividad, E.; Castro, M.; Mediano, A.; Chen, D.-X.; Sanchez, A.; Balcells, LI.; Martínez, B.

    2010-10-01

    We show both experimental evidences and Monte Carlo modeling of the effects of interparticle dipolar interactions on the hysteresis losses. Results indicate that an increase in the intensity of dipolar interactions produce a decrease in the magnetic susceptibility and hysteresis losses, thus diminishing the hyperthermia output. These findings may have important clinical implications for cancer treatment.

  7. The Factors Influencing Young Children's Social Interaction in Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Eun Mee

    2015-01-01

    When technology integration is accomplished successfully in early childhood education settings, children tend to interact more with one another and exchange information related to computer tasks as well as the overall classroom on-going curriculum themes. Therefore, to explore how young children are interacting in computer areas when using…

  8. Expert-Novice Interactions: Influence of Partner Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verba, Mina; Winnykamen, Fajda

    1992-01-01

    Presents study results showing that a range of modes of interactive organization coexist in expert-novice problem-solving activity and vary with the asymmetry of the relationships. Reports that by combining high achieving status with task-related expertise, the resulting interactive dynamic is guidance/tutoring. Argues for multidimensional…

  9. Influence of charge traps in carbon nanodots on gas interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Anwesha; Reddy, Siva Kumar; Deka Boruah, Buddha; Misra, Abha

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear electrical characteristic of carbon nanodots (CNDs) has revealed important physical phenomena of charge trapping playing a dominant role in surface interactions. Functional groups on the surface of CNDs attract ambient water molecules which in turn act as charge traps and give rise to electrical hysteresis that plays a dominant role in understanding charge transport in CNDs on surface interactions. Hysteresis in the current–voltage response is further utilized to study the interaction of the CNDs with nitrogen dioxide gas as an external stimuli. The hysteresis area is observed to be dependent on the time of gas interaction with the CNDs, therefore revealing the interaction mechanism of the CNDs with the gas.

  10. Framing matters: contextual influences on interracial interaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Laura G; Sommers, Samuel R

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies indicate that interracial interactions frequently have negative outcomes but have typically focused on social contexts. The current studies examined the effect of manipulating interaction context. In Study 1, Black and White participants worked together with instructions that created either a social focus or a task focus. With a task focus, interracial pairs were more consistently synchronized, Black participants showed less executive function depletion, and White participants generally showed reduced implicit bias. Follow-up studies suggested that prejudice concerns help explain these findings: White participants reported fewer concerns about appearing prejudiced when they imagined an interracial interaction with a task focus rather than a social focus (Study 2a), and Black participants reported less vigilance against prejudice in an imagined interracial interaction with a task focus rather than a social focus (Study 2b). Taken together, these studies illustrate the importance of interaction context for the experiences of both Blacks and Whites.

  11. Influence of charge traps in carbon nanodots on gas interaction.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anwesha; Reddy, Siva Kumar; Deka Boruah, Buddha; Misra, Abha

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear electrical characteristic of carbon nanodots (CNDs) has revealed important physical phenomena of charge trapping playing a dominant role in surface interactions. Functional groups on the surface of CNDs attract ambient water molecules which in turn act as charge traps and give rise to electrical hysteresis that plays a dominant role in understanding charge transport in CNDs on surface interactions. Hysteresis in the current-voltage response is further utilized to study the interaction of the CNDs with nitrogen dioxide gas as an external stimuli. The hysteresis area is observed to be dependent on the time of gas interaction with the CNDs, therefore revealing the interaction mechanism of the CNDs with the gas.

  12. The influence of interspecific interactions on species range expansion rates

    PubMed Central

    Svenning, Jens-Christian; Gravel, Dominique; Holt, Robert D.; Schurr, Frank M.; Thuiller, Wilfried; Münkemüller, Tamara; Schiffers, Katja H.; Dullinger, Stefan; Edwards, Thomas C.; Hickler, Thomas; Higgins, Steven I.; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Pagel, Jörn; Normand, Signe

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing and predicted global change makes understanding and predicting species’ range shifts an urgent scientific priority. Here, we provide a synthetic perspective on the so far poorly understood effects of interspecific interactions on range expansion rates. We present theoretical foundations for how interspecific interactions may modulate range expansion rates, consider examples from empirical studies of biological invasions and natural range expansions as well as process-based simulations, and discuss how interspecific interactions can be more broadly represented in process-based, spatiotemporally explicit range forecasts. Theory tells us that interspecific interactions affect expansion rates via alteration of local population growth rates and spatial displacement rates, but also via effects on other demographic parameters. The best empirical evidence for interspecific effects on expansion rates comes from studies of biological invasions. Notably, invasion studies indicate that competitive dominance and release from specialized enemies can enhance expansion rates. Studies of natural range expansions especially point to the potential for competition from resident species to reduce expansion rates. Overall, it is clear that interspecific interactions may have important consequences for range dynamics, but also that their effects have received too little attention to robustly generalize on their importance. We then discuss how interspecific interactions effects can be more widely incorporated in dynamic modeling of range expansions. Importantly, models must describe spatiotemporal variation in both local population dynamics and dispersal. Finally, we derive the following guidelines for when it is particularly important to explicitly represent interspecific interactions in dynamic range expansion forecasts: if most interacting species show correlated spatial or temporal trends in their effects on the target species, if the number of interacting species is low

  13. The influence of interspecific interactions on species range expansion rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Svenning, Jens-Christian; Gravel, Dominique; Holt, Robert D.; Schurr, Frank M.; Thuiller, Wilfried; Münkemüller, Tamara; Schiffers, Katja H.; Dullinger, Stefan; Edwards, Thomas C.; Hickler, Thomas; Higgins, Steven I.; Nabel, Julia E.M.S.; Pagel, Jörn; Normand, Signe

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing and predicted global change makes understanding and predicting species’ range shifts an urgent scientific priority. Here, we provide a synthetic perspective on the so far poorly understood effects of interspecific interactions on range expansion rates. We present theoretical foundations for how interspecific interactions may modulate range expansion rates, consider examples from empirical studies of biological invasions and natural range expansions as well as process-based simulations, and discuss how interspecific interactions can be more broadly represented in process-based, spatiotemporally explicit range forecasts. Theory tells us that interspecific interactions affect expansion rates via alteration of local population growth rates and spatial displacement rates, but also via effects on other demographic parameters. The best empirical evidence for interspecific effects on expansion rates comes from studies of biological invasions. Notably, invasion studies indicate that competitive dominance and release from specialized enemies can enhance expansion rates. Studies of natural range expansions especially point to the potential for competition from resident species to reduce expansion rates. Overall, it is clear that interspecific interactions may have important consequences for range dynamics, but also that their effects have received too little attention to robustly generalize on their importance. We then discuss how interspecific interactions effects can be more widely incorporated in dynamic modeling of range expansions. Importantly, models must describe spatiotemporal variation in both local population dynamics and dispersal. Finally, we derive the following guidelines for when it is particularly important to explicitly represent interspecific interactions in dynamic range expansion forecasts: if most interacting species show correlated spatial or temporal trends in their effects on the target species, if the number of interacting species is low

  14. Phase diagram of elastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, L; Ziherl, P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments show that polymeric nanoparticles often self-assemble into several non-close-packed lattices in addition to the face-centered cubic lattice. Here, we explore theoretically the possibility that the observed phase sequences may be associated with the softness of the particles, which are modeled as elastic spheres interacting upon contact. The spheres are described by two finite-deformation theories of elasticity, the modified Saint-Venant-Kirchhoff model and the neo-Hookean model. We determine the range of indentations where the repulsion between the spheres is pairwise additive and agrees with the Hertz theory. By computing the elastic energies of nine trial crystal lattices at densities far beyond the Hertzian range, we construct the phase diagram and find the face- and body-centered cubic lattices as well as the A15 lattice and the simple hexagonal lattice, with the last two being stable at large densities where the spheres are completely faceted. These results are qualitatively consistent with observations, suggesting that deformability may indeed be viewed as a generic property that determines the phase behavior in nanocolloidal suspensions.

  15. Interaction of Induced Anxiety and Verbal Working Memory: Influence of Trait Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Nilam; Stoodley, Catherine; Pine, Daniel S.; Grillon, Christian; Ernst, Monique

    This study examines the influence of trait anxiety on working memory (WM) in safety and threat. Interactions between experimentally induced anxiety and WM performance (on different cognitive loads) have been reported in healthy, nonanxious subjects. Differences in trait anxiety may moderate these interactions. Accordingly, these interactions may…

  16. Penguin-like diagrams from the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Chia Swee

    2015-04-24

    The Standard Model is highly successful in describing the interactions of leptons and quarks. There are, however, rare processes that involve higher order effects in electroweak interactions. One specific class of processes is the penguin-like diagram. Such class of diagrams involves the neutral change of quark flavours accompanied by the emission of a gluon (gluon penguin), a photon (photon penguin), a gluon and a photon (gluon-photon penguin), a Z-boson (Z penguin), or a Higgs-boson (Higgs penguin). Such diagrams do not arise at the tree level in the Standard Model. They are, however, induced by one-loop effects. In this paper, we present an exact calculation of the penguin diagram vertices in the ‘tHooft-Feynman gauge. Renormalization of the vertex is effected by a prescription by Chia and Chong which gives an expression for the counter term identical to that obtained by employing Ward-Takahashi identity. The on-shell vertex functions for the penguin diagram vertices are obtained. The various penguin diagram vertex functions are related to one another via Ward-Takahashi identity. From these, a set of relations is obtained connecting the vertex form factors of various penguin diagrams. Explicit expressions for the gluon-photon penguin vertex form factors are obtained, and their contributions to the flavor changing processes estimated.

  17. Penguin-like diagrams from the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Chia Swee

    2015-04-01

    The Standard Model is highly successful in describing the interactions of leptons and quarks. There are, however, rare processes that involve higher order effects in electroweak interactions. One specific class of processes is the penguin-like diagram. Such class of diagrams involves the neutral change of quark flavours accompanied by the emission of a gluon (gluon penguin), a photon (photon penguin), a gluon and a photon (gluon-photon penguin), a Z-boson (Z penguin), or a Higgs-boson (Higgs penguin). Such diagrams do not arise at the tree level in the Standard Model. They are, however, induced by one-loop effects. In this paper, we present an exact calculation of the penguin diagram vertices in the `tHooft-Feynman gauge. Renormalization of the vertex is effected by a prescription by Chia and Chong which gives an expression for the counter term identical to that obtained by employing Ward-Takahashi identity. The on-shell vertex functions for the penguin diagram vertices are obtained. The various penguin diagram vertex functions are related to one another via Ward-Takahashi identity. From these, a set of relations is obtained connecting the vertex form factors of various penguin diagrams. Explicit expressions for the gluon-photon penguin vertex form factors are obtained, and their contributions to the flavor changing processes estimated.

  18. On Public Influence on People's Interactions with Ordinary Biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Skandrani, Zina; Daniel, Lucie; Jacquelin, Lauriane; Leboucher, Gérard; Bovet, Dalila; Prévot, Anne-Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Besides direct impacts of urban biodiversity on local ecosystem services, the contact of city dwellers with urban nature in their everyday life could increase their awareness on conservation issues. In this paper, we focused on a particularly common animal urban species, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Through an observational approach, we examined behavioral interactions between city dwellers and this species in the Paris metropolis, France. We found that most people (mean: 81%) do not interact with pigeons. Further, interactions (either positive or negative) are context and age-dependent: children interact more than adults and the elderly, while people in tourist spots interact more than people in urban parks or in railway stations, a result that suggests that people interacting with pigeons are mostly tourists. We discuss these results in terms of public normative pressures on city dwellers' access to and reconnection with urban nature. We call for caution in how urban species are publically portrayed and managed, given the importance of interactions with ordinary biodiversity for the fate of nature conservation.

  19. Collaborative diagramming during problem based learning in medical education: Do computerized diagrams support basic science knowledge construction?

    PubMed

    De Leng, Bas; Gijlers, Hannie

    2015-05-01

    To examine how collaborative diagramming affects discussion and knowledge construction when learning complex basic science topics in medical education, including its effectiveness in the reformulation phase of problem-based learning. Opinions and perceptions of students (n = 70) and tutors (n = 4) who used collaborative diagramming in tutorial groups were collected with a questionnaire and focus group discussions. A framework derived from the analysis of discourse in computer-supported collaborative leaning was used to construct the questionnaire. Video observations were used during the focus group discussions. Both students and tutors felt that collaborative diagramming positively affected discussion and knowledge construction. Students particularly appreciated that diagrams helped them to structure knowledge, to develop an overview of topics, and stimulated them to find relationships between topics. Tutors emphasized that diagramming increased interaction and enhanced the focus and detail of the discussion. Favourable conditions were the following: working with a shared whiteboard, using a diagram format that facilitated distribution, and applying half filled-in diagrams for non-content expert tutors and\\or for heterogeneous groups with low achieving students. The empirical findings in this study support the findings of earlier more descriptive studies that diagramming in a collaborative setting is valuable for learning complex knowledge in medicine.

  20. Brown Dwarf Microlensing Diagram

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-10

    For the first time, two space-based telescopes have teamed up with ground-based observatories to observe a microlensing event, a magnification of the light of a distant star due to the gravitational effects of an unseen object in the foreground. In this case, the cause of the microlensing event was a brown dwarf, dubbed OGLE-2015-BLG-1319, orbiting a star. In terms of mass, brown dwarfs fall somewhere between the size of the largest planets and the smallest stars. Curiously, scientists have found that, for stars roughly the mass of our sun, less than 1 percent have a brown dwarf orbiting within 3 AU (1 AU is the distance between Earth and the sun). This newly discovered brown dwarf may fall in that distance range. This microlensing event was observed by ground-based telescopes looking for these uncommon events, and subsequently seen by NASA's Spitzer and Swift space telescopes. As the diagram shows, Spitzer and Swift offer additional vantage points for viewing this chance alignment. While Swift orbits close to Earth, and saw (blue diamonds) essentially the same change in light that the ground-based telescopes measured (grey markers), Spitzer's location much farther away from Earth gave it a very different perspective on the event (red circles). In particular, Spitzer's vantage point resulted in a time lag in the microlensing event it observed, compared to what was seen by Swift and the ground-based telescope. This offset allowed astronomers to determine the distance to OGLE-2015-BLG-1319 as well as its mass: around 30-65 times that of Jupiter. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21077

  1. Failure Assessment Diagram for Titanium Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Jones, Justin S.; Powell, Mollie M.; Puckett, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction equation was used to predict failure in Ti-4V-6Al joints brazed with Al 1100 filler metal. The joints used in this study were geometrically similar to the joints in the brazed beryllium metering structure considered for the ATLAS telescope. This study confirmed that the interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub Tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub Tau)are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in ATLAS brazed joints as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD).

  2. Rectangular diagrams of surfaces: representability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dynnikov, I. A.; Prasolov, M. V.

    2017-06-01

    Introduced here is a simple combinatorial way, which is called a rectangular diagram of a surface, to represent a surface in the three-sphere. It has a particularly nice relation to the standard contact structure on S^3 and to rectangular diagrams of links. By using rectangular diagrams of surfaces it is intended, in particular, to develop a method to distinguish Legendrian knots. This requires a lot of technical work of which the present paper addresses only the first basic question: which isotopy classes of surfaces can be represented by a rectangular diagram? Roughly speaking, the answer is this: there is no restriction on the isotopy class of the surface, but there is a restriction on the rectangular diagram of the boundary link arising from the presentation of the surface. The result extends to Giroux's convex surfaces for which this restriction on the boundary has a natural meaning. In a subsequent paper, transformations of rectangular diagrams of surfaces will be considered and their properties will be studied. By using the formalism of rectangular diagrams of surfaces an annulus in S^3 is produced here that is expected to be a counterexample to the following conjecture: if two Legendrian knots cobound an annulus and have zero Thurston-Bennequin numbers relative to this annulus, then they are Legendrian isotopic. Bibliography: 30 titles.

  3. Microenvironment Influences Interaction of Signaling Molecules | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Tumor progression depends not only on events that occur within cancer cells but also on the interaction of cancer cells with their environment, which can regulate tumor growth and metastasis and modulate the formation of new blood vessels to nourish the tumor. All cells communicate with other cells around them, including endothelial cells (the cells that make up blood vessels). They also interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM), a network of sugars and proteins that supports cells. Communication between neighboring cells and molecules often occurs through interaction among and between molecules on the cell surface and molecules of the ECM. Defining these interactions should facilitate the development of novel approaches to limit tumor progression.

  4. The Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow, Janice

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom use of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to infer not only the properties of a star but also the star's probable stage in evolution, life span, and age of the cluster in which it is located. (ZWH)

  5. Atemporal diagrams for quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Robert B.; Wu Shengjun; Yu Li; Cohen, Scott M.

    2006-05-15

    A system of diagrams is introduced that allows the representation of various elements of a quantum circuit, including measurements, in a form which makes no reference to time (hence 'atemporal'). It can be used to relate quantum dynamical properties to those of entangled states (map-state duality), and suggests useful analogies, such as the inverse of an entangled ket. Diagrams clarify the role of channel kets, transition operators, dynamical operators (matrices), and Kraus rank for noisy quantum channels. Positive (semidefinite) operators are represented by diagrams with a symmetry that aids in understanding their connection with completely positive maps. The diagrams are used to analyze standard teleportation and dense coding, and for a careful study of unambiguous (conclusive) teleportation. A simple diagrammatic argument shows that a Kraus rank of 3 is impossible for a one-qubit channel modeled using a one-qubit environment in a mixed state.

  6. The Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow, Janice

    1991-01-01

    Describes a classroom use of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to infer not only the properties of a star but also the star's probable stage in evolution, life span, and age of the cluster in which it is located. (ZWH)

  7. The Features of Interactive Whiteboards and Their Influence on Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennewell, Steve; Beauchamp, Gary

    2007-01-01

    In a small-scale study of Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-rich primary school, interactive whiteboards (IWBs) were found to be the predominant ICT tools used by teachers. The study sought to identify how the teachers used features of ICT to enhance learning, based on a list of ICT's functions published for teacher education…

  8. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle-Biomolecule Interactions Influence Oral Absorption.

    PubMed

    Jo, Mi-Rae; Yu, Jin; Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jae Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2016-11-29

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in various industrial fields, such as electronics, packaging, food, and cosmetics. Accordingly, concerns about the potential toxicity of TiO₂ NPs have increased. In order to comprehend their in vivo behavior and potential toxicity, we must evaluate the interactions between TiO₂ NPs and biomolecules, which can alter the physicochemical properties and the fate of NPs under physiological conditions. In the present study, in vivo solubility, oral absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion kinetics of food grade TiO₂ (f-TiO₂) NPs were evaluated following a single-dose oral administration to rats and were compared to those of general grade TiO₂ (g-TiO₂) NPs. The effect of the interactions between the TiO₂ NPs and biomolecules, such as glucose and albumin, on oral absorption was also investigated, with the aim of determining the surface interactions between them. The intestinal transport pathway was also assessed using 3-dimensional culture systems. The results demonstrate that slightly higher oral absorption of f-TiO₂ NPs compared to g-TiO₂ NPs could be related to their intestinal transport mechanism by microfold (M) cells, however, most of the NPs were eliminated through the feces. Moreover, the biokinetics of f-TiO₂ NPs was highly dependent on their interaction with biomolecules, and the dispersibility was affected by modified surface chemistry.

  9. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle-Biomolecule Interactions Influence Oral Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Mi-Rae; Yu, Jin; Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jae Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in various industrial fields, such as electronics, packaging, food, and cosmetics. Accordingly, concerns about the potential toxicity of TiO2 NPs have increased. In order to comprehend their in vivo behavior and potential toxicity, we must evaluate the interactions between TiO2 NPs and biomolecules, which can alter the physicochemical properties and the fate of NPs under physiological conditions. In the present study, in vivo solubility, oral absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion kinetics of food grade TiO2 (f-TiO2) NPs were evaluated following a single-dose oral administration to rats and were compared to those of general grade TiO2 (g-TiO2) NPs. The effect of the interactions between the TiO2 NPs and biomolecules, such as glucose and albumin, on oral absorption was also investigated, with the aim of determining the surface interactions between them. The intestinal transport pathway was also assessed using 3-dimensional culture systems. The results demonstrate that slightly higher oral absorption of f-TiO2 NPs compared to g-TiO2 NPs could be related to their intestinal transport mechanism by microfold (M) cells, however, most of the NPs were eliminated through the feces. Moreover, the biokinetics of f-TiO2 NPs was highly dependent on their interaction with biomolecules, and the dispersibility was affected by modified surface chemistry. PMID:28335354

  10. Pilot Automated Influence Diagram Decision Aid.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    1; 1, IN ONE LINE:’ CSZI NEW:NEWAVALS-U 126] ’ARE THESE VA-LIES3 COlRRECT? (Y OR N)’ 127!] -NEW IF Y’ 11121 128) MARAVALS ’-MtARA VJIhS, NE WA V.,AL.S...L/ 4 CA V AL tL GN ) l ]’V AL 1 3 3; C N OA COtiP/ DIM) (+/CONACOMP) p- I+CfNA[.COMP/CTRS1 122]3 MARAVAL4- MARAVALS [ ( -/ (±.ACAAN ITT’ ] CRS N𔃽N I

  11. Cooperative or Anticooperative: How Noncovalent Interactions Influence Each Other.

    PubMed

    Saha, Soumen; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-08-27

    This computational study examines the key factors that control the structures and energetics of the coexistence of multiple noncovalent interactions. 4-Amino-2-iodophenol is taken as a model that exhibits nine different kinds of noncovalent interactions, viz., cation-π (CP), hydrogen bond (HB) through O (OHB), HB through N (NHB), halogen bond (XB), π-π (PP), metal ion-lone pair (ML) through O (OML), ML through N (NML), charge assisted hydrogen bond (CHB) through O (OCHB), and CHB through N (NCHB). Through all possible combinations of these noncovalent interactions, based on energy, geometry, charge, and atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis, we have systematically analyzed the cooperativity among 40 ternary systems and 105 quaternary systems. We have observed that CP-HB, CP-XB, CP-PP, HB-HB, HB-XB, HB-PP, HB-ML, HB-CHB, XB-PP, XB-ML, XB-CHB, PP-ML, and PP-OCHB can form cooperative ternary systems. While studying the quaternary systems, we have observed that HB, XB, and PP work together by enhancing each other's strength. The study highlights that the positively charged species enhances HB-HB and HB-PP interactions and forms cooperative HB-HB-CHB, HB-HB-ML, HB-PP-ML, and HB-PP-CHB systems. Surprisingly, OHB-OML-NML, OHB-OML-OCHB, OHB-OML-NCHB, OHB-NML-OCHB, NHB-OML-NML, NHB-OML-NCHB, and NHB-NML-OCHB are also cooperative in nature despite the electrostatic repulsion between two positive charge species. The current study shows the widespread presence of cooperativity as well as anticooperativity in supramolecular assembles.

  12. Factors influencing flow steadiness in laminar boundary layer shock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumuklu, Ozgur; Levin, Deborah A.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.; Austin, Joanna M.

    2016-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method has been used to model laminar shock wave boundary interactions of hypersonic flow over a 30/55-deg double-wedge and "tick-shaped" model configurations studied in the Hypervelocity Expansion Tube facility and T-ADFA free-piston shock tunnel, respectively. The impact of thermochemical effects on these interactions by changing the chemical composition from nitrogen to air as well as argon for a stagnation enthalpy of 8.0 MJ/kg flow are investigated using the 2-D wedge model. The simulations are found to reproduce many of the classic features related to Edney Type V strong shock interactions that include the attached, oblique shock formed over the first wedge, the detached bow shock from the second wedge, the separation zone, and the separation and reattachment shocks that cause complex features such as the triple point for both cases. However, results of a reacting air flow case indicate that the size of the separation length, and the movement of the triple point toward to the leading edge is much less than the nitrogen case.

  13. Cyanogenic pseudomonads influence multitrophic interactions in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Rudrappa, Thimmaraju; Splaine, Robert E; Biedrzycki, Meredith L; Bais, Harsh P

    2008-04-30

    In the rhizosphere, plant roots cope with both pathogenic and beneficial bacterial interactions. The exometabolite production in certain bacterial species may regulate root growth and other root-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere. Here, we elucidated the role of cyanide production in pseudomonad virulence affecting plant root growth and other rhizospheric processes. Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 seedlings to both direct (with KCN) and indirect forms of cyanide from different pseudomonad strains caused significant inhibition of primary root growth. Further, we report that this growth inhibition was caused by the suppression of an auxin responsive gene, specifically at the root tip region by pseudomonad cyanogenesis. Additionally, pseudomonad cyanogenesis also affected other beneficial rhizospheric processes such as Bacillus subtilis colonization by biofilm formation on A. thaliana Col-0 roots. The effect of cyanogenesis on B. subtilis biofilm formation was further established by the down regulation of important B. subtilis biofilm operons epsA and yqxM. Our results show, the functional significance of pseudomonad cyanogenesis in regulating multitrophic rhizospheric interactions.

  14. Cyanogenic Pseudomonads Influence Multitrophic Interactions in the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Thimmaraju; Splaine, Robert E.; Biedrzycki, Meredith L.; Bais, Harsh P.

    2008-01-01

    In the rhizosphere, plant roots cope with both pathogenic and beneficial bacterial interactions. The exometabolite production in certain bacterial species may regulate root growth and other root-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere. Here, we elucidated the role of cyanide production in pseudomonad virulence affecting plant root growth and other rhizospheric processes. Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 seedlings to both direct (with KCN) and indirect forms of cyanide from different pseudomonad strains caused significant inhibition of primary root growth. Further, we report that this growth inhibition was caused by the suppression of an auxin responsive gene, specifically at the root tip region by pseudomonad cyanogenesis. Additionally, pseudomonad cyanogenesis also affected other beneficial rhizospheric processes such as Bacillus subtilis colonization by biofilm formation on A. thaliana Col-0 roots. The effect of cyanogenesis on B. subtilis biofilm formation was further established by the down regulation of important B. subtilis biofilm operons epsA and yqxM. Our results show, the functional significance of pseudomonad cyanogenesis in regulating multitrophic rhizospheric interactions. PMID:18446201

  15. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  16. Factors and Interactions Influencing Technology Integration during Situated Professional Development in an Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Evan M.; Hannafin, Michael J.; Polly, Drew; Rich, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This study examined factors that influence K-5 teachers' technology integration efforts during a semester-long Collaborative Apprenticeship. Results suggest that shared planning time, shared curriculum, connection to an individual, expertise, physical proximity, and comfort level influenced interactions across the community of practice. Posing and…

  17. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    PubMed Central

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems – i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, – play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist. PMID:24861995

  18. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence.

    PubMed

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-27

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  19. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  20. Characteristics of Interactive Oral and Computer-Mediated Peer Group Talk and Its Influence on Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewett, Beth L.

    2000-01-01

    Details a functional and qualitative study of interactive oral and computer-mediated communication (CMC)-generated (Norton "Connect") peer response group talk and its influence on revision. Finds the interactive peer groups in both environments talked primarily about their writing; however, the talk had different qualities when students used…

  1. Interpersonal Interaction in Online Learning: Experienced Online Instructors' Perceptions of Influencing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Cindy S.; Richardson, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    A multitude of factors influence interpersonal interaction between students and instructors in an online course. This study examines perceptions of six experienced online instructors to determine factors they believe increase interaction among their students and between the students and instructor of online courses. The end result is an inventory…

  2. U-Mo/Al-Si interaction: Influence of Si concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allenou, J.; Palancher, H.; Iltis, X.; Cornen, M.; Tougait, O.; Tucoulou, R.; Welcomme, E.; Martin, Ph.; Valot, C.; Charollais, F.; Anselmet, M. C.; Lemoine, P.

    2010-04-01

    Within the framework of the development of low enriched nuclear fuels for research reactors, U-Mo/Al is the most promising option that has however to be optimised. Indeed at the U-Mo/Al interfaces between U-Mo particles and the Al matrix, an interaction layer grows under irradiation inducing an unacceptable fuel swelling. Adding silicon in limited content into the Al matrix has clearly improved the in-pile fuel behaviour. This breakthrough is attributed to an U-Mo/Al-Si protective layer around U-Mo particles appeared during fuel manufacturing. In this work, the evolution of the microstructure and composition of this protective layer with increasing Si concentrations in the Al matrix has been investigated. Conclusions are based on the characterization at the micrometer scale (X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy) of U-Mo7/Al-Si diffusion couples obtained by thermal annealing at 450 °C. Two types of interaction layers have been evidenced depending on the Si content in the Al-Si alloy: the threshold value is found at about 5 wt.% but obviously evolves with temperature. It has been shown that for Si concentrations ranging from 2 to 10 wt.%, the U-Mo7/Al-Si interaction is bi-layered and the Si-rich part is located close to the Al-Si for low Si concentrations (below 5 wt.%) and close to the U-Mo for higher Si concentrations. For Si weight fraction in the Al alloy lower than 5 wt.%, the Si-rich sub-layer (close to Al-Si) consists of U(Al, Si) 3 + UMo 2Al 20, when the other sub-layer (close to U-Mo) is silicon free and made of UAl 3 and U 6Mo 4Al 43. For Si weight concentrations above 5 wt.%, the Si-rich part becomes U 3(Si, Al) 5 + U(Al, Si) 3 (close to U-Mo) and the other sub-layer (close to Al-Si) consists of U(Al, Si) 3 + UMo 2Al 20. On the basis of these results and of a literature survey, a scheme is proposed to explain the formation of different types of ILs between U-Mo and Al-Si alloys (i.e. different protective layers).

  3. Automatically Assessing Graph-Based Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Pete; Smith, Neil; Waugh, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    To date there has been very little work on the machine understanding of imprecise diagrams, such as diagrams drawn by students in response to assessment questions. Imprecise diagrams exhibit faults such as missing, extraneous and incorrectly formed elements. The semantics of imprecise diagrams are difficult to determine. While there have been…

  4. Automatically Assessing Graph-Based Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Pete; Smith, Neil; Waugh, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    To date there has been very little work on the machine understanding of imprecise diagrams, such as diagrams drawn by students in response to assessment questions. Imprecise diagrams exhibit faults such as missing, extraneous and incorrectly formed elements. The semantics of imprecise diagrams are difficult to determine. While there have been…

  5. Influence of Solvent in Controlling Peptide-Surface Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel A; Ashkenasy, Nurit; Tuttle, Tell

    2015-10-01

    Protein binding to surfaces is an important phenomenon in biology and in modern technological applications. Extensive experimental and theoretical research has been focused in recent years on revealing the factors that govern binding affinity to surfaces. Theoretical studies mainly focus on examining the contribution of the individual amino acids or, alternatively, the binding potential energies of the full peptide, which are unable to capture entropic contributions and neglect the dynamic nature of the system. We present here a methodology that involves the combination of nonequilibrium dynamics simulations with strategic mutation of polar residues to reveal the different factors governing the binding free energy of a peptide to a surface. Using a gold-binding peptide as an example, we show that relative binding free energies are a consequence of the balance between strong interactions of the peptide with the surface and the ability for the bulk solvent to stabilize the peptide.

  6. Matched designs and causal diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Mansournia, Mohammad A; Hernán, Miguel A; Greenland, Sander

    2013-01-01

    We use causal diagrams to illustrate the consequences of matching and the appropriate handling of matched variables in cohort and case-control studies. The matching process generally forces certain variables to be independent despite their being connected in the causal diagram, a phenomenon known as unfaithfulness. We show how causal diagrams can be used to visualize many previous results about matched studies. Cohort matching can prevent confounding by the matched variables, but censoring or other missing data and further adjustment may necessitate control of matching variables. Case-control matching generally does not prevent confounding by the matched variables, and control of matching variables may be necessary even if those were not confounders initially. Matching on variables that are affected by the exposure and the outcome, or intermediates between the exposure and the outcome, will ordinarily produce irremediable bias. PMID:23918854

  7. Electrochemical Phase Diagrams for Aqueous Redox Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-22

    theoretical analysis permits a classification of potential-pH diagrams into two basic types: 1) Pourbaix diagrams , in which 1 the stability field of solid...property" diagrams will contain conventional Pourbaix and Ellingham diagrams as subsets. 3. Improve the data-base supporting the computations by...research grant DAAL03-86-K-0062 and the preceding grant DAAG29-84-K-0074. 1. John C. Angus and Charles T. Angus, "Computation of Pourbaix Diagrams Using

  8. Factors in Client–Clinician Interaction That Influence Hearing Aid Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Mary Beth; Shaw, Lynn; Meston, Christine N.; Cheesman, Margaret F.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of client–clinician interactions has not been emphasized in hearing health care, despite the extensive evidence of the impact of the provider–patient interaction on health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify factors in the client–clinician interaction that may influence hearing aid adoption. Thirteen adults who had received a hearing aid recommendation within the previous 3 months and 10 audiologists participated in a study to generate, sort, and rate the importance of factors in client–clinician interaction that may influence the hearing aid purchase decision. A concept mapping approach was used to define meaningful clusters of factors. Quantitative analysis and qualitative interpretation of the statements resulted in eight concepts. The concepts in order of their importance are (a) Ensuring client comfort, (b) Understanding and meeting client needs, (c) Client-centered traits and actions, (d) Acknowledging client as an individual, (e) Imposing undue pressure and discomfort, (f) Conveying device information by clinician, (g) Supporting choices and shared decision making, and (h) Factors in client readiness. Two overarching themes of client-centered interaction and client empowerment were identified. Results highlight the influence of the client–clinician interaction in hearing aid adoption and suggest the possibility of improving hearing aid adoption by empowering clients through a client-centered interaction. PMID:22155784

  9. Factors in client-clinician interaction that influence hearing aid adoption.

    PubMed

    Poost-Foroosh, Laya; Jennings, Mary Beth; Shaw, Lynn; Meston, Christine N; Cheesman, Margaret F

    2011-09-01

    The influence of client-clinician interactions has not been emphasized in hearing health care, despite the extensive evidence of the impact of the provider-patient interaction on health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify factors in the client-clinician interaction that may influence hearing aid adoption. Thirteen adults who had received a hearing aid recommendation within the previous 3 months and 10 audiologists participated in a study to generate, sort, and rate the importance of factors in client-clinician interaction that may influence the hearing aid purchase decision. A concept mapping approach was used to define meaningful clusters of factors. Quantitative analysis and qualitative interpretation of the statements resulted in eight concepts. The concepts in order of their importance are (a) Ensuring client comfort, (b) Understanding and meeting client needs, (c) Client-centered traits and actions, (d) Acknowledging client as an individual, (e) Imposing undue pressure and discomfort, (f) Conveying device information by clinician, (g) Supporting choices and shared decision making, and (h) Factors in client readiness. Two overarching themes of client-centered interaction and client empowerment were identified. Results highlight the influence of the client-clinician interaction in hearing aid adoption and suggest the possibility of improving hearing aid adoption by empowering clients through a client-centered interaction.

  10. The influence of movement cues on intermanual interactions.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Herbert; Klein, Wolfhard

    2006-07-01

    In two experiments, we studied intermanual interactions in bimanual reversal movements and bimanual aiming movements. Targets were presented on a monitor or directly on the table on which the movements were produced. Amplitudes for each hand were cued symbolically or spatially either in advance of an imperative signal or simultaneous with it. In contrast to findings of Diedrichsen et al. (Psychological Science, 12, 493-498, 2001), reaction times for different-amplitude movements were longer than for same-amplitude movements both for symbolic and spatial cues presented on the monitor and directly on the table. However, with symbolic cues the effect of the relation between target amplitudes was considerably stronger than with spatial cues, no matter where the cues were presented. Intermanual correlations of amplitudes, movement times, and reaction times were smaller with different than with same target amplitudes, and this modulation was more pronounced when targets and cues were presented on the monitor than when they were presented on the table. The findings are taken to suggest that the basic reaction-time disadvantage of different-amplitude movements results from interference between concurrent processes of amplitude specification. Additional factors like interference between concurrent processes of mapping cues on movement characteristics may add strongly to it.

  11. Intraspecific genetic variation and competition interact to influence niche expansion

    PubMed Central

    Agashe, Deepa; Bolnick, Daniel I.

    2010-01-01

    Theory and empirical evidence show that intraspecific competition can drive selection favouring the use of novel resources (i.e. niche expansion). The evolutionary response to such selection depends on genetic variation for resource use. However, while genetic variation might facilitate niche expansion, genetically diverse groups may also experience weaker competition, reducing density-dependent selection on resource use. Therefore, genetic variation for fitness on different resources could directly facilitate, or indirectly retard, niche expansion. To test these alternatives, we factorially manipulated both the degree of genetic variation and population density in flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) exposed to both novel and familiar food resources. Using stable carbon isotope analysis, we measured temporal change and individual variation in beetle diet across eight generations. Intraspecific competition and genetic variation acted on different components of niche evolution: competition facilitated niche expansion, while genetic variation increased individual variation in niche use. In addition, genetic variation and competition together facilitated niche expansion, but all these impacts were temporally variable. Thus, we show that the interaction between genetic variation and competition can also determine niche evolution at different time scales. PMID:20462902

  12. Generic Phase Diagram of Binary Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Alexei

    Emergence of a large variety of self-assembled superlattices is a dramatic recent trend in the fields of nanoparticle and colloidal sciences. Motivated by this development, we propose a model that combines simplicity with a remarkably rich phase behavior, applicable to a wide range of such self-assembled systems. Those include nanoparticle and colloidal assemblies driven by DNA-mediated interactions, electrostatics, and possibly, by controlled drying. In our model, a binary system of Large and Small hard sphere (L and S)interact via selective short-range (''sticky'') attraction. In its simplest version, this Binary Sticky Sphere model features attraction only between 'S' and 'L' particles, respectively. We demonstrate that in the limit when this attraction is sufficiently strong compared to kT, the problem becomes purely geometrical: the thermodynamically preferred state should maximize the number of S-L contacts. A general procedure for constructing the phase diagram as a function of system composition f, and particle size ratio r, is outlined. In this way, the global phase behavior can be calculated very efficiently, for a given set of plausible candidate phases. Furthermore, the geometric nature of the problem enables us to generate those candidate phases through a well defined and intuitive construction. We calculate the phase diagrams both for 2D and 3D systems, and compare the results with existing experiments. Most of the 3D superlattices observed to date are featured in our phase diagram, while several more are yet to be discovered. The research was carried out at the CFN, DOE Office of Science Facility, at BNL, under Contract No. DE-SC0012704.

  13. Interaction between river water and groundwater: Geochemical and anthropogenic influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, L.; Karthikeyan, B.

    2011-12-01

    River water generally controls the quality and quantity of groundwater in its vicinity. Contribution by the rivers to groundwater is significant if there is over extraction. This is common in large cities where dependence on groundwater is high due to limited piped water supply. Chennai, India is one such large city where the river flowing is contaminated and the people in the near locality depend on groundwater for domestic use (Figure). The objective of this study is to understand the linkage between the river water and groundwater, and to assess the role played by the geochemical processes and anthropogenic influence. This study was carried out in and around Adyar River basin, Chennai by the collection of surface water and groundwater samples. Rainfall, lake water level and groundwater level from January 2005 to December 2009 was compared to understand their relationship. The concentration of major ion concentration vary widely in groundwater and surface water with respect to space and time. Na-Cl and Ca-Mg-Cl were the dominant groundwater and surface water type. Seawater intrusion may also be one of the reasons for Na-Cl dominant nature. In general, the ionic concentration of surface water increases towards the eastern part as in the case of groundwater. Evaporation and ion exchange were the major processes controlling groundwater chemistry in this area. Groundwater chemistry is similar to that of surface water. The surface water is contaminated due to discharge of industrial effluents and domestic sewage into the Adyar River by partly or untreated domestic sewage. Ecological restoration of Adyar River is planned and to be implemented shortly by the Government agencies which is expected to improve the river water quality. Systematic monitoring of water quality in this area will help to assess the improvement in surface water quality during the restoration process as well as its impact on groundwater.

  14. Phase diagram of hydrogen adsorbed on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Yuichi; Nakamura, Takashi

    1984-08-01

    The phase diagram for the H/Ni(111) system is calculated by treating a lattice gas on a honeycomb lattice through the position-space renormalization-group theory with prefacing transformation. The following interparticle interactions are considered: (A) nearest-neighbor exclusion, second-neighbor repulsion, and third-neighbor attraction, which was previously proposed by Domany et al.; (B) nearest-neighbor exclusion, second- and third-neighbor repulsions, and further-neighbor interactions up to the sixth-neighbor one. When the interaction parameters involved are suitably adjusted, both the interactions (A) and (B) lead to the phase diagrams in good agreement with the experimental one by Christmann et al. The change of the isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption with the adsorbed amount is also calculated. The result obtained from interaction (B) is consistent with experiment, whereas that from interaction (A) is not.

  15. The Influence of Social Interaction on Intuitions of Objectivity and Subjectivity.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Matthew; Knobe, Joshua; Strickland, Brent; Keil, Frank C

    2016-06-01

    We present experimental evidence that people's modes of social interaction influence their construal of truth. Participants who engaged in cooperative interactions were less inclined to agree that there was an objective truth about that topic than were those who engaged in a competitive interaction. Follow-up experiments ruled out alternative explanations and indicated that the changes in objectivity are explained by argumentative mindsets: When people are in cooperative arguments, they see the truth as more subjective. These findings can help inform research on moral objectivism and, more broadly, on the distinctive cognitive consequences of different types of social interaction.

  16. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  17. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  18. Monte Carlo study of Dirac semimetals phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Kotov, A. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper the phase diagram of Dirac semimetals is studied within a lattice Monte Carlo simulation. In particular, we concentrate on the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking which results in a semimetal-insulator transition. Using numerical simulation, we determine the values of the critical coupling constant of the semimetal-insulator transition for different values of the anisotropy of the Fermi velocity. This measurement allows us to draw a tentative phase diagram for Dirac semimetals. It turns out that within the Dirac model with Coulomb interaction both Na3Bi and Cd3As2 , known experimentally to be Dirac semimetals, would lie deep in the insulating region of the phase diagram. This result probably shows a decisive role of screening of the interelectron interaction in real materials, similar to the situation in graphene.

  19. How will biotic interactions influence climate change-induced range shifts?

    PubMed

    HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harsch, Melanie A; Ettinger, Ailene K; Ford, Kevin R; Theobald, Elinore J

    2013-09-01

    Biotic interactions present a challenge in determining whether species distributions will track climate change. Interactions with competitors, consumers, mutualists, and facilitators can strongly influence local species distributions, but few studies assess how and whether these interactions will impede or accelerate climate change-induced range shifts. In this paper, we explore how ecologists might move forward on this question. We first outline the conditions under which biotic interactions can result in range shifts that proceed faster or slower than climate velocity and result in ecological surprises. Next, we use our own work to demonstrate that experimental studies documenting the strength of biotic interactions across large environmental gradients are a critical first step for understanding whether they will influence climate change-induced range shifts. Further progress could be made by integrating results from these studies into modeling frameworks to predict how or generalize when biotic interactions mediate how changing climates influence range shifts. Finally, we argue that many more case studies like those described here are needed to explore the importance of biotic interactions during climate change-induced range shifts. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. Electrochemical phase diagrams for Ti oxides from density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Feng; Rondinelli, James M.

    2015-12-01

    Developing an accurate simulation method for the electrochemical stability of solids, as well as understanding the physics related with its accuracy, is critically important for improving the performance of compounds and predicting the stability of new materials in aqueous environments. Herein we propose a workflow for the accurate calculation of first-principles electrochemical phase (Pourbaix) diagrams. With this scheme, we study the electrochemical stabilities of Ti and Ti oxides using density-functional theory. First, we find the accuracy of an exchange-correlation functional in predicting formation energies and electrochemical stabilities is closely related with the electronic exchange interaction therein. Second, the metaGGA and hybrid functionals with a more precise description of the electronic exchange interaction lead to a systematic improvement in the accuracy of the Pourbaix diagrams. Furthermore, we show that accurate Ti Pourbaix diagrams also require that thermal effects are included through vibrational contributions to the free energy. We then use these diagrams to explain various experimental electrochemical phenomena for the Ti-O system, and show that if experimental formation energies for Ti oxides, which contain contributions from defects owing to their generation at high (combustion) temperatures, are directly used to predict room temperature Pourbaix diagrams then significant inaccuracies result. In contrast, the formation energies from accurate first-principles calculations, e.g., using metaGGA and hybrid functionals, are found to be more reliable. Finally, to facilitate the future application of our accurate electrochemical phase equilibria diagrams, the variation of the Ti Pourbaix diagrams with aqueous ion concentration is also provided.

  1. How abusive supervisors influence employees' voice and silence: the effects of interactional justice and organizational attribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Jiang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    In this research we investigated the influence of abusive supervision on employees' prosocial voice and silence, as well as clarified the roles of interactional justice (as a mediator) and organizational attribution (as a moderator). Moreover, we examined a mediated moderating model stipulating that interactional justice mediated the moderating effect of organizational attribution on the focal relationship. A scenario experiment was employed in Study 1, and after analyzing data from 196 employees, we found that abusive supervision influenced employees' prosocial voice and silence via interactional justice. In Study 2, data were collected from 379 employees in two waves separated by 1 week. The results not only replicated the findings of Study 1 but also indicated that organizational attribution buffered the abusive supervision-voice and silence relationship, and that interactional justice mediated this moderating effect.

  2. Leader charisma and affective team climate: the moderating role of the leader's influence and interaction.

    PubMed

    Hernández Baeza, Ana; Araya Lao, Cristina; García Meneses, Juliana; González Romá, Vicente

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we evaluate the role of leader charisma in fostering positive affective team climate and preventing negative affective climate. The analysis of a longitudinal database of 137 bank branches by means of hierarchical moderated regression shows that leader charisma has a stronger effect on team optimism than on team tension. In addition, the leader's influence and the frequency of leader-team interaction moderate the relationship between charisma and affective climate. However, whereas the leader's influence enhances the relationship between leader charisma and positive affective climate, the frequency of interaction has counterproductive effects.

  3. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  4. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  5. The Effect of Diagrams on Online Reading Processes and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrudden, Matthew T.; Magliano, Joseph P.; Schraw, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    This work examined how adjunct displays influence college readers' moment-by-moment processing of text and the products of reading, using reading time (Experiments 1 & 2), and think-aloud methodologies (Experiment 3). Participants did or did not study a diagram before reading a text. Overall, the reading time data, think-aloud data, and recall…

  6. Quantification of the Influence of Protein-Protein Interactions on Adsorbed Protein Structure and Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Latour, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    While protein-surface interactions have been widely studied, relatively little is understood at this time regarding how protein-surface interaction effects are influenced by protein-protein interactions and how these effects combine with the internal stability of a protein to influence its adsorbed-state structure and bioactivity. The objectives of this study were to develop a method to study these combined effects under widely varying protein-protein interaction conditions using hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) adsorbed on silica glass, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polyethylene as our model systems. In order to vary protein-protein interaction effects over a wide range, HEWL was first adsorbed to each surface type under widely varying protein solution concentrations for 2 h to saturate the surface, followed by immersion in pure buffer solution for 15 h to equilibrate the adsorbed protein layers in the absence of additionally adsorbing protein. Periodic measurements were made at selected time points of the areal density of the adsorbed protein layer as an indicator of the level of protein-protein interaction effects within the layer, and these values were then correlated with measurements of the adsorbed protein’s secondary structure and bioactivity. The results from these studies indicate that protein-protein interaction effects help stabilize the structure of HEWL adsorbed on silica glass, have little influence on the structural behavior of HEWL on HDPE, and actually serve to destabilize HEWL’s structure on PMMA. The bioactivity of HEWL on silica glass and HDPE was found to decrease in direct proportion to the degree of adsorption-induce protein unfolding. A direct correlation between bioactivity and the conformational state of adsorbed HEWL was less apparent on PMMA, thus suggesting that other factors influenced HEWL’s bioactivity on this surface, such as the accessibility of HEWL’s bioactive site being blocked by neighboring proteins or the surface

  7. Shifting species interaction in soil microbial community and its influence on ecosystem functions modulating.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Colica, Giovanni; Wu, Pei-pei; Li, Dunhai; Rossi, Federico; De Philippis, Roberto; Liu, Yongding

    2013-04-01

    The supportive and negative evidence for the stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) led to an ongoing debate among ecologists and called for new empirical and theoretical work. In this study, we took various biological soil crust (BSCs) samples along a spatial gradient with four environmental stress levels to examine the fitness of SGH in microbial interactions and evaluate its influence on biodiversity-function relationships in BSCs. A new assessment method of species interactions within hard-cultured invisible soil community was employed, directly based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprint images. The results showed that biotic interactions in soil phototroph community dramatically shifted from facilitation to dominant competition with the improvement of microhabitats. It offered new evidence, which presented a different perspective on the hypothesis that the relative importance of facilitation and competition varies inversely along the gradient of abiotic stress. The path analysis indicated that influence of biotic interactions (r = 0.19, p < 0.05) on ecosystem functions is lower than other community properties (r = 0.62, p < 0.001), including soil moisture, crust coverage, and biodiversity. Furthermore, the correlation between species interactions and community properties was non-significant with low negative influence (r = -0.27, p > 0.05). We demonstrate that the inversion of biotic interaction as a response to the gradient of abiotic stresses existed not only in the visible plant community but also in the soil microbial community.

  8. Cues Matter: Learning Assistants Influence Introductory Biology Student Interactions during Clicker-Question Discussions.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jennifer K; Wise, Sarah B; Rentsch, Jeremy; Furtak, Erin M

    2015-01-01

    The cues undergraduate biology instructors provide to students before discussions of clicker questions have previously been shown to influence student discussion. We further explored how student discussions were influenced by interactions with learning assistants (LAs, or peer coaches). We recorded and transcribed 140 clicker-question discussions in an introductory molecular biology course and coded them for features such as the use of reasoning and types of questions asked. Students who did not interact with LAs had discussions that were similar in most ways to students who did interact with LAs. When students interacted with LAs, the only significant changes in their discussions were the use of more questioning and more time spent in discussion. However, when individual LA-student interactions were examined within discussions, different LA prompts were found to generate specific student responses: question prompts promoted student use of reasoning, while students usually stopped their discussions when LAs explained reasons for answers. These results demonstrate that LA prompts directly influence student interactions during in-class discussions. Because clicker discussions can encourage student articulation of reasoning, instructors and LAs should focus on how to effectively implement questioning techniques rather than providing explanations.

  9. Cues Matter: Learning Assistants Influence Introductory Biology Student Interactions during Clicker-Question Discussions

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jennifer K.; Wise, Sarah B.; Rentsch, Jeremy; Furtak, Erin M.

    2015-01-01

    The cues undergraduate biology instructors provide to students before discussions of clicker questions have previously been shown to influence student discussion. We further explored how student discussions were influenced by interactions with learning assistants (LAs, or peer coaches). We recorded and transcribed 140 clicker-question discussions in an introductory molecular biology course and coded them for features such as the use of reasoning and types of questions asked. Students who did not interact with LAs had discussions that were similar in most ways to students who did interact with LAs. When students interacted with LAs, the only significant changes in their discussions were the use of more questioning and more time spent in discussion. However, when individual LA–student interactions were examined within discussions, different LA prompts were found to generate specific student responses: question prompts promoted student use of reasoning, while students usually stopped their discussions when LAs explained reasons for answers. These results demonstrate that LA prompts directly influence student interactions during in-class discussions. Because clicker discussions can encourage student articulation of reasoning, instructors and LAs should focus on how to effectively implement questioning techniques rather than providing explanations. PMID:26590204

  10. Introducing the Circular Flow Diagram to Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daraban, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The circular flow of income diagram is a simplified representation of the functioning of a free-market economic system. It illustrates how businesses interact with the other economic participants within the key macroeconomic markets that coordinate the flow of income through the national economy. Therefore, it can provide students of business with…

  11. Analysing Collisions Using Minkowski Diagrams in Momentum Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Nandor

    2011-01-01

    Momentum space and Minkowski diagrams are powerful tools for interpreting and analysing relativistic collisions in one or two spatial dimensions. All relevant quantities that characterize a collision, including the mass, velocity, momentum and energy of the interacting particles, both before and after collision, can be directly seen from a single…

  12. Introducing the Circular Flow Diagram to Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daraban, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The circular flow of income diagram is a simplified representation of the functioning of a free-market economic system. It illustrates how businesses interact with the other economic participants within the key macroeconomic markets that coordinate the flow of income through the national economy. Therefore, it can provide students of business with…

  13. Analysing Collisions Using Minkowski Diagrams in Momentum Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Nandor

    2011-01-01

    Momentum space and Minkowski diagrams are powerful tools for interpreting and analysing relativistic collisions in one or two spatial dimensions. All relevant quantities that characterize a collision, including the mass, velocity, momentum and energy of the interacting particles, both before and after collision, can be directly seen from a single…

  14. Spectral Determinants on Mandelstam Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, Luc; Kalvin, Victor; Kokotov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We study the regularized determinant of the Laplacian as a functional on the space of Mandelstam diagrams (noncompact translation surfaces glued from finite and semi-infinite cylinders). A Mandelstam diagram can be considered as a compact Riemann surface equipped with a conformal flat singular metric {|ω|^2}, where {ω} is a meromorphic one-form with simple poles such that all its periods are pure imaginary and all its residues are real. The main result is an explicit formula for the determinant of the Laplacian in terms of the basic objects on the underlying Riemann surface (the prime form, theta-functions, the canonical meromorphic bidifferential) and the divisor of the meromorphic form {ω}. As an important intermediate result we prove a decomposition formula of the type of Burghelea-Friedlander-Kappeler for the determinant of the Laplacian for flat surfaces with cylindrical ends and conical singularities.

  15. Hero's journey in bifurcation diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, L. H. A.; Mustaro, P. N.

    2012-06-01

    The hero's journey is a narrative structure identified by several authors in comparative studies on folklore and mythology. This storytelling template presents the stages of inner metamorphosis undergone by the protagonist after being called to an adventure. In a simplified version, this journey is divided into three acts separated by two crucial moments. Here we propose a discrete-time dynamical system for representing the protagonist's evolution. The suffering along the journey is taken as the control parameter of this system. The bifurcation diagram exhibits stationary, periodic and chaotic behaviors. In this diagram, there are transition from fixed point to chaos and transition from limit cycle to fixed point. We found that the values of the control parameter corresponding to these two transitions are in quantitative agreement with the two critical moments of the three-act hero's journey identified in 10 movies appearing in the list of the 200 worldwide highest-grossing films.

  16. Anatomy of geodesic Witten diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heng-Yu; Kuo, En-Jui; Kyono, Hideki

    2017-05-01

    We revisit the so-called "Geodesic Witten Diagrams" (GWDs) [1], proposed to be the holographic dual configuration of scalar conformal partial waves, from the perspectives of CFT operator product expansions. To this end, we explicitly consider three point GWDs which are natural building blocks of all possible four point GWDs, discuss their gluing procedure through integration over spectral parameter, and this leads us to a direct identification with the integral representation of CFT conformal partial waves. As a main application of this general construction, we consider the holographic dual of the conformal partial waves for external primary operators with spins. Moreover, we consider the closely related "split representation" for the bulk to bulk spinning propagator, to demonstrate how ordinary scalar Witten diagram with arbitrary spin exchange, can be systematically decomposed into scalar GWDs. We also discuss how to generalize to spinning cases.

  17. Quantum Dimer Model: Phase Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Chamon, Claudio; Castelnovo, Claudio

    We present new theoretical analysis of the Quantum Dimer Model. We study dimer models on square, cubic and triangular lattices and we reproduce their phase diagrams (which were previously known only numerically). We show that there are several types of dimer liquids and solids. We present preliminary analysis of several other models including doped dimers and planar spin ice, and some results on the Kagome and hexagonal lattices.

  18. Reliability computation from reliability block diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelson, P. O.; Eckstein, E. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Computer program computes system reliability for very general class of reliability block diagrams. Four factors are considered in calculating probability of system success: active block redundancy, standby block redundancy, partial redundancy, and presence of equivalent blocks in the diagram.

  19. Correlated and cooperative motions in segmental relaxation: Influence of constitutive unit weight and intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Bidur; Soto Puente, Jorge Arturo; Atawa, Bienvenu; Delbreilh, Laurent; Fatyeyeva, Kateryna; Saiter, Allisson; Dargent, Eric

    2016-12-01

    This work clarifies the notion of correlated and cooperative motions appearing during the α-relaxation process through the role of the molecular weight of the constitutive units and of the interchain dipolar interactions. By studying amorphous copolymers of poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) with different vinyl acetate contents, we show that the correlated motions are not sensitive to the interchain dipolar interactions, in contrast to the cooperative motions, which increase with a strengthening of the intermolecular interactions for this sample family. Concerning the influence of the molecular weight m_{0}, the notion of "correlated motions" seems to be equivalent to the notion of "cooperative motions" only for low m_{0} systems.

  20. Influence of cooling intensity on shock wave boundary layer interaction region in turbine cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczyński, P.; Szwaba, R.

    2016-10-01

    The shock wave boundary layer interaction on the suction side of a transonic turbine blade was one of the main objectives of the TFAST project. For this purpose a model of a turbine passage was designed, manufactured and assembled in a transonic wind tunnel. The paper presents the experimental investigations concerning the flow structure on the transonic turbine blade. A clean case (without a cooling system) with a normal shock wave interacting with a laminar boundary layer and also the influence of the blade cooling system with three different coolant blowing intensities on the laminar interaction region were investigated.

  1. Correlated and cooperative motions in segmental relaxation: Influence of constitutive unit weight and intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijal, Bidur; Soto Puente, Jorge Arturo; Atawa, Bienvenu; Delbreilh, Laurent; Fatyeyeva, Kateryna; Saiter, Allisson; Dargent, Eric

    2016-12-01

    This work clarifies the notion of correlated and cooperative motions appearing during the α-relaxation process through the role of the molecular weight of the constitutive units and of the interchain dipolar interactions. By studying amorphous copolymers of poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) with different vinyl acetate contents, we show that the correlated motions are not sensitive to the interchain dipolar interactions, in contrast to the cooperative motions, which increase with a strengthening of the intermolecular interactions for this sample family. Concerning the influence of the molecular weight m0, the notion of "correlated motions" seems to be equivalent to the notion of "cooperative motions" only for low m0 systems.

  2. Conversational time patterns and mutual influence in parent-child interactions: a time series approach.

    PubMed

    Welkowitz, J; Bond, R N; Feldman, L; Tota, M E

    1990-07-01

    Mutual influencing processes are assumed to be the basic building blocks in establishing parent-child bonding and in influencing cognitive and language behavior. A study by Jasnow and Feldstein (1986) revealed that, within the temporal domain of speech, preverbal (9-month-old) infants and their mothers exhibit a pattern of mutual influence (attunement) in their average durations of switching pauses. The general purpose of this research was to extend those findings to children with higher verbal functioning. In addition, parent and child genders, nature of the interaction, and specific aspects of parents' personalities, expressiveness, and instrumentality were considered. Each parent interacted with their 4- or 5-year-old son or daughter in each of two conversations--unstructured (social conversation) and structured (task activity). Conversations were processed by an automated computer system yielding objective measure of turns, vocalizations, pauses, and switching-pause durations. To examine interspeaker influence of attunement of temporal speech patterns, "influence coefficients" were computer for each speaker on a "turn-by-turn" basis using time series regression. Analysis of these coefficients revealed that: (1) Mutual influence is most evident with switching-pause duration. (2) Structure in the conversation (as defined by the task or parental instrumentality) seems to facilitate attunement for vocalization and switching pause duration. (3) Attunement with girls seems to occur equally well with both parents, while boys exhibit a style of temporal patterning influence which suggests greater identification with the father. (4) Expressiveness seems to facilitate attunement to the child's switching-pause duration.

  3. Scheil-Gulliver Constituent Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Bale, Christopher W.

    2017-06-01

    During solidification of alloys, conditions often approach those of Scheil-Gulliver cooling in which it is assumed that solid phases, once precipitated, remain unchanged. That is, they no longer react with the liquid or with each other. In the case of equilibrium solidification, equilibrium phase diagrams provide a valuable means of visualizing the effects of composition changes upon the final microstructure. In the present study, we propose for the first time the concept of Scheil-Gulliver constituent diagrams which play the same role as that in the case of Scheil-Gulliver cooling. It is shown how these diagrams can be calculated and plotted by the currently available thermodynamic database computing systems that combine Gibbs energy minimization software with large databases of optimized thermodynamic properties of solutions and compounds. Examples calculated using the FactSage system are presented for the Al-Li and Al-Mg-Zn systems, and for the Au-Bi-Sb-Pb system and its binary and ternary subsystems.

  4. Scheil-Gulliver Constituent Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Bale, Christopher W.

    2017-03-01

    During solidification of alloys, conditions often approach those of Scheil-Gulliver cooling in which it is assumed that solid phases, once precipitated, remain unchanged. That is, they no longer react with the liquid or with each other. In the case of equilibrium solidification, equilibrium phase diagrams provide a valuable means of visualizing the effects of composition changes upon the final microstructure. In the present study, we propose for the first time the concept of Scheil-Gulliver constituent diagrams which play the same role as that in the case of Scheil-Gulliver cooling. It is shown how these diagrams can be calculated and plotted by the currently available thermodynamic database computing systems that combine Gibbs energy minimization software with large databases of optimized thermodynamic properties of solutions and compounds. Examples calculated using the FactSage system are presented for the Al-Li and Al-Mg-Zn systems, and for the Au-Bi-Sb-Pb system and its binary and ternary subsystems.

  5. Phase diagram of crushed powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodard, Sébastien; Jalbaud, Olivier; Saurel, Richard; Burtschell, Yves; Lapebie, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    Compression of monodisperse powder samples in quasistatic conditions is addressed in a pressure range such that particles fragmentation occurs while the solid remains incompressible (typical pressure range of 1-300 MPa for glass powders). For a granular bed made of particles of given size, the existence of three stages is observed during compression and crush up. First, classical compression occurs and the pressure of the granular bed increases along a characteristic curve as the volume decreases. Then, a critical pressure is reached for which fragmentation begins. During the fragmentation process, the granular pressure stays constant in a given volume range. At the end of this second stage, 20%-50% of initial grains are reduced to finer particles, depending on the initial size. Then the compression undergoes the third stage and the pressure increases along another characteristic curve, in the absence of extra fragmentation. The present paper analyses the analogies between the phase transition in liquid-vapour systems and powder compression with crush-up. Fragmentation diagram for a soda lime glass is determined by experimental means. The analogues of the saturation pressure and latent heat of phase change are determined. Two thermodynamic models are then examined to represent the crush-up diagram. The first one uses piecewise functions while the second one is of van der Waals type. Both equations of state relate granular pressure, solid volume fraction, and initial particle diameter. The piecewise functions approach provides reasonable representations of the phase diagram while the van der Waals one fails.

  6. Causal diagrams in systems epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Methods of diagrammatic modelling have been greatly developed in the past two decades. Outside the context of infectious diseases, systematic use of diagrams in epidemiology has been mainly confined to the analysis of a single link: that between a disease outcome and its proximal determinant(s). Transmitted causes ("causes of causes") tend not to be systematically analysed. The infectious disease epidemiology modelling tradition models the human population in its environment, typically with the exposure-health relationship and the determinants of exposure being considered at individual and group/ecological levels, respectively. Some properties of the resulting systems are quite general, and are seen in unrelated contexts such as biochemical pathways. Confining analysis to a single link misses the opportunity to discover such properties. The structure of a causal diagram is derived from knowledge about how the world works, as well as from statistical evidence. A single diagram can be used to characterise a whole research area, not just a single analysis - although this depends on the degree of consistency of the causal relationships between different populations - and can therefore be used to integrate multiple datasets. Additional advantages of system-wide models include: the use of instrumental variables - now emerging as an important technique in epidemiology in the context of mendelian randomisation, but under-used in the exploitation of "natural experiments"; the explicit use of change models, which have advantages with respect to inferring causation; and in the detection and elucidation of feedback. PMID:22429606

  7. Preliminary Master Logic Diagram for ITER operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Taylor, N.P.; Poucet, A.E.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes the work performed to develop a Master Logic Diagram (MLD) for the operations phase of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The MLD is a probabilistic risk assessment tool used to identify the broad set of potential initiating events that could lead to an offsite radioactive or toxic chemical release from the facility under study. The MLD described here is complementary to the failure modes and effects analyses (FMEAs) that have been performed for ITER`s major plant systems in the engineering evaluation of the facility design. While the FMEAs are a bottom-up or component level approach, the MLD is a top-down or facility level approach to identifying the broad spectrum of potential events. Strengths of the MLD are that it analyzes the entire plant, depicts completeness in the accident initiator process, provides an independent method for identification, and can also identify potential system interactions. MLDs have been used successfully as a hazard analysis tool. This paper describes the process used for the ITER MLD to treat the variety of radiological and toxicological source terms present in the ITER design. One subtree of the nineteen page MLD is shown to illustrate the levels of the diagram.

  8. The Importance of Design in Learning from Node-Link Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Amelsvoort, Marije; van der Meij, Jan; Anjewierden, Anjo; van der Meij, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Diagrams organize by location. They give spatial cues for finding and recognizing information and for making inferences. In education, diagrams are often used to help students understand and recall information. This study assessed the influence of perceptual cues on reading behavior and subsequent retention. Eighty-two participants were assigned…

  9. The Importance of Design in Learning from Node-Link Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Amelsvoort, Marije; van der Meij, Jan; Anjewierden, Anjo; van der Meij, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Diagrams organize by location. They give spatial cues for finding and recognizing information and for making inferences. In education, diagrams are often used to help students understand and recall information. This study assessed the influence of perceptual cues on reading behavior and subsequent retention. Eighty-two participants were assigned…

  10. GPU based detection of topological changes in Voronoi diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, M.; Lulli, M.; Sbragaglia, M.

    2017-04-01

    The Voronoi diagrams are an important tool having theoretical and practical applications in a large number of fields. We present a new procedure, implemented as a set of CUDA kernels, which detects, in a general and efficient way, topological changes in case of dynamic Voronoi diagrams whose generating points move in time. The solution that we provide has been originally developed to identify plastic events during simulations of soft-glassy materials based on a lattice Boltzmann model with frustrated-short range attractive and mid/long-range repulsive-interactions. Along with the description of our approach, we present also some preliminary physics results.

  11. Size Dependent Phase Diagrams of Nickel-Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnin, Y.; Zappelli, A.; Amara, H.; Ducastelle, F.; Bichara, C.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon rich phase diagrams of nickel-carbon nanoparticles, relevant to catalysis and catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes, are calculated for system sizes up to about 3 nm (807 Ni atoms). A tight binding model for interatomic interactions drives the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations used to locate solid, core shell and liquid stability domains, as a function of size, temperature, and carbon chemical potential or concentration. Melting is favored by carbon incorporation from the nanoparticle surface, resulting in a strong relative lowering of the eutectic temperature and a phase diagram topology different from the bulk one. This should lead to a better understanding of the nanotube growth mechanisms.

  12. Managing family problems in advanced disease--a flow diagram.

    PubMed

    Smith, N; Regnard, C

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between patient, family and professional team can sometimes make difficult situations worse rather than better. This flow diagram attempts to clarify the process by which a professional assesses situations and suggests ways in which people can gain understanding about their difficulties. Once everyone has a greater understanding of what is or is not happening, the diagram points to ways in which professionals can use questions to help patient and family create a solution that is workable both for them and for the professionals.

  13. Phase diagram of hydrogen adsorbed on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, K.

    An explanation for the phase diagram of the H/Ni(111) system is proposed, where the existence of the p(2×2) phase is assumed in addition to the (2×2) phase. Using the position-space renormalization-group theory with prefacing transformation, a lattice gas on a honeycom lattice, including up to 6th nearest neighbor interactions, is treated. Another explanation previously put forward by Domany et al. is also examined, where the occurrence of the (2×2) ordered phase and the gas+p(2×2) coexistence phase is assumed. The phase diagrams thus obtained for these two cases are exhibited and discussed.

  14. Phase diagram of hydrogen adsorbed on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, K.

    1984-01-01

    An explanation for the phase diagram of the H/Ni(111) system is proposed, where the existence of the p(2 × 2) phase is assumed in addition to the (2 × 2) phase. Using the position-space renormalization-group theory with prefacing transformation, a lattice gas on a honeycomb lattice, including up to 6th nearest neighbor interactions, is treated. Another explanation previously put forward by Domany et al. is also examined, where the occurrence of the (2 × 2) ordered phase and the gas + p(2 × 2) coexistence phase is assumed. The phase diagrams thus obtained for these two cases are exhibited and discussed.

  15. Flow interaction based propagation model and bursty influence behavior analysis of Internet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Yu; Gu, Ren-Tao; Ji, Yue-Feng

    2016-11-01

    QoS (quality of service) fluctuations caused by Internet bursty flows influence the user experience in the Internet, such as the increment of packet loss and transmission time. In this paper, we establish a mathematical model to study the influence propagation behavior of the bursty flow, which is helpful for developing a deep understanding of the network dynamics in the Internet complex system. To intuitively reflect the propagation process, a data flow interaction network with a hierarchical structure is constructed, where the neighbor order is proposed to indicate the neighborhood relationship between the bursty flow and other flows. The influence spreads from the bursty flow to each order of neighbors through flow interactions. As the influence spreads, the bursty flow has negative effects on the odd order neighbors and positive effects on the even order neighbors. The influence intensity of bursty flow decreases sharply between two adjacent orders and the decreasing degree can reach up to dozens of times in the experimental simulation. Moreover, the influence intensity increases significantly when network congestion situation becomes serious, especially for the 1st order neighbors. Network structural factors are considered to make a further study. Simulation results show that the physical network scale expansion can reduce the influence intensity of bursty flow by decreasing the flow distribution density. Furthermore, with the same network scale, the influence intensity in WS small-world networks is 38.18% and 18.40% lower than that in ER random networks and BA scale-free networks, respectively, due to a lower interaction probability between flows. These results indicate that the macro-structural changes such as network scales and styles will affect the inner propagation behaviors of the bursty flow.

  16. Interacting with a Computer-Simulated Pet: Factors Influencing Children's Humane Attitudes and Empathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Yueh-Feng; Kaufman, David

    2014-01-01

    Previous research by Tsai and Kaufman (2010a, 2010b) has suggested that computer-simulated virtual pet dogs can be used as a potential medium to enhance children's development of empathy and humane attitudes toward animals. To gain a deeper understanding of how and why interacting with a virtual pet dog might influence children's social and…

  17. Interacting with a Computer-Simulated Pet: Factors Influencing Children's Humane Attitudes and Empathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Yueh-Feng; Kaufman, David

    2014-01-01

    Previous research by Tsai and Kaufman (2010a, 2010b) has suggested that computer-simulated virtual pet dogs can be used as a potential medium to enhance children's development of empathy and humane attitudes toward animals. To gain a deeper understanding of how and why interacting with a virtual pet dog might influence children's social and…

  18. Influence of supramolecular structures in crystals on parallel stacking interactions between pyridine molecules.

    PubMed

    Janjić, Goran V; Ninković, Dragan B; Zarić, Snezana D

    2013-08-01

    Parallel stacking interactions between pyridines in crystal structures and the influence of hydrogen bonding and supramolecular structures in crystals on the geometries of interactions were studied by analyzing data from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). In the CSD 66 contacts of pyridines have a parallel orientation of molecules and most of these pyridines simultaneously form hydrogen bonds (44 contacts). The geometries of stacked pyridines observed in crystal structures were compared with the geometries obtained by calculations and explained by supramolecular structures in crystals. The results show that the mean perpendicular distance (R) between pyridine rings with (3.48 Å) and without hydrogen bonds (3.62 Å) is larger than that calculated, because of the influence of supramolecular structures in crystals. The pyridines with hydrogen bonds show a pronounced preference for offsets of 1.25-1.75 Å, close to the position of the calculated minimum (1.80 Å). However, stacking interactions of pyridines without hydrogen bonds do not adopt values at or close to that of the calculated offset. This is because stacking interactions of pyridines without hydrogen bonds are less strong, and they are more susceptible to the influence of supramolecular structures in crystals. These results show that hydrogen bonding and supramolecular structures have an important influence on the geometries of stacked pyridines in crystals.

  19. The Influence of Interactive Context on Prelinguistic Vocalizations and Maternal Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gros-Louis, Julie; West, Meredith J.; King, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have documented influences of maternal responsiveness on cognitive and language development. Given the bidirectionality of interactions in caregiver-infant dyads, it is important to understand how infant behavior elicits variable responses. Prior studies have shown that mothers respond differentially to features of prelinguistic…

  20. Solar-stratosphere-troposphere interaction as a mechanism of solar influence on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    2003-01-01

    We will briefly review recent studies showing that stratospheric disturbances propagate to the troposphere and that UV variability affects the atmospheric circulation in the stratosphere and troposphere in a coherent fashion. We will outline a mechanism by which solar-stratosphere-troposphere interaction may influence climate and discuss a simple model that includes the basic elements of this mechanism.

  1. Support Services and Learning Styles Influencing Interaction in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucuk, M.; Genc-Kumtepe, E.; Tasci, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a case of online classes from the English Language Teaching Programme at Anadolu University, Turkey. The study used an explanatory case oriented research design that assisted to examine relations between students' learning styles and factors influencing students' participation in asynchronous interactions in online courses. The…

  2. Influences of Family-Systems Intervention Practices on Parent-Child Interactions and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivette, Carol M.; Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which the influences of family-systems intervention practices could be traced to variations in parent-child interactions and child development was investigated by meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM). MASEM is a procedure for producing a weighted pooled correlation matrix and fitting a structural equation model to the…

  3. The Influence of Interactive Context on Prelinguistic Vocalizations and Maternal Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gros-Louis, Julie; West, Meredith J.; King, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have documented influences of maternal responsiveness on cognitive and language development. Given the bidirectionality of interactions in caregiver-infant dyads, it is important to understand how infant behavior elicits variable responses. Prior studies have shown that mothers respond differentially to features of prelinguistic…

  4. Using Tablet Computers in Preschool: How Does the Design of Applications Influence Participation, Interaction and Dialogues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmér, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    The results in this article explore whether and how the design of applications used on tablet computers influences the interaction and dialogues that occur between children and pedagogues, the participation of children in the activities and the mathematics that can be learned. While mathematics offered a lens to explore the use of tablet devices,…

  5. The Influence of Positive Mother-Child Verbal Interactions on Adolescent Mothers' Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Heather-Lee M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this six-month qualitative microethnographic case study was to determine what influence a family literacy program based on positive mother-child verbal interactions would have on the participating adolescent mothers' literacy skills. The design of the program was founded on the Hart and Risley study (1995) and their findings…

  6. Interactive influences of ozone and climate on streamflow of forested watersheds

    Treesearch

    Ge Sun; Samuel B. Mclaughlin; John H. Porter; Johan Uddling; Patrick J. Mulholland; Mary B. Adams; Neil Pederson

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of forests tomitigate global climate change can be negatively influenced by tropospheric ozone that impairs both photosynthesis and stomatal control of plant transpiration, thus affecting ecosystem productivity and watershed hydrology. We have evaluated individual and interactive effects of ozone and climate on late season streamflow for six forested...

  7. Attentional Engagement in Infancy: The Interactive Influence of Attentional Inertia and Attentional State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, Lisa M.; Ross-Sheehy, Shannon; Kannass, Kathleen N.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the interactive influences of attentional state and attentional inertia on infants' level of attentional engagement. We assessed infants' distraction latencies longitudinally at 6.5 and 9 months as they explored toys, and we coded both their attentional state (focused vs. casual) and how long they had been looking at the toy at each…

  8. The Influence of Learner Characteristics on Satisfaction with Interactive Televised Courses in Florida Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Beverly L.; Kamata, Akihito; Smith, Kathleen Shea

    This report describes a pilot project designed to explore the influence of particular personality and demographic characteristics on community college student satisfaction with distance learning, specifically interactive telecommunications (ITV) courses. The study used the Telecourse Evaluation Questionnaire (TEQ) and the Sixteen Personality…

  9. Transitioning Transfer Students: Interactive Factors that Influence First-Year Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Mingchu; Williams, James E.; Vieweg, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the diverse patterns of interactive factors that influence transfer students' first-year retention at a midsize four-year university. The population for this study consisted of five cohorts totaling 1,713 full-time, degree-seeking transfer students. Sequential sets of logistic regression analyses on blocks of variables were…

  10. Father Caretaking Characteristics and Their Influence on Infant-Father Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotelchuck, Milton

    This paper describes five experimental studies which explored the influence of fathers' home caregiving and interactional characteristics on their infant's laboratory behavior. Approximately 300 families with children ranging in age from 6 to 24 months were studied. Each infant's reactions were observed as a function of the manipulation of the…

  11. The Influence of Positive Mother-Child Verbal Interactions on Adolescent Mothers' Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Heather-Lee M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this six-month qualitative microethnographic case study was to determine what influence a family literacy program based on positive mother-child verbal interactions would have on the participating adolescent mothers' literacy skills. The design of the program was founded on the Hart and Risley study (1995) and their findings…

  12. A study of the influence of forest gaps on fire–atmosphere interactions

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Kiefer; Warren E. Heilman; Shiyuan Zhong; Joseph J. (Jay) Charney; Xindi (Randy) Bian

    2016-01-01

    Much uncertainty exists regarding the possible role that gaps in forest canopies play in modulating fire–atmosphere interactions in otherwise horizontally homogeneous forests. This study examines the influence of gaps in forest canopies on atmospheric perturbations induced by a low-intensity fire using the ARPS-CANOPY model, a version of the Advanced Regional...

  13. Using Tablet Computers in Preschool: How Does the Design of Applications Influence Participation, Interaction and Dialogues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmér, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    The results in this article explore whether and how the design of applications used on tablet computers influences the interaction and dialogues that occur between children and pedagogues, the participation of children in the activities and the mathematics that can be learned. While mathematics offered a lens to explore the use of tablet devices,…

  14. Interactive influences of bioactive trace metals on biological production in oceanic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bruland, K.W.; Donat, J.R.; Hutchins, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors present an overview of the oceanic chemistries of the bioactive trace metals, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn; the authors combine field data with results from laboratory phytoplankton culture-trace metal studies and speculate on the potential influences of these trace metals on oceanic plankton production and species composition. Most field studies have focused on the effects of single metals. However, they propose that synergistic and antagonistic interactions between multiple trace metals could be very important in the oceans. Trace metal antagonisms that may prove particularly important are those between Cu and the potential biolimiting metals Fe, Mn, and Zn. These antagonistic interactions could have the greatest influence on biological productivity in areas of the open ocean isolated from terrestrial inputs, such as the remote high nutrient regions of the Pacific and Antarctic Oceans. The emerging picture of trace metal-biota interactions in these oceanic areas is one in which biology strongly influences distribution and chemical speciation of all these bioactive trace metals. It also seems likely that many of these bioactive trace metals and their speciation may influence levels of primary productivity, species composition, and trophic structure. Future investigations should give more complete consideration to the interactive effects of biologically important trace metals.

  15. Arrows in Comprehending and Producing Mechanical Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiser, Julie; Tversky, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical systems have structural organizations--parts, and their relations--and functional organizations--temporal, dynamic, and causal processes--which can be explained using text or diagrams. Two experiments illustrate the role of arrows in diagrams of mechanical systems. In Experiment 1, people described diagrams with or without arrows,…

  16. Differential Effectiveness of Two Science Diagram Types.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, William G.

    Reported is an Aptitude Treatment Instruction (ATI) Study designed to evaluate the aptitude of verbal comprehension in terms of two unitary complex science diagram types: a single complex block word diagram and a single complex picture word diagram.. ATI theory and research indicate that different effective instructional treatments tend to help…

  17. Influence of cation-pi interactions in different folding types of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael

    2003-03-25

    Cation-pi interactions play an important role to the stability of protein structures. In this work, we analyze the influence of cation-pi interactions in three-dimensional structures of membrane proteins. We found that transmembrane strand (TMS) proteins have more number of cation-pi interactions than transmembrane helical (TMH) proteins. In TMH proteins, both the positively charged residues Lys and Arg equally experience favorable cation-pi interactions whereas in TMS proteins, Arg is more likely than Lys to be in such interactions. There is no relationship between number of cation-pi interactions and number of residues in TMH proteins whereas a good correlation was observed in TMS proteins. The average cation-pi interaction energy for TMH proteins is -16 kcal/mol and that for TMS proteins is -27 kcal/mol. The pair-wise cation-pi interaction energy between aromatic and positively charged residues showed that Lys-Trp energy is stronger in TMS proteins than TMH proteins; Arg-Phe, Arg-Tyr and Lys-Phe have higher energy in TMH proteins than TMS proteins. The decomposition of energies into electrostatic and van der Waals revealed that the contribution from electrostatic energy is twice as that from van der Waals energy in both TMH and TMS proteins. The results obtained in the present study would be helpful to understand the contribution of cation-pi interactions to the stability of membrane proteins.

  18. Modeling the Influence of Interaction Layer Formation on Thermal Conductivity of U–Mo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.

    2015-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative Program continues to develop existing and new plate- and rod-type research and test reactor fuels with maximum attainable uranium loadings capable of potentially converting a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Currently, the program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of an even higher density fuel type consisting of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel plate and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the fuel and matrix, porosity that forms during fabrication of the fuel plates, and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper develops and validates a simple model to study the influence of interaction layer formation and conductivity, fuel particle size, and volume fraction of fuel dispersed in the matrix on the effective conductivity of the composite. The model shows excellent agreement with results previously presented in the literature. In particular, the thermal conductivity of the interaction layer does not appear to be important in determining the overall conductivity of the composite, while formation of the interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect. The effective thermal conductivity of the composite can be influenced by the fuel particle distribution by minimizing interaction layer formation and preserving the higher thermal conductivity matrix.

  19. TPH-2 Polymorphisms Interact with Early Life Stress to Influence Response to Treatment with Antidepressant Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gavin P.; Yuan, Yonggui; Shi, Yanyan; Pu, Mengjia; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variation in genes implicated in monoamine neurotransmission may interact with environmental factors to influence antidepressant response. We aimed to determine how a range of single nucleotide polymorphisms in monoaminergic genes influence this response to treatment and how they interact with childhood trauma and recent life stress in a Chinese sample. An initial study of monoaminergic coding region single nucleotide polymorphisms identified significant associations of TPH2 and HTR1B single nucleotide polymorphisms with treatment response that showed interactions with childhood and recent life stress, respectively (Xu et al., 2012). Methods: A total of 47 further single nucleotide polymorphisms in 17 candidate monoaminergic genes were genotyped in 281 Chinese Han patients with major depressive disorder. Response to 6 weeks’ antidepressant treatment was determined by change in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score, and previous stressful events were evaluated by the Life Events Scale and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form. Results: Three TPH2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs11178998, rs7963717, and rs2171363) were significantly associated with antidepressant response in this Chinese sample, as was a haplotype in TPH2 (rs2171363 and rs1487278). One of these, rs2171363, showed a significant interaction with childhood adversity in its association with antidepressant response. Conclusions: These findings provide further evidence that variation in TPH2 is associated with antidepressant response and may also interact with childhood trauma to influence outcome of antidepressant treatment. PMID:27521242

  20. The Effect of Social Network Diagrams on a Virtual Network of Practice: A Korean Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Il-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the presentation of social network diagrams on virtual team members' interaction behavior via e-mail. E-mail transaction data from 22 software developers in a Korean IT company was analyzed and depicted as diagrams by social network analysis (SNA), and presented to the members as an intervention. Results…

  1. The Effect of Social Network Diagrams on a Virtual Network of Practice: A Korean Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Il-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the presentation of social network diagrams on virtual team members' interaction behavior via e-mail. E-mail transaction data from 22 software developers in a Korean IT company was analyzed and depicted as diagrams by social network analysis (SNA), and presented to the members as an intervention. Results…

  2. An Instructional Strategy to Introduce Pedagogical Content Knowledge Using Venn Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Charlotte A.; Everett, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a three-circle Venn diagram as a vehicle for introducing pre-service elementary teachers to pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Each circle of the diagram represents pedagogy, content and context individually. The overlap of any two circles represents the interaction between the circles. For example, the overlap of…

  3. How parental dietary behavior and food parenting practices affect children's dietary behavior. Interacting sources of influence?

    PubMed

    Larsen, Junilla K; Hermans, Roel C J; Sleddens, Ester F C; Engels, Rutger C M E; Fisher, Jennifer O; Kremers, Stef P J

    2015-06-01

    Until now, the literatures on the effects of food parenting practices and parents' own dietary behavior on children's dietary behavior have largely been independent from one another. Integrating findings across these areas could provide insight on simultaneous and interacting influences on children's food intake. In this narrative review, we provide a conceptual model that bridges the gap between both literatures and consists of three main hypotheses. First, parental dietary behavior and food parenting practices are important interactive sources of influence on children's dietary behavior and Body Mass Index (BMI). Second, parental influences are importantly mediated by changes in the child's home food environment. Third, parenting context (i.e., parenting styles and differential parental treatment) moderates effects of food parenting practices, whereas child characteristics (i.e., temperament and appetitive traits) mainly moderate effects of the home food environment. Future studies testing (parts of) this conceptual model are needed to inform effective parent-child overweight preventive interventions.

  4. Novel antagonistic interactions associated with plant polyploidization influence trait selection and habitat preference.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Leena; Wiklund, Christer; Münzbergova, Zuzana; Dahlgren, Johan P; Ehrlén, Johan

    2010-03-01

    Polyploidization is an important mechanism for sympatric speciation in plants. Still, we know little about whether plant polyploidization leads to insect host shifts, and if novel interactions influence habitat and trait selection in plants. We investigated herbivory by the flower bud gall-forming midge Dasineura cardaminis on tetraploids and octoploids of the herb Cardamine pratensis. Gall midges attacked only octoploid plant populations, and a transplantation experiment confirmed this preference. Attack rates were higher in populations that were shaded, highly connected or occurred along stream margins. Within populations, late-flowering individuals with many flowers were most attacked. Galling reduced seed production and significantly influenced phenotypic selection on flower number. Our results suggest that an increase in ploidy may lead to insect host shifts and that plant ploidy explains insect host use. In newly formed plant polyploids, novel interactions may alter habitat preferences and trait selection, and influence the further evolution of cytotypes.

  5. Pharmacists’ Perceptions of the Influence of Interactions with the Pharmaceutical Industry on Clinical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Tejani, Aaron M; Loewen, Peter; Bachand, Richard; Harder, Curtis K

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of literature examining the perceptions of Canadian pharmacists toward drug promotion by the pharmaceutical industry and pharmacist–industry interactions. Objectives: To determine whether hospital pharmacists perceive their interactions with the pharmaceutical industry as influencing their clinical decision-making or that of their colleagues and whether hospital pharmacists perceive that interactions with the pharmaceutical industry create a conflict of interest. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of the complete sample of hospital pharmacists practising in 3 large health authorities in a single Canadian province was conducted from February to April 2010. Results: A total of 224 responses were received from the approximately 480 pharmacists in the target health authorities (response rate approximately 47%). Fifty-eight percent of respondents (127/218) did not believe that information received at industry-sponsored events influenced their clinical decision-making. Most (142/163 [87%]) disagreed that small gifts influenced their clinical decision-making, whereas responses were divided for large gifts. Respondents were also divided on the issue of whether their interactions created conflicts of interest, with most of those who had received gifts agreeing that large gifts would create a conflict of interest (134/163 [82%]) whereas small gifts would not (100/163 [61%]). There were positive correlations between respondents’ beliefs about their own susceptibility to influence from sponsored events or receipt of small or large gifts and the susceptibility of others, but 22% of respondents (28/127) expressed a different perception about sponsored events, all believing themselves to be less influenced than their colleagues. Only 6% (4/64) of those who received large gifts and 4% (5/142) of those who received small gifts and felt they were not influenced by these gifts reported that it was likely others would be influenced by the receipt of

  6. Pharmacists' Perceptions of the Influence of Interactions with the Pharmaceutical Industry on Clinical Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Tejani, Aaron M; Loewen, Peter; Bachand, Richard; Harder, Curtis K

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature examining the perceptions of Canadian pharmacists toward drug promotion by the pharmaceutical industry and pharmacist-industry interactions. To determine whether hospital pharmacists perceive their interactions with the pharmaceutical industry as influencing their clinical decision-making or that of their colleagues and whether hospital pharmacists perceive that interactions with the pharmaceutical industry create a conflict of interest. A cross-sectional survey of the complete sample of hospital pharmacists practising in 3 large health authorities in a single Canadian province was conducted from February to April 2010. A total of 224 responses were received from the approximately 480 pharmacists in the target health authorities (response rate approximately 47%). Fifty-eight percent of respondents (127/218) did not believe that information received at industry-sponsored events influenced their clinical decision-making. Most (142/163 [87%]) disagreed that small gifts influenced their clinical decision-making, whereas responses were divided for large gifts. Respondents were also divided on the issue of whether their interactions created conflicts of interest, with most of those who had received gifts agreeing that large gifts would create a conflict of interest (134/163 [82%]) whereas small gifts would not (100/163 [61%]). There were positive correlations between respondents' beliefs about their own susceptibility to influence from sponsored events or receipt of small or large gifts and the susceptibility of others, but 22% of respondents (28/127) expressed a different perception about sponsored events, all believing themselves to be less influenced than their colleagues. Only 6% (4/64) of those who received large gifts and 4% (5/142) of those who received small gifts and felt they were not influenced by these gifts reported that it was likely others would be influenced by the receipt of such gifts. Most hospital pharmacists who

  7. Microcanonical phase diagrams of short-range ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Michael; Pleimling, Michel

    2009-06-19

    A phase diagram is a graph in parameter space showing the phase boundaries of a many-particle system. Commonly, the control parameters are chosen to be those of the (generalized) canonical ensemble, such as temperature and magnetic field. However, depending on the physical situation of interest, the (generalized) microcanonical ensemble may be more appropriate, with the corresponding control parameters being energy and magnetization. We show that the phase diagram on this parameter space looks remarkably different from the canonical one. The general features of such a microcanonical phase diagram are investigated by studying two models of ferromagnets with short-range interactions. The physical consequences of the findings are discussed, including possible applications to nuclear fragmentation, adatoms on surfaces, and cold atoms in optical lattices.

  8. Phase diagram of a model of the protein amelogenin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaga, Jason; Pemberton, Elizabeth; Gunton, J. D.; Rickman, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the self-assembly and phase behavior of models of colloidal and protein particles with anisotropic interactions. One example of particular interest is amelogenin, an important protein involved in the formation of dental enamel. Amelogenin is primarily hydrophobic with a 25-residue charged C-terminus tail. This protein undergoes a hierarchical assembly process that is crucial to mineral deposition, and experimental work has demonstrated that the deletion of the C-terminus tail prevents this self-assembly. A simplified model of amelogenin has been proposed in which the protein is treated as a hydrophobic sphere, interacting via the Asakura-Oosawa (AO) potential, with a tethered point charge on its surface. In this paper, we examine the effect of the Coulomb interaction between the point charges in altering the phase diagram of the AO model. For the parameter case specific to amelogenin, we find that the previous in vitro experimental and model conditions correspond to the system being near the low-density edge of the metastable region of the phase diagram. Our study illustrates more generally the importance of understanding the phase diagram for proteins, in that the kinetic pathway for self-assembly and the resulting aggregate morphology depends on the location of the initial state in the phase diagram.

  9. Diagram, a Learning Environment for Initiation to Object-Oriented Modeling with UML Class Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Py, Dominique; Auxepaules, Ludovic; Alonso, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents Diagram, a learning environment for object-oriented modelling (OOM) with UML class diagrams. Diagram an open environment, in which the teacher can add new exercises without constraints on the vocabulary or the size of the diagram. The interface includes methodological help, encourages self-correcting and self-monitoring, and…

  10. Diagram, a Learning Environment for Initiation to Object-Oriented Modeling with UML Class Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Py, Dominique; Auxepaules, Ludovic; Alonso, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents Diagram, a learning environment for object-oriented modelling (OOM) with UML class diagrams. Diagram an open environment, in which the teacher can add new exercises without constraints on the vocabulary or the size of the diagram. The interface includes methodological help, encourages self-correcting and self-monitoring, and…

  11. A Community Based Systems Diagram of Obesity Causes.

    PubMed

    Allender, Steven; Owen, Brynle; Kuhlberg, Jill; Lowe, Janette; Nagorcka-Smith, Phoebe; Whelan, Jill; Bell, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Application of system thinking to the development, implementation and evaluation of childhood obesity prevention efforts represents the cutting edge of community-based prevention. We report on an approach to developing a system oriented community perspective on the causes of obesity. Group model building sessions were conducted in a rural Australian community to address increasing childhood obesity. Stakeholders (n = 12) built a community model that progressed from connection circles to causal loop diagrams using scripts from the system dynamics literature. Participants began this work in identifying change over time in causes and effects of childhood obesity within their community. The initial causal loop diagram was then reviewed and elaborated by 50 community leaders over a full day session. The process created a causal loop diagram representing community perceptions of determinants and causes of obesity. The causal loop diagram can be broken down into four separate domains; social influences; fast food and junk food; participation in sport; and general physical activity. This causal loop diagram can provide the basis for community led planning of a prevention response that engages with multiple levels of existing settings and systems.

  12. A Community Based Systems Diagram of Obesity Causes

    PubMed Central

    Allender, Steven; Owen, Brynle; Kuhlberg, Jill; Lowe, Janette; Nagorcka-Smith, Phoebe; Whelan, Jill; Bell, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Application of system thinking to the development, implementation and evaluation of childhood obesity prevention efforts represents the cutting edge of community-based prevention. We report on an approach to developing a system oriented community perspective on the causes of obesity. Methods Group model building sessions were conducted in a rural Australian community to address increasing childhood obesity. Stakeholders (n = 12) built a community model that progressed from connection circles to causal loop diagrams using scripts from the system dynamics literature. Participants began this work in identifying change over time in causes and effects of childhood obesity within their community. The initial causal loop diagram was then reviewed and elaborated by 50 community leaders over a full day session. Results The process created a causal loop diagram representing community perceptions of determinants and causes of obesity. The causal loop diagram can be broken down into four separate domains; social influences; fast food and junk food; participation in sport; and general physical activity. Discussion This causal loop diagram can provide the basis for community led planning of a prevention response that engages with multiple levels of existing settings and systems. PMID:26153893

  13. How does human-induced environmental change influence host-parasite interactions?

    PubMed

    Budria, Alexandre; Candolin, Ulrika

    2014-04-01

    Host-parasite interactions are an integral part of ecosystems that influence both ecological and evolutionary processes. Humans are currently altering environments the world over, often with drastic consequences for host-parasite interactions and the prevalence of parasites. The mechanisms behind the changes are, however, poorly known. Here, we explain how host-parasite interactions depend on two crucial steps--encounter rate and host-parasite compatibility--and how human activities are altering them and thereby host-parasite interactions. By drawing on examples from the literature, we show that changes in the two steps depend on the influence of human activities on a range of factors, such as the density and diversity of hosts and parasites, the search strategy of the parasite, and the avoidance strategy of the host. Thus, to unravel the mechanisms behind human-induced changes in host-parasite interactions, we have to consider the characteristics of all three parts of the interaction: the host, the parasite and the environment. More attention should now be directed to unfold these mechanisms, focusing on effects of environmental change on the factors that determine encounter rate and compatibility. We end with identifying several areas in urgent need of more investigations.

  14. Visualizing Set Concordance with Permutation Matrices and Fan Diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Bongshin

    2007-01-01

    Scientific problem solving often involves concordance (or discordance) analysis among the result sets from different approaches. For example, different scientific analysis methods with the same samples often lead to different or even conflicting conclusions. To reach a more judicious conclusion, it is crucial to consider different perspectives by checking concordance among those result sets by different methods. In this paper, we present an interactive visualization tool called ConSet, where users can effectively examine relationships among multiple sets at once. ConSet provides an overview using an improved permutation matrix to enable users to easily identify relationships among sets with a large number of elements. Not only do we use a standard Venn diagram, we also introduce a new diagram called Fan diagram that allows users to compare two or three sets without any inconsistencies that may exist in Venn diagrams. A qualitative user study was conducted to evaluate how our tool works in comparison with a traditional set visualization tool based on a Venn diagram. We observed that ConSet enabled users to complete more tasks with fewer errors than the traditional interface did and most users preferred ConSet. PMID:19641637

  15. Phase diagrams of bosonic ABn chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, G. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2016-04-01

    The A B N - 1 chain is a system that consists of repeating a unit cell with N sites where between the A and B sites there is an energy difference of λ. We considered bosons in these special lattices and took into account the kinetic energy, the local two-body interaction, and the inhomogenous local energy in the Hamiltonian. We found the charge density wave (CDW) and superfluid and Mott insulator phases, and constructed the phase diagram for N = 2 and 3 at the thermodynamic limit. The system exhibited insulator phases for densities ρ = α/ N, with α being an integer. We obtained that superfluid regions separate the insulator phases for densities larger than one. For any N value, we found that for integer densities ρ, the system exhibits ρ + 1 insulator phases, a Mott insulator phase, and ρ CDW phases. For non-integer densities larger than one, several CDW phases appear.

  16. Phase diagram study of Fulleride family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddeb, D.; Charfi-Kaddour, S.; Héritier, M.; Bennaceur, R.

    2004-08-01

    The phase diagram of the Fulleride compounds is studied as a function of n, i.e. the band filling of the LUMO or HOMO energy band, depending on the nature of the electron or hole doping, performed either chemically or by an electric field effect. We discuss the role of strong electron-electron correlation, related to electron-vibron interaction and Jahn-Teller distorsion. Superconducting coupling is expected for odd values of n and is expected to be strongest for n=3 in electron doped systems. We take into account the correlated nature of the electron Fermi liquid, which should exhibit a pseudogap phenomenon. Superconductivity is discussed within a strong coupling approach. We show that Tc( n) decrease away from n=3 on both sides of this maximum. Moreover, for even values of n, we obtain that the system is the neighbourhood of metal-insulator transition. The case of hole doping, although chemically unaccessible is also discussed.

  17. Reentrant phase diagram of network fluids.

    PubMed

    Russo, J; Tavares, J M; Teixeira, P I C; Telo da Gama, M M; Sciortino, F

    2011-02-25

    We introduce a microscopic model for particles with dissimilar patches which displays an unconventional "pinched" phase diagram, similar to the one predicted by Tlusty and Safran in the context of dipolar fluids [Science 290, 1328 (2000)]. The model-based on two types of patch interactions, which account, respectively, for chaining and branching of the self-assembled networks-is studied both numerically via Monte Carlo simulations and theoretically via first-order perturbation theory. The dense phase is rich in junctions, while the less-dense phase is rich in chain ends. The model provides a reference system for a deep understanding of the competition between condensation and self-assembly into equilibrium-polymer chains.

  18. Reentrant Phase Diagram of Network Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, J.; Tavares, J. M.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Telo da Gama, M. M.; Sciortino, F.

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a microscopic model for particles with dissimilar patches which displays an unconventional “pinched” phase diagram, similar to the one predicted by Tlusty and Safran in the context of dipolar fluids [Science 290, 1328 (2000)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.290.5495.1328]. The model—based on two types of patch interactions, which account, respectively, for chaining and branching of the self-assembled networks—is studied both numerically via Monte Carlo simulations and theoretically via first-order perturbation theory. The dense phase is rich in junctions, while the less-dense phase is rich in chain ends. The model provides a reference system for a deep understanding of the competition between condensation and self-assembly into equilibrium-polymer chains.

  19. Habitat context influences predator interference interactions and the strength of resource partitioning.

    PubMed

    Hughes, A Randall; Grabowski, Jonathan H

    2006-08-01

    Despite increasing evidence that habitat structure can shape predator-prey interactions, few studies have examined the impact of habitat context on interactions among multiple predators and the consequences for combined foraging rates. We investigated the individual and combined effects of stone crabs (Menippe mercenaria) and knobbed whelks (Busycon carica) when foraging on two common bivalves, the hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) and the ribbed mussel (Geukensia demissa) in oyster reef and sand flat habitats. Because these species co-occur across these and other estuarine habitats of varying physical complexity, this system is ideal for examining how habitat context influences foraging rates and the generality of predator interactions. Consistent with results from previous studies, consumption rates of each predator in isolation from the other were higher in the sand flat than in the more structurally complex oyster reef habitat. However, consumption by the two predators when combined surprisingly did not differ between the two habitats. This counterintuitive result probably stems from the influence of habitat structure on predator-predator interactions. In the sand-flat habitat, whelks significantly reduced their consumption of their less preferred prey when crabs were present. However, the structurally more complex oyster reef habitat appeared to reduce interference interactions among predators, such that consumption rates when the predators co-occurred did not differ from predation rates when alone. In addition, both habitat context and predator-predator interactions increased resource partitioning by strengthening predator dietary selectivity. Thus, an understanding of how habitat characteristics such as physical complexity influence interactions among predators may be critical to predicting the effects of modifying predator populations on their shared prey.

  20. Expression of Superparamagnetic Particles on FORC Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, A. M.; Kumari, M.; Crippa, F.; Petri-Fink, A.

    2015-12-01

    Identification of superparamagnetic (SP) particles in natural materials provides information on processes that lead to the new formation or dissolution of iron oxides. SP particles express themselves on first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams as a distribution centered near the origin of the diagram. Pike et al. (2001, GJI, 145, 721) demonstrated that thermal relaxation produces an upward shift in the FORC distribution, and attributed this to a pause encountered at each reversal field. In this study we examine the relationship between this upward shift and particles size on two sets of synthetic iron oxide nanoparticles. One set of coated magnetite particles have well-constrained particles size with 9, 16 and 20 nm as their diameter. A second set from the FeraSpin™ Series, consisting of FeraSpinXS, M and XL, were evaluated. Rock magnetic experiments indicate that the first set of samples is exclusively magnetite, whereas the FeraSpin samples contain predominantly magnetite with some degree of oxidation. Samples from both sets show that the upward shift of the FORC distribution at the origin increases with decreasing particle size. The amount of shift in the FeraSpin series is less when compared to the samples from the first set. This is attributed to the effect of interaction that counteracts the effect of thermal relaxation behavior of the SP particles. The FeraSpin series also shows a broader FORC distribution on the vertical axis that appears to be related to non-saturation of the hysteresis curve at maximum applied field. This non-saturation behavior can be due to spins of very fine particles or oxidation to hematite. AC susceptibility at low temperature indicates that particle interaction may affect the effective magnetic particle size. Our results suggest that the FORC distribution in pure SP particle systems provides information on the particle size distribution or oxidation, which can be further evaluated with low temperature techniques.

  1. Phase diagrams of polyelectrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, Khaled A.

    We study the phase diagram of polyelectrolyte solutions in salt and salt-free environments. We examine the phase behavior of polyelectrolyte solutions, in the semidilute regime, using different physical models, namely the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and the cross-linked model. In the RPA, we calculate the electrostatic free energy by summing all the fluctuations of the chains and all present ionic species. Within this approximation, the phase diagrams of salt-free polyelectrolyte solutions show phase separation even without including short-range attractions or ion condensation. We find that the phase behavior of large chains resembles the phase diagram of polymer network solutions. That is, the equilibrium is established between a network phase and a chain-free phase. Upon the addition of salt, the dissociated ions increase the entropy of the system and overcome the energy from the electrostatic fluctuations. When the short-range attraction between monomers is included in the model, the free energy predicts phase segregation for all salt valences at high salt concentrations (1 mol/l and higher). The phenomenon is called salting-out and occurs simply because the addition of salt reduces the quality of the solvent and induces precipitation. However, phase segregation in the presence of multivalent ions in polyelectrolyte solutions occurs at low salt concentrations (less than 1 mol/l). We propose that this phase separation is due to polyions cross-linked by multivalent ions. We constructed a phenomenological two-state model to examine this phenomenon. The two phases coexisting in the solution are a network-like phase and a polymer-free phase. The polymer-free phase is modeled using Debye-Huckel theory. In the cross-linked phase, each condensed multivalent ion attracts an equal number of monomers creating a neutral cluster. The energy of the cluster is evaluated by a simple Coulombic energy. The bare monomer charges between the linkages are treated as line of

  2. Voronoi Diagrams Without Bounding Boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, E. T. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a technique for presenting geographic data in Voronoi diagrams without having to specify a bounding box. The method restricts Voronoi cells to points within a user-defined distance of the data points. The mathematical foundation of the approach is presented as well. The cell clipping method is particularly useful for presenting geographic data that is spread in an irregular way over a map, as for example the Dutch dialect data displayed in Figure 2. The automatic generation of reasonable cell boundaries also makes redundant a frequently used solution to this problem that requires data owners to specify region boundaries, as in Goebl (2010) and Nerbonne et al (2011).

  3. The influence of interactions among phenolic compounds on the antiradical activity of chokeberries (Aronia melanocarpa).

    PubMed

    Jakobek, Lidija; Seruga, Marijan; Krivak, Petra

    2011-06-01

    In the present work, interactions between phenolic compounds from chokeberries and their influence on the antiradical activity was studied. Three fractions were isolated from chokeberries containing different classes of phenolic compounds. The first fraction contained a major part of phenolic acids and flavonols, the second anthocyanins, and the third insoluble phenols and proanthocyanidins. The phenolic compound content was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography, and the antiradical activity using the DPPH test. In order to evaluate the effects of interactions between phenolic compounds on the antiradical activity, the antiradical activity of individual phenolic fractions was compared with that obtained by mixing phenolic fractions. Phenolic mixtures showed the decrease in the antiradical activity in comparison with the individual phenolic fractions. These results suggest the existence of complex interactions among phenolic compounds that caused the decrease of the antiradical activity. Interactions among chokeberry phenols promoted a negative synergism.

  4. Predator cue and prey density interactively influence indirect effects on basal resources in intertidal oyster reefs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, A Randall; Rooker, Kelly; Murdock, Meagan; Kimbro, David L

    2012-01-01

    Predators can influence prey abundance and traits by direct consumption, as well as by non-consumptive effects of visual, olfactory, or tactile cues. The strength of these non-consumptive effects (NCEs) can be influenced by a variety of factors, including predator foraging mode, temporal variation in predator cues, and the density of competing prey. Testing the relative importance of these factors for determining NCEs is critical to our understanding of predator-prey interactions in a variety of settings. We addressed this knowledge gap by conducting two mesocosm experiments in a tri-trophic intertidal oyster reef food web. More specifically, we tested how a predatory fish (hardhead catfish, Ariopsis felis) directly influenced their prey (mud crabs, Panopeus spp.) and indirectly affected basal resources (juvenile oysters, Crassostrea virginica), as well as whether these direct and indirect effects changed across a density gradient of competing prey. Per capita crab foraging rates were inversely influenced by crab density, but they were not affected by water-borne predator cues. As a result, direct consumptive effects on prey foraging rates were stronger than non-consumptive effects. In contrast, predator cue and crab density interactively influenced indirect predator effects on oyster mortality in two experiments, with trait-mediated and density-mediated effects of similar magnitude operating to enhance oyster abundance. Consistent differences between a variable predator cue environment and other predator cue treatments (no cue and constant cue) suggests that an understanding of the natural risk environment experienced by prey is critical to testing and interpreting trait-mediated indirect interactions. Further, the prey response to the risk environment may be highly dependent on prey density, particularly in prey populations with strong intra-specific interactions.

  5. Predator Cue and Prey Density Interactively Influence Indirect Effects on Basal Resources in Intertidal Oyster Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A. Randall; Rooker, Kelly; Murdock, Meagan; Kimbro, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Predators can influence prey abundance and traits by direct consumption, as well as by non-consumptive effects of visual, olfactory, or tactile cues. The strength of these non-consumptive effects (NCEs) can be influenced by a variety of factors, including predator foraging mode, temporal variation in predator cues, and the density of competing prey. Testing the relative importance of these factors for determining NCEs is critical to our understanding of predator-prey interactions in a variety of settings. We addressed this knowledge gap by conducting two mesocosm experiments in a tri-trophic intertidal oyster reef food web. More specifically, we tested how a predatory fish (hardhead catfish, Ariopsis felis) directly influenced their prey (mud crabs, Panopeus spp.) and indirectly affected basal resources (juvenile oysters, Crassostrea virginica), as well as whether these direct and indirect effects changed across a density gradient of competing prey. Per capita crab foraging rates were inversely influenced by crab density, but they were not affected by water-borne predator cues. As a result, direct consumptive effects on prey foraging rates were stronger than non-consumptive effects. In contrast, predator cue and crab density interactively influenced indirect predator effects on oyster mortality in two experiments, with trait-mediated and density-mediated effects of similar magnitude operating to enhance oyster abundance. Consistent differences between a variable predator cue environment and other predator cue treatments (no cue and constant cue) suggests that an understanding of the natural risk environment experienced by prey is critical to testing and interpreting trait-mediated indirect interactions. Further, the prey response to the risk environment may be highly dependent on prey density, particularly in prey populations with strong intra-specific interactions. PMID:22970316

  6. Environmental influences on epistatic interactions: viabilities of cytochrome c genotypes in interpopulation crosses.

    PubMed

    Willett, Christopher S; Burton, Ronald S

    2003-10-01

    The genetic incompatibilities that underlie F2 hybrid breakdown and reproductive isolation between allopatric populations may be susceptible to environmental interactions. Here we show that epistatic interactions between cytochrome c (CYC) alleles and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation are dramatically influenced by environmental temperature in interpopulation hybrids of the copepod Tigriopus californicus. CYC is a nuclear-encoded gene that functionally interacts with electron transport system (ETS) complexes composed in part of mtDNA-encoded proteins. Previous studies have provided evidence for functional coadaptation between CYC and ETS complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) and for cytoplasmic effects on the fitness of CYC genotype in copepod hybrids. In this study, selection on CYC genotype is shown to continue into advanced generation hybrids (F2-F8) increasing the likelihood that CYC itself is involved in the interaction (and not a linked factor). Relative viabilities varied markedly between copepods raised in two different temperature/light regimes. These results suggest that both intrinsic coadaptation and extrinsic selection will influence the outcome of natural hybridizations between populations. Furthermore, the results indicate that the fitness of particular hybrid genotypes depends on additional non-mtDNA encoded genes that interact with CYC.

  7. Phase diagrams for sonoluminescing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.

    1996-11-01

    Sound driven gas bubbles in water can emit light pulses. This phenomenon is called sonoluminescence (SL). Two different phases of single bubble SL have been proposed: diffusively stable and diffusively unstable SL. We present phase diagrams in the gas concentration versus forcing pressure state space and also in the ambient radius versus gas concentration and versus forcing pressure state spaces. These phase diagrams are based on the thresholds for energy focusing in the bubble and two kinds of instabilities, namely (i) shape instabilities and (ii) diffusive instabilities. Stable SL only occurs in a tiny parameter window of large forcing pressure amplitude Pa˜1.2-1.5 atm and low gas concentration of less than 0.4% of the saturation. The upper concentration threshold becomes smaller with increased forcing. Our results quantitatively agree with experimental results of Putterman's UCLA group on argon, but not on air. However, air bubbles and other gas mixtures can also successfully be treated in this approach if in addition (iii) chemical instabilities are considered. All statements are based on the Rayleigh-Plesset ODE approximation of the bubble dynamics, extended in an adiabatic approximation to include mass diffusion effects. This approximation is the only way to explore considerable portions of parameter space, as solving the full PDEs is numerically too expensive. Therefore, we checked the adiabatic approximation by comparison with the full numerical solution of the advection diffusion PDE and find good agreement.

  8. Asteroseismology Across the HR Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. J.; Cunha, M. S.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.

    2003-05-01

    Ground-based observations have detected solar-like oscillations on Sun-like stars, and diagnostics similar to those used in helioseismology are now being used to test and constrain the physics and evolutionary state of these stars. Multi-mode oscillations are being observed in an abundance of other stars, including slowly pulsating B stars (SPB stars), delta-Scuti stars, Ap stars and the pulsating white dwarfs. New classes of pulsators continue to be discovered across the Herzsprung-Russell diagram. Yet the chances still to be faced to make asteroseismology across the HR diagram a reality are formidable. Observation, data analysis and theory all pose hard problems to be overcome. This book, reflecting the goal of the meeting, aims to facilitate a cross-fertilisation of ideas and approaches between fields covering different pulsators and with different areas of expertise. The book successfully covers most known types of pulsators, reflecting a highly productive and far reaching interchange of ideas which we believe is conveyed by the papers and posters published, making it a reference for researchers and postgraduate students working on stellar structure and evolution. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1173-3

  9. Phase Diagrams of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, Matthew; Horowitz, Chuck; Berry, Don; da Silva Schneider, Andre

    2016-03-01

    In the inner crust of neutrons stars, where matter is near the saturation density, protons and neutrons arrange themselves into complex structures called nuclear pasta. Early theoretical work predicted a simple graduated hierarchy of pasta phases, consisting of spheres, cylinders, slabs, and uniform matter with voids. Previous work has simulated these phases with a simple classical model and has shown that the formation of these structures is dependent on the temperature, density, and proton fraction. However, previous work only studied a limited range of these parameters due to computational limitations. Thanks to recent advances in computing it is now possible to survey the structure of nuclear pasta for a larger range of parameters. By simulating nuclear pasta with constant temperature and proton fraction in an expanding simulation volume we are able to study the phase transitions in nuclear pasta, and thus produce a set of phase diagrams. We report on these phase diagrams as well as newly identified phases of nuclear pasta and discuss their implications for neutron star observables.

  10. Conflict and expectancies interact to predict sexual behavior under the influence among gay and bisexual men

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Brooke E; Starks, Tyrel J; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Golub, Sarit

    2013-01-01

    As the mechanisms of the associations between substance use and risky sex remain unclear, this study investigates the interactive roles of conflicts about casual sex and condom use and expectancies of the sexual effects of substances in those associations among gay men. Conflict interacted with expectancies to predict sexual behavior under the influence; low casual sex conflict coupled with high expectancies predicted the highest number of casual partners, and high condom use conflict and high expectancies predicted the highest number of unprotected sex acts. Results have implications for intervention efforts that aim to improve sexual decision-making and reduce sexual expectancies. PMID:23584507

  11. Conflict and expectancies interact to predict sexual behavior under the influence among gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Wells, Brooke E; Starks, Tyrel J; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Golub, Sarit

    2014-07-01

    As the mechanisms of the associations between substance use and risky sex remain unclear, this study investigates the interactive roles of conflicts about casual sex and condom use and expectancies of the sexual effects of substances in those associations among gay men. Conflict interacted with expectancies to predict sexual behavior under the influence; low casual sex conflict coupled with high expectancies predicted the highest number of casual partners, and high condom use conflict and high expectancies predicted the highest number of unprotected sex acts. Results have implications for intervention efforts that aim to improve sexual decision-making and reduce sexual expectancies. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Interactions with grandparents and great-grandparents: a comparison of activities, influences, and relationships.

    PubMed

    Roberto, K A; Skoglund, R R

    1996-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between young adults and their grandparents and great-grandparents. A convenience sample of fifty-two college students, who had at least one living grandparent and great-grandparent, completed a questionnaire that assessed their interactions with their grandparents and great-grandparents. The respondents engaged in more frequent contact and activities with their grandparents than with their great-grandparents. They also perceived their grandparents as having a more defined role and being more influential in their lives than great-grandparents. Discussion centers on potential personal and demographic factors that may have influenced the respondents' perceptions of and interactions with their great-grandparents.

  13. The Influence of Strong Laser Fields on the Interaction between Fast B+3 Clusters and Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Peng; Wang, Gui-Qiu; Yao, Li; Gao, Hong; Wang, Yao-Chuan; Zhong, Hai-Yang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Kun; Sun, Min; Xu, Dian-Guo

    2013-03-01

    The influence of a high-intensity laser field on the inelastic interactions between a swift B+3 cluster ion and a plasma target is studied by means of the linearized Vlasov-Poisson theory. Excitations of the plasma are described by the classical plasma dielectric function. In the presence of the laser field, the general expressions for the induced potential in the target and the interaction force among the ions within the cluster are derived. Based on the numerical solution of the equations of motion for the constituent ions, the Coulomb explosion patterns and the cluster's energy losses are discussed for a range of laser parameters.

  14. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness

    DOE PAGES

    Atchley, Adam L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L.; ...

    2016-05-18

    The effect of three environmental conditions: 1) thickness of organic soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content or water table height above and below the soil surface, on active layer thickness (ALT) are investigated using an ensemble of 1D thermal hydrology models. Sensitivity analyses of the ensemble exposed the isolated influence of each environmental condition on ALT and their multivariate interactions. The primary and interactive influences are illustrated in the form of color maps of ALT change. Results show that organic layer acts as a strong insulator, and its thickness is the dominant control of ALT, but themore » strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is dependent on the saturation state. Snow depth, subsurface saturation, and ponded water depth are strongly codependent and positively correlated to ALT.« less

  15. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Atchley, Adam L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-05-18

    The effect of three environmental conditions: 1) thickness of organic soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content or water table height above and below the soil surface, on active layer thickness (ALT) are investigated using an ensemble of 1D thermal hydrology models. Sensitivity analyses of the ensemble exposed the isolated influence of each environmental condition on ALT and their multivariate interactions. The primary and interactive influences are illustrated in the form of color maps of ALT change. Results show that organic layer acts as a strong insulator, and its thickness is the dominant control of ALT, but the strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is dependent on the saturation state. Snow depth, subsurface saturation, and ponded water depth are strongly codependent and positively correlated to ALT.

  16. Vulnerabilities, Influences and Interaction Paths: Failure Data for Integrated System Risk Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land

    2006-01-01

    We describe graph-based analysis methods for identifying and analyzing cross-subsystem interaction risks from subsystem connectivity information. By discovering external and remote influences that would be otherwise unexpected, these methods can support better communication among subsystem designers at points of potential conflict and to support design of more dependable and diagnosable systems. These methods identify hazard causes that can impact vulnerable functions or entities if propagated across interaction paths from the hazard source to the vulnerable target. The analysis can also assess combined impacts of And-Or trees of disabling influences. The analysis can use ratings of hazards and vulnerabilities to calculate cumulative measures of the severity and importance. Identification of cross-subsystem hazard-vulnerability pairs and propagation paths across subsystems will increase coverage of hazard and risk analysis and can indicate risk control and protection strategies.

  17. Vulnerabilities, Influences and Interaction Paths: Failure Data for Integrated System Risk Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land

    2006-01-01

    We describe graph-based analysis methods for identifying and analyzing cross-subsystem interaction risks from subsystem connectivity information. By discovering external and remote influences that would be otherwise unexpected, these methods can support better communication among subsystem designers at points of potential conflict and to support design of more dependable and diagnosable systems. These methods identify hazard causes that can impact vulnerable functions or entities if propagated across interaction paths from the hazard source to the vulnerable target. The analysis can also assess combined impacts of And-Or trees of disabling influences. The analysis can use ratings of hazards and vulnerabilities to calculate cumulative measures of the severity and importance. Identification of cross-subsystem hazard-vulnerability pairs and propagation paths across subsystems will increase coverage of hazard and risk analysis and can indicate risk control and protection strategies.

  18. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Atchley, Adam L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-05-18

    The effect of three environmental conditions: 1) thickness of organic soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content or water table height above and below the soil surface, on active layer thickness (ALT) are investigated using an ensemble of 1D thermal hydrology models. Sensitivity analyses of the ensemble exposed the isolated influence of each environmental condition on ALT and their multivariate interactions. The primary and interactive influences are illustrated in the form of color maps of ALT change. Results show that organic layer acts as a strong insulator, and its thickness is the dominant control of ALT, but the strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is dependent on the saturation state. Snow depth, subsurface saturation, and ponded water depth are strongly codependent and positively correlated to ALT.

  19. Sandwichlike strain glass phase diagram of Ti49Ni51 -xPdx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shuai; Zhou, Chao; Xue, Dezhen; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jian; Ding, Xiangdong; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Ren, Xiaobing

    2016-12-01

    Two kinds of phase diagrams can be observed in doped ferroic materials. A glass phase diagram is formed by doping a nontransforming end into a ferroic matrix, while doping a transforming end forms phase diagrams with a phase boundary separating two different ferroic phases. Here we report a phase diagram in which a strain glass state is sandwiched between two distinct ferroelastic phases. This type of phase diagram in doped ferroelastic materials bridges the one with a glass state and the one with a phase boundary. We thus establish a 3D phase diagram of Ti50 -yNi50 +y -xPdx ternary alloys, in which the evolution of these different kinds of phase diagrams can be observed. An understanding from the Landau free energy landscape suggests that the transforming doping end plays three roles in influencing the ferroic matrix: (1) to destabilize the ferroic matrix phase, (2) to stabilize another ferroic phase different from the matrix one, and (3) to create random local fields. The competition between these effects determines various phase diagrams in doped ferroic materials. Thus our work may provide an experimental foundation for a unified mechanism to all three kinds of phase diagrams.

  20. Exploratory research on reading cognition and escape-route planning using building evacuation plan diagrams.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chieh-Hsin; Lin, Ching-Yuan; Hsu, Yu-Min

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of evacuation plan diagrams is for readers to comprehend and then plan an evacuation route. However, comprehending such diagrams involves complex issues that have yet to be addressed by research. This study aims to investigate how Taiwanese people interpret evacuation plan diagrams in their buildings. Issues of interest include the amount of time that it takes for a member of the general public to read a diagram and the time that they spend planning their escape route. Correlated and influencing factors are analyzed. The floor plan of an actual department store was used as the diagram for cognitive testing. A method of stimulated measurement was conducted over the Internet. The results of the experiment showed that the time it takes to plan an escape route is about 1.1 to 2 times longer than its reading time. This indicates that there is a significant time difference between diagram interpretation and stimulated planning. It was found that the longer it takes to read a diagram, the longer it takes to plan an escape route. In addition, to understand the difference between interpretations by the general public versus those with an architectural background, an analysis showed that the general public takes two to three times longer than architectural professionals to read a diagram and plan an escape route. Consequently, improvements in reading diagrams could help in the planning of a more efficient escape route. Furthermore, through our analysis, we found that the design of diagram symbols must satisfy conventional use and also that diagrams must avoid the use of metaphorical and abstract symbols. Diagrams that follow our guidelines will generally result in more effective and efficient conveyance of the intended message, thereby assisting in an emergency.

  1. Microbial endocrinology: Host-microbiota neuroendocrine interactions influencing brain and behavior.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms, whether present as commensals within the microbiota or introduced as part of a therapeutic regimen, to influence behavior has been demonstrated by numerous laboratories over the last few years. Our understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for microbiota-gut-brain interactions is, however, lacking. The complexity of the microbiota is, of course, a contributing factor. Nonetheless, while microbiologists approaching the issue of microbiota-gut-brain interactions in the behavior well recognize such complexity, what is often overlooked is the equal complexity of the host neurophysiological system, especially within the gut which is differentially innervated by the enteric nervous system. As such, in the search for common mechanisms by which the microbiota may influence behavior one may look for mechanisms which are shared by both host and microbiota. Such interkingdom signaling can be found in the shared production of neurochemical mediators that are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The study of the production and recognition of neurochemicals that are exactly the same in structure to those produced in the vertebrate organisms is known as microbial endocrinology. The examination of the microbiota from the vantage point of host-microbiota neuroendocrine interactions cannot only identify new microbial endocrinology-based mechanisms by which the microbiota can influence host behavior, but also lead to the design of interventions in which the composition of the microbiota may be modulated in order to achieve a specific microbial endocrinology-based profile beneficial to overall host behavior.

  2. Parents' Metacognitive Knowledge: Influences on Parent-Child Interactions in a Science Museum Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gregory P.; Anderson, David

    2013-06-01

    Despite science learning in settings such as science museums being recognized as important and given increasing attention in science education circles, the investigation of parents' and their children's metacognition in such settings is still in its infancy. This is despite an individual's metacognition being acknowledged as an important influence on their learning within and across contexts. This research investigated parents' metacognitive procedural and conditional knowledge, a key element of their metacognition, related to (a) what they knew about how they and their children thought and learned, and (b) whether this metacognitive knowledge influenced their interactions with their children during their interaction with a moderately complex simulation in a science museum. Parents reported metacognitive procedural and conditional knowledge regarding their own and their children's thinking and learning processes. Further, parents were aware that this metacognitive knowledge influenced their interactions with their children, seeing this as appropriate pedagogical action for them within the context of the particular exhibit and its task requirements at the science museum, and for the child involved. These findings have implications for exhibit and activity development within science museum settings.

  3. Influence of intramolecular f-f interactions on nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetizations in quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes containing two terbium or dysprosium magnetic centers.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Matsumura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2013-10-10

    Nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) phenomena, which arise from admixture of more than two orthogonal electronic spin wave functions through the couplings with those of the nuclear spins, are one of the important magnetic relaxation processes in lanthanide single molecule magnets (SMMs) in the low temperature range. Although recent experimental studies have indicated that the presence of the intramolecular f-f interactions affects their magnetic relaxation processes, little attention has been given to their mechanisms and, to the best of our knowledge, no rational theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretations of how the nuclear spin driven QTMs are influenced by the f-f interactions. Since quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes with two terbium or dysprosium ions as the magnetic centers show moderate f-f interactions, these are appropriate to investigate the influence of the f-f interactions on the dynamic magnetic relaxation processes. In the present paper, a theoretical model including ligand field (LF) potentials, hyperfine, nuclear quadrupole, magnetic dipolar, and the Zeeman interactions has been constructed to understand the roles of the nuclear spins for the QTM processes, and the resultant Zeeman plots are obtained. The ac susceptibility measurements of the magnetically diluted quadruple-decker monoterbium and diterbium phthalocyanine complexes, [Tb-Y] and [Tb-Tb], have indicated that the presence of the f-f interactions suppresses the QTMs in the absence of the external magnetic field (H(dc)) being consistent with previous reports. On the contrary, the faster magnetic relaxation processes are observed for [Tb-Tb] than [Tb-Y] at H(dc) = 1000 Oe, clearly demonstrating that the QTMs are rather enhanced in the presence of the external magnetic field. Based on the calculated Zeeman diagrams, these observations can be attributed to the enhanced nuclear spin driven QTMs for [Tb-Tb]. At the H(dc) higher than 2000 Oe, the

  4. The influence of print exposure on the body-object interaction effect in visual word recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dana; Siakaluk, Paul D.; Pexman, Penny M.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the influence of print exposure on the body-object interaction (BOI) effect in visual word recognition. High print exposure readers and low print exposure readers either made semantic categorizations (“Is the word easily imageable?”; Experiment 1) or phonological lexical decisions (“Does the item sound like a real English word?”; Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 showed that there was a larger BOI effect for the low print exposure readers than for the high print exposure readers in semantic categorization, though an effect was observed for both print exposure groups. However, the results from Experiment 2 showed that the BOI effect was observed only for the high print exposure readers in phonological lexical decision. The results of the present study suggest that print exposure does influence the BOI effect, and that this influence varies as a function of task demands. PMID:22563312

  5. The influence of print exposure on the body-object interaction effect in visual word recognition.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dana; Siakaluk, Paul D; Pexman, Penny M

    2012-01-01

    We examined the influence of print exposure on the body-object interaction (BOI) effect in visual word recognition. High print exposure readers and low print exposure readers either made semantic categorizations ("Is the word easily imageable?"; Experiment 1) or phonological lexical decisions ("Does the item sound like a real English word?"; Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 showed that there was a larger BOI effect for the low print exposure readers than for the high print exposure readers in semantic categorization, though an effect was observed for both print exposure groups. However, the results from Experiment 2 showed that the BOI effect was observed only for the high print exposure readers in phonological lexical decision. The results of the present study suggest that print exposure does influence the BOI effect, and that this influence varies as a function of task demands.

  6. Evolutionary Influenced Interaction Pattern as Indicator for the Investigation of Natural Variants Causing Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The importance of short membrane sequence motifs has been shown in many works and emphasizes the related sequence motif analysis. Together with specific transmembrane helix-helix interactions, the analysis of interacting sequence parts is helpful for understanding the process during membrane protein folding and in retaining the three-dimensional fold. Here we present a simple high-throughput analysis method for deriving mutational information of interacting sequence parts. Applied on aquaporin water channel proteins, our approach supports the analysis of mutational variants within different interacting subsequences and finally the investigation of natural variants which cause diseases like, for example, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In this work we demonstrate a simple method for massive membrane protein data analysis. As shown, the presented in silico analyses provide information about interacting sequence parts which are constrained by protein evolution. We present a simple graphical visualization medium for the representation of evolutionary influenced interaction pattern pairs (EIPPs) adapted to mutagen investigations of aquaporin-2, a protein whose mutants are involved in the rare endocrine disorder known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and membrane proteins in general. Furthermore, we present a new method to derive new evolutionary variations within EIPPs which can be used for further mutagen laboratory investigations.

  7. Evolutionary Influenced Interaction Pattern as Indicator for the Investigation of Natural Variants Causing Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Labudde, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The importance of short membrane sequence motifs has been shown in many works and emphasizes the related sequence motif analysis. Together with specific transmembrane helix-helix interactions, the analysis of interacting sequence parts is helpful for understanding the process during membrane protein folding and in retaining the three-dimensional fold. Here we present a simple high-throughput analysis method for deriving mutational information of interacting sequence parts. Applied on aquaporin water channel proteins, our approach supports the analysis of mutational variants within different interacting subsequences and finally the investigation of natural variants which cause diseases like, for example, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In this work we demonstrate a simple method for massive membrane protein data analysis. As shown, the presented in silico analyses provide information about interacting sequence parts which are constrained by protein evolution. We present a simple graphical visualization medium for the representation of evolutionary influenced interaction pattern pairs (EIPPs) adapted to mutagen investigations of aquaporin-2, a protein whose mutants are involved in the rare endocrine disorder known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and membrane proteins in general. Furthermore, we present a new method to derive new evolutionary variations within EIPPs which can be used for further mutagen laboratory investigations. PMID:26180540

  8. Influence of substrate interaction and confinement on electric-field-induced transition in symmetric block-copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Mukherjee, Rajdip; Ankit, Kumar; Bhattacharya, Avisor; Nestler, Britta

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we study morphologies arising due to competing substrate interaction, electric field, and confinement effects on a symmetric diblock copolymer. We employ a coarse-grained nonlocal Cahn-Hilliard phenomenological model taking into account the appropriate contributions of substrate interaction and electrostatic field. The proposed model couples the Ohta-Kawasaki functional with Maxwell equation of electrostatics, thus alleviating the need for any approximate solution used in previous studies. We calculate the phase diagram in electric-field-substrate strength space for different film thicknesses. In addition to identifying the presence of parallel, perpendicular, and mixed lamellae phases similar to analytical calculations, we also find a region in the phase diagram where hybrid morphologies (combination of two phases) coexist. These hybrid morphologies arise either solely due to substrate affinity and confinement or are induced due to the applied electric field. The dependence of the critical fields for transition between the various phases on substrate strength, film thickness, and dielectric contrast is discussed. Some preliminary 3D results are also presented to corroborate the presence of hybrid morphologies.

  9. Phase diagrams for high Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Whitler, J.D.; Roth, R.S. NIST, Gaithersburg, MD )

    1991-01-01

    The phase diagrams of ternary and quaternary systems containing superconducting phases are presented, as are the phase diagrams of the associated binary systems. The diagrams are divided into two large groups: (1) alkaline earth-rare earth-copper-oxygen diagrams, and (2) alkaline earth-bismuth/lead-copper-oxygen diagrams. The first group includes BaO-REO-CuO systems followed by SrO-REO-CuO or Nd2O3-CeO-CuO systems. The second group includes systems related to the AE-Bi2O3-CuO and AE-PbO-CuO systems. The phase diagrams are accompanied by notes relating procedures used in the studies, results obtained, and comparisons with the results in the literature for the same system.

  10. Continuation of point clouds via persistence diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, Marcio; Hiraoka, Yasuaki; Obayashi, Ippei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a mathematical and algorithmic framework for the continuation of point clouds by persistence diagrams. A key property used in the method is that the persistence map, which assigns a persistence diagram to a point cloud, is differentiable. This allows us to apply the Newton-Raphson continuation method in this setting. Given an original point cloud P, its persistence diagram D, and a target persistence diagram D‧, we gradually move from D to D‧, by successively computing intermediate point clouds until we finally find a point cloud P‧ having D‧ as its persistence diagram. Our method can be applied to a wide variety of situations in topological data analysis where it is necessary to solve an inverse problem, from persistence diagrams to point cloud data.

  11. Interaction of induced anxiety and verbal working memory: influence of trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nilam; Stoodley, Catherine; Pine, Daniel S; Grillon, Christian; Ernst, Monique

    2017-09-01

    This study examines the influence of trait anxiety on working memory (WM) in safety and threat. Interactions between experimentally induced anxiety and WM performance (on different cognitive loads) have been reported in healthy, nonanxious subjects. Differences in trait anxiety may moderate these interactions. Accordingly, these interactions may be potentiated by high trait anxiety (HTA), or show a resilient pattern that protects cognitive performance. HTA and low trait anxiety (LTA) were defined by a median split of scores on the trait component of the state-trait anxiety inventory. Sustained anxiety was evoked by a probabilistic exposure to an aversive scream, and was measured by eyeblink startle and self-report. WM was tested using an n-back task (1-, 2-, and 3-back). Results revealed that, as expected, the HTA group reported greater anxiety during the task. However, trait anxiety did not impact the modulation of WM performance by induced anxiety. Notably, HTA influenced anxiety-potentiated startle (startle during threat minus startle during safe; APS) differently as a function of memory load. Accordingly, APS decreased with increasing WM load, but HTA antagonized this reduction. The HTA group showed no impairment on the 3-back WM task despite a higher APS. The amplified APS could be associated with the increase in effort-related cognitive arousal. Furthermore, this third replication of the interaction of induced anxiety by load on WM performance testifies to the robustness of the unique interplay between anxiety and WM. © 2017 Patel et al. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Influence of packing interactions on the average conformation of B-DNA in crystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Tereshko, V; Subirana, J A

    1999-04-01

    The molecular interactions in crystals of oligonucleotides in the B form have been analysed and in particular the end-to-end interactions. Phosphate-phosphate interactions in dodecamers are also reviewed. A strong influence of packing constraints on the average conformation of the double helix is found. There is a strong relationship between the space group, the end-to-end interactions and the average conformation of DNA. Dodecamers must have a B-form average conformation with 10 +/- 0.1 base pairs per turn in order to crystallize in the P212121 and related space groups usually found. Decamers show a wider range of conformational variation, with 9.7-10. 6 base pairs per turn, depending on the terminal sequence and the space group. The influence of the space group in decamers is quite striking and remains unexplained. Only small variations are allowed in each case. Thus, crystal packing is strongly related to the average DNA conformation in the crystals and deviations from the average are rather limited. The constraints imposed by the crystal lattice explain why the average twist of the DNA in solution (10.6 base pairs per turn) is seldom found in oligonucleotides crystallized in the B form.

  13. Soil abiotic factors influence interactions between belowground herbivores and plant roots.

    PubMed

    Erb, Matthias; Lu, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Root herbivores are important ecosystem drivers and agricultural pests, and, possibly as a consequence, plants protect their roots using a variety of defensive strategies. One aspect that distinguishes belowground from aboveground plant-insect interactions is that roots are constantly exposed to a set of soil-specific abiotic factors. These factors can profoundly influence root resistance, and, consequently, the outcome of the interaction with belowground feeders. In this review, we synthesize the current literature on the impact of soil moisture, nutrients, and texture on root-herbivore interactions. We show that soil abiotic factors influence the interaction by modulating herbivore abundance and behaviour, root growth and resistance, beneficial microorganisms, as well as natural enemies of the herbivores. We suggest that abiotic heterogeneity may explain the high variability that is often encountered in root-herbivore systems. We also propose that under abiotic stress, the relative fitness value of the roots and the potential negative impact of herbivory increases, which may lead to a higher defensive investment and an increased recruitment of beneficial microorganisms by the plant. At the same time, both root-feeding herbivores and natural enemies are likely to decrease in abundance under extreme environmental conditions, leading to a context- and species-specific impact on plant fitness. Only by using tightly controlled experiments that include soil abiotic heterogeneity will it be possible to understand the impact of root feeders on an ecosystem scale and to develop predictive models for pest occurrence and impact.

  14. Influence of social interactions on the response to social cues in spiderlings.

    PubMed

    Lesne, Pierre; Jeanson, Raphaël

    2015-02-01

    Mutual attraction is one central mechanism involved in the maintenance of cohesion in group-living species and relies on a modulation of individual behaviours in response to the presence of conspecifics. Social markers left in the environment can play an additional role in the modulation of behaviours and can substantially impact the cohesion of social groups. In this study, our objective was to examine the interplay between the presence of social cues and the individual responsiveness to conspecifics in spiderlings. Spiders are relevant models to address this issue as juveniles lay silk draglines during their displacements and display a transient gregarious phase. We introduced single or pairs of spiderlings in an experimental arena covered with different amounts of silk. Our results indicated that the probability of moving increased with the presence and the quantity of silk in single individuals. In contrast, we did not find evidence for any influence of the quantity of silk on interacting spiderlings and we showed that social interactions inhibited the individual response to social markers. Overall, our study suggests that the influence of social interactions on the modulation of individual behaviours prevailed over the presence of social cues. We discussed our results in the framework of chemical communication to explain the interplay between social cues and social interactions on the modulation of individual behaviours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Polymer segregation under confinement: Influences of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the polymer and crowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuhao; Yu, Wancheng; Wang, Jiajun; Luo, Kaifu

    2015-10-01

    Entropy driven polymer segregation in confinements as a model for chromosome separation in bacteria has attracted wide attention; however, the effects of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the binding protein and the newly replicated DNA on the segregation dynamics are not clear. Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the influences of crowders and the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders on segregation of two overlapping polymers under a cylindrical confinement. We find that the segregation time increases with increasing the volume fraction of crowders due to the slower chain diffusion in crowded environments. For a fixed volume fraction of crowders, the segregation time decreases with increasing the size of crowders. Moreover, the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders can significantly facilitate the chain segregation. These results are important for understanding the chromosome segregation in living cells.

  16. Hubble's diagram and cosmic expansion.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Robert P

    2004-01-06

    Edwin Hubble's classic article on the expanding universe appeared in PNAS in 1929 [Hubble, E. P. (1929) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 15, 168-173]. The chief result, that a galaxy's distance is proportional to its redshift, is so well known and so deeply embedded into the language of astronomy through the Hubble diagram, the Hubble constant, Hubble's Law, and the Hubble time, that the article itself is rarely referenced. Even though Hubble's distances have a large systematic error, Hubble's velocities come chiefly from Vesto Melvin Slipher, and the interpretation in terms of the de Sitter effect is out of the mainstream of modern cosmology, this article opened the way to investigation of the expanding, evolving, and accelerating universe that engages today's burgeoning field of cosmology.

  17. Gravity on-shell diagrams

    DOE PAGES

    Herrmann, Enrico; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2016-11-22

    Here, we study on-shell diagrams for gravity theories with any number of super-symmetries and find a compact Grassmannian formula in terms of edge variables of the graphs. Unlike in gauge theory where the analogous form involves only d log-factors, in gravity there is a non-trivial numerator as well as higher degree poles in the edge variables. Based on the structure of the Grassmannian formula for N = 8 supergravity we conjecture that gravity loop amplitudes also possess similar properties. In particular, we find that there are only logarithmic singularities on cuts with finite loop momentum and that poles at infinitymore » are present, in complete agreement with the conjecture presented in.« less

  18. Gravity on-shell diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Enrico; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2016-11-22

    Here, we study on-shell diagrams for gravity theories with any number of super-symmetries and find a compact Grassmannian formula in terms of edge variables of the graphs. Unlike in gauge theory where the analogous form involves only d log-factors, in gravity there is a non-trivial numerator as well as higher degree poles in the edge variables. Based on the structure of the Grassmannian formula for N = 8 supergravity we conjecture that gravity loop amplitudes also possess similar properties. In particular, we find that there are only logarithmic singularities on cuts with finite loop momentum and that poles at infinity are present, in complete agreement with the conjecture presented in.

  19. Hubble's diagram and cosmic expansion

    PubMed Central

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    Edwin Hubble's classic article on the expanding universe appeared in PNAS in 1929 [Hubble, E. P. (1929) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 15, 168–173]. The chief result, that a galaxy's distance is proportional to its redshift, is so well known and so deeply embedded into the language of astronomy through the Hubble diagram, the Hubble constant, Hubble's Law, and the Hubble time, that the article itself is rarely referenced. Even though Hubble's distances have a large systematic error, Hubble's velocities come chiefly from Vesto Melvin Slipher, and the interpretation in terms of the de Sitter effect is out of the mainstream of modern cosmology, this article opened the way to investigation of the expanding, evolving, and accelerating universe that engages today's burgeoning field of cosmology. PMID:14695886

  20. Gravity on-shell diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Enrico; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2016-11-01

    We study on-shell diagrams for gravity theories with any number of super-symmetries and find a compact Grassmannian formula in terms of edge variables of the graphs. Unlike in gauge theory where the analogous form involves only d log-factors, in gravity there is a non-trivial numerator as well as higher degree poles in the edge variables. Based on the structure of the Grassmannian formula for {N}=8 supergravity we conjecture that gravity loop amplitudes also possess similar properties. In particular, we find that there are only logarithmic singularities on cuts with finite loop momentum and that poles at infinity are present, in complete agreement with the conjecture presented in [1].

  1. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  2. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO-AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV' transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  3. Process Flow Diagrams for Training and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Jacobus

    This paper focuses on the use of process flow diagrams for training first responders who execute search and seizure warrants at electronic crime scenes. A generic process flow framework is presented, and the design goals and layout characteristics of process flow diagrams are discussed. An evaluation of the process flow diagrams used in training courses indicates that they are beneficial to first responders performing searches and seizures, and they speed up investigations, including those conducted by experienced personnel.

  4. Origin and use of crystallization phase diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization phase diagrams are frequently used to conceptualize the phase relations and also the processes taking place during the crystallization of macromolecules. While a great deal of freedom is given in crystallization phase diagrams owing to a lack of specific knowledge about the actual phase boundaries and phase equilibria, crucial fundamental features of phase diagrams can be derived from thermodynamic first principles. Consequently, there are limits to what can be reasonably displayed in a phase diagram, and imagination may start to conflict with thermodynamic realities. Here, the commonly used ‘crystallization phase diagrams’ are derived from thermodynamic excess properties and their limitations and appropriate use is discussed. PMID:25760697

  5. Cascading processes and interactions in torrent catchments and their influence on the damage pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiler, Margreth; Gebbers, David

    2014-05-01

    Research on single geomorphological processes during damaging events has a long history; however, comprehensive documentations and analyses of the events have been conducted not until the late 1980s. Thus, for highly damaging events insights about triggering, the evolution and the impacts of processes during an event and the resulting damage were produced. Though, in the majority of cases the processes were studied in a well-defined procedure of one disciplinary focus. These focused studies neglect mutable influences which may alter the sequence of the process or the event. During damaging events multiple geomorphological processes are active which leads to the assumption that they have a certain impact on each other and the course of damaging effect. Consequently, for a comprehensive hazard and risk analysis all processes of a catchment have to be analysed and evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively (MARZOCCHI, 2007). Although the demand for a sophisticated risk management is increasing, the research on interactions as well as on physical vulnerability to multiple hazards, including the different processes impact effects, is still very limited (KAPPES et al., 2010, 2011). The challenges in this field are the quantity of data needed, and furthermore to conduct this kind of analysis is very complex and complicated (KAPPES et al. 2012). Yet, knowledge about possible interactions and resulting impact effects could significantly contribute to the reduction of risk in a region. The objective of this study is to analyse, i) how geomorphological processes interact with each other and with other factors of the surrounding during a damaging event, ii) what influences those interactions have on the resulting damage of the event and iii) whether or not different events are comparable in terms of those interactions and their impacts. To meet these objectives, 15 damaging torrent events, which occurred between 2000 and 2011 in the Bernese Oberland and the Pennine Alps

  6. Experimental Tests of Normative Group Influence and Representation Effects in Computer-Mediated Communication: When Interacting Via Computers Differs from Interacting With Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eun-Ju; Nass, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Presents two experiments to address the questions of if and how normative social influence operates in anonymous computer-mediated communication and human-computer interaction. Finds that the perception of interaction partner (human vs. computer) moderated the group conformity effect such that the undergraduate student subjects expressed greater…

  7. Phase diagram of tobacco mosaic virus solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Hartmut; Löwen, Hartmut

    1999-02-01

    The phase behavior of an aqueous suspension of rodlike tobacco mosaic viruses is investigated theoretically as a function of the virus density and the concentration of added salt. The total free energy involves ``volume terms'' from the microscopic counter- and co-ions and an effective pair interaction between the colloidal rods described by a Yukawa-segment model according to linear screening theory. Within a thermodynamic perturbation approach, the short-range repulsion between the rods is mapped onto a reference system of effective hard spherocylinders. The free energy of the spherocylinder system is gained from combining a cell model with scaled particle theory, which yields a reasonable phase diagram. The remaining long-range interaction is treated within a mean-field approximation. As a result we find stable fluid, nematic, and smectic phases as well as AAA- and ABC-stacked crystals. For increasing salt concentration at fixed rod concentration, there is a nematic reentrant transition. We finally discuss our results in view of experimental data.

  8. The Influence of Hydrogen Bonding on Sphingomyelin/Colipid Interactions in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Al Sazzad, Md. Abdullah; Jäntti, Niklas Z.; Pentikäinen, Olli T.; Slotte, J. Peter

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid acyl chain composition and order, the hydrogen bonding, and properties of the phospholipid headgroup all influence cholesterol/phospholipid interactions in hydrated bilayers. In this study, we examined the influence of hydrogen bonding on sphingomyelin (SM) colipid interactions in fluid uni- and multilamellar vesicles. We have compared the properties of oleoyl or palmitoyl SM with comparable dihydro-SMs, because the hydrogen bonding properties of SM and dihydro-SM differ. The association of cholestatrienol, a fluorescent cholesterol analog, with oleoyl sphingomyelin (OSM) was significantly stronger than its association with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, in bilayers with equal acyl chain order. The association of cholestatrienol with dihydro-OSM, which lacks a trans double bond in the sphingoid base, was even stronger than the association with OSM, suggesting an important role for hydrogen bonding in stabilizing sterol/SM interactions. Furthermore, with saturated SM in the presence of 15 mol % cholesterol, cholesterol association with fluid dihydro-palmitoyl SM bilayers was stronger than seen with palmitoyl SM under similar conditions. The different hydrogen bonding properties in OSM and dihydro-OSM bilayers also influenced the segregation of palmitoyl ceramide and dipalmitoylglycerol into an ordered phase. The ordered, palmitoyl ceramide-rich phase started to form above 2 mol % in the dihydro-OSM bilayers but only above 6 mol % in the OSM bilayers. The lateral segregation of dipalmitoylglycerol was also much more pronounced in dihydro-OSM bilayers than in OSM bilayers. The results show that hydrogen bonding is important for sterol/SM and ceramide/SM interactions, as well as for the lateral segregation of a diglyceride. A possible molecular explanation for the different hydrogen bonding in SM and dihydro-SM bilayers is presented and discussed. PMID:26789766

  9. Individual variation in agrammatism: a single case study of the influence of interaction.

    PubMed

    Beeke, Suzanne; Wilkinson, Ray; Maxim, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Agrammatic speech can manifest in different ways in the same speaker if task demands change. Individual variation is considered to reflect adaptation, driven by psycholinguistic factors such as underlying deficit. Recently, qualitative investigations have begun to show ways in which conversational interaction can influence the form of an agrammatic speaker's output. To explore qualitative patterns of individual variation in the output of a single case, in order to address the following questions: (1) in what ways do grammatical structure, verbs and argument structure differ qualitatively between data samples?; and (2) what is the influence of interaction on the structure of utterances? A man with severe and chronic agrammatism is videotaped completing tests of spoken sentence construction, composite, and cartoon strip picture descriptions and a story telling task. In addition, he independently videotapes a sample of conversation with a family member at home. Analyses of these data draw on cognitive neuropsychological, linguistic and psycholinguistic methodologies as well as the data-driven procedures of conversation analysis. The qualitative analysis uncovers considerable variation between data sets with respect to grammatical structure, verbs and argument structure. The agrammatic speaker appears more skilled at imposing order on his spontaneous speech than the results of sentence construction tests might predict. Interaction influences his output style. Adaptation is found to be a collaborative process that occurs between two speakers in the quest for mutual understanding, not something that takes place within an individual. It is concluded that an interactional approach to agrammatism has the potential to yield important insights into the characteristics of telegraphic speech and individual variation. The failure of sentence-level tests to capture this individual's skill in producing systematically structured utterances in conversation implies that the

  10. Influence of metoprolol dosage release formulation on the pharmacokinetic drug interaction with paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Stout, Stephen M; Nielsen, Jace; Welage, Lynda S; Shea, Michael; Brook, Robert; Kerber, Kevin; Bleske, Barry E

    2011-03-01

    Studies have demonstrated an influence of dosage release formulations on drug interactions and enantiomeric plasma concentrations. Metoprolol is a commonly used beta-adrenergic antagonist metabolized by CYP2D6. The CYP2D6 inhibitor paroxetine has previously been shown to interact with metoprolol tartrate. This open-label, randomized, 4-phase crossover study assessed the potential differential effects of paroxetine on stereoselective pharmacokinetics of immediate-release (IR) tartrate and extended-release (ER) succinate metoprolol formulations. Ten healthy participants received metoprolol IR (50 mg) and ER (100 mg) with and without paroxetine coadministration. Blood samples were collected over 24 hours for determination of metoprolol plasma enantiomer concentrations. Paroxetine coadministration significantly increased S and R metoprolol area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the 24-hour blood draw (AUC(0-24h)) by 4- and 5-fold, respectively for IR, and 3- and 4-fold, respectively, for ER. S/R AUC ratios significantly decreased. These results demonstrate a pharmacokinetic interaction between paroxetine and both formulations of metoprolol. The interaction is greater with R metoprolol, and stereoselective metabolism is lost. This could theoretically result in greater beta-blockade and lost cardioselectivity. The magnitude of the interaction was similar between metoprolol formulations, which may be attributable to low doses/drug input rates employed.

  11. Early adversity and combat exposure interact to influence anterior cingulate cortex volume in combat veterans☆

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Steven H.; Kuo, Janice R.; Schaer, Marie; Kaloupek, Danny G.; Eliez, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood and combat trauma have been observed to interact to influence amygdala volume in a sample of U.S. military veterans with and without PTSD. This interaction was assessed in a second, functionally-related fear system component, the pregenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, using the same sample and modeling approach. Method Anterior cingulate cortical tissues (gray + white matter) were manually-delineated in 1.5 T MR images in 87 U.S. military veterans of the Vietnam and Persian Gulf wars. Hierarchical multiple regression modeling was used to assess associations between anterior cingulate volume and the following predictors, trauma prior to age 13, combat exposure, the interaction of early trauma and combat exposure, and PTSD diagnosis. Results As previously observed in the amygdala, unique variance in anterior cingulate cortical volume was associated with both the diagnosis of PTSD and with the interaction of childhood and combat trauma. The pattern of the latter interaction indicated that veterans with childhood trauma exhibited a significant inverse linear relationship between combat trauma and anterior cingulate volume while those without childhood trauma did not. Such associations were not observed in hippocampal or total cerebral tissue volumes. Conclusions In the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as in the amygdala, early trauma may confer excess sensitivity to later combat trauma. PMID:24179818

  12. Influence of the number of topologically interacting neighbors on swarm dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yilun; Bouffanais, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Recent empirical and theoretical works on collective behaviors based on a topological interaction are beginning to offer some explanations as for the physical reasons behind the selection of a particular number of nearest neighbors locally affecting each individual's dynamics. Recently, flocking starlings have been shown to topologically interact with a very specific number of neighbors, between six to eight, while metric-free interactions were found to govern human crowd dynamics. Here, we use network- and graph-theoretic approaches combined with a dynamical model of locally interacting self-propelled particles to study how the consensus reaching process and its dynamics are influenced by the number k of topological neighbors. Specifically, we prove exactly that, in the absence of noise, consensus is always attained with a speed to consensus strictly increasing with k. The analysis of both speed and time to consensus reveals that, irrespective of the swarm size, a value of k ~ 10 speeds up the rate of convergence to consensus to levels close to the one of the optimal all-to-all interaction signaling. Furthermore, this effect is found to be more pronounced in the presence of environmental noise. PMID:24567077

  13. Predominance zone diagrams and their application to solvent extraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Páez-Hernández, M E; Ramírez, M T; Rojas-Hernández, A

    2000-01-24

    Predominance zone diagrams have been useful tools in solving problems in analytical chemistry. They can be used to establish the best conditions for separation of mixtures or to optimize recovery procedures for a given species. The few reports on predominance zone diagrams for the participant species in liquid-liquid extraction systems, describe their construction as diagrams of the Pourbaix type (epsilon/pH). With the generalized species and equilibria method (GSEM) it is possible to elaborate Predominance zone diagrams for extraction (PZDE) in proper spaces and with parameters strictly related to these processes such as pH and the volume ratio, r. Therefore, using the GSEM, PZDE that allow us to determine the best conditions for the extraction of a given substance have been elaborated. The stoichiometry of the species been extracted can also be determined from the experimental conditions. It has been demonstrated that with the GSEM, PZDE can be constructed for systems of one and two components. In this work, we intend to demonstrate that the algorithm is valid for the elaboration of PZDE in systems of three and four components. Examples of analytical interest are presented such as lead (II) extraction with diphenyltiocarbazone (dithizone) and that for cadmium (II) with 8-hydroxyquinolein (oxine) in chloroform. The influence of a masking agent, the etilendiaminotetraacetic acid (EDTA) over the extraction of both metals was also assessed.

  14. Does timing matter? How priority effects influence the outcome of parasite interactions within hosts.

    PubMed

    Hoverman, Jason T; Hoye, Bethany J; Johnson, Pieter T J

    2013-12-01

    In nature, hosts are exposed to an assemblage of parasite species that collectively form a complex community within the host. To date, however, our understanding of how within-host-parasite communities assemble and interact remains limited. Using a larval amphibian host (Pacific chorus frog, Pseudacris regilla) and two common trematode parasites (Ribeiroia ondatrae and Echinostoma trivolvis), we experimentally examined how the sequence of host exposure influenced parasite interactions within hosts. While there was no evidence that the parasites interacted when hosts were exposed to both parasites simultaneously, we detected evidence of both intraspecific and interspecific competition when exposures were temporally staggered. However, the strength and outcome of these priority effects depended on the sequence of addition, even after accounting for the fact that parasites added early in host development were more likely to encyst compared to parasites added later. Ribeiroia infection success was reduced by 14 % when Echinostoma was added prior to Ribeiroia, whereas no such effect was noted for Echinostoma when Ribeiroia was added first. Using a novel fluorescent-labeling technique that allowed us to track Ribeiroia infections from different exposure events, we also discovered that, similar to the interspecific interactions, early encysting parasites reduced the encystment success of later arriving parasites by 41 %, which could be mediated by host immune responses and/or competition for space. These results suggest that parasite identity interacts with host immune responses to mediate parasite interactions within the host, such that priority effects may play an important role in structuring parasite communities within hosts. This knowledge can be used to assess host-parasite interactions within natural communities in which environmental conditions can lead to heterogeneity in the timing and composition of host exposure to parasites.

  15. [Comparison of film-screen combinations in contrast-detail diagram and with interactive image analysis. 3: Trimodal histograms of gray scale distribution in bar groups of lead pattern images].

    PubMed

    Hagemann, G; Eichbaum, G; Stamm, G

    1998-05-01

    The following four screen film combinations were compared: a) a combination of anticrossover film and UV-light emitting screens, b) a combination of blue-light emitting screens and film and c) two conventional green fluorescing screen film combinations. Radiographs of a specially designed plexiglass phantom (0.2 x 0.2 x 0.12 m3) with bar patterns of lead and plaster and of air, respectively were obtained using the following parameters: 12 pulse generator, 0.6 mm focus size, 4.7 mm aluminum prefilter, a grid with 40 lines/cm (12:1) and a focus-detector distance of 1.15 m. Image analysis was performed using an Ibas system and a Zeiss Kontron computer. Display conditions were the following: display distance 0.12 m, a vario film objective 35/70 (Zeiss), a video camera tube with a PbO photocathode, 625 lines (Siemens Heimann), an Ibas image matrix of 512 x 512 pixels with a spatial resolution of ca. 7 cycles/mm, the projected matrix area was 5000 micron 2. Maxima in the histograms of a grouped bar pattern were estimated as mean values from the bar and gap regions ("mean value method"). They were used to calculate signal contrast, standard deviations of the means and scatter fraction. Comparing the histograms with respect to spatial resolution and kV setting a clear advantage of the UVR system becomes obvious. The quantitative analysis yielded a maximum spatial resolution of approx. 3 cycles/mm for the UVR system at 60 kV which decreased to half of this value at 117 kV caused by the increasing influence of scattered radiation. A ranking of screen-film systems with respect to image quality and dose requirement is presented. For its evaluation an interactive image analysis using the mean value method was found to be superior to signal/noise ratio measurements and visual analysis in respect to diagnostic relevance and saving of time.

  16. The surprising influence of late charged current weak interactions on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.

    2016-10-01

    The weak interaction charged current processes (νe + n ↔ p +e-; νbare + p ↔ n +e+; n ↔ p +e- +νbare) interconvert neutrons and protons in the early universe and have significant influence on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) light-element abundance yields, particularly that for 4He. We demonstrate that the influence of these processes is still significant even when they operate well below temperatures T ∼ 0.7 MeV usually invoked for "weak freeze-out," and in fact down nearly into the alpha-particle formation epoch (T ≈ 0.1 MeV). This physics is correctly captured in commonly used BBN codes, though this late-time, low-temperature persistent effect of the isospin-changing weak processes, and the sensitivity of the associated rates to lepton energy distribution functions and blocking factors are not widely appreciated. We quantify this late-time influence by analyzing weak interaction rate dependence on the neutron lifetime, lepton energy distribution functions, entropy, the proton-neutron mass difference, and Hubble expansion rate. The effects we point out here render BBN a keen probe of any beyond-standard-model physics that alters lepton number/energy distributions, even subtly, in epochs of the early universe all the way down to near T = 100 keV.

  17. Priorities for representation: Task settings and object interaction both influence object memory.

    PubMed

    Kirtley, Clare; Tatler, Benjamin W

    2016-01-01

    Following an active task, the memory representations for used and unused objects are different. However, it is not clear whether these differences arise due to prioritizing objects that are task-relevant, objects that are physically interacted with, or a combination of the two factors. The present study allowed us to tease apart the relative importance of task-relevance and physical manipulation on object memory. A paradigm was designed in which objects were either necessary to complete a task (target), moved out of the way (obstructing, but interacted with), or simply present in the environment (background). Participants' eye movements were recorded with a portable tracker during the task, and they received a memory test on the objects after the task was completed. Results showed that manipulating an object is sufficient to change how information is extracted and retained from fixations, compared to background objects. Task-relevance provides an additional influence: information is accumulated and retained differently for manipulated target objects than manipulated obstructing objects. These findings demonstrate that object memory is influenced both by whether we physically interact with an object, and the relevance of that object to our behavioral goals.

  18. Vesicle deformation by microtubules: A phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsellem, Virginie; Cardoso, Olivier; Tabeling, Patrick

    1998-10-01

    The experimental investigation of vesicles deformed by the growth of encapsulated microtubules shows that the axisymmetric morphologies can be classified into ovals, lemons, φ, cherries, dumbbells, and pearls. A geometrical phase diagram is established. Numerical minimization of the elastic energy of the membrane reproduces satisfactorily well the observed morphologies and the corresponding phase diagram.

  19. Genetic risk score and adiposity interact to influence triglyceride levels in a cohort of Filipino women

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, N; Mayer-Davis, E J; Mendez, M A; Mohlke, K L; North, K E; Adair, L S

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Individually, genetic variants only moderately influence cardiometabolic (CM) traits, such as lipid and inflammatory markers. In this study we generated genetic risk scores from a combination of previously reported variants influencing CM traits, and used these scores to explore how adiposity levels could mediate genetic contributions to CM traits. Subjects/Methods: Participants included 1649 women from the 2005 Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey. Three genetic risk scores were constructed for C-reactive protein (CRP), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (TGs). We used linear regression models to assess the association between each genetic risk score and its related trait. We also tested for interactions between each score and measures of adiposity. Results: Each genetic risk score explained a greater proportion of variance in trait levels than any individual genetic variant. We found an interaction between the TG genetic risk score (2.29–14.34 risk alleles) and waist circumference (WC) (Pinteraction=1.66 × 10−2). Based on model predictions, for individuals with a higher TG genetic risk score (75th percentile=12), having an elevated WC (⩾80 cm) increased TG levels from 1.32 to 1.71 mmol l−1. However, for individuals with a lower score (25th percentile=7), having an elevated WC did not significantly change TG levels. Conclusions: The TG genetic risk score interacted with adiposity to synergistically influence TG levels. For individuals with a genetic predisposition to elevated TG levels, our results suggest that reducing adiposity could possibly prevent further increases in TG levels and thereby lessen the likelihood of adverse health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease. PMID:24932782

  20. Physiological State Influences the Social Interactions of Two Honeybee Nest Mates

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Geraldine A.; Lillvis, Joshua L.; Bray, Helen J.; Mustard, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Physiological state profoundly influences the expression of the behaviour of individuals and can affect social interactions between animals. How physiological state influences food sharing and social behaviour in social insects is poorly understood. Here, we examined the social interactions and food sharing behaviour of honeybees with the aim of developing the honeybee as a model for understanding how an individual's state influences its social interactions. The state of individual honeybees was manipulated by either starving donor bees or feeding them sucrose or low doses of ethanol to examine how a change in hunger or inebriation state affected the social behaviours exhibited by two closely-related nestmates. Using a lab-based assay for measuring individual motor behaviour and social behaviour, we found that behaviours such as antennation, willingness to engage in trophallaxis, and mandible opening were affected by both hunger and ethanol intoxication. Inebriated bees were more likely to exhibit mandible opening, which may represent a form of aggression, than bees fed sucrose alone. However, intoxicated bees were as willing to engage in trophallaxis as the sucrose-fed bees. The effects of ethanol on social behaviors were dose-dependent, with higher doses of ethanol producing larger effects on behaviour. Hungry donor bees, on the other hand, were more likely to engage in begging for food and less likely to antennate and to display mandible opening. We also found that when nestmates received food from donors previously fed ethanol, they began to display evidence of inebriation, indicating that ethanol can be retained in the crop for several hours and that it can be transferred between honeybee nestmates during trophallaxis. PMID:22427864

  1. Complex and interacting influences of the autonomic nervous system on cardiac electrophysiology in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Heidi L; Rivers, Joshua P; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2016-12-01

    Mice may now be the preferred animal model for biomedical research due to its anatomical, physiological, and genetic similarity to humans. However, little is known about accentuated antagonism of chronotropic and dromotropic properties in conscious mice. Accordingly, we describe the complex and interacting influence of the autonomic nervous system on cardiac electrophysiology in conscious mice. Specifically, we report the effects of single and combined cardiac autonomic blockade on measurements of pulse interval (heart rate), atrio-ventricular interval, sinus node recovery time (SNRT), SNRT corrected for spontaneous sinus cycle, and Wenckebach cycle length in conscious mice free of the confounding influences of anesthetics and surgical trauma. Autonomic influences were quantified as the change in parameter induced by its selective blocker (Sympathetic or Parasympathetic Effect) or as the difference between the intrinsic value and the value after a selective blocker (Sympathetic or Parasympathetic Tonus). Sympatho-Vagal Balance (SVB) was assessed as the ratio of control interval to intrinsic interval. SVB suggests slight parasympathetic dominance in the control of cardiac electrophysiology intervals. Furthermore, results documents a complex interaction between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system in the control of cardiac electrophysiology parameters. Specifically, the parasympathetic effect was greater than the parasympathetic tonus in the control of cardiac electrophysiology parameters. In contrast, the sympathetic effect was smaller than the sympathetic tonus in the control of cardiac electrophysiology parameters. Results have important implications because actions of pharmacological agents that alter the autonomic control of cardiac electrophysiology are transformed by these interacting mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of compressibility on the Lagrangian statistics of vorticity-strain-rate interactions.

    PubMed

    Danish, Mohammad; Sinha, Sawan Suman; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of compressibility on Lagrangian statistics of vorticity and strain-rate interactions. The Lagrangian statistics are extracted from "almost" time-continuous data sets of direct numerical simulations of compressible decaying isotropic turbulence by employing a cubic spline-based Lagrangian particle tracker. We study the influence of compressibility on Lagrangian statistics of alignment in terms of compressibility parameters-turbulent Mach number, normalized dilatation-rate, and flow topology. In comparison to incompressible turbulence, we observe that the presence of compressibility in a flow field weakens the alignment tendency of vorticity toward the largest strain-rate eigenvector. Based on the Lagrangian statistics of alignment conditioned on dilatation and topology, we find that the weakened tendency of alignment observed in compressible turbulence is because of a special group of fluid particles that have an initially negligible dilatation-rate and are associated with stable-focus-stretching topology.

  3. Influence of compressibility on the Lagrangian statistics of vorticity-strain-rate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danish, Mohammad; Sinha, Sawan Suman; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of compressibility on Lagrangian statistics of vorticity and strain-rate interactions. The Lagrangian statistics are extracted from "almost" time-continuous data sets of direct numerical simulations of compressible decaying isotropic turbulence by employing a cubic spline-based Lagrangian particle tracker. We study the influence of compressibility on Lagrangian statistics of alignment in terms of compressibility parameters—turbulent Mach number, normalized dilatation-rate, and flow topology. In comparison to incompressible turbulence, we observe that the presence of compressibility in a flow field weakens the alignment tendency of vorticity toward the largest strain-rate eigenvector. Based on the Lagrangian statistics of alignment conditioned on dilatation and topology, we find that the weakened tendency of alignment observed in compressible turbulence is because of a special group of fluid particles that have an initially negligible dilatation-rate and are associated with stable-focus-stretching topology.

  4. Acculturation influences on AAPI adolescent-mother interactions and adolescents' sexual initiation.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tsui-Sui Annie; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Guthrie, Barbara; Caldwell, Cleopatra H

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis of data is to examine relationships among Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPI) adolescents' level of acculturation, maternal influences, and age of sexual initiation. Selected predictive variables are based on the theoretical frameworks and literature review. The results indicate that for these adolescents speaking English at home was positively associated with maternal sexual discussion, mothers' perceptions of connectedness with their adolescents, adolescents' perceived maternal sexual expectations, and later sexual initiation at Wave 1. Adolescents' years of U.S. residency are positively associated with adolescents' level of perceived connectedness with their mothers and later sexual initiation at Wave 2. Adolescents' level of acculturation influence how they interacted with their mothers, perceived their mothers' sexual expectations, and when they decided to initiate sexual intercourse. Interventions to delay AAPI adolescents' sexual debut should consider factors related to AAPI adolescents' and their mothers' levels of acculturation.

  5. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control.

  6. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control. PMID:26161895

  7. The morphological diagram of spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziolkowski, J.

    1996-02-01

    Catalytic anisotropy in mild oxidation reactions results from the varying activity of different crystal faces. Here, spinels exposing (100), (110), and (111) faces have been considered and their Curie-Wulff plots have been drawn, admitting that the relative G(hkl) surface free energies may change in a wide range as a function of composition, inversion, and segregation degree. The normalized free surface energies are defined as A = G(100)/G(111), B = G(110)/G(111), and C = G(111)/G(111) = 1 = const. This made it possible to construct bidimensional morphological diagrams (morphology = f(A,B) at C = const) in the exposed-face-type, solid-type, and exposure-percentage versions. Eleven morphological habits of grains have been identified, including (100)-cube, (110)-dodecahedron, (111)-hexagons, 18-hedron, 20-hedron, and up to 26-hedra bordered with (i) 6 (100)-octagons, 12 (110)-rectangles, and 8 (111)-hexagons, (ii) 6 (100)-squares, 12 (110)-rectangles, and 8 (111)-triangles, or (iii) 6 (100)-squares, 12 (110)-octagons, and 8 (100)-triangles. The analysis is valid for all compounds crystallizing in the cubic system and preferentially exposing the three enumerated faces.

  8. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  9. Phase Diagram of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often been subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood - resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety, in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN, in different chemical environments, at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 15 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 673 K. The present study has been supported by the U.S. DHS under Award Number 2008-ST-061-ED0001.

  10. How does timing, duration and severity of heat stress influence pollen-pistil interactions in angiosperms?

    PubMed

    Snider, John L; Oosterhuis, Derrick M

    2011-07-01

    Reproductive development in sexual plants is substantially more sensitive to high temperature stress than vegetative development, resulting in negative implications for food and fiber production under the moderate temperature increases projected to result from global climate change. High temperature exposure either during early pollen development or during the progamic phase of pollen development will negatively impact pollen performance and reproductive output; both phases of pollen development are considered exceptionally sensitive to moderate heat stress. However, moderately elevated temperatures either before or during the progamic phase can limit fertilization by negatively impacting important pollen pistil interactions required for successful pollen tube growth toward the ovules. This minireview identifies the impacts of heat stress on pollen-pistil interactions and sexual reproduction in angiosperms. A special emphasis is placed on the biochemical response of the pistil to moderately high temperature and the resultant influence on in vivo pollen performance and fertilization.

  11. Electrophoresis of two spheres: Influence of double layer and van der Waals interactions.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shiojenn; Huang, Chih-Hua; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Considering recent applications of electrophoresis conduced in nanoscaled devices, where particle-particle interaction can play a role, we studied for the first time the electrophoresis of two rigid spheres along their center line, taking account of the hydrodynamic, electric, and van der Waals interactions between them. Under the conditions of constant surface potential and surface charge density, the influences of the level of surface potential/charge density, the bulk salt concentration, and the particle-particle distance on their electrokinetic behaviors are examined. Numerical simulation reveals that these behaviors are much more complicated and interesting than those of isolated particles. In particular, we show that care must be taken in choosing an appropriate particle concentration in relevant experiment to avoid obtaining unreliable mobility data.

  12. How does timing, duration and severity of heat stress influence pollen-pistil interactions in angiosperms?

    PubMed Central

    Oosterhuis, Derrick M

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive development in sexual plants is substantially more sensitive to high temperature stress than vegetative development, resulting in negative implications for food and fiber production under the moderate temperature increases projected to result from global climate change. High temperature exposure either during early pollen development or during the progamic phase of pollen development will negatively impact pollen performance and reproductive output; both phases of pollen development are considered exceptionally sensitive to moderate heat stress. However, moderately elevated temperatures either before or during the progamic phase can limit fertilization by negatively impacting important pollen pistil interactions required for successful pollen tube growth toward the ovules. This mini-review identifies the impacts of heat stress on pollen-pistil interactions and sexual reproduction in angiosperms. A special emphasis is placed on the biochemical response of the pistil to moderately high temperature and the resultant influence on in vivo pollen performance and fertilization. PMID:21628998

  13. Specific interaction of capsid protein and importin-{alpha}/{beta} influences West Nile virus production

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuvanakantham, Raghavan; Chong, Mun-Keat; Ng, Mah-Lee

    2009-11-06

    West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein has been shown to enter the nucleus of infected cells. However, the mechanism by which C protein enters the nucleus is unknown. In this study, we have unveiled for the first time that nuclear transport of WNV and Dengue virus C protein is mediated by their direct association with importin-{alpha}. This interplay is mediated by the consensus sequences of bipartite nuclear localization signal located between amino acid residues 85-101 together with amino acid residues 42 and 43 of C protein. Elucidation of biological significance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction demonstrated that the binding efficiency of this association influenced the nuclear entry of C protein and virus production. Collectively, this study illustrated the molecular mechanism by which the C protein of arthropod-borne flavivirus enters the nucleus and showed the importance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction in the context of flavivirus life-cycle.

  14. Relaxation Process of Interacting Two-mode System Influenced by Markovian Thermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Masashi

    2017-02-01

    Two different models of a relaxation process are considered for a linearly interacting two-mode system under the influence of independent Markovian thermal reservoirs. One is to describe the relaxation process of bare particles and the other is to describe the one of quasi particles which are derived from bare particles by the Bogoliubov transformation. The difference is that the former does not includes the effect of the inter-mode interaction on the damping operator while the latter does. The equations of motion are solved algebraically by making use of non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics. The relaxation processes in the two models are investigated in detail. The results are applied for investigating a non-ideal beam splitter with photon loss and noise addition.

  15. Non-local sub-characteristic zones of influence in unsteady interactive boundary-layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothmayer, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of incompressible, unsteady, interactive, boundary layers are examined for a model hypersonic boundary layer and internal flow past humps or, equivalently, external flow past short-scaled humps. Using a linear high frequency analysis, it is shown that the domains of dependence within the viscous sublayer may be a strong function of position within the sublayer and may be strongly influenced by the pressure displacement interaction, or the prescribed displacement condition. Detailed calculations are presented for the hypersonic boundary layer. This effect is found to carry over directly to the fully viscous problem as well as the nonlinear problem. In the fully viscous problem, the non-local character of the domains of dependence manifests itself in the sub-characteristics. Potential implications of the domain of dependence structure on finite difference computations of unsteady boundary layers are briefly discussed.

  16. Relaxation Process of Interacting Two-mode System Influenced by Markovian Thermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    Two different models of a relaxation process are considered for a linearly interacting two-mode system under the influence of independent Markovian thermal reservoirs. One is to describe the relaxation process of bare particles and the other is to describe the one of quasi particles which are derived from bare particles by the Bogoliubov transformation. The difference is that the former does not includes the effect of the inter-mode interaction on the damping operator while the latter does. The equations of motion are solved algebraically by making use of non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics. The relaxation processes in the two models are investigated in detail. The results are applied for investigating a non-ideal beam splitter with photon loss and noise addition.

  17. No aging phenomena in ferrofluids: the influence of coating on interparticle interactions of maghemite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rabias, Ioannis; Fardis, Michael; Devlin, Eamonn; Boukos, Nikos; Tsitrouli, Danai; Papavassiliou, George

    2008-05-01

    The influence of coating on interparticle interactions in ferrofluids has been investigated using various techniques such as Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetometry, transmission electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron, and resonance micro-Raman spectroscopy. Aging and spin-glass-like behavior was investigated in frozen ferrofluids of various concentrations from dense, initial value of 40 mg of coated nanoparticles per 1 mL of water, to dilute 1:10 (4 mg/mL). The as-prepared nanoparticles, core size 7-8 nm, were subsequently coated with a gummic acid corona of 20 nm thickness, which was observed to prevent agglomeration and to delay aggregation even in dense ferrofluids. The resulting separation of magnetic cores due to the coating eliminated all magnetic interparticle interaction mechanisms, such as exchange and dipoledipole, thus ensuring no aging effects of the magnetic particle system, as manifested in particle agglomeration and precipitation.

  18. Influence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the parametric amplification of spin waves

    SciTech Connect

    Verba, Roman; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei

    2015-09-14

    The influence of the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI) on the parametric amplification of spin waves propagating in ultrathin ferromagnetic film is considered theoretically. It is shown that the IDMI changes the relation between the group velocities of the signal and idler spin waves in a parametric amplifier, which may result in the complete vanishing of the reversed idler wave. In the optimized case, the idler spin wave does not propagate from the pumping region at all, which increases the efficiency of the amplification of the signal wave and suppresses the spurious impact of the idler waves on neighboring spin-wave processing devices.

  19. Influence of emitted electrons transiting between surfaces on plasma-surface interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Campanell, Michael; Wang, Hongyue

    2013-09-02

    Emitted electrons are accelerated back into the plasma by the sheath. If their mean free path is large, they can propagate directly to another surface without suffering collisions. We analyze the effects of “transit” on plasma-surface interaction. When transit occurs, surfaces exchanging electrons are intricately coupled. All surfaces float more negatively than they would if the emission collisionally remixed with the bulk plasma. Asymmetries of the system drive a net “transit current” between the surfaces, which influences their potential difference. The larger the initial energy spread of the emitted electrons, the larger the potential difference.

  20. Interactive effect of leaders' influence tactics and ethical leadership on work effort and helping behavior.

    PubMed

    Kacmar, K Michele; Carlson, Dawn S; Harris, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the interactive influence of a) leaders' exemplification and supplication efforts and b) followers' perceptions of the leaders' ethicality on followers' work efforts and helping behaviors. We surveyed 58 leaders and 175 followers who worked for a governmental agency in the United States. Results indicated that the expected positive (negative) relationship between leaders' usage of exemplification and work effort was evident when ethical leadership was high (low). The expected positive relationship between leaders' engagement in supplication and helping behaviors was not present when ethical leadership was high, but the predicted negative relationship was found between supplication and helping when perceptions of leaders' ethicality were low.

  1. Influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on double-layer capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Recently a Poisson-Helmholtz-Boltzmann (PHB) model [Bohinc , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.031130 85, 031130 (2012)] was developed by accounting for solvent-mediated nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions. Nonelectrostatic interactions are described by a Yukawa-like pair potential. In the present work, we modify the PHB model by adding steric effects (finite ion size) into the free energy to derive governing equations. The modified PHB model is capable of capturing both ion specificity and ion crowding. This modified model is then employed to study the capacitance of the double layer. More specifically, we focus on the influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on charging a double layer near a flat surface in the presence of steric effects. We numerically compute the differential capacitance as a function of the voltage under various conditions. At small voltages and low salt concentrations (dilute solution), we find out that the predictions from the modified PHB model are the same as those from the classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory, indicating that nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions and steric effects are negligible. At moderate voltages, nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions play an important role in determining the differential capacitance. Generally speaking, nonelectrostatic interactions decrease the capacitance because of additional nonelectrostatic repulsion among excess counterions inside the double layer. However, increasing the voltage gradually favors steric effects, which induce a condensed layer with crowding of counterions near the electrode. Accordingly, the predictions from the modified PHB model collapse onto those computed by the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory considering steric effects alone. Finally, theoretical predictions are compared and favorably agree with experimental data, in particular, in concentrated solutions, leading one to conclude that the modified PHB model adequately predicts the diffuse

  2. The effects of three-body dispersion interactions on liquid-liquid phase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, P. D.

    1989-02-01

    Using perturbation theory, we show that three-body dispersion interactions influence the phase diagrams of partially miscible liquid mixtures. In our model mixtures, the argon-like particles interact through Maitland-Smith pair potentials and Axilrod-Teller three-body potentials. We find that ternary liquid-liquid coexistence curves are sensitive to vABC, the strength of the Axilrod-Teller interaction appearing for the first time in the ternary mixture. Effective pair potentials predict the ternary phase diagrams well if vABC satisfies Tang's rule.

  3. Influence of counterions on the interaction of pyridinium salts with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Sarapuk, J; Kleszczyńska, H; Pernak, J; Kalewska, J; Rózycka-Roszak, B

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of pyridinium salts (PS) with red blood cells and planar lipid membranes was studied. The aim of the work was to find whether certain cationic surfactant counterion influence its possible biological activity. The counterions studied were Cl-, Br-, I-, ClO4-, BF4- and NO3-. The model membranes used were erythrocyte and planar lipid membranes (BLM). At high concentration the salts caused 100% erythrocyte hemolysis (C100) or broke BLMs (CC). Both parameters describe mechanical properties of model membranes. It was found that the efficiency of the surfactant to destabilize model membranes depended to some degree on its counterion. In both, erythrocyte and BLM experiments, the highest efficiency was observed for Br-, the lowest for NO3-. The influence of all other anions on surfactant efficiency changed between these two extremities; that of chloride and perchlorate ions was similar. Some differences were found in the case of BF4- ion. Its influence on hemolytic possibilities of PS was significant while BLM destruction required relatively high concentration of this anion. Apparently, the influence of various anions on the destructive action of PS on the model membrane used may be attributed to different mobilities and radii of hydrated ions and hence, to different possibilities of particular anions to modify the surface potential of model membranes. This can lead to a differentiated interaction of PS with modified bilayers. Moreover, the effect of anions on the water structure must be taken into account. It is important whether the anions can be classified as water ordering kosmotropes that hold the first hydration shell tightly or water disordering chaotropes that hold water molecules in that shell loosely.

  4. Platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence Staphylococcus aureus–platelet interactions or infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Daga, Shruti; Shepherd, James G.; Callaghan, J. Garreth S.; Hung, Rachel K.Y.; Dawson, Dana K.; Padfield, Gareth J.; Hey, Shi Y.; Cartwright, Robyn A.; Newby, David E.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac vegetations result from bacterium–platelet adherence, activation and aggregation, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in infective endocarditis. The GPIIb/IIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptors play a central role in platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation induced by endocarditis pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, but the influence of known polymorphisms of these receptors on the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is unknown. We determined the GPIIIa platelet antigen PlA1/A2 and FcγRIIa H131R genotype of healthy volunteers (n = 160) and patients with infective endocarditis (n = 40), and investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on clinical outcome in infective endocarditis and S. aureus–platelet interactions in vitro. Platelet receptor genotype did not correlate with development of infective endocarditis, vegetation characteristics on echocardiogram or the composite clinical end-point of embolism, heart failure, need for surgery or mortality (P > 0.05 for all), even though patients with the GPIIIa PlA1/A1 genotype had increased in vivo platelet activation (P = 0.001). Furthermore, neither GPIIIa PlA1/A2 nor FcγRIIa H131R genotype influenced S. aureus-induced platelet adhesion, activation or aggregation in vitro (P > 0.05). Taken together, our data suggest that the GPIIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence S. aureus–platelet interactions in vitro or the clinical course of infective endocarditis. PMID:21044892

  5. Influence of membrane lipid composition on flavonoid-membrane interactions: Implications on their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Stalin; Krishnaswamy, Sridharan; Devashya, Venkappayya; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2015-04-01

    The membrane interactions and localization of flavonoids play a vital role in altering membrane-mediated cell signaling cascades as well as influence the pharmacological activities such as anti-tumour, anti-microbial and anti-oxidant properties of flavonoids. Various techniques have been used to investigate the membrane interaction of flavonoids. These include partition coefficient, fluorescence anisotropy, differential scanning calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, electrophysiological methods and molecular dynamics simulations. Each technique will provide specific information about either alteration of membrane fluidity or localization of flavonoids within the lipid bilayer. Apart from the diverse techniques employed, the concentrations of flavonoids and lipid membrane composition employed in various studies reported in literature also are different and together these variables contribute to diverse findings that sometimes contradict each other. This review highlights different techniques employed to investigate the membrane interaction of flavonoids with special emphasis on erythrocyte model membrane systems and their significance in understanding the nature and extent of flavonoid-membrane interactions. We also attempt to correlate the membrane localization and alteration in membrane fluidity with the biological activities of flavonoids such as anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-microbial properties.

  6. Interaction between two cholesterol metabolism genes influences memory: findings from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Corinne D; Koscik, Rebecca L; Jonaitis, Erin M; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Hermann, Bruce P; La Rue, Asenath; Sager, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The strongest genetic factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) is APOE; nine additional susceptibility genes have recently been identified. The effect of these genes is often assumed to be additive and polygenic scores are formed as a summary measure of risk. However, interactions between these genes are likely to be important. We sought to examine the role of interactions between the nine recently identified AD susceptibility genes and APOE in cognitive function and decline in 1,153 participants from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention, a longitudinal study of middle-aged adults enriched for a parental history of AD. Participants underwent extensive cognitive testing at baseline and up to two additional visits approximately 4 and 6 years later. The influence of the interaction between APOE and each of 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the nine recently identified genes on three cognitive factor scores (Verbal Learning and Memory, Working Memory, and Immediate Memory) was examined using linear mixed models adjusting for age, gender, and ancestry. Interactions between the APOE ε4 allele and both of the genotyped ABCA7 SNPs, rs3764650 and rs3752246, were associated with all three cognitive factor scores (p-values ≤ 0.01). Both of these genes are in the cholesterol metabolism pathway leading to AD. This research supports the importance of considering non-additive effects of AD susceptibility genes.

  7. Environmental influences on virus-host interactions in an Australian subtropical reservoir.

    PubMed

    Säwström, Christin; Pollard, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Viral and prokaryotic interactions in freshwaters have been investigated worldwide but there are few temporal studies in the tropics and none in the sub-tropics. In this 10-month study, we examined temporal changes in virus-host interactions and viral life cycles (lytic versus lysogenic) in relation to the prevailing environmental conditions in a subtropical water reservoir (Wivenhoe) in southeast Queensland, Australia. Heterotrophic prokaryotes and picocyanobacteria were positively correlated with concentrations of viruses throughout the study, indicating the presence of both bacteriophages and cyanophages in the reservoir. The percentage of heterotrophic prokaryotes and picocyanobacteria containing intracellular viruses (FVIC) ranged between 0.2% and 2.4% and did not vary significantly over the 10-month study, whereas lysogenic heterotrophic prokaryotes were only detected in the drier months of June and July. Spearman rank correlation analysis showed that the oxidative-reduction potential (ORP) of the water reservoir influenced the concentrations of viruses, heterotrophic prokaryotes and picocyanobacteria significantly, with low ORP offering a favourable environment for these components. There was a negative relationship between FVIC and rainfall suggesting the associated run-off altered virus-host interactions. Overall, our study provides novel information and inferences on how virus-host interactions in subtropical freshwaters might respond to changes in precipitation predicted to occur with global climate change.

  8. Influence of plant genetic diversity on interactions between higher trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Mooney, Kailen A

    2013-06-23

    While the ecological consequences of plant diversity have received much attention, the mechanisms by which intraspecific diversity affects associated communities remains understudied. We report on a field experiment documenting the effects of patch diversity in the plant Baccharis salicifolia (genotypic monocultures versus polycultures of four genotypes), ants (presence versus absence) and their interaction on ant-tended aphids, ants and parasitic wasps, and the mechanistic pathways by which diversity influences their multi-trophic interactions. Five months after planting, polycultures (versus monocultures) had increased abundances of aphids (threefold), ants (3.2-fold) and parasitoids (1.7-fold) owing to non-additive effects of genetic diversity. The effect on aphids was direct, as plant genetic diversity did not mediate ant-aphid, parasitoid-aphid or ant-parasitoid interactions. This increase in aphid abundance occurred even though plant growth (and thus aphid resources) was not higher in polycultures. The increase in ants and parasitoids was an indirect effect, due entirely to higher aphid abundance. Ants reduced parasitoid abundance by 60 per cent, but did not affect aphid abundance or plant growth, and these top-down effects were equivalent between monocultures and polycultures. In summary, intraspecific plant diversity did not increase primary productivity, but nevertheless had strong effects across multiple trophic levels, and effects on both herbivore mutualists and enemies could be predicted entirely as an extension of plant-herbivore interactions.

  9. Seasonal Influences on Ground-Surface Water Interactions in an Arsenic-Affected Aquifer in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, L. A.; Magnone, D.; Van Dongen, B.; Bryant, C.; Boyce, A.; Ballentine, C. J.; Polya, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Millions of people in South and Southeast Asia consume drinking water daily which contains dangerous levels of arsenic exceeding health-based recommendations [1]. A key control on arsenic mobilization in aquifers in these areas has been controversially identified as the interaction of 'labile' organic matter contained in surface waters with groundwaters and sediments at depth [2-4], which may trigger the release of arsenic from the solid- to aqueous-phase via reductive dissolution of iron-(hyr)oxide minerals [5]. In a field site in Kandal Province, Cambodia, which is an arsenic-affected area typical to others in the region, there are strong seasonal patterns in groundwater flow direction, which are closely related to monsoonal rains [6] and may contribute to arsenic release in this aquifer. The aim of this study is to explore the implications of the high susceptibility of this aquifer system to seasonal changes on potential ground-surface water interactions. The main objectives are to (i) identify key zones where there are likely ground-surface water interactions, (ii) assess the seasonal impact of such interactions and (iii) quantify the influence of interactions using geochemical parameters (such as As, Fe, NO3, NH4, 14C, 3T/3He, δ18O, δ2H). Identifying the zones, magnitude and seasonal influence of ground-surface water interactions elucidates new information regarding potential locations/pathways of arsenic mobilization and/or transport in affected aquifers and may be important for water management strategies in affected areas. This research is supported by NERC (NE/J023833/1) to DP, BvD and CJB and a NERC PhD studentship (NE/L501591/1) to DM. References: [1] World Health Organization, 2008. [2] Charlet & Polya (2006), Elements, 2, 91-96. [3] Harvey et al. (2002), Science, 298, 1602-1606. [4] Lawson et al. (2013), Env. Sci. Technol. 47, 7085 - 7094. [5] Islam et al. (2004), Nature, 430, 68-71. [6] Benner et al. (2008) Appl. Geochem. 23(11), 3072 - 3087.

  10. What Influences Patient-Therapist Interactions in Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy? Qualitative Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Mary; Cullinane, Paul; Hurley, John; Leahy, Irene; Bunzli, Samantha; O'Sullivan, Peter B; O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal physical therapy involves both specific and nonspecific effects. Nonspecific variables associated with the patient, therapist, and setting may influence clinical outcomes. Recent quantitative research has shown that nonspecific factors, including patient-therapist interactions, can influence treatment outcomes. It remains unclear, however, what factors influence patient-therapist interaction. This qualitative systematic review and meta-synthesis investigated patients' and physical therapists' perceptions of factors that influence patient-therapist interactions. Eleven databases were searched independently. Qualitative studies examining physical therapists' and patients' perceptions of factors that influence patient-therapist interactions in musculoskeletal settings were included. Two reviewers independently selected articles, assessed methodological quality using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP), and performed the 3 stages of analysis: extraction of findings, grouping of findings (codes), and abstraction of findings. Thirteen studies were included. Four themes were perceived to influence patient-therapist interactions: (1) physical therapist interpersonal and communication skills (ie, presence of skills such as listening, encouragement, confidence, being empathetic and friendly, and nonverbal communication), (2) physical therapist practical skills (ie, physical therapist expertise and level of training, although the ability to provide good education was considered as important only by patients), (3) individualized patient-centered care (ie, individualizing the treatment to the patient and taking patient's opinions into account), and (4) organizational and environmental factors (ie, time and flexibility with care and appointments). Only studies published in English were included. A mix of interpersonal, clinical, and organizational factors are perceived to influence patient-therapist interactions, although research is needed to identify

  11. State diagrams for harmonically trapped bosons in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Rigol, Marcos; Batrouni, George G.; Rousseau, Valery G.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2009-05-15

    We use quantum Monte Carlo simulations to obtain zero-temperature state diagrams for strongly correlated lattice bosons in one and two dimensions under the influence of a harmonic confining potential. Since harmonic traps generate a coexistence of superfluid and Mott insulating domains, we use local quantities such as the quantum fluctuations of the density and a local compressibility to identify the phases present in the inhomogeneous density profiles. We emphasize the use of the 'characteristic density' to produce a state diagram that is relevant to experimental optical lattice systems, regardless of the number of bosons or trap curvature and of the validity of the local-density approximation. We show that the critical value of U/t at which Mott insulating domains appear in the trap depends on the filling in the system, and it is in general greater than the value in the homogeneous system. Recent experimental results by Spielman et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 120402 (2008)] are analyzed in the context of our two-dimensional state diagram, and shown to exhibit a value for the critical point in good agreement with simulations. We also study the effects of finite, but low (T{<=}t/2), temperatures. We find that in two dimensions they have little influence on our zero-temperature results, while their effect is more pronounced in one dimension.

  12. Influence of Mach Number and Incoming Boundary Layer on Shock Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Ilona; Threadgill, James; Little, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations, schlieren imaging, oil flow visualization and PIV measurements have been performed on the shock boundary layer interaction (SBLI) formed by a 10° compression ramp. The incoming Mach number and boundary layer characteristics are varied to examine their influence on the SBLI. Focus is placed on understanding the effect of these parameters on the structure and unsteadiness of the resultant interaction. Lower Mach numbers M = 2 . 3 (δ0 = 1 . 7 mm , θ = 0 . 29 mm , Reθ = 3115 , H = 1 . 4) and M = 3 (δ0 = 1 . 3 mm , θ = 0 . 25 mm , Reθ = 1800 , H = 1 . 8) show a turbulent or transitional approach boundary layer with no apparent separation at the ramp. Mach 4 has a large separated region which is seemingly a result of a now laminar or transitional approach boundary layer. Pulsations in the separated region correspond to the expected low frequency SBLI dynamics showing a broad peak around a Strouhal number of St = fLint /U∞ = 0 . 27 which is lower than the characteristic frequency of the turbulent boundary layer. Additional results examining the influence of boundary layer modifications (e.g. sweep) and wind tunnel side-walls are also included. Supported by Raytheon Missile Systems.

  13. Invasive earthworms interact with abiotic conditions to influence the invasion of common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica).

    PubMed

    Roth, Alexander M; Whitfeld, Timothy J S; Lodge, Alexandra G; Eisenhauer, Nico; Frelich, Lee E; Reich, Peter B

    2015-05-01

    Common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica L.) is one of the most abundant and ecologically harmful non-native plants in forests of the Upper Midwest United States. At the same time, European earthworms are invading previously glaciated areas in this region, with largely anecdotal evidence suggesting they compound the negative effects of buckthorn and influence the invasibility of these forests. Germination and seedling establishment are important control points for colonization by any species, and manipulation of the conditions influencing these life history stages may provide insight into why invasive species are successful in some environments and not others. Using a greenhouse microcosm experiment, we examined the effects of important biotic and abiotic factors on the germination and seedling establishment of common buckthorn. We manipulated light levels, leaf litter depth and earthworm presence to investigate the independent and interactive effects of these treatments on buckthorn establishment. We found that light and leaf litter depth were significant predictors of buckthorn germination but that the presence of earthworms was the most important factor; earthworms interacted with light and leaf litter to increase the number and biomass of buckthorn across all treatments. Path analysis suggested both direct and moisture-mediated indirect mechanisms controlled these processes. The results suggest that the action of earthworms may provide a pathway through which buckthorn invades forests of the Upper Midwest United States. Hence, researchers and managers should consider co-invasion of plants and earthworms when investigating invasibility and creating preemptive or post-invasion management plans.

  14. Mucoadhesion on pig vesical mucosa: influence of polycarbophil/calcium interactions.

    PubMed

    Kerec, M; Bogataj, M; Mugerle, B; Gasperlin, M; Mrhar, A

    2002-07-08

    The influence of polycarbophil/calcium interactions on the mucoadhesive properties of polycarbophil has been examined. Polycarbophil dispersions and films with different concentrations of calcium or sodium ions were prepared and the following parameters were measured: detachment force on pig vesical mucosa, zeta potential, pH and viscosity. Polycarbophil detachment force decreased significantly in the presence of calcium but not sodium. Both ions decrease the pH of polycarbophil dispersions. On the other hand, altering the pH of hydrated polycarbophil films in the absence of added ions had an insignificant effect on detachment force. Both ions reduce the absolute values of polycarbophil zeta potential, calcium more efficiently than sodium. We could conclude that decreased mucoadhesion strength of polycarbophil in the presence of calcium is due to the chelation of polycarbophil carboxylic groups by calcium and crosslinking of polymer. The crosslinked polymer chains would be expected to be less flexible, and therefore, interpenetrate to a lesser extent with the glycosaminoglycans of mucus. Additionally, the interactions between functional groups of polycarbophil and mucus glycosaminoglycans are lowered due to the calcium, blocking the carboxylic groups. The mechanism of calcium influence on viscosity of polycarbophil dispersions appears to be different: repulsion between ionised carboxylic groups of polycarbophil prevails over the crosslinking of polycarbophil by calcium.

  15. A heuristic model for potential geomorphic influences on trophic interactions in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Martin W.

    2006-07-01

    Whereas certain linkages between stream channel morphology and stream ecology are fairly well-understood, how geomorphology influences trophic interactions remains largely unknown. As a first step, a simple, heuristic model is developed that couples reach-scale geomorphic morphology with trophic dynamics between vegetation, detritus, herbivores, and predators. Predation is assumed to increase with depth beyond a threshold depth, and herbivory is assumed to decrease with velocity beyond a threshold velocity. Results show that the modeled food chain is sensitive to channel geometry, particularly around the threshold conditions for predators and herbivores. Importantly, geomorphic influences are not isolated to a particular trophic level, but rather are transferred through the food chain via top-down and bottom-up effects. The modeled system is particularly sensitive to changes in the end-members of the food chain: vegetation and predators. Results illustrate that geomorphic disturbances, known to affect a single trophic level (e.g., fish), likely impact multiple trophic levels in the stream ecosystem via trophic interactions. Such impacts at the multiple trophic level are poorly understood. While limited by the lack of empirical long-term data for testing and calibration, this simple model provides a structure for generating hypotheses, collecting targeted data, and assessing the potential impacts of stream disturbance or restoration on entire stream ecosystems. Further, the model illustrates the potential for future coupled stream models to explore spatial and temporal linkages.

  16. Influence of sound immersion and communicative interaction on the Lombard effect.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Maëva; Henrich, Nathalie; Dubois, Danièle

    2010-06-01

    To examine the influence of sound immersion techniques and speech production tasks on speech adaptation in noise. In Experiment 1, we compared the modification of speakers' perception and speech production in noise when noise is played into headphones (with and without additional self-monitoring feedback) or over loudspeakers. We also examined how this sound immersion effect depends on noise type (broadband or cocktail party) and level (from 62 to 86dB SPL). In Experiment 2, we compared the modification of acoustic and lip articulatory parameters in noise when speakers interact or not with a speech partner. Speech modifications in noise were greater when cocktail party noise was played in headphones than over loudspeakers. Such an effect was less noticeable in broadband noise. Adding a self-monitoring feedback into headphones reduced this effect but did not completely compensate for it. Speech modifications in noise were greater in interactive situation and concerned parameters that may not be related to voice intensity. The results support the idea that the Lombard effect is both a communicative adaptation and an automatic regulation of vocal intensity. The influence of auditory and communicative factors has some methodological implications on the choice of appropriate paradigms to study the Lombard effect.

  17. In utero testosterone exposure influences physiological responses to dyadic interactions in neurotypical adults.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Anna; Senese, Vincenzo Paolo; Setoh, Peipei; Ripoli, Cristian; Esposito, Gianluca

    2016-10-01

    We investigated how different levels of prenatal exposure to testosterone influence physiological reactions to dyadic interactions, hypothesising that higher levels of prenatal testosterone are linked to greater physiological responses. Autonomic nervous system responses to dyadic interactions focussed on social or physical norms were measured. Physiological assessment of excitability (heart rate, facial temperature) and a behavioural assessment (Likert items judgements) were run on 25 neurotypical participants who had distinct testosterone exposure levels in utero. In utero exposure to testosterone was assessed measuring 2D : 4D (ratio between the lengths of the index and the ring fingers). Higher testosterone exposure participants showed greater physiological arousal: a greater heart rate decrease, independent from scenario type (p<0.05), and opposite facial temperature changes in response to social (increase) (vs.) physical scenarios (decrease) were found (Left-cheek: p<0.05; Right-cheek: p<0.05). These findings suggest a long-term influence of prenatal environment on adults' physiological responses during social situations.

  18. Disordering transitions in vortex matter: Peak effect and phase diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.J.; Reichhardt, C.; Zimanyi, G.T.; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

    2000-08-01

    Using numerical simulations of magnetically interacting vortices in disordered layered superconductors we obtain the static vortex phase diagram as a function of magnetic field and temperature. For increasing field or temperature, we find a transition from ordered straight vortices to disordered decoupled vortices. This transition is associated with a peak effect in the critical current as well as plastic flow of the vortices. For samples with increasing disorder strength the field at which the decoupling occurs decreases. Long range interactions in the c-axis are required to observe the effect.

  19. Phase Diagram of the Two-Chain Hubbard Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Youngho; Liang, Shoudan; Lee, T. K.

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the charge gap and spin gap for the two-chain Hubbard model as a function of the on-site Coulomb interaction and the interchain hopping amplitude. We used the density matrix renormalization group method and developed a method to calculate separately the gaps numerically for the symmetric and antisymmetric modes with respect to the exchange of the chain indices. We have found very different behaviors for the weak and strong interaction cases. Our calculated phase diagram is compared to the one obtained by Balents and Fisher using the weak coupling renormalization group technique.

  20. Multilevel Modeling of Direct Effects and Interactions of Peers, Parents, School, and Community Influences on Adolescent Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayberry, Megan L.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Koenig, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This study tested a social-ecological model of adolescent substance use. Multilevel modeling was used to investigate how systems, such as parents, peers, schools, and communities, directly influence and interact together to influence adolescent substance use. Participants included 14,548 (50.3% female) middle school students who were 78.6% White,…

  1. Multilevel Modeling of Direct Effects and Interactions of Peers, Parents, School, and Community Influences on Adolescent Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayberry, Megan L.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Koenig, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This study tested a social-ecological model of adolescent substance use. Multilevel modeling was used to investigate how systems, such as parents, peers, schools, and communities, directly influence and interact together to influence adolescent substance use. Participants included 14,548 (50.3% female) middle school students who were 78.6% White,…

  2. Influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge, and tissue interaction on transscleral macromolecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Srikantha, Nishanthan; Mourad, Fatma; Suhling, Klaus; Elsaid, Naba; Levitt, James; Chung, Pei Hua; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Jackson, Timothy L

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge and tissue interaction on transscleral diffusion. Unfixed, porcine sclera was clamped in an Ussing chamber. Fluorophore-labelled neutral albumin, neutral dextran, or neutral ficoll were placed in one hemi-chamber and the rate of transscleral diffusion was measured over 24 h using a spectrophotometer. Experiments were repeated using dextrans and ficoll with positive or negative net surface charges. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was undertaken to compare transscleral diffusion with diffusion through a solution. All molecules were 70 kDa. With FRAP, the diffusion coefficient (D) of neutral molecules was highest for albumin, followed by ficoll, then dextran (p < 0.0001). Positive dextrans diffused fastest, followed by negative, then neutral dextrans (p = 0.0004). Neutral ficoll diffused the fastest, followed by positive then negative ficoll (p = 0.5865). For the neutral molecules, transscleral D was highest for albumin, followed by dextran, then ficoll (p < 0.0001). D was highest for negative ficoll, followed by neutral, then positive ficoll (p < 0.0001). By contrast, D was highest for positive dextran, followed by neutral, then negative dextran (p = 0.0021). In conclusion, diffusion in free solution does not predict transscleral diffusion and the molecular-tissue interaction is important. Molecular size, shape, and charge may all markedly influence transscleral diffusion, as may conformability to a lesser degree, but their effects may be diametrically opposed in different molecules, and their influence on diffusion is more complex than previously thought. Each variable cannot be considered in isolation, and the interplay of all these variables needs to be tested, when selecting or designing drugs for transscleral delivery.

  3. Organizational Influences on Interdisciplinary Interactions during Research and Design of Large-Scale Complex Engineered Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Seifert, Colleen M.; Papalambros, Panos Y.

    2012-01-01

    The design of large-scale complex engineered systems (LaCES) such as an aircraft is inherently interdisciplinary. Multiple engineering disciplines, drawing from a team of hundreds to thousands of engineers and scientists, are woven together throughout the research, development, and systems engineering processes to realize one system. Though research and development (R&D) is typically focused in single disciplines, the interdependencies involved in LaCES require interdisciplinary R&D efforts. This study investigates the interdisciplinary interactions that take place during the R&D and early conceptual design phases in the design of LaCES. Our theoretical framework is informed by both engineering practices and social science research on complex organizations. This paper provides preliminary perspective on some of the organizational influences on interdisciplinary interactions based on organization theory (specifically sensemaking), data from a survey of LaCES experts, and the authors experience in the research and design. The analysis reveals couplings between the engineered system and the organization that creates it. Survey respondents noted the importance of interdisciplinary interactions and their significant benefit to the engineered system, such as innovation and problem mitigation. Substantial obstacles to interdisciplinarity are uncovered beyond engineering that include communication and organizational challenges. Addressing these challenges may ultimately foster greater efficiencies in the design and development of LaCES and improved system performance by assisting with the collective integration of interdependent knowledge bases early in the R&D effort. This research suggests that organizational and human dynamics heavily influence and even constrain the engineering effort for large-scale complex systems.

  4. The influence of GABRA2, childhood trauma, and their interaction on alcohol, heroin, and cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Yuan, Qiaoping; Shen, Pei-Hong; Goldman, David; Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    The GABRA2 gene has been implicated in addiction. Early life stress has been shown to alter GABRA2 expression in adult rodents. We hypothesized that childhood trauma, GABRA2 variation, and their interaction would influence addiction vulnerability. African-American men were recruited for this study: 577 patients with lifetime DSM-IV single and comorbid diagnoses of alcohol, cocaine, and heroin dependence, and 255 control subjects. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was administered. Ten GABRA2 haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. We found that exposure to childhood trauma predicted substance dependence (p < .0001). Polysubstance dependence was associated with the highest CTQ scores (p < .0001). The African Americans had four common haplotypes (frequency: .11-.30) within the distal haplotype block: two that correspond to the Caucasian and Asian yin-yang haplotypes, and two not found in other ethnic groups. One of the unique haplotypes predicted heroin addiction, whereas the other haplotype was more common in control subjects and seemed to confer resilience to addiction after exposure to severe childhood trauma. The yin-yang haplotypes had no effects. Moreover, the intron 2 SNP rs11503014, not located in any haplotype block and potentially implicated in exon splicing, was independently associated with addiction, specifically heroin addiction (p < .005). Childhood trauma interacted with rs11503014 variation to influence addiction vulnerability, particularly to cocaine (p < .005). Our results suggest that at least in African-American men, childhood trauma, GABRA2 variation, and their interaction play a role in risk-resilience for substance dependence.

  5. The Influence of GABRA2, Childhood Trauma and their Interaction on Alcohol, Heroin and Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Yuan, Qiaoping; Shen, Pei-Hong; Goldman, David; Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    Background The GABRA2 gene has been implicated in addiction. Early life stress has been shown to alter GABRA2 expression in adult rodents. We hypothesized that childhood trauma, GABRA2 variation and their interaction would influence addiction vulnerability. Methods African American men were recruited for this study: 577 patients with lifetime DSM-IV single and comorbid diagnoses of alcohol, cocaine and heroin dependence, and 255 controls. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was administered. Ten GABRA2 haplotype-tagging SNPs were genotyped. Results We found that exposure to childhood trauma predicted substance dependence (p < 0.0001). Polysubstance dependence was associated with the highest CTQ scores (p < 0.0001). The African Americans had four common haplotypes (frequency: 0.11 – 0.30) within the distal haplotype block: two that correspond to the Caucasian and Asian yin-yang haplotypes and two not found in other ethnic groups. One of the unique haplotypes predicted heroin addiction whereas the other haplotype was more common in controls and appeared to confer resilience to addiction after exposure to severe childhood trauma. The yin-yang haplotypes had no effects. Moreover, the intron 2 SNP rs11503014, not located in any haplotype block and potentially implicated in exon splicing, was independently associated with addiction, specifically heroin addiction (p < 0.005). Childhood trauma interacted with rs11503014 variation to influence addiction vulnerability, particularly to cocaine (p < 0.005). Conclusions Our results suggest that at least in African American men, childhood trauma, GABRA2 variation and their interaction play a role in risk-resilience for substance dependence. PMID:19833324

  6. Influence of long-range Coulomb interaction in velocity map imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barillot, T.; Brédy, R.; Celep, G.; Cohen, S.; Compagnon, I.; Concina, B.; Constant, E.; Danakas, S.; Kalaitzis, P.; Karras, G.; Lépine, F.; Loriot, V.; Marciniak, A.; Predelus-Renois, G.; Schindler, B.; Bordas, C.

    2017-07-01

    The standard velocity-map imaging (VMI) analysis relies on the simple approximation that the residual Coulomb field experienced by the photoelectron ejected from a neutral or ion system may be neglected. Under this almost universal approximation, the photoelectrons follow ballistic (parabolic) trajectories in the externally applied electric field, and the recorded image may be considered as a 2D projection of the initial photoelectron velocity distribution. There are, however, several circumstances where this approximation is not justified and the influence of long-range forces must absolutely be taken into account for the interpretation and analysis of the recorded images. The aim of this paper is to illustrate this influence by discussing two different situations involving isolated atoms or molecules where the analysis of experimental images cannot be performed without considering long-range Coulomb interactions. The first situation occurs when slow (meV) photoelectrons are photoionized from a neutral system and strongly interact with the attractive Coulomb potential of the residual ion. The result of this interaction is the formation of a more complex structure in the image, as well as the appearance of an intense glory at the center of the image. The second situation, observed also at low energy, occurs in the photodetachment from a multiply charged anion and it is characterized by the presence of a long-range repulsive potential. Then, while the standard VMI approximation is still valid, the very specific features exhibited by the recorded images can be explained only by taking into consideration tunnel detachment through the repulsive Coulomb barrier.

  7. The Influence of Ice-Ocean Interactions on Europa's Overturning Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Manucharyan, G. E.; Thompson, A. F.; Goodman, J. C.; Vance, S.

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa appears to have a global liquid ocean, which is located beneath an ice shell that covers the moon's entire surface. Linking ocean dynamics and ice-ocean interactions is crucial to understanding observed surface features on Europa as well as other satellite measurements. Ocean properties and circulation may also provide clues as to whether the moon has the potential to support extraterrestrial life through chemical transport governed by ice-ocean interactions. Previous studies have identified a Hadley cell-like overturning circulation extending from the equator to mid latitudes. However, these model simulations do not consider ice-ocean interactions. In this study, our goal is to investigate how the ocean circulation may be affected by ice. We study two ice-related processes by building idealized models. One process is horizontal convection driven by an equator-to-pole buoyancy difference due to latitudinal ice transport at the ocean surface, which is found to be much weaker than the convective overturning circulation. The second process we consider is the freshwater layer formed by ice melting at the equator. A strong buoyancy contrast between the freshwater layer and the underlying water suppresses convection and turbulent mixing, which may modify the surface heat flux from the ocean to the bottom of the ice. We find that the salinity of the ocean below the freshwater layer tends to be homogeneous both vertically and horizontally with the presence of an overturning circulation. Critical values of circulation strength constrain the freshwater layer depth, and this relationship is sensitive to the average salinity of the ocean. Further coupling of temperature and salinity of the ice and the ocean that includes mutual influences between the surface heat flux and the freshwater layer may provide additional insights into the ice-ocean feedback, and its influence on the latitudinal difference of heat transport.

  8. A short report: Word-level phonological and lexical characteristics interact to influence phoneme awareness.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Tiffany P

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the influence of word-level phonological and lexical characteristics on early phoneme awareness. Typically developing children, ages 61 to 78 months, completed a phoneme-based, odd-one-out task that included consonant-vowel-consonant word sets (e.g., "chair-chain-ship") that varied orthogonally by a phonological characteristic, sound contrast similarity (similar vs. dissimilar), and a lexical characteristic, neighborhood density (dense vs. sparse). In a subsample of the participants-those with the highest vocabularies-results were in line with a predicted interactive effect of phonological and lexical characteristics on phoneme awareness performance: word sets contrasting similar sounds were less likely to yield correct responses in words from sparse neighborhoods than words from dense neighborhoods. Word sets contrasting dissimilar sounds were most likely to yield correct responses regardless of the words' neighborhood density. Based on these findings, theories of early phoneme awareness should consider both word-level and child-level influences on performance. Attention to these influences is predicted to result in more sensitive and specific measures of reading risk.

  9. Flow diagram analysis of electrical fatalities in construction industry.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chia-Fen; Lin, Yuan-Yuan; Ikhwan, Mohamad

    2012-01-01

    The current study reanalyzed 250 electrical fatalities in the construction industry from 1996 to 2002 into seven patterns based on source of electricity (power line, energized equipment, improperly installed or damaged equipment), direct contact or indirect contact through some source of injury (boom vehicle, metal bar or pipe, and other conductive material). Each fatality was coded in terms of age, company size, experience, performing tasks, source of injury, accident cause and hazard pattern. The Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID) was applied to the coded data of the fatal electrocution to find a subset of predictors that might derive meaningful classifications or accidents scenarios. A series of Flow Diagrams was constructed based on CHAID result to illustrate the flow of electricity travelling from electrical source to human body. Each of the flow diagrams can be directly linked with feasible prevention strategies by cutting the flow of electricity.

  10. Counting planar diagrams with various restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    Explicit expressions are considered for the generating functions concerning the number of planar diagrams with given numbers of 3- and 4-point vertices. It is observed that planar renormalization theory requires diagrams with restrictions, in the sense that one wishes to omit 'tadpole' insertions and 'seagull' insertions; at a later stage also self-energy insertions are to be removed, and finally also the dressed 3-point insertions and the dressed 4-point insertions. Diagrams with such restrictions can all be counted exactly. This results in various critical lines in the λ- g plane, where λ and g are effective zero-dimensional coupling constants. These lines can be localized exactly.

  11. Phase diagrams of self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, H.-U.; Riesenhuber, M.; Geisel, T.

    1996-09-01

    We present a method which allows the analytic determination of phase diagrams in the self-organizing map, a model for the formation of topographic projection patterns in the brain and in signal processing applications. The method only requires an ansatz for the tesselation of the data space induced by the map, not for the explicit state of the map. We analytically obtain phase diagrams for various examples, including models for the development of orientation and ocular-dominance maps. The latter phase diagram exhibits transitions to broadening ocular-dominance patterns as observed in a recent experiment.

  12. The Kohn-Luttinger mechanism and phase diagram of the superconducting state in the Shubin-Vonsovsky model

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Val'kov, V. V.; Mitskan, V. A.; Korovuskin, M. M.

    2013-10-15

    Using the Shubin-Vonsovsky model in the weak-coupling regime W > U > V (W is the bandwidth, U is the Hubbard onsite repulsion, and V is the Coulomb interaction at neighboring sites) based on the Kohn-Luttinger mechanism, we determined the regions of the existence of the superconducting phases with the d{sub xy}, p, s, and d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} symmetry types of the order parameter. It is shown that the effective interaction in the Cooper channel considerably depends not only on single-site but also on intersite Coulomb correlations. This is demonstrated by the example of the qualitative change and complication of the phase diagram of the superconducting state. The superconducting (SC) phase induction mechanism is determined taking into account polarization contributions in the second-order perturbation theory in the Coulomb interaction. The results obtained for the angular dependence of the superconducting gap in different channels are compared with angule-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results. The influence of long-range hops in the phase diagram and critical superconducting transition temperature in different channels is analyzed. The conditions for the appearance of the Kohn-Luttinger superconductivity with the d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} symmetry and high critical temperatures T{sub c} {approx} 100 K near the half-filling are determined.

  13. Epistatic interactions of genes influence within-individual variation of physical activity traits in mice.

    PubMed

    Leamy, Larry J; Pomp, Daniel; Lightfoot, J Timothy

    2011-06-01

    A number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) recently have been discovered that affect various activity traits in mice, but their collective impact does not appear to explain the consistently moderate to high heritabilities for these traits. We previously suggested interactions of genes, or epistasis, might account for additional genetic variability of activity, and tested this for the average distance, duration and speed run by mice during a 3 week period. We found abundant evidence for epistasis affecting these traits, although, recognized that epistatic effects may well vary within individuals over time. We therefore conducted a full genome scan for epistatic interactions affecting these traits in each of seven three-day intervals. Our intent was to assess the extent and trends in epistasis affecting these traits in each of the intervals. We discovered a number of epistatic interactions of QTLs that influenced the activity traits in the mice, the majority of which were not previously found and appeared to affect the activity traits (especially distance and speed) primarily in the early or in the late age intervals. The overall impact of epistasis was considerable, its contribution to the total phenotypic variance varying from an average of 22-35% in the three traits across all age intervals. It was concluded that epistasis is more important than single-locus effects of genes on activity traits at specific ages and it is therefore an essential component of the genetic architecture of physical activity.

  14. The influence of inelastic neutrino interactions with light clusters on core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-12-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light clusters in hot nuclear matter on core-collapse supernova simulations. These interactions have been neglected in most hydrodynamical supernova simulations. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged- current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ~ 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light clusters have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light clusters, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  15. Interaction of triprolidine hydrochloride with serum albumins: thermodynamic and binding characteristics, and influence of site probes.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Kalanur, Shankara S; Katrahalli, Umesha; Seetharamappa, J

    2011-04-05

    The interaction between triprolidine hydrochloride (TRP) to serum albumins viz. bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by spectroscopic methods. The experimental results revealed the static quenching mechanism in the interaction of TRP with protein. The number of binding sites close to unity for both TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA indicated the presence of single class of binding site for the drug in protein. The binding constant values of TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA were observed to be 4.75 ± 0.018 × 10(3) and 2.42 ± 0.024 × 10(4)M(-1) at 294 K, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces played the major role in the binding of TRP to proteins. The distance of separation between the serum albumin and TRP was obtained from the Förster's theory of non-radioactive energy transfer. The metal ions viz., K(+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) were found to influence the binding of the drug to protein. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of TRP to Sudlow's site I on both BSA and HSA. The CD, 3D fluorescence spectra and FT-IR spectral results revealed the changes in the secondary structure of protein upon interaction with TRP.

  16. Factors influencing occupant-to-seat belt interaction in far-side crashes.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C A; Fildes, B N; Gibson, T J; Boström, O; Pintar, F A

    2007-01-01

    Seat belt interaction with a far-side occupant's shoulder and thorax is critical to governing excursion towards the struck-side of the vehicle in side impact. In this study, occupant-to-belt interaction was simulated using a modified MADYMO human model and finite element belts. Quasi-static tests with volunteers and dynamic sled tests with PMHS and WorldSID were used for model validation and comparison. Parameter studies were then undertaken to quantify the effect of impact direction, seat belt geometry and pretension on occupant-to-seat belt interaction. Results suggest that lowering the D-ring and increasing pretension reduces the likelihood of the belt slipping off the shoulder. Anthropometry was also shown to influence restraint provided by the shoulder belt. Furthermore, the belt may slip off the occupant's shoulder at impact angles greater than 40 degrees from frontal when no pretension is used. However, the addition of pretension allowed the shoulder to engage the belt in all impacts from 30 to 90 degrees.

  17. Attachment style and oxytocin receptor gene variation interact in influencing social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Notzon, S; Domschke, K; Holitschke, K; Ziegler, C; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Reif, A; Deckert, J; Zwanzger, P

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety has been suggested to be promoted by an insecure attachment style. Oxytocin is discussed as a mediator of trust and social bonding as well as a modulator of social anxiety. Applying a gene-environment (G × E) interaction approach, in the present pilot study the main and interactive effects of attachment styles and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variation were probed in a combined risk factor model of social anxiety in healthy probands. Participants (N = 388; 219 females, 169 males; age 24.7 ± 4.7 years) were assessed for anxiety in social situations (Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory) depending on attachment style (Adult Attachment Scale, AAS) and OXTR rs53576 A/G genotype. A less secure attachment style was significantly associated with higher social anxiety. This association was partly modulated by OXTR genotype, with a stronger negative influence of a less secure attachment style on social anxiety in A allele carriers as compared to GG homozygotes. The present pilot data point to a strong association of less secure attachment and social anxiety as well as to a gene-environment interaction effect of OXTR rs53576 genotype and attachment style on social anxiety possibly constituting a targetable combined risk marker of social anxiety disorder.

  18. Social interactions influence dopamine and octopamine homeostasis in the brain of the ant Formica japonica.

    PubMed

    Wada-Katsumata, Ayako; Yamaoka, Ryohei; Aonuma, Hitoshi

    2011-05-15

    In ants, including Formica japonica, trophallaxis and grooming are typical social behaviors shared among nestmates. After depriving ants of either food or nestmates and then providing them with either food or nestmates, a behavioral change in type and frequency of social interactions was observed. We hypothesized that starvation and isolation affected levels of brain biogenic amines including dopamine (DA) and octopamine (OA) - neuromediators modifying various insect behaviors - and tested the relationship between brain biogenic amines and social behaviors of stressed ants. Ants starved for 7 days contained lower brain DA levels and they did not perform trophallaxis toward nestmates. Feeding starved ants sucrose solution re-established trophallaxis but not brain DA levels. The performance of trophallaxis induced recovery of brain DA content to the level of untreated ants. Ants that were isolated for 2 days displayed markedly increased OA levels, which following nestmate interactions, returned to levels similar to those of control (non-isolated) ants and ants isolated for 1 h. We conclude that: (1) starvation reduced brain DA level but had no significant effect on brain OA (trophallaxis recovered the brain DA levels), and (2) isolation increased brain OA level but had no effect on brain DA (trophallaxis and grooming events recovered the brain OA levels). We suggest that social interactions with nestmates influenced brain biogenic amine homeostasis in stressed F. japonica.

  19. Algorithmic implementation of particle-particle ladder diagram approximation to study strongly-correlated metals and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayogi, A.; Majidi, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    In condensed-matter physics, strongly-correlated systems refer to materials that exhibit variety of fascinating properties and ordered phases, depending on temperature, doping, and other factors. Such unique properties most notably arise due to strong electron-electron interactions, and in some cases due to interactions involving other quasiparticles as well. Electronic correlation effects are non-trivial that one may need a sufficiently accurate approximation technique with quite heavy computation, such as Quantum Monte-Carlo, in order to capture particular material properties arising from such effects. Meanwhile, less accurate techniques may come with lower numerical cost, but the ability to capture particular properties may highly depend on the choice of approximation. Among the many-body techniques derivable from Feynman diagrams, we aim to formulate algorithmic implementation of the Ladder Diagram approximation to capture the effects of electron-electron interactions. We wish to investigate how these correlation effects influence the temperature-dependent properties of strongly-correlated metals and semiconductors. As we are interested to study the temperature-dependent properties of the system, the Ladder diagram method needs to be applied in Matsubara frequency domain to obtain the self-consistent self-energy. However, at the end we would also need to compute the dynamical properties like density of states (DOS) and optical conductivity that are defined in the real frequency domain. For this purpose, we need to perform the analytic continuation procedure. At the end of this study, we will test the technique by observing the occurrence of metal-insulator transition in strongly-correlated metals, and renormalization of the band gap in strongly-correlated semiconductors.

  20. Virial expansion with Feynman diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Leyronas, X.

    2011-11-15

    We present a field theoretic method for the calculation of the second and third virial coefficients b{sub 2} and b{sub 3} of two-species fermions interacting via a contact interaction. The method is mostly analytic. We find a closed expression for b{sub 3} in terms of the two- and three-body T matrices. We recover numerically, at unitarity, and also in the whole Bose-Einstein-condensate-BCS crossover, previous numerical results for the third virial coefficient b{sub 3}.

  1. Mapping QTL main and interaction influences on milling quality in elite US rice germplasm.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J C; McClung, A M; Fjellstrom, R G; Moldenhauer, K A K; Boza, E; Jodari, F; Oard, J H; Linscombe, S; Scheffler, B E; Yeater, K M

    2011-02-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) head-rice yield (HR) is a key export and domestic quality trait whose genetic control is poorly understood. With the goal of identifying genomic regions influencing HR, quantitative-trait-locus (QTL) mapping was carried out for quality-related traits in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from crosses of common parent Cypress, a high-HR US japonica cultivar, with RT0034, a low-HR indica line (129 RILs) and LaGrue, a low-HR japonica cultivar (298 RILs), grown in two US locations in 2005-2007. Early heading increased HR in the Louisiana (LA) but not the Arkansas (AR) location. Fitting QTL-mapping models to separate QTL main and QTL × environment interaction (QEI) effects and identify epistatic interactions revealed six main-effect HR QTLs in the two crosses, at four of which Cypress contributed the increasing allele. Multi-QTL models accounted for 0.36 of genetic and 0.21 of genetic × environment interaction of HR in MY1, and corresponding proportions of 0.25 and 0.37 in MY2. The greater HR advantage of Cypress in LA than in AR corresponded to a genomewide pattern of opposition of HR-increasing QTL effects by AR-specific effects, suggesting a selection strategy for improving this cultivar for AR. Treating year-location combinations as independent environments resulted in underestimation of QEI effects, evidently owing to lower variation among years within location than between location. Identification of robust HR QTLs in elite long-grain germplasm is suggested to require more detailed attention to the interaction of plant and grain development parameters with environmental conditions than has been given to date.

  2. Covariant diagrams for one-loop matching

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Zhengkang

    2017-05-30

    Here, we present a diagrammatic formulation of recently-revived covariant functional approaches to one-loop matching from an ultraviolet (UV) theory to a low-energy effective fi eld theory. Various terms following from a covariant derivative expansion (CDE) are represented by diagrams which, unlike conventional Feynman diagrams, involve gauge-covariant quantities and are thus dubbed "covariant diagrams." The use of covariant diagrams helps organize and simplify one-loop matching calculations, which we illustrate with examples. Of particular interest is the derivation of UV model-independent universal results, which reduce matching calculations of specifi c UV models to applications of master formulas. We also show how suchmore » derivation can be done in a more concise manner than the previous literature, and discuss how additional structures that are not directly captured by existing universal results, including mixed heavy-light loops, open covariant derivatives, and mixed statistics, can be easily accounted for.« less

  3. Some Geometric Aspects of the Ternary Diagram.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, G. M.; Watson, D. F.

    1989-01-01

    Uses the process of normalization in the Cartesian coordinate system which entails radial projection onto a transect to compare different compositions of minerals. Warns that the ternary diagram should not be used as a framework for calculations. (MVL)

  4. An Improved Mnemonic Diagram for Thermodynamic Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Joaquin; Brainard, Alan J.

    1989-01-01

    Considers pressure, volume, entropy, temperature, Helmholtz free energy, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and internal energy. Suggests the mnemonic diagram is for use with simple systems that are defined as macroscopically homogeneous, isotropic, uncharged, and chemically inert. (MVL)

  5. Covariant diagrams for one-loop matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengkang

    2017-05-01

    We present a diagrammatic formulation of recently-revived covariant functional approaches to one-loop matching from an ultraviolet (UV) theory to a low-energy effective field theory. Various terms following from a covariant derivative expansion (CDE) are represented by diagrams which, unlike conventional Feynman diagrams, involve gauge-covariant quantities and are thus dubbed "covariant diagrams." The use of covariant diagrams helps organize and simplify one-loop matching calculations, which we illustrate with examples. Of particular interest is the derivation of UV model-independent universal results, which reduce matching calculations of specific UV models to applications of master formulas. We show how such derivation can be done in a more concise manner than the previous literature, and discuss how additional structures that are not directly captured by existing universal results, including mixed heavy-light loops, open covariant derivatives, and mixed statistics, can be easily accounted for.

  6. Architecture flow diagrams under teamwork reg sign

    SciTech Connect

    Nicinski, T.

    1992-02-01

    The Teamwork CASE tool allows Data Flow Diagrams (DFDs) to be maintained for structured analysis. Fermilab has extended teamwork under UNIX{trademark} to permit Hatley and Pirbhai Architecture Flow Diagrams (AFDs) to be associated with DFDs and subsequently maintained. This extension, called TWKAFD, allows a user to open an AFD, graphically edit it, and replace it into a TWKAFD maintained library. Other aspects of Hatley and Pirbhai's methodology are supported. This paper presents a quick tutorial on Architecture Diagrams. It then describes the user's view of TWKAFD, the experience incorporating it into teamwork, and the successes with using the Architecture Diagram methodology along with the shortcomings of using the teamwork/TWKAFD tool. 8 refs.

  7. Veitch diagram plotter simplifies Boolean functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. K.

    1964-01-01

    This device for simplifying the plotting of a Veitch diagram consists of several overlays for blocking out the unwanted squares. This method of plotting the various input combinations to a computer is used in conjunction with the Boolean functions.

  8. An Improved Mnemonic Diagram for Thermodynamic Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Joaquin; Brainard, Alan J.

    1989-01-01

    Considers pressure, volume, entropy, temperature, Helmholtz free energy, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and internal energy. Suggests the mnemonic diagram is for use with simple systems that are defined as macroscopically homogeneous, isotropic, uncharged, and chemically inert. (MVL)

  9. A Smart Thermal Block Diagram Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn; Miyake, Robert; Dodge, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    The presentation describes a Smart Thermal Block Diagram Tool. It is used by JPL's Team X in studying missions during the Pre-Phase A. It helps generate cost and mass estimates using proprietary data bases.

  10. Putting knowledge into practice: Does information on adverse drug interactions influence people's dosing behaviour?

    PubMed

    Dohle, Simone; Dawson, Ian G J

    2017-05-01

    Adverse drug events relating to drug-drug interactions are a common cause of patient harm. Central to avoiding this harm is the patients' understanding that certain drug combinations present a synergistic risk. Two studies tested whether providing individuals with information about a drug combination that presents a synergistic (cf. additive) risk would elicit higher perceived risk and, therefore, would result in greater precaution in terms of dosing behaviour. Both studies employed an experimental design. Participants were presented with a scenario describing how two symptoms of an infection could each be treated by a different drug. In Experiment 1, information about the effects of combining the two drugs was varied: (1) no information, (2) combination elicits an additive risk, or (3) combination elicits a synergistic risk. In Experiment 2, the size of the risk (small or large) and the participant's role (patient or doctor) was also varied. In both experiments, perceived risk and negative affect increased in response to information about the increased probability of side effects from the drug-drug interaction. Despite these increases, participants did not adjust their drug dosing behaviour in either experiment: Dosing was similar when these interactions were large or small, or when they were due to synergistic or additive effects. People may struggle to transfer their knowledge of drug-drug interaction risks into decision-making behaviours. Care should be taken not to assume that holding accurate risk perceptions of a drug's side effect will result in decisions that help avoid adverse drug events. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Adverse effects of drug-drug interactions are a cause of hospital admissions and increase morbidity and mortality. Patients' understanding that certain drug combinations present a synergistic risk is crucial to avoid harm. It is not clear whether synergistic drug interactions increase risk perception and

  11. Gluing Ladder Feynman Diagrams into Fishnets

    DOE PAGES

    Basso, Benjamin; Dixon, Lance J.

    2017-08-14

    We use integrability at weak coupling to compute fishnet diagrams for four-point correlation functions in planar Φ 4 theory. Our results are always multilinear combinations of ladder integrals, which are in turn built out of classical polylogarithms. The Steinmann relations provide a powerful constraint on such linear combinations, which leads to a natural conjecture for any fishnet diagram as the determinant of a matrix of ladder integrals.

  12. Lattice and Phase Diagram in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2008-10-13

    Model calculations have produced a number of very interesting expectations for the QCD Phase Diagram, and the task of a lattice calculations is to put these studies on a quantitative grounds. I will give an overview of the current status of the lattice analysis of the QCD phase diagram, from the quantitative results of mature calculations at zero and small baryochemical potential, to the exploratory studies of the colder, denser phase.

  13. A universal structured-design diagramer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Program (FLOWCHARTER) generates standardized flowcharts and concordances for development and debugging of programs in any language. User describes programming-language grammar, providing syntax rules in Backus-Naur form (BNF), list of semantic rules, and set of concordance rules. Once grammar is described, user supplies only source code of program to be diagrammed. FLOWCHARTER automatically produces flow diagram and concordance. Source code for program is written for PASCAL Release 2 compiler, as distributed by University of Minnesota.

  14. Gluing Ladder Feynman Diagrams into Fishnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Benjamin; Dixon, Lance J.

    2017-08-01

    We use integrability at weak coupling to compute fishnet diagrams for four-point correlation functions in planar ϕ4 theory. The results are always multilinear combinations of ladder integrals, which are in turn built out of classical polylogarithms. The Steinmann relations provide a powerful constraint on such linear combinations, leading to a natural conjecture for any fishnet diagram as the determinant of a matrix of ladder integrals.

  15. Reliability computation from reliability block diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelson, P. O.; Eckstein, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    A method and a computer program are presented to calculate probability of system success from an arbitrary reliability block diagram. The class of reliability block diagrams that can be handled include any active/standby combination of redundancy, and the computations include the effects of dormancy and switching in any standby redundancy. The mechanics of the program are based on an extension of the probability tree method of computing system probabilities.

  16. ISS EPS Orbital Replacement Unit Block Diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Gregory V.

    2001-01-01

    The attached documents are being provided to Switching Power Magazine for information purposes. This magazine is writing a feature article on the International Space Station Electrical Power System, focusing on the switching power processors. These units include the DC-DC Converter Unit (DDCU), the Bi-directional Charge/Discharge Unit (BCDU), and the Sequential Shunt Unit (SSU). These diagrams are high-level schematics/block diagrams depicting the overall functionality of each unit.

  17. Influence of non perfect impedance boundary on the bistable region in thermoacoustic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, B.; Mariappan, S.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the influence of non perfect impedance boundary on the bistable zone in thermoacoustic interactions of a horizontal Rijke tube. A wave based approach is used to obtain the nonlinear dispersion relation with frequency dependent impedance boundary condition. The location and the time delay in the response of the heater are considered as bifurcation parameters to obtain the stability boundaries. In the presence of non perfect impedance boundary condition, we find that the extent of globally unstable regime reduces and the bistable zone significantly increases. The quantitative changes in the stability boundaries and the bistable zone are investigated for different time lags. However, the nature of bifurcation remains sub critical and unaltered for the range of time delays considered in the present study.

  18. Detention Times of Microswimmers Close to Surfaces: Influence of Hydrodynamic Interactions and Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaar, Konstantin; Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger

    2015-07-01

    After colliding with a surface, microswimmers reside there during the detention time. They accumulate and may form complex structures such as biofilms. We introduce a general framework to calculate the distribution of detention times using the method of first-passage times and study how rotational noise and hydrodynamic interactions influence the escape from a surface. We compare generic swimmer models to the simple active Brownian particle. While the respective detention times of source dipoles are smaller, the ones of pullers are larger by up to several orders of magnitude, and pushers show both trends. We apply our results to the more realistic squirmer model, for which we use lubrication theory, and validate them by simulations with multiparticle collision dynamics.

  19. Influence of Alkylammonium Acetate Buffers on Protein-Ligand Noncovalent Interactions Using Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Gavriilidou, Agni F. M.; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the influence of three volatile alkylammonium acetate buffers on binding affinities for protein-ligand interactions determined by native electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Four different types of proteins were chosen for this study. A charge-reduction effect was observed for all the cases studied, in comparison to the ions formed in ammonium acetate solution. When increasing the collision energy, the complexes of trypsin and the ligand were found to be more stable when sprayed from alkylammonium acetate buffers than from ammonium acetate. The determined dissociation constant (Kd) also exhibited a drop (up to 40%) when ammonium acetate was replaced by alkylammonium acetate buffers for the case of lysozyme and the ligand. The prospective uses of these ammonium acetate analogs in native ESI-MS are discussed in this paper as well.

  20. The influence of gene-environment interactions on the development of alcoholism and drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2012-04-01

    Alcoholism and drug dependence are common psychiatric disorders with a heritability of about 50%; therefore genetic and environmental influences are equally important. Early-life stress is a predictor of adolescent problem drinking/drug use and alcohol/drug dependence in adulthood, but moderating factors governing the availability of alcohol/drug are important. The risk-resilience balance for addiction may be due in part to the interaction between genetic variation and environment stressors (G × E); this has been confirmed by twin studies of inferred genetic risk. Measured genotype studies to detect G × E effects have used a range of alcohol consumption and diagnostic phenotypes and stressors ranging from early-life to adulthood past year life events. In this article, the current state of the field is critically reviewed and suggestions are put forth for future research.

  1. The Influence of Gene–Environment Interactions on the Development of Alcoholism and Drug Dependence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism and drug dependence are common psychiatric disorders with a heritability of about 50%; therefore genetic and environmental influences are equally important. Early-life stress is a predictor of adolescent problem drinking/drug use and alcohol/drug dependence in adulthood, but moderating factors governing the availability of alcohol/drug are important. The risk–resilience balance for addiction may be due in part to the interaction between genetic variation and environment stressors (G×E); this has been confirmed by twin studies of inferred genetic risk. Measured genotype studies to detect G×E effects have used a range of alcohol consumption and diagnostic phenotypes and stressors ranging from early-life to adulthood past year life events. In this article, the current state of the field is critically reviewed and suggestions are put forth for future research. PMID:22367454

  2. Influence of microbial colonization on sperm-mucus interaction in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Eggert-Kruse, W; Gerhard, I; Hofmann, H; Runnebaum, B; Petzoldt, D

    1987-05-01

    Two-hundred-and-thirty-three asymptomatic couples with a mean duration of infertility of 5 years were submitted to postcoital testing (PT) and to sperm penetration meter test (SPMT) and simultaneous microbial screening. Cervical swabs and semen specimens were collected for culture of Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, other potentially pathogenic and commensal aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, herpes simplex virus, vaginal swabs for Trichomonas vaginalis and yeasts. Results of microbial screening were analysed with regard to sperm penetration ability into wives' cervical mucus in vivo and in vitro, but no marked influence was revealed for most microorganisms. Samples of only one of the 233 couples proved to be completely sterile. The findings suggest that in asymptomatic patients microbial colonization is of minor importance for sperm-mucus interaction.

  3. Influence of hydroxylation and glycosylation in ring A of soybean isoflavones on interaction with BSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinyao; Ren, Fenglian

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the influence of hydroxylation and glycosylation of soybean isoflavones in ring A on the interaction with BSA was investigated. Two soybean isoflavone aglycones (daidzein and genistein) and their glycosides (daidzin and genistin) were used to study their ability to bind BSA by quenching the BSA intrinsic fluorescence in solution. The hydroxylation and glycosylation of soybean isoflavones in ring A significantly affected the binding/quenching process; in general, the hydroxylation increases the binding affinity and the glycosylation decreased the binding affinity. For daidzein and daidzin, the binding constants for BSA were 5.2 × 10 4 and 5.58 × 10 3 L mol -1, respectively. For genistein and genistin, the binding constants were 8.40 × 10 5 and 1.44 × 10 5 L mol -1, respectively.

  4. The Influence of Railpad Stiffness on Wheelset/track Interaction and Corrugation Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ILIAS, H.

    1999-11-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the influence of the railpad stiffness on vehicle/track interaction and corrugation growth. For the structural dynamics of vehicle and track a time domain model is used which includes all relevant contact non-linearities. A simple war model enables profile development calculations to be undertaken in the time domain by closing the feedback loop between a short-term dynamical process (structural dynamics) and a long-term damaging process (wear). The initial profile is taken from measurements of a ground rail. It is found that stiffer railpads lead to higher corrugation growth. The parametric excitation from passing sleepers is found to be important. For the chosen operational values this wavelength-fixing mechanism dominates the so-called final profiles of profile development calculations.

  5. Amyloid and APOE ε4 interact to influence short-term decline in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mormino, Elizabeth C; Betensky, Rebecca A; Hedden, Trey; Schultz, Aaron P; Ward, Andrew; Huijbers, Willem; Rentz, Dorene M; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A

    2014-05-20

    To examine whether β-amyloid (Aβ) and APOE ε4 status independently contribute or interact to influence longitudinal cognitive decline in clinically normal older individuals (CN). Data from 490 CNs were aggregated across 3 observational cohort studies (Harvard Aging Brain Study, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, and Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Ageing; median age = 75.0 years, 255 female), and the contributions of APOE ε4 and Aβ on longitudinal change over a median of 1.49 years were examined. Cognitive decline was assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Logical Memory (immediate and delayed recall scores). High Aβ participants were more likely to be APOE ε4+ than low Aβ participants. CNs who were both high Aβ and APOE ε4+ showed greater decline in Logical Memory immediate recall (p < 0.087), Logical Memory delayed recall (p < 0.024), and MMSE (p < 0.034) compared to all other groups (low Aβ/APOE ε4-, low Aβ/APOE ε4+, and high Aβ/APOE ε4-). No other pairwise contrast was significant for any cognitive measure. Clinically normal individuals who are APOE ε4+ and have high Aβ showed the highest cognitive decline. These results suggest that Aβ and APOE ε4 are not redundant contributors of decline in aging but rather interact to promote decline during the short follow-up period examined in this study. Longer follow-up periods will be essential to fully elucidate the influence of Alzheimer disease risk factors on cognitive decline in aging. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Environmental conditions and biotic interactions influence ecosystem structure and function in a drying stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludlam, J.P.; Magoulick, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    Benthic consumers influence stream ecosystem structure and function, but these interactions depend on environmental context. We experimentally quantified the effects of central stoneroller minnows (Campostoma anomalum (Rafinesque) and Meek's crayfish (Orconectes meeki meeki (Faxon)) on benthic communities using electric exclusion quadrats in Little Mulberry Creek before (June) and during (August) seasonal stream drying. Unglazed ceramic tiles were deployed in June and August to measure periphyton and invertebrate abundance, and leafpack decomposition and primary production were also measured in August. Relationships between stoneroller and crayfish density and the size of consumer effects were evaluated with multiple linear regression models. Average chlorophyll a abundance was greater on exposed than exclusion tiles in August, but not in June. Sediment dry mass, periphyton ash-free dry mass (AFDM), and chironomid densities on tiles did not differ among treatments in either period. Leaf packs decayed faster in exposed than exclusion treatments (kexposed = 0.038 ?? 0.013, kexclusion = 0.007 ?? 0.002), but consumer effects were stronger in some pools than others. Leafpack invertebrate biomass and abundance and tile primary productivity did not differ among treatments. Consumer effects on chlorophyll a were related to crayfish and stoneroller density, and effects on chironomid density were related to stoneroller density. These results contrast with a previous exclusion experiment in Little Mulberry Creek that demonstrated strong consumer effects. The influence of stream drying on consumer effects appears to have been reduced by strong spates, underscoring the importance of conducting multi-year studies to determine the magnitude of variability in ecological interactions. ?? US Government: USGS 2010.

  7. HD domain of SAMHD1 influences Vpx-induced degradation at a post-interaction step

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jian; Hou, Jingwei; Zhao, Ke; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Du, Juan

    2016-02-12

    Primate SAMHD1 proteins are potent inhibitors of viruses, including retroviruses such as HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. Vpx, a distinctive viral protein expressed by HIV-2 and some SIVs, induces SAMHD1 degradation by forming a Vpx-DCAF1-based ubiquitin ligase complex. Either the N- or the C-terminus of SAMHD1 is critical for Vpx-induced degradation, depending on the types of SAMHD1 and Vpx proteins. However, it was not fully understood whether other regions of SAMHD1 also contribute to its depletion by Vpx. In the present study, we report that SAMHD1 from chicken (SAMHD1{sub GG}) was not degraded by SIVmac Vpx, in contrast with results for human SAMHD1 (SAMHD1{sub HS}). Results regarding to SAMHD1{sub HS} and SAMHD1{sub GG} fusion proteins supported previous findings that the C-terminus of SAMHD1{sub HS} is essential for Vpx-induced degradation. Internal domain substitution, however, revealed that the HD domain also contributes to Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. Interestingly, the HD domain influenced Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation without affecting Vpx-SAMHD1 interaction. Therefore, our findings revealed that factors in addition to Vpx-SAMHD1 binding influence the efficiency of Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. - Highlights: • SAMHD1{sub GG} from chicken could not be depleted by SIVmac Vpx. • The C-terminus of human SAMHD1{sub HS} is critical for its degradation by Vpx. • The HD domain is essential for Vpx-induced degradation of SAMHD1{sub HS}. • Altering the HD domain does not affect Vpx-SAMHD1 interaction.

  8. Managing uncertainty in collaborative robotics engineering projects: The influence of task structure and peer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Michelle

    Uncertainty is ubiquitous in life, and learning is an activity particularly likely to be fraught with uncertainty. Previous research suggests that students and teachers struggle in their attempts to manage the psychological experience of uncertainty and that students often fail to experience uncertainty when uncertainty may be warranted. Yet, few educational researchers have explicitly and systematically observed what students do, their behaviors and strategies, as they attempt to manage the uncertainty they experience during academic tasks. In this study I investigated how students in one fifth grade class managed uncertainty they experienced while engaged in collaborative robotics engineering projects, focusing particularly on how uncertainty management was influenced by task structure and students' interactions with their peer collaborators. The study was initiated at the beginning of instruction related to robotics engineering and preceded through the completion of several long-term collaborative robotics projects, one of which was a design project. I relied primarily on naturalistic observation of group sessions, semi-structured interviews, and collection of artifacts. My data analysis was inductive and interpretive, using qualitative discourse analysis techniques and methods of grounded theory. Three theoretical frameworks influenced the conception and design of this study: community of practice, distributed cognition, and complex adaptive systems theory. Uncertainty was a pervasive experience for the students collaborating in this instructional context. Students experienced uncertainty related to the project activity and uncertainty related to the social system as they collaborated to fulfill the requirements of their robotics engineering projects. They managed their uncertainty through a diverse set of tactics for reducing, ignoring, maintaining, and increasing uncertainty. Students experienced uncertainty from more different sources and used more and

  9. Influence of the interactions between tea (Camellia sinensis) extracts and ascorbic acid on their antioxidant activity: analysis with interaction indexes and isobolograms.

    PubMed

    Enko, Jolanta; Gliszczyńska-Świgło, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Products containing natural additives, including antioxidants, are usually perceived by consumers as safer than those with synthetic ones. Natural antioxidants, besides having a preservative activity, may exert beneficial health effects. Interactions between antioxidants may significantly change their antioxidant activity, thus in designing functional foods or food/cosmetic ingredients knowledge about the type of interactions could be useful. In the present study, the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA; vitamin C) and different black and green tea extracts and the influence on their antioxidant activities were investigated. The antioxidant activities of tea extracts and their mixtures with AA prepared in several different weight ratios were measured using the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods. The type of interaction was determined by interaction indexes and isobolograms. It was found that the weight ratio of extracts to AA significantly influenced the antioxidant activity of a mixture and the type of interaction between these components. The weight ratio of tea extract to AA can cause the change of interaction, e.g. from antagonism to additivism or from additivism to synergism. The observed differences in the type of interactions were probably also a result of different extracts' polyphenol composition and content. The type of interaction may also be affected by the medium in which extracts and AA interact, especially its pH and the solvent used. To obtain the best antioxidant effect, all these factors should be taken into account during the design of a tea extract-AA mixture.

  10. Interaction of the GCKR and A1CF loci with alcohol consumption to influence the risk of gout.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Humaira; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Merriman, Tony R

    2017-07-05

    Some gout-associated loci interact with dietary exposures to influence outcome. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate interactions between alcohol exposure and urate-associated loci in gout. A total of 2792 New Zealand European and Polynesian (Māori or Pacific) people with or without gout were genotyped for 29 urate-associated genetic variants and tested for a departure from multiplicative interaction with alcohol exposure in the risk of gout. Publicly available data from 6892 European subjects were used to test for a departure from multiplicative interaction between specific loci and alcohol exposure for the risk of hyperuricemia (HU). Multivariate adjusted logistic and linear regression was done, including an interaction term. Interaction of any alcohol exposure with GCKR (rs780094) and A1CF (rs10821905) influenced the risk of gout in Europeans (interaction term 0.28, P = 1.5 × 10(-4); interaction term 0.29, P = 1.4 × 10(-4), respectively). At A1CF, alcohol exposure suppressed the gout risk conferred by the A-positive genotype. At GCKR, alcohol exposure eliminated the genetic effect on gout. In the Polynesian sample set, there was no experiment-wide evidence for interaction with alcohol in the risk of gout (all P > 8.6 × 10(-4)). However, at GCKR, there was nominal evidence for an interaction in a direction consistent the European observation (interaction term 0.62, P = 0.05). There was no evidence for an interaction of A1CF or GCKR with alcohol exposure in determining HU. These data support the hypothesis that alcohol influences the risk of gout via glucose and apolipoprotein metabolism. In the absence of alcohol exposure, genetic variants in the GCKR and A1CF genes have a stronger role in gout.

  11. Calculation of binary phase diagrams between the actinide elements, rare earth elements, and transition metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Selle, J E

    1992-06-26

    Attempts were made to apply the Kaufman method of calculating binary phase diagrams to the calculation of binary phase diagrams between the rare earths, actinides, and the refractory transition metals. Difficulties were encountered in applying the method to the rare earths and actinides, and modifications were necessary to provide accurate representation of known diagrams. To calculate the interaction parameters for rare earth-rare earth diagrams, it was necessary to use the atomic volumes for each of the phases: liquid, body-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, and face-centered cubic. Determination of the atomic volumes of each of these phases for each element is discussed in detail. In some cases, empirical means were necessary. Results are presented on the calculation of rare earth-rare earth, rare earth-actinide, and actinide-actinide diagrams. For rare earth-refractory transition metal diagrams and actinide-refractory transition metal diagrams, empirical means were required to develop values for the enthalpy of vaporization for rare earth elements and values for the constant (C) required when intermediate phases are present. Results of using the values determined for each element are presented.

  12. The influence of interactional semantic patterns on the interpretation of noun-noun compounds.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Phil; Maguire, Rebecca; Cater, Arthur W S

    2010-03-01

    The CARIN theory (C. L. Gagné & E. J. Shoben, 1997) proposes that people use statistical knowledge about the relations with which modifiers are typically used to facilitate the interpretation of modifier-noun combinations. However, research on semantic patterns in compounding has suggested that regularities tend to be associated with pairings of semantic categories, rather than individual concepts (e.g., P. Maguire, E. J. Wisniewski, & G. Storms, in press; B. Warren, 1978). In the present study, the authors investigated whether people are sensitive to interactional semantic patterns in compounding. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the influence of a given modifier on ease of interpretation varies depending on the semantic category of the head. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the relation preference of the head noun influences ease of interpretation when the semantic category of the modifier is compatible with that preference. In light of these findings, the authors suggest that people are sensitive to how different semantic categories tend to be paired in combination and that this information is used to facilitate the interpretation process.

  13. Follow the heart or the head? The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiayi; Yu, Rongjun

    2015-01-01

    The experience of emotion has a powerful influence on daily-life decision making. Following Plato’s description of emotion and reason as two horses pulling us in opposite directions, modern dual-system models of decision making endorse the antagonism between reason and emotion. Decision making is perceived as the competition between an emotion system that is automatic but prone to error and a reason system that is slow but rational. The reason system (in “the head”) reins in our impulses (from “the heart”) and overrides our snap judgments. However, from Darwin’s evolutionary perspective, emotion is adaptive, guiding us to make sound decisions in uncertainty. Here, drawing findings from behavioral economics and neuroeconomics, we provide a new model, labeled “The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition,” to elaborate the relationship of emotion and reason in decision making. Specifically, in our model, we identify factors that determine when emotions override reason and delineate the type of contexts in which emotions help or hurt decision making. We then illustrate how cognition modulates emotion and how they cooperate to affect decision making. PMID:25999889

  14. Influence of Cu(II) on the interaction of sulfite with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dong-Sheng; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Liang, Jie-Qing

    2006-10-01

    The quantitative influence of Cu(II) on the interaction of eukaryotic DNA with sulfite (SO 32-), which is a derivative of sulfur dioxide in the human body, was studied using ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrometry. The results showed that under physiological pH conditions, SO 32- reacted weakly with DNA at concentrations of up to 10 -1 M, at which point a rapid increase in the reaction constant and the reaction number of SO 32- with DNA was observed. The addition of Cu(II) at concentrations ranging from 6.67 × 10 -4 to 3.33 × 10 -3 M to DNA-SO 32- binary systems increased the reaction constant of SO 32- with DNA 41- to 115-fold at a low concentration of SO 32- (10 -3 M), and 4- to 84-fold at an intermediate concentration of SO 32- (10 -2 M), but had little influence on the reaction number of SO 32- with DNA compared with the absence of Cu(II). When the concentration of SO 32- reached 10 -1 M, the presence of Cu(II) reduced the reaction number but had no effect on the reaction constant of SO 32- with DNA. These results show that the efficiency of SO 32- is increased in the presence of Cu(II) at high concentrations of SO 32-.

  15. The Influence of ENSO on Air-Sea Interaction in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. A.; Scott, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    Observations and model experiments are used to investigate the influence of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in the tropical Pacific on air-sea interaction in the north tropical Atlantic Ocean. The two ocean basins are "bridged" by the large-scale atmospheric circulation changes associated with ENSO. In the mixed layer model ("MLM") experiments, observed SSTs in the tropical Pacific from 1950-1999 are specified as boundary conditions in an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) while upper ocean conditions over the remainder of the globe are simulated by a variable depth mixed layer model. Using composites from the MLM experiment and from the NCEP reanalysis we describe: i) the relationship between SST anomalies in the equatorial Pacific and those over the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico; ii) how changes in the atmosphere associated with ENSO can force SST anomalies to form via surface energy fluxes, entrainment of subsurface waters into the surface mixed layer, and Ekman transports; iii) the influence of the atmospheric bridge on ocean conditions other than SSTs, including salinity and mixed layer depth (MLD); and iv) the extent to which SST anomalies generated by the atmospheric bridge in the Caribbean feed back on the atmospheric circulation. The latter is determined by comparing the MLM experiment with a "Control" set of simulations where observed SSTs are still prescribed in the tropical Pacific but the SSTs over the remainder of the global are set to their climatological values.

  16. PATTERNS IN SOIL FERTILITY AND ROOT HERBIVORY INTERACT TO INFLUENCE FINE-ROOT DYNAMICS.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Glen, N.; Jones, Robert, H.

    2006-03-01

    Fine-scale soil nutrient enrichment typically stimulates root growth, but it may also increase root herbivory, resulting in trade-offs for plant species and potentially influencing carbon cycling patterns. We used root ingrowth cores to investigate the effects of microsite fertility and root herbivory on root biomass in an aggrading upland forest in the coastal plain of South Carolina, USA. Treatments were randomly assigned to cores from a factorial combination of fertilizer and insecticide. Soil, soil fauna, and roots were removed from the cores at the end of the experiment (8–9 mo), and roots were separated at harvest into three diameter classes. Each diameter class responded differently to fertilizer and insecticide treatments. The finest roots (,1.0 mm diameter), which comprised well over half of all root biomass, were the only ones to respond significantly to both treatments, increasing when fertilizer and when insecticide were added (each P , 0.0001), with maximum biomass found where the treatments were combined (interaction term significant, P , 0.001). These results suggest that root-feeding insects have a strong influence on root standing crop with stronger herbivore impacts on finer roots and within more fertile microsites. Thus, increased vulnerability to root herbivory is a potentially significant cost of root foraging in nutrient-rich patches.

  17. An analytical master curve for Goodman diagram data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, A.; Fang, D.

    1993-05-01

    Estimation of the remaining safe life of structural parts which are not easily inspectable continues to be a problem. Even when load histories are available, laborious interpolation of Goodman diagram data is required in order to determine the remaining fatigue life of such parts. An analytical formulation of Goodman diagram data would expedite the life check. It is shown in this paper that, for many engineering materials at room temperature, the entire range of Goodman diagram data collapses on to a single master curve when presented as the ratio of lifetime with mean stress to lifetime at R = -1 for a given stress amplitude, as a function of a non-dimensional load parameter consisting of stress amplitude, mean stress, and material strength. The master curve is conveniently expressed in terms of two easily determined Weibull constants. Stress-concentration factor influences the value of the constants, as does the strain-rate sensitivity of some materials. By use of the master curve formula in an algorithm together with the Manson-Coffin life relation and Miner cumulative damage rule, computed fatigue lives lay within a factor of 2 of results obtained in tests under aircraft spectrum loads.

  18. The influence of source-receiver interaction on the numerical prediction of railway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulier, P.; Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2014-06-01

    The numerical prediction of vibrations in buildings due to railway traffic is a complicated problem where wave propagation in the soil couples the source (railway tunnel or track) and the receiver (building). This through-soil coupling is often neglected in state-of-the-art numerical models in order to reduce the computational cost. In this paper, the effect of this simplifying assumption on the accuracy of numerical predictions is investigated. A coupled finite element-boundary element methodology is employed to analyze the interaction between a building and a railway tunnel at depth or a ballasted track at the surface of a homogeneous halfspace, respectively. Three different soil types are considered. It is demonstrated that the dynamic axle loads can be calculated with reasonable accuracy using an uncoupled strategy in which through-soil coupling is disregarded. If the transfer functions from source to receiver are considered, however, large local variations in terms of vibration insertion gain are induced by source-receiver interaction, reaching up to 10 dB and higher, although the overall wave field is only moderately affected. A global quantification of the significance of through-soil coupling is made, based on the mean vibrational energy entering a building. This approach allows assessing the common assumption in seismic engineering that source-receiver interaction can be neglected if the distance between source and receiver is sufficiently large compared to the wavelength of waves in the soil. It is observed that the interaction between a source at depth and a receiver mainly affects the power flow distribution if the distance between source and receiver is smaller than the dilatational wavelength in the soil. Interaction effects for a railway track at grade are observed if the source-receiver distance is smaller than six Rayleigh wavelengths. A similar trend is revealed if the passage of a freight train is considered. The overall influence of dynamic

  19. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Inaniwa, T. Kanematsu, N.; Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  20. BDNF Val66Met is associated with introversion and interacts with 5-HTTLPR to influence neuroticism.

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Antonio; Tanaka, Toshiko; Sutin, Angelina R; Deiana, Barbara; Balaci, Lenuta; Sanna, Serena; Olla, Nazario; Maschio, Andrea; Uda, Manuela; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Costa, Paul T

    2010-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission, and has been linked to neuroticism, a major risk factor for psychiatric disorders. A recent genome-wide association (GWA) scan, however, found the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) associated with extraversion but not with neuroticism. In this study, we examine the links between BDNF and personality traits, assessed using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), in a sample from SardiNIA (n=1560) and the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA; n=1131). Consistent with GWA results, we found that BDNF Met carriers were more introverted. By contrast, in both samples and in a meta-analysis inclusive of published data (n=15251), we found no evidence for a main effect of BDNF Val66Met on neuroticism. Finally, on the basis of recent reports of an epistatic effect between BDNF and the serotonin transporter, we explored a Val66Met x 5-HTTLPR interaction in a larger SardiNIA sample (n=2333). We found that 5-HTTLPR LL carriers scored lower on neuroticism in the presence of the BDNF Val variant, but scored higher on neuroticism in the presence of the BDNF Met variant. Our findings support the association between the BDNF Met variant and introversion and suggest that BDNF interacts with the serotonin transporter gene to influence neuroticism.

  1. Influence of interactions between genes and childhood trauma on refractoriness in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-10-03

    Psychiatric disorders are excellent disease models in which gene-environmental interaction play a significant role in the pathogenesis. Childhood trauma has been known as a significant environmental factor in the progress of, and prognosis for psychiatric illness. Patients with refractory illness usually have more severe symptoms, greater disability, lower quality of life and are at greater risk of suicide than other psychiatric patients. Our literature review uncovered some important clinical factors which modulate response to treatment in psychiatric patients who have experienced childhood trauma. Childhood trauma seems to be a critical determinant of treatment refractoriness in psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. In patients with psychotic disorders, the relationship between childhood trauma and treatment-refractoriness appears to be mediated by cognitive impairment. In the case of bipolar disorder, the relationship appears to be mediated by greater affective disturbance and earlier onset, while in major depressive disorder the mediating factors are persistent, severe symptoms and frequent recurrence. In suicidal individuals, childhood maltreatment was associated with violent suicidal attempts. In the case of PTSD patients, it appears that childhood trauma makes the brain more vulnerable to subsequent trauma, thus resulting in more severe, refractory symptoms. Given that several studies have suggested that there are distinct subtypes of genetic vulnerability to childhood trauma, it is important to understand how gene-environment interactions influence the course of psychiatric illnesses in order to improve therapeutic strategies.

  2. Interactive influence of temperature and relative humidity on egg parasitoids of Riptortus pedestris (Hemiptera: Alydidae).

    PubMed

    Mainali, Bishwo P; Kim, Sangwon; Lim, Un Taek

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies reported that of the two egg parasitoids of Riptortus pedestris (F.) (Hemiptera: Alydidae) found in Korea, Gryon japonicum (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) appears in soybean fields much earlier than Ooencyrtus nezarae Ishii (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). To explain this phenomenon, we evaluated the interactive influence of temperature and relative humidity (RH) on the biological attributes of these parasitoids, including adult parasitoid longevity and survival. Temperature had significant effects on all the biological attributes examined for both parasitoids, while RH only affected rates of parasitism and adult emergence. Interaction between temperature and species, but not RH and species was found to affect significantly on parasitism. G. japonicum showed higher relative increment in parasitism than O. nezarae at temperatures higher than 25 degrees C. No significant differences in progeny sex ratio were detected for either species at any temperature x humidity combination. RH had no effect on the developmental time of O. nezarae but on the developmental time of G. japonicum, which was longer at low RH. Although the biological attributes of adult parasitoids of both species showed a wide range of adaptability, but it did not explain the patterns of occurrence of these species in the field. However, G. japonicum showed greater longevity than O. nezarae at all combinations of temperature and RH and this may partially explain the seasonal pattern of occurrence of adult parasitoids in the field previously observed.

  3. Mammal diversity influences the carbon cycle through trophic interactions in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Sobral, Mar; Silvius, Kirsten M; Overman, Han; Oliveira, Luiz F B; Rabb, Ted K; Fragoso, José M V

    2017-10-09

    Biodiversity affects many ecosystem functions and services, including carbon cycling and retention. While it is known that the efficiency of carbon capture and biomass production by ecological communities increases with species diversity, the role of vertebrate animals in the carbon cycle remains undocumented. Here, we use an extensive dataset collected in a high-diversity Amazonian system to parse out the relationship between animal and plant species richness, feeding interactions, tree biomass and carbon concentrations in soil. Mammal and tree species richness is positively related to tree biomass and carbon concentration in soil-and the relationship is mediated by organic remains produced by vertebrate feeding events. Our research advances knowledge of the links between biodiversity and carbon cycling and storage, supporting the view that whole community complexity-including vertebrate richness and trophic interactions-drives ecosystem function in tropical systems. Securing animal and plant diversity while protecting landscape integrity will contribute to soil nutrient content and carbon retention in the biosphere.A high-diversity Amazonian system reveals the influence of mammalian diversity on the carbon cycle, mediated through vertebrate feeding events.

  4. Influence of wind and lake morphometry on the interaction between two rivers entering a stratified lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morillo, S.; Imberger, J.; Antenucci, J.P.; Woods, P.F.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of two rivers flowing into Coeur d'Alene Lake (United States) was investigated with a field experiment and three-dimensional numerical simulations. The focus was on the influence of basin morphology, wind speed, and wind direction on the fate and transport of the inflowing water. Data from the field campaign showed that intrusions from the two rivers propagated into the lake at different depths, with the trace element polluted Coeur d'Alene River flowing into the lake above the trace element poor and nutrient rich St. Joe River inflow. The inflows initially intruded horizontally into the lake at their level of neutral buoyancy and later mixed vertically. Model results revealed that, as the intrusions entered the main lake basin, a forced horizontal mode-two basin-scale internal wave interacted with the intrusions to frequently siphon them into the lake proper and where rapid vertical mixing followed. The results serve to show how detailed transport and mixing patterns in a lake can have important consequences for the plankton ecology in the lake. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  5. Complex contextual influences on the communicative interactions of students with multiple and severe disabilities.

    PubMed

    De Bortoli, Tania; Arthur-Kelly, Michael; Foreman, Phil; Balandin, Susan; Mathisen, Bernice

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore teachers' perceptions and experiences of supports and obstacles to engaging students with multiple and severe disabilities (MSD) in communicative interactions at school. Eleven teachers of students with MSD participated in two in-depth interviews. Interview transcripts were analysed for narrative structure and content themes. Inter-coder reliability for coding of content themes was 87.5%. Participants identified a broad range of factors, including: characteristics of individual students, attitudes, perceptions and beliefs of teachers and other staff, class structure, staffing, opportunities for collegiality, resources, funding, infrastructure, collaboration with speech-language pathologists, appropriate communication education for teachers, the role of government departments, and broader societal factors. The findings suggest that there are complex contextual influences on the communicative interactions of students with MSD. While inadequate systemic supports appear to contribute to low frequencies of communication, systemic factors can be structured so that students participate in activities and have opportunities for communication. Further research is required with teachers of students with MSD to substantiate these findings.

  6. Flavor release and perception in hard candy: influence of flavor compound-compound interactions.

    PubMed

    Schober, Amanda L; Peterson, Devin G

    2004-05-05

    The influence of flavor compound-compound interactions on flavor release properties and flavor perception in hard candy was investigated. Hard candies made with two different modes of binary flavor delivery, (1) L-menthol and 1,8-cineole added as a mixture and (2) L-menthol and 1,8-cineole added separate from one another, were analyzed via breath analysis and sensory time-intensity testing. Single-flavor candy containing only L-menthol or 1,8-cineole was also investigated via breath analysis for comparison. The release rates of both L-menthol and 1,8-cineole in the breath were more rapid and at a higher concentration when the compounds were added to hard candy separate from one another in comparison to their addition as a mixture (conventional protocol). Additionally, the time-intensity study indicated a significantly increased flavor intensity (measured as overall cooling) for hard candy made with separate addition of these flavor compounds. In conclusion, the flavor properties of hard candy can be controlled, at least in part, by flavor compound-compound interactions and may be altered by the method of flavor delivery.

  7. Modelling Europa's interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere: Influence of plumes in Europa's atmosphere on the plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloecker, A.; Saur, J.; Roth, L.

    2015-12-01

    We study the influence of plumes in Europa's atmosphere on the interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere and the plasma environment. We apply a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, which includes plasma production and loss due to electron impact ionization and dissociative recombination, and electromagnetic induction in a subsurface water ocean.The model considers the magnetospheric and ionospheric electrons separately. We show that an atmospherical inhomogeneity, such as a plume, affects the plasma interaction in the way that a pronounced north-south asymmetry in the near and the Alfvénic far field develops. Furthermore, a "small Alfvén winglet" within Europa's Alfvén wing forms. We also investigate if such signatures of atmospherical inhomogeneities are visible in magnetic field measurements of the Galileo magnetometer. In addition to our MHD model we apply an analytical approach based on the model by Saur et al. (2007) for our studies. We compare the model results with the observed magnetic field data from three flybys of Europa that occurred during the Alfvén wing crossing.

  8. BDNF Val66Met is Associated with Introversion and Interacts with 5-HTTLPR to Influence Neuroticism

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Tanaka, Toshiko; Sutin, Angelina R; Deiana, Barbara; Balaci, Lenuta; Sanna, Serena; Olla, Nazario; Maschio, Andrea; Uda, Manuela; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Costa, Paul T

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission, and has been linked to neuroticism, a major risk factor for psychiatric disorders. A recent genome-wide association (GWA) scan, however, found the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) associated with extraversion but not with neuroticism. In this study, we examine the links between BDNF and personality traits, assessed using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), in a sample from SardiNIA (n=1560) and the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA; n=1131). Consistent with GWA results, we found that BDNF Met carriers were more introverted. By contrast, in both samples and in a meta-analysis inclusive of published data (n=15251), we found no evidence for a main effect of BDNF Val66Met on neuroticism. Finally, on the basis of recent reports of an epistatic effect between BDNF and the serotonin transporter, we explored a Val66Met × 5-HTTLPR interaction in a larger SardiNIA sample (n=2333). We found that 5-HTTLPR LL carriers scored lower on neuroticism in the presence of the BDNF Val variant, but scored higher on neuroticism in the presence of the BDNF Met variant. Our findings support the association between the BDNF Met variant and introversion and suggest that BDNF interacts with the serotonin transporter gene to influence neuroticism. PMID:20042999

  9. Engineering polymer blend microparticles: an investigation into the influence of polymer blend distribution and interaction.

    PubMed

    Alhnan, Mohamed A; Basit, Abdul W

    2011-01-18

    The aim of this work was to understand the influence of polymer interaction and distribution on drug release from microparticles fabricated from blends of polymers. Blends of pH dependent polymer (Eudragit S, soluble above pH 7) and pH independent polymer (Eudragit RL, Eudragit RS or ethylcellulose) were incorporated into prednisolone loaded microparticles using a novel emulsion solvent evaporation method. Microparticles fabricated from blends of Eudragit S and Eudragit RL or RS did not modify drug release compared to microparticles fabricated from Eudragit S alone. This can be attributed to the high degree of miscibility of Eudragit S with Eudragit RS or Eudragit RL within the microparticles as confirmed by glass transition temperature measurements and confocal laser scanning microscopy. In contrast, microparticles prepared from blends of Eudragit S (75%) and ethylcellulose (25%) extended the release of prednisolone at pH 7.4 (compared to Eudragit S microparticles). This change in release profile was related to the immiscibility of Eudragit S and ethylcellulose as assessed by thermal analysis, and confirmed by microscopy which showed pores within the microparticle structures following dissolution of the Eudragit S domains. The ability of water insoluble polymers to extend drug release from enteric polymer microparticles is dependent on the miscibility and interaction of the polymers. This knowledge is important in the design of pH responsive microparticles capable of extending drug release in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cannibalism as an interacting phenotype: precannibalistic aggression is influenced by social partners in the endangered Socorro Isopod (Thermosphaeroma thermophilum).

    PubMed

    Bleakley, B H; Welter, S M; McCauley-Cole, K; Shuster, S M; Moore, A J

    2013-04-01

    Models for the evolution of cannibalism highlight the importance of asymmetries between individuals in initiating cannibalistic attacks. Studies may include measures of body size but typically group individuals into size/age classes or compare populations. Such broad comparisons may obscure the details of interactions that ultimately determine how socially contingent characteristics evolve. We propose that understanding cannibalism is facilitated by using an interacting phenotypes perspective that includes the influences of the phenotype of a social partner on the behaviour of a focal individual and focuses on variation in individual pairwise interactions. We investigated how relative body size, a composite trait between a focal individual and its social partner, and the sex of the partners influenced precannibalistic aggression in the endangered Socorro isopod, Thermosphaeroma thermophilum. We also investigated whether differences in mating interest among males and females influenced cannibalism in mixed sex pairs. We studied these questions in three populations that differ markedly in range of body size and opportunities for interactions among individuals. We found that relative body size influences the probability of and latency to attack. We observed differences in the likelihood of and latency to attack based on both an individual's sex and the sex of its partner but found no evidence of sexual conflict. The instigation of precannibalistic aggression in these isopods is therefore a property of both an individual and its social partner. Our results suggest that interacting phenotype models would be improved by incorporating a new conditional ψ, which describes the strength of a social partner's influence on focal behaviour.

  11. Influence of Mg 2+ and Cd 2+ on the interaction between sparfloxacin and calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Guo, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Lin-Li

    2008-04-01

    Mg 2+ and Cd 2+ have different binding capacity to sparfloxacin, and have different combination modes with calf thymus DNA. Selecting these two different metal ions, the influence of them on the binding constants between SPFX and calf thymus DNA, as well as the related mechanism have been studied by using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The result shows that Cd 2+ has weak binding capacity to SPFX in the SPFX-Cd 2+ binary system, but can decrease the binding between SPFX and DNA obviously in SPFX-DNA-Cd 2+ ternary system. Mg 2+ has strong binding capacity to SPFX. It can increase the binding between SPFX and DNA at concentrations <0.01 mM, and decrease the binding between them at concentrations >0.01 mM. Referring to the different modes of Mg 2+ and Cd 2+ binding to DNA, the mechanism of the influence of metal ions on the binding between SPFX and DNA has been proposed. SPFX can directly bind to DNA by chelating DNA base sites. If a metal ion at certain concentration mainly binds to DNA bases, it can decrease the binding constants between SPFX and DNA through competing with SPFX. While if a metal ion at certain concentration mainly binds to phosphate groups of DNA, it can increase the binding constants by building a bridge between SPFX and DNA. The influence direction of metal ions on the binding between quinolone and DNA relays on their binding ratio of affinity for bases to phosphate groups on DNA. Our result supports Palumbo's conclusion that the binding between SPFX and the phosphate groups is the precondition for the combination between SPFX and DNA, which is stabilized through stacking interactions between the condensed rings of SPFX and DNA bases.

  12. The effective QCD phase diagram and the critical end point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Bashir, Adnan; Cobos-Martínez, J. J.; Hernández-Ortiz, Saúl; Raya, Alfredo

    2015-08-01

    We study the QCD phase diagram on the temperature T and quark chemical potential μ plane, modeling the strong interactions with the linear sigma model coupled to quarks. The phase transition line is found from the effective potential at finite T and μ taking into account the plasma screening effects. We find the location of the critical end point (CEP) to be (μCEP /Tc, TCEP /Tc) ∼ (1.2, 0.8), where Tc is the (pseudo)critical temperature for the crossover phase transition at vanishing μ. This location lies within the region found by lattice inspired calculations. The results show that in the linear sigma model, the CEP's location in the phase diagram is expectedly determined solely through chiral symmetry breaking. The same is likely to be true for all other models which do not exhibit confinement, provided the proper treatment of the plasma infrared properties for the description of chiral symmetry restoration is implemented. Similarly, we also expect these corrections to be substantially relevant in the QCD phase diagram.

  13. Caffeine/nutrition interaction in the rat brain: Influence on latent inhibition and cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Márlison José Lima; de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2011-01-10

    Caffeine, like malnutrition, can produce behavioral and electrophysiological alterations. However, the interaction of both factors remains unclear. Here this interaction has been studied in male Wistar rats previously malnourished during the lactation period by feeding their dams the "regional basic diet" of Northeast Brazil, containing about 8% protein, predominantly from vegetable sources (RBD(8)). At 70-75days of life, a subset of the pups was treated intraperitoneally with 30mg/kg caffeine for 4days while being tested according to the behavioral model of latent inhibition. Another group was subjected to an electrophysiological recording of the phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression, and the effects of caffeine injected during the recording session were evaluated. Caffeine did not affect cortical spreading depression, but antagonized latent inhibition in both the RBD(8)-malnourished rats and in the well-nourished control group fed a chow diet with 22% protein. This effect of caffeine was not seen in malnourished rats fed a protein-supplemented RBD (protein increased to 22% by increasing the proportion of foodstuffs from vegetable origin; RBD(22) group), suggesting that the amino acid imbalance of this diet may modulate the caffeine effects on latent inhibition. The results indicate a differential effect of caffeine in the latent inhibition behavioral model, as compared to the cortical spreading depression phenomenon, and this effect is influenced by the early nutritional status of the animal. We suggest that caffeine may modulate dopaminergic subcortical receptors participating in attention processes, but does not interact at the cortical level, in a way that would affect cortical spreading depression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Interactions between fluvial forces and vegetation size, density and morphology influence plant mortality during experimental floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, J. C.; Kui, L.; Manners, R.; Wilcox, A. C.; Lightbody, A.; Sklar, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Introduction and methods Fluvial disturbance is a key driver of riparian vegetation dynamics in river corridors. Despite an increasing understanding of ecohydraulic interactions between plants and fluvial forces, the interactive influences of plant morphology and sediment supply on plant mortality, a key demographic factor, are largely unknown. To better understand these processes, we designed and conducted a series of flume experiments to: (1) quantify effects of plant traits that interact with flow and sediment transport on plant loss to scour during floods; and (2) predict plant dislodgement for different species across a range of plant sizes, patch densities, and sediment condition (equilibrium transport versus sediment deficit). We ran ten experimental floods in a 28 m long × 0.6 m wide × 0.71 m tall flume, using live, 1-3 year-old tamarisk and cottonwood seedlings with contrasting morphologies with varied combinations of size and density. Results and discussion Both sediment supply and plant traits (morphology and composition) have significant impacts on plant vulnerability during floods. Sediment deficit resulted in bed degradation and a 35% greater risk of plant loss compared to equilibrium sediment conditions. The probability of plant dislodgement in sparse patches was 4.5 times greater than in dense patches. Tamarisk plants and patches had greater frontal area, basal diameter and longer roots compared to cottonwood across all seedling heights. These traits, as well as its lower crown position reduced tamarisk's vulnerability to scour by 75%. Compared with cottonwood, tamarisk exhibits better resistance to floods, due to its greater root biomass and longer roots that stabilize soil, and its greater frontal area and lower crown that effectively trap sediment. These traits likely contribute to riverscape-scale changes in channel morphology that are evident where tamarisk has invaded native riparian communities, and explain the persistence of tamarisk

  15. Consequences of complex environments: Temperature and energy intake interact to influence growth and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Stahlschmidt, Zachary R; Jodrey, Alicia D; Luoma, Rachel L

    2015-09-01

    The field of comparative physiology has a rich history of elegantly examining the effects of individual environmental factors on performance traits linked to fitness (e.g., thermal performance curves for locomotion). However, animals live in complex environments wherein multiple environmental factors co-vary. Thus, we investigated the independent and interactive effects of temperature and energy intake on the growth and metabolic rate of juvenile corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) in the context of shifts in complex environments. Unlike previous studies that imposed constant or fluctuating temperature regimes, we manipulated the availability of preferred thermal microclimates (control vs. relatively warm regimes) for eight weeks and allowed snakes to behaviorally thermoregulate among microclimates. By also controlling for energy intake, we demonstrate an interactive effect of temperature and energy on growth-relevant temperature shifts had no effect on snakes' growth when energy intake was low and a positive effect on growth when energy intake was high. Thus, acclimation to relatively warm thermal options can result in increased rates of growth when food is abundant in a taxon in which body size confers fitness advantages. Temperature and energy also interactively influenced metabolic rate-snakes in the warmer temperature regime exhibited reduced metabolic rate (O2 consumption rate at 25 °C and 30 °C) if they had relatively high energy intake. Although we advocate for continued investigation into the effects of complex environments on other traits, our results indicate that warming may actually benefit important life history traits in some taxa and that metabolic shifts may underlie thermal acclimation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Composition of extrafloral nectar influences interactions between the myrmecophyte Humboldtia brunonis and its ant associates.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Megha; Radhika, Venkatesan; Satish, Suma; Borges, Renee M

    2012-01-01

    Ant-plant interactions often are mediated by extrafloral nectar (EFN) composition that may influence plant visitation by ants. Over a 300 km range in the Indian Western Ghats, we investigated the correlation between the EFN composition of the myrmecophytic ant-plant Humboldtia brunonis (Fabaceae) and the number and species of ants visiting EFN. EFN composition varied among H. brunonis populations and between plant organs (floral bud vs. young leaf EFN). In general, EFN was rich in sugars with small quantities of amino acids, especially essential amino acids, and had moderate invertase activity. In experiments at the study sites with sugar and amino acid solutions and with leaf or floral bud EFN mimics, dominant EFN-feeding ants differentiated between solutions as well as between mimics. The castration parasite Crematogaster dohrni (northern study site) was the least selective and did not exhibit any clear feeding preferences, while the largely trophobiont-tending non-protective Myrmicaria brunnea (middle study site) preferred higher sucrose concentrations and certain essential/non-essential amino acid mixtures. The mutualistic Technomyrmex albipes (southern study site) preferred sucrose over glucose or fructose solutions and consumed the leaf EFN mimic to a greater extent than the floral bud EFN mimic. This young leaf EFN mimic had low sugar concentrations, the lowest viscosity and sugar:amino acid ratio, was rich in essential amino acids, and appeared ideally suited to the digestive physiology of T. albipes. This preference for young leaf EFN may explain the greater protection afforded to young leaves than to floral buds by T. albipes, and may also help to resolve ant-pollinator conflicts. The differential response of dominant ants to sugar, amino acids, or solution viscosity suggests that plants can fine-tune their interactions with local ants via EFN composition. Thus, EFN can mediate local partner-choice mechanisms in ant-plant interactions.

  17. Legionella-protozoa-nematode interactions in aquatic biofilms and influence of Mip on Caenorhabditis elegans colonization.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Janine; Krüger, Stefanie; Fontvieille, Dominique; Ünal, Can M; Michel, Rolf; Labrosse, Aurélie; Steinert, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaireś disease, is naturally found in aquatic habitats. The intracellular life cycle within protozoa pre-adapted the "accidental" human pathogen to also infect human professional phagocytes like alveolar macrophages. Previous studies employing the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that also nematodes might serve as a natural host for L. pneumophila. Here, we report for the first time from a natural co-habitation of L. pneumophila and environmental nematode species within biofilms of a warm water spring. In addition, we identified the protozoan species Oxytricha bifaria, Stylonychia mytilus, Ciliophrya sp. which have never been described as potential interaction partners of L. pneumophila before. Modeling and dissection of the Legionella-protozoa-nematode interaction revealed that C. elegans ruptures Legionella-infected amoebal cells and by this means incorporate the pathogen. Further infection studies revealed that the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein of L. pneumophila, which is known to bind collagen IV during human lung infection, promotes the colonization of the intestinal tract of L4 larvae of C. elegans and negatively influences the life span of the worms. The Mip-negative L. pneumophila mutant exhibited a 32-fold reduced colonization rate of the nematodes after 48h when compared to the wild-type strain. Taken together, these studies suggest that nematodes may serve as natural hosts for L. pneumophila, promote their persistence and dissemination in the environment, and co-evolutionarily pre-adapt the pathogen for interactions with extracellular constituents of human lung tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids) were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64%) elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently identified S. meliloti s

  19. Thermal fluctuations and phase diagrams of the phase-field crystal model with pinning.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J A P; Granato, E; Achim, C V; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2008-09-01

    We study the influence of thermal fluctuations in the phase diagram of a recently introduced two-dimensional phase field crystal model with an external pinning potential. The model provides a continuum description of pinned lattice systems allowing for both elastic deformations and topological defects. We introduce a nonconserved version of the model and determine the ground-state phase diagram as a function of lattice mismatch and strength of the pinning potential. Monte Carlo simulations are used to determine the phase diagram as a function of temperature near commensurate phases. The results show a rich phase diagram with commensurate, incommensurate, and liquidlike phases with a topology strongly dependent on the type of ordered structure. A finite-size scaling analysis of the melting transition for the c(2x2) commensurate phase shows that the thermal correlation length exponent nu and specific heat behavior are consistent with the Ising universality class as expected from analytical arguments.

  20. [Factors influencing activity of oral anticoagulants. Interactions with drugs and food].

    PubMed

    Sawicka-Powierza, Jolanta; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota; Ołtarzewska, Alicja Małgorzata; Chlabicz, Sławomir

    2008-05-01

    Oral anticoagulants (OAC) are commonly used as a life-long therapy in prevention of systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease and prosthetic hart valves and in the primary and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. They are also used for the prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with acute myocardial infarction and with angina pectoris, in patients with biological hart valves and after some types of orthopaedics surgery. The International Normalized Ratio (INR) is used to evaluate the efficacy of anti-coagulant therapy. The risk of thromboembolic and haemorrhagic complications increases when the INR is out of the therapeutic range. The aim of this study was to present information about the factors influencing activity of oral anticoagulants and interactions between oral anticoagulants and drugs or food. The effect of oral anticoagulants is influenced by genetic and environmental factors such as: medicines, food, diseases and pre-existing conditions. A common mutation in the gene coding for the cytochrome P450 (CYP2C9), with one or more combinations of its polymorphisms, is responsible for the reduced warfarin requirements or for the resistance to warfarin. A mutation in the factor IX is responsible for the risk of bleeding during OAC therapy without excessive prolongation of the prothrombin time (PT). Drugs, herbs and multivitamin supplements can alter the absorption, pharmacokinetics or pharmakodynamics of OAC. Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and paracetamol in combination with OAC seem to be the most dangerous because they are available without prescription and are used without medical consultation. Patients on OAC therapy are sensitive to changing dietary intake of vitamin K, which is supplied from phylloquinones in plants or from vitamin K-containing medicines. The effect of OAC can be influenced by other existing factors like: fever, diarrhoea, alcohol abuse or physical hyperactivity. Some malignancies