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Sample records for interband matrix element

  1. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  2. Comix, a New Matrix Element Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Gleisberg, Tanju; Hoche, Stefan; /Durham U., IPPP

    2008-09-03

    We present a new tree-level matrix element generator, based on the color dressed Berends-Giele recursive relations. We discuss two new algorithms for phase space integration, dedicated to be used with large multiplicities and color sampling.

  3. Semiclassical matrix elements from periodic orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, B.; Fishman, S.; Mueller, K.; Wintgen, D.

    1992-01-01

    An extension of Gutzwiller's (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1990) semiclassical theory for chaotic systems that allows a determination of matrix elements in terms of classical periodic orbits. Associated zeta functions are derived. The semiclassical predictions are found to be in good agreement with Fourier transforms of quantum spectra of hydrogen in a magnetic field. Expressions for off-diagonal matrix elements are derived that are extensions of the Bohr correspondence relations for integrable systems.

  4. Interband cascade detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Shun Lien (Inventor); Li, Jian (Inventor); Yang, Rui Q. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A device for detecting radiation, typically in the infrared. Photons are absorbed in an active region of a semiconductor device such that the absorption induces an interband electronic transition and generates photo-excited charge carriers. The charge carriers are coupled into a carrier transport region having multiple quantum wells and characterized by intersubband relaxation that provides rapid charge carrier collection. The photo-excited carriers are collected from the carrier transport region at a conducting contact region. Another carrier transport region characterized by interband tunneling for multiple stages draws charge carriers from another conducting contact and replenishes the charge carriers to the active region for photo-excitation. A photocurrent is generated between the conducting contacts through the active region of the device.

  5. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  6. Matrix elements from moments of correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia Cheng; Bouchard, Chris; Orginos, Konstantinos; Richards, David G.

    2016-10-01

    Momentum-space derivatives of matrix elements can be related to their coordinate-space moments through the Fourier transform. We derive these expressions as a function of momentum transfer Q2 for asymptotic in/out states consisting of a single hadron. We calculate corrections to the finite volume moments by studying the spatial dependence of the lattice correlation functions. This method permits the computation of not only the values of matrix elements at momenta accessible on the lattice, but also the momentum-space derivatives, providing {\\it a priori} information about the Q2 dependence of form factors. As a specific application we use the method, at a single lattice spacing and with unphysically heavy quarks, to directly obtain the slope of the isovector form factor at various Q2, whence the isovector charge radius. The method has potential application in the calculation of any hadronic matrix element with momentum transfer, including those relevant to hadronic weak decays.

  7. Renormalon ambiguities in NRQCD operator matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Chen, Yu-Qi

    1999-09-01

    We analyze the renormalon ambiguities that appear in factorization formulas in QCD. Our analysis contains a simple argument that the ambiguities in the short-distance coefficients and operator matrix elements are artifacts of dimensional-regularization factorization schemes and are absent in cutoff schemes. We also present a method for computing the renormalon ambiguities in operator matrix elements and apply it to a computation of the ambiguities in the matrix elements that appear in the NRQCD factorization formulas for the annihilation decays of S-wave quarkonia. Our results, combined with those of Braaten and Chen for the short-distance coefficients, provide an explicit demonstration that the ambiguities cancel in the physical decay rates. In addition, we analyze the renormalon ambiguities in the Gremm-Kapustin relation and in various definitions of the heavy-quark mass.

  8. The MOON project and DBD matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-06-01

    This is a brief report on experimental studies of double beta decays (DBD) in Japan, the MOON project for spectroscopic studies of neutrino-less DBD (0vββ) and on experimental studies of DBD nuclear matrix elements. Experimental DBD studies in Japan were made by geochemical methods on 130Te, 128Te and 96Zr and by a series of ELEGANT(EL) counting methods, EL III on 76Ge, EL IV, V on 100Mo, 116Cd, and EL VI on 48Ca. Future counter experiments are MOON, CANDLES, XMASS and DCBA. The MOON project, which is based on EL V, aims at studies of the Majorana nature of the neutrino (v) and the v-mass spectrum by spectroscopic 0vββ experiments with the v-mass sensitivity of < mmv > = 100-30 meV. The MOON detector is a super ensemble of multi-layer modules, each being composed by PL scintillator plates and position-sensitive detector planes. DBD nuclear matrix elements have been studied experimentally by using charge exchange reactions. The 2-neutrino DBD matrix elements are expressed by successive single-β matrix elements through low-lying intermediate states.

  9. Doping-Induced Interband Gain in InAs/AlSb Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolokolov, K. I.; Ning, C. Z.

    2005-01-01

    A paper describes a computational study of effects of doping in a quantum well (QW) comprising a 10-nm-thick layer of InAs sandwiched between two 21-nm-thick AlSb layers. Heretofore, InAs/AlSb QWs have not been useful as interband gain devices because they have type-II energy-band-edge alignment, which causes spatial separation of electrons and holes, thereby leading to weak interband dipole matrix elements. In the doping schemes studied, an interior sublayer of each AlSb layer was doped at various total areal densities up to 5 X 10(exp 12) / square cm. It was found that (1) proper doping converts the InAs layer from a barrier to a well for holes, thereby converting the heterostructure from type II to type I; (2) the resultant dipole matrix elements and interband gains are comparable to those of typical type-I heterostructures; and (3) dipole moments and optical gain increase with the doping level. Optical gains in the transverse magnetic mode can be almost ten times those of other semiconductor material systems in devices used to generate medium-wavelength infrared (MWIR) radiation. Hence, doped InAs/AlSb QWs could be the basis of an alternative material system for devices to generate MWIR radiation.

  10. Lattice QCD calculations of weak matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detar, Carleton

    2017-01-01

    Lattice QCD has become the method of choice for calculating the hadronic environment of the electroweak interactions of quarks. So it is now an essential tool in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Advances in computing power and algorithms have resulted in increasingly precise predictions and increasingly stringent tests of the Standard Model. I review results of recent calculations of weak matrix elements and discuss their implications for new physics. Supported by US NSF grant PHY10-034278.

  11. Twisted mass QCD for weak matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Carlos

    2006-12-01

    I report on the application of tmQCD techniques to the computation of hadronic matrix elements of four-fermion operators. Emphasis is put on the computation of BK in quenched QCD performed by the ALPHA Collaboration. The extension of tmQCD strategies to the study of neutral B- meson mixing is briefly discussed. Finally, some remarks are made concerning proposals to apply tmQCD to the computation of K → ππ amplitudes.

  12. Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element

    SciTech Connect

    Alwall, Johan; Freitas, Ayres; Mattelaer, Olivier; /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /Louvain U.

    2012-04-10

    We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM. The goal of the LHC at CERN, scheduled to start this year, is to discover new physics through deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. After discovery of deviations from the SM, the next step will be classification of the new physics. An important first goal in this process will be establishing a mass spectrum of the new particles. One of the most challenging scenarios is pair-production of new particles which decay to invisible massive particles, giving missing energy signals. Many methods have been proposed for mass determination in such scenarios (for a recent list of references, see e.g. [1]). In this proceeding, we report the first steps in applying the Matrix Element Method (MEM) in the context of supersymmetric scenarios giving missing energy signals. After a quick review of the MEM, we will focus on squark pair production, a process where other mass determination techniques have difficulties to simultaneously determine the LSP and squark masses. Finally, we will introduce methods to extend the range of validity of the MEM, by taking into account initial state radiation (ISR) in the method.

  13. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Q.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  14. Effect of Interband Fluctuation on Spin Susceptibility in Molecular Dirac Fermion System α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Genki; Kobayashi, Akito

    2017-01-01

    The nontrivial properties of interband spin fluctuations are studied by the random phase approximation in a Hubbard model describing the molecular conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3, where wave functions are based on the four sublattices named A, A', B, and C in a two-dimensional BEDT-TTF molecular plane. It is found that the ferrimagnetic polarization observed by a recent NMR measurement emerges only if there exist cross terms among intra- and inter-band irreducible susceptibility matrix elements in the presence of the on-site Coulomb interaction U. It is also found that the nontrivial sign of the interband components of the spin susceptibility, being negative only for the B sublattice, is closely related to the characteristic phase structure of wave functions in the Dirac fermion system with multisublattices. The negative value of the spin susceptibility on the B sublattice observed in the experiment is associated with this negative interband susceptibility, which comes from the excitations in the gentle-slope region of the energy dispersion connecting the Dirac points with saddle points in the first Brillouin zone.

  15. Precision Measurement of Transition Matrix Elements via Light Shift Cancellation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    vanishes, provide precise constraints on the matrix elements. We make the fhstmeasurement of the 5s-6p matrix elements in rubidium by measuring the...We make the first measurement of the 5s-6p matrix elements in rubidium by measuring the light shift around the 421 and 423 nm zeros through...elements in rubidium by measuring the light shift around the 421 and 423 nm zeros through diffraction of a condensate off a sequence of standing wave

  16. Useful extremum principle for the variational calculation of matrix elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Rau, A. R. P.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    Variational principles are considered for the approximate evaluation of the diagonal matrix elements of an arbitrary known linear Hermitian operator. A method is derived that is immediately applicable to the variational determination of both the off-diagonal and diagonal matrix elements of normal and modified Green's functions.

  17. Analytic Matrix Elements and Gradients with Shifted Correlated Gaussians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are shown to be analytic. Their gradients with respect to the non-linear parameters of the Gaussians are also analytic. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.

  18. Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transfer Matrix Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    jACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) (UNCLASSIFIED) ROTORDYNAMIC ANALYSIS WITH SHELL ELEMENTS FOR THE TRANSFER MATRIX METHOD 12...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE AFIT/CI "OVERPRINT" iii ABSTRACT Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transfer Matrix Method. (August...analysts in indus- try . ’ . ," Accesiu:, For NTIS CR,4i Fi FilC TA,: [3 0. fi A-1 B I ., ,.................. ,., ROTORDYNAMIC ANALYSIS WITH SHELL ELEMENTS

  19. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  20. Vanishing of dipole matrix elements at level crossings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocher, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration that the vanishing of certain coupling matrix elements at level crossings follow from angular momentum commutation relations. A magnetic dipole transition having delta M = plus or minus 1, induced near a crossing of the levels in a nonzero magnetic field, is found to have a dipole matrix element comparable to or smaller than the quotient of the level separation and the field. This result also applies in the analogous electric field electric dipole case.

  1. The dynamic stiffness matrix of two-dimensional elements: application to Kirchhoff's plate continuous elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimir, J. B.; Kevorkian, S.; Vinh, T.

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes a procedure for building the dynamic stiffness matrix of two-dimensional elements with free edge boundary conditions. The dynamic stiffness matrix is the basis of the continuous element method. Then, the formulation is used to build a Kirchhoff rectangular plate element. Gorman's method of boundary condition decomposition and Levy's series are used to obtain the strong solution of the elementary problem. A symbolic computation software partially performs the construction of the dynamic stiffness matrix from this solution. The performances of the element are evaluated from comparisons with harmonic responses of plates obtained by the finite element method.

  2. Coulomb matrix elements in multi-orbital Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünemann, Jörg; Gebhard, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Coulomb matrix elements are needed in all studies in solid-state theory that are based on Hubbard-type multi-orbital models. Due to symmetries, the matrix elements are not independent. We determine a set of independent Coulomb parameters for a d-shell and an f-shell and all point groups with up to 16 elements (O h , O, T d , T h , D 6h , and D 4h ). Furthermore, we express all other matrix elements as a function of the independent Coulomb parameters. Apart from the solution of the general point-group problem we investigate in detail the spherical approximation and first-order corrections to the spherical approximation.

  3. Computer programs for the Boltzmann collision matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P.

    1989-09-01

    When the distribution function in the kinetic theory of gases is expanded in a basis of orthogonal functions, the Boltzmann collision operators can be evaluated in terms of appropriate matrix elements. These matrix elements are usually given in terms of highly complex algebraic expressions. When Burnett functions, which consist of Sonine polynomials and spherical harmonics, are used as the basis, the irreducible tensor formalism provides expressions for the matrix elements that are algebraically simple, possess high symmetry, and are computationally more economical than in any other basis. The package reported here consists of routines to compute such matrix elements in a Burnett function basis for a mixture of hard sphere gases, as also the loss integral of a Burnett mode and the functions themselves. The matrix elements involve the Clebsch-Gordan and Brody-Moshinsky coefficients, both of which are used here for unusually high values of their arguments. For the purpose of validation both coefficients are computed using two different methods. Though written for hard sphere molecules the package can, with only slight modification, be adapted to more general molecular models as well.

  4. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  5. Neutrinoless double-β decay and nuclear transition matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P. K.

    2015-10-28

    Within mechanisms involving the light Majorana neutrinos, squark-neutrino, Majorons, sterile neutrinos and heavy Majorana neutrino, nuclear transition matrix elements for the neutrinoless (β{sup −}β{sup −}){sub 0ν} decay of {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 128,130}Te and {sup 150}Nd nuclei are calculated by employing the PHFB approach. Effects due to finite size of nucleons, higher order currents, short range correlations, and deformations of parent as well as daughter nuclei on the calculated matrix elements are estimated. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements within long-ranged mechanisms but for double Majoron accompanied (β{sup −}β{sup −}ϕϕ){sub 0ν} decay modes are 9%–15%. In the case of short ranged heavy Majorona neutrino exchange mechanism, the maximum uncertainty is about 35%. The maximum systematic error within the mechanism involving the exchange of light Majorana neutrino is about 46%.

  6. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S.; Frederico, T.; Krein,; Williams, A.G.

    1991-12-31

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  7. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S. ); Frederico, T. , Sao Jose dos Campos, SP . Inst. de Estudos Avancados); Krein, . Inst. de Fisica Teorica); Williams, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  8. Rovibrational matrix elements of the quadrupole moment of N2 in a solid parahydrogen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Adya P.; Balasubramanian, T. K.

    2008-11-01

    The present work pertains to the study of the rotational dynamics of N2 molecules solvated in a matrix of solid para-H2. It is shown that the mixing of the rotational states due to the anisotropic part of the N2-H2 pair potential in the solid gives rise to an additional 5.4% contribution to the intensity of quadrupole-induced double transitions involving N2-H2 pair. Hence the recently reported quadrupole moment matrix element of N2 in a solid para-H2 crystal [A. P. Mishra and T. K. Balasubramanian, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 124507 (2006)], which was deduced from a comparison of the theoretical intensity (with rotational mixing of states neglected) with the measured value is larger by ˜2.7%. The ground electronic state rovibrational matrix elements ⟨v'J'|Q2(r)|vJ⟩ of N2 molecule in a solid parahydrogen matrix for v,v'≤1 and J,J'≤4 have also been computed by taking into account the changes in the intramolecular potential of N2 due to the intermolecular interaction in the matrix. The computed quadrupole moment matrix elements agree well with a few available values (for v =v'=0) deduced from the observed transitions.

  9. Magic wavelengths, matrix elements, polarizabilities, and lifetimes of Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Clark, Charles W.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent interest in their applications, we report a systematic study of Cs atomic properties calculated by a high-precision relativistic all-order method. Excitation energies, reduced matrix elements, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for levels with principal quantum numbers n ≤12 and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers l ≤3 . Recommended values and estimates of uncertainties are provided for a number of electric-dipole transitions and the electric dipole polarizabilities of the n s , n p , and n d states. We also report a calculation of the electric quadrupole polarizability of the ground state. We display the dynamic polarizabilities of the 6 s and 7 p states for optical wavelengths between 1160 and 1800 nm and identify corresponding magic wavelengths for the 6 s -7 p1 /2 and 6 s -7 p3 /2 transitions. The values of relevant matrix elements needed for polarizability calculations at other wavelengths are provided.

  10. Calculation of transition matrix elements by nonsingular orbital transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kývala, Mojmír

    A general strategy is described for the evaluation of transition matrix elements between pairs of full class CI wave functions built up from mutually nonorthogonal molecular orbitals. A new method is proposed for the counter-transformation of the linear expansion coefficients of a full CI wave function under a nonsingular transformation of the molecular-orbital basis. The method, which consists in a straightforward application of the Cauchy-Binet formula to the definition of a Slater determinant, is shown to be simple and suitable for efficient implementation on current high-performance computers. The new method appears mainly beneficial to the calculation of miscellaneous transition matrix elements among individually optimized CASSCF states and to the re-evaluation of the CASCI expansion coefficients in Slater-determinant bases formed from arbitrarily rotated (e.g., localized or, conversely, delocalized) active molecular orbitals.

  11. Interband optical transitions in ellipsoidal shaped nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereselidze, Tamaz; Tchelidze, Tamar; Devdariani, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The optical properties of crystalline semiconductor nanoparticles with ellipsoidal shape are investigated and discussed as a function of the shape-anisotropy parameter. The optical transition-matrix elements are calculated in the dipole approximation using perturbation theory and with a direct diagonalization of the appropriate Hamiltonian. The matrix elements involving the ground and first excited states are monotonic functions of the shape-anisotropy parameter, whereas matrix elements involving the highly excited states have zeros and extrema that are reflected in the behaviour of the corresponding transition probabilities. Moreover, some matrix elements involving the excited states have discontinuity. We demonstrate that, nanoparticles with ellipsoidal shape can be grown with the infrared as well as ultraviolet features.

  12. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Evaluation of a matrix element].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of the matrix element of the probability of interprotein electron transfer on the mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor centers and the distance between them was calculated. The calculations were made under the assumption that electron transfer proceeds mainly by a collective excitation of polaron nature, like a solvated electron state. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data and indicate the nonexponential behavior of this dependence in the case when the distance transfer is less than 20 A.

  13. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; ...

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  14. Disk level S-matrix elements at eikonal Regge limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garousi, Mohammad R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the calculation of the color-ordered disk level S-matrix element of massless scalar vertex operators for the special case that some of the Mandelstam variables for which there are no open string channel in the amplitude, are set to zero. By explicit calculation we show that the string form factors in the 2n-point functions reduce to one at the eikonal Regge limit.

  15. Calculating weak matrix elements using HYP staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Bhattacharya; G. T. Fleming; G. Kilcup; R. Gupta; W. Lee; S. Sharpe

    2004-03-01

    We present preliminary results of weak matrix elements relevant to CP violation calculated using the HYP (II) staggered fermions. Since the complete set of matching coefficients at the one-loop level became available recently, we have constructed lattice operators with all the g{sup 2} corrections included. The main results include both {Delta}I = 3/2 and {Delta}I = 1/2 contributions.

  16. Algebraic evaluation of matrix elements in the Laguerre function basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, A. E.; Caprio, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Laguerre functions constitute one of the fundamental basis sets for calculations in atomic and molecular electron-structure theory, with applications in hadronic and nuclear theory as well. While similar in form to the Coulomb bound-state eigenfunctions (from the Schrödinger eigenproblem) or the Coulomb-Sturmian functions (from a related Sturm-Liouville problem), the Laguerre functions, unlike these former functions, constitute a complete, discrete, orthonormal set for square-integrable functions in three dimensions. We construct the SU(1, 1) × SO(3) dynamical algebra for the Laguerre functions and apply the ideas of factorization (or supersymmetric quantum mechanics) to derive shift operators for these functions. We use the resulting algebraic framework to derive analytic expressions for matrix elements of several basic radial operators (involving powers of the radial coordinate and radial derivative) in the Laguerre function basis. We illustrate how matrix elements for more general spherical tensor operators in three dimensional space, such as the gradient, may then be constructed from these radial matrix elements.

  17. Microscopic method for E 0 transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. A.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Kibédi, T.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    We present a microscopic model for electric monopole (E 0 ) transition matrix elements by combining a configuration interaction model for orbital occupations with an energy-density functional model for the single-particle potential and radial wave functions. The configuration interaction model is used to constrain the orbital occupations for the diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements. These are used in an energy-density functional calculation to obtain a self-consistent transition density. This density contains the valence contribution, as well as the polarization of the protons by the valence protons and neutrons. We show connections between E 0 matrix elements and isomer and isotope shifts of the charge radius. The spin-orbit correction to the charge density is important in some cases. This model accounts for a large part of the data over a wide region of the nuclear chart. It also accounts for the shape of the observed electron scattering form factors. The results depend on the Skyrme parameters used for the energy-density functional and might be used to provide new constraints for them.

  18. Weak matrix elements on the lattice - Circa 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, A.

    1995-10-03

    Status of weak matrix elements is reviewed. In particular, e{prime}/e, B {yields} K*{gamma}, B{sub B} and B{sub B}, are discussed and the overall situation with respect to the lattice effort and some of its phenomenological implications are summarised. For e{prime}/e the need for the relevant matrix elements is stressed in view of the forthcoming improved experiments. For some of the operators, (e.g. O{sub 6}), even bound on their matrix elements would be very helpful. On B {yields} K{degrees}{gamma}, a constant behavior of T{sub 2} appears disfavored although dependence of T{sub 2} could, of course, be milder than a simple pole. Improved data is badly needed to settle this important issue firmly, especially in view of its ramification for extractions of V{sub td} from B {yields} {rho}{gamma}. On B{sub {kappa}}, the preliminary result from JLQCD appears to contradict Sharpe et al. JLQCD data seems to fit very well to linear {alpha} dependence and leads to an appreciably lower value of B{sub {kappa}}. Four studies of B{sub {kappa}} in the {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} (n{sub f} = 2) theory indicate very little quenching effects on B{sub {kappa}}; the full theory value seems to be just a little less than the quenched result. Based on expectations from HQET, analysis of B-parameter (B{sub h}{ell}) for the heavy-light mesons via B{sub h}{ell}) = constant + constants{prime}/m{sub h}{ell} is suggested. A summary of an illustrative sample of hadron matrix elements is given and constraints on CKM parameters (e.g. V{sub td}/V{sub ts}, on the unitarity triangle and on x{sub s}/x{sub d}, emerging from the lattice calculations along with experimental results are briefly discussed. In quite a few cases, for the first time, some indication of quenching errors on weak matrix elements are now becoming available.

  19. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; ...

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore » technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  20. Kaon matrix elements and CP violation from quenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristian, Calin-Radu

    We report the results of a calculation of the K → pipi matrix elements relevant for the DeltaI = 1/2 rule and epsilon '/epsilon in quenched lattice QCD using domain wall fermions at a fixed lattice spacing of a-1 ˜ 2 GeV. Working in the three-quark effective theory, where only the u, d and s quarks enter and which is known perturbatively to next-to-leading order; we calculate the lattice K → pi and K → |0> matrix elements of dimension six, four-fermion operators. Through lowest order chiral perturbation theory these yield K → pipi matrix elements, which we then normalize to continuum values through a non-perturbative renormalization technique. For the Delta I = 1/2 rule we find a value of 25.3 +/- 1.8 (statistical error only) compared to the experimental value of 22.2, with individual isospin amplitudes 10--20% below the experimental values. For epsilon '/epsilon; using known central values for standard model parameters, we calculate (-4.0 +/- 2.3) x 10-4 (statistical error only) compared to the current experimental average of (17.2 +/- 1.8) x 10-4. Because we find a large cancellation between the I = 0 and I = 2 contributions to epsilon'/epsilon, the result may be very sensitive to the approximations employed. Among these are the use of: quenched QCD, lowest order chiral perturbation theory and continuum perturbation theory below 1.3 GeV. We have also calculated the kaon B parameter, BK and find BK(2 GeV) = 0.532(11). Although currently unable to give a reliable systematic error; we have control over statistical errors and more simulations will yield information about the effects of the approximations on this first-principles determination of these important quantities.

  1. Weak matrix elements efforts on the lattice: Status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, A.

    1995-01-01

    Lattice approach to weak matrix elements is reviewed. Recent progress in treating heavy quarks on the lattice is briefly discussed. Illustrative sample of results obtained so far is given. Among them I elaborate on B{sub K}, {line_integral}{sub B} and B {yields} K*{sub {gamma}}. Experimental implications especially with regard to constraints on the Standard Model (i.e. Wolfenstein) parameters, V{sub td} measurements and expectations for B{sub s}-{bar B}{sub s}, oscillations are briefly discussed.

  2. Separable approximation to two-body matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, Luis M.

    2010-04-15

    Two-body matrix elements of arbitrary local interactions are written as the sum of separable terms in a way that is well suited for the exchange and pairing channels present in mean-field calculations. The expansion relies on the transformation to center of mass and relative coordinate (in the spirit of Talmi's method) and therefore it is only useful (finite number of expansion terms) for harmonic oscillator single particle states. The converge of the expansion with the number of terms retained is studied for a Gaussian two body interaction. The limit of a contact (delta) force is also considered. Ways to handle the general case are also discussed.

  3. The Matrix Element Method in the LHC era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    The Matrix Element Method (MEM) is a powerful multivariate method allowing to maximally exploit the experimental and theoretical information available to an analysis. The method is reviewed in depth, and several recent applications of the MEM at LHC experiments are discussed, such as searches for rare processes and measurements of Standard Model observables in Higgs and Top physics. Finally, a new implementation of the MEM is presented. This project builds on established phase-space parametrisations known to greatly improve the speed of the calculations, and aims at a much improved modularity and maintainability compared to previous software, easing the use of the MEM for high-statistics data analyses.

  4. Closed String S-matrix Elements in Open String Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garousi, Mohammad R.; Maktabdaran, G. R.

    2005-03-01

    We study the S-matrix elements of the gauge invariant operators corresponding to on-shell closed strings, in open string field theory. In particular, we calculate the tree level S-matrix element of two arbitrary closed strings, and the S-matrix element of one closed string and two open strings. By mapping the world-sheet of these amplitudes to the upper half z-plane, and by evaluating explicitly the correlators in the ghost part, we show that these S-matrix elements are exactly identical to the corresponding disk level S-matrix elements in perturbative string theory.

  5. The application of the transfer matrix and matrix condensation methods with finite elements to duct acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craggs, A.

    1989-08-01

    When making an acoustic finite element model of a duct system, the resulting matrices can be very large due to the length of ductwork, the complex changes in geometry and the numerous junctions, and a full model may require several thousand nodes. In this paper two techniques are given for reducing the size of the matrices; the transfer matrix method and the condensed stiffness matrix approach—both of which lead to equations expressed in terms of the input and output nodes only. The methods are demonstrated with examples on a straight section of duct and a branched duct network. The substantial reductions in computer memory shown imply that duct acoustic problems can be studied using a desktop work station.

  6. The Matrix Element Method: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Gainer, James S.; Lykken, Joseph; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Mrenna, Stephen; Park, Myeonghun

    2013-07-12

    The increasing use of multivariate methods, and in particular the Matrix Element Method (MEM), represents a revolution in experimental particle physics. With continued exponential growth in computing capabilities, the use of sophisticated multivariate methods-- already common-- will soon become ubiquitous and ultimately almost compulsory. While the existence of sophisticated algorithms for disentangling signal and background might naively suggest a diminished role for theorists, the use of the MEM, with its inherent connection to the calculation of differential cross sections will benefit from collaboration between theorists and experimentalists. In this white paper, we will briefly describe the MEM and some of its recent uses, note some current issues and potential resolutions, and speculate about exciting future opportunities.

  7. Determination of CKM Matrix Elements with Superallowed Fermi Decays^*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Brian

    1996-10-01

    The u-d element (V_ud) of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark mixing matrix is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions. Its most precise determination comes from nuclear physics experiments, in particular, from measurements of superallowed Fermi beta decays. Precise knowledge of V_ud will allow a variety of tests of the Standard Model, in addition to placing a number of important constraints on astrophysics and cosmology. These measurements, which require both precision nuclear physics experiments and state of the art theoretical nuclear physics calculations, have been made for a variety of nuclei ranging from ^14O to ^54Co. The u-d element obtained from these measurements are in statistical agreement and the average value obtained implies a non-unitary CKM matrix, which if correct, would require exotic extensions to the Standard Model. Unfortunately the theoretical calculations of the isospin breaking corrections, which are necessary to extract V_ud, are controversial. In order to resolve this controversy, much effort has recently been invested in measuring V_ud from the superallowed Fermi decay of ^10C, where the isospin breaking corrections are expected to be small. This is a very challenging experiment, since it requires the precision measurement of very small branching ratios in a high background environment. I will report on the current status of the determination of V_ud emphasizing the recent experimental effort to measure V_ud from the superallowed Fermi decay of ^10C. ^*Supported by the U.S. D.O.E. under Contracts No. W-31-109-ENG-38 and No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  8. Fabrication of synthetic diffractive elements using advanced matrix laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, M.; Svoboda, J.; Květoň, M.; Fiala, P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a matrix laser writing device based on a demagnified projection of a micro-structure from a computer driven spatial light modulator. The device is capable of writing completely aperiodic micro-structures with resolution higher than 200 000 DPI. An optical system is combined with ultra high precision piezoelectric stages with an elementary step ~ 4 nm. The device operates in a normal environment, which significantly decreases the costs compared to competitive technologies. Simultaneously, large areas can be exposed up to 100 cm2. The capabilities of the constructed device will be demonstrated on particular elements fabricated for real applications. The optical document security is the first interesting field, where the synthetic image holograms are often combined with sophisticated aperiodic micro-structures. The proposed technology can easily write simple micro-gratings creating the color and kinetic visual effects, but also the diffractive cryptograms, waveguide couplers, and other structures recently used in the field of optical security. A general beam shaping elements and special photonic micro-structures are another important applications which will be discussed in this paper.

  9. Placing three-dimensional isoparametric elements into NASTRAN. [alterations in matrix assembly to simplify generation of higher order elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, M. B.; Filstrup, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Linear (8 node), parabolic (20 node), cubic (32 node) and mixed (some edges linear, some parabolic and some cubic) have been inserted into NASTRAN, level 15.1. First the dummy element feature was used to check out the stiffness matrix generation routines for the linear element in NASTRAN. Then, the necessary modules of NASTRAN were modified to include the new family of elements. The matrix assembly was changed so that the stiffness matrix of each isoparametric element is only generated once as the time to generate these higher order elements tends to be much longer than the other elements in NASTRAN. This paper presents some of the experiences and difficulties of inserting a new element or family of elements into NASTRAN.

  10. Interband coupling and transport interband scattering in s± superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Vladimir; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2016-04-04

    A two-band model with repulsive interband coupling and interband transport (potential) scattering is considered to elucidate their effects on material properties. In agreement with previous work, we find that the bands order parameters Δ1,2 differ and the large is at the band with a smaller normal density of states (DOS), Nn2 < Nn1. However, the bands energy gaps, as determined by the energy dependence of the DOS, are equal due to scattering. For each temperature, the gaps turn zero at a certain critical interband scattering rate, i.e. for strong enough scattering the model material becomes gappless. In the gapless state, the DOS at the band 2 is close to the normal state value, whereas at the band 1 it has a V-shape with non-zero minimum. When the normal bands DOS' are mismatched, Nn1 6= Nn2, the critical temperature Tc is suppressed even in the absence of interband scattering, Tc(Nn1) has a dome-like shape. With increasing interband scattering, the London penetration depth at low temperatures evolves from being exponentially at to the powerlaw and even to near linear behavior in the gapless state, the latter being easily misinterpreted as caused by order parameter nodes.

  11. Neutrinoless Double Beta Nuclear Matrix Elements Around Mass 80 in the Nuclear Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji; Taguchi, Daisuke; Teruya, Eri

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. In its theoretical nuclear side it is particularly important to estimate three types of nuclear matrix elements, namely, Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) types matrix elements. The shell model calculations and also the pair-truncated shell model calculations are carried out to check the model dependence on nuclear matrix elements. In this work the neutrinoless double-beta decay for mass A = 82 nuclei is studied. It is found that the matrix elements are quite sensitive to the ground state wavefunctions.

  12. Determination of the weak magnetism matrix element in {sup 14}C beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Zeuli, A.R.; Ahmad, I.; Coulter, K.P.; Greene, J.P.; Schiffer, J.P.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Mortara, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Higher order beta decay matrix elements, such as weak magnetism, will introduce small departures (a shape factor) from the allowed beta decay electron energy spectrum. The value of the weak magnetism matrix element is predicted by the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and an experimental determination of the weak magnetism matrix element can be interpreted as a test of CVC. We have determined the weak magnetism matrix element from the {sup 14}C shape factor, which was measured using an apparatus incorporating a high resolution solid state detector and a super conducting solenoid. The results of our measurement will be presented.

  13. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey -Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-08

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1-flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323 × 64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a = 0.081 fm and with Mπ = 312 MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. As a result, a detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep → ∞ estimates is presented.

  14. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; ...

    2016-06-08

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1-flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323 × 64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a = 0.081 fm and with Mπ = 312 MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. Wemore » show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. As a result, a detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep → ∞ estimates is presented.« less

  15. Configuration interaction matrix elements for the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Macek, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    In the spherical model of the quantum Hall system, the two-body matrix elements and pseudopotentials can be found analytically in terms of a general scalar pair interaction potential by expressing the pair interaction as a weighted sum over Legendre polynomials. For non-infinite systems, only a finite set of terms in the potential expansion contribute to the interactions; the contributing terms define an effective spatial potential for the system. The connection between the effective spatial potential and the pseudopotential is one-to-one for finite systems, and any completely defined model pseudopotential can be analytically inverted to give a unique corresponding spatial potential. This technique of inverting the pseudopotential to derive effective spatial potentials may be of use for developing accurate model spatial potentials for quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We demonstrate the technique and the corresponding spatial potentials for a few example model pseudopotentials. Supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. DOE, Grant DE-FG02-02ER15283 to the University of Tennessee.

  16. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joó, Bálint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1 flavor ensemble with lattices of size $32^3 \\times 64$ generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at $a=0.081$~fm and with $M_\\pi=312$~MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a two-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation $t_{\\rm sep}$. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost-effectiveness. A detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of $t_{\\rm sep}$ needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the $t_{\\rm sep} \\to \\infty $ estimates is presented.

  17. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  18. Monolithic single mode interband cascade lasers with wide wavelength tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Edlinger, M.; Weih, R.; Scheuermann, J.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-11-01

    Monolithic two-section interband cascade lasers offering a wide wavelength tunability in the wavelength range around 3.7 μm are presented. Stable single mode emission in several wavelength channels was realized using the concept of binary superimposed gratings and two-segment Vernier-tuning. The wavelength selective elements in the two segments were based on specially designed lateral metal grating structures defined by electron beam lithography. A dual-step dry etch process provided electrical separation between the segments. Individual current control of the segments allowed wavelength channel selection as well as continuous wavelength tuning within channels. A discontinuous tuning range extending over 158 nm in up to six discrete wavelength channels was achieved. Mode hop free wavelength tuning up to 14 nm was observed within one channel. The devices can be operated in continuous wave mode up to 30 °C with the output powers of 3.5 mW around room temperature.

  19. Jumping phase control in interband photonic transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jiang; Gao, Zhuoyang; Zhu, Haibin; Jiang, Chun

    2014-03-10

    Indirect interband photonic transition provides a nonmagnetic and linear scheme to achieve optical isolation in integrated photonics. In this paper, we demonstrate that the nonreciprocal transition can be induced through two pathways respectively by different modulation designs. At the end of those pathways, the two final modes have π phaseshift. We call this phenomenon jumping phase control since this approach provides a method to control the mode phase after the conversion. This approach also yields a novel way to generate nonreciprocal phaseshift and may contribute to chip-scale optoelectronic applications.

  20. Application of the Finite-Element Z-Matrix Method to e-H2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The present study adapts the Z-matrix formulation using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians. This is a energy-independent basis which allows flexible boundary conditions and is amenable to efficient algorithms for evaluating the necessary matrix elements with molecular targets.

  1. Calculation of Moment Matrix Elements for Bilinear Quadrilaterals and Higher-Order Basis Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-06

    B. M. Kolundzija and A. R. Djordjević, Electromagnetic Modeling of Composite Metallic and Dielectric Structures . Boston: Artech House, 2002...REPORT REPORT NO: NAWCADPAX/TR-2015/241 CALCULATION OF MOMENT MATRIX ELEMENTS FOR BILINEAR QUADRILATERALS AND HIGHER-ORDER BASIS...CALCULATION OF MOMENT MATRIX ELEMENTS FOR BILINEAR QUADRILATERALS AND HIGHER-ORDER BASIS FUNCTIONS by John S. Asvestas

  2. Localization in band random matrix models with and without increasing diagonal elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-ge

    2002-06-01

    It is shown that localization of eigenfunctions in the Wigner band random matrix model with increasing diagonal elements can be related to localization in a band random matrix model with random diagonal elements. The relation is obtained by making use of a result of a generalization of Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory, which shows that reduced Hamiltonian matrices with relatively small dimensions can be introduced for nonperturbative parts of eigenfunctions, and by employing intermediate basis states, which can improve the method of the reduced Hamiltonian matrix. The latter model deviates from the standard band random matrix model mainly in two aspects: (i) the root mean square of diagonal elements is larger than that of off-diagonal elements within the band, and (ii) statistical distributions of the matrix elements are close to the Lévy distribution in their central parts, except in the high top regions.

  3. Uncertainty evaluation for the matrix ``solidified state'' of fissionable elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Elena; Iancso, Georgeta

    2012-09-01

    In case of the analysis of the radioactive liquid samples, no matter the relative physical analysis method used, two impediments act that belong to the behavior in time of the dispersion state of the liquid samples to be analyzed and of the standard used in the analysis. That is, one of them refers to the state of the sample to be analyzed when being sampled, which "alter" during the time elapsed from sampling up to the analysis of the sample. The other impediment is the natural change of the dispersion state of the standard radioactive solutions, due to the occurrence and evolution in time of the radiocolloidal and pseudo-radiocolloidal states. These radiocolloidal states are states of aggregation and they lead to the destruction of the homogeneity of the solutions. Taking into consideration the advantages offered by the relative physical methods of analysis as against the chemical or the radiochemical ones, different ways of eliminating these impediments have been tried. We eliminated these impediments processing the liquid reference materials (the solutions calibrated in radionuclides of interest), immediately after the preparation. This processing changes the liquid physical state of the reference materials in a "solidified state". Through this procedure the dispersion states of the samples, practically, can no longer be essentially modified in time and also ensure the uniform distribution of the radionuclides of interest in the elemental matrix of the samples "state solidified". The homogeneity of the distribution of the atoms of the radionuclides from the samples "solidified state" was checked up through the track micromapping technique of the alpha particles. Through this technique, in the chemically etched track detectors that were put in direct contact with the sample for a determined period of time, the alpha exposure time of the detectors, micromaps of alpha tracks were obtained. These micromaps are retorts through tracks of the distributions atoms of

  4. Interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) architecture for PV devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Rui Q.; Tian, Zhaobing; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Klem, John F.

    2015-10-20

    A photovoltaic (PV) device, comprising a PV interband cascade (IC) stage, wherein the IC PV stage comprises an absorption region with a band gap, the absorption region configured to absorb photons, an intraband transport region configured to act as a hole barrier, and an interband tunneling region configured to act as an electron barrier. An IC PV architecture for a photovoltaic device, the IC PV architecture comprising an absorption region, an intraband transport region coupled to the absorption region, and an interband tunneling region coupled to the intraband transport region and to the adjacent absorption region, wherein the absorption region, the intraband transport region, and the interband tunneling region are positioned such that electrons will flow from the absorption region to the intraband transport region to the interband tunneling region.

  5. Interband quasiparticle scattering in superconducting LiFeAs reconciles photoemission and tunneling measurements.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christian; Sykora, Steffen; Hänke, Torben; Schlegel, Ronny; Baumann, Danny; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B; Harnagea, Luminita; Wurmehl, Sabine; van den Brink, Jeroen; Büchner, Bernd

    2013-01-04

    Several angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies reveal a poorly nested Fermi surface of LiFeAs, far away from a spin density wave instability, and clear-cut superconducting gap anisotropies. On the other hand a very different, more nested Fermi surface and dissimilar gap anisotropies have been obtained from quasiparticle interference (QPI) data, which were interpreted as arising from intraband scattering within holelike bands. Here we show that this ARPES-QPI paradox is completely resolved by interband scattering between the holelike bands. The resolution follows from an excellent agreement between experimental quasiparticle scattering data and T-matrix QPI calculations (based on experimental band structure data), which allows disentangling interband and intraband scattering processes.

  6. Interband Quasiparticle Scattering in Superconducting LiFeAs Reconciles Photoemission and Tunneling Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Christian; Sykora, Steffen; Hänke, Torben; Schlegel, Ronny; Baumann, Danny; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B.; Harnagea, Luminita; Wurmehl, Sabine; van den Brink, Jeroen; Büchner, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Several angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies reveal a poorly nested Fermi surface of LiFeAs, far away from a spin density wave instability, and clear-cut superconducting gap anisotropies. On the other hand a very different, more nested Fermi surface and dissimilar gap anisotropies have been obtained from quasiparticle interference (QPI) data, which were interpreted as arising from intraband scattering within holelike bands. Here we show that this ARPES-QPI paradox is completely resolved by interband scattering between the holelike bands. The resolution follows from an excellent agreement between experimental quasiparticle scattering data and T-matrix QPI calculations (based on experimental band structure data), which allows disentangling interband and intraband scattering processes.

  7. Finite element analysis of metal matrix composite blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isai Thamizh, R.; Velmurugan, R.; Jayagandhan, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, compressor rotor blade of a gas turbine engine has been analyzed for stress, maximum displacement and natural frequency using ANSYS software for determining its failure strength by simulating the actual service conditions. Static stress analysis and modal analysis have been carried out using Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which is currently used in compressor blade. The results are compared with those obtained using Ti matrix composites reinforced with SiC. The advantages of using metal matrix composites in the gas turbine compressor blades are investigated. From the analyses carried out, it seems that composite rotor blades have lesser mass, lesser tip displacement and lower maximum stress values.

  8. Status and future of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-beta decay: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Jonathan; Menéndez, Javier

    2017-04-01

    The nuclear matrix elements that govern the rate of neutrinoless double beta decay must be accurately calculated if experiments are to reach their full potential. Theorists have been working on the problem for a long time but have recently stepped up their efforts as ton-scale experiments have begun to look feasible. Here we review past and recent work on the matrix elements in a wide variety of nuclear models and discuss work that will be done in the near future. Ab initio nuclear-structure theory, which is developing rapidly, holds out hope of more accurate matrix elements with quantifiable error bars.

  9. Status and future of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-beta decay: a review.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jonathan; Menéndez, Javier

    2017-04-01

    The nuclear matrix elements that govern the rate of neutrinoless double beta decay must be accurately calculated if experiments are to reach their full potential. Theorists have been working on the problem for a long time but have recently stepped up their efforts as ton-scale experiments have begun to look feasible. Here we review past and recent work on the matrix elements in a wide variety of nuclear models and discuss work that will be done in the near future. Ab initio nuclear-structure theory, which is developing rapidly, holds out hope of more accurate matrix elements with quantifiable error bars.

  10. Determination of configuration matrix element and outer synchronization among networks with different topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Ling; Liu, Shuo; Li, Gang; Zhao, Guannan; Gu, Jiajia; Tian, Jing; Wang, Zhouyang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we research the outer synchronization among discrete networks with different topologies. Based on Lyapunov theorem, a novel synchronization technique is designed. Further, the control inputs of the networks and the adaptive laws of configuration matrix element are obtained. In the end, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the synchronization technique. It is found that the designed control input of the networks ensures the convergence of the errors among the networks to zero. And the designed adaptive law of configuration matrix element can replace effectively configuration matrix element in networks.

  11. EH3 matrix mineralogy with major and trace element composition compared to chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, S. W.; McDonough, W. F.; NéMeth, P.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the matrix mineralogy in primitive EH3 chondrites Sahara 97072, ALH 84170, and LAR 06252 with transmission electron microscopy; measured the trace and major element compositions of Sahara 97072 matrix and ferromagnesian chondrules with laser-ablation, inductively coupled, plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS); and analyzed the bulk composition of Sahara 97072 with LA-ICPMS, solution ICPMS, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The fine-grained matrix of EH3 chondrites is unlike that in other chondrite groups, consisting primarily of enstatite, cristobalite, troilite, and kamacite with a notable absence of olivine. Matrix and pyroxene-rich chondrule compositions differ from one another and are distinct from the bulk meteorite. Refractory lithophile elements are enriched by a factor of 1.5-3 in chondrules relative to matrix, whereas the matrix is enriched in moderately volatile elements. The compositional relation between the chondrules and matrix is reminiscent of the difference between EH3 pyroxene-rich chondrules and EH3 Si-rich, highly sulfidized chondrules. Similar refractory element ratios between the matrix and the pyroxene-rich chondrules suggest the fine-grained material primarily consists of the shattered, sulfidized remains of the formerly pyroxene-rich chondrules with the minor addition of metal clasts. The matrix, chondrule, and metal-sulfide nodule compositions are probably complementary, suggesting all the components of the EH3 chondrites came from the same nebular reservoir.

  12. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  13. Neutrinoless double beta nuclear matrix elements around mass 80 in the nuclear shell-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, N.; Higashiyama, K.; Taguchi, D.; Teruya, E.

    2015-05-01

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. For theoretical nuclear physics it is particularly important to estimate three types of matrix elements, namely Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) matrix elements. In this paper, we carry out shell-model calculations and also pair-truncated shell-model calculations to check the model dependence in the case of mass A=82 nuclei.

  14. Effects of interband transitions on Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wysin, G M; Chikan, Viktor; Young, Nathan; Dani, Raj Kumar

    2013-08-14

    The Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles is considered based on a quantum model for the dielectric function ϵ(ω) in the presence of a DC magnetic field B. We focus on effects in ϵ(ω) due to interband transitions (IBTs), which are important in the blue and ultraviolet for noble metals used in plasmonics. The dielectric function is found using the perturbation of the electron density matrix due to the optical field of the incident electromagnetic radiation. The calculation is applied to transitions between two bands (d and p, for example) separated by a gap, as one finds in gold at the L-point of the Fermi surface. The result of the DC magnetic field is a shift in the effective optical frequency causing IBTs by ±μBB/ħ, where opposite signs are associated with left/right circular polarizations. The Faraday rotation for a dilute solution of 17 nm diameter gold nanoparticles is measured and compared with both the IBT theory and a simpler Drude model for the bound electron response. Effects of the plasmon resonance mode on Faraday rotation in nanoparticles are also discussed.

  15. Matrix elements and duality for type 2 unitary representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, Jason L.; Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.

    2015-12-15

    The characteristic identity formalism discussed in our recent articles is further utilized to derive matrix elements of type 2 unitary irreducible gl(m|n) modules. In particular, we give matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, including the non-elementary generators, together with their phases on finite dimensional type 2 unitary irreducible representations which include the contravariant tensor representations and an additional class of essentially typical representations. Remarkably, we find that the type 2 unitary matrix element equations coincide with the type 1 unitary matrix element equations for non-vanishing matrix elements up to a phase.

  16. Simulations of Resonant Intraband and Interband Tunneling Spin Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Cartoixa-Soler, Xavier; McGill, T. C.; Smith, Darryl L.; Schulman, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews resonant intraband and interband tunneling spin filters It explores the possibility of building a zero-magnetic-field spin polarizer using nonmagnetic III-V semiconductor heterostructures. It reviews the extensive simulations of quantum transport in asymmetric InAs/GaSb/AlSb resonant tunneling structures with Rashba spin splitting and proposes a. new device concept: side-gated asymmetric Resonant Interband Tunneling Diode (a-RITD).

  17. Matrix elements of Δ B =0 operators in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Wan

    2015-05-01

    We study the light-quark mass and spatial volume dependence of the matrix elements of Δ B =0 four-quark operators relevant for the determination of Vu b and the lifetime ratios of single-b hadrons. To this end, one-loop diagrams are computed in the framework of heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory with partially quenched formalism for three light-quark flavors in the isospin limit; flavor-connected and -disconnected diagrams are carefully analyzed. These calculations include the leading light-quark flavor and heavy-quark spin symmetry breaking effects in the heavy hadron spectrum. Our results can be used in the chiral extrapolation of lattice calculations of the matrix elements to the physical light-quark masses and to infinite volume. To provide insight on such chiral extrapolation, we evaluate the one-loop contributions to the matrix elements containing external Bd, Bs mesons and Λb baryon in the QCD limit, where sea and valence quark masses become equal. In particular, we find that the matrix elements of the λ3 flavor-octet operators with an external Bd meson receive the contributions solely from connected diagrams in which current lattice techniques are capable of precise determination of the matrix elements. Finite volume effects are at most a few percent for typical lattice sizes and pion masses.

  18. Insights into Nuclear Triaxiality from Interference Effects in E2 Matrix Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allmond, J. M.; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.

    2007-10-01

    Recently, we have introduced [1] a triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and E2 tensors. The E2 matrix elements [2] of the osmium isotopes (186, 188, 190, and 192) are studied in the framework of this model (59 of 84 E2 matrix elements deviate by 30% or less). It is shown that interference effects in the inertia tensor (K-mixing) and the E2 tensor can lead to significant reductions in the diagonal E2 matrix elements. In some instances, the diagonal E2 matrix elements may decrease with increasing spin. Additionally, a sum rule for diagonal E2 matrix elements is shown and used to explore missing strength from K-admixtures. [1] J.L. Wood, A-M. Oros-Peusquens, R. Zaballa, J.M. Allmond, and W.D. Kulp, Phys. Rev. C 70, 024308 (2004). [2] C.Y. Wu, D. Cline, T. Czosnyka, A. Backlin, C. Baktash, R.M. Diamond, G.D. Dracoulis, L. Hasselgren, H. Kluge, et al., Nucl. Phys. A607, 178 (1996).

  19. Quenched domain wall QCD with DBW2 gauge action toward nucleon decay matrix element calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasumichi

    2001-10-01

    The domain wall fermion action is a promising way to control chiral symmetry in lattice gauge theory. By the good chiral symmetry of this approach even at finite lattice spacing, one is able to extract hadronic matrix elements, like kaon weak matrix elements, for which the symmetry is extremely important. Ordinary fermions with poor chiral symmetry make calculation difficult because of the large mixing of operators with different chiral structure. Even though the domain wall fermion action with the simple Wilson gauge action has a good chiral symmetry, one can further improve the symmetry by using a different gauge action. We take a non-perturbatively improved action, the DBW2 action of the QCD Taro group. Hadron masses are systematically examined for a range of parameters. Application to nucleon decay matrix element is also discussed.

  20. B(s) 0-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B -meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ =1.206 (18 )(6 ), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B -meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vt d|=8.00 (34 )(8 )×10-3, |Vt s|=39.0 (1.2 )(0.4 )×10-3, and |Vt d/Vt s|=0.2052 (31 )(10 ), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2 σ . These results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  1. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  2. Analytic matrix elements for the two-electron atomic basis with logarithmic terms

    SciTech Connect

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2014-08-01

    The two-electron problem for the helium-like atoms in S-state is considered. The basis containing the integer powers of ln r, where r is a radial variable of the Fock expansion, is studied. In this basis, the analytic expressions for the matrix elements of the corresponding Hamiltonian are presented. These expressions include only elementary and special functions, what enables very fast and accurate computation of the matrix elements. The decisive contribution of the correct logarithmic terms to the behavior of the two-electron wave function in the vicinity of the triple-coalescence point is reaffirmed.

  3. Double β-decay nuclear matrix elements for the A=48 and A=58 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouras, L. D.; Vergados, J. D.

    1983-11-01

    The nuclear matrix elements entering the double β decays of the 48Ca-48Ti and 58Ni-58Fe systems have been calculated using a realistic two nucleon interaction and realistic shell model spaces. Effective transition operators corresponding to a variety of gauge theory models have been considered. The stability of such matrix elements against variations of the nuclear parameters is examined. Appropriate lepton violating parameters are extracted from the A=48 data and predictions are made for the lifetimes of the positron decays of the A=58 system. RADIOACTIVITY Double β decay. Gauge theories. Lepton nonconservation. Neutrino mass. Shell model calculations.

  4. Generalization of the Mulliken-Hush treatment for the calculation of electron transfer matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for the calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element for electron transfer processes is introduced and results for several systems are presented. The method can be applied to ground and excited state systems and can be used in cases where several states interact strongly. Within the set of states chosen it is a non-perturbative treatment, and can be implemented using quantities obtained solely in terms of the adiabatic states. Several applications based on quantum chemical calculations are briefly presented. Finally, since quantities for adiabatic states are the only input to the method, it can also be used with purely experimental data to estimate electron transfer matrix elements.

  5. Semiclassical matrix elements for a chaotic propagator in the scar function basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Alejandro M. F.

    2013-04-01

    A semiclassical approximation for the matrix elements of a quantum chaotic propagator in the scar function basis has been derived. The obtained expression is solely expressed in terms of canonical invariant objects. For our purpose, we have used the recently developed, semiclassical matrix elements of the propagator in coherent states, together with the linearization of the flux in the neighborhood of a classically unstable periodic orbit of chaotic two-dimensional systems. The expression derived here is successfully verified to be exact for a (linear) cat map, after the theory is adapted to a discrete phase space appropriate to a quantized torus.

  6. Potential-model calculation of an order-v2 nonrelativistic QCD matrix element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Jungil

    2006-07-01

    We present two methods for computing dimensionally regulated nonrelativistic QCD heavy-quarkonium matrix elements that are related to the second derivative of the heavy-quarkonium wave function at the origin. The first method makes use of a hard-cutoff regulator as an intermediate step and requires knowledge only of the heavy-quarkonium wave function. It involves a significant cancellation that is an obstacle to achieving high numerical accuracy. The second method is more direct and yields a result that is identical to the Gremm-Kapustin relation, but it is limited to use in potential models. It can be generalized to the computation of matrix elements of higher order in the heavy-quark velocity and can be used to resum the contributions to decay and production rates that are associated with those matrix elements. We apply these methods to the Cornell potential model and compute a matrix element for the J/ψ state that appears in the leading relativistic correction to the production and decay of that state through the color-singlet quark-antiquark channel.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2016-06-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s { n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  8. Matrix elements and diquark correlations in quenched QCD with overlap fermions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebbi, Claudio

    2006-12-01

    We present results for BK and selected matrix elements for beyond the standard model interactions obtained in quenched QCD with overlap fermions. We also illustrate results on baryon wave- functions and diquark correlations within baryons in the Coulomb and Landau gauge.

  9. Nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-β decay: Relativity and short-range correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L. S.; Yao, J. M.; Ring, P.; Meng, J.

    2017-02-01

    Background:The discovery of neutrinoless double-β (0 ν β β ) decay would demonstrate the nature of neutrinos, have profound implications for our understanding of matter-antimatter mystery, and solve the mass hierarchy problem of neutrinos. The calculations for the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν of 0 ν β β decay are crucial for the interpretation of this process. Purpose: We study the effects of relativity and nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations on the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν by assuming the mechanism of exchanging light or heavy neutrinos for the 0 ν β β decay. Methods:The nuclear matrix elements M0 ν are calculated within the framework of covariant density functional theory, where the beyond-mean-field correlations are included in the nuclear wave functions by configuration mixing of both angular-momentum and particle-number projected quadrupole deformed mean-field states. Results: The nuclear matrix elements M0 ν are obtained for ten 0 ν β β -decay candidate nuclei. The impact of relativity is illustrated by adopting relativistic or nonrelativistic decay operators. The effects of short-range correlations are evaluated. Conclusions: The effects of relativity and short-range correlations play an important role in the mechanism of exchanging heavy neutrinos though the influences are marginal for light neutrinos. Combining the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν with the observed lower limits on the 0 ν β β -decay half-lives, the predicted strongest limits on the effective masses are ||<0.06 eV for light neutrinos and | |-1>3.065 ×108GeV for heavy neutrinos.

  10. Relativistic description of nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double-β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L. S.; Yao, J. M.; Ring, P.; Meng, J.

    2014-11-01

    Background: Neutrinoless double-β (0 ν β β ) decay is related to many fundamental concepts in nuclear and particle physics beyond the standard model. Currently there are many experiments searching for this weak process. An accurate knowledge of the nuclear matrix element for the 0 ν β β decay is essential for determining the effective neutrino mass once this process is eventually measured. Purpose: We report the first full relativistic description of the 0 ν β β decay matrix element based on a state-of-the-art nuclear structure model. Methods: We adopt the full relativistic transition operators which are derived with the charge-changing nucleonic currents composed of the vector coupling, axial-vector coupling, pseudoscalar coupling, and weak-magnetism coupling terms. The wave functions for the initial and final nuclei are determined by the multireference covariant density functional theory (MR-CDFT) based on the point-coupling functional PC-PK1. Correlations beyond the mean field are introduced by configuration mixing of both angular momentum and particle number projected quadrupole deformed mean-field wave functions. Results: The low-energy spectra and electric quadrupole transitions in 150Nd and its daughter nucleus 150Sm are well reproduced by the MR-CDFT calculations. The 0 ν β β decay matrix elements for both the 01+→01+ and 01+→02+ decays of 150Nd are evaluated. The effects of particle number projection, static and dynamic deformations, and the full relativistic structure of the transition operators on the matrix elements are studied in detail. Conclusions: The resulting 0 ν β β decay matrix element for the 01+→01+ transition is 5.60 , which gives the most optimistic prediction for the next generation of experiments searching for the 0 ν β β decay in 150Nd.

  11. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with k·p and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  12. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  13. Efficient and accurate evaluation of potential energy matrix elements for quantum dynamics using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alborzpour, Jonathan P.; Tew, David P.; Habershon, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a linear combination of basis functions, such as Gaussian wavepackets (GWPs), requires costly evaluation of integrals over the entire potential energy surface (PES) of the system. The standard approach, motivated by computational tractability for direct dynamics, is to approximate the PES with a second order Taylor expansion, for example centred at each GWP. In this article, we propose an alternative method for approximating PES matrix elements based on PES interpolation using Gaussian process regression (GPR). Our GPR scheme requires only single-point evaluations of the PES at a limited number of configurations in each time-step; the necessity of performing often-expensive evaluations of the Hessian matrix is completely avoided. In applications to 2-, 5-, and 10-dimensional benchmark models describing a tunnelling coordinate coupled non-linearly to a set of harmonic oscillators, we find that our GPR method results in PES matrix elements for which the average error is, in the best case, two orders-of-magnitude smaller and, in the worst case, directly comparable to that determined by any other Taylor expansion method, without requiring additional PES evaluations or Hessian matrices. Given the computational simplicity of GPR, as well as the opportunities for further refinement of the procedure highlighted herein, we argue that our GPR methodology should replace methods for evaluating PES matrix elements using Taylor expansions in quantum dynamics simulations.

  14. Numerical investigations on the effect of slenderness ratio of matrix elements in cryogenic chill down process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reby Roy, K. E.; Mohammed, Jesna; Abhiroop, V. M.; Thekkethil, S. R.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic fluids have many applications in space, medicine, preservation etc. The chill-down of cryogenic fluid transfer line is a complicated phenomenon occurring in most of the cryogenic systems. The cryogenic fluid transfer line, which is initially at room temperature, has to be cooled to the temperature of the cryogen as fast as possible. When the cryogenic fluid at liquid state passes along the line, transient heat transfer between the cryogen and the transfer line causes voracious evaporation of the liquid. This paper makes a contribution to the two-phase flow along a rectangular flow passage consisting of an array of elliptically shaped matrix elements. A simplified 2D model is considered and the problem is solved using ANSYS FLUENT. The present analysis aims to study the influence of the slenderness ratio of matrix elements on the heat transfer rate and chill down time. For a comparative study, matrix elements of slenderness ratios 5 and 10 are considered. Liquid nitrogen at 74K flows through the matrix. The material of the transfer line is assumed to be aluminium which is initially at room temperature. The influence of Reynolds numbers from 800 to 3000 on chill-down is also investigated.

  15. Multiband compact texture unit descriptor for intra-band and inter-band texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safia, Abdelmounaime; He, Dong-Chen

    2015-07-01

    The standard approach for extracting texture in multispectral images is to analyze intra-band spatial relationships in each spectral band independently and ignore inter-band spatial relationships. Analyzing both spatial relationships often yields better performance but suffers from being computationally cumbersome. In this paper, a solution for the simultaneous analysis of intra- and inter-band spatial relationships is proposed based on a new descriptor, named the multiband Compact Texture Unit (multiband C-TU). The proposed multiband C-TU descriptor was compared with the monoband C-TU and the Gray Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) methods in a supervised classification scheme, which used only texture information. Tests were conducted using panchromatic and pan-sharpened multispectral WorldView-2 images from three different sites. The average classification rates obtained by texture extracted from the panchromatic band using GLCM and monoband C-TU were 63.9% and 65.5% respectively. When pan-sharpened multispectral bands were used, these monoband texture methods recorded an average classification rate of 73.6% and 78.6%. When the three first Principal Component Analysis (PCA) bands were used, these monoband texture methods performed similarly to those for pan-sharpened multispectral bands. The proposed multiband C-TU descriptor extracted from the pan-sharpened multispectral bands recorded the highest average classification rate of 87.2%. When the proposed descriptor was extracted from the first three PCA bands, the average classification rate decreased by 8.3% compared to the use of the pan-sharpened bands. This suggested that inter-band spatial relationships were not preserved by the PCA transform.

  16. $B^0_{(s)}$-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran

    2016-06-28

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B-meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ=1.206(18)(6), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B-meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vtd| = 8.00(34)(8)×10-3, |Vts| = 39.0(1.2)(0.4)×10-3, and |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2052(31)(10), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2σ. In addition, these results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  17. $$B^0_{(s)}$$-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    DOE PAGES

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; ...

    2016-06-28

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B-meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ=1.206(18)(6), where the second errormore » stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B-meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vtd| = 8.00(34)(8)×10-3, |Vts| = 39.0(1.2)(0.4)×10-3, and |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2052(31)(10), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2σ. In addition, these results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.« less

  18. General expressions for the matrix elements of the tight-binding operator within the Racah-Wigner algebra*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    General expressions for the matrix elements of the tight-binding operator are presented using the Racah-Wigner algebra, where the wave functions are expressed as coupled multiplet wave functions within a given angular momentum coupling scheme. The knowledge of all possible Slater determinants is not necessary and the matrix elements can be written as compact expressions computable with arbitrary accuracy.

  19. Interband cascade light emitting devices based on type-II quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lin, C.H.; Murry, S.J.

    1997-06-01

    The authors discuss physical processes in the newly developed type-II interband cascade light emitting devices, and review their recent progress in the demonstration of the first type-II interband cascade lasers and the observation of interband cascade electroluminescence up to room temperature in a broad mid-infrared wavelength region (extended to 9 {mu}m).

  20. Low threshold interband cascade lasers operating above room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, B.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Mid-IR type-II interband cascade lasers were demonstrated in pulsed mode at temperatures up to 325 K and in continuous mode up to 200 K. At 80 K, the threshold current density was 8.9 A/cm2 and a cw outpout power of 140 mW/facet was obtained.

  1. A novel FPGA-programmable switch matrix interconnection element in quantum-dot cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Sara; Rahimi Azghadi, Mostafa; Zakerolhosseini, Ali; Navi, Keivan

    2015-04-01

    The Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is a novel nanotechnology, promising extra low-power, extremely dense and very high-speed structure for the construction of logical circuits at a nanoscale. In this paper, initially previous works on QCA-based FPGA's routing elements are investigated, and then an efficient, symmetric and reliable QCA programmable switch matrix (PSM) interconnection element is introduced. This element has a simple structure and offers a complete routing capability. It is implemented using a bottom-up design approach that starts from a dense and high-speed 2:1 multiplexer and utilise it to build the target PSM interconnection element. In this study, simulations of the proposed circuits are carried out using QCAdesigner, a layout and simulation tool for QCA circuits. The results demonstrate high efficiency of the proposed designs in QCA-based FPGA routing.

  2. Nuclear matrix elements of the double beta decay for mass around 80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji; Teruya, Eri

    2014-09-01

    In nature there are 30 kinds of nuclei which are expected to have double beta decays. Among them ten nuclei are actually observed for the neutrino double beta decays. Still no observation is made for the neutrinoless double beta decays (0 νββ) . The 0 νββ decay is expected to occur only when neutrinos have masses and they are Majorana particles. In that respect observation of 0 νββ is to determine whether neutrinos are Majorana particles or not. In theoretical side in order to estimate the half life of 0 νββ determination of the nuclear matrix elements are essential. They were calculated in many theoretical frameworks, but the results are not consistent in various models. In this study we carry out shell model calculations for 82Se and 82Kr nuclei. After obtaining the wavefunctions, we calculate the nuclear matrix elements. For comparison we make pair truncated shell model calculations.

  3. Short-distance matrix elements for $D$-meson mixing for 2+1 lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We study the short-distance hadronic matrix elements for D-meson mixing with partially quenched Nf = 2+1 lattice QCD. We use a large set of the MIMD Lattice Computation Collaboration's gauge configurations with a2 tadpole-improved staggered sea quarks and tadpole-improved Lüscher-Weisz gluons. We use the a2 tadpole-improved action for valence light quarks and the Sheikoleslami-Wohlert action with the Fermilab interpretation for the valence charm quark. Our calculation covers the complete set of five operators needed to constrain new physics models for D-meson mixing. We match our matrix elements to the MS-NDR scheme evaluated at 3 GeV. We report values for the Beneke-Buchalla-Greub-Lenz-Nierste choice of evanescent operators.

  4. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  5. Calculation of Dipole Transition Matrix Elements and Expectation Values by Vibrational Coupled Cluster Method.

    PubMed

    Banik, Subrata; Pal, Sourav; Prasad, M Durga

    2010-10-12

    An effective operator approach based on the coupled cluster method is described and applied to calculate vibrational expectation values and absolute transition matrix elements. Coupled cluster linear response theory (CCLRT) is used to calculate excited states. The convergence pattern of these properties with the rank of the excitation operator is studied. The method is applied to a water molecule. Arponen-type double similarity transformation in extended coupled cluster (ECCM) framework is also used to generate an effective operator, and the convergence pattern of these properties is compared to the normal coupled cluster (NCCM) approach. It is found that the coupled cluster method provides an accurate description of these quantities for low lying vibrational excited states. The ECCM provides a significant improvement for the calculation of the transition matrix elements.

  6. A new formulation to calculate general HFB matrix elements through the Pfaffian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Oi, Makito

    2012-08-01

    A new formula is presented for the calculation of matrix elements between multi-quasiparticle Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) states. The formula is expressed in terms of the Pfaffian, and is derived by using Fermion coherent states with Grassmann numbers. It turns out that the formula corresponds to an extension of the generalized Wick's theorem and simplifies the combinatorial complexity resulting from practical applications of the generalized Wick's theorem by unifying the transition density and the transition pairing tensor in HFB theory. The resultant formula is simpler and more compact than the traditional description of matrix elements of general many-body operators. In addition, through the derivation of our new formula, we found that the Pfaffian version of the Lewis Carroll formula corresponds to a relation suggested by Balian and Brezin for HFB theory in 1969.

  7. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM.

  8. Determination of electric-dipole matrix elements in K and Rb from Stark shift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Bindiya; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2007-11-15

    Stark shifts of potassium and rubidium D1 lines have been measured with high precision by Miller et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49, 5128 (1994)]. In this work, we combine these measurements with our all-order calculations to determine the values of the electric-dipole matrix elements for the 4p{sub j}-3d{sub j{sup '}} transitions in K and the 5p{sub j}-4d{sub j{sup '}} transitions in Rb to high precision. The 4p{sub 1/2}-3d{sub 3/2} and 5p{sub 1/2}-4d{sub 3/2} transitions contribute on the order of 90% to the respective polarizabilities of the np{sub 1/2} states in K and Rb, and the remaining 10% can be accurately calculated using the relativistic all-order method. Therefore, the combination of the experimental data and theoretical calculations allows us to determine the np-(n-1)d matrix elements and their uncertainties. We compare these values with our all-order calculations of the np-(n-1)d matrix elements in K and Rb for a benchmark test of the accuracy of the all-order method for transitions involving nd states. Such matrix elements are of special interest for many applications, such as determination of ''magic'' wavelengths in alkali-metal atoms for state-insensitive cooling and trapping, and determination of blackbody radiation shifts in optical frequency standards with ions.

  9. Calculation of the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction involving relativistic hydrogenic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2017-03-01

    The program MTRDCOUL [1] calculates the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction between a charged particle and an atomic electron, ∫ ψf∗ (r) ∣ R - r∣-1ψi(r) d r. Bound-free transitions are considered, and relativistic hydrogenic wave functions are used. In this revised version a bug discovered in the F3Y CPC Program Library subprogram [2] is fixed.

  10. Quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation.

    PubMed

    D'Ariano, G M; Lo Presti, P

    2001-05-07

    Quantum operations describe any state change allowed in quantum mechanics, including the evolution of an open system or the state change due to a measurement. We present a general method based on quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation. As input the method needs only a single entangled state. The feasibility of the technique for the electromagnetic field is shown, and the experimental setup is illustrated based on homodyne tomography of a twin beam.

  11. An improved method for extracting matrix elements from lattice three-point functions

    SciTech Connect

    C. Aubin, K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    The extraction of matrix elements from baryon three-point functions is complicated by the fact that the signal-to-noise drops rapidly as a function of time. Using a previously discussed method to improve the signal-to-noise for lattice two-point functions, we use this technique to do so for lattice three-point functions, using electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon and Delta as an example.

  12. Useful extremum principle for the variational calculation of matrix elements. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1975-01-01

    Recent work (Gerjuoy et al., 1974) on variational principles for diagonal bound state matrix elements of arbitrary Hermitian operators is extended. In particular, it is shown that the previously derived minimum principle for the trial auxiliary function appearing in such variational principles can be constructed using a modified Hamiltonian possessing not heretofore recognized positive definite properties. Thus there is at least one alternative to the particular modified Hamiltonian on which the results of Gerjuoy et al. (1974) originally were based.

  13. Measuring the CKM matrix element V{sub tb} at D-zero and CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.

    1997-07-01

    I present measurements by the CDF collaboration of the Standard Model three generation CKM matrix element V{sub tb} and of a special case extension with additional assumptions, using current Tevatron t{anti t} data. I then show how we can significantly improve the precision on V{sub tb} and at the same time extend the measurement so it is not constrained by Standard Model assumptions, using single top production at the upgraded Tevatron.

  14. Finite element analysis of stress transfer mechanism from matrix to the fiber in SWCN reinforced nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2017-02-01

    This study defined as micromechanical finite element (FE) approach examining the stress transfer mechanism in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCN) reinforced composites. In the modeling, 3D unit-cell method was evaluated. Carbon nanotube reinforced composites were modeled as three layers which comprises CNT, interface and matrix material. Firstly; matrix, fiber and interfacial materials all together considered as three layered cylindrical nanocomposite. Secondly, the cylindrical matrix material was assumed to be isotropic and also considered as a continuous medium. Then, fiber material was represented with zigzag type SWCNs. Finally, SWCN was combined with the elastic medium by using springs with different constants. In the FE modeling of SWCN reinforced composite model springs were modeled by using ANSYS spring damper element COMBIN14. The developed interfacial van der Waals interaction effects between the continuous matrix layer and the carbon nanotube fiber layer were simulated by applying these various spring stiffness values. In this study, the layered composite cylindrical FE model was presented as the equivalent mechanical properties of SWCN structures in terms of Young's modulus. The obtained results and literature values were presented and discussed. Figures, 16, 17, and 18 of the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, a solid diamond symbol appeared instead of a Greek tau on the y axis labels for these three figures. This article was updated on 17 March 2017 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged.

  15. MOON for neutrino-less {beta}{beta} decays and {beta}{beta} nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-11-09

    The MOON project aims at spectroscopic 0v{beta}{beta} studies with the v-mass sensitivity of 100-30 meV by measuring two beta rays from {sup 100}Mo and/or {sup 82}Se. The detector is a compact super-module of multi-layer PL scintillator plates. R and D works made by the pro to-type MOON-1 and the small PL plate show the possible energy resolution of around {sigma}{approx}2.2%, as required for the mass sensitivity. Nuclear matrix elements M{sup 2v} for 2v{beta}{beta} are shown to be given by the sum {sigma}{sub L}M{sub k} of the 2v{beta}{beta} matrix elements M{sub k} through intermediate quasi-particle states in the Fermi-surface, where Mi is obtained experimentally by using the GT(J{sup {pi}} = 1{sup +}) matrix elements of M{sub i}(k) and M{sub f}(k) for the successive single-{beta} transitions through the k-th intermediate state.

  16. Matrix element method at next-to-leading order for arbitrary jet algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, Robin; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The matrix element method usually employs leading-order matrix elements. We discuss the generalization towards higher orders in perturbation theory and show how the matrix element method can be used at next-to-leading order for arbitrary infrared-safe jet algorithms. We discuss three variants at next-to-leading order. The first two variants work at the level of the jet momenta. The first variant adheres to strict fixed order in perturbation theory. We present a method for the required integration over the radiation phase space. The second variant is inspired by the POWHEG method and works as the first variant at the level of the jet momenta. The third variant is a more exclusive POWHEG version. Here we resolve exactly one jet into two subjets. If the two subjets are resolved above a scale p⊥min, the likelihood is computed from the POWHEG-modified real emission part, otherwise it is given by the POWHEG-modified virtual part.

  17. MOON for neutrino-less ββ decays and ββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-11-01

    The MOON project aims at spectroscopic 0vββ studies with the v-mass sensitivity of 100-30 meV by measuring two beta rays from 100Mo and/or 82Se. The detector is a compact super-module of multi-layer PL scintillator plates. R&D works made by the pro to-type MOON-1 and the small PL plate show the possible energy resolution of around σ~2.2%, as required for the mass sensitivity. Nuclear matrix elements M2v for 2vββ are shown to be given by the sum ΣLMk of the 2vββ matrix elements Mk through intermediate quasi-particle states in the Fermi-surface, where Mi is obtained experimentally by using the GT(Jπ = 1+) matrix elements of Mi(k) and Mf(k) for the successive single-β transitions through the k-th intermediate state.

  18. A Data Matrix Method for Improving the Quantification of Element Percentages of SEM/EDX Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2009-01-01

    A simple 2D M N matrix involving sample preparation enables the microanalyst to peer below the noise floor of element percentages reported by the SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/ energy dispersive x-ray) analysis, thus yielding more meaningful data. Using the example of a 2 3 sample set, there are M = 2 concentration levels of the original mix under test: 10 percent ilmenite (90 percent silica) and 20 percent ilmenite (80 percent silica). For each of these M samples, N = 3 separate SEM/EDX samples were drawn. In this test, ilmenite is the element of interest. By plotting the linear trend of the M sample s known concentration versus the average of the N samples, a much higher resolution of elemental analysis can be performed. The resulting trend also shows how the noise is affecting the data, and at what point (of smaller concentrations) is it impractical to try to extract any further useful data.

  19. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  20. Engineering interband transport by time-dependent disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Tayebirad, Ghazal; Mannella, Riccardo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2011-09-15

    We show how the evolution of atoms in a tilted lattice can be changed and controlled by phase noise on the lattice. Dependent on the characteristic parameters of the noise, the interband transport can be either suppressed or enhanced, which is of interest for very precise control in experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates. The effect of the noise on the survival probability in the ground band is summarized in a scaling plot, stressing the universality of our results.

  1. A Fortran program to calculate the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction involving hydrogenic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2017-03-01

    The program MTRXCOUL [1] calculates the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction between a charged particle and an atomic electron, ∫ψf∗ (r) | R - r | - 1ψi(r) d r. Bound-free transitions are considered, and non-relativistic hydrogenic wave functions are used. In this revised version a bug discovered in the F3Y CPC Program Library (PL) subprogram [2] is fixed. Furthermore, the COULCC CPC PL subprogram [3] applied for the calculations of the radial wave functions of the free states and the Bessel functions is replaced by the CPC PL subprogram DCOUL [4].

  2. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  3. Many-body correlations of QRPA in nuclear matrix elements of double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, J.

    2015-10-28

    We present two new ideas on the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) approach for calculating nuclear matrix elements of double-beta decay. First, it is necessary to calculate overlaps of the QRPA states obtained on the basis of the ground states of different nuclei. We calculate this overlap using quasiboson vacua as the QRPA ground states. Second, we show that two-particle transfer paths are possible to use for the calculation under the closure approximation. A calculation is shown for {sup 150}Nd→{sup 150}Sm using these two new ideas, and their implication is discussed.

  4. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  5. Nucleon matrix elements with Nf=2+1+1 maximally twisted fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Dinter, Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2010-06-01

    We present the first lattice calculation of nucleon matrix elements using four dynamical flavors. We use the Nf=2+1+1 maximally twisted mass formulation. The renormalization is performed non-perturbatively in the RI'-MOM scheme and results are given for the vector and axial vector operators with up to one-derivative. Our calculation of the average momentum of the unpolarized non-singlet parton distribution is presented and compared to our previous results obtained from the Nf=2 case.

  6. Comparative Study of Various Algorithms for the Merging of Parton Showers and Matrix Elements in Hadronic Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alwall, J.; Hoche, S.; Krauss, F.; Lavesson, N.; Lonnblad, L.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Moretti, M.; Papadopoulos, C.G.; Piccinini, F.; Schumann, S.; Treccani, M.; Winter, J.; Worek, M.; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Lund U. /Louvain U. /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Athens U. /INFN, Pavia /Dresden, Tech. U. /Karlsruhe U., TP /Silesia U.

    2007-06-27

    We compare different procedures for combining fixed-order tree-level matrix-element generators with parton showers. We use the case of W-production at the Tevatron and the LHC to compare different implementations of the so-called CKKW and MLM schemes using different matrix-element generators and different parton cascades. We find that although similar results are obtained in all cases, there are important differences.

  7. Measurement of single top quark production at D0 using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrevski, Jovan Pavle

    2007-01-01

    Until now, the top quark has only been observed produced in pairs, by the strong force. According to the standard model, it can also be produced singly, via an electroweak interaction. Top quarks produced this way provide powerful ways to test the charged-current electroweak interactions of the top quark, to measure |Vtb|, and to search for physics beyond the standard model. This thesis describes the application of the matrix element analysis technique to the search for single top quark production with the D0 detector using 0.9 fb-1 of Run II data. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the background model, assuming a Standard Model s-channel to t-channel cross section ratio of σst = 0.44, we measure the single top quark production cross section: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.8$-1.4\\atop{+1.6}$ pb. This result has a p-value of 0.08%, corresponding to a 3.2 standard deviation Gaussian equivalent significance.

  8. Symbolic algorithms for the computation of Moshinsky brackets and nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursescu, D.; Tomaselli, M.; Kuehl, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    To facilitate the use of the extended nuclear shell model (NSM), a FERMI module for calculating some of its basic quantities in the framework of MAPLE is provided. The Moshinsky brackets, the matrix elements for several central and non-central interactions between nuclear two-particle states as well as their expansion in terms of Talmi integrals are easily given within a symbolic formulation. All of these quantities are available for interactive work. Program summaryTitle of program:Fermi Catalogue identifier:ADVO Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVO Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:None Computer for which the program is designed and others on which is has been tested:All computers with a licence for the computer algebra package MAPLE [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterloo Maple Inc., produced by MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc.] Instalations:GSI-Darmstadt; University of Kassel (Germany) Operating systems or monitors under which the program has beentested: WindowsXP, Linux 2.4 Programming language used:MAPLE 8 and 9.5 from MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc. Memory required to execute with typical data:30 MB No. of lines in distributed program including test data etc.:5742 No. of bytes in distributed program including test data etc.:288 939 Distribution program:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:In order to perform calculations within the nuclear shell model (NSM), a quick and reliable access to the nuclear matrix elements is required. These matrix elements, which arise from various types of forces among the nucleons, can be calculated using Moshinsky's transformation brackets between relative and center-of-mass coordinates [T.A. Brody, M. Moshinsky, Tables of Transformation Brackets, Monografias del Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1960] and by the proper use of the nuclear states in different coupling notations

  9. Charge-exchange reactions and nuclear matrix elements for {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Frekers, D.

    2009-11-09

    Charge-exchange reactions of (n, p) and (p, n) type at intermediate energies are a powerful tool for the study of nuclear matrix element in {beta}{beta} decay. The present paper reviews some of the most recent experiments in this context. Here, the (n, p) type reactions are realized through (d, {sup 2}He), where {sup 2}He refers to two protons in a singlet {sup 1}S{sub 0} state and where both of these are momentum analyzed and detected by the same spectrometer and detector. These reactions have been developed and performed exclusively at KVI, Groningen (NL), using an incident deuteron energy of 183 MeV. Final state resolutions of about 100 keV have routinely been available. On the other hand, the ({sup 3}He, t) reaction is of (p, n) type and was developed at the RCNP facility in Osaka (JP). Measurements with an unprecedented high resolution of 30 keV at incident energies of 420 MeV are now readily possible. Using both reaction types one can extract the Gamow-Teller transition strengths B(GT{sup +}) and B(GT{sup -}), which define the two ''legs'' of the {beta}{beta} decay matrix elements for the 2v{beta}{beta} decay The high resolution available in both reactions allows a detailed insight into the excitations of the intermediate odd-odd nuclei and, as will be shown, some unexpected features are being unveiled.

  10. Determination of color-octet matrix elements from e+e- processes at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Feng; Qiao, Cong-Feng; Chao, Kuang-Ta

    1997-08-01

    We present an analysis of the preliminary experimental data of direct J/ψ production in e+e- processes at low energies. We find that the color-octet contributions are crucially important to the cross section in this energy region, and their inclusion produces a good description of the data. By fitting to the data, we extract the individual values of two color-octet matrix elements: ~1.1×10-2 GeV3; /m2c~7.4×10-3 GeV3. We discuss the allowed range of the two matrix elements constrained by the theoretical uncertainties. We find that is poorly determined because it is sensitive to the variation of the choice of mc, αs and . However, /m2c is quite stable [about (6-9)×10-3 GeV3] when the parameters vary in reasonable ranges. The uncertainties due to large experimental errors are also discussed.

  11. Theory and computation of electromagnetic transition matrix elements in the continuous spectrum of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examines the mathematical properties of the free-free ( f - f) matrix elements of the full electric field operator, O E (κ, r̅), of the multipolar Hamiltonian. κ is the photon wavenumber. Special methods are developed and applied for their computation, for the general case where the scattering wavefunctions are calculated numerically in the potential of the term-dependent ( N - 1) electron core, and are energy-normalized. It is found that, on the energy axis, the f - f matrix elements of O E (κ, r̅) have singularities of first order, i.e., as ɛ' → ɛ, they behave as ( ɛ - ɛ')-1. The numerical applications are for f - f transitions in hydrogen and neon, obeying electric dipole and quadrupole selection rules. In the limit κ = 0, O E (κ, r̅) reduces to the length form of the electric dipole approximation (EDA). It is found that the results for the EDA agree with those of O E (κ, r̅), with the exception of a wave-number region k' = k ± κ about the point k' = k.

  12. Many-body-localization transition: strong multifractality spectrum for matrix elements of local operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    For short-ranged disordered quantum models in one dimension, the many-body-localization is analyzed via the adaptation to the many-body context (Serbyn et al 2015 Phys. Rev. X 5 041047) of the Thouless point of view on the Anderson transition: the question is whether a local interaction between two long chains is able to reshuffle completely the eigenstates (delocalized phase with a volume-law entanglement) or whether the hybridization between tensor states remains limited (many-body-localized phase with an area-law entanglement). The central object is thus the level of hybridization induced by the matrix elements of local operators, as compared with the difference of diagonal energies. The multifractal analysis of these matrix elements of local operators is used to analyze the corresponding statistics of resonances. Our main conclusion is that the critical point is characterized by the strong-multifractality spectrum f(0≤slant α ≤slant 2)=\\fracα{2} , well known in the context of Anderson localization in spaces of effective infinite dimensionality, where the size of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the volume. Finally, the possibility of a delocalized non-ergodic phase near criticality is discussed.

  13. The Sp(3, R) Sympletic Model: a comparison of exact and approximate matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Anna; Caprio, Mark; Rowe, David

    2014-03-01

    The Sp(3, R) symplectic model has a close physical connection to both the microscopic shell model and the collective deformation and rotational degrees of freedom, and it is a natural extension of the Elliot SU(3) model from single-shell to multi-shell dynamics. The Sp(3, R) Lie algebra--which contains the angular momentum operators, the quadrupole and vibrational momentum operators and the quadrupole flow tensor operators--is the smallest algebra containing both the shell model Hamiltonian and the rotor algebra. In the limit of large number of oscillator quanta, the Sp(3, R) algebra contracts to the U(3) boson algebra. For large values of the Casimir operator of the SU(3) subalgebra, the sp(3, R) algebra further contracts to the algebra of the collective coupled rotor-vibrator model. The exact Sp(3, R) matrix elements, calculated using the vector coherent state method, are compared with approximate matrix elements calculated in the U(3) boson limit. Science Advancement under a Cottrell Scholar Award and by the US DOE under grant DE-FG02-95ER-40934.

  14. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II with the matrix-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-05-01

    We describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convoluting the leading order matrix element describing q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime} {nu}{sub {ell}}, with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}, we observe 33 candidate events and measure M{sub top} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons and is the most precise single measurement of the top quark mass in this channel.

  15. Precision Measurement of the Neutron Twist-3 Matrix Element dn2: Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Posik, Matthew; Flay, David; Parno, Diana; Allada, Kalyan; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Chiranjib; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Franklin, Gregg; Friend, Megan; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Gomez, Javier; Guo, Lei; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, J; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jin, Ge; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lukhanin, Oleksandr; Mamyan, Vahe; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Moffit, Bryan; Muangma, Navaphon; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Oh, Yongseok; Peng, Jen-chieh; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Troth, Wolfgang; Wang, Diancheng; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2014-07-01

    Double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections were measured at large Bjorken x (0.25 lte x lte 0.90), in both the deep-inelastic and resonance regions, by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV from a transversely and longitudinally polarized 3He target. In this dedicated experiment, the spin structure function g2 on 3He was determined with precision at large x, and the neutron twist-three matrix element dn2 was measured at ?Q2? of 3.21 and 4.32 GeV2/c2, with an absolute precision of about 10?5. Our results are found to be in agreement with lattice QCD calculations and resolve the disagreement found with previous data at ?Q2?= 5 GeV2/c2. Combining dn2 and a newly extracted twist-four matrix element, fn2, the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were extracted and found to be of opposite sign and about 60 MeV/fm in magnitude.

  16. Top quark mass measurement in the lepton plus jets channel using a modified matrix element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Siegrist, J.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-04-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, mt, obtained from p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. We analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb-1. We select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. We calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. Our event likelihood is a function of mt and a parameter JES (jet energy scale) that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. We use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. We also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, we find mt=172.7±1.8(stat+JES)±1.2(syst)GeV/c2.

  17. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton final state using the matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Grohsjean, Alexander

    2008-12-15

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, is the heaviest known fundamental particle. The precise knowledge of its mass yields important constraints on the mass of the yet-unobserved Higgs boson and allows to probe for physics beyond the Standard Model. The first measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel with the Matrix Element method at the D0 experiment is presented. After a short description of the experimental environment and the reconstruction chain from hits in the detector to physical objects, a detailed review of the Matrix Element method is given. The Matrix Element method is based on the likelihood to observe a given event under the assumption of the quantity to be measured, e.g. the mass of the top quark. The method has undergone significant modifications and improvements compared to previous measurements in the lepton+jets channel: the two undetected neutrinos require a new reconstruction scheme for the four-momenta of the final state particles, the small event sample demands the modeling of additional jets in the signal likelihood, and a new likelihood is designed to account for the main source of background containing tauonic Z decay. The Matrix Element method is validated on Monte Carlo simulated events at the generator level. For the measurement, calibration curves are derived from events that are run through the full D0 detector simulation. The analysis makes use of the Run II data set recorded between April 2002 and May 2008 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb-1. A total of 107 t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events with one electron and one muon in the final state are selected. Applying the Matrix Element method to this data set, the top quark mass is measured to be mtopRun IIa = 170.6 ± 6.1(stat.)-1.5+2.1(syst.)GeV; mtopRun IIb = 174.1 ± 4.4(stat.)-1.8+2.5(syst.)GeV; m

  19. Recent progress in development of mid-IR interband cascade lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Hill, Cory J.; Wong, Chung M.

    2004-01-01

    Type-II interband cascade lasers are promising in becoming efficient and compact mid-infrared light sources for many applications. Significant progress toward such a goal has recently been made in terms of lowering their threshold current densities and raising operation temperature. Also, continuous wave operation of single-mode distributed feedback interband cascade lasers has been demonstrated. We review the recent progress of the Sb-based mid-IR interband cascade lasers and present some latest results.

  20. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  1. Comparison of finite element and transfer matrix methods for numerical investigation of surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddouche, Issam; Cherbi, Lynda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) in the visible regime at a metal/dielectric interface within two different waveguide structures, the first is a Photonic Crystal Fiber where the Full Vector Finite Element Method (FVFEM) is used and the second is a slab waveguide where the transfer matrix method (TMM) is used. Knowing the diversities between the two methods in terms of speed, simplicity, and scope of application, computation is implemented with respect to wavelength and metal layer thickness in order to analyze and compare the performances of the two methods. Simulation results show that the TMM can be a good approximation for the FVFEM and that SPPs behave more like modes propagating in a semi infinite metal/dielectric structure as metal thickness increases from about 150 nm.

  2. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 . The matrix element technique is applied to t t ¯ events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton +jets final state of t t ¯ decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt=173.93 ±1.84 GeV .

  3. Single-particle parity-nonconserving matrix elements in {sup 207}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Komives, A.; Knott, J.E.; Leuschner, M.; Szymanski, J.J.; Bowman, J.D.; Jamrisk, D.

    1993-10-01

    Measurements of the helicity dependence of neutron scattering off of heavy nuclei by the TRIPLE collaboration have yielded multiple parity-nonconserving asymmetries. The asymmetries are predominantly positive, in contradiction to the zero average asymmetry predicted by the statistical model of neutron- nucleus scattering. Theoretical calculations that explain the non-zero average asymmetry require single-particle parity- nonconserving matrix elements 10-100 times larger than those predicted by meson exchange models. We are determining the single-particle parity non-conserving mixing in {sup 207}Pb by measuring the circular polarization of the 1.064 MeV {gamma} ray. The experiment uses a transmission polarimeter and a fast data acquisition system. Initial results are presented.

  4. Standard Model anatomy of WIMP dark matter direct detection. II. QCD analysis and hadronic matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Richard J.; Solon, Mikhail P.

    2015-02-01

    Models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) specified at the electroweak scale are systematically matched to effective theories at hadronic scales where WIMP-nucleus scattering observables are evaluated. Anomalous dimensions and heavy-quark threshold matching conditions are computed for the complete basis of lowest-dimension effective operators involving quarks and gluons. The resulting QCD renormalization group evolution equations are solved. The status of relevant hadronic matrix elements is reviewed and phenomenological illustrations are given, including details for the computation of the universal limit of nucleon scattering with heavy S U (2 )W×U (1 )Y charged WIMPs. Several cases of previously underestimated hadronic uncertainties are isolated. The results connect arbitrary models specified at the electroweak scale to a basis of nf=3 -flavor QCD operators. The complete basis of operators and Lorentz invariance constraints through order v2/c2 in the nonrelativistic nucleon effective theory are derived.

  5. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.

  6. A modified Finite Element-Transfer Matrix for control design of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, T.-M.; Yousuff, A.; Bahar, L. Y.; Konstandinidis, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Finite Element-Transfer Matrix (FETM) method was developed for reducing the computational efforts involved in structural analysis. While being widely used by structural analysts, this method does, however, have certain limitations, particularly when used for the control design of large flexible structures. In this paper, a new formulation based on the FETM method is presented. The new method effectively overcomes the limitations in the original FETM method, and also allows an easy construction of reduced models that are tailored for the control design. Other advantages of this new method include the ability to extract open loop frequencies and mode shapes with less computation, and simplification of the design procedures for output feedback, constrained compensation, and decentralized control. The development of this new method and the procedures for generating reduced models using this method are described in detail and the role of the reduced models in control design is discussed through an illustrative example.

  7. Lattice QCD calculation of the proton decay matrix element in the continuum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, N.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Aoki, S.; Kanaya, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Iwasaki, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Onogi, T.

    2004-12-01

    We present a quenched lattice QCD calculation of the {alpha} and {beta} parameters of the proton decay matrix element. The simulation is carried out using the Wilson quark action at three values of the lattice spacing in the range a{approx_equal}0.1-0.064 fm to study the scaling violation effect. We find only mild scaling violation when the lattice scale is determined by the nucleon mass. We obtain in the continuum limit, vertical bar {alpha}(NDR,2 GeV) vertical bar=0.0090(09)(+5-19) GeV{sup 3} and vertical bar{beta}(NDR,2 GeV)vertical bar=0.0096(09)(+6-20) GeV{sup 3} with {alpha} and {beta} in a relatively opposite sign, where the first error is statistical and the second is due to the uncertainty in the determination of the physical scale.

  8. Influence of Pairing on the Nuclear Matrix Elements of the Neutrinoless {beta}{beta} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.

    2008-02-08

    We study in this Letter the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements (NME's) in the framework of the interacting shell model. We analyze them in terms of the total angular momentum of the decaying neutron pair and as a function of the seniority truncations in the nuclear wave functions. This point of view turns out to be very adequate to gauge the accuracy of the NME's predicted by different nuclear models. In addition, it gives back the protagonist role in this process to the pairing interaction, the one which is responsible for the very existence of double beta decay emitters. We show that low seniority approximations, comparable to those implicit in the quasiparticle RPA in a spherical basis, tend to overestimate the NME's in several decays.

  9. Spin dipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay nuclei by charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.; Frekers, D.

    2016-11-01

    Spin dipole (SD) strengths for double beta-decay (DBD) nuclei were studied experimentally for the first time by using measured cross sections of (3He, t) charge-exchange reactions (CERs). Then SD nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) {M}α ({{SD}}) for low-lying 2- states were derived from the experimental SD strengths by referring to the experimental α = GT (Gamow-Teller) and α = F (Fermi) strengths. They are consistent with the empirical NMEs M({{SD}}) based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant. The CERs are used to evaluate the SD NME, which is associated with one of the major components of the neutrino-less DBD NME.

  10. The Matrix Element Method at the LHC: status and prospects for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    The Matrix Element Method (MEM) is a powerful multivariate method allowing to maximally exploit the experimental and theoretical information available to an analysis. Applications of the MEM at LHC experiments are discussed, such as searches for rare processes and measurements of properties of the Standard Model Higgs boson. The MadWeight software, allowing for a fast and automated computation of MEM weights for any user- specified process, is briefly reviewed. A new implementation of the MEM in the C++ language, MoMEMta, is presented. Building on MadWeight's tricks to accelerate the calculations, it aims at a much improved modularity and maintainability. Examples of this modularity are discussed: the possibility to compute several weights in parallel (propagation of systematic uncertainties), the Differential MEM (DMEM), and a novel way to search for lion-resonant. New Physics.

  11. Semiclassical form factor for spectral and matrix element fluctuations of multidimensional chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Turek, Marko; Spehner, Dominique; Müller, Sebastian; Richter, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    We present a semiclassical calculation of the generalized form factor Kab(tau) which characterizes the fluctuations of matrix elements of the operators a and b in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian of a chaotic system. Our approach is based on some recently developed techniques for the spectral form factor of systems with hyperbolic and ergodic underlying classical dynamics and f = 2 degrees of freedom, that allow us to go beyond the diagonal approximation. First we extend these techniques to systems with f > 2. Then we use these results to calculate Kab(tau). We show that the dependence on the rescaled time tau (time in units of the Heisenberg time) is universal for both the spectral and the generalized form factor. Furthermore, we derive a relation between Kab(tau) and the classical time-correlation function of the Weyl symbols of a and b.

  12. A simple representation of energy matrix elements in terms of symmetry-invariant bases.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Guiqing; Boyd, Russell J

    2010-02-01

    When a system under consideration has some symmetry, usually its Hamiltonian space can be parallel partitioned into a set of subspaces, which is invariant under symmetry operations. The bases that span these invariant subspaces are also invariant under the symmetry operations, and they are the symmetry-invariant bases. A standard methodology is available to construct a series of generator functions (GFs) and corresponding symmetry-adapted basis (SAB) functions from these symmetry-invariant bases. Elements of the factorized Hamiltonian and overlap matrix can be expressed in terms of these SAB functions, and their simple representations can be deduced in terms of GFs. The application of this method to the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian is demonstrated.

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain amore » top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.« less

  14. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  15. Mesh refinement in finite element analysis by minimization of the stiffness matrix trace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittur, Madan G.; Huston, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Most finite element packages provide means to generate meshes automatically. However, the user is usually confronted with the problem of not knowing whether the mesh generated is appropriate for the problem at hand. Since the accuracy of the finite element results is mesh dependent, mesh selection forms a very important step in the analysis. Indeed, in accurate analyses, meshes need to be refined or rezoned until the solution converges to a value so that the error is below a predetermined tolerance. A-posteriori methods use error indicators, developed by using the theory of interpolation and approximation theory, for mesh refinements. Some use other criterions, such as strain energy density variation and stress contours for example, to obtain near optimal meshes. Although these methods are adaptive, they are expensive. Alternatively, a priori methods, until now available, use geometrical parameters, for example, element aspect ratio. Therefore, they are not adaptive by nature. An adaptive a-priori method is developed. The criterion is that the minimization of the trace of the stiffness matrix with respect to the nodal coordinates, leads to a minimization of the potential energy, and as a consequence provide a good starting mesh. In a few examples the method is shown to provide the optimal mesh. The method is also shown to be relatively simple and amenable to development of computer algorithms. When the procedure is used in conjunction with a-posteriori methods of grid refinement, it is shown that fewer refinement iterations and fewer degrees of freedom are required for convergence as opposed to when the procedure is not used. The mesh obtained is shown to have uniform distribution of stiffness among the nodes and elements which, as a consequence, leads to uniform error distribution. Thus the mesh obtained meets the optimality criterion of uniform error distribution.

  16. Nuclear-Structure Data Relevant to Neutinoless-Double-Beta-Decay Matrix Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    An observation of neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the most exciting prospects in contemporary physics. It follows that calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for this process are of high priority. The change in the wave functions between the initial and final states of the neutrinoless-double-beta-decay candidates 76Ge-->76Se, 100Mo-->100Ru, 130Te-->130Xe, and 136Xe-->136Ba have been studied with transfer reactions. The data are focused on the change in the occupancies of the valence orbitals in the ground states as two neutrons decay into two protons. The results set a strict constraint on any theoretical calculations describing this rearrangement and thus on the magnitude of the nuclear matrix elements for this process, which currently exhibit uncertainties at the factor of 2-4 level. Prior to these measurements there were limited experimental data were available A = 76 and 100 systems, and very limited data for the A = 130 and 136 systems, in a large part due to the gaseous Xe isotopes involved. The uncertainties on most of these data are estimated to range from 0.1-0.3 nucleons. The program started with the A = 76 system, with subsequent calculations, modified to reproduce the experimental occupancies, exhibiting a significant reduction in the discrepancy between various models. New data are available for the A = 100 , 130, and 136 systems. I review the program, making detailed comparisons between the latest theoretical calculations and the experimental data where available. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  17. Minimizing matrix effect by femtosecond laser ablation and ionization in elemental determination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bochao; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2013-05-07

    Matrix effect is unavoidable in direct solid analysis, which usually is a leading cause of the nonstoichiometric effect in quantitative analysis. In this research, experiments were carried out to study the overall characteristics of atomization and ionization in laser-solid interaction. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers were applied in a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twenty-nine solid standards of ten different matrices, including six metals and four dielectrics, were analyzed. The results indicate that the fs-laser mode offers more stable relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) with irradiance higher than 7 × 10(13) W·cm(-2), which could be more reliable in the determination of element composition of solids. The matrix effect is reduced by half when the fs-laser is employed, owing to the fact that the fs-laser ablation and ionization (fs-LAI) incurs an almost heat-free ablation process and creates a dense plasma for the stable ionization.

  18. Leptonic CP phase determined by an equation involving PMNS matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Jia-Hui; Li, Xue-Qian

    2017-04-01

    Several approximate equalities among the matrix elements of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) and Pontecorvo–Maki–Nakagawa–Sakata (PMNS) matrices imply that hidden symmetries may exist and be common for both quark and neutrino sectors. The charge parity (CP) phase of the CKM matrix ({δ }{CKM}) is involved in these equalities and can be investigated when these equalities turn into several equations. As we substitute those experimentally measured values of the three mixing angles into the equations for quarks, it is noted that one of the equations which holds exactly has a solution {δ }{CKM}=({68.95}-1.15+1.15)^\\circ . That value accords with ({69.1}-3.85+2.02)^\\circ determined from available data. Generalizing the scenario to the lepton sector, the same equality determines the leptonic CP phase {δ }{PMNS} to be ({275.20}-1.15+1.15)^\\circ . Thus we predict the value of {δ }{PMNS} from the equation. So far there is no direct measurement on {δ }{PMNS}, but a recent analysis based on the neutrino oscillation data prefers a phase close to 270°.

  19. Open-Ended Recursive Approach for the Calculation of Multiphoton Absorption Matrix Elements.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ringholm, Magnus; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-03-10

    We present an implementation of single residues for response functions to arbitrary order using a recursive approach. Explicit expressions in terms of density-matrix-based response theory for the single residues of the linear, quadratic, cubic, and quartic response functions are also presented. These residues correspond to one-, two-, three- and four-photon transition matrix elements. The newly developed code is used to calculate the one-, two-, three- and four-photon absorption cross sections of para-nitroaniline and para-nitroaminostilbene, making this the first treatment of four-photon absorption in the framework of response theory. We find that the calculated multiphoton absorption cross sections are not very sensitive to the size of the basis set as long as a reasonably large basis set with diffuse functions is used. The choice of exchange-correlation functional, however, significantly affects the calculated cross sections of both charge-transfer transitions and other transitions, in particular, for the larger para-nitroaminostilbene molecule. We therefore recommend the use of a range-separated exchange-correlation functional in combination with the augmented correlation-consistent double-ζ basis set aug-cc-pVDZ for the calculation of multiphoton absorption properties.

  20. Open-Ended Recursive Approach for the Calculation of Multiphoton Absorption Matrix Elements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an implementation of single residues for response functions to arbitrary order using a recursive approach. Explicit expressions in terms of density-matrix-based response theory for the single residues of the linear, quadratic, cubic, and quartic response functions are also presented. These residues correspond to one-, two-, three- and four-photon transition matrix elements. The newly developed code is used to calculate the one-, two-, three- and four-photon absorption cross sections of para-nitroaniline and para-nitroaminostilbene, making this the first treatment of four-photon absorption in the framework of response theory. We find that the calculated multiphoton absorption cross sections are not very sensitive to the size of the basis set as long as a reasonably large basis set with diffuse functions is used. The choice of exchange–correlation functional, however, significantly affects the calculated cross sections of both charge-transfer transitions and other transitions, in particular, for the larger para-nitroaminostilbene molecule. We therefore recommend the use of a range-separated exchange–correlation functional in combination with the augmented correlation-consistent double-ζ basis set aug-cc-pVDZ for the calculation of multiphoton absorption properties. PMID:25821415

  1. Improved EPMA Trace Element Accuracy Using a Matrix Iterated Quantitative Blank Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, J. J.; Wark, D. A.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    At trace element levels below several hundred PPM, accuracy is more often the limiting factor for EPMA quantification rather than precision. Modern EPMA instruments equipped with low noise detectors, counting electronics and large area analyzing crystals can now routinely achieve sensitivities for most elements in the 10 to 100 PPM levels (or even lower). But due to various sample and instrumental artifacts in the x-ray continuum, absolute accuracy is often the limiting factor for ultra trace element quantification. These artifacts have various mechanisms, but are usually attributed to sample artifacts (e.g., sample matrix absorption edges)1, detector artifacts (e.g., Ar or Xe absorption edges) 2 and analyzing crystal artifacts (extended peak tails preventing accurate determination of the true background and ¡§negative peaks¡¨ or ¡§holes¡¨ in the x-ray continuum). The latter being first described3 by Self, et al. and recently documented for the Ti kÑ in quartz geo-thermometer. 4 Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Si () O () Total Average: -.00146 -.00031 -.00180 .00013 .00240 46.7430 53.2563 99.9983 Std Dev: .00069 .00075 .00036 .00190 .00117 .00000 .00168 .00419 The general magnitude of these artifacts can be seen in the above analyses of Ti ka in a synthetic quartz standard. The values for each spectrometer/crystal vary systematically from ¡V18 PPM to + 24 PPM. The exact mechanism for these continuum ¡§holes¡¨ is not known but may be related to secondary lattice diffraction occurring at certain Bragg angles depending on crystal mounting orientation for non-isometric analyzing crystals5. These x-ray continuum artifacts can produce systematic errors at levels up to 100 PPM or more depending on the particular analytical situation. In order to correct for these inaccuracies, a ¡§blank¡¨ correction has been developed that applies a quantitative correction to the measured x-ray intensities during the matrix iteration, by calculating the intensity

  2. High-Speed Operation of Interband Cascade Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Wright, Malcom W.; Farr, William H.; Yang, Rui Q.; Liu, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Optical sources operating in the atmospheric window of 3-5 microns are of particular interest for the development of free-space optical communication link. It is more advantageous to operate the free-space optical communication link in 3-5-microns atmospheric transmission window than at the telecom wavelength of 1.5 m due to lower optical scattering, scintillation, and background radiation. However, the realization of optical communications at the longer wavelength has encountered significant difficulties due to lack of adequate optical sources and detectors operating in the desirable wavelength regions. Interband Cascade (IC) lasers are novel semiconductor lasers that have a great potential for the realization of high-power, room-temperature optical sources in the 3-5-microns wavelength region, yet no experimental work, until this one, was done on high-speed direct modulation of IC lasers. Here, highspeed interband cascade laser, operating at wavelength 3.0 m, has been developed and the first direct measurement of the laser modulation bandwidth has been performed using a unique, highspeed quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP). The developed laser has modulation bandwidth exceeding 3 GHz. This constitutes a significant increase of the IC laser modulation bandwidth over currently existing devices. This result has demonstrated suitability of IC lasers as a mid-IR light source for multi-GHz free-space optical communications links

  3. Complex Type-II Interband Cascade MQW Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui

    2007-01-01

    Multiple-quantum-well (MQW) photodetectors of a proposed type would contain active regions comprising multiple superlattice subregions. These devices would have complex structures: The superlattice of each subregion would be designed for enhanced absorption of photons in a desired wavelength band (typically in the infrared) and multiple subregions of different design would be cascaded for multicolor operation. The designs of these photodetectors would take advantage of the characteristic alignment of the edges of the electron-energy bands in type-II quantum-well structures: Within each finite superlattice, interband transitions would be used for detecting photons, and between finite superlattices, intraband relaxation and interband tunneling would be used for transport of charge carriers, all such as to enable detection of normally incident photons. Absorption of photons in the active region of a photodetector according to the proposal could be significantly enhanced by designing the superlattice/MQW structures to contain closely spaced energy states. The photodetector could be operated with a small bias to facilitate transport of charge carriers. The superlattices could be somewhat chirped, with a preferred transport direction.

  4. Heavy-ion double charge exchange reactions: A tool toward 0 νββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta decay is fundamental for neutrino physics. In this paper, an innovative technique to extract information on the nuclear matrix elements by measuring the cross section of a double charge exchange nuclear reaction is proposed. The basic point is that the initial- and final-state wave functions in the two processes are the same and the transition operators are similar. The double charge exchange cross sections can be factorized in a nuclear structure term containing the matrix elements and a nuclear reaction factor. First pioneering experimental results for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV incident energy show that such cross section factorization reasonably holds for the crucial 0+ → 0+ transition to 40Args, at least at very forward angles.

  5. Genetic Organization of Interphase Chromosome Bands and Interbands in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Zhimulev, Igor F.; Zykova, Tatyana Yu.; Goncharov, Fyodor P.; Khoroshko, Varvara A.; Demakova, Olga V.; Semeshin, Valeriy F.; Pokholkova, Galina V.; Boldyreva, Lidiya V.; Demidova, Darya S.; Babenko, Vladimir N.; Demakov, Sergey A.; Belyaeva, Elena S.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes display specific banding pattern; the underlying genetic organization of this pattern has remained elusive for many years. In the present paper, we analyze 32 cytology-mapped polytene chromosome interbands. We estimated molecular locations of these interbands, described their molecular and genetic organization and demonstrate that polytene chromosome interbands contain the 5′ ends of housekeeping genes. As a rule, interbands display preferential “head-to-head” orientation of genes. They are enriched for “broad” class promoters characteristic of housekeeping genes and associate with open chromatin proteins and Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) components. In two regions, 10A and 100B, coding sequences of genes whose 5′-ends reside in interbands map to constantly loosely compacted, early-replicating, so-called “grey” bands. Comparison of expression patterns of genes mapping to late-replicating dense bands vs genes whose promoter regions map to interbands shows that the former are generally tissue-specific, whereas the latter are represented by ubiquitously active genes. Analysis of RNA-seq data (modENCODE-FlyBase) indicates that transcripts from interband-mapping genes are present in most tissues and cell lines studied, across most developmental stages and upon various treatment conditions. We developed a special algorithm to computationally process protein localization data generated by the modENCODE project and show that Drosophila genome has about 5700 sites that demonstrate all the features shared by the interbands cytologically mapped to date. PMID:25072930

  6. Matrix elements in the coupled-cluster approach - With application to low-lying states in Li

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ynnerman, Anders

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is suggested for evaluating matrix elements of an operator between wavefunctions in the coupled-cluster form. The use of the exponential ansatz leads to compact exponential expressions also for matrix elements. Algorithms are developed for summing all effects of one-particle clusters and certain chains of two-particle clusters (containing the well-known random-phase approximation as a subset). The treatment of one-particle perturbations in single valence states is investigated in detail. As examples the oscillator strength for the 2s-2p transition in Li as well as the hyperfine structure for the two states are studied and compared to earlier work.

  7. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  8. LATTICE MATRIX ELEMENTS AND CP VIOLATION IN B AND KA PHYSICS: STATUS AND OUTLOOK.

    SciTech Connect

    SONI,A.

    2003-01-03

    Status of lattice calculations of hadron matrix elements along with CP violation in B and in K systems is reviewed. Lattice has provided useful input which, in conjunction with experimental data, leads to the conclusion that CP-odd phase in the CKM matrix plays the dominant role in the observed asymmetry in B {yields} {psi}K{sub s}. It is now quite likely that any beyond the SM, CP-odd, phase will cause only small deviations in B-physics. Search for the effects of the new phase(s) will consequently require very large data samples as well as very precise theoretical predictions. Clean determination of all the angles of the unitarity triangle therefore becomes essential. In this regard B {yields} KD{sup 0} processes play a unique role. Regarding K-decays, remarkable progress made by theory with regard to maintenance of chiral symmetry on the lattice is briefly discussed. First application already provide quantitative information on B{sub K} and the {Delta}I = 1/2 rule. The enhancement in ReA{sub 0} appears to arise solely from tree operators, esp. Q{sub 2}; penguin contribution to ReA{sub 0} appears to be very small. However, improved calculations are necessary for {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} as there the contributions of QCD penguins and electroweak penguins largely seem to cancel. There are good reasons, though, to believe that these cancellations will not survive improvements that are now underway. Importance of determining the unitarity triangle purely from K-decays is also emphasized.

  9. Pulsed and CW performance of 7-stage interband cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Canedy, Chadwick L; Abell, Joshua; Merritt, Charles D; Bewley, William W; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Mijin; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R

    2014-04-07

    We report a narrow-ridge interband cascade laser emitting at λ ≈3.5 μm that produces up to 592 mW of cw power with a wallplug efficiency of 10.1% and beam quality factor of M(2) = 3.7 at T = 25 °C. A pulsed cavity length study of broad-area lasers from the same wafer confirms that the 7-stage structure with thicker separate confinement layers has a reduced internal loss of ≈3 cm(-1). More generally, devices from a large number of wafers with similar 7-stage designs and wavelengths spanning 2.95-4.7 μm exhibit consistently higher pulsed external differential quantum efficiencies than earlier state-of-the-art ICLs.

  10. Single-Mode, Distributed Feedback Interband Cascade Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frez, Clifford F. (Inventor); Borgentun, Carl E. (Inventor); Briggs, Ryan M. (Inventor); Bagheri, Mahmood (Inventor); Forouhar, Siamak (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Single-mode, distributed feedback interband cascade lasers (ICLs) using distributed-feedback gratings (e.g., lateral Bragg gratings) and methods of fabricating such ICLs are provided. The ICLs incorporate distributed-feedback gratings that are formed above the laser active region and adjacent the ridge waveguide (RWG) of the ICL. The ICLs may incorporate a double-ridge system comprising an optical confinement structure (e.g., a RWG) disposed above the laser active region that comprises the first ridge of the double ridge system, a DFB grating (e.g., lateral Bragg grating) disposed above the laser active region and adjacent the optical confinement structure, and an electric confinement structure that passes at least partially through the laser active region and that defines the boundary of the second ridge comprises and the termination of the DFB grating.

  11. On the modified active region design of interband cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, M.; Ryczko, K.; Dyksik, M.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Weih, R.; Dallner, M.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-28

    Type II InAs/GaInSb quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaSb or InAs substrates and designed to be integrated in the active region of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the mid infrared have been investigated. Optical spectroscopy, combined with band structure calculations, has been used to probe their electronic properties. A design with multiple InAs QWs has been compared with the more common double W-shaped QW and it has been demonstrated that it allows red shifting the emission wavelength and enhancing the transition oscillator strength. This can be beneficial for the improvements of the ICLs performances, especially when considering their long-wavelength operation.

  12. Automated evaluation of matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions: A Mathematica version of the FRODO program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2013-02-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO), formerly developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme, has been rewritten in Mathematica. New version : A program summaryProgram title: FRODO Catalogue identifier: ADV Y _v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3878 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 170729 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which the Mathematica computer algebra system can be installed Operating system: Linux Classification: 5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADV Y _v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 171(2005)63 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No Nature of problem. In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICFs) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The previous formulation of such matrix elements in the MuPAD computer algebra system, has been rewritten using Mathematica. Solution method: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICFs and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Reasons for new version: Some years ago we published in this journal a couple of papers [1, 2

  13. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements.

  14. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  15. Calculating three loop ladder and V-topologies for massive operator matrix elements by computer algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; von Manteuffel, A.; Schneider, C.

    2016-05-01

    Three loop ladder and V-topology diagrams contributing to the massive operator matrix element AQg are calculated. The corresponding objects can all be expressed in terms of nested sums and recurrences depending on the Mellin variable N and the dimensional parameter ε. Given these representations, the desired Laurent series expansions in ε can be obtained with the help of our computer algebra toolbox. Here we rely on generalized hypergeometric functions and Mellin-Barnes representations, on difference ring algorithms for symbolic summation, on an optimized version of the multivariate Almkvist-Zeilberger algorithm for symbolic integration, and on new methods to calculate Laurent series solutions of coupled systems of differential equations. The solutions can be computed for general coefficient matrices directly for any basis also performing the expansion in the dimensional parameter in case it is expressible in terms of indefinite nested product-sum expressions. This structural result is based on new results of our difference ring theory. In the cases discussed we deal with iterative sum- and integral-solutions over general alphabets. The final results are expressed in terms of special sums, forming quasi-shuffle algebras, such as nested harmonic sums, generalized harmonic sums, and nested binomially weighted (cyclotomic) sums. Analytic continuations to complex values of N are possible through the recursion relations obeyed by these quantities and their analytic asymptotic expansions. The latter lead to a host of new constants beyond the multiple zeta values, the infinite generalized harmonic and cyclotomic sums in the case of V-topologies.

  16. Theoretical uncertainties in the nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay: The transition operator

    SciTech Connect

    Menéndez, Javier

    2013-12-30

    We explore the theoretical uncertainties related to the transition operator of neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay. The transition operator used in standard calculations is a product of one-body currents, that can be obtained phenomenologically as in Tomoda [1] or Šimkovic et al. [2]. However, corrections to the operator are hard to obtain in the phenomenological approach. Instead, we calculate the 0νββ decay operator in the framework of chiral effective theory (EFT), which gives a systematic order-by-order expansion of the transition currents. At leading orders in chiral EFT we reproduce the standard one-body currents of Refs. [1] and [2]. Corrections appear as two-body (2b) currents predicted by chiral EFT. We compute the effects of the leading 2b currents to the nuclear matrix elements of 0νββ decay for several transition candidates. The 2b current contributions are related to the quenching of Gamow-Teller transitions found in nuclear structure calculations.

  17. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Adam Paul

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb-1 dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t$\\bar{t}$ and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb-1 dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 ± 2.6(stat) ± 3.3(syst) GeV/c2 from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 178 GTeV/c2 and 3.1 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 172.5 GeV/c2. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  18. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  19. Fast calculation of the sensitivity matrix in magnetic induction tomography by tetrahedral edge finite elements and the reciprocity theorem.

    PubMed

    Hollaus, K; Magele, C; Merwa, R; Scharfetter, H

    2004-02-01

    Magnetic induction tomography of biological tissue is used to reconstruct the changes in the complex conductivity distribution by measuring the perturbation of an alternating primary magnetic field. To facilitate the sensitivity analysis and the solution of the inverse problem a fast calculation of the sensitivity matrix, i.e. the Jacobian matrix, which maps the changes of the conductivity distribution onto the changes of the voltage induced in a receiver coil, is needed. The use of finite differences to determine the entries of the sensitivity matrix does not represent a feasible solution because of the high computational costs of the basic eddy current problem. Therefore, the reciprocity theorem was exploited. The basic eddy current problem was simulated by the finite element method using symmetric tetrahedral edge elements of second order. To test the method various simulations were carried out and discussed.

  20. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q-) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, ( {< {| {H_ab } |^2 } > } )^{1/2} = 6.7 {mH}, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, | {H_ab } | = 3.8 {mH}. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q- in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  1. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  2. Matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator between kaon and pion states

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, I.; Lubicz, V.; Martinelli, G.; Orifici, L.; Simula, S.

    2011-10-01

    We compute the matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator sF{sub {mu}{nu}}{sigma}{sup {mu}{nu}}d between kaon and pion states, using lattice QCD with maximally twisted-mass fermions and two flavors of dynamical quarks (N{sub f}=2). The operator is renormalized nonperturbatively in the RI'/MOM scheme and our simulations cover pion masses as light as 270 MeV and three values of the lattice spacing from {approx_equal}0.07 up to {approx_equal}0.1 fm. At the physical point our result for the corresponding tensor form factor at zero-momentum transfer is f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.417(14{sub stat})(5{sub syst}), where the systematic error does not include the effect of quenching the strange and charm quarks. Our result differs significantly from the old quenched result f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.78(6) obtained by the SPQ{sub cd}R Collaboration with pion masses above 500 MeV. We investigate the source of this difference and conclude that it is mainly related to the chiral extrapolation. We also study the tensor charge of the pion and obtain the value f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.195(8{sub stat})(6{sub syst}) in good agreement with, but more accurate than the result f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.216(34) obtained by the QCDSF Collaboration using higher pion masses.

  3. Interband polarized absorption in InP polytypic superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Faria Junior, P. E.; Sipahi, G. M.; Campos, T.

    2014-11-21

    Recent advances in growth techniques have allowed the fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures with mixed wurtzite/zinc-blende crystal phases. Although the optical characterization of these polytypic structures is well reported in the literature, a deeper theoretical understanding of how crystal phase mixing and quantum confinement change the output linear light polarization is still needed. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the mixing effects of wurtzite and zinc-blende phases on the interband absorption and in the degree of light polarization of an InP polytypic superlattice. We use a single 8 × 8 k⋅p Hamiltonian that describes both crystal phases. Quantum confinement is investigated by changing the size of the polytypic unit cell. We also include the optical confinement effect due to the dielectric mismatch between the superlattice and the vaccum and we show it to be necessary to match experimental results. Our calculations for large wurtzite concentrations and small quantum confinement explain the optical trends of recent photoluminescence excitation measurements. Furthermore, we find a high sensitivity to zinc-blende concentrations in the degree of linear polarization. This sensitivity can be reduced by increasing quantum confinement. In conclusion, our theoretical analysis provides an explanation for optical trends in InP polytypic superlattices, and shows that the interplay of crystal phase mixing and quantum confinement is an area worth exploring for light polarization engineering.

  4. Direct measurement of excited-state dipole matrix elements using electromagnetically induced transparency in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Daniel J.; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2016-04-01

    Applying large magnetic fields to gain access to the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime can isolate three-level systems in a hot alkali metal vapors, thereby simplifying usually complex atom-light interactions. We use this method to make the first direct measurement of the |<5 P ||e r ||5 D >| matrix element in 87Rb. An analytic model with only three levels accurately models the experimental electromagnetically induced transparency spectra and extracted Rabi frequencies are used to determine the dipole matrix element. We measure |<5 P3 /2||e r ||5 D5 /2>| =(2.290 ±0 .002stat±0 .04syst) e a0 , which is in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations of Safronova, Williams, and Clark [Phys. Rev. A 69, 022509 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevA.69.022509].

  5. A single Lanczos propagation method for calculating transition amplitudes. III. S-matrix elements with a complex-symmetric Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenmin; Li, Guohui; Guo, Hua

    2001-12-01

    The recently proposed single Lanczos propagation method [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 9944 (1999); ibid. 114, 1467 (2001)] is extended to complex-symmetric Hamiltonians. It is shown that the complex-symmetric Lanczos algorithm possesses several useful numerical properties similar to those observed in real-symmetric cases, which enable one to compute multiple transition amplitudes with a single Lanczos propagation. The usefulness of the method is illustrated in calculating the S-matrix elements for the collinear H+H2 reaction.

  6. 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements with self-consistent short-range correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Simkovic, Fedor; Faessler, Amand; Muether, Herbert; Rodin, Vadim; Stauf, Markus

    2009-05-15

    A self-consistent calculation of nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double-beta decays (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 128}Te, {sup 130}Te, and {sup 136}Xe is presented in the framework of the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (RQRPA) and the standard QRPA. The pairing and residual interactions as well as the two-nucleon short-range correlations are for the first time derived from the same modern realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, namely, from the charge-dependent Bonn potential (CD-Bonn) and the Argonne V18 potential. In a comparison with the traditional approach of using the Miller-Spencer Jastrow correlations, matrix elements for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay are obtained that are larger in magnitude. We analyze the differences among various two-nucleon correlations including those of the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM) and quantify the uncertainties in the calculated 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix elements.

  7. Analytical O (αs) corrections to the beam frame double-spin density matrix elements of e+e-→t t ¯

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldamäe, L.; Groote, S.; Körner, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    We provide analytical results for the O (αs) corrections to the double-spin density matrix elements in the reaction e+e-→t t ¯ . These concern the elements l l , l t , l n , t t , t n , and n n of the double-spin density matrix elements where l , t , n stand for longitudinal, transverse and normal orientations with respect to the beam frame spanned by the electron and the top quark momentum.

  8. Energy levels and transition probability matrix elements of ruby for maser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berwin, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Program computes fine structure energy levels of ruby as a function of magnetic field. Included in program is matrix formulation, each row of which contains a magnetic field and four corresponding energy levels.

  9. Efficient formulation of robust hybrid elements using orthogonal stress/strain interpolants and admissible matrix formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, K. Y.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of using orthogonal constant and higher order stress modes in formulating efficient hybrid elements by equipping the primary idea of Bergan and Hanssen (1975). Two sample elements modified from Pian-Sumihara 5-beta plane and Pian-Tong 18-beta hexahedral assumed contravariant stress elements are derived. With the suggested admissible simplifications of the flexibility matrices incorporated into the two new elements, new plane and hexahedral elements requiring respectively no and a negligible amount of computing efforts for inverting the flexibility matrices are formed. All proposed elements are stable, invariant, contain no empirically determined factor and strictly pass the patch test. Popular benchmark problems are studied and the accuracy of the proposed elements is close to their parent models.

  10. Efficient and precise calculation of the b-matrix elements in diffusion-weighted imaging pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkov, Mikhail; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Price, William S.

    2014-06-01

    Precise NMR diffusion measurements require detailed knowledge of the cumulative dephasing effect caused by the numerous gradient pulses present in most NMR pulse sequences. This effect, which ultimately manifests itself as the diffusion-related NMR signal attenuation, is usually described by the b-value or the b-matrix in the case of multidirectional diffusion weighting, the latter being common in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging. Neglecting some of the gradient pulses introduces an error in the calculated diffusion coefficient reaching in some cases 100% of the expected value. Therefore, ensuring the b-matrix calculation includes all the known gradient pulses leads to significant error reduction. Calculation of the b-matrix for simple gradient waveforms is rather straightforward, yet it grows cumbersome when complexly shaped and/or numerous gradient pulses are introduced. Making three broad assumptions about the gradient pulse arrangement in a sequence results in an efficient framework for calculation of b-matrices as well providing some insight into optimal gradient pulse placement. The framework allows accounting for the diffusion-sensitising effect of complexly shaped gradient waveforms with modest computational time and power. This is achieved by using the b-matrix elements of the simple unmodified pulse sequence and minimising the integration of the complexly shaped gradient waveform in the modified sequence. Such re-evaluation of the b-matrix elements retains all the analytical relevance of the straightforward approach, yet at least halves the amount of symbolic integration required. The application of the framework is demonstrated with the evaluation of the expression describing the diffusion-sensitizing effect, caused by different bipolar gradient pulse modules.

  11. Efficient and precise calculation of the b-matrix elements in diffusion-weighted imaging pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, Mikhail; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Price, William S

    2014-06-01

    Precise NMR diffusion measurements require detailed knowledge of the cumulative dephasing effect caused by the numerous gradient pulses present in most NMR pulse sequences. This effect, which ultimately manifests itself as the diffusion-related NMR signal attenuation, is usually described by the b-value or the b-matrix in the case of multidirectional diffusion weighting, the latter being common in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging. Neglecting some of the gradient pulses introduces an error in the calculated diffusion coefficient reaching in some cases 100% of the expected value. Therefore, ensuring the b-matrix calculation includes all the known gradient pulses leads to significant error reduction. Calculation of the b-matrix for simple gradient waveforms is rather straightforward, yet it grows cumbersome when complexly shaped and/or numerous gradient pulses are introduced. Making three broad assumptions about the gradient pulse arrangement in a sequence results in an efficient framework for calculation of b-matrices as well providing some insight into optimal gradient pulse placement. The framework allows accounting for the diffusion-sensitising effect of complexly shaped gradient waveforms with modest computational time and power. This is achieved by using the b-matrix elements of the simple unmodified pulse sequence and minimising the integration of the complexly shaped gradient waveform in the modified sequence. Such re-evaluation of the b-matrix elements retains all the analytical relevance of the straightforward approach, yet at least halves the amount of symbolic integration required. The application of the framework is demonstrated with the evaluation of the expression describing the diffusion-sensitizing effect, caused by different bipolar gradient pulse modules.

  12. Effective elastoplastic behavior of two-phase ductile matrix composites: Return mapping algorithm and finite element implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, J.W.; Tseng, K.H.

    1995-12-31

    Discrete numerical integration algorithm is employed to integrate rate equations in the effective elastoplastic model for particle reinforced ductile matrix composites based on probabilistic micromechanical formulations. In particular, the unconditionally stable implicit backward Euler integration algorithm is formulated for elastoplasticity of particle reinforced plastic matrix composites. In addition to the local integration algorithm, in nonlinear finite element methods for boundary value problems, tangent moduli are needed for the global Newton`s iterations. For this purpose, the continuum tangent operator based on the continuous rate equations is derived. In order to preserve the quadratic rate of convergence, the consistent tangent operator is constructed based on the proposed backward Euler integration algorithm. The elastoplastic model is further extended to accommodate the effect of viscosity in the matrix. The extension is based on the method of Duvaut-Lions viscoplasticity. The local integration algorithm and the consistent tangent operator are formulated for particle reinforced viscoplastic matrix composites. Numerical experiments are performed to assess the capability of the proposed integration algorithm and the convergence behavior of various tangent moduli.

  13. Protein composition of interband regions in polytene and cell line chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite many efforts, little is known about distribution and interactions of chromatin proteins which contribute to the specificity of chromomeric organization of interphase chromosomes. To address this issue, we used publicly available datasets from several recent Drosophila genome-wide mapping and annotation projects, in particular, those from modENCODE project, and compared molecular organization of 13 interband regions which were accurately mapped previously. Results Here we demonstrate that in interphase chromosomes of Drosophila cell lines, the interband regions are enriched for a specific set of proteins generally characteristic of the "open" chromatin (RNA polymerase II, CHRIZ (CHRO), BEAF-32, BRE1, dMI-2, GAF, NURF301, WDS and TRX). These regions also display reduced nucleosome density, histone H1 depletion and pronounced enrichment for ORC2, a pre-replication complex component. Within the 13 interband regions analyzed, most were around 3-4 kb long, particularly those where many of said protein features were present. We estimate there are about 3500 regions with similar properties in chromosomes of D. melanogaster cell lines, which fits quite well the number of cytologically observed interbands in salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Conclusions Our observations suggest strikingly similar organization of interband chromatin in polytene chromosomes and in chromosomes from cell lines thereby reflecting the existence of a universal principle of interphase chromosome organization. PMID:22093916

  14. Computation of scattering matrix elements of large and complex shaped absorbing particles with multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yueqian; Yang, Minglin; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2015-05-01

    Light scattering properties of absorbing particles, such as the mineral dusts, attract a wide attention due to its importance in geophysical and environment researches. Due to the absorbing effect, light scattering properties of particles with absorption differ from those without absorption. Simple shaped absorbing particles such as spheres and spheroids have been well studied with different methods but little work on large complex shaped particles has been reported. In this paper, the surface Integral Equation (SIE) with Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) is applied to study scattering properties of large non-spherical absorbing particles. SIEs are carefully discretized with piecewise linear basis functions on triangle patches to model whole surface of the particle, hence computation resource needs increase much more slowly with the particle size parameter than the volume discretized methods. To improve further its capability, MLFMA is well parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed memory computer platform. Without loss of generality, we choose the computation of scattering matrix elements of absorbing dust particles as an example. The comparison of the scattering matrix elements computed by our method and the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA) for an ellipsoid dust particle shows that the precision of our method is very good. The scattering matrix elements of large ellipsoid dusts with different aspect ratios and size parameters are computed. To show the capability of the presented algorithm for complex shaped particles, scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 600 of complex refractive index m = 1.555 + 0.004 i and different orientations are studied.

  15. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    SciTech Connect

    Agodi, C. Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.; Cappuzzello, F.; Greco, V.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Longhitano, F.; Branchina, V.; Foti, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2015-10-28

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  16. General formulation of rovibrational kinetic energy operators and matrix elements in internal bond-angle coordinates using factorized Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Wassja A.; Leonhard, Kai

    2016-12-01

    We show how inverse metric tensors and rovibrational kinetic energy operators in terms of internal bond-angle coordinates can be obtained analytically following a factorization of the Jacobian worked out by Frederick and Woywod. The structure of these Jacobians is exploited in two ways: On one hand, the elements of the metric tensor as well as its determinant all have the form ∑rmsin (αn) cos (βo) . This form can be preserved by working with the adjugate metric tensor that can be obtained without divisions. On the other hand, the adjugate can be obtained with less effort by exploiting the lower triangular structure of the Jacobians. Together with a suitable choice of the wavefunction, we avoid singularities and show how to obtain analytical expressions for the rovibrational kinetic energy matrix elements.

  17. Solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for matrix removal in trace element assay of actinide materials.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Manard, Benjamin T; Castro, Alonso; Montoya, Dennis P; Xu, Ning; Chamberlin, Rebecca M

    2017-05-15

    Advances in sample nebulization and injection technology have significantly reduced the volume of solution required for trace impurity analysis in plutonium and uranium materials. Correspondingly, we have designed and tested a novel chip-based microfluidic platform, containing a 100-µL or 20-µL solid-phase microextraction column, packed by centrifugation, which supports nuclear material mass and solution volume reductions of 90% or more compared to standard methods. Quantitative recovery of 28 trace elements in uranium was demonstrated using a UTEVA chromatographic resin column, and trace element recovery from thorium (a surrogate for plutonium) was similarly demonstrated using anion exchange resin AG MP-1. Of nine materials tested, compatibility of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chips with the strong nitric acid media was highest. The microcolumns can be incorporated into a variety of devices and systems, and can be loaded with other solid-phase resins for trace element assay in high-purity metals.

  18. Probing interband coulomb interactions in semiconductor nanostructures with 2D double-quantum coherence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Velizhanin, Kirill A; Piryatinski, Andrei

    2011-05-12

    Employing the interband exciton scattering model, we have derived a closed set of equations determining the 2D double-quantum coherence signal sensitive to the interband Coulomb interactions (i.e., many-body Coulomb interactions leading to the couplings between exciton and biexciton bands) in semiconductor nanostructures such as nanocrystals, quantum wires, wells, and carbon nanotubes. Our general analysis of 2D double-quantum coherence resonances has demonstrated that the interband Coulomb interactions lead to new cross-peaks whose appearance can be interpreted as a result of exciton and biexciton state mixing. The presence of the strongly coupled resonant states and weakly coupled background of off-resonant states can significantly simplify cross-peak analysis by eliminating the congested background spectrum. Our simulations of the 2D double-quantum coherence signal in PbSe NCs have validated this approach.

  19. A static analysis of metal matrix composite spur gear by three-dimensional finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, N.; Vijayarangan, S.

    1993-03-01

    A number of engineering components have recently been made using metal matrix composite (MMC) materials, due to their overwhelming advantages, such as light weight high strength, higher dimensional stability and minimal attack by environment, when compared with polymer-based composite materials, even though the cost of MMCs are very high. Power transmission gears are one such area able to make use of MMC materials. Here an attempt is made to study and compare the performance of gears made of MMC materials with that of conventional steel material gears. It may be concluded from this study that MMC materials are highly suitable for making gears that are to transmit even fairly large power.

  20. Short-distance matrix elements for D-meson mixing for 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia Cheng

    We study the short-distance hadronic matrix elements for D-meson mixing with partially quenched Nf = 2+1 lattice QCD. We use a large set of the MIMD Lattice Computation Collaboration's gauge configurations with a2 tadpole-improved staggered sea quarks and tadpole-improved Luscher-Weisz gluons. We use the a2 tadpole-improved action for valence light quarks and the Sheikoleslami-Wohlert action with the Fermilab interpretation for the valence charm quark. Our calculation covers the complete set of five operators needed to constrain new physics models for D-meson mixing. We match our matrix elements to the MS-NDR scheme evaluated at 3GeV. We report values for the Beneke-Buchalla-Greub-Lenz-Nierste choice of evanescent operators and obtain / mD = 0.042(4)GeV3, /mD = -0.078(4)GeV3, < O3>/mD = 0.033(2)GeV 3, /mD = 0.155(10)GeV3, /mD = 0.058(6)GeV3.

  1. All fiber optical inter-band router for broadband wavelength division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Shin, W; Han, S; Park, C; Oh, K

    2004-05-03

    We propose a new type of all-fiber device for inter-band router using a novel hybrid waveguide-MEMS technology. Both continuous and discrete band-routing functions are realized by precise twist control over the fused coupling region, which results in pi phase shift between the output ports. Experimentally we demonstrate inter-band routing functions between O and C-band as well as between E and L-band with a low insertion loss, wide bandwidth of operation, high channel isolation and fast response.

  2. Pericellular Matrix Mechanics in the Anulus Fibrosus Predicted by a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Model and In Situ Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li; Guilak, Farshid; Setton, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Anulus fibrosus (AF) cells have been demonstrated to exhibit dramatic differences in morphology and biologic responses to different types of mechanical stimuli. AF cells may reside as single cell, paired or multiple cells in a contiguous pericellular matrix (PCM), whose structure and properties are expected to have a significant influence on the mechanical stimuli that these cells may experience during physiologic loading of the spine, as well as in tissue degeneration and regeneration. In this study, a computational model was developed to predict the micromechanical stimuli, such as stress and strain, fluid pressure and flow, of cells and their surrounding PCM in the AF tissue using three-dimensional (3D) finite element models based on in situ morphology. 3D solid geometries of cell-PCM regions were registered from serial confocal images obtained from mature rat AF tissues by custom codes. Distinct cell-matrix units were modeled with a custom 3D biphasic finite element code (COMSOL Multiphysics), and simulated to experience uni-axial tensile strain along the local collagen fiber direction. AF cells were predicted to experience higher volumetric strain with a strain amplification ratio (relative to that in the extracellular matrix) of ~ 3.1 – 3.8 at equilibrium, as compared to the PCM domains (1.3 – 1.9). The strain concentrations were generally found at the cell/PCM interface and stress concentration at the PCM/ECM interface. Increased numbers of cells within a contiguous PCM was associated with an apparent increase of strain levels and decreased rate of fluid pressurization in the cell, with magnitudes dependent on the cell size, shape and relative position inside the PCM. These studies provide spatio-temporal information on micromechanics of AF cells in understanding the mechanotransduction in the intervertebral disc. PMID:19946619

  3. Matrix equation decomposition and parallel solution of systems resulting from unstructured finite element problems in electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    Finite element modeling has proven useful for accurately simulating scattered or radiated electromagnetic fields from complex three-dimensional objects whose geometry varies on the scale of a fraction of an electrical wavelength. An unstructured finite element model of realistic objects leads to a large, sparse, system of equations that needs to be solved efficiently with regard to machine memory and execution time. Both factorization and iterative solvers can be used to produce solutions to these systems of equations. Factorization leads to high memory requirements that limit the electrical problem size of three-dimensional objects that can be modeled. An iterative solver can be used to efficiently solve the system without excessive memory use and in a minimal amount of time if the convergence rate is controlled.

  4. Solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for matrix removal in trace element assay of actinide materials

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Jun; Manard, Benjamin Thomas; Castro, Alonso; ...

    2017-02-02

    Advances in sample nebulization and injection technology have significantly reduced the volume of solution required for trace impurity analysis in plutonium and uranium materials. Correspondingly, we have designed and tested a novel chip-based microfluidic platform, containing a 100-µL or 20-µL solid-phase microextraction column, packed by centrifugation, which supports nuclear material mass and solution volume reductions of 90% or more compared to standard methods. Quantitative recovery of 28 trace elements in uranium was demonstrated using a UTEVA chromatographic resin column, and trace element recovery from thorium (a surrogate for plutonium) was similarly demonstrated using anion exchange resin AG MP-1. Of ninemore » materials tested, compatibility of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chips with the strong nitric acid media was highest. Finally, the microcolumns can be incorporated into a variety of devices and systems, and can be loaded with other solid-phase resins for trace element assay in high-purity metals.« less

  5. Notch Sensitivity of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Tensile Loading: An Experimental, Analytical, and Finite Element Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haque, A.; Ahmed, L.; Ware, T.; Jeelani, S.; Verrilli, Michael J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The stress concentrations associated with circular notches and subjected to uniform tensile loading in woven ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) have been investigated for high-efficient turbine engine applications. The CMC's were composed of Nicalon silicon carbide woven fabric in SiNC matrix manufactured through polymer impregnation process (PIP). Several combinations of hole diameter/plate width ratios and ply orientations were considered in this study. In the first part, the stress concentrations were calculated measuring strain distributions surrounding the hole using strain gages at different locations of the specimens during the initial portion of the stress-strain curve before any microdamage developed. The stress concentration was also calculated analytically using Lekhnitskii's solution for orthotropic plates. A finite-width correction factor for anisotropic and orthotropic composite plate was considered. The stress distributions surrounding the circular hole of a CMC's plate were further studied using finite element analysis. Both solid and shell elements were considered. The experimental results were compared with both the analytical and finite element solutions. Extensive optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations were carried out for identifying the fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of both the notched and notched specimens. The stress concentration factors (SCF) determined by analytical method overpredicted the experimental results. But the numerical solution underpredicted the experimental SCF. Stress concentration factors are shown to increase with enlarged hole size and the effects of ply orientations on stress concentration factors are observed to be negligible. In all the cases, the crack initiated at the notch edge and propagated along the width towards the edge of the specimens.

  6. An Investigation of Reliability Models for Ceramic Matrix Composites and their Implementation into Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of modeling approaches for the failure analysis of ceramic-based material systems used in high temperature environments was the primary objective of this research effort. These materials have the potential to support many key engineering technologies related to the design of aeropropulsion systems. Monolithic ceramics exhibit a number of useful properties such as retention of strength at high temperatures, chemical inertness, and low density. However, the use of monolithic ceramics has been limited by their inherent brittleness and a large variation in strength. This behavior has motivated material scientists to reinforce the monolithic material with a ceramic fiber. The addition of a second ceramic phase with an optimized interface increases toughness and marginally increases strength. The primary purpose of the fiber is to arrest crack growth, not to increase strength. The material systems of interest in this research effort were laminated ceramic matrix composites, as well as two- and three- dimensional fabric reinforced ceramic composites. These emerging composite systems can compete with metals in many demanding applications. However, the ongoing metamorphosis of ceramic composite material systems, and the lack of standardized design data has in the past tended to minimize research efforts related to structural analysis. Many structural components fabricated from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have been designed by "trial and error." The justification for this approach lies in the fact that during the initial developmental phases for a material system fabrication issues are paramount. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating feasibility rather than fully understanding the processes controlling mechanical behavior. This is understandable during periods of rapid improvements in material properties for any composite system. But to avoid the ad hoc approach, the analytical methods developed under this effort can be used to develop rational structural

  7. Circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'kov, V. V.; Ganichev, S. D.; Schneider, Petra; Back, C.; Oestreich, M.; Rudolph, J.; Hägele, D.; Golub, L. E.; Wegscheider, W.; Prettl, W.

    2003-11-01

    We observed a circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) in GaAs quantum wells at inter-band excitation. The spectral dependence of the CPGE is measured together with that of the polarization degree of the time-resolved photoluminescence. A theoretical model takes into account spin splitting of conduction and valence bands.

  8. Charge-transfer contributions to the excitonic coupling matrix element in BODIPY-based energy transfer cassettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, J. Dominik; Lyskov, Igor; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Marian, Christel M.

    2017-01-01

    BODIPY-based dyads serve as model systems for the investigation of excitation energy transfer (EET). Through-space EET is brought about by direct and exchange interactions between the transition densities of donor and acceptor localized states. The presence of a molecular linker gives rise to additional charge transfer (CT) contributions. Here, we present a novel approach for the calculation of the excitonic coupling matrix element (ECME) including CT contributions which is based on supermolecular one-electron transition density matrices (STD). The validity of the approach is assessed for a model system of two π -stacked ethylene molecules at varying intermolecular separation. Wave functions and electronic excitation energies of five EET cassettes comprising anthracene as exciton donor and BODIPY as exciton acceptor are obtained by the redesigned combined density functional theory and multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI-R) method. CT contributions to the ECME are shown to be important in the covalently linked EET cassettes.

  9. Calculation of the covariant matrix elements, and cross-sections of Compton diffusion on a bound electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Saleh, Salwa

    2016-10-01

    This paper completes a previous published work that calculated analytically the relativistic wavefunctions for bound electron in a Compton diffusion process. This work calculates the relativistic propagator and the Wronskian of the two associated Feynman diagrams of Compton diffusion (emission first and absorption first). Then find an explicit expression for the covariant matrix elements separated into two parts: spin-angular part and radial part. Using these explicit expressions, the effective cross-section for Compton diffusion in the most general form is obtained in terms of basic dynamical and static quantities, like electron's and photon's 4-momenta and atomic number. The form of the cross-section is put ready for numerical calculations.

  10. Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Element |Vub| with B→ρeν Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Jolly, S.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Falbo, M.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Grenier, G. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; van Bibber, K.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Campagna, E.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Abe, K.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Himel, T.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Henderson, R.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-05-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction for the rare decays B→ρeν and extract a value for the magnitude of Vub, one of the smallest elements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix. The results are given for five different calculations of form factors used to para­metrize the hadronic current in semileptonic decays. Using a sample of 55×106 BB¯ meson pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring, we obtain B(B0→ρ-e+ν)=(3.29±0.42±0.47±0.55)×10-4 and |Vub|=(3.64±0.22±0.25+0.39-0.56)×10-3, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and theoretical, respectively.

  11. Top quark mass measurement in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method and in situ jet energy calibration.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Griso, S Pagan; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Siegrist, J; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-12-17

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m(t) is obtained using a sample of tt events from pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m(t) and a parameter Δ(JES) used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, a value of m(t)=173.0 ± 1.2 GeV/c(2) is measured.

  12. Single element of the matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: Measurements of the extracted currents combined with diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yordanov, D. Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.

    2016-02-15

    Combining measurements of the extracted currents with probe and laser-photodetachment diagnostics, the study is an extension of recent tests of factors and gas-discharge conditions stimulating the extraction of volume produced negative ions. The experiment is in a single element of a rf source with the design of a matrix of small-radius inductively driven discharges. The results are for the electron and negative-ion densities, for the plasma potential and for the electronegativity in the vicinity of the plasma electrode as well as for the currents of the extracted negative ions and electrons. The plasma-electrode bias and the rf power have been varied. Necessity of a high bias to the plasma electrode and stable linear increase of the extracted currents with the rf power are the main conclusions.

  13. Occupancies of individual orbits, and the nuclear matrix element of the {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, J.; Poves, A.

    2009-10-15

    We discuss the variation of the nuclear matrix element (NME) for the neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay of {sup 76}Ge when the wave functions are constrained to reproduce the experimental occupancies of the two nuclei involved in the transition. In the interacting shell model description the value of the NME is enhanced about 15% compared to previous calculations, whereas in the QRPA the NME's are reduced by 20%-30%. This diminishes the discrepancies between both approaches. In addition, we discuss the effect of the short-range correlations on the NME in light of the recently proposed parametrizations based on a consistent renormalization of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} transition operator.

  14. Am phases in the matrix of a U–Pu–Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn E.; Kennedy, J. Rory; Madden, James W.; O’Holleran, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ζ-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in δ-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  15. Determination of trace elements in dolomite and gypsum by atomic absorption spectrometry: overcoming the matrix interference by flotation separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafilov, Trajče; Zendelovska, Dragica; Pavlovska, Gorica; Čundeva, Katarina

    2002-05-01

    The interferences of Ca and Mg as matrix elements in dolomite and gypsum on Ag, Cd, Cr, Mn, Tl and Zn absorbances during their electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) determination are investigated. The results reveal that Ca and Mg do not interfere on Zn and Mn, tend to decrease absorbances of Ag, Cd and Cr, while Tl suffers the most significant influence. A flotation separation method is proposed to eliminate matrix interferences. Hydrated iron(III) oxide, Fe 2O 3· xH 2O, and iron(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Fe(HMDTC) 3, are applied as flotation collectors. The influence of hydrophobic dithiocarbamate anion, HMDTC, on flotation recoveries of each analyte is studied. The most suitable concentrations of dolomite and gypsum solutions for flotation are determined. To avoid flotation suppression due to the reaction of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ with surfactant ions, a fit foaming agent was selected. The elements present in dolomite and gypsum as traces have been analyzed by ETAAS. Their ETAAS limits of detection following flotation are found to be 0.021 μg·g -1 for Ag, 0.019 μg·g -1 for Cd, 0.014 μg·g -1 for Cr and 0.11 μg·g -1 for Tl. The determination of Mn and Zn can be performed by flame AAS (FAAS). The limit of detection for Mn is 1.5 μg·g -1, while for Zn 0.8 μg·g -1.

  16. Structural Anomalies Detected in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Combined Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Analysis (NDE and FEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Most reverse engineering approaches involve imaging or digitizing an object and then creating a computerized reconstruction that can be integrated, in three dimensions, into a particular design environment. The rapid prototyping technique builds high-quality physical prototypes directly from computer-aided design files. This fundamental technique for interpreting and interacting with large data sets is being used here via Velocity2 (an integrated image-processing software, ref. 1) using computed tomography (CT) data to produce a prototype three-dimensional test specimen model for analyses. A study at the NASA Glenn Research Center proposes to use these capabilities to conduct a combined nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) to screen pretest and posttest structural anomalies in structural components. A tensile specimen made of silicon nitrite (Si3N4) ceramic matrix composite was considered to evaluate structural durability and deformity. Ceramic matrix composites are being sought as candidate materials to replace nickel-base superalloys for turbine engine applications. They have the unique characteristics of being able to withstand higher operating temperatures and harsh combustion environments. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass (ref. 2). Detailed three-dimensional volume rendering of the tensile test specimen was successfully carried out with Velocity2 (ref. 1) using two-dimensional images that were generated via computed tomography. Subsequent, three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed, and the results obtained were compared with those predicted by NDE-based calculations and experimental tests. It was shown that Velocity2 software can be used to render a three-dimensional object from a series of CT scan images with a minimum level of complexity. The analytical results (ref. 3) show that the high-stress regions correlated well with the damage sites identified by the CT scans

  17. Modal correlation of test and finite element results using cross orthogonality with a reduced mass matrix obtained by modal reduction and NASTRAN's Generalized Dynamic Reduction solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Derek; Budynas, Richard G.

    A common procedure for performing a cross orthogonality check for the purpose of modal correlation between the test and the finite element analysis results incorporates the Guyan reduction method to obtain a reduced mass matrix. This paper describes a procedure which uses NASTRAN's Generalized Dynamic Reduction solution routine which is much more accurate than the standard Guyan reduction solution and which offers the advantage of not requiring the selection of mdof. Using NASTRAN's DMAP programming methods, a modal reduction of the full analytical mass matrix is performed based on the accelerometer locations and the analytical modal matrix results. The accuracy of the procedure is illustrated in two case studies.

  18. Exact tensor hypercontraction: a universal technique for the resolution of matrix elements of local finite-range N-body potentials in many-body quantum problems.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Hohenstein, Edward G; Schunck, Nicolas F; Sherrill, C David; Martínez, Todd J

    2013-09-27

    Configuration-space matrix elements of N-body potentials arise naturally and ubiquitously in the Ritz-Galerkin solution of many-body quantum problems. For the common specialization of local, finite-range potentials, we develop the exact tensor hypercontraction method, which provides a quantized renormalization of the coordinate-space form of the N-body potential, allowing for a highly separable tensor factorization of the configuration-space matrix elements. This representation allows for substantial computational savings in chemical, atomic, and nuclear physics simulations, particularly with respect to difficult "exchangelike" contractions.

  19. Circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhang, R.; Liu, B.; Xie, Z. L.; Xiu, X. Q.; Han, P.; Lu, H.; Zheng, Y. D.; Chen, Y. H.; Tang, C. G.; Wang, Z. G.

    2008-01-01

    The circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) is observed in InN at inter-band excitation. The function of the CPGE induced current on laser helicity is experimentally demonstrated and illustrated with the microscopic model. A spin-dependent current obtained in InN is one order larger than in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures at inter-band excitation. The dependence of CPGE current amplitude on light power and incident angle can be well evaluated with phenomenological theory. This sizeable spin-dependent current not only provides an opportunity to realize spin polarized current at room temperature, but also can be utilized as a reliable tool of spin splitting investigation in semiconductors.

  20. Spectral narrowing and stabilization of interband cascade laser by volume Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Venus, George; Smirnov, Vadim; Mokhun, Oleksiy; Bewley, William W; Merritt, Charles D; Canedy, Chadwick L; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Mijin; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry; Vodopyanov, Konstantin; Glebov, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    A volume Bragg grating recorded in photo-thermo-refractive glass was used to spectrally lock the emission from an 18-μm-wide interband cascade laser ridge to a wavelength of 3.12 μm. The spectral width of emission into the resonant mode is narrowed by more than 300 times, and the thermal wavelength shift is reduced by 60 times. While the power loss penalty is about 30%, the spectral brightness increases by 200 times.

  1. Indirect interband transition induced by optical near fields with large wave numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Maiku; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Optical near fields (ONFs) have Fourier components with large wave numbers that are two or three orders of magnitude larger than those of far-field propagating light owing to their nonuniformity in space. By utilizing these large wave numbers, the ONF is expected to induce an indirect interband transition between Bloch states having different wave numbers and directly generate an electron-hole pair without electron-phonon coupling. We perform time-dependent dynamics calculations of a one-dimensional periodic potential with an indirect band-gap structure and demonstrate that the ONF definitely induces an indirect interband transition. Instead of using the general Bloch boundary condition, which is usually imposed in conventional band structure calculations, we adopt an alternative boundary condition, the Born-von Kármán boundary condition, to appropriately treat indirect interband transitions. The calculated absorption spectra for the far-field and ONF excitations show different absorption edges and spectral patterns. We argue that this difference can be experimentally measured as evidence of the effects of the large wave numbers of the ONF.

  2. Interband Tunneling for Hole Injection in III-Nitride Ultraviolet Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuewei; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Johnson, Jared M.; Akyol, Fatih; Allerman, Andrew A.; Moseley, Michael William; Armstrong, Andrew; Hwang, Jinwoo; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-04-09

    Low p-type conductivity and high contact resistance remain a critical problem in wide band gap AlGaN-based ultraviolet light emitters due to the high acceptor ionization energy. In this work, interband tunneling is demonstrated for non-equilibrium injection of holes through the use of ultra-thin polarization-engineered layers that enhance tunneling probability by several orders of magnitude over a PN homojunction. Al0.3Ga0.7N interband tunnel junctions with a lowresistance of 5.6 × 10-4 Ω cm2 were obtained and integrated on ultraviolet light emitting diodes.Tunnel injection of holes was used to realize GaN-free ultraviolet light emitters with bottom and top n-type Al0.3Ga0.7N contacts. At an emission wavelength of 327 nm, stable output power of 6 W/cm2 at a current density of 120 A/cm2 with a forward voltage of 5.9 V was achieved. Our demonstration of efficient interband tunneling could enable device designs for higher efficiency ultraviolet emitters.

  3. Electric dipole moment function of the X1 Sigma/+/ state of CO - Vibration-rotation matrix elements for transitions of gas laser and astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The electric dipole moment function of the ground electronic state of carbon monoxide has been determined by combining numerical solutions of the radial Schrodinger equation with absolute intensity data of vibration-rotation bands. The derived dipole moment function is used to calculate matrix elements of interest to stellar astronomy and of importance in the carbon monoxide laser.

  4. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  5. A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John C

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  6. Kaon matrix elements and CP violation from lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu

    Low energy constants describing the weak, two-pion decays of K mesons in chiral perturbation theory are computed using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions in a finite volume with spatial extent 2.74 fm and for a single inverse lattice spacing 1/a = 1.73 GeV. Partially quenched perturbation theory is used in both leading and next-to-leading order. The non-perturbative regularization independent RI/MOM renormalization scheme is employed to determine these low energy constants in the continuum, RI normalization scheme with 20% statistical errors but systematic errors which are estimated to lie between 50 and 100% depending on the operator. These low energy constants are then used to estimate the DeltaI = 1/2 and DeltaI = 3/2 K → pipi decay matrix elements and epsilon'/epsilon. The poor convergence of chiral perturbation theory for quark masses as large as that of the strange quark severely limits the accuracy of these results.

  7. A novel approach for computing glueball masses and matrix elements in Yang-Mills theories on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Morte, Michele; Giusti, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    We make use of the global symmetries of the Yang-Mills theory on the lattice to design a new computational strategy for extracting glueball masses and matrix elements which achieves an exponential reduction of the statistical error with respect to standard techniques. By generalizing our previous work on the parity symmetry, the partition function of the theory is decomposed into a sum of path integrals each giving the contribution from multiplets of states with fixed quantum numbers associated to parity, charge conjugation, translations, rotations and central conjugations Z N 3. Ratios of path integrals and correlation functions can then be computed with a multi-level Monte Carlo integration scheme whose numerical cost, at a fixed statistical precision and at asymptotically large times, increases power-like with the time extent of the lattice. The strategy is implemented for the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory, and a full-fledged computation of the mass and multiplicity of the lightest glueball with vacuum quantum numbers is carried out at a lattice spacing of 0.17 fm.

  8. Determination of transition dipole matrix elements for the 266 nm photofragmentation of JKM state-selected CD3I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipes, Leonard C.; Kim, Dae Young; Brandstater, Nathan; Fuglesang, Christopher D.; Baugh, Delroy

    1995-12-01

    The photofragmentation of rovibrational energy-level and magnetic-state polarized ( overlineX1A 1)CD 3I ∣JKM>≡∣111> was performed at 266 nm. The ∣ NK) rotational energy level distribution and the angular momentum polarization of the vibrationless ( overlineX2A″ 2) CD 3 photofragment were measured by (2+1) REMPI. State-selecting the parent CD 3I allowed the elements of the transition dipole matrix (or T-matrix) to be determined by relating the initial system (CD 3I plus photon) statistical tensors to measured product statistical moments. This is believed to be the first report of the experimental determination of T-matrix elements for a chemical reaction.

  9. Potential curves and nonadiabatic matrix elements for collisions involving fragments of the HeN + molecular ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian-ping; Buenker, Robert J.; Hirsch, Gerhard; Kimura, Mineo

    1995-05-01

    Ab initio multireference CI calculations have been carried out for the HeN+ molecular ion in order to describe collision processes between its constituent neutral and ionized atoms. The accuracy of these calculations is evaluated by means of a comparison of results obtained at large internuclear separations with the corresponding asymptotic energies deduced from atomic spectral data. Energy values are computed for the eleven lowest He++N and He+N+ atomic limits and average discrepancies relative to the experimental excitation energies up to 110 000 cm-1 are found to lie in the 1000-3000 cm-1 range, of which only 200 cm-1 appears to be the fault of the configuration interaction (CI) technique itself, with the main portion of the error stemming from the choice of atomic orbital (AO) basis instead. The HeN+ X 3Σ- ground state is calculated to have a De value of only 1414 cm-1, but the excited 2 3Π state has a much larger value of 22 133 cm-1 by virtue of an avoided crossing with the lower state of this symmetry. The corresponding radial nonadiabatic coupling is responsible for a large cross section for an excitation process between the N+(3Pg)+He and N+(3Du)+He channels which indirectly provides an efficient electron-capture mechanism leading to the N(4Su)+He+ exit channel. Additional nonadiabatic matrix elements for rotational and spin-orbit coupling have also been obtained and analyzed, as well as transition moments between the various HeN+ molecular states calculated.

  10. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements in {gamma}p --> p {omega} using CLAS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Vernarsky, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort towards a ''complete'' experiment for the ω meson, we present studies from an experiment with an unpolarized target and a circularly polarized photon beam (g1c), carried out using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The experiment was analyzed using an extended maximum likelihood fit with partial wave amplitudes. New likelihood functions were calculated to account for the polarization of the photon beam. Both circular and linear polarizations are explored. The results of these fits are then used to project out the spin density matrix for the {omega}. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements will be presented using this method.

  11. Element analysis and calculation of the attenuation coefficients for gold, bronze and water matrixes using MCNP, WinXCom and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, M.; Shirmardi, S. P.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, element analysis and the mass attenuation coefficient for matrixes of gold, bronze and water with various impurities and the concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) are evaluated and calculated by the MCNP simulation code for photons emitted from Barium-133, Americium-241 and sources with energies between 1 and 100 keV. The MCNP data are compared with the experimental data and WinXCom code simulated results by Medhat. The results showed that the obtained results of bronze and gold matrix are in good agreement with the other methods for energies above 40 and 60 keV, respectively. However for water matrixes with various impurities, there is a good agreement between the three methods MCNP, WinXCom and the experimental one in low and high energies.

  12. Neutral kaon mixing beyond the Standard Model with nf = 2 + 1 chiral fermions. Part 1: bare matrix elements and physical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garron, Nicolas; Hudspith, Renwick J.; Lytle, Andrew T.

    2016-11-01

    We compute the hadronic matrix elements of the four-quark operators relevant for {K}^0-{overline{K}}^0 mixing beyond the Standard Model. Our results are from lattice QCD simulations with n f = 2 + 1 flavours of domain-wall fermion, which exhibit continuum-like chiral-flavour symmetry. The simulations are performed at two different values of the lattice spacing ( a ˜ 0 .08 and a ˜ 0 .11 fm) and with lightest unitary pion mass ˜ 300 MeV. For the first time, the full set of relevant four-quark operators is renormalised non-perturbatively through RI-SMOM schemes; a detailed description of the renormalisation procedure is presented in a companion paper. We argue that the intermediate renormalisation scheme is responsible for the discrepancies found by different collaborations. We also study different normalisations and determine the matrix elements of the relevant four-quark operators with a precision of ˜ 5% or better.

  13. Thermal conductivity tensors of the cladding and active layers of interband cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanle; Cui, Boya; Vurgaftman, I.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Abell, J.; Meyer, J. R.; Grayson, M.

    2014-12-01

    The cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of the W-active stages and InAs/AlSb superlattice optical cladding layer of an interband cascade laser (ICL) were characterized for temperatures ranging from 15 K to 324 K. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the active layer is somewhat larger than the cross-plane value at temperatures above about 30 K, while the thermal conductivity tensor becomes nearly isotropic at the lowest temperatures studied. These results will improve ICL performance simulations and guide the optimization of thermal management.

  14. Recent progress in the development of antimonide-based mid-ir interband cascade lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Hill, Cory J.; Wong, Chung M.

    2004-01-01

    Antimonide-based type-II interband cascade lasers are promising in becoming efficient and compact mid-infrared light sources for many applications such as gas sensing and environmental monitoring. Significant progress toward such a goal has recently been made in terms of achieving low threshold current densities, high temperature operation, and continuous wave operation of single-mode distributed feedback lasers. We review the recent progress of Sb-based mid-IR IC lasers and address the requirements for further improvements in their performance.

  15. Strong interband Faraday rotation in 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3.

    PubMed

    Ohnoutek, L; Hakl, M; Veis, M; Piot, B A; Faugeras, C; Martinez, G; Yakushev, M V; Martin, R W; Drašar, Č; Materna, A; Strzelecka, G; Hruban, A; Potemski, M; Orlita, M

    2016-01-11

    The Faraday effect is a representative magneto-optical phenomenon, resulting from the transfer of angular momentum between interacting light and matter in which time-reversal symmetry has been broken by an externally applied magnetic field. Here we report on the Faraday rotation induced in the prominent 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3 due to bulk interband excitations. The origin of this non-resonant effect, extraordinarily strong among other non-magnetic materials, is traced back to the specific Dirac-type Hamiltonian for Bi2Se3, which implies that electrons and holes in this material closely resemble relativistic particles with a non-zero rest mass.

  16. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the D0 Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeninger, Kevin Alexander; /Bonn U.

    2004-04-01

    Using a data set of 158 and 169 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run-II data in the electron and muon plus jets channel, respectively, the top quark mass has been measured using the Matrix Element Method. The method and its implementation are described. Its performance is studied in Monte Carlo using ensemble tests and the method is applied to the Moriond 2004 data set.

  17. On the Use of Finite Difference Matrix-Vector Products in Newton-Krylov Solvers for Implicit Climate Dynamics with Spectral Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, David; Woodward, Carol S.; Evans, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solution of global climate models requires effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a time step dictated by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability governed by the fastest of the time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton s method is applied for these systems. Each iteration of the Newton s method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite-difference which may show a loss of accuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite-difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral-element based shallow-water dynamical-core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM).

  18. Genomic matrix attachment region and chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays identify novel putative regulatory elements at the imprinted Dlk1/Gtl2 locus.

    PubMed

    Braem, Caroline; Recolin, Bénédicte; Rancourt, Rebecca C; Angiolini, Christopher; Barthès, Pauline; Branchu, Priscillia; Court, Franck; Cathala, Guy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Forné, Thierry

    2008-07-04

    We previously showed that genomic imprinting regulates matrix attachment region activities at the mouse Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) locus and that these activities are functionally linked to neighboring differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Here, we investigate the similarly structured Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinted domain and show that in the mouse liver, the G/C-rich intergenic germ line-derived DMR, a sequence involved in domain-wide imprinting, is highly retained within the nuclear matrix fraction exclusively on the methylated paternal copy, reflecting its differential function on that chromosome. Therefore, not only "classical" A/T-rich matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences but also other important regulatory DNA elements (such as DMRs) can be recovered from genomic MAR assays following a high salt treatment. Interestingly, the recovery of one A/T-rich sequence (MAR4) from the "nuclear matrix" fraction is strongly correlated with gene expression. We show that this element possesses an intrinsic activity that favors transcription, and using chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays, we demonstrate that the MAR4 interacts with the intergenic germ line-derived DMR specifically on the paternal allele but not with the Dlk1/Gtl2 promoters. Altogether, our findings shed a new light on gene regulation at this locus.

  19. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    DOE PAGES

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but thismore » Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.« less

  20. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.

  1. High-Energy Anomaly in the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectra of Nd2-xCexCuO4: Evidence for a Matrix Element Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rienks, E. D. L.; ńrrälä, M.; Lindroos, M.; Roth, F.; Tabis, W.; Yu, G.; Greven, M.; Fink, J.

    2014-09-01

    We use polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the high-energy anomaly (HEA) in the dispersion of Nd2-xCexCuO4, x =0.123. We find that at particular photon energies the anomalous, waterfall-like dispersion gives way to a broad, continuous band. This suggests that the HEA is a matrix element effect: it arises due to a suppression of the intensity of the broadened quasiparticle band in a narrow momentum range. We confirm this interpretation experimentally, by showing that the HEA appears when the matrix element is suppressed deliberately by changing the light polarization. Calculations of the matrix element using atomic wave functions and simulation of the ARPES intensity with one-step model calculations provide further evidence for this scenario. The possibility to detect the full quasiparticle dispersion further allows us to extract the high-energy self-energy function near the center and at the edge of the Brillouin zone.

  2. Measurement of the electroweak top quark production cross section and the CKM matrix element Vtb with the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, Matthias

    2009-06-29

    At particle accelerators the Standard Model has been tested and will be tested further to a great precision. The data analyzed in this thesis have been collected at the world's highest energetic-collider, the Tevatron, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in the vicinity of Chicago, IL, USA. There, protons and antiprotons are collided at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The discovery of the top quark was one of the remarkable results not only for the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider, but also for the Standard Model, which had predicted the existence of the top quark because of symmetry arguments long before already. Still, the Tevatron is the only facility able to produce top quarks. The predominant production mechanism of top quarks is the production of a top-antitop quark pair via the strong force. However, the Standard Model also allows the production of single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. This process features the unique opportunity to measure the |Vtb| matrix element of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix directly, without assuming unitarity of the matrix or assuming that the number of quark generations is three. Hence, the measurement of the cross section of electroweak top quark production is more than the technical challenge to extract a physics process that only occurs one out of ten billion collisions. It is also an important test of the V-A structure of the electroweak interaction and a potential window to physics beyond the Standard Model in the case where the measurement of |V{sub tb}| would result in a value significantly different from 1, the value predicted by the Standard Model. At the Tevatron two production processes contribute significantly to the production of single top quarks: the production via the t-channel, also called W-gluon fusion, and the production via the s-channel, known as well as W* process. This analysis searches for the combined s+t channel

  3. Rebalancing of internally generated carriers for mid-infrared interband cascade lasers with very low power consumption.

    PubMed

    Vurgaftman, I; Bewley, W W; Canedy, C L; Kim, C S; Kim, M; Merritt, C D; Abell, J; Lindle, J R; Meyer, J R

    2011-12-13

    The interband cascade laser differs from any other class of semiconductor laser, conventional or cascaded, in that most of the carriers producing population inversion are generated internally, at semimetallic interfaces within each stage of the active region. Here we present simulations demonstrating that all previous interband cascade laser performance has suffered from a significant imbalance of electron and hole densities in the active wells. We further confirm experimentally that correcting this imbalance with relatively heavy n-type doping in the electron injectors substantially reduces the threshold current and power densities relative to all earlier devices. At room temperature, the redesigned devices require nearly two orders of magnitude less input power to operate in continuous-wave mode than the quantum cascade laser. The interband cascade laser is consequently the most attractive option for gas sensing and other spectroscopic applications requiring low output power and minimum heat dissipation at wavelengths extending from 3 μm to beyond 6 μm.

  4. Interband π plasmon of graphene: strong small-size and field-enhancement effects.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinlian; Zeng, Haibo; Wang, Cong; Li, Zhigang; Kan, Caixia; Liu, Youwen

    2014-11-14

    The interband π plasmon of graphene has energy corresponding to the ultraviolet (UV) wave band, and hence is promising for UV nanophotonics and nanooptoelectronics. However, its special size effect and electric field-enhancement effect have not been well understood. Here, we have investigated the far-field optical extinction and near-field enhancement features of the interband π plasmon in a graphene nanodisk using discrete dipole approximation and finite-difference time-domain methods. Very interestingly, it has been found that the in-plane (transverse mode) optical extinction peak of monolayer graphene firstly significantly red shifts with increasing diameter, but then tends to a saturation value when the diameter is above 20 nm, showing a strong small-size-sensitive effect. Furthermore, the transverse mode optical extinction peak obviously blue shifts with increasing thickness when the thickness is relatively small. Significantly, the corresponding local electric field enhancement factor produced by the plasmon, which can be found to be as large as several tens, firstly increases with the increase of the size and then reaches a maximum value at only several nanometers in size. Such an ultrasmall-size-sensitive plasmon in the UV region endows graphene dots with new promising potential uses in ultrasmall photo-electric devices and nanoantennas, and in UV enhancers.

  5. Single-mode interband cascade laser sources for mid-infrared spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, J.; von Edlinger, M.; Weih, R.; Becker, S.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-05-01

    Compared to the near infrared, many technologically and industrially relevant gas species have more than an order of magnitude higher absorption features in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength range. These species include for example important hydrocarbons (methane, acetylene), nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) has proven to be a versatile tool for gas sensing applications with significant advantages compared to other techniques. These advantages include real time measurement, standoff detection and ruggedness of the sensor. We present interband cascade lasers (ICLs), which have evolved into important laser sources for the MIR spectral range from 3 to 7 μm. ICLs achieve high efficiency by cascading optically active zones whilst using interband transitions, so they combine common diode laser as well as quantum cascade laser based technologies. Our application grade singlemode distributed feedback devices operate continuous wave at room temperature and are offering several features especially useful for high performance TLAS applications like: side mode suppression ratio of > 30 dB, continuous tuning ranges up to 30 nm, low threshold power densities and low overall power consumption. The devices are typically integrated in a thermoelectrically cooled TO-style package, hermetically sealed using a cap with anti-reflection coated window. This low power consumption as well as the compact size and ruggedness of the fabricated laser sources makes them perfectly suited for battery powered portable solutions for in field spectroscopy applications.

  6. Two-photon interband absorption coefficients in tungstate and molybdate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukanin, V. I.; Karasik, A. Ya.

    2015-02-01

    Two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficients were measured in tungstate and molybdate crystals - BaWO4, KGW, CaMoO4, BaMoO4, CaWO4, PbWO4 and ZnWO4 upon different orientations of excitation polarization with respect to the crystallographic axes. Trains of 25 ps pulses with variable radiation intensities of third (349 nm) harmonics of passively mode-locked 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser were used for interband two-photon excitation of the crystals. It was suggested that in the case, when 349 nm radiation pumping energy exceeds the bandgap width (hν>Eg), the nonlinear excitation process can be considered as two-step absorption. The interband two-photon absorption in all the studied crystals induces the following one-photon absorption from the exited states, which affects the nonlinear process dynamics and leads to a hysteresis in the dependence of the transmission on the excitation intensity. This fact was taken into account under analysis of the experimental dependences of the reciprocal transmission on the excitation intensity. Laser excitation in the transparency region of the crystals caused stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) not for all the crystals studied. The measured nonlinear coefficients allowed us to explain the suppression of SRS in crystals as a result of competition between the SRS and TPA.

  7. High operation temperature mid-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors grown on InAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Zhicheng; He, Li

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, interband cascade detectors (ICIP) based on typer-II superlattice have shown great performance potential at high operation temperature. In this paper, we report our studies on mid-infrared interband cascade photodetectors first grown on InAs substrate. We examined the photo-generated carriers' transport in ICIP structures by comparing three detectors grown on InAs substrate. The 2-stages ICIP device has demonstrated a high quantum efficiency around 20% at room temperature. The dark current density of the 2-stages ICIP device at -0.05V is as low as 1 nA at 80K, 1 mA at 150K, which is comparable to the state of art PIN superlattice photodetectors with similar cutoff wavelength. The Johnson-noise limited D* reaches 1.64×1014cm.Hz1/2/W at 3.65 μm and 80K, and 4.1×1010cm.Hz1/2/W at 3.8 μm and 200K. The 300 K background limited infrared performance (BLIP) operation temperature is estimated to be over 140 K.

  8. Interband and intraband relaxation dynamics in InSb based quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, M.; Khodaparast, G. A.; Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B.; Saha, D.; Sanders, G.; Stanton, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    We utilize pump/probe spectroscopy to determine the interband and intraband relaxation dynamics in InSb based quantum wells. Using non-degenerate pump/probe techniques, we observed several time scales for relaxation. One time scale τ3 ranging from 2 ps to 5 ps is due to the intraband relaxation dynamics. Here, both the emission of LO phonons (within the Γ valley) and carrier scattering between the X, L, and Γ valleys contribute to the relaxation. An observed longer relaxation time, τ2 ≈ 20 ps, is attributed to electron-hole recombination across the gap (the interband relaxation time). Finally, using a mid-infrared (MIR) degenerate pump/probe scheme, we observed a very fast relaxation time of ˜1 ps, which is due to the saturation of the band-to-band absorption. Our results are important for developing concepts for InSb devices operating in the THz or MIR optical ranges with the endless need for faster response.

  9. Metastability and Inter-Band Frequency Modulation in Networks of Oscillating Spiking Neuron Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, David; Shanahan, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Groups of neurons firing synchronously are hypothesized to underlie many cognitive functions such as attention, associative learning, memory, and sensory selection. Recent theories suggest that transient periods of synchronization and desynchronization provide a mechanism for dynamically integrating and forming coalitions of functionally related neural areas, and that at these times conditions are optimal for information transfer. Oscillating neural populations display a great amount of spectral complexity, with several rhythms temporally coexisting in different structures and interacting with each other. This paper explores inter-band frequency modulation between neural oscillators using models of quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons and Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We vary the structural connectivity in a network of neural oscillators, assess the spectral complexity, and correlate the inter-band frequency modulation. We contrast this correlation against measures of metastable coalition entropy and synchrony. Our results show that oscillations in different neural populations modulate each other so as to change frequency, and that the interaction of these fluctuating frequencies in the network as a whole is able to drive different neural populations towards episodes of synchrony. Further to this, we locate an area in the connectivity space in which the system directs itself in this way so as to explore a large repertoire of synchronous coalitions. We suggest that such dynamics facilitate versatile exploration, integration, and communication between functionally related neural areas, and thereby supports sophisticated cognitive processing in the brain. PMID:23614040

  10. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, Petra

    2008-07-31

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with theW boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t $\\bar{t}$ →W±W b$\\bar{b}$ →q $\\bar{t}$lnb$\\bar{b}$ is the ”golden channel” for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: mt = (169.2±3.5(stat.)±1.0(syst.)) GeV . The

  11. Long-term analysis of elemental content in airborne particulate matter by PIXE and positive matrix factorization: Annual trends and seasonal variability during 2003 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pražnikar, Jure; Cepak, Franka; Žibert, Janez

    2014-09-01

    In the presented study a comprehensive statistical analysis of the chemical composition of atmospheric particulate matter was carried out. The data were collected from April 2003 to August 2008 with a 7-day time resolution in the Northern Adriatic Port of Koper and analyzed by the Proton Induced X-ray method (PIXE). The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of fifteen chemical elements identified six source factors, three natural-regional sources and three local-anthropogenic sources. Heavy machinery, industry and iron ore factor were marked as anthropogenic sources. Heavy machinery source was represented by the elements V, Ni and Cu. The elements Fe and Mn are attributed to the Iron ore source and were explained by the proximity of the bulk-cargo warehouse and the intense handling of iron ore in Port of Koper. The heavy industry source represented by Pb and Zn was the only anthropogenic factor, which shows clear seasonal pattern. In contrast to the local-anthropogenic source factors, natural and regional source factors show significant negative trend. The reduction of the crustal elements Ca, Ti and Sr, joined in a soil source, and sulfur-biomass source, represented by elements K and S, have been attributed to more intense precipitation and to the negative trend of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. The negative trend of the Cl and Br elements was in line with the negative trend of the wind speed above the sea surface and the significant sea-wave height.

  12. Detection of Matrix Elements and Trace Impurities in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Photovoltaic Absorbers Using Surface Analytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Haidong; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-10-01

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films are well known as the next-generation solar cell materials notable for their high absorption coefficient for solar radiation, suitable band gap, and ability for deposition on flexible substrate materials, allowing the production of highly flexible and lightweight solar panels. To improve solar cell performances, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is much needed. In this study, Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin films were prepared on molybdenum back contacts deposited on soda-lime glass substrates via three-stage evaporation. Surface analyses via AES and SIMS were used to characterize the CIGS thin films and compare their depth profiles. We determined the average concentration of the matrix elements, Cu, In, Ga, and Se, using ICP-AES, XRF, and EPMA. We also obtained depth profiling results using TOF-SIMS, magnetic sector SIMS and AES, and APT, a sub-nanometer resolution characterization technique that enables three-dimensional elemental mapping. The SIMS technique, with its high detection limit and ability to obtain the profiles of elements in parallel, is a powerful tool for monitoring trace elements in CIGS thin films. To identify impurities in a CIGS layer, the distribution of trace elements was also observed according to depth by SIMS and APT.

  13. POTHMF: A program for computing potential curves and matrix elements of the coupled adiabatic radial equations for a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Gerdt, V. P.; Rostovtsev, V. A.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Abrashkevich, A. G.; Kaschiev, M. S.; Serov, V. V.

    2008-02-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program is presented which calculates with the relative machine precision potential curves and matrix elements of the coupled adiabatic radial equations for a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field. The potential curves are eigenvalues corresponding to the angular oblate spheroidal functions that compose adiabatic basis which depends on the radial variable as a parameter. The matrix elements of radial coupling are integrals in angular variables of the following two types: product of angular functions and the first derivative of angular functions in parameter, and product of the first derivatives of angular functions in parameter, respectively. The program calculates also the angular part of the dipole transition matrix elements (in the length form) expressed as integrals in angular variables involving product of a dipole operator and angular functions. Moreover, the program calculates asymptotic regular and irregular matrix solutions of the coupled adiabatic radial equations at the end of interval in radial variable needed for solving a multi-channel scattering problem by the generalized R-matrix method. Potential curves and radial matrix elements computed by the POTHMF program can be used for solving the bound state and multi-channel scattering problems. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the energy values, a short-range reaction matrix and corresponding wave functions with the help of the KANTBP program. Benchmark calculations for the known photoionization cross-sections are presented. Program summaryProgram title:POTHMF Catalogue identifier:AEAA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:8123 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data

  14. Feature extraction and recognition for rolling element bearing fault utilizing short-time Fourier transform and non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huizhong; Liang, Lin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Xu, Guanghua

    2015-01-01

    Due to the non-stationary characteristics of vibration signals acquired from rolling element bearing fault, the time-frequency analysis is often applied to describe the local information of these unstable signals smartly. However, it is difficult to classify the high dimensional feature matrix directly because of too large dimensions for many classifiers. This paper combines the concepts of time-frequency distribution(TFD) with non-negative matrix factorization(NMF), and proposes a novel TFD matrix factorization method to enhance representation and identification of bearing fault. Throughout this method, the TFD of a vibration signal is firstly accomplished to describe the localized faults with short-time Fourier transform(STFT). Then, the supervised NMF mapping is adopted to extract the fault features from TFD. Meanwhile, the fault samples can be clustered and recognized automatically by using the clustering property of NMF. The proposed method takes advantages of the NMF in the parts-based representation and the adaptive clustering. The localized fault features of interest can be extracted as well. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the 9 kinds of the bearing fault on a test bench is performed. The proposed method can effectively identify the fault severity and different fault types. Moreover, in comparison with the artificial neural network(ANN), NMF yields 99.3% mean accuracy which is much superior to ANN. This research presents a simple and practical resolution for the fault diagnosis problem of rolling element bearing in high dimensional feature space.

  15. Complex Source and Radiation Behaviors of Small Elements of Linear and Matrix Flexible Ultrasonic Phased-Array Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amory, V.; Lhémery, A.

    2008-02-01

    Inspection of irregular components is problematical: maladjustment of transducer shoes to surfaces causes aberrations. Flexible phased-arrays (FPAs) designed at CEA LIST to maximize contact are driven by adapted delay laws to compensate for irregularities. Optimizing FPA requires simulation tools. The behavior of one element computed by FEM is observed at the surface and its radiation experimentally validated. Efforts for one element prevent from simulating a FPA by FEM. A model is proposed where each element behaves as nonuniform source of stresses. Exact and asymptotic formulas for Lamb problem are used as convolution kernels for longitudinal, transverse and head waves; the latter is of primary importance for angle-T-beam inspections.

  16. Tests on the extracted current density of negative hydrogen ions from a single element of the matrix source

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, St.; Yordanov, D. Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-08

    Concepts for the extraction of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions from a rf matrix source (a matrix of small-radius discharges with a planar-coil inductive driving) are presented and discussed based on experimental results for the current densities of the extracted ions and the co-extracted electrons. The experiment has been carried out in a single discharge of the source: a rf discharge with a radius of 2.25 cm inductively driven by a 3.5-turn planar coil. The length of the discharge tube, the area of the reference electrode inserted in the discharge volume, the discharge modes, the magnetic filter and its position along the discharge length, the position of the permanent magnets for the separation of the co-extracted electrons from the extracted ions in the extraction device and the bias applied to its first electrode are considered as factors influencing the extracted currents of negative ions.

  17. Nuclear matrix elements for 0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays: Comparative analysis of the QRPA, shell model and IBM predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Civitarese, Osvaldo; Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    In this work we report on general properties of the nuclear matrix elements involved in the neutrinoless double β{sup −} decays (0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays) of several nuclei. A summary of the values of the NMEs calculated along the years by the Jyväskylä-La Plata collaboration is presented. These NMEs, calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), are compared with those of the other available calculations, like the Shell Model (ISM) and the interacting boson model (IBA-2)

  18. Matrix elements for the ground-state to ground-state 2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -} decay of Te isotopes in a hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, D. R.; Civitarese, O.

    2010-01-15

    Theoretical matrix elements, for the ground-state to ground-state two-neutrino double-{beta}-decay mode (2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -}gs->gs) of {sup 128,130}Te isotopes, are calculated within a formalism that describes interactions between neutrons in a superfluid phase and protons in a normal phase. The elementary degrees of freedom of the model are proton-pair modes and pairs of protons and quasineutrons. The calculation is basically a parameter-free one, because all relevant parameters are fixed from the phenomenology. A comparison with the available experimental data is presented.

  19. A unified derivation of Hamiltonian and optical transition matrix elements for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules using transformation tools of modern quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenke, David W.

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we systematically derive the matrix elements of the nuclear rotation operators for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules in a parity adapted Hund’s case (a) basis. Our expressions are valid for an arbitrary number of electrons and arbitrary electronic configurations. The common ad hoc sign changes of angular momentum operators are shown to be equivalent to a change in phase of basis functions. We show how to relate this basis to that required for scattering calculations. We also give the expressions for Einstein A coefficients for electric dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic dipole transitions.

  20. Polarization-independent gain in mid-infrared interband cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryczko, K.; Sek, G.

    2016-11-01

    We have calculated the gain function of a type-II W-design AlSb/InAs/GaAsSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells to be used in an active region of interband cascade lasers, for two linear polarizations of in-plane propagating light: transverse-electric and transverse-magnetic. The effect of external electric field, imitating the conditions in a working device, has also been taken into account. We have proposed an active region design suitable for practical realization of mid-infrared lasing devices with controllable polarization properties. We have also demonstrated a way to achieve polarization-independent gain in mid-infrared emitters, which has not been reported so far.

  1. High-power continuous-wave interband cascade lasers with 10 active stages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mijin; Bewley, William W; Canedy, Chadwick L; Kim, Chul Soo; Merritt, Charles D; Abell, Joshua; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R

    2015-04-20

    We report the pulsed and continuous wave (cw) performance of 10-stage interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting at both λ ≈3.2 μm and λ ≈3.45 μm. The slope efficiency is higher while the external differential quantum efficiency per stage remains about the same when comparison is made to earlier results for 7-stage ICLs with similar carrier-rebalanced designs. At T = 25°C, an 18-μm-wide ridge with 4.5 mm cavity length and high-reflection/anti-reflection coatings emits up to 464 mW of cw output power with beam quality factor M(2) = 1.9, for higher brightness than has ever been reported previously for an ICL. When the cavity length is reduced to 1 mm, both the 10-stage and 7-stage devices reach 18% cw wallplug efficiency at T = 25°C.

  2. Interband cascade lasers with >40% continuous-wave wallplug efficiency at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Merritt, C. D.; Bewley, W. W.; Vurgaftman, I. Meyer, J. R.; Kim, M.

    2015-09-21

    Broad-area 10-stage interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting at λ = 3.0–3.2 μm are shown to maintain continuous-wave (cw) wallplug efficiencies exceeding 40% at temperatures up to 125 K, despite having a design optimized for operation at ambient and above. The cw threshold current density at 80 K is only 11 A/cm{sup 2} for a 2 mm cavity with anti-reflection/high-reflection coatings on the two facets. The external differential quantum efficiency for a 1-mm-long cavity with the same coatings is 70% per stage at 80 K, and still above 65% at 150 K. The results demonstrate that at cryogenic temperatures, where free carrier absorption losses are minimized, ICLs can convert electrical to optical energy nearly as efficiently as the best specially designed intersubband-based quantum cascade lasers.

  3. Strong interband Faraday rotation in 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3

    PubMed Central

    Ohnoutek, L.; Hakl, M.; Veis, M.; Piot, B. A.; Faugeras, C.; Martinez, G.; Yakushev, M. V.; Martin, R. W.; Drašar, Č.; Materna, A.; Strzelecka, G.; Hruban, A.; Potemski, M.; Orlita, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Faraday effect is a representative magneto-optical phenomenon, resulting from the transfer of angular momentum between interacting light and matter in which time-reversal symmetry has been broken by an externally applied magnetic field. Here we report on the Faraday rotation induced in the prominent 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3 due to bulk interband excitations. The origin of this non-resonant effect, extraordinarily strong among other non-magnetic materials, is traced back to the specific Dirac-type Hamiltonian for Bi2Se3, which implies that electrons and holes in this material closely resemble relativistic particles with a non-zero rest mass. PMID:26750455

  4. Infrared detection with colloidal quantum dots based on interband and intraband transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    While much research on colloidal quantum dots is focused on their potential as visible emitter or light harvester, this talk will cover our investigations of the mercury chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots in the thermal mid-infrared ranges of 3-5 microns and 8-12 microns where the atmosphere is transparent. HgTe is a zero-gap semiconductor. As a result, colloidal quantum dots (CQD) of sizes between 10 and 20 nm readily lead to infrared gaps tuning between 3 and 12 microns respectively. It is also very promising that infrared photodetection using dried films of these CQDs has now been demonstrated up to 12 microns. Further improvement through chemistry are likely and will be required to raise the detectivity to the level required to transform thermal infrared detection technology. In contrast to HgTe CQDs which tend to be intrinsic, beta-HgS and HgSe CQDs are naturally n-doped, in the first such instance with CQDs. Furthermore, the doping is modulated by modifying the surface composition, and this effect is attributed to the tuning of the energy level with respect to the environment, via the surface electrostatics. With controlled doping, both HgSe and HgS CQDs have now led to the first operation of mid-infrared CQD photodetector based on the intraband absorption. This is a breakthrough in the field of colloidal quantum dots where interband transitions had been exclusively used for the past 30 years. One challenge with both interband and intraband infrared CQDs will be to reduce the nonradiative recombination, which will improve the detectivity as well as allow to use their infrared luminescence.

  5. Circumzenithal sky region survey at the frequency of 30 GHz with 32-element radiometer matrix of the RATAN-600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Bursov, N. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Stolyarov, V. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Semenova, T. A.; Khaikin, V. B.; Grechkin, A. A.

    2013-04-01

    We report the preliminary results of a deep sky survey in the field of 00h < RA < 24h, 40{./°}5 < 42{./°}5 with the RATAN-600 and its new focal 32-feed receiver matrix at the limiting radio frequency of 30 GHz, with the resolution up to 5″ in right ascension and 30″ in declination. The first results, including new estimates of the anisotropy of background radiation at the scales of ( l > 3000) and noise from discrete radio sources in the wavelength range between the NVSS and IRAS catalogs are listed.

  6. The FEM-R-Matrix Approach: Use of Mixed Finite Element and Gaussian Basis Sets for Electron Molecule Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    For the calculation of electron molecule collision cross sections R-matrix methods automatically take advantage of the division of configuration space into an inner region (I) bounded by radius tau b, where the scattered electron is within the molecular charge cloud and the system is described by an correlated Configuration Interaction (CI) treatment in close analogy to bound state calculations, and an outer region (II) where the scattered electron moves in the long-range multipole potential of the target and efficient analytic methods can be used for solving the asymptotic Schroedinger equation plus boundary conditions.

  7. Apparatus and method for identification of matrix materials in which transuranic elements are embedded using thermal neutron capture gamma-ray emission

    DOEpatents

    Close, D.A.; Franks, L.A.; Kocimski, S.M.

    1984-08-16

    An invention is described that enables the quantitative simultaneous identification of the matrix materials in which fertile and fissile nuclides are embedded to be made along with the quantitative assay of the fertile and fissile materials. The invention also enables corrections for any absorption of neutrons by the matrix materials and by the measurement apparatus by the measurement of the prompt and delayed neutron flux emerging from a sample after the sample is interrogated by simultaneously applied neutrons and gamma radiation. High energy electrons are directed at a first target to produce gamma radiation. A second target receives the resulting pulsed gamma radiation and produces neutrons from the interaction with the gamma radiation. These neutrons are slowed by a moderator surrounding the sample and bathe the sample uniformly, generating second gamma radiation in the interaction. The gamma radiation is then resolved and quantitatively detected, providing a spectroscopic signature of the constituent elements contained in the matrix and in the materials within the vicinity of the sample. (LEW)

  8. Relativistic correction to e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg at B factories and constraint on color-octet matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    He Zhiguo; Fan Ying; Chao Kuangta

    2010-03-01

    We calculate the relativistic correction to J/{psi} production in the color-singlet process e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg at B factories. We employ the nonrelativistic QCD factorization approach, where the short-distance coefficients are calculated perturbatively and the long-distance matrix elements are extracted from the decays of J/{psi} into e{sup +}e{sup -} and light hadrons. We find that the O(v{sup 2}) relativistic correction can enhance the cross section by a factor of 20-30%, comparable to the enhancement due to the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative correction obtained earlier. Combining the relativistic correction with the QCD radiative correction, we find that the color-singlet contribution to e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg can saturate the latest observed cross section {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+X{sub non-cc})=0.43{+-}0.09{+-}0.09 pb by Belle, thus leaving little room to the color-octet contributions. This gives a very stringent constraint on the color-octet contribution, and may imply that the values of color-octet matrix elements are much smaller than expected earlier by using the naive velocity scaling rules or extracted from fitting experimental data with the leading-order calculations.

  9. Theory of multiple-stage interband photovoltaic devices and ultimate performance limit comparison of multiple-stage and single-stage interband infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkey, Robert T.; Yang, Rui Q.

    2013-09-01

    A theoretical framework for studying signal and noise in multiple-stage interband infrared photovoltaic devices is presented. The theory flows from a general picture of electrons transitioning between thermalized reservoirs. Making the assumption of bulk-like absorbers, we show how the standard semiconductor transport and recombination equations can be extended to the case of multiple-stage devices. The electronic noise arising from thermal fluctuations in the transition rates between reservoirs is derived using the Shockley-Ramo and Wiener-Khinchin theorems. This provides a unified noise treatment accounting for both the Johnson and shot noise. Using a Green's function formalism, we derive consistent analytic expressions for the quantum efficiency and thermal noise in terms of the design parameters and macroscopic material properties of the absorber. The theory is then used to quantify the potential performance improvement from the use of multiple stages. We show that multiple-stage detectors can achieve higher sensitivities for applications requiring a fast temporal response. This is shown by deriving an expression for the optimal number of stages in terms of the absorption coefficient and absorber thicknesses for a multiple-stage detector with short absorbers. The multiple-stage architecture may also be useful for improving the sensitivity of high operating temperature detectors in situations where the quantum efficiency is limited by a short diffusion length. The potential sensitivity improvement offered by a multiple-stage architecture can be judged from the product of the absorption coefficient, α, and diffusion length, Ln, of the absorber material. For detector designs where the absorber lengths in each of the stages are equal, the multiple-stage architecture offers the potential for significant detectivity improvement when αLn ≤ 0.2. We also explore the potential of multiple-stage detectors with photocurrent-matched absorbers. In this architecture, the

  10. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Pangilinan, Monica

    2010-05-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the Vtb element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W'. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb-1 of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30-1.20+0.98 pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9σ Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 ± 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0σ, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |Vtb| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |Vtb| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W' using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W' with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W' → t$\\bar{p}$, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W'L with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W'R) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is

  11. Top quark produced through the electroweak force: Discovery using the matrix element analysis and search for heavy gauge bosons using boosted decision trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangilinan, Monica

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the Vtb element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W'. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb--1 of data from the DO detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism spp¯→ tb+X,tqb+X=4.30+0.98-1.2 0pb The measured result corresponds to a 4.9sigma Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 +/- 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0sigma, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |Vtb| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |Vtb| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W' using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W' with masses within 600--950 GeV. For four general models of W' boson production using decay channel W' → tb¯, the lower mass limits are the following: M( W'L with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M( W'R ) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is lighter or heavier than W'R ; and M( W'L+R ) > 915 GeV.

  12. Fault diagnosis of rolling element bearing based on S transform and gray level co-occurrence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghang; Tang, Baoping; Tan, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Time-frequency analysis is an effective tool to extract machinery health information contained in non-stationary vibration signals. Various time-frequency analysis methods have been proposed and successfully applied to machinery fault diagnosis. However, little research has been done on bearing fault diagnosis using texture features extracted from time-frequency representations (TFRs), although they may contain plenty of sensitive information highly related to fault pattern. Therefore, to make full use of the textural information contained in the TFRs, this paper proposes a novel fault diagnosis method based on S transform, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and multi-class support vector machine (Multi-SVM). Firstly, S transform is chosen to generate the TFRs due to its advantages of providing frequency-dependent resolution while keeping a direct relationship with the Fourier spectrum. Secondly, the famous GLCM-based texture features are extracted for capturing fault pattern information. Finally, as a classifier which has good discrimination and generalization abilities, Multi-SVM is used for the classification. Experimental results indicate that the GLCM-based texture features extracted from TFRs can identify bearing fault patterns accurately, and provide higher accuracies than the traditional time-domain and frequency-domain features, wavelet packet node energy or two-direction 2D linear discriminant analysis based features of the same TFRs in most cases.

  13. Matrix isolation technique for the study of some factors affecting the partitioning of trace elements. [using vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzybowski, J. M.; Allen, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    The factors that affect the preferred positions of cations in ionic solid solutions were investigated utilizing vibrational spectroscopy. Solid solutions of the sulfate and chromate ions codoped with La(+3) and Ca(+2) in a KBr host lattice were examined as a function of the polyvalent cation concentration. The cation-anion pairing process was found to be random for Ca(+2), whereas the formation of La(+3)-SO4(-2) ion pairs with a C2 sub v bonding geometry is highly preferential to any type of La(+3)-CrO4(-2) ion pair formation. The relative populations of ion pair site configurations are discussed in terms of an energy-entropy competition model which can be applied to the partition of trace elements during magmatic processes.

  14. Precision measurements of B(D+→μ+νμ), the pseudoscalar decay constant fD+, and the quark mixing matrix element |Vcd|

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. J.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, H. L.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. B.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction B(D+→μ+νμ)=[3.71±0.19(stat)±0.06(sys)]×10-4 based on 2.92 fb-1 of data accumulated at √s =3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. This measurement, in conjunction with the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vcd| determined from a global Standard Model fit, implies a value for the weak decay constant fD+=(203.2±5.3±1.8) MeV. Additionally, using this branching fraction measurement together with a lattice QCD prediction for fD+, we find |Vcd|=0.2210±0.0058±0.0047. In either case, these are the most precise results for these quantities to date.

  15. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  16. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-01

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  17. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  18. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton+jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Brucken, E.; Devoto, F.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Casal, B.; Gomez, G.; Palencia, E.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Amerio, S.; Dorigo, T.; Gresele, A.; Lazzizzera, I.; Amidei, D.; Campbell, M.

    2010-12-17

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of tt events from pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a value of m{sub t}=173.0{+-}1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  19. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and \\textit{in situ} Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-10-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events, a value of m{sub t} = 173.0 {+-} 1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  20. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton+jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Siegrist, J.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Volobouev, I.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2010-12-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass mt is obtained using a sample of tt¯ events from pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of mt and a parameter ΔJES used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6fb-1 of integrated luminosity, a value of mt=173.0±1.2GeV/c2 is measured.

  1. Search for the Higgs boson produced in association with Z→ℓ+ℓ- using the matrix element method at CDF II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shekhar, R.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-10-01

    We present a search for associated production of the standard model Higgs boson and a Z boson where the Z boson decays to two leptons and the Higgs decays to a pair of b quarks in pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. We use event probabilities based on standard model matrix elements to construct a likelihood function of the Higgs content of the data sample. In a CDF data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7fb-1 we see no evidence of a Higgs boson with a mass between 100GeV/c2 and 150GeV/c2. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section for ZH production as a function of the Higgs boson mass mH; the limit is 8.2 times the standard model prediction at mH=115GeV/c2.

  2. Time-dependent wave-packet method for the complete determination of S-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael

    1990-01-01

    An alternative time-dependent wave-packet method for treating three-dimensional gas phase reactive atom-diatom collisions is presented. The method employs a nonreactive body-frame wave packet propagation procedure, made possible by judicious use of absorbing optical potentials, a novel scheme for interpolating the wave function from coordinates in one arrangement to those in another and the fact that the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is an initial-value problem. The last feature makes possible a computationally viable and accurate procedure for changing from one arrangement's coordinates to another. In addition, the method allows the determination of S-matrix elements over a wide range of energies from a single wave-packet propagation. The method is illustrated by carrying out detailed calculations of inelastic and reactive scattering in the H + H2 system using the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz potential surface.

  3. On the evaluation of nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements for MCSCF/CI wave functions. IV. Second derivative terms using analytic gradient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxe, Paul; Yarkony, David R.

    1987-01-01

    A recently proposed methodology for determining second derivative nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements h(J,I,Rα,R) ≡<ΨJ(r;R)‖(∂2/∂R2α )ΨI(r;R)>r based on analytic gradient methods is implemented and discussed. Here r denotes the electronic coordinates, R the nuclear coordinates, and the ΨJ (r;R) are eigenfunctions of the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer Hamiltonian at the state averaged MCSCF/CI level. The region of a conical intersection of the 1,2 2A' potential energy surfaces of the Li-H2 system is considered in order to illustrate the potential of this approach. The relation between h(J,I,Rα,R) and the first derivative matrix elements g(J,I,Rα,R) ≡<ΨJ(r;R)‖(∂/∂Rα)ΨI (r;R)>r is considered and the role of symmetry discussed. The h(J,I,Rα,R) are analyzed in terms of contributions from molecular orbital and CI coefficient derivatives and the importance of the various nuclear degree of freedom, Rα, is considered. It is concluded that for the case considered a flexible multiconfiguration wave function is desirable for characterizing h(J,I,Rα,R). This methodology complements recent advances in treating nonadiabatic processes for diatomic and triatomic systems starting with adiabatic states, including the work of Mead, Truhlar, and co-workers on conical (Jahn-Teller) intersections in X3 systems, by providing an essential computational step for the ab initio characterization the relevant electronic structure parameters.

  4. A Search for the tt¯H (H → bb) Large Hadron Collider with the atlas detector using a matrix element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basye, Austin T.

    A matrix element method analysis of the Standard Model Higgs boson, produced in association with two top quarks decaying to the lepton-plus-jets channel is presented. Based on 20.3 fb--1 of s=8 TeV data, produced at the Large Hadron Collider and collected by the ATLAS detector, this analysis utilizes multiple advanced techniques to search for ttH signatures with a 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to two b -quarks. After categorizing selected events based on their jet and b-tag multiplicities, signal rich regions are analyzed using the matrix element method. Resulting variables are then propagated to two parallel multivariate analyses utilizing Neural Networks and Boosted Decision Trees respectively. As no significant excess is found, an observed (expected) limit of 3.4 (2.2) times the Standard Model cross-section is determined at 95% confidence, using the CLs method, for the Neural Network analysis. For the Boosted Decision Tree analysis, an observed (expected) limit of 5.2 (2.7) times the Standard Model cross-section is determined at 95% confidence, using the CLs method. Corresponding unconstrained fits of the Higgs boson signal strength to the observed data result in the measured signal cross-section to Standard Model cross-section prediction of mu = 1.2 +/- 1.3(total) +/- 0.7(stat.) for the Neural Network analysis, and mu = 2.9 +/- 1.4(total) +/- 0.8(stat.) for the Boosted Decision Tree analysis.

  5. A magnesium hydroxide preconcentration/matrix reduction method for the analysis of rare earth elements in water samples using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hui-Fang; Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Wang, Chu-Fang

    2011-08-15

    This paper describes a simple method for simultaneous preconcentration and matrix reduction during the analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) in water samples through laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). From a systematic investigation of the co-precipitation of REEs using magnesium hydroxide, we optimized the effects of several parameters - the pH, the amount of magnesium, the shaking time, the efficiency of Ba removal, and the sample matrix - to ensure quantitative recoveries. We employed repetitive laser ablation to remove the dried-droplet samples from the filter medium and introduce them into the ICP-MS system for determinations of REEs. The enrichment factors ranged from 8 to 88. The detection limit, at an enrichment factor of 32, ranged from 0.03 to 0.20 pg mL(-1). The relative standard deviations for the determination of REEs at a concentration of 1 ng mL(-1) when processing 40 mL sample solution were 2.0-4.8%. We applied this method to the satisfactory determination of REEs in lake water and synthetic seawater samples.

  6. Effects of crossed electric and magnetic fields on the interband optical absorption spectra of variably spaced semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuleta, J. N.; Reyes-Gómez, E.

    2016-05-01

    The interband optical absorption spectra of a GaAs-Ga1-xAlxAs variably spaced semiconductor superlattice under crossed in-plane magnetic and growth-direction applied electric fields are theoretically investigated. The electronic structure, transition strengths and interband absorption coefficients are analyzed within the weak and strong magnetic-field regimes. A dramatic quenching of the absorption coefficient is observed, in the weak magnetic-field regime, as the applied electric field is increased, in good agreement with previous experimental measurements performed in a similar system under growth-direction applied electric fields. A decrease of the resonant tunneling in the superlattice is also theoretically obtained in the strong magnetic-field regime. Moreover, in this case, we found an interband absorption coefficient weakly dependent on the applied electric field. Present theoretical results suggest that an in-plane magnetic field may be used to tune the optical properties of variably spaced semiconductor superlattices, with possible future applications in solar cells and magneto-optical devices.

  7. Short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors operating above room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Lei, Lin; ...

    2016-01-13

    High temperature operation (250–340 K) of short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIPs) with InAs/GaSb/Al0.2In0.8Sb/GaSb superlattice absorbers has been demonstrated with a 50% cutoff wavelength of 2.9 μm at 300 K. Two ICIP structures, one with two and the other with three stages, were designed and grown to explore this multiple-stage architecture. At λ = 2.1 μm, the two- and three-stage ICIPs had Johnson-noise-limited detectivities of 5.1 × 109 and 5.8 ×109 cm Hz1/2/W, respectively, at 300 K. The better device performance of the three-stage ICIP over the two-stage ICIP confirmed the advantage of more stages for this cascade architecture. Furthermore,more » an Arrhenius activation energy of 450 meV is extracted for the bulk resistance-area product, which indicates the dominance of the diffusion current at these high temperatures.« less

  8. Short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors operating above room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Lei, Lin; Jiang, Yuchao; Yang, Rui Q.; Klem, John F.; Johnson, Matthew B.

    2016-01-13

    High temperature operation (250–340 K) of short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIPs) with InAs/GaSb/Al0.2In0.8Sb/GaSb superlattice absorbers has been demonstrated with a 50% cutoff wavelength of 2.9 μm at 300 K. Two ICIP structures, one with two and the other with three stages, were designed and grown to explore this multiple-stage architecture. At λ = 2.1 μm, the two- and three-stage ICIPs had Johnson-noise-limited detectivities of 5.1 × 109 and 5.8 ×109 cm Hz1/2/W, respectively, at 300 K. The better device performance of the three-stage ICIP over the two-stage ICIP confirmed the advantage of more stages for this cascade architecture. Furthermore, an Arrhenius activation energy of 450 meV is extracted for the bulk resistance-area product, which indicates the dominance of the diffusion current at these high temperatures.

  9. Interband and intraband electron kinetics in non-thermal warm dense gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan Brown, Shaughnessy; Chen, Zhijiang; Curry, Chandra; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Ng, Andrew; Reid, Matthew; Tsui, Ying Y.; Glenzer, Siegfried H.

    2015-11-01

    Single-state warm dense matter may be produced via isochoric heating of thin metal foils using ultrafast high-power lasers. Previous experiments have confirmed that electron temperatures exceed ion temperatures during the initial picoseconds following excitation; however, electron kinetics in non-thermal states preceding establishment of a well-defined electron thermal distribution remain little understood. X-ray and optical probing techniques provide necessary resolution to investigate these electronic properties. Here, we will present a study of electron kinetics in warm dense gold produced by irradiating free-standing 30 nm Au foils with a 400 nm FWHM, 45 fs Ti:Sapphire laser system at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The temporal evolutions of AC conductivity for 400 nm and 800 nm laser pulses are simultaneously determined with sub-100 fs resolution, providing insight into the 5 d-6 s/ p interband and 6 s / p intraband transitions respectively. Our results suggest that Auger decay and three-body recombination play important roles in electron thermalization of warm dense gold.

  10. Detection of methyl mercaptan with a 3393-nm distributed feedback interband cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhui; Zhen, Weimeng; Zhang, Zheyuan; Li, Jinyi; Gao, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Attention has been focused recently on the harmful effects and malodor of methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), so it is desired to detect CH3SH in situ, sensitively, and selectively. We detected methyl mercaptan via tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) with a room-temperature distributed feedback interband cascade laser emitting around 3393 nm and a hollow waveguide gas cell with 5 m length. The fundamental characteristic fingerprint absorptions of CH3SH from 3260 to 3400 nm were examined, and the spectral line 3393.584 nm (corresponding to the ν 2 C-H symmetric stretch) was determined to be the optimum for CH3SH detection. The response characteristics of the TLAS system were established by implementing a set of CH3SH concentration gradient experiments with wavelength-scanned direct absorption spectroscopy. The results show that CH3SH TLAS spectra are in excellent agreement with spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory database; the TLAS response linearity is 0.987, and the detection limit is as low as 25 ppbv (parts per billion by volume, 10-9) with integrated time 1.84 s, corresponding to an absorbance of 1.34 × 10-4 (near the theoretical detection limit). Overall, the TLAS system is a robust method for CH3SH monitoring of industrial waste gas emissions.

  11. Type-I interband cascade lasers near 3.2 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yuchao; Li, Lu; Yang, Rui Q.; Gupta, James A.; Aers, Geof C.; Dupont, Emmanuel; Baribeau, Jean-Marc; Wu, Xiaohua; Johnson, Matthew B.

    2015-01-26

    Interband cascade (IC) lasers have been demonstrated based on type-I InGaAsSb/AlAsSb quantum well (QW) active regions. These type-I IC lasers are composed of 6-cascade stages and InAs/AlSb superlattice cladding layers. In contrast to the use of quinary AlGaInAsSb barriers for active region in previous type-I QW lasers, the type-I QW active region in each stage is sandwiched by digitally graded multiple InAs/AlSb QW electron injector and GaSb/AlSb QW hole injector. The fabricated type-I IC lasers were able to operate in continuous wave and pulsed modes at temperatures up to 306 and 365 K, respectively. The threshold current densities of broad-area lasers were around 300 A/cm{sup 2} at 300 K with a lasing wavelength near 3.2 μm. The implications and prospects of these initial results are discussed.

  12. Interband cascade laser sources in the mid-infrared for green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeth, J.; von Edlinger, M.; Scheuermann, J.; Becker, S.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Weih, R.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-03-01

    Tunable Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TLAS) has proven to be a versatile tool for gas sensing applications with significant advantages compared to other techniques. These advantages include real time measurement, standoff detection and ruggedness of the sensor. Especially the Mid-Infrared (MIR) wavelength region from 3 to 6 microns is of great interest for industrial process control and the reduction of pollutants. In this contribution we present novel ICL devices developed to address the crucial air pollutant sulfur dioxide SO2 at its transition around 4 μm. In general, interband cascade lasers (ICLs) have evolved into important laser sources for the MIR spectral range. Compared to quantum cascade lasers, they offer significant advantages with respect to threshold power density as well as overall power consumption. In contrast to conventional diode lasers, ICLs are able to cover the entire MIR wavelength range of interest. For application in TLAS, single-mode devices are required. In this work application-grade distributed feedback (DFB) ICL devices for addressing SO2 at the wavelength range around 4 μm are presented. A lateral metal grating, defined by electron beam lithography, is used to achieve DFB operation and hence spectrally single-mode emission. Continuous wave laser operation with threshold power consumption below 100 mW at room temperature, side mode suppression ratio of > 30 dB and wavelength tuning range up to 28 nm are demonstrated.

  13. Widely-tunable interband cascade lasers for the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Edlinger, M.; Scheuermann, J.; Weih, R.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Höfling, S.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Distributed feedback (DFB) laser sources are key components of modern gas analyzers based on tunable laser absorption spectroscopy. While the current induced tuning range of DFB lasers is usually limited to a few nanometers, there are a number of applications which will benefit from lasers with a wider tunability, e.g. multi-gas sensing or spectroscopy of liquids. In this paper, we present monolithic widely tunable laser devices in the 3.6 μm wavelength region based on interband cascade laser material. Using the concept of binary superimposed (BSG) grating structures and two-segment Vernier-tuning, stable single-mode emission is realized at discrete wavelength channels in the 3560 nm to 3620 nm region. A total tuning range around 60 nm in three channels is demonstrated. Within a single channel, the emission wavelength can be tuned mode hop free over up to 5 nm. The wavelength channels can be arbitrarily placed in the range of the material gain, allowing BSG lasers to sweep over several gas absorption lines. The number of channels can be chosen as well. Within a wavelength channel, the lasers show DFB like spectral performance with setup limited sidemode suppressino ratios around 25 dB and milliwatt levels of continuous wave output powers around room temperature. This paper will present an overview of the laser concept, simulations, performance data and applications.

  14. Monolithically integrated mid-IR interband cascade laser and photodetector operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Shazzad Rassel, S. M.; Yang, Rui Q.; Corrége, Cédric J.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Larson, Preston R.; Gupta, James A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the demonstration of a monolithically integrated mid-IR interband cascade (IC) laser and photodetector operating at room temperature. The base structure for the integrated laser and detector is a six-stage type-I IC laser with GaInAsSb quantum well active regions. The laser/detector pair was defined using focused ion beam milling. The laser section lased in cw mode with an emission wavelength of ˜3.1 μm at 20 °C and top-illuminated photodetectors fabricated from the same wafer had Johnson-noise-limited detectivity of 1.05 × 109 cm Hz1/2/W at this wavelength and temperature. Under the same condition, the detectivity for the edge illumination configuration for the monolithically integrated laser/photodetector pairs is projected to be as high as 1.85 × 1010 cm Hz1/2/W, as supported by experimentally observed high photocurrent and open-circuit voltage. These high performance characteristics for monolithically integrated IC devices show great prospects for on-chip integration of mid-IR photonic devices for miniaturized sensors and on-chip optical communication systems.

  15. Superconducting graphene sheets in CaC6 enabled by phonon-mediated interband interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.-L.; Sobota, J. A.; Howard, C. A.; Pickard, C. J.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Mo, S.-K.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2014-03-01

    There is a great deal of fundamental and practical interest in the possibility of inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene. But while bulk graphite can be made to superconduct when certain metal atoms are intercalated between its graphene sheets, the same has not been achieved in a single layer. Moreover, there is a considerable debate about the precise mechanism of superconductivity in intercalated graphite. Here we report angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting graphite intercalation compound CaC6 that distinctly resolve both its intercalant-derived interlayer band and its graphene-derived π* band. Our results indicate the opening of a superconducting gap in the π* band and reveal a substantial contribution to the total electron-phonon-coupling strength from the π*-interlayer interband interaction. Combined with theoretical predictions, these results provide a complete account for the superconducting mechanism in graphite intercalation compounds and lend support to the idea of realizing superconducting graphene by creating an adatom superlattice.

  16. Intraband and interband spin-orbit torques in non-centrosymmetric ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Vyborny, K.; Jungwirth, T.; Gao, H.; Sinova, J.; Manchon, A.

    2015-03-01

    Experimental observations of the spin-orbit torque in non-centrosymmetric ferromagnets such as multilayered ferromagnetic metals and dilute magnetic semiconductors, have recently been reported. Two scenarios have been invoked to explain the origin of these current-driven torques. In the first one, the spin orbit coupling generates an in-plane non-equilibrium spin density and exerts a field-like torque on the magnetization. In the second one, the torque originates from the spin Hall effect occurring in the normal metal placed below the ferromagnet. Recently, a large (anti-)damping-like torque has been observed in a single magnetic GaMnAs layer. Obviously, the torque cannot be attributed to the spin Hall effect owing to the absence of the adjacent heavy metal. Such a torque might be attributed to the interband contribution to the non-equilibrium spin polarization in the linear-response Kubo formula. This intrinsic (scattering-independent) mechanism is related to (a specific type of) the Berry curvature and our calculations corroborate its link to actual experiments. Our numerical results show the parametric dependences of the different torque components, they exhibit similarities to the analytical results for the Rashba two-dimensional electron gas in the weak disorder limit and open new perspectives in the development of current-driven spin-orbit torques by structural design.

  17. Reduction of Matrix-Induced Oxide Interferences on Rare Earth Elements and Platinum Using a Desolvating Nebulizer System with Quadrupole Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, F.

    2013-12-01

    This paper will examine the use of a specialized low-flow desolvating nebulizer system for reduction of oxide mass spectral interferences that can occur in quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS). This nebulizer system uses an inert low-flow nebulizer (100 microliters/min) coupled to an inert, heated membrane desolvator for efficient water vapor removal before sample aerosol injection to the Q-ICP-MS instrument. Water vapor from conventional nebulizer / spray chamber systems used with Q-ICP-MS can cause numerous mass spectral interferences. One general example is metal oxides formed from the combination of oxygen (from injected water) with sample matrix components. Two specific examples of metal oxide interferences will be investigated with and without membrane desolvation: Ba and Ce oxides on several low-mass rare earth elements (Sm, Eu, and Gd) and Hf oxides on platinum. Rare earth elements are critically important components of modern electronics (ex. magnets, lasers, cell phones, computers) and platinum is a widely used catalyst. Figures of merit for both a conventional nebulizer/spray chamber and the desolvating nebulizer systems will include operating conditions, interference intensities and reduction factors, background equivalent concentrations (BECs), and instrument detection limits (IDLs).

  18. Determination of elemental constituents in different matrix materials and flow injection studies by the electrolyte cathode glow discharge technique with a new design

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar, R.; Karunasagar, D.; Ranjit, M.; Arunachalam, J.

    2009-10-15

    An open-to-air type electrolyte cathode discharge (ELCAD) has been developed with a new design. The present configuration leads to a stable plasma even at low flow rates (0.96 mL/min). Plasma fluctuations arising from the variations in the gap between solid anode and liquid cathode were eliminated by providing a V-groove to the liquid glass-capillary. Cathode (ground) connection is given to the solution at the V-groove itself. Interfaced to atomic emission spectrometry (AES), its analytical performance is evaluated. The optimized molarity of the solution is 0.2 M. The analytical response curves for Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn demonstrated good linearity. The limit of detections of Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn are determined to be 17, 11, 5, 45, 15, 28, and 3 ng mL{sup -1}. At an integration time of 0.3 s, the relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the acid blank solutions are found to be less than 10% for the elements Ca, Cu, Cd, Hg, Fe, and Zn and 18% for Pb. The method is applied for the determination of the elemental constituents in different matrix materials such as tuna fish (IAEA-350), oyster tissue (NIST SRM 1566a), and coal fly ash (CFA SRM 1633b). The obtained results are in good agreement with the certified values. The accuracy is found to be between 7% and 0.6% for major to trace levels of constituent elements and the precision between 11% and 0.6%. For the injection of 100 {mu} L of 200 ng mL{sup -1} mercury solution at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, the flow injection studies resulted in the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 8%, concentration detection limit of 10 ng/mL, and mass detection limit of 1 ng for mercury.

  19. Matrix and impurity element distributions in CdHgTe (CMT) and (Cd,Zn)(Te,Se) compounds by chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capper, P.; O'Keefe, E. S.; Maxey, C.; Dutton, D.; Mackett, P.; Butler, C.; Gale, I.

    1996-04-01

    This review describes several of the main techniques used to determine matrix element distributions and those which can provide a survey of impurity levels and assess deliberate doping concentrations in Cd xHg 1 - xTe and CdTe-based substrate materials. The most widely used method to non-destructively determine x is that of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry and lateral x variations in current bulk, LPE and MOVPE material measured by this technique will be presented. Auger electron spectrometry (AES) has been used on bevelled samples to assess variations in x with depth and interface widths in LPE, MOVPE and MBE layers and examples will be given. Near IR spectrometry is also now being used to monitor the variations in Zn and Se content, in CdZnTe and CdTeSe respectively, and results in this area will be described along with measurements of Zn on the micro-scale using AES. All of these techniques need to be calibrated against an absolute chemical analysis technique and we have used atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The latter technique also provides the accurate measure of dopant and impurity elements to standardise other techniques. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is mainly used for the determination of dopant depth distributions while laser scan mass spectrometry (LSMS) has the unique capability of providing a survey of low levels of impurities in thin epitaxial layers. Depth profiles of arsenic and iodine in MOVPE heterostructures, using SIMS, will be given. Impurity surveys, using LSMS, in bulk CMT and substrate materials and in CMT epitaxial layers grown by LPE, MOVPE and MBE will be described. Reported glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) results on substrate materials will be compared to the present results.

  20. Spectral diagnostics based on Doppler-broadened H{sub α} line shape in a single element of a matrix source

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanova, S.; Pashov, A.

    2015-04-08

    The study is on optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a single element of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions. The method developed for description of the hydrogen atoms behaviour is based on analysis of the Balmer H{sub α} line profile, and it can be readily applied to various low pressure hydrogen discharges. The present observations reveal the existence of thermal as well as of non-thermal fast hydrogen atoms in the discharge. For processing of the experimental data a line shape model, which accounts for details of the plasma kinetics and the fine structure of the Balmer lines is developed. The fit of this model to the recorded at different experimental conditions line shapes results in the temperature of the thermal atoms, the mean energy of the fast atoms, the ratio between the densities of these two group of atoms and the relative populations of the fine structure components of the n = 3 hydrogen state. The present study indicates that the reactions leading to production of fast atoms and the process of energy exchange between thermal and fast atoms may be important for the correct modeling of the plasma kinetics.

  1. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method.

    PubMed

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Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Oliveros, S; Perera, L; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Meier, F; Ratnikov, F; Snow, G R; Zvada, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Massironi, A; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Musienko, Y; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Valls, N; Smith, G; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Malik, S; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Primavera, F; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Zablocki, J; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Korjenevski, S; Petrillo, G; Verzetti, M; Vishnevskiy, D; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wolfe, E; Wood, J; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Vuosalo, C; Woods, N; Collaboration, Authorinst The Cms

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5[Formula: see text] collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in [Formula: see text] collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8[Formula: see text]. In order to separate the signal from the larger [Formula: see text]  + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, [Formula: see text], relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125[Formula: see text]. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is [Formula: see text] (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value [Formula: see text].

  2. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger tt¯ + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, μ, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is μ < 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value μ^ = 1.2+1.6-1.5.

  3. On the comparison of matrix element calculations of O(ααs) with the measurement of photon emission in hadronic Z 0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mättig, P.; Spiesberger, H.; Zeuner, W.

    1993-12-01

    The uncertainties in interpreting photon bremsstrahlung in the processe^ + e^ - to Z^0 to qbar q with matrix element calculations of O(ααs) are discussed. We address the stability of the calculations with respect to the emission of collinear photons and to higher-order QCD corrections and discuss the bias due to experimental photon isolation cuts. We analyze the resulting uncertainties for various procedures to define an event with a final state photon. Of particular interest are (i) a two-step procedure where first jets are reconstructed from hadrons alone and in a second step the photon is required to be isolated from these jets, and (ii) a ‘democratic’ procedure where the photon is inculded in the jet reconstruction but a certain maximum hadronic energy is allowed in the photon jet. In both cases we estimate that the uncertainties of the theoretical predictions, hadronization effects and the experimental photon isolation are of the order of 4%. To obtain this level of accuracy, however, the democratic procedure requires very hard cuts that reduce the event samples significantly.

  4. Calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements for ground and excited state electron transfer reactions: Comparison of the generalized Mulliken-Hush and block diagonalization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1997-06-01

    Two independent methods are presented for the nonperturbative calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) for electron transfer reactions using ab initio electronic structure theory. The first is based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) model, a multistate generalization of the Mulliken Hush formalism for the electronic coupling. The second is based on the block diagonalization (BD) approach of Cederbaum, Domcke, and co-workers. Detailed quantitative comparisons of the two methods are carried out based on results for (a) several states of the system Zn2OH2+ and (b) the low-lying states of the benzene-Cl atom complex and its contact ion pair. Generally good agreement between the two methods is obtained over a range of geometries. Either method can be applied at an arbitrary nuclear geometry and, as a result, may be used to test the validity of the Condon approximation. Examples of nonmonotonic behavior of the electronic coupling as a function of nuclear coordinates are observed for Zn2OH2+. Both methods also yield a natural definition of the effective distance (rDA) between donor (D) and acceptor (A) sites, in contrast to earlier approaches which required independent estimates of rDA, generally based on molecular structure data.

  5. Novel approaches for correction against the soft matrix effects in the quantitative elemental imaging of human substantia nigra tissue using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surowka, A. D.; Wrobel, P.; Marzec, M. M.; Adamek, D.; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    The inherent structural heterogeneity of biological specimens poses a number of problems for analytical techniques to assess for the elemental composition of a sample, and this is the case with quantitative X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Differences in density along with any possible variation in thickness upon frequently used freeze drying of thin samples could influence the results of the quantification and therefore underlie one of the most critical matrix effects in XRF, often referred to as the mass thickness effect. In our study, we analyzed substantia nigra tissue samples of various thicknesses mounted onto silicon nitride membranes. The aim was to show up the variation in the mass thickness of the different substantia nigra tissue compartments: the neuromelanine pigmented neurons and neuropil could influence the final quantitative results. In that respect, the main goal was to derive several semi- and fully-quantitative methods to correct for the mass thickness effects using either a membrane Si transmission signal or the intensity of incoherently scattered primary X-ray radiation. Also, the pioneer topographic studies on dried substantia nigra tissue specimens demonstrated the drying procedure is accompanied by an around 80% reduction in the samples' thickness. The correction scheme is presented together with the semi-theoretical procedure developed to compute for the mass thickness for substantia nigra tissue structures, and the correction scheme's robustness is also presented.

  6. A Search for the Higgs Boson Produced in Association with $Z\\to \\ell^+\\ell^-$ Using the Matrix Element Method at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-08-01

    We present a search for associated production of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson and a Z boson where the Z boson decays to two leptons and the Higgs decays to a pair of b quarks in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. We use event probabilities based on SM matrix elements to construct a likelihood function of the Higgs content of the data sample. In a CDF data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} we see no evidence of a Higgs boson with a mass between 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. We set 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the cross-section for ZH production as a function of the Higgs boson mass m{sub H}; the limit is 8.2 times the SM prediction at m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Top quark mass measurement in the t tmacr all hadronic channel using a matrix element technique in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Pagan Griso, S.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the all hadronic channel (t tmacr →b bmacr q1 qmacr 2q3 qmacr 4) using 943pb-1 of p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV collected at the CDF II detector at Fermilab (CDF). We apply the standard model production and decay matrix element (ME) to t tmacr candidate events. We calculate per-event probability densities according to the ME calculation and construct template models of signal and background. The scale of the jet energy is calibrated using additional templates formed with the invariant mass of pairs of jets. These templates form an overall likelihood function that depends on the top quark mass and on the jet energy scale (JES). We estimate both by maximizing this function. Given 72 observed events, we measure a top quark mass of 171.1±3.7(stat+JES)±2.1(syst)GeV/c2. The combined uncertainty on the top quark mass is 4.3GeV/c2.

  8. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger tt¯ + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratiomore » between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, μ, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is μ < 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value μ^ = 1.2+1.6-1.5.« less

  9. Interband optical transition energy and oscillator strength in a lead based CdSe quantum dot quantum well heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanamoorthy, S. N.; Peter, A. John

    2015-06-24

    Binding energies of the exciton and the interband optical transition energies are studied in a CdSe/Pb{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Se/CdSe spherical quantum dot-quantum well nanostructure taking into account the geometrical confinement effect. The core and shell are taken as the same material. The initial and final states of energy and the overlap integrals of electron and hole wave functions are determined by the oscillator strength. The oscillator strength and the radiative transition life time with the dot radius are investigated for various Cd alloy content in the core and shell materials.

  10. Photogalvanic effects for interband transition in p-Si0.5Ge0.5/Si multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C. M.; Cho, K. S.; Chen, Y. F.; Peng, Y. H.; Chiu, C. W.; Kuan, C. H.

    2007-12-01

    Circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) and linear photogalvanic effect for interband transition have been observed simultaneously in Si0.5Ge0.5/Si multiple quantum wells. The signature of the CPGE is evidenced by the change of its sign upon reversing the radiation helicity. It is found that the observed CPGE photocurrent is an order of magnitude greater than that obtained for intersubband transition. The dependences of the CPGE on the angle of incidence and the excitation intensities can be well interpreted based on its characteristics. The large signal of spin generation observed here at room temperature should be very useful for the realization of practical application of spintronics.

  11. Spin-multipole nuclear matrix elements in the p n quasiparticle random-phase approximation: Implications for β and β β half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostensalo, Joel; Suhonen, Jouni

    2017-01-01

    Half-lives for 148 potentially measurable 2nd-, 3rd-, 4th-, 5th-, 6th-, and 7th-forbidden unique beta transitions are predicted. To achieve this, the ratio of the nuclear matrix elements (NMEs), calculated by the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA), MpnQRPA, and a two-quasiparticle (two-qp) model, Mqp, is studied and compared with earlier calculations for the allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) 1+ and first-forbidden spin-dipole (SD) 2- transitions. The present calculations are done using realistic single-particle model spaces and G -matrix based microscopic two-body interactions. In terms of the ratio k =MpnQRPA/Mqp the studied decays fall into two groups: for GROUP 1, which consists of transitions involving non-magic nuclei, the ratio turns out to be k =0.29 ±0.15 . For GROUP 2, consisting of transitions involving semimagic nuclei, the ratio is 0.5-0.8 for half of the decays and less than 5 ×10-3 for the other half. The magnitudes of the NMEs for several nuclei of GROUP 2 depend sensitively on the size of the used single-particle space and the energies of few key single-particle orbitals used in the pnQRPA calculation, while no such dependence is found for the transitions involving nuclei of GROUP 1. Comparing the NME ratios k of GROUP 1 with those of the earlier GT and SD calculations, where also experimental data are available, the expected "experimental" half-lives for the decays between the 0+ ground state of the even-even reference nuclei and the Jπ=3+,4-,5+,6-,7+,8- states of the neighboring odd-odd nuclei are derived for possible experimental verification. The present results could also shed light to the magnitudes of the NMEs corresponding to the high-forbidden unique 0+→Jπ=3+,4-,5+,6-,7+,8- virtual transitions taking part in the neutrinoless double beta decays.

  12. Direct mapping of spin and orbital entangled wave functions under interband spin-orbit coupling of giant Rashba spin-split surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Ryo; Kuroda, Kenta; Yaji, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Sakano, M.; Harasawa, A.; Kondo, Takeshi; Komori, F.; Shin, S.

    2017-01-01

    We use spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES) combined with a polarization-variable laser and investigate the spin-orbit coupling effect under interband hybridization of Rashba spin-split states for the surface alloys Bi/Ag(111) and Bi/Cu(111). In addition to the conventional band mapping of photoemission for Rashba spin splitting, the different orbital and spin parts of the surface wave function are directly imaged into energy-momentum space. It is unambiguously revealed that the interband spin-orbit coupling modifies the spin and orbital character of the Rashba surface states leading to the enriched spin-orbital entanglement and the pronounced momentum dependence of the spin polarization. The hybridization thus strongly deviates the spin and orbital characters from the standard Rashba model. The complex spin texture under interband spin-orbit hybridization proposed by first-principles calculation is experimentally unraveled by SARPES with a combination of p - and s -polarized light.

  13. Spectral resampling based on user-defined inter-band correlation filter: C3 and C4 grass species classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjorlolo, Clement; Mutanga, Onisimo; Cho, Moses A.; Ismail, Riyad

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a user-defined inter-band correlation filter function was used to resample hyperspectral data and thereby mitigate the problem of multicollinearity in classification analysis. The proposed resampling technique convolves the spectral dependence information between a chosen band-centre and its shorter and longer wavelength neighbours. Weighting threshold of inter-band correlation (WTC, Pearson's r) was calculated, whereby r = 1 at the band-centre. Various WTC (r = 0.99, r = 0.95 and r = 0.90) were assessed, and bands with coefficients beyond a chosen threshold were assigned r = 0. The resultant data were used in the random forest analysis to classify in situ C3 and C4 grass canopy reflectance. The respective WTC datasets yielded improved classification accuracies (kappa = 0.82, 0.79 and 0.76) with less correlated wavebands when compared to resampled Hyperion bands (kappa = 0.76). Overall, the results obtained from this study suggested that resampling of hyperspectral data should account for the spectral dependence information to improve overall classification accuracy as well as reducing the problem of multicollinearity.

  14. Measurement of the decay B →D ℓνℓ in fully reconstructed events and determination of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vc b|

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glattauer, R.; Schwanda, C.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, V.; Barberio, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Breibeck, F.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Greenwald, D.; Haba, J.; Hamer, P.; Hara, T.; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsu, C.-L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, I. S.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; MacNaughton, J.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yook, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We present a determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vc b| using the decay B →D ℓνℓ (ℓ=e ,μ ) based on 711 fb-1 of e+e-→ϒ (4 S ) data recorded by the Belle detector and containing 772 ×106 B B ¯ pairs. One B meson in the event is fully reconstructed in a hadronic decay mode, while the other, on the signal side, is partially reconstructed from a charged lepton and either a D+ or D0 meson in a total of 23 hadronic decay modes. The isospin-averaged branching fraction of the decay B →D ℓνℓ is found to be B (B0→D-ℓ+νℓ )=(2.31 ±0.03 (stat )±0.11 (syst ))% . Analyzing the differential decay rate as a function of the hadronic recoil with the parametrization of Caprini, Lellouch, and Neubert and using the form-factor prediction G (1 ) =1.0541 ±0.0083 calculated by FNAL/MILC, we obtain ηEW|Vc b| =(40.12 ±1.34 )×10-3 , where ηEW is the electroweak correction factor. Alternatively, assuming the model-independent form-factor parametrization of Boyd, Grinstein, and Lebed and using lattice QCD data from the FNAL/MILC and HPQCD collaborations, we find ηEW|Vc b| =(41.10 ±1.14 )×10-3 .

  15. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp →ϕp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moriya, K.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp →ϕp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s ) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the ϕ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the ϕ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (ϕ →K+K-) and neutral- (ϕ →KS0KL0) KK ¯ decay modes of the ϕ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K- track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed ϕ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-modes, respectively. Possible effects from K+Λ* channels with pKK ¯ final states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive ϕ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.

  16. Determination of the Form Factors for the Decay B0 to D*- l+ nu_l and of the CKM Matrix Element |Vcb|

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-06-06

    We present a combined measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V{sub cb}| and of the parameters {rho}{sup 2}, R{sub 1}(1), and R{sub 2}(1), which fully characterize the form factors for the B{sup 0} {yields} D*-{ell}+?{sub {ell}} decay in the framework of HQET. The results, based on a selected sample of about 52,800 B{sup 0} {yields} D*-{ell}+?{sub {ell}} decays, recorded by the BABAR detector, are {rho}{sup 2} = 1.156 {+-} 0.094 {+-} 0.028, R{sub 1}(1) = 1.329{+-}0.131{+-}0.044, R{sub 2}(1) = 0.859{+-}0.077{+-}0.022, and F(1)|V{sub cb}| = (35.0{+-}0.4{+-}1.1)x10-3. The first error is the statistical and the second is the systematic uncertainty. Combining these measurements with the previous BABAR measurement of the form factors, which employs a different ?t technique on a partial sample of the data, we improve the statistical precision of the result, {rho}{sup 2} = 1.179 {+-} 0.048 {+-} 0.028,R{sub 1}(1) = 1.417 {+-} 0.061 {+-} 0.044,R{sub 2}(1) = 0.836 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.022, and F(1)|V{sub cb}| = (34.7 {+-} 0.3 {+-} 1.1) x 10-3. Using lattice calculations for the axial form factor F(1), we extract |V{sub cb}| = (37.7{+-}0.3{+-}1.2{+-}{sup 1.2}{sub 1.4})x10{sup -3}, where the third error is due to the uncertainty in F(1). We also present a measurement of the exclusive branching fraction, B = (4.77 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.39)%.

  17. ({sup 3}He,t) reaction on the double {beta} decay nucleus {sup 48}Ca and the importance of nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Grewe, E.-W.; Frekers, D.; Rakers, S.; Baeumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Thies, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Botha, N. T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Neveling, R.

    2007-11-15

    High-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) measurements on the double {beta}-decay ({beta}{beta}) nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been performed at RCNP (Osaka, Japan) to determine Gamow-Teller (GT{sup -}) transitions to the nucleus {sup 48}Sc, which represents the intermediate nucleus in the second-order perturbative description of the {beta}{beta} decay. At a bombarding energy of E{sub {sup 3}He}=420 MeV an excitation energy resolution of 40 keV was achieved. The measurements were performed at two angle positions of the Grand Raiden Spectrometer (GRS): 0 deg. and 2.5 deg. The results of both settings were combined to achieve angular distributions, by which the character of single transitions could be determined. To characterize the different multipoles, theoretical angular distributions for states with J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +},2{sup +},2{sup -}, and 3{sup +} were calculated using the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) Code DW81. The GT{sup -} strength was extracted up to E{sub x}=7 MeV and combined with corresponding GT{sup +} strength deduced from the {sup 48}Ti(d,{sup 2}He){sup 48}Sc data to calculate the low-energy part of the {beta}{beta}-decay matrix element for the {sup 48}Ca 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay. We show that after applying trivial momentum corrections to the ({sup 3}He,t) spectrum, the two reaction probes (p,n) and ({sup 3}He,t) reveal a spectral response to an impressively high degree of similarity in the region of low momentum transfer.

  18. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; ...

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L)more » $$K\\bar{K}$$ decay modes of the Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with p$$K\\bar{K}$$ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.« less

  19. Determination of the Form Factors for the Decay B0 -> D*-l+nu_l and of the CKM Matrix Element |Vcb|

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    The authors present a combined measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V{sub cb}| and of the parameters {rho}{sup 2}, R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, which fully characterize the form factors of the B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} decay in the framework of HQET, based on a sample of about 52,800 B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} decays recorded by the BABAR detector. The kinematical information of the fully reconstructed decay is used to extract the following values for the parameters (where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic): {rho}{sup 2} = 1.156 {+-} 0.094 {+-} 0.028, R{sub 1} = 1.329 {+-} 0.131 {+-} 0.044, R{sub 2} = 0.859 {+-} 0.077 {+-} 0.022, F(1)|V{sub cb}| = (35.03 {+-} 0.39 {+-} 1.15) x 10{sup -3}. By combining these measurements with the previous BABAR measurements of the form factors which employs a different technique on a partial sample of the data, they improve the statistical accuracy of the measurement, obtaining: {rho}{sup 2} = 1.179 {+-} 0.048 {+-} 0.028, R{sub 1} = 1.417 {+-} 0.061 {+-} 0.044, R{sub 2}, = 0.836 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.022, and F(1)|V{sub cb}| = (34.68 {+-} 0.32 {+-} 1.15) x 10{sup -3}. Using the lattice calculations for the axial form factor F(1), they extract |V{sub cb}| = (37.74 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 1.25 {+-} {sub 1.44}{sup 1.23}) x 10{sup -3}, where the third error is due to the uncertainty in F(1).

  20. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method with Quasi-Monte Carlo integration

    SciTech Connect

    Lujan, Paul Joseph

    2009-12-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the top quark mass obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. The measurement uses a matrix element integration method to calculate a t$\\bar{t}$ likelihood, employing a Quasi-Monte Carlo integration, which enables us to take into account effects due to finite detector angular resolution and quark mass effects. We calculate a t$\\bar{t}$ likelihood as a 2-D function of the top pole mass mt and ΔJES, where ΔJES parameterizes the uncertainty in our knowledge of the jet energy scale; it is a shift applied to all jet energies in units of the jet-dependent systematic error. By introducing ΔJES into the likelihood, we can use the information contained in W boson decays to constrain ΔJES and reduce error due to this uncertainty. We use a neural network discriminant to identify events likely to be background, and apply a cut on the peak value of individual event likelihoods to reduce the effect of badly reconstructed events. This measurement uses a total of 4.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, requiring events with a lepton, large ET, and exactly four high-energy jets in the pseudorapidity range |η| < 2.0, of which at least one must be tagged as coming from a b quark. In total, we observe 738 events before and 630 events after applying the likelihood cut, and measure mt = 172.6 ± 0.9 (stat.) ± 0.7 (JES) ± 1.1 (syst.) GeV/c2, or mt = 172.6 ± 1.6 (tot.) GeV/c2.

  1. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I. J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moriya, K.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L) $K\\bar{K}$ decay modes of the Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with p$K\\bar{K}$ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.

  2. Doping-Induced Type-II to Type-I Transition and Interband Optical Gain in InAs/AlSb Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolokolov, K. I.; Ning, C. Z.

    2003-01-01

    We show that proper doping of the barrier regions can convert the well-known type-II InAs/AlSb QWs to type I, producing strong interband transitions comparable to regular type-I QWs. The interband gain for TM mode is as high as 4000 l/cm, thus providing an important alternative material system in the mid-infrared wavelength range. We also study the TE and TM gain as functions of doping level and intrinsic electron-hole density.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

    1962-04-17

    A boron-10 containing reactor control element wherein the boron-10 is dispersed in a matrix material is describeri. The concentration of boron-10 in the matrix varies transversely across the element from a minimum at the surface to a maximum at the center of the element, prior to exposure to neutrons. (AEC)

  4. Forward problem solution as the operator of filtered and back projection matrix to reconstruct the various method of data collection and the object element model in electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ain, Khusnul; Kurniadi, Deddy; Suprijanto; Santoso, Oerip; Wibowo, Arif

    2015-04-16

    Back projection reconstruction has been implemented to get the dynamical image in electrical impedance tomography. However the implementation is still limited in method of adjacent data collection and circular object element model. The study aims to develop the methods of back projection as reconstruction method that has the high speed, accuracy, and flexibility, which can be used for various methods of data collection and model of the object element. The proposed method uses the forward problem solution as the operator of filtered and back projection matrix. This is done through a simulation study on several methods of data collection and various models of the object element. The results indicate that the developed method is capable of producing images, fastly and accurately for reconstruction of the various methods of data collection and models of the object element.

  5. Compact CH4 sensor system based on a continuous-wave, low power consumption, room temperature interband cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Gluszek, Aleksander K.; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-01-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based methane sensor, employing a dense-pattern multi-pass gas cell and a 3.3 μm, CW, DFB, room temperature interband cascade laser (ICL), is reported. The optical integration based on an advanced folded optical path design and an efficient ICL control system with appropriate electrical power management resulted in a CH4 sensor with a small footprint (32 × 20 × 17 cm3) and low-power consumption (6 W). Polynomial and least-squares fit algorithms are employed to remove the baseline of the spectral scan and retrieve CH4 concentrations, respectively. An Allan-Werle deviation analysis shows that the measurement precision can reach 1.4 ppb for a 60 s averaging time. Continuous measurements covering a seven-day period were performed to demonstrate the stability and robustness of the reported CH4 sensor system.

  6. Interband resonant transitions in two-dimensional hexagonal lattices: Rabi oscillations, Zener tunnelling, and tunnelling of phase dislocations.

    PubMed

    Shchesnovich, Valery S; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-09-01

    We study, analytically and numerically, the dynamics of interband transitions in two-dimensional hexagonal periodic photonic lattices. We develop an analytical approach employing the Bragg resonances of different types and derive the effective multi-level models of the Landau-Zener-Majorana type. For two-dimensional periodic potentials without a tilt, we demonstrate the possibility of the Rabi oscillations between the resonant Fourier amplitudes. In a biased lattice, i.e., for a two-dimensional periodic potential with an additional linear tilt, we identify three basic types of the interband transitions or Zener tunnelling. First, this is a quasi-one-dimensional tunnelling that involves only two Bloch bands and occurs when the Bloch index crosses the Bragg planes away from one of the high-symmetry points. In contrast, at the high-symmetry points (i.e., at the M and Gamma points), the Zener tunnelling is essentially two-dimensional, and it involves either three or six Bloch bands being described by the corresponding multi-level Landau-Zener-Majorana systems. We verify our analytical results by numerical simulations and observe an excellent agreement. Finally, we show that phase dislocations, or optical vortices, can tunnel between the spectral bands preserving their topological charge. Our theory describes the propagation of light beams in fabricated or optically-induced two-dimensional photonic lattices, but it can also be applied to the physics of cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates tunnelling in tilted two-dimensional optical potentials and other types of resonant wave propagation in periodic media.

  7. Band edge modulation and interband optical transition in AlN:Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}}-O_{{\\rm{N}}} nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pu; Shi, Jun-jie; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Xin-he; Zhong, Hong-xia; Ding, Yi-min; Lu, Jing; Wang, Xihua

    2014-04-01

    AlN nanotubes (NTs) have many novel characteristics and great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic nanodevices. However, little is known about the influence of Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}}-O_{{\\rm{N}}} co-doping effects on their optical properties. Here, we focus on investigating the electronic structures, clarify the interband optical transition mechanism and give a clear atomic picture for the important electron/hole localization centre in AlN:Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}}-O_{{\\rm{N}}} NTs using the GGA-1/2 method. We find that the Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}} doping efficiency can be improved effectively due to O_{{\\rm{N}}} doping in AlN NTs. The Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}} and O_{{\\rm{N}}} form Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}}-O_{{\\rm{N}}} defect complex easily along the AlN NT axis (C-axis). The Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}}-O_{{\\rm{N}}} defect complex can result in a remarkable charge transfer around it and modify the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum significantly. Meanwhile, the Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}}-O_{{\\rm{N}}} defect complex also forms the important exciton localization centre and effectively enhances the interband radiative recombination rate. Moreover, the light emission/absorption sensitively depends on its polarization. The parallel polarized light ({\\mathbf{E}}\\shortparallel {\\rm{C}}) is much stronger than the perpendicular one ({\\mathbf{E}}\\bot {\\rm{C}}). The Mg_{{\\rm{Al}}}-O_{{\\rm{N}}} co-doping thus paves a new way for improving the performance of electronic and optoelectronic nanodevices based on AlN NTs.

  8. Inelastic scattering matrix elements for the nonadiabatic collision B(2P1/2)+H2(1Σg+,j)<-->B(2P3/2)+H2(1Σg+,j')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David E.; Niday, Thomas A.; Yang, Sang H.

    2006-10-01

    Inelastic scattering matrix elements for the nonadiabatic collision B(P1/22)+H2(Σg+1,j)↔B(P3/22)+H2(Σg+1,j') are calculated using the time dependent channel packet method (CPM). The calculation employs 1A'2, 2A'2, and 1A″2 adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces determined by numerical computation at the multireference configuration-interaction level [M. H. Alexander, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 6041 (1993)]. The 1A'2 and 2A'2, adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces are transformed to yield diabatic electronic potential energy surfaces that, when combined with the total B +H2 rotational kinetic energy, yield a set of effective potential energy surfaces [M. H. Alexander et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7956 (1995)]. Within the framework of the CPM, the number of effective potential energy surfaces used for the scattering matrix calculation is then determined by the size of the angular momentum basis used as a representation. Twenty basis vectors are employed for these calculations, and the corresponding effective potential energy surfaces are identified in the asymptotic limit by the H2 rotor quantum numbers j =0, 2, 4, 6 and B electronic states Pja2, ja=1/2, 3/2. Scattering matrix elements are obtained from the Fourier transform of the correlation function between channel packets evolving in time on these effective potential energy surfaces. For these calculations the H2 bond length is constrained to a constant value of req=1.402a.u. and state to state scattering matrix elements corresponding to a total angular momentum of J =1/2 are discussed for j =0↔j'=0,2,4 and P1/22↔P1/22, P3/22 over a range of total energy between 0.0 and 0.01a.u.

  9. Inelastic scattering matrix elements for the nonadiabatic collision B(2P1/2)+H2(1Sigmag+,j)<-->B(2P3/2)+H2(1Sigmag+,j').

    PubMed

    Weeks, David E; Niday, Thomas A; Yang, Sang H

    2006-10-28

    Inelastic scattering matrix elements for the nonadiabatic collision B(2P1/2)+H2(1Sigmag+,j)<-->B(2P3/2)+H2(1Sigmag+,j') are calculated using the time dependent channel packet method (CPM). The calculation employs 1 2A', 2 2A', and 1 2A" adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces determined by numerical computation at the multireference configuration-interaction level [M. H. Alexander, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 6041 (1993)]. The 1 2A' and 2 2A', adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces are transformed to yield diabatic electronic potential energy surfaces that, when combined with the total B+H2 rotational kinetic energy, yield a set of effective potential energy surfaces [M. H. Alexander et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7956 (1995)]. Within the framework of the CPM, the number of effective potential energy surfaces used for the scattering matrix calculation is then determined by the size of the angular momentum basis used as a representation. Twenty basis vectors are employed for these calculations, and the corresponding effective potential energy surfaces are identified in the asymptotic limit by the H2 rotor quantum numbers j=0, 2, 4, 6 and B electronic states 2Pja, ja=1/2, 3/2. Scattering matrix elements are obtained from the Fourier transform of the correlation function between channel packets evolving in time on these effective potential energy surfaces. For these calculations the H2 bond length is constrained to a constant value of req=1.402 a.u. and state to state scattering matrix elements corresponding to a total angular momentum of J=1/2 are discussed for j=0<-->j'=0,2,4 and 2P1/2<-->2P1/2, 2P3/2 over a range of total energy between 0.0 and 0.01 a.u.

  10. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  11. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson associated with a W Boson using Matrix Element Technique in the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez

    2010-05-01

    method used to estimate the background contribution. The Matrix Element method, that was successfully used in the single top discovery analysis and many other analyses within the CDF collaboration, is the multivariate technique used in this thesis to discriminate signal from background events. With this technique is possible to calculate a probability for an event to be classified as signal or background. These probabilities are then combined into a discriminant function called the Event Probability Discriminant, EPD, which increases the sensitivity of the WH process. This method is described in detail in Chapter 7. As no evidence for the signal has been found, the results obtained with this work are presented in Chapter 8 in terms of exclusion regions as a function of the mass of the Higgs boso, taking into account the full systematics. The conclusions of this work to obtain the PhD are presnted in Chapter 9.

  12. Property Evaluation and Damage Evolution of Environmental Barrier Coatings and Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Sub-Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael; Jaskowiak, Martha; Hurst, Janet; Bhatt, Ram; Fox, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes recent development of environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. The creep and fatigue behavior at aggressive long-term high temperature conditions have been evaluated and highlighted. Thermal conductivity and high thermal gradient cyclic durability of environmental barrier coatings have been evaluated. The damage accumulation and complex stress-strain behavior environmental barrier coatings on SiCSiC ceramic matrix composite turbine airfoil subelements during the thermal cyclic and fatigue testing of have been also reported.

  13. Spin-density matrix elements for γp→K*0Σ+ at Eγ=1.85-3.0 GeV with evidence for the κ(800) meson exchange.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S H; Hicks, K; Ahn, J K; Nakano, T; Ahn, D S; Chang, W C; Chen, J Y; Daté, S; Ejiri, H; Fujimura, H; Fujiwara, M; Fukui, S; Gohn, W; Hotta, T; Imai, K; Ishikawa, T; Joo, K; Kato, Y; Kohri, H; Kon, Y; Lee, H S; Maeda, Y; Miyabe, M; Mibe, T; Morino, Y; Muramatsu, N; Nakatsugawa, Y; Niiyama, M; Noumi, H; Oh, Y; Ohashi, Y; Ohta, T; Oka, M; Parker, J; Rangacharyulu, C; Ryu, S Y; Sawada, T; Sugaya, Y; Sumihama, M; Tsunemi, T; Uchida, M; Ungaro, M; Yosoi, M

    2012-03-02

    The exclusive reaction γp→K(+)π(-)Σ(+) was measured for the first time using linearly polarized photons at beam energies from 1.85 to 2.96 GeV. Angular distributions in the rest frame of the K(+)π(-) system were fitted to extract spin-density matrix elements of the K(*0) decay. The measured parity spin asymmetry shows that natural-parity exchange is dominant in this reaction. This result clearly indicates the need for t-channel exchange of the κ(800) scalar meson.

  14. Estimation of the coordinates of several signal sources from the algebraic properties of the matrix of cross correlation moments of signals at the outputs of the receiving elements of an antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanov, Iu. A.; Korobko, O. V.; Tauroginskii, B. I.

    1985-07-01

    The paper examines the question of the existence of the weight vector of an antenna array in the case of which the array amplitude pattern can be represented by a polynomial whose degree is equal to the number of signal sources, while the roots of the polynomial uniquely correspond to the angular coordinates of the sources. It is shown that this weight vector is a linear combination of eigenvectors corresponding to the minimum eigenvalue of the matrix of the cross correlation moments of signals at the outputs of the receiving elements of the array.

  15. A matrix effect and accuracy evaluation for the determination of elements in milk powder LIBS and laser ablation/ICP-OES spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gilon, N; El-Haddad, J; Stankova, A; Lei, W; Ma, Q; Motto-Ros, V; Yu, J

    2011-11-01

    Laser ablation coupled to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) were investigated for the determination of Ca, Mg, Zn and Na in milk samples. The accuracy of both methods was evaluated by comparison of the concentration found using LA-ICP-OES and LIBS with classical wet digestion associated with ICP-OES determination. The results were not fully acceptable, with biases from less than 1% to more than 60%. Matrix effects were also investigated. The sample matrix can influence the temperature, electron number density (n (e)) and other excitation characteristics in the ICP. These ICP characteristics were studied and evaluated during ablation of eight milk samples. Differences in n (e) (from 8.9 to 13.8 × 10(14) cm(-3)) and rotational temperature (ranging from 3,400 to 4,400 K) occurred with no correlation with trueness. LIBS results obtained after classical external calibration procedure gave degraded accuracy, indicating a strong matrix effect. The LIBS measurements clearly showed that the major problem in LA-ICP was related to the ablation process and that LIBS spectroscopy is an excellent diagnostic tool for LA-ICP techniques.

  16. Plasmonic Hot Hole Generation by Interband Transition in Gold-Polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Barman, Tapan; Hussain, Amreen A; Sharma, Bikash; Pal, Arup R

    2015-12-10

    Studies on hot carrier science and technology associated with various types of nanostructures are dominating today's nanotechnology research. Here we report a novel synthesis of polyaniline-gold (PAni-Au) nanocomposite thin films with gold nanostructures (AuNs) of desired shape and size uniformly incorporated in the polymer matrix. According to shape as well as size variation of AuNs, two tunable plasmonic UV-Visible absorption bands are observed in each of the nanocomposites. Plasmonic devices are fabricated using PAni-Au nanocomposite having different UV-Visible plasmon absorption bands. However, all the devices show strong photoelectrical responses in the blue region (400-500 nm) of the visible spectrum. The d-band to sp-band (d-sp) transition of electrons in AuNs produces hot holes that are the only carriers in the material responsible for photocurrent generation in the device. This work provides an experimental evidence of novel plasmonic hot hole generation process that was still a prediction.

  17. Plasmonic Hot Hole Generation by Interband Transition in Gold-Polyaniline

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Tapan; Hussain, Amreen A.; Sharma, Bikash; Pal, Arup R.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on hot carrier science and technology associated with various types of nanostructures are dominating today’s nanotechnology research. Here we report a novel synthesis of polyaniline-gold (PAni-Au) nanocomposite thin films with gold nanostructures (AuNs) of desired shape and size uniformly incorporated in the polymer matrix. According to shape as well as size variation of AuNs, two tunable plasmonic UV-Visible absorption bands are observed in each of the nanocomposites. Plasmonic devices are fabricated using PAni-Au nanocomposite having different UV-Visible plasmon absorption bands. However, all the devices show strong photoelectrical responses in the blue region (400–500 nm) of the visible spectrum. The d-band to sp-band (d-sp) transition of electrons in AuNs produces hot holes that are the only carriers in the material responsible for photocurrent generation in the device. This work provides an experimental evidence of novel plasmonic hot hole generation process that was still a prediction. PMID:26656664

  18. Inter-band interference suppression in multi-band OFDM-PON uplink transmission using window shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Hun; Jung, Sang-Min; Jung, Sun-Young; Kang, Soo-Min; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-01-01

    We propose window shaping based inter-band interference suppression technique in multi-band orthogonal frequency division multiple access (MB-OFDMA) based passive optical network (PON) system. Conventional MB-OFDMA and raised-cosine (RC) windowed MB-OFDMA were compared in QPSK transmission and adaptive modulation scenario. The effect of OFDM clipping ratio is analyzed, which is used to mitigate peak to average power ratio (PAPR) problem at the transmitter. Also, the MB-OFDMA based multiple access performance is investigated according to the different roll-off factor of RC window in terms of error vector magnitude (EVM) and effective bit rate. Compared with the conventional MB-OFDMA which is rectangular windowed, the RC-windowed MB-OFDMA shows better performance by suppressed sidelobe which leads to IBI. The maximum effective bit rate of 10 Gbps was achieved for 20 km transmission scenario at optimum roll-off factor, while it was 9 Gbps in the conventional MB-OFDMA transmission.

  19. Effect of crystal-field splitting and interband hybridization on the metal-insulator transitions of strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteryaev, Alexander I.; Ferrero, Michel; Georges, Antoine; Parcollet, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    We investigate a quarter-filled two-band Hubbard model involving a crystal-field splitting, which lifts the orbital degeneracy as well as an interorbital hopping (interband hybridization). Both terms are relevant to the realistic description of correlated materials such as transition-metal oxides. The nature of the Mott metal-insulator transition is clarified and is found to depend on the magnitude of the crystal-field splitting. At large values of the splitting, a transition from a two-band to a one-band metal is first found as the on-site repulsion is increased and is followed by a Mott transition for the remaining band, which follows the single-band (Brinkman-Rice) scenario well documented previously within dynamical mean-field theory. At small values of the crystal-field splitting, a direct transition from a two-band metal to a Mott insulator with partial orbital polarization is found, which takes place simultaneously for both orbitals. This transition is characterized by a vanishing of the quasiparticle weight for the majority orbital but has a first-order character for the minority orbital. It is pointed out that finite-temperature effects may easily turn the metallic regime into a bad metal close to the orbital polarization transition in the metallic phase.

  20. Combined influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on interband emission energy of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-11-01

    We explore the profiles of interband emission energy (IEE) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) under the simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) and in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In this regard, modulation of IEE by the variation of several other relevant quantities such as electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential and aluminium concentration has also been investigated. Gradual alteration of HP and T affects IEE discernibly. Inclusion of noise has been found to enhance or deplete the IEE depending upon its mode of application. Moreover, under given conditions of temperature and pressure, the difference between the impurity-free ground state energy and the binding energy appears to be crucial in determining whether or not the profiles of IEE would resemble that of binding energy. The findings reveal fascinating role played by noise in tailoring the IEE of doped QD system under conspicuous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  1. Optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a 3.24 μm interband cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Manfred, K. M.; Ritchie, G. A. D.; Lang, N.; Röpcke, J.; Helden, J. H. van

    2015-06-01

    The development of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) has made the strong C-H transitions in the 3 μm spectral region increasingly accessible. We present the demonstration of a single mode distributed feedback ICL coupled to a V-shaped optical cavity in an optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) experiment. We achieved a minimum detectable absorption coefficient, α{sub min}, of (7.1±0.2)×10{sup −8} cm{sup −1} for a spectrum of CH{sub 4} at 3.24 μm with a two second acquisition time (100 scans averaged). This corresponds to a detection limit of 3 ppb CH{sub 4} at atmospheric pressure, which is comparable to previously reported OF-CEAS instruments with diode lasers or quantum cascade lasers. The ability to frequency lock an ICL source in the important 3 μm region to an optical cavity holds great promise for future spectroscopic applications.

  2. Multi-species sensing using multi-mode absorption spectroscopy with mid-infrared interband cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, S.; Northern, J. H.; Gras, B.; Ewart, P.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Merritt, C. D.; Bewley, W. W.; Canedy, C. L.; Vurgaftman, I.; Meyer, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    The application of an interband cascade laser, ICL, to multi-mode absorption spectroscopy, MUMAS, in the mid-infrared region is reported. Measurements of individual mode linewidths of the ICL, derived from the pressure dependence of lineshapes in MUMAS signatures of single, isolated, lines in the spectrum of HCl, were found to be in the range 10-80 MHz. Multi-line spectra of methane were recorded using spectrally limited bandwidths, of approximate width 27 cm-1, defined by an interference filter, and consist of approximately 80 modes at spectral locations spanning the 100 cm-1 bandwidth of the ICL output. Calibration of the methane pressures derived from MUMAS data using a capacitance manometer provided measurements with an uncertainty of 1.1 %. Multi-species sensing is demonstrated by the simultaneous detection of methane, acetylene and formaldehyde in a gas mixture. Individual partial pressures of the three gases are derived from best fits of model MUMAS signatures to the data with an experimental error of 10 %. Using an ICL, with an inter-mode interval of ~10 GHz, MUMAS spectra were recorded at pressures in the range 1-10 mbar, and, based on the data, a potential minimum detection limit of the order of 100 ppmv is estimated for MUMAS at atmospheric pressure using an inter-mode interval of 80 GHz.

  3. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit.more » In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.« less

  4. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit. In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.

  5. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  6. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  7. Multiregional periodic matrix for modeling the population dynamics of sardine (Sardina pilchardus) along the moroccan atlantic coast: management elements for fisheries.

    PubMed

    Serghini, Mansour; Boutayeb, Abdesslam; Auger, Pierre; Charouki, Najib; Ramzi, Azeddine; Ettahiri, Omar; Tchuente, Maurice

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a deterministic time discrete mathematical model based on multiregional periodic matrices to describe the dynamics of Sardina pilchardus in the Central Atlantic area of the Moroccan coast. This model deals with two stages (immature and mature) and three spatial zones where sardines are supposed to migrate from one zone to another. The population dynamics is described by an autonomous recurrence equation N(t + 1) = A.N(t), where A is a positive matrix whose entries are estimated using data collected during biannual acoustic surveys carried out from 2001 to 2003 onboard the Norwegian research vessel "Dr Fridtjof Nansen". The dominant eigenvalue lambda of A that gives the long-term growth rate of fish population is smaller than one. This agrees with the stock decrease observed in the data collected. We show that lambda is highly sensitive to the recruitment rate and much less sensitive to the reproduction rate. These results can clearly be used to define an efficient scenario in order to fight for instance against a stock decrease.

  8. Effect of alloying elements on the composition of carbide phases and mechanical properties of the matrix of high-carbon chromium-vanadium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V. I.; Tarasenko, L. V.; Utkina, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the results of phase physicochemical analysis of high-carbon chromium-vanadium steel, the predominant type of carbide that provides high wear resistance has been established, and its amount and amount of carbon in martensite have been determined. Data on the composition and the amount of carbide phase and on the chemical composition of the martensite of high-carbon steel have been obtained, which allows determination of the alloying-element concentration limits. The mechanical testing of heats of a chosen chemical composition has been carried out after quenching and low-temperature tempering. The tests have demonstrated benefits of new steel in wear resistance and bending strength with the fatigue strength being retained, compared to steels subjected to cementation. The mechanism of secondary strengthening of the steel upon high-temperature tempering has been revealed. High-temperature tempering can be applied to articles that are required to possess both high wear resistance and heat resistance.

  9. Determination of rare earth element in carbonate using laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry: an examination of the influence of the matrix on laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2007-02-05

    In this study, we examined the influence of the matrix on rare earth element (REE) analyses of carbonate with laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) using carbonate and NIST glass standards. A UV 213 nm Nd:YAG laser system was coupled to an ICP-MS. Laser-ablation was carried out in both He and Ar atmospheres to investigate the influence of ablation gas on the analytical results. A small amount of N2 gas was added to the carrier gas to enhance the signal intensities. Synthetic CaCO3 standards, doped with REEs, as well as NIST glasses (NIST SRM 610 and 612) were used as calibration standards. Carbonatite, which is composed of pure calcite, was analyzed as carbonate samples. The degree of the influence of the matrix on the results was evaluated by comparing the results, which were calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards. With laser-ablation in a He atmosphere, the differences between the results calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards were less than 10% across the REE series, except for those of La which were 25%. In contrast, for the measurements made in an Ar atmosphere, the results calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards differed by 25-40%. It was demonstrated that the LA-ICP-MS system can provide quantitative analysis of REE concentrations in carbonate samples using non matrix-matched standards of NIST glasses.

  10. Blue and red shifts of interband transition energy in supported Au nanoclusters on SiO2 and HOPG investigated by reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borisyuk, P V; Troyan, V I; Pushkin, M A; Borman, V D; Tronin, V N

    2012-11-01

    Gold nanoclusters supported on SiO2 and HOPG are experimentally investigated by the reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Two different trends in the size-dependence of the position of the energy-loss peak corresponding to the interband Au 5d --> 6s6p transition is observed: a blue shift for Au clusters on SiO2 and a red shift for Au clusters on HOPG. The different behaviors are qualitatively explained by the influence of the substrate on the spectrum of electronic states in Au nanoclusters.

  11. Finite element and micromechanical modeling for investigating effective material properties of polymer-matrix nanocomposites with microfiber, reinforced by CNT arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahouneh, Vahid; Mashhadi, Mahmoud Mosavi; Naei, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-09-01

    This paper is motivated by the lack of studies to investigate the effect of fiber reinforced CNT arrays on the material properties of nanocomposites. To make a comprehensive study, this research work is conducted in two ways. Firstly, the effect of microfiber as reinforcement on the effective material properties is investigated; secondly, the study is carried on as the microfibers reinforced by CNT arrays. In both above-mentioned approaches, the results are compared to the results of generalized mixture rule which is known as a widely used micro-mechanical model. The representative volume element (RVE) is considered as a well-known method to investigate the effect of adding CNT arrays on the skin of microfibers. The results show that Generalized Mixture Rule cannot properly predict the effects of changing the length and diameter of nanotubes on the effective properties of nanocomposites. The main objective of this research work is to determine the effects of increasing nanotubes on the elastic properties which are achieved using two aforementioned methods including FE and rule of mixture. It is also absorbed; effective properties of RVE can be improved by increasing the volume fraction, length and decreasing CNT arrays diameter.

  12. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  13. Interband optical absorption in wurtzite MgxZn1-xO/ZnO/MgyZn1-yO asymmetric quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Z.; Zhu, Z. N.; Wang, M. M.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, M. S.; Qu, Y.; Ban, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    Based on Fermi golden rule, the optical absorption induced by interband transition of electrons and holes in wurtzite MgxZn1-xO/ZnO/MgyZn1-yO asymmetric quantum wells at room temperature has been discussed. The built-in electric field (BEF) and Poisson potential are considered to calculate the eigenstates and eigenenergies of electrons and holes. The interband optical absorption coefficients (IOACs) influenced by ternary mixed crystal and size effects as functions of incident photon wavelengths are presented. The results indicate that increasing Mg component in left barrier can enhance the BEF to enforce electrons (holes) close to the left (right) interface, so as to reduce the overlapping of their wave functions. Thus the IOAC peak decreases rapidly and presents a blue shift with the increment of Mg component x. Furthermore, the size effect on IOACs is also discussed. The absorption peak is more sensitive to the change of the well width than the left barrier size. The absorption peak reduces sharply and shows a red shift with the increase of the well width. Our results could provide guidance on experiments and device fabrication.

  14. Improved 206Pb/238U microprobe geochronology by the monitoring of a trace-element-related matrix effect; SHRIMP, ID-TIMS, ELA-ICP-MS and oxygen isotope documentation for a series of zircon standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, L.P.; Kamo, S.L.; Allen, C.M.; Davis, D.W.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Valley, J.W.; Mundil, R.; Campbell, I.H.; Korsch, R.J.; Williams, I.S.; Foudoulis, C.

    2004-01-01

    Precise isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) documentation is given for two new Palaeozoic zircon standards (TEMORA 2 and R33). These data, in combination with results for previously documented standards (AS3, SL13, QGNG and TEMORA 1), provide the basis for a detailed investigation of inconsistencies in 206Pb/238U ages measured by microprobe. Although these ages are normally consistent between any two standards, their relative age offsets are often different from those established by ID-TIMS. This is true for both sensitive high-resolution ion-microprobe (SHRIMP) and excimer laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ELA-ICP-MS) dating, although the age offsets are in the opposite sense for the two techniques. Various factors have been investigated for possible correlations with age bias, in an attempt to resolve why the accuracy of the method is worse than the indicated precision. Crystallographic orientation, position on the grain-mount and oxygen isotopic composition are unrelated to the bias. There are, however, striking correlations between the 206Pb/238U age offsets and P, Sm and, most particularly, Nd abundances in the zircons. Although these are not believed to be the primary cause of this apparent matrix effect, they indicate that ionisation of 206Pb/238U is influenced, at least in part, by a combination of trace elements. Nd is sufficiently representative of the controlling trace elements that it provides a quantitative means of correcting for the microprobe age bias. This approach has the potential to reduce age biases associated with different techniques, different instrumentation and different standards within and between laboratories. Crown Copyright ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence for single top-quark production in the s-channel in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector using the Matrix Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. 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E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. 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C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    This Letter presents evidence for single top-quark production in the s-channel using proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis is performed on events containing one isolated electron or muon, large missing transverse momentum and exactly two b-tagged jets in the final state. The analysed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. The signal is extracted using a maximum-likelihood fit of a discriminant which is based on the matrix element method and optimized in order to separate single-top-quark s-channel events from the main background contributions, which are top-quark pair production and W boson production in association with heavy-flavour jets. The measurement leads to an observed signal significance of 3.2 standard deviations and a measured cross-section of σs = 4.8 ± 0.8(stat.)-1.3+1.6 (syst.) pb, which is consistent with the Standard Model expectation. The expected significance for the analysis is 3.9 standard deviations.

  16. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; ...

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb⁻¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limitsmore » are set on σ(pp̄→WH)×B(H→bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.« less

  17. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb⁻¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on σ(pp̄→WH)×B(H→bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  18. Scattering Matrix Elements for the Nonadiabatic Collision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    is the insight the 2B H+ system lends to collisional de-excitation in the operation of diode-pumped alkali lasers 2 (DPALs). The Air Force is...no. 18, 1995. [8] W. F. Krupke , R. J. Beach, S. A. Payne, V. K. Kanz, and J. T. Early, "DPAL: A New Class of Lasers for CW Power Beaming at Ideal...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and

  19. Angular reduction in multiparticle matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, D. R.; Parke, W. C.

    1989-12-01

    A general method for reduction of coupled spherical harmonic products is presented. When the total angular coupling is zero, the reduction leads to an explicitly real expression in the scalar products of the unit vector arguments of the spherical harmonics. For nonscalar couplings, the reduction gives Cartesian tensor forms for the spherical harmonic products; tensors built from the physical vectors in the original expression. The reduction for arbitrary couplings is given in closed form, making it amenable to symbolic manipulation on a computer. The final expressions do not depend on a special choice of coordinate axes, nor do they contain azimuthal quantum number summations, or do they have complex tensor terms for couplings to a scalar; consequently, they are easily interpretable from the properties of the physical vectors they contain.

  20. Application of Heisenberg's S matrix program to the angular scattering of the H + D2(v(i) = 0, j(i) = 0) → HD(v(f) = 3, j(f) = 0) + D reaction: piecewise S matrix elements using linear, quadratic, step-function, and top-hat parametrizations.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiao; Connor, J N L

    2012-11-26

    A previous paper by Shan and Connor (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2011, 13, 8392) reported the surprising result that four simple parametrized S matrices can reproduce the forward-angle glory scattering of the H + D(2)(v(i)=0,j(i)=0) → HD(v(f)=3,j(f)=0) + D reaction, whose differential cross section (DCS) had been computed in a state-of-the-art scattering calculation for a state-of-the-art potential energy surface. Here, v and j are vibrational and rotational quantum numbers, respectively, and the translational energy is 1.81 eV. This paper asks the question: Can we replace the analytic functions (of class C(ω)) used by Shan-Connor with simpler mathematical functions and still reproduce the forward-angle glory scattering? We first construct S matrix elements (of class C(0)) using a quadratic phase and a piecewise-continuous pre-exponential factor consisting of three pieces. Two of the pieces are constants, with one taking the value N (a real normalization constant) at small values of the total angular momentum number, J; the other piece has the value 0 at large J. These two pieces are joined at intermediate values of J by either a straight line, giving rise to the linear parametrization (denoted param L), or a quadratic curve, which defines the quadratic parametrization (param Q). We find that both param L and param Q can reproduce the glory scattering for center-of-mass reactive scattering angles, θ(R) ≲ 30°. Second, we use a piecewise-discontinuous pre-exponential factor and a quadratic phase, giving rise to a step-function parametrization (param SF) and a top-hat parametrization (param TH). We find that both param SF and param TH can reproduce the forward-angle scattering, even though these class C(-1) parametrizations are usually considered too simplistic to be useful for calculations of DCSs. We find that an ultrasimplistic param THz, which is param TH with a phase of zero, can also reproduce the glory scattering at forward angles. The S matrix elements for

  1. Matrix thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  2. Conversion of Osculating Orbital Elements to Mean Orbital Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Der, Gim J.; Danchick, Roy

    1996-01-01

    Orbit determination and ephemeris generation or prediction over relatively long elapsed times can be accomplished with mean elements. The most simple and efficient method for orbit determination, which is also known as epoch point conversion, performs the conversion of osculating elements to mean elements by iterative procedures. Previous epoch point conversion methods are restricted to shorter elapsed times with linear convergence. The new method presented in this paper calculates an analytic initial guess of the unknown mean elements from a first order theory of secular perturbations and computes a transition matrix with accurate numerical partials. It thereby eliminates the problem of an inaccurate initial guess and an identity transition matrix employed by previous methods. With a good initial guess of the unknown mean elements and an accurate transition matrix, converging osculating elements to mean elements can be accomplished over long elapsed times with quadratic convergence.

  3. Ppb-level mid-infrared ethane detection based on three measurement schemes using a 3.34-μm continuous-wave interband cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunguang; Zheng, Chuantao; Dong, Lei; Ye, Weilin; Tittel, Frank K.; Wang, Yiding

    2016-07-01

    A ppb-level mid-infrared ethane (C2H6) sensor was developed using a continuous-wave, thermoelectrically cooled, distributed feedback interband cascade laser emitting at 3.34 μm and a miniature dense patterned multipass gas cell with a 54.6-m optical path length. The performance of the sensor was investigated using two different techniques based on the tunable interband cascade laser: direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) and second-harmonic wavelength modulation spectroscopy (2 f-WMS). Three measurement schemes, DAS, WMS and quasi-simultaneous DAS and WMS, were realized based on the same optical sensor core. A detection limit of ~7.92 ppbv with a precision of ±30 ppbv for the separate DAS scheme with an averaging time of 1 s and a detection limit of ~1.19 ppbv with a precision of about ±4 ppbv for the separate WMS scheme with a 4-s averaging time were achieved. An Allan-Werle variance analysis indicated that the precisions can be further improved to 777 pptv @ 166 s for the separate DAS scheme and 269 pptv @ 108 s for the WMS scheme, respectively. For the quasi-simultaneous DAS and WMS scheme, both the 2 f signal and the direct absorption signal were simultaneously extracted using a LabVIEW platform, and four C2H6 samples (0, 30, 60 and 90 ppbv with nitrogen as the balance gas) were used as the target gases to assess the sensor performance. A detailed comparison of the three measurement schemes is reported. Atmospheric C2H6 measurements on the Rice University campus and a field test at a compressed natural gas station in Houston, TX, were conducted to evaluate the performance of the sensor system as a robust and reliable field-deployable sensor system.

  4. Sync Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, William C.; Metz, W. Chris; Mitrani, Jacques E.; Hewett, Jr., Paul L.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  5. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) = 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.

  6. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $$\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$= 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) =more » 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.« less

  7. Stokes scattering matrix for human skin.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Anak; Stamnes, Snorre; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Oyvind; Stamnes, Knut; Stamnes, Jakob J

    2012-11-01

    We use a layered model of normal human skin based on size distributions of polydisperse spherical particles and their complex refractive indices to compute the Stokes scattering matrix at wavelengths in the visible spectral band. The elements of the Stokes scattering matrix are required in a polarized radiative transfer code for a coupled air-tissue system to compute the polarized reflectance and examine how it is dependent on the vertical structure of the inherent optical properties of skin, including the phase matrix. Thus, the elements of the Stokes scattering matrix can be useful for investigating polarization-dependent light propagation in turbid optical media, such as human skin tissue.

  8. Cohesive Zone Model User Element

    SciTech Connect

    Tippetts, Trevor

    2007-04-17

    Cohesive Zone Model User Element (CZM UEL) is an implementation of a Cohesive Zone Model as an element for use in finite element simulations. CZM UEL computes a nodal force vector and stiffness matrix from a vector of nodal displacements. It is designed for structural analysts using finite element software to predict crack initiation, crack propagation, and the effect of a crack on the rest of a structure.

  9. Kinetics of generation, relaxation, and accumulation of electronic excitations under two-photon interband picosecond absorption in tungstate and molibdate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lukanin, V. I.; Karasik, A. Ya.

    2013-08-15

    Under two-photon 523.5 nm interband picosecond laser excitation, we measured the kinetics of induced absorption in PbWO{sub 4}, ZnWO{sub 4}, and PbMoO{sub 4} crystals with 532 to 633 nm continuous probe radiation. We obtained real-time information about the dynamics of the generation, relaxation, and accumulations of electronic excitations over a wide time range (from picoseconds to hundreds of seconds) and the 77-300 K temperature range. For the studied crystals, exponential temperature-independent growth of the induced absorption (IA) with 60 ns rise time reflects the dynamics of the generation of electronic excitation. The kinetics of the IA exponential growth with temperature-dependent 3.5-11 {mu}s time constants reflect the dynamics of energy migration between neighboring tungstate (molibdate) ions to traps for the studied crystals. The multiexponential relaxation absorption kinetics strongly depend on temperature, and the relaxation decay time of induced absorption increased from tens to hundreds of milliseconds to seconds under crystal cooling from 300 to 77 K. We found that the increase in the laser pump repetition rate (0-10 Hz) leads to the accumulation of electronic excitations. Control of the repetition rate and the number of excitations allowed us to change the relaxation time of the induced absorption by more than two orders of magnitude. Due to accumulation of excitations at 77 K, the absorption relaxation time can exceed 100 s for PbWO{sub 4} and PbMoO{sub 4} crystals. In the initially transparent crystals, two-photon interband absorption (2PA) leads to crystals opacity at the 523 and 633 nm wavelengths. (An inverse optical transmission of the crystals exceeds 50-55 at a 50-100 GW/cm{sup 2} pump intensity.) Measured at {approx}1 mW probe radiation of 532 and 633 nm wavelengths, the induced absorption values are comparable with those obtained under two-photon absorption at {approx}5 kW pump power. An optical 2PA shutter for the visible spectral range

  10. Theoretical investigation of wave-vector-dependent analytical and numerical formulations of the interband impact-ionization transition rate for electrons in bulk silicon and GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolnik, Jan; Wang, Yang; Oguzman, Ismail H.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The electron interband impact-ionization rate for both silicon and gallium arsenide is calculated using an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation with the expressed purpose of comparing different formulations of the interband ionization transition rate. Specifically, three different treatments of the transition rate are examined: the traditional Keldysh formula, a new k-dependent analytical formulation first derived by W. Quade, E. Scholl, and M. Rudan (1993), and a more exact, numerical method of Y. Wang and K. F. Brennan (1994). Although the completely numerical formulation contains no adjustable parameters and as such provides a very reliable result, it is highly computationally intensive. Alternatively, the Keldysh formular, although inherently simple and computationally efficient, fails to include the k dependence as well as the details of the energy band structure. The k-dependent analytical formulation of Quade and co-workers overcomes the limitations of both of these models but at the expense of some new parameterization. It is found that the k-dependent analytical method of Quade and co-workers produces very similar results to those obtained with the completely numerical model for some quantities. Specifically, both models predict that the effective threshold for impact ionization in GaAs and silicon is quite soft, that the majority of ionization events originate from the second conduction band in both materials, and that the transition rate is k dependent. Therefore, it is concluded that the k-dependent analytical model can qualitatively reproduce results similar to those obtained with the numerical model yet with far greater computational efficiency. Nevertheless, there exist some important drawbacks to the k-dependent analytical model of Quade and co-workers: These are that it does not accurately reproduce the quantum yield data for bulk silicon, it requires determination of a new parameter, related physically to the overlap intergrals of the Bloch state which

  11. Theoretical Investigation of Wave-Vector-Dependent Analytical and Numerical Formulations of the Interband Impact-Ionization Transition Rate for Electron in Bulk Silicon and GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolnik, Jan; Wang, Yang; Oguzman, Ismail H.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The electron interband impact-ionization rate for both silicon and gallium arsenide is calculated using an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation with the expressed purpose of comparing different formulations of the interband ionization transition rate. Specifically, three different treatments of the transition rate are examined: the traditional Keldysh formula, a new k-dependent analytical formulation first derived by W. Quade, E Scholl, and M. Rudan, and a more exact, numerical method of Y. Wang and K. F. Brennan. Although the completely numerical formulation contains no adjustable parameters and as such provides a very reliable result, it is highly computationally intensive. Alternatively, the Keldysh formula, although inherently simple and computationally efficient, fails to include the k dependence as well as the details of the energy band structure. The k-dependent analytical formulation of Quade and co-workers overcomes the limitations of both of these models but at the expense of some new parameterization. It is found that the k-dependent analytical method of Quade and co-workers produces very similar results to those obtained with (he completely numerical model for some quantities. Specifically, both models predict that the effective threshold for impact ionization in GaAs and silicon is quite soft, that the majority of ionization events originate from the second conduction band in both materials, and that the transition rate is k dependent. Therefore, it is concluded that the k-dependent analytical model can qualitatively reproduce results similar to those obtained with the numerical model yet with far greater computational efficiency. Nevertheless, there exist some important drawbacks to the k-dependent analytical model of Quade and co-workers: These are that it does not accurately reproduce the quantum yield data for bulk silicon, it requires determination of a new parameter, related physically to (he overlap integrals of the Bloch state which can only be

  12. Degeneracies when T=0 two body interaction matrix elements are set equal to zero: Talmi's method of calculating coefficients of fractional parentage to states forbidden by the Pauli principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Shadow J. Q.; Zamick, Larry

    2001-11-01

    In a previous work [S.J.Q. Robinson and Larry Zamick, Phys. Rev. C 63, 064416 (2001)] we studied the effects of setting all two body T=0 matrix elements to zero in shell model calculations for 43Ti (43Sc) and 44Ti. The results for 44Ti were surprisingly good despite the severity of this approximation. In single-j shell calculations (fn7/2) degeneracies arose between the T=12 I=(12)-1 and (132)-1 states in 43Sc as well as the T=12 I=(132)-2, (172)-1, and (192)-1 in 43Sc. For 44Ti the T=0 states 3+2, 7+2, 9+1, and 10+1 are degenerate as are the 10+2 and 12+1 states. The degeneracies can be explained by certain 6j symbols and 9j symbols either vanishing or being equal as indeed they are. Previously we used Regge symmetries of 6j symbols to explain the vanishing 6j and 9j symbols. In this work a simpler, more physical method is used. This is Talmi's method of calculating coefficients of fractional parentage (cfp) for identical particles to states which are forbidden by the Pauli principle. This is done for both the one particle cfp to handle 6j symbols and the two particle cfp for the 9j symbols. From this we learn that the common thread for the angular momenta I for which the above degeneracies occur is that these angular momenta cannot exist in the calcium isotopes in the f7/2 shell. There are no T=32 f37/2 states with angular momenta 12, 132, 172, and 192. In the same vein there are no T=2 f47/2 states with angular momenta 3, 7, 9, 10, or 12. For these angular momenta, all the states can be classified by the dual quantum numbers (Jπ,Jν).

  13. Matrix Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Engineering and Te.1’ ical Manageent FOR THE COMMANDER JOHN C. MADDEN, Colonel, USAF S , Integrated Engineering Technical Managesent IF YOUR ADDRESS HAS...In those early years all aspects of engineering design were conducted under the umbrella of this one organization. The Division had under its control ...direct control of the engineering workforce. It now became more and more apparent that we needed to combine more and more elements of the total design

  14. Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) Query

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site allows you to to easily query the Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) and generate a list of the corresponding Hazard Ranking System (HRS) factor values, benchmarks, and data elements that you need.

  15. Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) Query - Popup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site allows you to to easily query the Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) and generate a list of the corresponding Hazardous Ranking System (HRS) factor values, benchmarks, and data elements that you need.

  16. Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Andreas; Llorca, Javier

    2010-08-01

    In metal matrix composites, a metal is combined with another, often nonmetallic, phase to produce a novel material having attractive engineering attributes of its own. A subject of much research in the 1980s and 1990s, this class of materials has, in the past decade, increased significantly in variety. Copper matrix composites, layered composites, high-conductivity composites, nanoscale composites, microcellular metals, and bio-derived composites have been added to a palette that, ten years ago, mostly comprised ceramic fiber- or particle-reinforced light metals together with some well-established engineering materials, such as WC-Co cermets. At the same time, research on composites such as particle-reinforced aluminum, aided by novel techniques such as large-cell 3-D finite element simulation or computed X-ray microtomography, has served as a potent vehicle for the elucidation of the mechanics of high-contrast two-phase elastoplastic materials, with implications that range well beyond metal matrix composites.

  17. Risk Management using Dependency Stucture Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    An efficient method based on dependency structure matrix (DSM) analysis is given for ranking risks in a complex system or process whose entities are mutually dependent. This rank is determined according to the element's values of the unique positive eigenvector which corresponds to the matrix spectral radius modeling the considered engineering system. For demonstration, the risk problem of NASA's robotic spacecraft is analyzed.

  18. Compact CH{sub 4} sensor system based on a continuous-wave, low power consumption, room temperature interband cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Gluszek, Aleksander K.; Tittel, Frank K.; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Griffin, Robert J.

    2016-01-04

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based methane sensor, employing a dense-pattern multi-pass gas cell and a 3.3 μm, CW, DFB, room temperature interband cascade laser (ICL), is reported. The optical integration based on an advanced folded optical path design and an efficient ICL control system with appropriate electrical power management resulted in a CH{sub 4} sensor with a small footprint (32 × 20 × 17 cm{sup 3}) and low-power consumption (6 W). Polynomial and least-squares fit algorithms are employed to remove the baseline of the spectral scan and retrieve CH{sub 4} concentrations, respectively. An Allan-Werle deviation analysis shows that the measurement precision can reach 1.4 ppb for a 60 s averaging time. Continuous measurements covering a seven-day period were performed to demonstrate the stability and robustness of the reported CH{sub 4} sensor system.

  19. On the effect of the barrier widths in the InAs/AlSb/GaSb single-barrier interband tunneling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. F.; Yang, L.; Wu, M. C.; Chu, S. N. G.; Cho, A. Y.

    1990-10-01

    The dependence of the interband tunneling current on AlSb barrier widths is studied in the InAs/AlSb/GaSb single-barrier diode structures. The experimental results show that the peak current density displays an exponential dependence on the barrier width. The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation combined with the kṡp two-band model were used in analyzing the energy level in the AlSb barrier through which the peak tunneling currents occur. The energy level thus obtained (0.48±0.10 eV above the valence band edge of the AlSb) agrees with the valence-band offset (0.40±0.15 eV) between the AlSb and the GaSb obtained by x-ray photoemission measurement reported by Gualtieri et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 49, 1037 (1986)]. By adjusting the barrier width properly, we obtained a high peak current density of 24 kA/cm2 (with a peak-to-valley ratio of 1.4) and a high peak-to-valley ratio of 4.5 (with a peak current density of 3.5 kA/cm2) at room temperature. In addition, the peak-current voltages for different AlSb barrier widths were calculated and compared with the measured results.

  20. Room-temperature spin photocurrent spectra at interband excitation and comparison with reflectance-difference spectroscopy in InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. L.; Chen, Y. H.; Jiang, C. Y.; Liu, Y.; Ma, H.

    2011-03-01

    Spectra of the interband spin photocurrent due to Rashba and Dresselhaus spin splittings have been experimentally investigated in InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells at room temperature. The Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) spectra are found to be quite similar in the spectral regions corresponding to the transitions 1e1hh (the first conduction to the first valence sub-band of heavy hole) and 1e2hh. The ratio of Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE currents for the transition 1e1hh is estimated to be 4.95. The magnitude of the Rashba-induced CPGE current is up to several tens of nA/W for the transition 1e1hh, which is 1 order of magnitude larger than that obtained in GaN/AlGaN superlattices. Comparing the CPGE spectrum with reflectance-difference and photoreflectance spectra, we find that the large Rashba spin splitting is mainly induced by a large indium atom segregation effect and by the internal field in the quantum wells.

  1. Temperature dependence of phonon modes, dielectric functions, and interband electronic transitions in Cu2ZnSnS4 semiconductor films.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwu; Jiang, Kai; Zhang, Jinzhong; Chen, Xiangui; Hu, Zhigao; Chen, Shiyou; Sun, Lin; Chu, Junhao

    2012-07-28

    The quaternary semiconductor Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS) has attracted a lot of attention as a possible absorber material for solar cells due to its direct bandgap and high absorption coefficient. In this study, photovoltaic CZTS nanocrystalline film with a grain size of about 10 nm has been grown on a c-plane sapphire substrate by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. With increasing the temperature from 86 to 323 K, the A(1) phonon mode shows a red shift of about 9 cm(-1) due to the combined effects of thermal expansion and the anharmonic coupling to the other phonons. Optical and electronic properties of the CZTS film have been investigated by transmittance spectra in the temperature range of 8-300 K. Near-infrared-ultraviolet dielectric functions have been extracted with the Tauc-Lorentz dispersion model. The fundamental band gap E(0), and higher-energy critical points E(1) and E(2) are located at 1.5, 3.6, and 4.2 eV, respectively. Owing to the influences of electron-phonon interaction and the lattice expansion, the three interband transitions present a red shift trend with increasing temperature. It was found that the absorption coefficient in the visible region increases due to the modifications of electronic band structures. The detailed study of the optical properties of CZTS film can provide an experimental basis for CZTS-based solar cell applications.

  2. Room temperature operation of epitaxially grown Si/Si0.5Ge0.5/Si resonant interband tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rommel, Sean L.; Dillon, Thomas E.; Dashiell, M. W.; Feng, H.; Kolodzey, J.; Berger, Paul R.; Thompson, Phillip E.; Hobart, Karl D.; Lake, Roger; Seabaugh, Alan C.; Klimeck, Gerhard; Blanks, Daniel K.

    1998-10-01

    Resonant interband tunneling diodes on silicon substrates are demonstrated using a Si/Si0.5Ge0.5/Si heterostructure grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy which utilized both a central intrinsic spacer and δ-doped injectors. A low substrate temperature of 370 °C was used during growth to ensure a high level of dopant incorporation. A B δ-doping spike lowered the barrier for holes to populate the quantum well at the valence band discontinuity, and an Sb δ-doping reduces the doping requirement of the n-type bulk Si by producing a deep n+ well. Samples studied from the as-grown wafers showed no evidence of negative differential resistance (NDR). The effect of postgrowth rapid thermal annealing temperature was studied on tunnel diode properties. Samples which underwent heat treatment at 700 and 800 °C for 1 min, in contrast, exhibited NDR behavior. The peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) and peak current density of the tunnel diodes were found to depend strongly on δ-doping placement and on the annealing conditions. PVCRs ranging up to 1.54 were measured at a peak current density of 3.2 kA/cm2.

  3. Development of matrix photoreceivers based on carbon nanotubes array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagov, E. V.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.; Dudin, A. A.; Ichkitidze, L. P.; Kitsyuk, E. P.; Orlov, A. P.; Pavlov, A. A.; Polokhin, A. A.; Shaman, Yu. P.

    2016-04-01

    The technology of production of matrix photoreceivers based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) consisting of 16 sensitive elements was developed. Working wavelength range, performance and sensitivity were studied.

  4. Optical matrix-matrix multiplication method demonstrated by the use of a multifocus hololens.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y Z; Liu, H K

    1984-08-01

    A method of optical matrix-matrix multiplication is presented. The feasibility of the method is also experimentally demonstrated by the use of a dichromated-gelatin multifocus holographic lens (hololens). With the specific values of matrices chosen, the average percentage error between the theoretical and experimental data of the elements of the output matrix of the multiplication of some specific pairs of 3 x 3 matrices is 0.4%, which corresponds to an 8-bit accuracy.

  5. Optical matrix-matrix multiplication method demonstrated by the use of a multifocus hololens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. K.; Liang, Y.-Z.

    1984-01-01

    A method of optical matrix-matrix multiplication is presented. The feasibility of the method is also experimentally demonstrated by the use of a dichromated-gelatin multifocus holographic lens (hololens). With the specific values of matrices chosen, the average percentage error between the theoretical and experimental data of the elements of the output matrix of the multiplication of some specific pairs of 3 x 3 matrices is 0.4 percent, which corresponds to an 8-bit accuracy.

  6. Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-04-02

    Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

  7. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  8. Phenomenology of the CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Nir, Y.

    1989-07-01

    The way in which an exact determination of the CKM matrix elements tests the Standard Model is demonstrated by a two generation example. The determination of matrix elements from meson semi-leptonic decays is explained, with an emphasis on the respective reliability of quark level and meson level calculations. The assumptions involved in the use of loop processes are described. Finally, the state of the art of our knowledge of the CKM matrix is presented. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  9. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    feedstock and the performance in the end-application. The cellulose resource matrix should become a practical tool for stakeholders to make choices regarding raw materials, process or market. Although there is a vast amount of scientific and economic information available on cellulose and lignocellulosic resources, the accessibility for the interested layman or entrepreneur is very difficult and the relevance of the numerous details in the larger context is limited. Translation of science to practical accessible information with modern data management and data integration tools is a challenge. Therefore, a detailed matrix structure was composed in which the different elements or entries of the matrix were identified and a tentative rough set up was made. The inventory includes current commodities and new cellulose containing and raw materials as well as exotic sources and specialties. Important chemical and physical properties of the different raw materials were identified for the use in processes and products. When available, the market data such as price and availability were recorded. Established and innovative cellulose extraction and refining processes were reviewed. The demands on the raw material for suitable processing were collected. Processing parameters known to affect the cellulose properties were listed. Current and expected emerging markets were surveyed as well as their different demands on cellulose raw materials and processes. The setting up of the cellulose matrix as a practical tool requires two steps. Firstly, the reduction of the needed data by clustering of the characteristics of raw materials, processes and markets and secondly, the building of a database that can provide the answers to the questions from stakeholders with an indicative character. This paper describes the steps taken to achieve the defined clusters of most relevant and characteristic properties. These data can be expanded where required. More detailed specification can be obtained

  10. Low Noise Interband Cascade Photodetectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-28

    negative than -20 mV at high temperatures. For example, the Johnson-noise-limited D* values at a wavelength of 5 m and 300 K are 6.0x108 and 1.1x109...at -0.2 V and -0.6 V, respectively. However, the dark-current increases with increasingly negative bias and the device performance eventually...becomes dark-current-shot- noise-limited. This occurs at a bias more negative than -0.2 V for EB2700-7D-A at 300 K. In 2 3 4 5 6 0.00 0.04 0.08 0.12 0.16

  11. Application of Fuzzy Logic to Matrix FMECA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, N. Ravi; Prabhu, B. S.

    2001-04-01

    A methodology combining the benefits of Fuzzy Logic and Matrix FMEA is presented in this paper. The presented methodology extends the risk prioritization beyond the conventional Risk Priority Number (RPN) method. Fuzzy logic is used to calculate the criticality rank. Also the matrix approach is improved further to develop a pictorial representation retaining all relevant qualitative and quantitative information of several FMEA elements relationships. The methodology presented is demonstrated by application to an illustrative example.

  12. Elemental ZOO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helser, Terry L.

    2003-04-01

    This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

  13. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kekäläinen, Pekka

    2014-10-06

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  14. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  15. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  16. The intraclass covariance matrix.

    PubMed

    Carey, Gregory

    2005-09-01

    Introduced by C.R. Rao in 1945, the intraclass covariance matrix has seen little use in behavioral genetic research, despite the fact that it was developed to deal with family data. Here, I reintroduce this matrix, and outline its estimation and basic properties for data sets on pairs of relatives. The intraclass covariance matrix is appropriate whenever the research design or mathematical model treats the ordering of the members of a pair as random. Because the matrix has only one estimate of a population variance and covariance, both the observed matrix and the residual matrix from a fitted model are easy to inspect visually; there is no need to mentally average homologous statistics. Fitting a model to the intraclass matrix also gives the same log likelihood, likelihood-ratio (LR) chi2, and parameter estimates as fitting that model to the raw data. A major advantage of the intraclass matrix is that only two factors influence the LR chi2--the sampling error in estimating population parameters and the discrepancy between the model and the observed statistics. The more frequently used interclass covariance matrix adds a third factor to the chi2--sampling error of homologous statistics. Because of this, the degrees of freedom for fitting models to an intraclass matrix differ from fitting that model to an interclass matrix. Future research is needed to establish differences in power-if any--between the interclass and the intraclass matrix.

  17. Matrix management for aerospace 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The martix management approach to program management is an organized effort for attaining program objectives by defining and structuring all elements so as to form a single system whose parts are united by interaction. The objective of the systems approach is uncompromisingly complete coverage of the program management endeavor. Starting with an analysis of the functions necessary to carry out a given program, a model must be defined; a matrix of responsibility assignment must be prepared; and each operational process must be examined to establish how it is to be carried out and how it relates to all other processes.

  18. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  19. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOEpatents

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  20. On the Instanton R-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2016-08-01

    A torus action on a symplectic variety allows one to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equations ( R-matrices). For a torus action on cotangent bundles over flag varieties the resulting R-matrices are the standard rational solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation, well known in the theory of quantum integrable systems. The torus action on the instanton moduli space leads to more complicated R-matrices, depending additionally on two equivariant parameters t 1 and t 2. In this paper we derive an explicit expression for the R-matrix associated with the instanton moduli space. We study its matrix elements and its Taylor expansion in the powers of the spectral parameter. Certain matrix elements of this R-matrix give a generating function for the characteristic classes of tautological bundles over the Hilbert schemes in terms of the bosonic cut-and-join operators. In particular we rederive from the R-matrix the well known Lehn's formula for the first Chern class. We explicitly compute the first several coefficients for the power series expansion of the R-matrix in the spectral parameter. These coefficients are represented by simple contour integrals of some symmetrized bosonic fields.

  1. Transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Koji; Nishio, Takayuki; Yamada, Takashi ); Kawase, Yoshihiro . Dept. of Information Science)

    1999-05-01

    For the next generation of high speed railway systems and automobiles new braking systems are currently under development. These braking systems take into account the eddy currents, which are produced by the movement of the conductor in the magnetic field. For their optimum design, it is necessary to know the distribution of eddy currents in the moving conductor. The finite element method (FEM) is often used to simulate them. Here, transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor is presented. Here the magnetic vector potential is interpolated at the upwind position and the time derivative term is discretized by the backward difference method. As a result, the system matrix becomes symmetric and the ICCG method is applicable to solve the matrix. This method is used to solve an eddy current rail brake system. The results demonstrate that this approach is suitable to solve transient problems involving movement.

  2. The Curriculum Matrix: Transcendence and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foshay, Arthur W.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a curriculum matrix embodying three elements (purpose, substance, practice) and their various dimensions. Argues for a transcendent view of mathematics as a profoundly human, spiritual, astonishing, majestic, and powerful enterprise. Outlines seven mathematical ideas that have transformed human experience by celebrating unlimited freedom…

  3. Propulsive matrix of a helical flagellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He-Peng; Liu, Bin; Bruce, Rodenborn; Harry, L. Swinney

    2014-11-01

    We study the propulsion matrix of bacterial flagella numerically using slender body theory and the regularized Stokeslet method in a biologically relevant parameter regime. All three independent elements of the matrix are measured by computing propulsive force and torque generated by a rotating flagellum, and the drag force on a translating flagellum. Numerical results are compared with the predictions of resistive force theory, which is often used to interpret micro-organism propulsion. Neglecting hydrodynamic interactions between different parts of a flagellum in resistive force theory leads to both qualitative and quantitative discrepancies between the theoretical prediction of resistive force theory and the numerical results. We improve the original theory by empirically incorporating the effects of hydrodynamic interactions and propose new expressions for propulsive matrix elements that are accurate over the parameter regime explored.

  4. [Healthcare marketing elements].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Marketing puts its foundation on a few key concepts: need-demand, product-service, satisfaction, exchange, market, or business structure manufacturing / supply. The combination of these elements allows you to build an effective marketing strategy. Crucial in this respect is to remember the Porter matrix, which shows that for a correct analysis of the relevant market is necessary to refer to the "five forces at play", ie: customers, competitors, new entrants and substitutes threat. Another key lever for proper marketing oriented approach is the continuous and constant monitoring of the application, anticipating their dissatisfactions.

  5. Multipole Matrix of Green Function of Laplace Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, K.; Górka, P.

    Multipole matrix elements of Green function of Laplace equation are calculated. The multipole matrix elements of Green function in electrostatics describe potential on a sphere which is produced by a charge distributed on the surface of a different (possibly overlapping) sphere of the same radius. The matrix elements are defined by double convolution of two spherical harmonics with the Green function of Laplace equation. The method we use relies on the fact that in the Fourier space the double convolution has simple form. Therefore we calculate the multipole matrix from its Fourier transform. An important part of our considerations is simplification of the three dimensional Fourier transformation of general multipole matrix by its rotational symmetry to the one-dimensional Hankel transformation.

  6. Effective Hamiltonian and unitarity of the S matrix.

    PubMed

    Rotter, I

    2003-07-01

    The properties of open quantum systems are described well by an effective Hamiltonian H that consists of two parts: the Hamiltonian H of the closed system with discrete eigenstates and the coupling matrix W between discrete states and continuum. The eigenvalues of H determine the poles of the S matrix. The coupling matrix elements W(cc')(k) between the eigenstates k of H and the continuum may be very different from the coupling matrix elements W(cc')(k) between the eigenstates of H and the continuum. Due to the unitarity of the S matrix, the W(cc')(k) depend on energy in a nontrivial manner. This conflicts with the assumptions of some approaches to reactions in the overlapping regime. Explicit expressions for the wave functions of the resonance states and for their phases in the neighborhood of, respectively, avoided level crossings in the complex plane and double poles of the S matrix are given.

  7. Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) Query - April 2016

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site allows you to to easily query the Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) and generate a list of the corresponding Hazardous Ranking System (HRS) factor values, benchmarks, and data elements that you need.

  8. Compact, low power consumption methane sensor based on a novel miniature multipass gas cell and a CW, room temperature interband cascade laser emitting at 3.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Gluszek, Aleksander K.; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-02-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)-based methane sensor, employing a miniature dense-pattern multi-pass gas cell (MPGC) and a continuous wave, room temperature interband cascade laser (ICL), is reported. The optical integration based on an advanced folded optical path design and an efficient ICL control system with appropriate electrical power management results in a methane sensor with a small footprint (32 × 20 × 17 cm3) and low-power consumption (6W). The direct absorption measurement strategy allows absolute quantitative assessments without any calibration. Polynomial and least-squares fit algorithms are employed to remove the baseline of the spectral scan and retrieve CH4 concentrations, respectively. An Allan-Werle deviation analysis shows that the measurement precision can reach 1.4 ppb for a 60 s averaging time. Continuous measurements lasting seven days were performed to demonstrate the stability and robustness of the reported methane sensor.

  9. Atomistic tight-binding study of electronic structure and interband optical transitions in GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1−x}/GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Usman, Muhammad; O'Reilly, Eoin P.

    2014-02-17

    Large-supercell tight-binding calculations are presented for GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1−x}/GaAs single quantum wells (QWs) with Bi fractions x of 3.125% and 12.5%. Our results highlight significant distortion of the valence band states due to the alloy disorder. A large full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) is estimated in the ground state interband transition energy (≈33 meV) at 3.125% Bi, consistent with recent photovoltage measurements for similar Bi compositions. Additionally, the alloy disorder effects are predicted to become more pronounced as the QW width is increased. However, they are less strong at the higher Bi composition (12.5%) required for the design of temperature-stable lasers, with a calculated FWHM of ≈23.5 meV at x = 12.5%.

  10. InAs-based interband-cascade-lasers emitting around 7 μm with threshold current densities below 1 kA/cm{sup 2} at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dallner, Matthias; Hau, Florian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2015-01-26

    Interband cascade lasers (ICLs) grown on InAs substrates with threshold current densities below 1 kA/cm{sup 2} are presented. Two cascade designs with different lengths of the electron injector were investigated. Using a cascade design with 3 InAs quantum wells (QWs) in the electron injector, a device incorporating 22 stages in the active region exhibited a threshold current density of 940 A/cm{sup 2} at a record wavelength of 7 μm for ICLs operating in pulsed mode at room temperature. By investigating the influence of the number of stages on the device performance for a cascade design with 2 QWs in the electron injector, a further reduction of the threshold current density to 800 A/cm{sup 2} was achieved for a 30 stage device.

  11. Spectra of Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells and their behaviors under external strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. L.; Chen, Y. H.; Liu, Y.; Jiang, C. Y.; Ma, H.; Zhu, L. P.

    2012-04-01

    Spectra of Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at inter-band excitation in symmetric GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum wells have been investigated at room temperature. The lineshape of Rashba and Dresselhaus-type CPGE spectra is similar, and the Rashba-type is about five times larger than that of Dresselhaus-type. The CPGE current for 1HH-1E (the first valence subband of heavy hole to the first conduction) has the same sign with that of 1LH-1E, while the strain-induced Rashba-type CPGE has different sign for them, and no detectable strain-induced Dresselhaus-type CPGE is observed.

  12. Temperature dependence of spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinling; Cheng, Shuying; Lai, Yunfeng; Zheng, Qiao; Zhu, Laipan; Chen, Yonghai; Ren, Jun

    2015-10-19

    Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at inter-band excitation have been experimentally investigated in InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells at a temperature range of 80 to 290 K. It is found that, the sign of Rashba-type current reverses at low temperatures, while that of Dresselhaus-type remains unchanged. The temperature dependence of ratio of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling parameters, increasing from -6.7 to 17.9, is obtained, and the possible reasons are discussed. We also develop a model to extract the Rashba-type effective electric field at different temperatures. It is demonstrated that excitonic effect will significantly influence the Rashba-type CPGE, while it has little effect on Dresselhaus-type CPGE.

  13. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  14. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  15. Element 117

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-09-30

    An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

  16. Element 117

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-08

    An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

  17. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  18. Implementation of mixed formulation elements in PC/NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, Harry G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation and use of a consistent family of two and three dimensional elements in NASTRAN. The elements which are based on a mixed formulation include a replacement of the original NASTRAN shear element and the addition of triangular quadrilateral shell elements and tetrahedral, pentahedral and hexahedral solid elements. These elements support all static loads including temperature gradient and pressure load. The mass matrix is also generated to support all dynamic rigid formats.

  19. 2-Adic clustering of the PAM matrix.

    PubMed

    Khrennikov, A Yu; Kozyrev, S V

    2009-12-07

    In this paper we demonstrate that the use of the system of 2-adic numbers provides a new insight to some problems of genetics, in particular, degeneracy of the genetic code and the structure of the PAM matrix in bioinformatics. The 2-adic distance is an ultrametric and applications of ultrametric in bioinformatics are not surprising. However, by using the 2-adic numbers we match ultrametric with a number theoretic structure. In this way we find new applications of an ultrametric which differ from known up to now in bioinformatics. We obtain the following results. We show that the PAM matrix A allows the expansion into the sum of the two matrices A=A((2))+A((infinity)), where the matrix A((2)) is 2-adically regular (i.e. matrix elements of this matrix are close to locally constant with respect to the discussed earlier by the authors 2-adic parametrization of the genetic code), and the matrix A((infinity)) is sparse. We discuss the structure of the matrix A((infinity)) in relation to the side chain properties of the corresponding amino acids. We introduce the family of substitution matrices A(alpha,beta)=alpha A((2))+beta A((infinity)), alpha,beta>or=0 which should allow to vary the alignment procedure in order to take into account the different chemical and geometric properties of the amino acids.

  20. Primary cilium mechanotransduction of tensile strain in 3D culture: Finite element analyses of strain amplification caused by tensile strain applied to a primary cilium embedded in a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Pattie S; Bodle, Josephine C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-06-27

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential with lineage specification that is dictated by both the chemical and mechanical stimuli to which they are exposed. We have previously shown that 10% cyclic tensile strain increases hASC osteogenesis and cell-mediated calcium accretion. We have also recently shown that primary cilia are present on hASC and that chemically-induced lineage specification of hASC concurrently results in length and conformation changes of the primary cilia. Further, we have observed cilia length changes in hASC cultured within a collagen I gel in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. We therefore hypothesize that primary cilia may play a key mechanotransduction role for hASC exposed to tensile strain. The goal of this study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine strains occurring within the ciliary membrane in response to 10% tensile strain applied parallel, or perpendicular, to cilia orientation. To elucidate the mechanical environment experienced by the cilium, several lengths were modeled and evaluated based on cilia lengths measured on hASC grown under varied culture conditions. Principal tensile strains in both hASC and ciliary membranes were calculated using FEA, and the magnitude and location of maximum principal tensile strain determined. We found that maximum principal tensile strain was concentrated at the base of the cilium. In the linear elastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane from 150% to 200%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains, approximately 400%. In the hyperelastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane around 30%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains ranging from 50% to 70%. Interestingly, FEA results indicated that primary cilium length was not

  1. Primary Cilium Mechanotransduction of Tensile Strain in 3D Culture: Finite Element Analyses of Strain Amplification Caused by 10% Tensile Strain Applied to a Primary Cilium Embedded in a Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Pattie S.; Bodle, Josephine C.; Loboa, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential with lineage specification that is dictated by both the chemical and mechanical stimuli to which they are exposed. We have previously shown that 10% cyclic tensile strain increases hASC osteogenesis and cell-mediated calcium accretion. We have also recently shown that primary cilia are present on hASC and that chemically-induced lineage specification of hASC concurrently results in length and conformation changes of the primary cilia. Further, we have observed cilia length changes on hASC cultured within a collagen I gel in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. We therefore hypothesize that primary cilia may play a key mechanotransduction role for hASC exposed to tensile strain. The goal of this study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine strains occurring within the ciliary membrane in response to 10% tensile strain applied parallel, or perpendicular, to cilia orientation. To elucidate the mechanical environment experienced by the cilium, several lengths were modeled and evaluated based on cilia lengths measured on hASC grown under varied culture conditions. Principal tensile strains in both hASC and ciliary membranes were calculated using FEA, and the magnitude and location of maximum principal tensile strain determined. We found that maximum principal tensile strain was concentrated at the base of the cilium. In the linear elastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane from 150 to 200%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains, approximately 400%. In the hyperelastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane around 30%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains ranging from 50% to 70% . Interestingly, FEA results indicated that primary cilium length was not

  2. REE Abundances in Matrix of Allende (CV) Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, M.; Nakamura, N.; Kimura, M.

    1996-03-01

    In order to examine trace element distributions in matrix material of primitive chondrites, four interchondrule matrix specimens (sample weight ~100 micrograms) were carefully excavated using a microdrill from the petrographically characterized areas of the published sections of Allende (CV) chondrite and were precisely analyzed for REE, Ba, Sr, Rb, K, Ca and Mg by direct loading isotope dilution method (DL-IDMS).

  3. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1962-08-14

    A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

  5. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Herakovich, C. T.; Pindera, M-J.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model capable of predicting the thermomechanical response of continuously reinforced metal matrix composite laminates subjected to multiaxial loading was developed. A micromechanical model is used in conjunction with nonlinear lamination theory to determine inelastic laminae response. Matrix viscoplasticity, residual stresses, and damage to the fiber/matrix interfacial zone are explicitly included in the model. The representative cell of the micromechanical model is considered to be in a state of generalized plane strain, enabling a quasi two-dimensional analysis to be performed. Constant strain finite elements are formulated with elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations. Interfacial debonding is incorporated into the model through interface elements based on the interfacial debonding theory originally presented by Needleman, and modified by Tvergaard. Nonlinear interfacial constitutive equations relate interfacial tractions to displacement discontinuities at the interface. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of an experimental program conducted on silicon carbide/titanium (SiC/Ti) unidirectional, (O4), and angle-ply, (+34)(sub s), tubular specimens. Multiaxial loading included increments of axial tension, compression, torque, and internal pressure. Loadings were chosen in an effort to distinguish inelastic deformation due to damage from matrix plasticity and separate time-dependent effects from time-independent effects. Results show that fiber/matrix debonding is nonuniform throughout the composite and is a major factor in the effective response. Also, significant creep behavior occurs at relatively low applied stress levels at room temperature.

  6. Transfer matrix representation for periodic planar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, A.; Ghiringhelli, G. L.

    2016-06-01

    Sound transmission through infinite planar media characterized by in-plane periodicity is faced by exploiting the free wave propagation on the related unit cells. An appropriate through-thickness transfer matrix, relating a proper set of variables describing the acoustic field at the two external surfaces of the medium, is derived by manipulating the dynamic stiffness matrix related to a finite element model of the unit cell. The adoption of finite element models avoids analytical modeling or the simplification on geometry or materials. The obtained matrix is then used in a transfer matrix method context, making it possible to combine the periodic medium with layers of different nature and to treat both hard-wall and semi-infinite fluid termination conditions. A finite sequence of identical sub-layers through the thickness of the medium can be handled within the transfer matrix method, significantly decreasing the computational burden. Transfer matrices obtained by means of the proposed method are compared with analytical or equivalent models, in terms of sound transmission through barriers of different nature.

  7. Hacking the Matrix.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, Michael; Spence, Jason R

    2017-01-05

    Recently in Nature, Gjorevski et al. (2016) describe a fully defined synthetic hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix to support in vitro growth of intestinal stem cells and organoids. The hydrogel allows exquisite control over the chemical and physical in vitro niche and enables identification of regulatory properties of the matrix.

  8. Fuzzy risk matrix.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Adam S; Mannan, M Sam

    2008-11-15

    A risk matrix is a mechanism to characterize and rank process risks that are typically identified through one or more multifunctional reviews (e.g., process hazard analysis, audits, or incident investigation). This paper describes a procedure for developing a fuzzy risk matrix that may be used for emerging fuzzy logic applications in different safety analyses (e.g., LOPA). The fuzzification of frequency and severity of the consequences of the incident scenario are described which are basic inputs for fuzzy risk matrix. Subsequently using different design of risk matrix, fuzzy rules are established enabling the development of fuzzy risk matrices. Three types of fuzzy risk matrix have been developed (low-cost, standard, and high-cost), and using a distillation column case study, the effect of the design on final defuzzified risk index is demonstrated.

  9. Some remarks on unilateral matrix equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cerchiai, Bianca L.; Zumino, Bruno

    2001-02-01

    We briefly review the results of our paper LBNL-46775: We study certain solutions of left-unilateral matrix equations. These are algebraic equations where the coefficients and the unknown are square matrices of the same order, or, more abstractly, elements of an associative, but possibly noncommutative algebra, and all coefficients are on the left. Recently such equations have appeared in a discussion of generalized Born-Infeld theories. In particular, two equations, their perturbative solutions and the relation between them are studied, applying a unified approach based on the generalized Bezout theorem for matrix polynomials.

  10. Connective stability of nonlinear matrix systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of stability under structural perturbations of free dynamic systems described by the differential equation dx/dt = A(t,x)x, where the matrix A(t,x) has time-varying nonlinear elements. The concept of 'connective stability' is introduced to study the structural properties of competitive-cooperative nonlinear matrix systems. It is shown that stability reliability in such systems is high and that they remain stable despite time-varying (including 'on-off') interaction among individual agents present in the system. The results obtained can be used to study stability aspects of mathematical models arising in as diverse fields as economics, biology, arms races, and transistor circuits.

  11. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  12. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  13. Boundary element solution for periodic acoustic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, M.; Croaker, P.; Kessissoglou, N.

    2016-01-01

    This work shows when using the boundary element method to solve 3D acoustic scattering problems from periodic structures, the coefficient matrix can be represented as a block Toeplitz matrix. By exploiting the Toeplitz structure, the computational time and storage requirements to construct the coefficient matrix are significantly reduced. To solve the linear system of equations, the original matrix is embedded into a larger and more structured matrix called the block circulant matrix. Discrete Fourier transform is then employed in an iterative algorithm to solve the block Toeplitz system. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the formulation for periodic acoustic problems, two exterior acoustic case studies are considered. The first case study examines a continuous structure to predict the noise generated by a sharp-edged flat plate under quadrupole excitation. Directivity plots obtained using the periodic boundary element method technique are compared with numerical results obtained using a conventional boundary element model. The second case study examines a discrete periodic structure to predict the acoustic performance of a sonic crystal noise barrier. Results for the barrier insertion loss are compared with both finite element results and available data in the literature.

  14. Method of determining lanthanidies in a transition element host

    DOEpatents

    De Kalb, Edward L.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1976-02-03

    A phosphor composition contains a lanthanide activator element within a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO.sub.4 with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On X-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence.

  15. Faces of matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    2012-08-01

    Partition functions of eigenvalue matrix models possess a number of very different descriptions: as matrix integrals, as solutions to linear and nonlinear equations, as τ-functions of integrable hierarchies and as special-geometry prepotentials, as result of the action of W-operators and of various recursions on elementary input data, as gluing of certain elementary building blocks. All this explains the central role of such matrix models in modern mathematical physics: they provide the basic "special functions" to express the answers and relations between them, and they serve as a dream model of what one should try to achieve in any other field.

  16. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  17. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  18. A Sixteen Node Shell Element with a Matrix Stabilization Scheme.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-22

    coordinates with components x, y and z are defined on the shell midsurface in addition to global coordinates with components X, Y and Z. The x, y and z axes... midsurface while a3 is normal to the surface. The al, A2 and a3 vectors are given at each node as an input. In addition, they are defined at each integra...drawn from the point on the midsurface to the generic material point, t is the shell thickness and the nondimenslonal coordinate C runs from -1 to 1

  19. Merging weak and QCD showers with matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Christiansen, Jesper Roy; Prestel, Stefan

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present a consistent way of combining associated weak boson radiation in hard dijet events with hard QCD radiation in Drell–Yan-like scatterings. This integrates multiple tree-level calculations with vastly different cross sections, QCD- and electroweak parton-shower resummation into a single framework. The new merging strategy is implemented in the P ythia event generator and predictions are confronted with LHC data. Improvements over the previous strategy are observed. Results of the new electroweak-improved merging at a future 100 TeV proton collider are also investigated.

  20. Nuclear matrix elements for double-β decay

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Jonathan

    2015-07-15

    Recent progress in nuclear-structure theory has been dramatic. I describe applications in progress of ab inito calculations to double-beta decay, and discuss the recent and future application of generator-coordinate methods to the same problem. I also discuss the old and vexing problem of the renormalization of the weak nuclear axial-vector coupling constant “in medium” and plans to resolve it.

  1. Functional Polymer Matrix Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the carbon nanofibers led to the deterioration of the polymeric cellulose structure. Extensive research on the surface treatment of carbon nanofibers...1 November 2003 - 14-Mar-05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-03-1-3042 Functional Polymer Matrix Fibres 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...MARYLABONE RD LONDON NWl 5TH PERFORMANCE REPORT Project title: Functional polymer matrix fibers Period of performance: 1 November 2003 - 31 October 2004

  2. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  3. Matrix representation of the time operator

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Carl M.; Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna

    2012-06-15

    In quantum mechanics the time operator {Theta} satisfies the commutation relation [{Theta}, H]=i, and thus it may be thought of as being formally canonically conjugate to the Hamiltonian H. The time operator associated with a given Hamiltonian H is not unique because one can replace {Theta} by {Theta}+{Theta}{sub hom}, where {Theta}{sub hom} satisfies the homogeneous condition [{Theta}{sub hom}, H]= 0. To study this nonuniqueness the matrix elements of {Theta} for the harmonic-oscillator Hamiltonian are calculated in the eigenstate basis. This calculation requires the summation of divergent series, and the summation is accomplished by using zeta-summation techniques. It is shown that by including appropriate homogeneous contributions, the matrix elements of {Theta} simplify dramatically. However, it is still not clear whether there is an optimally simple representation of the time operator.

  4. Ceramic Matrix Composite Vane Subelement Burst Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, David N.; Verrilli, Michael; Calomino, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Burst tests were performed on Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) vane specimens, manufactured by two vendors, under the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) project. Burst specimens were machined from the ends of 76mm long vane sub-elements blanks and from High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) tested specimens. The results of burst tests will be used to compare virgin specimens with specimens that have had an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) applied, both HPBR tested and untested, as well as a comparison between vendors.

  5. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  6. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture

    DOEpatents

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gschwind, Michael K; Gunnels, John A

    2013-11-05

    Mechanisms for performing matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture are provided. A vector load operation is performed to load a first vector operand of the matrix multiplication operation to a first target vector register. A load and splat operation is performed to load an element of a second vector operand and replicating the element to each of a plurality of elements of a second target vector register. A multiply add operation is performed on elements of the first target vector register and elements of the second target vector register to generate a partial product of the matrix multiplication operation. The partial product of the matrix multiplication operation is accumulated with other partial products of the matrix multiplication operation.

  7. Photomask CD and LER characterization using Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Dirnstorfer, I.; Bischoff, J.; Meiner, K.; Ketelsen, H.; Richter, U.; Mikolajick, T.

    2014-10-01

    Critical dimension and line edge roughness on photomask arrays are determined with Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry. Arrays with large sinusoidal perturbations are measured for different azimuth angels and compared with simulations based on rigorous coupled wave analysis. Experiment and simulation show that line edge roughness leads to characteristic changes in the different Mueller matrix elements. The influence of line edge roughness is interpreted as an increase of isotropic character of the sample. The changes in the Mueller matrix elements are very similar when the arrays are statistically perturbed with rms roughness values in the nanometer range suggesting that the results on the sinusoidal test structures are also relevant for "real" mask errors. Critical dimension errors and line edge roughness have similar impact on the SE MM measurement. To distinguish between both deviations, a strategy based on the calculation of sensitivities and correlation coefficients for all Mueller matrix elements is shown. The Mueller matrix elements M13/M31 and M34/M43 are the most suitable elements due to their high sensitivities to critical dimension errors and line edge roughness and, at the same time, to a low correlation coefficient between both influences. From the simulated sensitivities, it is estimated that the measurement accuracy has to be in the order of 0.01 and 0.001 for the detection of 1 nm critical dimension error and 1 nm line edge roughness, respectively.

  8. Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs step quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinling; Cheng, Shuying; Lai, Yunfeng; Zheng, Qiao; Chen, Yonghai

    2014-03-01

    Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at inter-band excitation have been experimentally investigated in InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs step quantum wells (QWs) at room temperature. The Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE spectra are quite similar with each other during the spectral region corresponding to the transition of the excitonic state 1H1E (the first valence subband of heavy hole to the first conduction subband of electrons). The ratio of Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE current for the transition 1H1E is estimated to be 8.8±0.1, much larger than that obtained in symmetric QWs (4.95). Compared to symmetric QWs, the reduced well width enhances the Dresselhaus-type spin splitting, but the Rashba-type spin splitting increases more rapidly in the step QWs. Since the degree of the segregation effect of indium atoms and the intensity of build-in field in the step QWs are comparable to those in symmetric QWs, as proved by reflectance difference and photoreflectance spectra, respectively, the larger Rashba-type spin splitting is mainly induced by the additional interface introduced by step structures.

  9. Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs step quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at inter-band excitation have been experimentally investigated in InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs step quantum wells (QWs) at room temperature. The Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE spectra are quite similar with each other during the spectral region corresponding to the transition of the excitonic state 1H1E (the first valence subband of heavy hole to the first conduction subband of electrons). The ratio of Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE current for the transition 1H1E is estimated to be 8.8±0.1, much larger than that obtained in symmetric QWs (4.95). Compared to symmetric QWs, the reduced well width enhances the Dresselhaus-type spin splitting, but the Rashba-type spin splitting increases more rapidly in the step QWs. Since the degree of the segregation effect of indium atoms and the intensity of build-in field in the step QWs are comparable to those in symmetric QWs, as proved by reflectance difference and photoreflectance spectra, respectively, the larger Rashba-type spin splitting is mainly induced by the additional interface introduced by step structures. PMID:24646286

  10. Spectra of circular and linear photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in In0.15Ga0.85As/Al0.3Ga0.7As multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinling; Chen, Yonghai; Cheng, Shuying; Lai, Yunfeng

    2013-03-01

    Spectra of circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) and linear photogalvanic effect (LPGE) for inter-band transition have been experimentally investigated in In0.15Ga0.85As/Al0.3Ga0.7As multiple quantum wells (QWs) at room temperature. The CPGE and LPGE spectra are quite similar during the spectral region corresponding to the transitions 1e1hh (the first valence subband of heavy hole to the first conduction band) and 1e2hh, which is also similar to that of the photoconductivity. Comparing the photocurrent induced by LPGE and CPGE along [1 1 0] and [1 1bar 0] directions, we obtain the anisotropic ratio of the linear photogalvanic tensor χ and circular photogalvanic tensor γ to be χxxz/χyyz=3.6 and γxy/γyx=1.3 (x∥[1 1 0] and y∥[1 1bar 0]), which indicate that the symmetry of the structure belongs to C2v point group and the Rashba spin splitting is the dominant mechanism to induce the k-linear spin splitting of the subband in the In0.15Ga0.85As/Al0.3Ga0.7As QWs. The magnitude of the LPGE is nearly at the same order with that of the CPGE for the investigated spectral region at room temperature.

  11. Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs step quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinling; Cheng, Shuying; Lai, Yunfeng; Zheng, Qiao; Chen, Yonghai

    2014-03-19

    : Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at inter-band excitation have been experimentally investigated in InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs step quantum wells (QWs) at room temperature. The Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE spectra are quite similar with each other during the spectral region corresponding to the transition of the excitonic state 1H1E (the first valence subband of heavy hole to the first conduction subband of electrons). The ratio of Rashba- and Dresselhaus-induced CPGE current for the transition 1H1E is estimated to be 8.8±0.1, much larger than that obtained in symmetric QWs (4.95). Compared to symmetric QWs, the reduced well width enhances the Dresselhaus-type spin splitting, but the Rashba-type spin splitting increases more rapidly in the step QWs. Since the degree of the segregation effect of indium atoms and the intensity of build-in field in the step QWs are comparable to those in symmetric QWs, as proved by reflectance difference and photoreflectance spectra, respectively, the larger Rashba-type spin splitting is mainly induced by the additional interface introduced by step structures.

  12. Generalized matrix inversion is not harder than matrix multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Marko D.; Stanimirovic, Predrag S.

    2009-08-01

    Starting from the Strassen method for rapid matrix multiplication and inversion as well as from the recursive Cholesky factorization algorithm, we introduced a completely block recursive algorithm for generalized Cholesky factorization of a given symmetric, positive semi-definite matrix . We used the Strassen method for matrix inversion together with the recursive generalized Cholesky factorization method, and established an algorithm for computing generalized {2,3} and {2,4} inverses. Introduced algorithms are not harder than the matrix-matrix multiplication.

  13. Battery element and method for making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, Thomas J. (Inventor); Pinsky, Naum (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a method for producing a battery element useful as at least a positive plate in a lead-acid battery, the element comprising a fluid impervious, electrically conductive matrix having mutually opposing first and second surfaces and positive active electrode material associated with the first surface of the matrix, the improvement which comprises: conditioning the first surface to enhance the association of the positive active electrode material and the first surface; and applying and associating the positive active electrode material to the first surface.

  14. Extracellular matrix structure.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  15. Matrix interdiction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-01-01

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove k columns such that the sum over all rows of the maximum entry in each row is minimized. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem which can be applied to prioritize the border checkpoints in order to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully cross the border. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we will prove the problem is NP-hard, and even NP-hard to approximate with an additive n{gamma} factor for a fixed constant {gamma}. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves a factor of (n-k) mUltiplicative approximation ratio.

  16. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  17. Rheocasting Al Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girot, F. A.; Albingre, L.; Quenisset, J. M.; Naslain, R.

    1987-11-01

    Aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced by SiC short fibers (or whiskers) can be prepared by rheocasting, a process which consists of the incorporation and homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement by stirring within a semi-solid alloy. Using this technique, composites containing fiber volume fractions in the range of 8-15%, have been obtained for various fibers lengths (i.e., 1 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm for SiC fibers). This paper attempts to delineate the best compocasting conditions for aluminum matrix composites reinforced by short SiC (e.g Nicalon) or SiC whiskers (e.g., Tokamax) and characterize the resulting microstructures.

  18. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  19. Direct Measurement of the Density Matrix of a Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Giner, L.; Chalich, Y.; Horton, M. J.; Banker, J.; Lundeen, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    One drawback of conventional quantum state tomography is that it does not readily provide access to single density matrix elements since it requires a global reconstruction. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a scheme that can be used to directly measure individual density matrix elements of general quantum states. The scheme relies on measuring a sequence of three observables, each complementary to the last. The first two measurements are made weak to minimize the disturbance they cause to the state, while the final measurement is strong. We perform this joint measurement on polarized photons in pure and mixed states to directly measure their density matrix. The weak measurements are achieved using two walk-off crystals, each inducing a polarization-dependent spatial shift that couples the spatial and polarization degrees of freedom of the photons. This direct measurement method provides an operational meaning to the density matrix and promises to be especially useful for large dimensional states.

  20. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Tranter, Troy J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2009-03-24

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  1. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Tranter, Troy J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2003-02-04

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  2. Virtues of Mueller matrix detection of objects embedded in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2000-06-01

    We will present a brief introduction to Mueller matrix imaging (MMI) from cradle to adolescence and then show how it can be effectively used for detection of objects embedded in a highly scattering medium when ordinary radiance imaging might fail. We will show which elements and combination of elements are important for gaining the highest contrast against the background continuum. The mapping of certain combinations of Mueller matrix elements into an equivalent human visual system will also be discussed.

  3. Virtues of Mueller matrix detection of objects embedded in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2000-04-01

    We will present a brief introduction to Mueller matrix imaging from cradle to adolescence and then show how it can be effectively used for detection of objects embedded in a highly scattering medium when ordinary radiance imaging might fail. We will show which elements and combination of elements are important for gaining the highest contrast against the background continuum. The mapping of certain combinations of Mueller matrix elements into an equivalent human visual system will also be discussed.

  4. Constructing the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John

    2012-09-01

    As part of our 'toolkit' for analysing an extraterrestrial signal, the facility for calculating structural affinity to known phenomena must be part of our core capabilities. Without such a resource, we risk compromising our potential for detection and decipherment or at least causing significant delay in the process. To create such a repository for assessing structural affinity, all known systems (language parameters) need to be structurally analysed to 'place' their 'system' within a relational communication matrix. This will need to include all known variants of language structure, whether 'living' (in current use) or ancient; this must also include endeavours to incorporate yet undeciphered scripts and non-human communication, to provide as complete a picture as possible. In creating such a relational matrix, post-detection decipherment will be assisted by a structural 'map' that will have the potential for 'placing' an alien communication with its nearest known 'neighbour', to assist subsequent categorisation of basic parameters as a precursor to decipherment. 'Universal' attributes and behavioural characteristics of known communication structure will form a range of templates (Elliott, 2001 [1] and Elliott et al., 2002 [2]), to support and optimise our attempt at categorising and deciphering the content of an extraterrestrial signal. Detection of the hierarchical layers, which comprise intelligent, complex communication, will then form a matrix of calculations that will ultimately score affinity through a relational matrix of structural comparison. In this paper we develop the rationales and demonstrate functionality with initial test results.

  5. Matrix product state renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, M.; Rams, M. M.; Zauner, V.; Haegeman, J.; Verstraete, F.

    2016-11-01

    The truncation or compression of the spectrum of Schmidt values is inherent to the matrix product state (MPS) approximation of one-dimensional quantum ground states. We provide a renormalization group picture by interpreting this compression as an application of Wilson's numerical renormalization group along the imaginary time direction appearing in the path integral representation of the state. The location of the physical index is considered as an impurity in the transfer matrix and static MPS correlation functions are reinterpreted as dynamical impurity correlations. Coarse-graining the transfer matrix is performed using a hybrid variational ansatz based on matrix product operators, combining ideas of MPS and the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz. Through numerical comparison with conventional MPS algorithms, we explicitly verify the impurity interpretation of MPS compression, as put forward by V. Zauner et al. [New J. Phys. 17, 053002 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/5/053002] for the transverse-field Ising model. Additionally, we motivate the conceptual usefulness of endowing MPS with an internal layered structure by studying restricted variational subspaces to describe elementary excitations on top of the ground state, which serves to elucidate a transparent renormalization group structure ingrained in MPS descriptions of ground states.

  6. METCAN-PC - METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites offer great potential for use in advanced aerospace structural applications. The realization of this potential however, requires concurrent developments in (1) a technology base for fabricating high temperature metal matrix composite structural components, (2) experimental techniques for measuring their thermal and mechanical characteristics, and (3) computational methods to predict their behavior. METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is a computer program developed to predict this behavior. METCAN can be used to computationally simulate the non-linear behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC), thus allowing the potential payoff for the specific application to be assessed. It provides a comprehensive analysis of composite thermal and mechanical performance. METCAN treats material nonlinearity at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level, where the behavior of each constituent is modeled accounting for time-temperature-stress dependence. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by making use of composite micromechanics and macromechanics. Factors which affect the behavior of the composite properties include the fabrication process variables, the fiber and matrix properties, the bonding between the fiber and matrix and/or the properties of the interphase between the fiber and matrix. The METCAN simulation is performed as point-wise analysis and produces composite properties which are readily incorporated into a finite element code to perform a global structural analysis. After the global structural analysis is performed, METCAN decomposes the composite properties back into the localized response at the various levels of the simulation. At this point the constituent properties are updated and the next iteration in the analysis is initiated. This cyclic procedure is referred to as the integrated approach to metal matrix composite analysis. METCAN

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, H.

    1960-04-26

    A description is given for a fuel element comprising a body of uranium metal or an uranium compound dispersed in a matrix material made from magnesium, calcium, or barium and a stainless steel jacket enclosing the body.

  8. Minimal parameter solution of the orthogonal matrix differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Markley, F. Landis

    1990-01-01

    As demonstrated in this work, all orthogonal matrices solve a first order differential equation. The straightforward solution of this equation requires n sup 2 integrations to obtain the element of the nth order matrix. There are, however, only n(n-1)/2 independent parameters which determine an orthogonal matrix. The questions of choosing them, finding their differential equation and expressing the orthogonal matrix in terms of these parameters are considered. Several possibilities which are based on attitude determination in three dimensions are examined. It is shown that not all 3-D methods have useful extensions to higher dimensions. It is also shown why the rate of change of the matrix elements, which are the elements of the angular rate vector in 3-D, are the elements of a tensor of the second rank (dyadic) in spaces other than three dimensional. It is proven that the 3-D Gibbs vector (or Cayley Parameters) are extendable to other dimensions. An algorithm is developed emplying the resulting parameters, which are termed Extended Rodrigues Parameters, and numerical results are presented of the application of the algorithm to a fourth order matrix.

  9. Minimal parameter solution of the orthogonal matrix differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Markley, F. Landis

    1988-01-01

    As demonstrated in this work, all orthogonal matrices solve a first order differential equation. The straightforward solution of this equation requires n sup 2 integrations to obtain the element of the nth order matrix. There are, however, only n(n-1)/2 independent parameters which determine an orthogonal matrix. The questions of choosing them, finding their differential equation and expressing the orthogonal matrix in terms of these parameters are considered. Several possibilities which are based on attitude determination in three dimensions are examined. It is shown that not all 3-D methods have useful extensions to higher dimensions. It is also shown why the rate of change of the matrix elements, which are the elements of the angular rate vector in 3-D, are the elements of a tensor of the second rank (dyadic) in spaces other than three dimensional. It is proven that the 3-D Gibbs vector (or Cayley Parameters) are extendable to other dimensions. An algorithm is developed employing the resulting parameters, which are termed Extended Rodrigues Parameters, and numerical results are presented of the application of the algorithm to a fourth order matrix.

  10. Sparsity of the normal matrix in the refinement of macromolecules at atomic and subatomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Jelsch, C

    2001-09-01

    The normal matrix in the least-squares refinement of macromolecules is very sparse when the resolution reaches atomic and subatomic levels. The elements of the normal matrix, related to coordinates, thermal motion and charge-density parameters, have a global tendency to decrease rapidly with the interatomic distance between the atoms concerned. For instance, in the case of the protein crambin at 0.54 A resolution, the elements are reduced by two orders of magnitude for distances above 1.5 A. The neglect a priori of most of the normal-matrix elements according to a distance criterion represents an approximation in the refinement of macromolecules, which is particularly valid at very high resolution. The analytical expressions of the normal-matrix elements, which have been derived for the coordinates and the thermal parameters, show that the degree of matrix sparsity increases with the diffraction resolution and the size of the asymmetric unit.

  11. Systematic errors for a Mueller matrix dual rotating compensator ellipsometer.

    PubMed

    Broch, Laurent; En Naciri, Aotmane; Johann, Luc

    2008-06-09

    The characterization of anisotropic materials and complex systems by ellipsometry has pushed the design of instruments to require the measurement of the full reflection Mueller matrix of the sample with a great precision. Therefore Mueller matrix ellipsometers have emerged over the past twenty years. The values of some coefficients of the matrix can be very small and errors due to noise or systematic errors can induce distored analysis. We present a detailed characterization of the systematic errors for a Mueller Matrix Ellipsometer in the dual-rotating compensator configuration. Starting from a general formalism, we derive explicit first-order expressions for the errors on all the coefficients of the Mueller matrix of the sample. The errors caused by inaccuracy of the azimuthal arrangement of the optical components and residual ellipticity introduced by imperfect optical elements are shown. A new method based on a four-zone averaging measurement is proposed to vanish the systematic errors.

  12. Optical implementation of the Hopfield neural network with matrix gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sheng L.; Lo, Rong C.; Shi, Cha Y.

    2004-02-01

    We propose a new method for the optical implementation of the Hopfield neural network with a universal tool. The tool is a matrix grating constituted with a group of element gratings. The algorithms for designing a matrix grating are proposed, and a matrix grating is created to execute recognition experiments by use of the Hopfield neural network. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method performs well. The stability of the light efficiencies of different optical components used in optical networks is also considered.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Kingston, W.E.; Kopelman, B.; Hausner, H.H.

    1963-07-01

    A fuel element consisting of uranium nitride and uranium carbide in the form of discrete particles in a solid coherent matrix of a metal such as steel, beryllium, uranium, or zirconium and clad with a metal such as steel, aluminum, zirconium, or beryllium is described. The element is made by mixing powdered uranium nitride and uranium carbide with powdered matrix metal, then compacting and sintering the mixture. (AEC)

  14. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  15. Random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, Alan; Rao, N. Raj

    Random matrix theory is now a big subject with applications in many disciplines of science, engineering and finance. This article is a survey specifically oriented towards the needs and interests of a numerical analyst. This survey includes some original material not found anywhere else. We include the important mathematics which is a very modern development, as well as the computational software that is transforming the theory into useful practice.

  16. Micromechanical analysis of a continuous fiber metal matrix composite including the effects of matrix viscoplasticity and evolving damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. H.; Jones, R. H.; Boyd, J. G.

    1994-03-01

    A THERMOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS of a metal matrix continuous fiber composite is performed herein. The analysis includes the effects of matrix inelasticity and interface cracking. Due to these nonlinearities, the analysis is performed computationally using the finite element method. Matrix inelasticity is modeled with a rate dependent viscoplasticity model. Interface fracture is modeled by the use of a nonlinear interface constitutive model. The problem formulation is summarized, and results are given for a typical SiC-Ti composite at elevated temperature. Preliminary results indicate that rate dependent viscoplasticity can be a significant mechanism for dissipating the energy available for interface fracture, thus contributing to improved macroscopic ductility of the composite.

  17. Computing Fiber/Matrix Interfacial Effects In SiC/RBSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    Computational study conducted to demonstrate use of boundary-element method in analyzing effects of fiber/matrix interface on elastic and thermal behaviors of representative laminated composite materials. In study, boundary-element method implemented by Boundary Element Solution Technology - Composite Modeling System (BEST-CMS) computer program.

  18. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data.

  19. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data. PMID:26575482

  20. Channeled partial Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alenin, Andrey S.; Tyo, J. S.

    2015-09-01

    In prior work,1,2 we introduced methods to treat channeled systems in a way that is similar to Data Reduction Method (DRM), by focusing attention on the Fourier content of the measurement conditions. Introduction of Q enabled us to more readily extract the performance of the system and thereby optimize it to obtain reconstruction with the least noise. The analysis tools developed for that exercise can be expanded to be applicable to partial Mueller Matrix Polarimeters (pMMPs), which were a topic of prior discussion as well. In this treatment, we combine the principles involved in both of those research trajectories and identify a set of channeled pMMP families. As a result, the measurement structure of such systems is completely known and the design of a channeled pMMP intended for any given task becomes a search over a finite set of possibilities, with the additional channel rotation allowing for a more desirable Mueller element mixing.

  1. On the Matrix Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Shui-Hung; Hou, Edwin; Pang, Wan-Kai

    2006-01-01

    A novel and simple formula for computing the matrix exponential function is presented. Specifically, it can be used to derive explicit formulas for the matrix exponential of a general matrix A satisfying p(A) = 0 for a polynomial p(s). It is ready for use in a classroom and suitable for both hand as well as symbolic computation.

  2. Time-dependent deformation of titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Bahei-El-din, Y. A.; Mirdamadi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element program called VISCOPAC was developed and used to conduct a micromechanics analysis of titanium metal matrix composites. The VISCOPAC program uses a modified Eisenberg-Yen thermo-viscoplastic constitutive model to predict matrix behavior under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The analysis incorporated temperature-dependent elastic properties in the fiber and temperature-dependent viscoplastic properties in the matrix. The material model was described and the necessary material constants were determined experimentally. Fiber-matrix interfacial behavior was analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model. The thermal residual stresses due to the fabrication cycle were predicted with a failed interface, The failed interface resulted in lower thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber. Stresses due to a uniform transverse load were calculated at two temperatures, room temperature and an elevated temperature of 650 C. At both temperatures, a large stress concentration was calculated when the interface had failed. The results indicate the importance of accuracy accounting for fiber-matrix interface failure and the need for a micromechanics-based analytical technique to understand and predict the behavior of titanium metal matrix composites.

  3. The Lehmer Matrix and Its Recursive Analogue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Lehmer matrix and its recursive analogue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  4. Supported Molecular Matrix Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yu-Ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are difficult to separate using conventional gel electrophoresis methods such as SDS-PAGE and agarose gel electrophoresis, owing to their large size and heterogeneity. On the other hand, cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis can separate these molecules, but is not compatible with glycan analysis. Here, we describe a novel membrane electrophoresis technique, termed "supported molecular matrix electrophoresis" (SMME), in which a porous polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane filter is used to achieve separation. This description includes the separation, visualization, and glycan analysis of mucins with the SMME technique.

  5. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  6. TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSES OF URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D; Charles Shick, C

    2008-06-09

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an analytical method to measure many trace elements in a variety of uranium materials at the high part-per-billion (ppb) to low part-per-million (ppm) levels using matrix removal and analysis by quadrapole ICP-MS. Over 35 elements were measured in uranium oxides, acetate, ore and metal. Replicate analyses of samples did provide precise results however none of the materials was certified for trace element content thus no measure of the accuracy could be made. The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) does provide a Certified Reference Material (CRM) that has provisional values for a series of trace elements. The NBL CRM were purchased and analyzed to determine the accuracy of the method for the analysis of trace elements in uranium oxide. These results are presented and discussed in the following paper.

  7. Effects of thirty elements on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dermience, Michael; Lognay, Georges; Mathieu, Françoise; Goyens, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The human skeleton, made of 206 bones, plays vital roles including supporting the body, protecting organs, enabling movement, and storing minerals. Bones are made of organic structures, intimately connected with an inorganic matrix produced by bone cells. Many elements are ubiquitous in our environment, and many impact bone metabolism. Most elements have antagonistic actions depending on concentration. Indeed, some elements are essential, others are deleterious, and many can be both. Several pathways mediate effects of element deficiencies or excesses on bone metabolism. This paper aims to identify all elements that impact bone health and explore the mechanisms by which they act. To date, this is the first time that the effects of thirty minerals on bone metabolism have been summarized.

  8. Two modulator generalized ellipsometer for complete mueller matrix measurement

    DOEpatents

    Jellison, Jr., Gerald E.; Modine, Frank A.

    1999-01-01

    A two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) comprising two polarizer-photoelastic modulator (PEM) pairs, an optical light source, an optical detection system, and associated data processing and control electronics, where the PEMs are free-running. The input light passes through the first polarizer-PEM pair, reflects off the sample surface or passes through the sample, passes through the second PEM-polarizer pair, and is detected. Each PEM is free running and operates at a different resonant frequency, e.g., 50 and 60 kHz. The resulting time-dependent waveform of the light intensity is a complicated function of time, and depends upon the exact operating frequency and phase of each PEM, the sample, and the azimuthal angles of the polarizer-PEM pairs, but can be resolved into a dc component and eight periodic components. In one embodiment, the waveform is analyzed using a new spectral analysis technique that is similar to Fourier analysis to determine eight sample Mueller matrix elements (normalized to the m.sub.00 Mueller matrix element). The other seven normalized elements of the general 4.times.4 Mueller matrix can be determined by changing the azimuthal angles of the PEM-polarizer pairs with respect to the plane of incidence. Since this instrument can measure all elements of the sample Mueller matrix, it is much more powerful than standard ellipsometers.

  9. Computation and Uses of the Semidiscrete Matrix Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kolda, T.G.; O'Leary, D.P.

    1999-06-01

    We derive algorithms for computing a semidiscrete approximation to a matrix in the Frobenius and weighted norms. The approximation is formed as a weighted sum of outer products of vectors whose elements are +/=1 or 0, so the storage required by the approximation is quite small.

  10. Some Properties of the Correlation Matrix of Dichotomous Guttman Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca

    1988-01-01

    Properties of dichotomous Guttman-scalable items are described. Both the elements and eigenvalues of the Pearson correlation matrix of such items can be expressed as simple functions of the number of items if the score distribution is uniform and there is an equal number of items at each difficulty level. (SLD)

  11. Sparse matrix methods based on orthogonality and conjugacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A matrix having a high percentage of zero elements is called spares. In the solution of systems of linear equations or linear least squares problems involving large sparse matrices, significant saving of computer cost can be achieved by taking advantage of the sparsity. The conjugate gradient algorithm and a set of related algorithms are described.

  12. Fiber shape effects on metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. C.; Lee, H.-J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of different fiber shapes on the behavior of metal matrix composites is computationally simulated. A three-dimensional finite element model consisting of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in a three by three unit cell array of a SiC/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite is used in the analysis. The model is employed to represent five fiber shapes that include a circle, an ellipse, a kidney, and two different cross shapes. The distribution of stresses and the composite material properties, such as moduli, coefficients of thermal expansion, and Poisson's ratios, are obtained from the finite element analysis using the various fiber shapes. Comparisons of these results are used to determine the sensitivity of the composite behavior to the different fiber shapes. In general, fiber dominated properties are not affected by fiber geometry and matrix dominated properties are only moderately affected.

  13. Matrix Formulation of Pebble Circulation in the PEBBED Code

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans D; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami

    2002-04-01

    The PEBBED technique provides a foundation for equilibrium fuel-cycle analysis and optimization in pebble-bed cores in which the fuel elements are continuously flowing and, if desired, recirculating. In addition to the modern analysis techniques used in, or being developed for, the code, PEBBED incorporates a novel nuclide-mixing algorithm that allows for sophisticated recirculation patterns using a matrix generated from basic core parameters. Derived from a simple partitioning of the pebble flow, the elements of the recirculation matrix are used to compute the spatially averaged density of each nuclide at the entry plane from the nuclide densities of pebbles emerging from the discharge conus. The order of the recirculation matrix is a function of the flexibility and sophistication of the fuel handling mechanism. This formulation for coupling pebble flow and neutronics enables core design and fuel cycle optimization to be performed by manipulating a few key core parameters. The formulation is amenable to modern optimization techniques.

  14. Compact Fuel Element Environment Test