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Sample records for intercellular junction assembly

  1. Intercellular junctions in myriapods.

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Bigliardi, E; Lane, N J

    1990-01-01

    Tissue from the intestinal tract of myriapods, including millipedes, centipedes and pauropods were examined in tracer-impregnated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The foregut and hindgut of all three classes exhibit pleated septate junctions; these display undulating intercellular ribbons in thin sections. In replicas they show discrete intramembranous particle (IMP) arrays aligned in rows in parallel; with one another. The tissues of the hindgut also possess scalariform junctions, characterized by cross-striated intercellular clefts in sections and IMP-enriched membranes in replicas. Gap junctions occur in all groups, but they are atypical in replicas in that their component IMPs do not always fracture onto the E face, as is characteristic of other arthropods; some IMPs cleave to the P face and others to the E face. The midgut of these organisms exhibits smooth septate junctions with conventional straight septal ribbons and occasional interseptal columns. However the intramembranous appearance in replicas is variable, particularly in centipedes, in that the rows of IMPs in chemically-unfixed propanecryofixed tissues, are prominent and adhere preferentially to the E face, with complementary P face grooves, while in fixed tissues the IMPs are much less distinct and fracture to either P face or E face. They tend not to protrude far beyond the mid-plane of the membrane bilayer and lie in rows which commonly take on the form of a network. Individual rows of the network sometimes curve to run beside a second row, over a short distance, before bending away into another part of the network. The aligned particle rows, which are much more prominent in millipedes, where they frequently lie in close parallel appositions, do not fuse into ridges as often occurs in insect tissues. The myriapod junctions, therefore, are of the same general kind as are found in the gut tract of other arthropod groups, but differ with respect to the subtleties of their intramembranous

  2. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  3. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Yeun; Yoon, Sei Mee; Choi, Eun Ju; Lee, Jinu

    2016-09-15

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action.

  4. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  5. Gap Junction Intercellular Communication in Bone Marrow Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    osteogenesis, osteoblast function, or mesenchymal-derived hematopoietic support. This project postulates that the loss of gap junction ( GJ )-mediated...intercellular communication (IC) in the osteogenic HM is one of the mechanisms involved in dysfunctional mesenchymal hematopoietic support. GJ are cell...bone (30-39). GJ are formed by hexamers (hemichannels) of a family of proteins called connexins, with cell specific expression and functions(40, 41

  6. The Septate Junction: A Structural Basis for Intercellular Coupling*

    PubMed Central

    Gilula, Norton B.; Branton, Daniel; Satir, Peter

    1970-01-01

    Electron microscopy, freeze-etching, and optical diffraction show how the structure of the septate junction may provide the basis for the low-resistance pathway between the electrically coupled cells in mussel gill epithelia. Conventional electron microscopy suggests that the septa are pleated sheets that differentiate from and are structurally continuous with the junctional cell membranes. Freeze-etching exposes geometrically arranged rows of 85-Å particles within the junctional cell membranes. Diffraction evidence shows that these membrane particles and the alternate vertices of the intercellular septal sheets are congruent and therefore superposable. Together, the membrane particles and septal sheets provide a channel that extends from the cytoplasm of one cell through the septate junction to the cytoplasm of the adjacent cell. Images PMID:5272312

  7. Treponema pallidum Invades Intercellular Junctions of Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. Denee; Navab, Mahamad; Haake, David A.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1988-05-01

    The pathogenesis of syphilis reflects invasive properties of Treponema pallidum, but the actual mode of tissue invasion is unknown. We have found two in vitro parallels of treponemal invasiveness. We tested whether motile T. pallidum could invade host cells by determining the fate of radiolabeled motile organisms added to a HeLa cell monolayer; 26% of treponemes associated with the monolayer in a trypsin-resistant niche, presumably between the monolayer and the surface to which it adhered, but did not attain intracellularity. Attachment of T. pallidum to cultured human and rabbit aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells was 2-fold greater than to HeLa cells. We added T. pallidum to aortic endothelial cells grown on membrane filters under conditions in which tight intercellular junctions had formed. T. pallidum was able to pass through the endothelial cell monolayers without altering tight junctions, as measured by electrical resistance. In contrast, heat-killed T. pallidum and the nonpathogen Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter failed to penetrate the monolayer. Transmission electron micrographs of sections of the monolayer showed T. pallidum in intercellular junctions. Our in vitro observations suggest that these highly motile spirochetes may leave the circulation by invading the junctions between endothelial cells.

  8. F-actin binding protein, anillin, regulates integrity of intercellular junctions in human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Feygin, Alex; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) are key morphological features of differentiated epithelial cells that regulate the integrity and permeability of tissue barriers. Structure and remodeling of epithelial junctions depends on their association with the underlying actomyosin cytoskeleton. Anillin is a unique scaffolding protein interacting with different cytoskeletal components, including actin filaments and myosin motors. Its role in the regulation of mammalian epithelial junctions remains unexplored. Downregulation of anillin expression in human prostate, colonic, and lung epithelial cells triggered AJ and TJ disassembly without altering the expression of junctional proteins. This junctional disassembly was accompanied by dramatic disorganization of the perijunctional actomyosin belt; while the general architecture of the actin cytoskeleton, and activation status of non-muscle myosin II, remained unchanged. Furthermore, loss of anillin disrupted the adducin-spectrin membrane skeleton at the areas of cell-cell contact, selectively decreased γ-adducin expression, and induced cytoplasmic aggregation of αII-spectrin. Anillin knockdown activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and JNK inhibition restored AJ and TJ integrity and cytoskeletal organization in anillin-depleted cells. These findings suggest a novel role for anillin in regulating intercellular adhesion in model human epithelia by mechanisms involving the suppression of JNK activity and controlling the assembly of the perijunctional cytoskeleton. PMID:25809162

  9. Reduction in gap junction intercellular communication promotes glioma migration

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Qurratulain; Sin, Wun-Chey; Naus, Christian C.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), an aggressive form of adult brain tumor, is difficult to treat due to its invasive nature. One of the molecular changes observed in GBM is a decrease in the expression of the gap junction protein Connexin43 (Cx43); however, how a reduction in Cx43 expression contributes to glioma malignancy is still unclear. In this study we examine whether a decrease in Cx43 protein expression has a role in enhanced cell migration, a key feature associated with increased tumorigenicity. We used a 3D spheroid migration model that mimics the in vivo architecture of tumor cells to quantify migration changes. We found that down-regulation of Cx43 expression in the U118 human glioma cell line increased migration by reducing cell-ECM adhesion, and changed the migration pattern from collective to single cell. In addition gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) played a more prominent role in mediating migration than the cytoplasmic interactions of the C-terminal tail. Live imaging revealed that reducing Cx43 expression enhanced relative migration by increasing the cell speed and affecting the direction of migration. Taken together our findings reveal an unexplored role of GJIC in facilitating collective migration. PMID:25926558

  10. Gap Junction Intercellular Communication Mediates Ammonia-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Arús, Bernardo Assein; Leite, Marina Concli; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-02-01

    Astrocytes are important brain targets of ammonia, a neurotoxin implicated in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. During hyperammonemia, the pivotal role of astrocytes in brain function and homeostasis is impaired. These cells are abundantly interconnected by gap junctions (GJ), which are intercellular channels that allow the exchange of signaling molecules and metabolites. This communication may also increase cellular vulnerability during injuries, while GJ uncoupling could limit the extension of a lesion. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate whether astrocyte coupling through GJ contributes to ammonia-induced cytotoxicity. We found that carbenoxolone (CBX), an effective GJ blocker, prevented the following effects induced by ammonia in astrocyte primary cultures: (1) decrease in cell viability and membrane integrity; (2) increase in reactive oxygen species production; (3) decrease in GSH intracellular levels; (4) GS activity; (5) pro-inflammatory cytokine release. On the other hand, CBX had no effect on C6 astroglial cells, which are poorly coupled via GJ. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that GJ play a role in ammonia-induced cytotoxicity. Although more studies in vivo are required to confirm our hypothesis, our data suggest that GJ communication between astrocytes may transmit damage signals and excitotoxic components from unhealthy to normal cells, thereby contributing to the propagation of the neurotoxicity of ammonia.

  11. Benzalkonium Chloride Suppresses Rabbit Corneal Endothelium Intercellular Gap Junction Communication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenhao; Huang, Yue; Xie, Hui; Pan, Juxin; Liu, Fanfei; Li, Xuezhi; Chen, Wensheng; Hu, Jiaoyue; Liu, Zuguo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) plays a critical role in the maintenance of corneal endothelium homeostasis. We determined if benzalkonium chloride (BAK) alters GJIC activity in the rabbit corneal endothelium since it is commonly used as a drug preservative in ocular eyedrop preparations even though it can have cytotoxic effects. Methods Thirty-six adult New Zealand albino rabbits were randomly divided into three groups. BAK at 0.01%, 0.05%, and 0.1% was applied twice daily to one eye of each of the rabbits in one of the three groups for seven days. The contralateral untreated eyes were used as controls. Corneal endothelial morphological features were observed by in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Immunofluorescent staining resolved changes in gap junction integrity and localization. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR evaluated changes in levels of connexin43 (Cx43) and tight junction zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) gene and protein expression, respectively. Cx43 and ZO-1 physical interaction was detected by immunoprecipitation (IP). Primary rabbit corneal endothelial cells were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing BAK for 24 hours. The scrape-loading dye transfer technique (SLDT) was used to assess GJIC activity. Results Topical administration of BAK (0.05%, 0.1%) dose dependently disrupted corneal endothelial cell morphology, altered Cx43 and ZO-1 distribution and reduced Cx43 expression. BAK also markedly induced increases in Cx43 phosphorylation status concomitant with decreases in the Cx43-ZO-1 protein-protein interaction. These changes were associated with marked declines in GJIC activity. Conclusions The dose dependent declines in rabbit corneal endothelial GJIC activity induced by BAK are associated with less Cx43-ZO-1 interaction possibly arising from increases in Cx43 phosphorylation and declines in its protein expression. These novel changes provide additional evidence that BAK containing eyedrop preparations

  12. PKCζ PHOSPHORYLATES OCCLUDIN AND PROMOTES ASSEMBLY OF EPITHELIAL TIGHT JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Suneet; Suzuki, Takuya; Seth, Ankur; Samak, Geetha; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Evidence indicates that protein kinases play an important role in the regulation of epithelial tight junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of PKCζ in tight junction regulation in Caco-2 and MDCK cell monolayers. Inhibition of PKCζ by a specific PKCζ-pseudosubstrate peptide results in redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the intercellular junctions and disruption of barrier function without affecting cell viability. Reduced expression of PKCζ by antisense oligonucleotide or shRNA also results in compromised tight junction integrity. Inhibition or knock down of PKCζ delays calcium-induced assembly of tight junctions. Tight junction disruption by PKCζ-pseudosubstrate is associated with the dephosphorylation of occludin and ZO-1 on Ser and Thr residues. PKCζ directly binds to the C-terminal domain of occludin and phosphorylates it on Thr residues. T403, T404, T424 and T438 in occludin C-terminal domain are the predominant sites of PKCζ-dependent phosphorylation. T424A or T438A mutation in full length occludin delays its assembly into the tight junctions. Inhibition of PKCζ also induces redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the tight junctions and dissociates these proteins from the detergent-insoluble fractions in mouse ileum. This study demonstrates that PKCζ phosphorylates occludin on specific Thr residues and promotes assembly of epithelial tight junctions. PMID:21545357

  13. Intercellular junctions of the hen parathyroid gland. A freeze-fracture study.

    PubMed Central

    Setoguti, T; Inoue, Y; Suematsu, T

    1982-01-01

    The fine structure of the intercellular junctions of the hen parathyroid gland was studied using freeze-fracture replicas and thin sections. In the conventional thin sections, desmosomes, intermediate junctions (maculae adherentes) and gap junctions were observed, and in the lanthanum-fixed sections, tight junctions (maculae occludentes) were demonstrated as well. In the freeze-fracture replicas, desmosomes, gap junctions, tight junctions and combination forms of gap and tight junctions occurred, but intermediate junctions were not identified. Junctional complexes (zonulae occludentes) were not encountered in any preparations. The gap junctions varied in size and shape; they ranged from irregularly shaped, minute assemblages of particles to large aggregations of a round or elliptic outline. Both the tight junctions and the combination forms of gap and tight junctions also exhibited a variety of shape and dimension, and, depending on the form of the tight junctional strands, they were classified into three types: type I consisted of a simple line of strands; type II consisted of a closed network of strands; and type III consisted of an open network of strands. The combination forms were more numerous than the typical tight junctions. The possible significance of these junctions is discussed in relation to the function of the parathyroid parenchymal cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7174510

  14. The modulation of gap-junctional intercellular communication by lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Defamie, Norah; Mesnil, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Lipid rafts are specific microdomains of plasma membrane which are enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. These domains seem to favour the interactions of particular proteins and the regulation of signalling pathways in the cells. Recent data have shown that among the proteins, which are preferentially localized in lipid rafts, are connexins that are the structural proteins of gap junctions. Since gap junctional intercellular communication is involved in various cellular processes and pathologies such as cancer, we were interested to review the various observations concerning this specific localization of connexins in lipid rafts and its consequences on gap junctional intercellular communication capacity. In particular, we will focus our discussion on the role of the lipid raft-connexin connection in cancer progression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics.

  15. Intercellular communication via gap junctions affected by mechanical load in the bovine annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Jane; Duncan, Neil A

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the intervertebral disc, as in other connective tissues including tendon, ligament and bone, form interconnected cellular networks that are linked via functional gap junctions. These cellular networks may be necessary to affect a coordinated response to mechanical and environmental stimuli. Using confocal microscopy with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching methods, we explored the in situ strain environment of the outer annulus of an intact bovine disc and the effect of high-level flexion on gap junction signalling. The in situ strain environment in the extracellular matrix of the outer annulus under high flexion load was observed to be non-uniform with the extensive cellular processes remaining crimped sometimes at flexion angles greater than 25°. A significant transient disruption of intercellular communication via functional gap junctions was measured after 10 and 20 min under high flexion load. This study illustrates that in healthy annulus fibrosus tissue, high mechanical loads can impede the functioning of the gap junctions. Future studies will explore more complex loading conditions to determine whether losses in intercellular communication can be permanent and whether gap junctions in aged and degenerated tissues become more susceptible to load. The current research suggests that cellular structures such as gap junctions and intercellular networks, as well as other cell-cell and cell-matrix interconnections, need to be considered in computational models in order to fully understand how macroscale mechanical signals are transmitted across scales to the microscale and ultimately into a cellular biosynthetic response in collagenous tissues.

  16. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  17. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deymier, P. A.; Swinteck, N.; Runge, K.; Deymier-Black, A.; Hoying, J. B.

    2015-11-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  18. TLR2 Regulates Gap Junction Intercellular Communication in Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francis J.; Prince, Alice S.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune response to inhaled bacteria, such as the opportunist Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is initiated by TLR2 displayed on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. Activation of TLR2 is accompanied by an immediate Ca2+ flux that is both necessary and sufficient to stimulate NF-κB and MAPK proinflammatory signaling to recruit and activate polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the airway. In human airway cells gap junction channels were found to provide a regulated conduit for the movement of Ca2+ from cell to cell. In response to TLR2 stimulation, by either lipid agonists or P. aeruginosa, gap junctions functioned to transiently amplify proinflammatory signaling by communicating Ca2+ fluxes from stimulated to adjacent, non-stimulated cells thus increasing epithelial CXCL8 production. P. aeruginosa stimulation also induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Connexin 43 and association with c-Src, events linked to the closure of these channels. By 4 hours post bacterial stimulation, gap junction communication was decreased indicating an autoregulatory control of the connexins. Thus, gap junction channels comprised of Connexin 43 and other connexins in airway cells provide a mechanism to coordinate and regulate the epithelial immune response even in the absence of signals from the immune system. PMID:18354224

  19. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, Juan A.; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Saez, Juan C. . E-mail: jsaez@bio.puc.cl

    2006-06-15

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels.

  20. Intercellular Diffusion of a Fluorescent Sucrose Analog via the Septal Junctions in a Filamentous Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Nürnberg, Dennis J.; Mariscal, Vicente; Bornikoel, Jan; Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Krauß, Norbert; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many filamentous cyanobacteria produce specialized nitrogen-fixing cells called heterocysts, which are located at semiregular intervals along the filament with about 10 to 20 photosynthetic vegetative cells in between. Nitrogen fixation in these complex multicellular bacteria depends on metabolite exchange between the two cell types, with the heterocysts supplying combined-nitrogen compounds but dependent on the vegetative cells for photosynthetically produced carbon compounds. Here, we used a fluorescent tracer to probe intercellular metabolite exchange in the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We show that esculin, a fluorescent sucrose analog, is incorporated by a sucrose import system into the cytoplasm of Anabaena cells. The cytoplasmic esculin is rapidly and reversibly exchanged across vegetative-vegetative and vegetative-heterocyst cell junctions. Our measurements reveal the kinetics of esculin exchange and also show that intercellular metabolic communication is lost in a significant fraction of older heterocysts. SepJ, FraC, and FraD are proteins located at the intercellular septa and are suggested to form structures analogous to gap junctions. We show that a ΔsepJ ΔfraC ΔfraD triple mutant shows an altered septum structure with thinner septa but a denser peptidoglycan layer. Intercellular diffusion of esculin and fluorescein derivatives is impaired in this mutant, which also shows a greatly reduced frequency of nanopores in the intercellular septal cross walls. These findings suggest that FraC, FraD, and SepJ are important for the formation of junctional structures that constitute the major pathway for feeding heterocysts with sucrose. PMID:25784700

  1. Intercellular diffusion of a fluorescent sucrose analog via the septal junctions in a filamentous cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Nürnberg, Dennis J; Mariscal, Vicente; Bornikoel, Jan; Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Krauß, Norbert; Herrero, Antonia; Maldener, Iris; Flores, Enrique; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2015-03-17

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria produce specialized nitrogen-fixing cells called heterocysts, which are located at semiregular intervals along the filament with about 10 to 20 photosynthetic vegetative cells in between. Nitrogen fixation in these complex multicellular bacteria depends on metabolite exchange between the two cell types, with the heterocysts supplying combined-nitrogen compounds but dependent on the vegetative cells for photosynthetically produced carbon compounds. Here, we used a fluorescent tracer to probe intercellular metabolite exchange in the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We show that esculin, a fluorescent sucrose analog, is incorporated by a sucrose import system into the cytoplasm of Anabaena cells. The cytoplasmic esculin is rapidly and reversibly exchanged across vegetative-vegetative and vegetative-heterocyst cell junctions. Our measurements reveal the kinetics of esculin exchange and also show that intercellular metabolic communication is lost in a significant fraction of older heterocysts. SepJ, FraC, and FraD are proteins located at the intercellular septa and are suggested to form structures analogous to gap junctions. We show that a ΔsepJ ΔfraC ΔfraD triple mutant shows an altered septum structure with thinner septa but a denser peptidoglycan layer. Intercellular diffusion of esculin and fluorescein derivatives is impaired in this mutant, which also shows a greatly reduced frequency of nanopores in the intercellular septal cross walls. These findings suggest that FraC, FraD, and SepJ are important for the formation of junctional structures that constitute the major pathway for feeding heterocysts with sucrose. Anabaena and its relatives are filamentous cyanobacteria that exhibit a sophisticated form of prokaryotic multicellularity, with the formation of differentiated cell types, including normal photosynthetic cells and specialized nitrogen-fixing cells called heterocysts. The question

  2. The Role of Chemical Inhibition of Gap-Junctional Intercellular Communication in Toxicology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-31

    Florida. Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC has been implicated as an important epigenetic modulation during...Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology, February 1991, Dallas, Texas. A major epigenetic modulation induced by many tumor promoters both in vivo...GJIC in rat pancreatic epithelial cells. The results indicated that many chlorinated pesticides , the phorbol ester tumor promoter, TPA, and a number of

  3. The Role of Chemical Inhibition of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication in Toxicology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-14

    cell communication, tumor promoters, terato- 0620 gens, neurotoxins, protein kinase C, chemical toxicity. 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary...hypothesis that chemical modulation of gap junctional intercellular communication can lead to many toxic endpoints, such as teratogenesis, tumor promotion... tumor promotion, reproductive-, immune- and neurotoxicities. To date, after two years into the project, we have initiated work on all of the specific aims

  4. Analysis of gap junctional intercellular communications using a dielectrophoresis-based microchip.

    PubMed

    Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Charrier, Céline; Brounais-Le Royer, Bénédicte; Mullard, Mathilde; Brown, Hannah K; Verrecchia, Franck; Heymann, Dominique

    2017-03-01

    Gap junctions are transmembrane structures that directly connect the cytoplasm of adjacent cells, making intercellular communications possible. It has been shown that the behaviour of several tumours - such as bone tumours - is related to gap junction intercellular communications (GJIC). Several methodologies are available for studying GJIC, based on measuring different parameters that are useful for multiple applications, such as the study of carcinogenesis for example. These methods nevertheless have several limitations. The present manuscript describes the setting up of a dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based lab-on-a-chip platform for the real-time study of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication between osteosarcoma cells and the main cells accessible to their microenvironment. We conclude that using the DEParray technology for the GJIC assessment has several advantages comparing to current techniques. This methodology is less harmful for cells integrity; cells can be recovered after interaction to make further molecular analysis; it is possible to study GJIC in real time; we can promote cell interactions using up to five different populations. The setting up of this new methodology overcomes several difficulties to perform experiments for solving questions about GJIC process that we are not able to do with current technics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. A fine structural analysis of intercellular junctions in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A; Revel, J P

    1970-05-01

    Zonulae occludentes and gap junctions were examined both in the intact mouse liver and in a junction-rich membrane fraction from homogenized mouse liver. These preparations were visualized with the techniques of uranyl acetate staining en bloc, staining with colloidal lanthanum, negative staining with phosphotungstate, and freeze-cleaving. The zonula occludens is arranged as a meshwork of branching and anastomosing threadlike contacts sealing the lumen of the bile canaliculus from the liver intercellular space. The gap junction is characterized in section by a 20 A gap between the apposed junctional membrane outer leaflets, and permeation of this space with lanthanum or phosphotungstate reveals a polygonal lattice of subunits with a center-to-center spacing of 90-100 A. Freeze-cleaved gap junctions show a similar lattice. Extraction of junction-rich fractions with 60% aqueous acetone results in a disappearance of the 20 A gap in sectioned pellets and an inability to demonstrate the polygonal lattice with either the freeze-cleave or negative staining techniques. Extraction of the membranes with 50% acetone does not produce this effect. Thin-layer chromatography of the acetone extracts reveals a group of phospholipids in the 60% extract that are not detectable in the 50% extract. Acetone does not cause any detectable change in the structure of the zonula occludens, but the occluding junction becomes leaky to lanthanum following acetone treatment. The effects of other reagents on the junctions are reported.

  6. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    PubMed

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetic Measurements Reveal Enhanced Protein-Protein Interactions at Intercellular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Kisting, Meridith A.; Leckband, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    The binding properties of adhesion proteins are typically quantified from measurements with soluble fragments, under conditions that differ radically from the confined microenvironment of membrane bound proteins in adhesion zones. Using classical cadherin as a model adhesion protein, we tested the postulate that confinement within quasi two-dimensional intercellular gaps exposes weak protein interactions that are not detected in solution binding assays. Micropipette-based measurements of cadherin-mediated, cell-cell binding kinetics identified a unique kinetic signature that reflects both adhesive (trans) bonds between cadherins on opposing cells and lateral (cis) interactions between cadherins on the same cell. In solution, proposed lateral interactions were not detected, even at high cadherin concentrations. Mutations postulated to disrupt lateral cadherin association altered the kinetic signatures, but did not affect the adhesive (trans) binding affinity. Perturbed kinetics further coincided with altered cadherin distributions at junctions, wound healing dynamics, and paracellular permeability. Intercellular binding kinetics thus revealed cadherin interactions that occur within confined, intermembrane gaps but not in solution. Findings further demonstrate the impact of these revealed interactions on the organization and function of intercellular junctions. PMID:27009566

  8. Identifying connexin expression and determining gap junction intercellular communication in rainbow trout cells.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Joshua; Poynter, Sarah J; DeWitte-Orr, Stephanie J

    2017-05-01

    Gap junctions are groups of membrane-bound channels that allow the passage of small molecules and ions between cells, permitting cell-cell communication. Because of their importance in cell homeostasis, gap junction presence and function were characterized in three commonly studied rainbow trout cell lines, namely RTgill-W1, RTgutGC, and RTG-2. Firstly, gap junction presence was determined by screening for gap junction protein alpha 7 and alpha 1 (GJA7 and GJA1) presence at the transcript level and GJA7 at the protein level. GJA7 was successfully identified at both the transcript and protein levels, and GJA1 was detected at the transcript level in all three cell lines. This is the first report of a GJA7 full-length transcript sequence in rainbow trout cells. Gap junction function, as determined by gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), was examined using Lucifer yellow dye migration with the scrape and load technique; visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a gap junction inhibitor, was used to confirm the presence of functional gap junctions. Effects of serum deprivation on GJIC were also monitored; 24-h serum deprivation resulted in greater dye migration compared with 30-min serum deprivation. Both RTG-2 and RTgill-W1 showed significant dye migration that was inhibited by PMA while RTgutGC did not. Human foreskin fibroblast (HFF-1) cells were used as a positive control for gap junction presence and function. Taken together, our study shows that rainbow trout cells express connexin transcripts and proteins, and RTG-2 and, to a lesser extent, RTgill-W1 cells are able to perform GJIC.

  9. INHIBITION OF GAP JUNCTIONAL INTERCELLULAR COMMUNICATION BY PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS IN RAT LIVER AND DOLPHIN KIDNEY EPITHELIAL CELL LINES IN VITRO AND SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication (GJIC) is the major pathway of intercellular signal transduction, and is, thus, important for normal cell growth and function. Recent studies have revealed a global distribution of some perfluorinated organic compounds e...

  10. INHIBITION OF GAP JUNCTIONAL INTERCELLULAR COMMUNICATION BY PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS IN RAT LIVER AND DOLPHIN KIDNEY EPITHELIAL CELL LINES IN VITRO AND SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication (GJIC) is the major pathway of intercellular signal transduction, and is, thus, important for normal cell growth and function. Recent studies have revealed a global distribution of some perfluorinated organic compounds e...

  11. Effects of Intercellular Junction Protein Expression on Intracellular Ice Formation in Mouse Insulinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Adam Z.; Karlsson, Jens O.M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of cryopreservation procedures for tissues has proven to be difficult in part because cells within tissue are more susceptible to intracellular ice formation (IIF) than are isolated cells. In particular, previous studies suggest that cell-cell interactions increase the likelihood of IIF by enabling propagation of ice between neighboring cells, a process thought to be mediated by gap junction channels. In this study, we investigated the effects of cell-cell interactions on IIF using three genetically modified strains of the mouse insulinoma cell line MIN6, each of which expressed key intercellular junction proteins (connexin-36, E-cadherin, and occludin) at different levels. High-speed video cryomicroscopy was used to visualize the freezing process in pairs of adherent cells, revealing that the initial IIF event in a given cell pair was correlated with a hitherto unrecognized precursor phenomenon: penetration of extracellular ice into paracellular spaces at the cell-cell interface. Such paracellular ice penetration occurred in the majority of cell pairs observed, and typically preceded and colocalized with the IIF initiation events. Paracellular ice penetration was generally not observed at temperatures >−5.65°C, which is consistent with a penetration mechanism via defects in tight-junction barriers at the cell-cell interface. Although the maximum temperature of paracellular penetration was similar for all four cell strains, genetically modified cells exhibited a significantly higher frequency of ice penetration and a higher mean IIF temperature than did wild-type cells. A four-state Markov chain model was used to quantify the rate constants of the paracellular ice penetration process, the penetration-associated IIF initiation process, and the intercellular ice propagation process. In the initial stages of freezing (>−15°C), junction protein expression appeared to only have a modest effect on the kinetics of propagative IIF, and even cell

  12. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis zoospore secretions rapidly disturb intercellular junctions in frog skin.

    PubMed

    Brutyn, Melanie; D'Herde, Katharina; Dhaenens, Maarten; Van Rooij, Pascale; Verbrugghe, Elin; Hyatt, Alex D; Croubels, Siska; Deforce, Dieter; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Global amphibian declines are in part driven by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, causing superficial dermatomycosis with epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis in infected amphibians. The susceptibility to chytridiomycosis and the severity of epidermal lesions in amphibians with chytridiomycosis are not consistent across species or even among individuals. Severe infections cause death of the animal most likely through disturbance of ion homeostasis. The mechanism by which this superficial skin infection results in epidermal lesions has so far eluded precise definition. It was the aim of this study to unravel how B. dendrobatidis causes alterations that affect skin integrity. Exposure of Xenopus laevis skin to B. dendrobatidis zoospore supernatant using skin explants and Ussing chambers caused rapid disruption of intercellular junctions, demonstrated using histology and transmission electron microscopy. The loss of intercellular junctions led to detachment-induced cell apoptosis, or anoikis. The zoospore supernatant induced neither apoptosis nor necrosis in isolated primary keratinocytes of X. laevis. This supports the idea that the loss of cell contacts triggered apoptosis in the skin explants. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein composition of the supernatant revealed a complex mixture, including several new virulence associated proteins, such as proteases, biofilm-associated proteins and a carotenoid ester lipase. Protease and lipase activity of the supernatant was confirmed with a protease and lipase assay. In conclusion, B. dendrobatidis zoospores produce a complex mixture of proteins that quickly disturbs epidermal intercellular junctions leading to anoikis in the anuran skin. The role of the identified proteins in this process remains to be determined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gap Junction Intercellular Communication: A Review of a Potential Platform to Modulate Craniofacial Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rossello, Ricardo A.; Kohn, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Defects in craniofacial tissues, resulting from trauma, congenital abnormalities, oncologic resection or progressive deforming diseases, may result in aesthetic deformity, pain and reduced function. Restoring the structure, function and aesthetics of craniofacial tissues represents a substantial clinical problem in need of new solutions. More biologically-interactive biomaterials could potentially improve the treatment of craniofacial defects, and an understanding of developmental processes may help identify strategies and materials that can be used in tissue engineering. One such strategy that can potentially advance tissue engineering is cell–cell communication. Gap junction intercellular communication is the most direct way of achieving such signaling. Gap junction communication through connexin-mediated junctions, in particular connexin 43 (Cx43), plays a major role bone development. Given the important role of Cx43 in controlling development and differentiation, especially in bone cells, controlling the expression of Cx43 may provide control over cell-to-cell communication and may help overcome some of the challenges in craniofacial tissue engineering. Following a review of gap junctions in bone cells, the ability to enhance cell–cell communication and osteogenic differentiation via control of gap junctions is discussed, as is the potential utility of this approach in craniofacial tissue engineering. PMID:18481782

  14. Gap junction intercellular communication: a review of a potential platform to modulate craniofacial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rossello, Ricardo A; Kohn, David H

    2009-02-01

    Defects in craniofacial tissues, resulting from trauma, congenital abnormalities, oncologic resection or progressive deforming diseases, may result in aesthetic deformity, pain and reduced function. Restoring the structure, function and aesthetics of craniofacial tissues represents a substantial clinical problem in need of new solutions. More biologically-interactive biomaterials could potentially improve the treatment of craniofacial defects, and an understanding of developmental processes may help identify strategies and materials that can be used in tissue engineering. One such strategy that can potentially advance tissue engineering is cell-cell communication. Gap junction intercellular communication is the most direct way of achieving such signaling. Gap junction communication through connexin-mediated junctions, in particular connexin 43 (Cx43), plays a major role bone development. Given the important role of Cx43 in controlling development and differentiation, especially in bone cells, controlling the expression of Cx43 may provide control over cell-to-cell communication and may help overcome some of the challenges in craniofacial tissue engineering. Following a review of gap junctions in bone cells, the ability to enhance cell-cell communication and osteogenic differentiation via control of gap junctions is discussed, as is the potential utility of this approach in craniofacial tissue engineering. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. De novo reestablishment of gap junctional intercellular communications during reprogramming to pluripotency and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sharovskaya, Yulia Y; Philonenko, Elena S; Kiselev, Sergei L; Lagarkova, Maria A

    2012-09-20

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been described in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and various somatic cells. GJIC has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation. Recently, a new type of pluripotent stem cells was generated by direct reprogramming of somatic cells. Here, for the first time, we show that during reprogramming events GJIC is re-established upon reaching complete reprogramming. The opposite process of cell differentiation from the pluripotent state leads to the disruption of GJIC between pluripotent and differentiated cell subsets. However, GJIC is subsequently re-established de novo within each differentiated cell type in vitro, forming communication compartments within a histotype. Our results provide the important evidence that reestablisment of functional gap junctions to the level similar to human ESCs is an additional physiological characteristic of somatic cell reprogramming to the pluripotent state and differentiation to the specific cell type.

  16. Requirement of gap junctional intercellular communication for human villous trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cronier, Laurent; Frendo, Jean-Louis; Defamie, Norah; Pidoux, Guillaume; Bertin, Gladys; Guibourdenche, Jean; Pointis, Georges; Malassine, Andre

    2003-11-01

    During pregnancy, the villous trophoblast develops from the fusion of cytotrophoblastic cells (CT) into a syncytiotrophoblast (ST), supporting the main physiological functions of the human placenta. Connexin43 (Cx43) is demonstrated in situ and in vitro in the villous trophoblast between CT and between CT and ST. Moreover, the presence of a gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) during in vitro trophoblast differentiation was previously demonstrated. Because the exchange of molecules through gap junctions is considered to play a major role in the control of cell and tissue differentiation, we studied the effects of a gap junctional uncoupler, heptanol, on morphological and functional trophoblast differentiation and on GJIC measured by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. We found that when the GJIC was interrupted, CT still aggregated but fused poorly. This morphological effect was associated with a significant decrease of trophoblastic-specific gene expression (beta human chorionic gonadotropin and human chorionic somatomammotropin). This blocking action was reversible as demonstrated by recovery of GJIC and trophoblast differentiation process after heptanol removal. Moreover, the inhibition of the trophoblast differentiation did not affect Cx43 transcript expression and Cx43 protein expression. These data suggest that the molecular exchanges through gap junctions preceding cellular fusion are essential for trophoblast differentiation generating the multifunctional syncytiotrophoblast.

  17. Irsogladine maleate regulates gap junctional intercellular communication-dependent epithelial barrier in human nasal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Ryo; Nomura, Kazuaki; Kakuki, Takuya; Takano, Ken-Ichi; Kohno, Takayuki; Konno, Takumi; Sawada, Norimasa; Himi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    The airway epithelium of the human nasal mucosa acts as the first physical barrier that protects against inhaled substances and pathogens. Irsogladine maleate (IM) is an enhancer of gastric mucosal protective factors via upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). GJIC is thought to participate in the formation of functional tight junctions. However, the effects of IM on GJIC and the epithelial barrier in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) remain unknown. To investigate the effects of IM on GJIC and the tight junctional barrier in HNECs, primary cultures of HNECs transfected with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-HNECs) were treated with IM and the GJIC inhibitors oleamide and 18β-GA. Some cells were pretreated with IM before treatment with TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) to examine whether IM prevented the changes via TLR3-mediated signal pathways. In hTERT-HNECs, GJIC blockers reduced the expression of tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7, occludin, tricellulin, and JAM-A. IM induced GJIC activity and enhanced the expression of claudin-1, -4, and JAM-A at the protein and mRNA levels with an increase of barrier function. GJIC blockers prevented the increase of the tight junction proteins induced by IM. Furthermore, IM prevented the reduction of JAM-A but not induction of IL-8 and TNF-α induced by poly(I:C). In conclusion, IM can maintain the GJIC-dependent tight junctional barrier via regulation of GJIC in upper airway nasal epithelium. Therefore, it is possible that IM may be useful as a nasal spray to prevent the disruption of the epithelial barrier by viral infections and exposure to allergens in human nasal mucosa.

  18. A rapid and sensitive assay of intercellular coupling by voltage imaging of gap junction networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of mechanisms that govern connexin channel gating and permeability regulate coupling in gap junction networks. Mutations in connexin genes have been linked to several pathologies, including cardiovascular anomalies, peripheral neuropathy, skin disorders, cataracts and deafness. Gap junction coupling and its patho–physiological alterations are commonly assayed by microinjection experiments with fluorescent tracers, which typically require several minutes to allow dye transfer to a limited number of cells. Comparable or longer time intervals are required by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Paired electrophysiological recordings have excellent time resolution but provide extremely limited spatial information regarding network connectivity. Results Here, we developed a rapid and sensitive method to assay gap junction communication using a combination of single cell electrophysiology, large–scale optical recordings and a digital phase–sensitive detector to extract signals with a known frequency from Vf2.1.Cl, a novel fluorescent sensor of plasma membrane potential. Tests performed in HeLa cell cultures confirmed that suitably encoded Vf2.1.Cl signals remained confined within the network of cells visibly interconnected by fluorescently tagged gap junction channels. We used this method to visualize instantly intercellular connectivity over the whole field of view (hundreds of cells) in cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal mice. A simple resistive network model reproduced accurately the spatial dependence of the electrical signals throughout the cellular network. Our data suggest that each pair of cochlear non−sensory cells of the lesser epithelial ridge is coupled by ~1500 gap junction channels, on average. Junctional conductance was reduced by 14% in cochlear cultures harboring the T5M mutation of connexin30, which induces a moderate hearing loss in connexin30T5M/T5M knock–in mice, and by 91% in cultures from

  19. Regulation of gap junctional intercellular communication by TCDD in HMEC and MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gakhar, Gunjan Schrempp, Diane Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that many neoplastic tissues exhibit a decrease in gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Many hydrocarbons and organochlorine compounds are environmental pollutants known to be carcinogenic. The effect of an organochlorine compound, TCDD, on GJIC in human breast cell lines has not been established. In the present study, we showed that TCDD causes an inhibition in the gap junctional activity in MCF-7 (breast cancer cells). In MCF-7 cells, an increase in the phosphorylated form of gap junctional protein, connexin 43 (Cx43), and PKC {alpha} was seen in the presence of TCDD. Gap junctional plaque formation was significantly decreased in MCF-7 cells in the presence of TCDD. Immunoprecipitation studies of PKC {alpha} showed that TCDD caused a significant 40% increase in the phosphorylated Cx43 in MCF-7 cells. TCDD also modulated the translocation of PKC {alpha} from the cytosol to the membrane and caused a 2-fold increase in the PKC {alpha} activity at 50 nM TCDD in MCF-7 cells. Calphostin C, an inhibitor of PKC {alpha}, showed a significant inhibition of PKC {alpha} activity in the presence of TCDD. Furthermore, TCDD also caused a decrease in the gap junctional activity and Cx43 protein in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). However, we observed a shift in the Cx43 plaques towards the perinuclear membrane in the presence of TCDD by confocal microscopy and Western blot. Overall, these results conclude that TCDD decreases GJIC by phosphorylating Cx43 via PKC {alpha} signaling pathway in MCF-7 cells; however, TCDD decreases the GJIC by affecting the localization of Cx43 in HMEC. These new findings elucidate the differential mode of effect of TCDD in the downregulation of GJIC in HMEC and MCF-7 cells.

  20. [Gap junctional intercellular communication: a new mechanism in pathophysiology of migraine with aura. Therapeutic applications].

    PubMed

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2012-12-01

    Migraine is a common, recurrent and disabling primary headache disorder, which affects up to 20% of the population. About a third of patients with migraine have attacks with aura, a focal neurological disturbance that manifests itself as visual, sensitive or motor symptoms. Cortical spreading depression, a wave of electrical activity that moves across the cerebral cortex through neuronal-glial cell gap junctions, would be involved in the triggering of migraine aura. Moreover, cortical spreading depression activates perivascular trigeminal afferents in the neocortex, that through central and peripheral reflex, cause inflammatory reaction in the meninges to generate the headache. Tonabersat, a novel benzopyran compound, was selected for clinical trial on the basis of its inhibitory activity on cortical spreading depression and neurogenic inflammation in animal models of migraine. Moreover, tonabersat inhibited trigeminal ganglion neuronal-glial cell gap junctions, suggesting that this compound could prevent peripheral sensitization within the ganglion. In clinical trial, tonabersat showed a preventive effect on attacks of migraine with aura but had no efficacy on non-aura attacks and in the acute treatment of migraine. In conclusion, neuronal-glial cell gap junctional intercellular communication seems to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine with aura and is emerging as a new promising therapeutic target for prophylactic treatment of patients with chronic attacks.

  1. Giant cadherins Fat and Dachsous self-bend to organize properly spaced intercellular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Nagae, Shigenori; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Tanoue, Takuji; Iwasaki, Kenji; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    The cadherins Fat and Dachsous regulate cell polarity and proliferation via their heterophilic interactions at intercellular junctions. Their ectodomains are unusually large because of repetitive extracellular cadherin (EC) domains, which raises the question of how they fit in regular intercellular spaces. Cadherins typically exhibit a linear topology through the binding of Ca2+ to the linker between the EC domains. Our electron-microscopic observations of mammalian Fat4 and Dachsous1 ectodomains, however, revealed that, although their N-terminal regions exhibit a linear configuration, the C-terminal regions are kinked with multiple hairpin-like bends. Notably, certain EC–EC linkers in Fat4 and Dachsous1 lost Ca2+-binding amino acids. When such non–Ca2+-binding linkers were substituted for a normal linker in E-cadherin, the mutant E-cadherins deformed more extensively than the wild-type molecule. To simulate cadherin structures with non–Ca2+-binding linkers, we used an elastic network model and confirmed that bent configurations can be generated by deformation of non–Ca2+-binding linkers. These findings suggest that Fat and Dachsous self-bend due to the loss of Ca2+-binding amino acids from specific EC–EC linkers, and can therefore adapt to confined spaces. PMID:25355906

  2. Protein kinase Cζ phosphorylates occludin and promotes assembly of epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Jain, Suneet; Suzuki, Takuya; Seth, Ankur; Samak, Geetha; Rao, Radhakrishna

    2011-07-15

    Protein kinases play an important role in the regulation of epithelial tight junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of PKCζ (protein kinase Cζ) in tight junction regulation in Caco-2 and MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney) cell monolayers. Inhibition of PKCζ by a specific PKCζ pseudosubstrate peptide results in redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 (zona occludens 1) from the intercellular junctions and disruption of barrier function without affecting cell viability. Reduced expression of PKCζ by antisense oligonucleotide or shRNA (short hairpin RNA) also results in compromised tight junction integrity. Inhibition or knockdown of PKCζ delays calcium-induced assembly of tight junctions. Tight junction disruption by PKCζ pseudosubstrate is associated with the dephosphorylation of occludin and ZO-1 on serine and threonine residues. PKCζ directly binds to the C-terminal domain of occludin and phosphorylates it on threonine residues. Thr403, Thr404, Thr424 and Thr438 in the occludin C-terminal domain are the predominant sites of PKCζ-dependent phosphorylation. A T424A or T438A mutation in full-length occludin delays its assembly into the tight junctions. Inhibition of PKCζ also induces redistribution of occludin and ZO-1 from the tight junctions and dissociates these proteins from the detergent-insoluble fractions in mouse ileum. The present study demonstrates that PKCζ phosphorylates occludin on specific threonine residues and promotes assembly of epithelial tight junctions.

  3. Age-related changes in gap junctional intercellular communication in osteoblastic cells

    PubMed Central

    Genetos, Damian C.; Zhou, Zhiyi; Li, Zhongyong; Donahue, Henry J.

    2013-01-01

    Aging demonstrates deleterious effects upon the skeleton which can predispose an individual to osteoporosis and related fractures. Despite the well-documented evidence that aging decreases bone formation, there remains little understanding whereby cellular aging alters skeletal homeostasis. We, and others, have previously demonstrated that gap junctions—membrane-spanning channels that allow direct cell-to-cell conductance of small signaling molecules—are critically involved in osteoblast differentiation and skeletal homeostasis. We examined whether the capacity of rat osteoblastic cells to form gap junctions and respond to known modulators of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) was dependent on the age of the animal from which they were isolated. We observed no effect of age upon osteoblastic Cx43 mRNA, protein or GJIC. We also examined age-related changes in PTH-stimulated GJIC. PTH demonstrated age-dependent effects upon GJIC: osteoblastic cells from young rats increased GJIC in response to PTH, whereas there was no change in GJIC in response to PTH in osteoblastic cells from mature or old rats. PTH-stimulated GJIC occurred independently of changes in Cx43 mRNA or protein expression. Cholera toxin significantly increased GJIC in osteoblastic cells from young rats compared to those from mature and old rats. These data demonstrate an age-related impairment in the capacity of osteoblastic cells to generate functional gap junctions in response to PTH, and suggest that an age-related defect in G protein-coupled adenylate cyclase activity at least partially contributes to decreased PTH-stimulated GJIC. PMID:22696456

  4. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection.

  5. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. PMID:24945433

  6. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Norris, Rachael P; Lampe, Paul D; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2015-04-28

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2-4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes.

  7. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles

    PubMed Central

    Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Egbert, Jeremy R.; Norris, Rachael P.; Lampe, Paul D.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2–4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes. PMID:25775542

  8. Sulforaphane counteracts aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer driven by dysregulated Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyao; Isayev, Orkhan; Heilmann, Katharina; Schoensiegel, Frank; Liu, Li; Nessling, Michelle; Richter, Karsten; Labsch, Sabrina; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Juergen; Gladkich, Jury; Giese, Nathalia; Werner, Jens; Schemmer, Peter; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M.; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Schaefer, Michael; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The extreme aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has been associated with blocked gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). We examined whether disturbed GJIC is responsible for a CSC phenotype in established and primary cancer cells and patient tissue of PDA using interdisciplinary methods based in physiology, cell and molecular biology, histology and epigenetics. Flux of fluorescent dyes and gemcitabine through gap junctions (GJs) was intact in less aggressive cells but not in highly malignant cells with morphological dysfunctional GJs. Among several connexins, only Cx43 was expressed on the cell surface of less aggressive and GJIC-competent cells, whereas Cx43 surface expression was absent in highly malignant, E-cadherin-negative and GJIC-incompetent cells. The levels of total Cx43 protein and Cx43 phosphorylated at Ser368 and Ser279/282 were high in normal tissue but low to absent in malignant tissue. si-RNA-mediated inhibition of Cx43 expression in GJIC-competent cells prevented GJIC and induced colony formation and the expression of stem cell-related factors. The bioactive substance sulforaphane enhanced Cx43 and E-cadherin levels, inhibited the CSC markers c-Met and CD133, improved the functional morphology of GJs and enhanced GJIC. Sulforaphane altered the phosphorylation of several kinases and their substrates and inhibition of GSK3, JNK and PKC prevented sulforaphane-induced CX43 expression. The sulforaphane-mediated expression of Cx43 was not correlated with enhanced Cx43 RNA expression, acetylated histone binding and Cx43 promoter de-methylation, suggesting that posttranslational phosphorylation is the dominant regulatory mechanism. Together, the absence of Cx43 prevents GJIC and enhances aggressiveness, whereas sulforaphane counteracts this process, and our findings highlight dietary co-treatment as a viable treatment option for PDA. PMID:24742583

  9. Cyclic-AMP induction of gap junctional intercellular communication increases bystander effect in suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Carystinos, G D; Katabi, M M; Laird, D W; Galipeau, J; Chan, H; Alaoui-Jamali, M A; Batist, G

    1999-01-01

    The phenomenon of the "bystander effect" (BE) observed in suicide gene therapy studies leads to the intriguing possibility that cytotoxicity can be achieved even in tumor cells that have not themselves been targeted with novel genetic material. There is considerable data suggesting the role of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC) in the BE. Transfer of connexin (Cx)-encoding genes, the building blocks of GJIC, has been shown both in vitro and in vivo to increase the BE. Since the loss of GJIC is a common feature of cancer cells, we examined the consequence of GJIC up-regulation on the BE in suicide gene therapy. We used 8-bromo-cyclic-AMP to induce Cx43 and GJIC. In mixing assays, using various proportions of cells containing viral thymidine kinase delivered by an adenoviral delivery system or stably transduced by a retrovirus vector, 8-bromo-cyclic-AMP enhanced the BE of cell killing using ganciclovir. The induction in cell killing was more significant when a low percentage of the cell population was infected, which is the relevant clinical situation. We have demonstrated that this is not due to an effect on infectivity or suicide gene expression. Since decreased GJIC is part of the transformed phenotype, induction of Cxs provides an element of selectivity to suicide gene therapy. Our study adds strength to the rationale to develop clinically tolerable GJ inducers to potentiate the effect of suicide gene therapy via the BE.

  10. Extract from the zooxanthellate jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata modulates gap junction intercellular communication in human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Leone, Antonella; Lecci, Raffaella Marina; Durante, Miriana; Piraino, Stefano

    2013-05-22

    On a global scale, jellyfish populations in coastal marine ecosystems exhibit increasing trends of abundance. High-density outbreaks may directly or indirectly affect human economical and recreational activities, as well as public health. As the interest in biology of marine jellyfish grows, a number of jellyfish metabolites with healthy potential, such as anticancer or antioxidant activities, is increasingly reported. In this study, the Mediterranean "fried egg jellyfish" Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Macri, 1778) has been targeted in the search forputative valuable bioactive compounds. A medusa extract was obtained, fractionated, characterized by HPLC, GC-MS and SDS-PAGE and assayed for its biological activity on breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa). The composition of the jellyfish extract included photosynthetic pigments, valuable ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, and polypeptides derived either from jellyfish tissues and their algal symbionts. Extract fractions showed antioxidant activity and the ability to affect cell viability and intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions (GJIC) differentially in MCF-7 and HEKa cells. A significantly higher cytotoxicity and GJIC enhancement in MCF-7 compared to HEKa cells was recorded. A putative action mechanism for the anticancer bioactivity through the modulation of GJIC has been hypothesized and its nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potential was discussed.

  11. Bay or baylike regions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were potent inhibitors of Gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, L M; Rummel, A M; Masten, S J; Trosko, J E; Upham, B L

    1998-01-01

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known carcinogens, and a considerable amount of research has been devoted to predicting the tumor-initiating potential of PAHs based on chemical structure. However, there has been little research into the effects of PAHs on the epigenetic events of tumor promotion and no structural correlation has been made thereof. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) activity was used in this study as an epigenetic biomarker to determine the structure-activity relationships of twelve different PAHs. The PAHs used were naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, anthracene, 1-methylanthracene, 2-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9, 10-dimethylanthracene, phenanthrene, fluorene, 1-methylfluorene, and fluoranthene. Results showed that PAHs containing bay or baylike regions inhibited GJIC more than did the linear PAHs. The nonnaphthalene PAHs were not cytotoxic as determined by a vital dye uptake assay, but the naphthalene compounds were cytotoxic at the higher doses, indicating that the down regulation of GJIC by these naphthalenes could be a consequence of general membrane damage. Inhibition of GJIC by all the inhibitory PAHs was reversed when the cells were refreshed with PAH-free growth medium. Inhibition of GJIC occurred within 0.5-5 min and correlated with the aqueous solubility of the PAHs. The present study revealed that there are structural determinants of epigenetic toxicity as determined by GJIC activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9417772

  12. Chemopreventive agents attenuate rapid inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication induced by environmental toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Babica, Pavel; Čtveráčková, Lucie; Lenčešová, Zuzana; Trosko, James E.; Upham, Brad L.

    2016-01-01

    Altered gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with chemical carcinogenesis, where both chemical tumor promoters and chemopreventive agents (CPAs) are known to conversely modulate GJIC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether attenuation of chemically inhibited GJIC represents a common outcome induced by different CPAs, which could be effectively evaluated using in vitro methods. Rat liver epithelial cells WB-F344 were pretreated with a CPA for either 30 min or 24 h, and then exposed to GJIC-inhibiting concentration of a selected tumor promoter or environmental toxicant (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, lindane, fluoranthene, DDT, perfluorooctanoic acid or pentachlorophenol). Out of nine CPAs tested, quercetin and silibinin elicited the most pronounced effects, preventing the dysregulation of GJIC by all the GJIC-inhibitors, but DDT. Metformin and curcumin attenuated the effects of three GJIC-inhibitors, whereas the other CPAs prevented the effects of two (diallyl sulfide, emodin) or one (indole-3 carbinol, thymoquinone) GJIC-inhibitor. Significant attenuation of chemically induced inhibition of GJIC was observed in 27 (50%) out of 54 possible combinations of nine CPAs and six GJIC inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that in vitro evaluation of GJIC can be used as an effective screening tool for identification of chemicals with potential chemopreventive activity. PMID:27266532

  13. Chemopreventive Agents Attenuate Rapid Inhibition of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Induced by Environmental Toxicants.

    PubMed

    Babica, Pavel; Čtveráčková, Lucie; Lenčešová, Zuzana; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2016-07-01

    Altered gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with chemical carcinogenesis, where both chemical tumor promoters and chemopreventive agents (CPAs) are known to conversely modulate GJIC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether attenuation of chemically inhibited GJIC represents a common outcome induced by different CPAs, which could be effectively evaluated using in vitro methods. Rat liver epithelial cells WB-F344 were pretreated with a CPA for either 30 min or 24 h, and then exposed to GJIC-inhibiting concentration of a selected tumor promoter or environmental toxicant [12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), lindane, fluoranthene, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), or pentachlorophenol]. Out of nine CPAs tested, quercetin and silibinin elicited the most pronounced effects, preventing the dysregulation of GJIC by all the GJIC inhibitors, but DDT. Metformin and curcumin attenuated the effects of three GJIC inhibitors, whereas the other CPAs prevented the effects of two (diallyl sulfide, emodin) or one (indole-3-carbinol, thymoquinone) GJIC inhibitor. Significant attenuation of chemically induced inhibition of GJIC was observed in 27 (50%) out of 54 possible combinations of nine CPAs and six GJIC inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that in vitro evaluation of GJIC can be used as an effective screening tool for identification of chemicals with potential chemopreventive activity.

  14. Caveolin-1 and -2 Interact with Connexin43 and Regulate Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Stéphanie; Cowan, Kyle N.; Shao, Qing; Cowan, Bryce J.

    2008-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) has been reported to interact with caveolin (Cav)-1, but the role of this association and whether other members of the caveolin family bind Cx43 had yet to be established. In this study, we show that Cx43 coimmunoprecipitates and colocalizes with Cav-1 and Cav-2 in rat epidermal keratinocytes. The colocalization of Cx43 with Cav-1 was confirmed in keratinocytes from human epidermis in vivo. Our mutation and Far Western analyses revealed that the C-terminal tail of Cx43 is required for its association with Cavs and that the Cx43/Cav-1 interaction is direct. Our results indicate that newly synthesized Cx43 interacts with Cavs in the Golgi apparatus and that the Cx43/Cavs complex also exists at the plasma membrane in lipid rafts. Using overexpression and small interfering RNA approaches, we demonstrated that caveolins regulate gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and that the presence of Cx43 in lipid raft domains may contribute to the mechanism modulating GJIC. Our results suggest that the Cx43/Cavs association occurs during exocytic transport, and they clearly indicate that caveolin regulates GJIC. PMID:18162583

  15. Effect of intercellular junction protein expression on water transport during freezing of MIN6 cells.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Adam Z; Karlsson, Jens O M

    2013-10-01

    A mouse insulinoma (MIN6) strain in which connexin expression has been inhibited by antisense technology holds promise as an experimental model system for investigating the role of gap junctions in intercellular ice propagation. However, to properly interpret measurements of intracellular ice formation kinetics, the effects of cell dehydration on cytoplasmic supercooling must be determined. Thus, the cell membrane water permeability in monolayer cultures of the antisense-transfected MIN6 strain was measured using a fluorescence quenching method. By repeating the experiments at 4°C, 12°C, 21°C, and 37°C, the activation energy for water transport was determined to be E(a) = 51 ± 3 k J/mol. Although differences between membrane permeability measurements in theantisense and wild-type strains were not statistically significant, simulation of water transport during rapid freezing (130°C/min) predicted that intracellular supercooling in the genetically modified MIN6 strain may become significantly larger than the supercooling in wild-type cells at temperatures below -15°C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. microRNAs, Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Larissa A.; Ricart, Rachel A.; Patel, Shyam A.; Lim, Philip K.; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2010-01-01

    The failed outcome of autologous bone marrow transplantation for breast cancer opens the field for investigations. This is particularly important because the bone marrow could be a major source of cancer cells during tertiary metastasis. This review discusses subsets of breast cancer cells, including those that enter the bone marrow at an early period of disease development, perhaps prior to clinical detection. This population of cells evades chemotherapeutic damage even at high doses. An understanding of this population might be crucial for the success of bone marrow transplants for metastatic breast cancer and for the eradication of cancer cells in bone marrow. In vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between bone marrow stroma and breast cancer cells. This review discusses GJIC in cancer metastasis, facilitating roles of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In addition, the review addresses potential roles for miRNAs, including those already linked to cancer biology. The literature on MSCs is growing and their links to metastasis are beginning to be significant leads for the development of new drug targets for breast cancer. In summary, this review discusses interactions among GJIC, miRNAs and MSCs as future consideration for the development of cancer therapies. PMID:21886602

  17. TLR2 mediates gap junctional intercellular communication through connexin-43 in intestinal epithelial barrier injury.

    PubMed

    Ey, Birgit; Eyking, Annette; Gerken, Guido; Podolsky, Daniel K; Cario, Elke

    2009-08-14

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) coordinates cellular functions essential for sustaining tissue homeostasis; yet its regulation in the intestine is not well understood. Here, we identify a novel physiological link between Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and GJIC through modulation of Connexin-43 (Cx43) during acute and chronic inflammatory injury of the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) barrier. Data from in vitro studies reveal that TLR2 activation modulates Cx43 synthesis and increases GJIC via Cx43 during IEC injury. The ulcerative colitis-associated TLR2-R753Q mutant targets Cx43 for increased proteasomal degradation, impairing TLR2-mediated GJIC during intestinal epithelial wounding. In vivo studies using mucosal RNA interference show that TLR2-mediated mucosal healing depends functionally on intestinal epithelial Cx43 during acute inflammatory stress-induced damage. Mice deficient in TLR2 exhibit IEC-specific alterations in Cx43, whereas administration of a TLR2 agonist protects GJIC by blocking accumulation of Cx43 and its hyperphosphorylation at Ser368 to prevent spontaneous chronic colitis in MDR1alpha-deficient mice. Finally, adding the TLR2 agonist to three-dimensional intestinal mucosa-like cultures of human biopsies preserves intestinal epithelial Cx43 integrity and polarization ex vivo. In conclusion, Cx43 plays an important role in innate immune control of commensal-mediated intestinal epithelial wound repair.

  18. Effect of airborne particles from selected indoor and outdoor environments on gap-junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Alink, G M; Sjögren, M; Bos, R P; Doekes, G; Kromhout, H; Scheepers, P T

    1998-08-01

    The effect of airborne particles from diesel exhaust, rubber and metal industry, urban air and biological sources (poultry, pig farming, compost industry) on gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) were compared, using HEPA1c1c7 cells. Particles as such were compared with aqueous and organic extracts. Significant inhibition of GJIC by particle suspensions was only observed for the diesel and rubber samples, and for one biological sample (compost). Up to 83% of the inhibition of the whole suspension could be attributed to the particles as such. Washing the particles with organic solvents (aceton, methanol, hexane) did not result in a significant loss of activity from the particles, although the organic fractions showed a significant activity towards GJIC. More active organics was eluted from the rubber industry particles than from the diesel particles by the organic solvent. It is suggested that cancer promoting potential as measured by inhibition of GJIC may vary widely depending on the particle source, and that this effect may be exerted by the particles as such and/or by means of tightly bound bio-active material to the surface.

  19. Extract from the Zooxanthellate Jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata Modulates Gap Junction Intercellular Communication in Human Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Antonella; Lecci, Raffaella Marina; Durante, Miriana; Piraino, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    On a global scale, jellyfish populations in coastal marine ecosystems exhibit increasing trends of abundance. High-density outbreaks may directly or indirectly affect human economical and recreational activities, as well as public health. As the interest in biology of marine jellyfish grows, a number of jellyfish metabolites with healthy potential, such as anticancer or antioxidant activities, is increasingly reported. In this study, the Mediterranean “fried egg jellyfish” Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Macri, 1778) has been targeted in the search forputative valuable bioactive compounds. A medusa extract was obtained, fractionated, characterized by HPLC, GC-MS and SDS-PAGE and assayed for its biological activity on breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa). The composition of the jellyfish extract included photosynthetic pigments, valuable ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, and polypeptides derived either from jellyfish tissues and their algal symbionts. Extract fractions showed antioxidant activity and the ability to affect cell viability and intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions (GJIC) differentially in MCF-7and HEKa cells. A significantly higher cytotoxicity and GJIC enhancement in MCF-7 compared to HEKa cells was recorded. A putative action mechanism for the anticancer bioactivity through the modulation of GJIC has been hypothesized and its nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potential was discussed. PMID:23697954

  20. MicroRNA Intercellular Transfer and Bioelectrical Regulation of Model Multicellular Ensembles by the Gap Junction Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Javier; Meseguer, Salvador; Mafe, Salvador

    2017-08-17

    We have studied theoretically the microRNA (miRNA) intercellular transfer through voltage-gated gap junctions in terms of a biophysically grounded system of coupled differential equations. Instead of modeling a specific system, we use a general approach describing the interplay between the genetic mechanisms and the single-cell electric potentials. The dynamics of the multicellular ensemble are simulated under different conditions including spatially inhomogeneous transcription rates and local intercellular transfer of miRNAs. These processes result in spatiotemporal changes of miRNA, mRNA, and ion channel protein concentrations that eventually modify the bioelectrical states of small multicellular domains because of the ensemble average nature of the electrical potential. The simulations allow a qualitative understanding of the context-dependent nature of the effects observed when specific signaling molecules are transferred through gap junctions. The results suggest that an efficient miRNA intercellular transfer could permit the spatiotemporal control of small cellular domains by the conversion of single-cell genetic and bioelectric states into multicellular states regulated by the gap junction interconnectivity.

  1. Local Oxidative Stress Expansion through Endothelial Cells – A Key Role for Gap Junction Intercellular Communication

    PubMed Central

    Feine, Ilan; Pinkas, Iddo; Salomon, Yoram; Scherz, Avigdor

    2012-01-01

    Background Major circulation pathologies are initiated by oxidative insult expansion from a few injured endothelial cells to distal sites; this possibly involves mechanisms that are important to understanding circulation physiology and designing therapeutic management of myocardial pathologies. We tested the hypothesis that a localized oxidative insult of endothelial cells (ECs) propagates through gap junction inter-cellular communication (GJIC). Methodology/Principal Findings Cultures comprising the bEnd.3 cell line, that have been established and recognized as suitable for examining communication among ECs, were used to study the propagation of a localized oxidative insult to remote cells. Spatially confined near infrared illumination of parental or genetically modified bEnd.3 cultures, pretreated with the photosensitizer WST11, generated O2•− and •OH radicals in the illuminated cells. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, utilizing various markers, and other methods, were used to monitor the response of non-illuminated bystander and remote cells. Functional GJIC among ECs was shown to be mandatory for oxidative insult propagation, comprising de-novo generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively), activation and nuclear translocation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, followed by massive apoptosis in all bystander cells adjacent to the primarily injured ECs. The oxidative insult propagated through GJIC for many hours, over hundreds of microns from the primary photogeneration site. This wave is shown to be limited by intracellular ROS scavenging, chemical GJIC inhibition or genetic manipulation of connexin 43 (a key component of GJIC). Conclusion/Significance Localized oxidative insults propagate through GJIC between ECs, while stimulating de-novo generation of ROS and RNS in bystander cells, thereby driving the insult's expansion. PMID:22911831

  2. [TGF-beta1 reduces connexin43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication in rat Leydig cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Man-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Zong-Ren; Ma, Jing

    2012-02-01

    To observe the effects of TGF-beta on the expression of connexin43 (Cx43) and Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in rat Leydig cells, and investigate the association of its effects on Leydig cells with its ability of changing GJIC. Primarily cultured purified Leydig cells were divided into a blank control group, a positive control group (treated with the GJIC inhibitor Carbenoxolone), and four TGF-beta1 groups (treated with TGF-beta1 at the concentration of 1, 2, 5 and 10 ng/ml, respectively, for 20 hours). The localization and expression of Cx43 were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot, and the changes in GJIC analyzed by FRAP assay. Cx43 was expressed as scattered bright spots in the cytoplasm and membrane of Leydig cells. TGF-beta1 significantly elevated the expression of Cx43 in the cytoplasm, but caused no evident change in the membrane. Western blot showed an evident increase in the phosphorylation of Cx43 with the increased concentration of TGF-beta1 as compared with that of the blank control group (P < 0.05). After 20 hours of treatment with TGF-beta1 at 5 ng/ml, the fluorescence intensity of Leydig cells was markedly reduced (P < 0.01), with a mean fluorescence recovery rate of merely (43.58 +/- 1.87)%. TGF-beta1 could significantly down-regulate GJIC between adjacent Leydig cells, and this inhibitory effect may be achieved by promoting the expression of Cx43 in the cytoplasm and elevating the phosphorylation of Cx43.

  3. Characterization of a gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) assay using cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Ewald; Lammerich, Hans-Peter; Conroy, Lynda L; Weisensee, Dirk

    2013-06-07

    Inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) via exposure to various toxic substances has been implicated in tumor promotion. In the present study, cigarette smoke total particulate matter (TPM), a known inhibitor of GJIC, were used to characterize a new GJIC screening assay in three independent experiments. The main features of this assay were automated fluorescence microscopy combined with non-invasive parachute technique. Rat liver epithelial cells (WB-F344) were stained with the fluorescent dye Calcein AM (acetoxymethyl) and exposed to TPM from the Kentucky Reference Cigarette 2R4F (a blend of Bright and Burley tobaccos) and from two single-tobacco cigarettes (Bright and Burley) for 3h. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA) was used as positive control and 0.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvent control. The transfer of dye to adjacent cells (percentage of stained cells) was used as a measure of cellular communication. A clear and reproducible dose-response of GJIC inhibition following TPM exposure was seen. Reproducibility and repeatability measurements for the 2R4F cigarette were 3.7% and 6.9%, respectively. The half-maximal effective concentration values were 0.34ng/ml for TPA, 0.050mg/ml for the 2R4F, 0.044mg/ml for the Bright cigarette, and 0.060mg/ml for the Burley cigarette. The assay was able to discriminate between the two single-tobacco cigarettes (P<0.0001), and between the single-tobacco cigarettes and the 2R4F (P=0.0008, 2R4F vs. Burley and P<0.0001, 2R4F vs. Bright). Thus, this assay can be used to determine the activity of complex mixtures such as cigarette smoke with high throughput and high precision. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of vegf on astrocytes: analysis of gap junctional intercellular communication, proliferation, and motility.

    PubMed

    Wuestefeld, Ricarda; Chen, Jingchen; Meller, Karl; Brand-Saberi, Beate; Theiss, Carsten

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), cell proliferation, and cell dynamics in primary astrocytes. VEGF is known as a dimeric polypeptide that potentially binds to two receptors, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, however many effects are mediated by VEGFR-2, for example, actin polymerization, forced cell migration, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Recently it has been shown that in case of hypoxia, ischemia or injury VEGF is upregulated to stimulate angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Besides this, VEGF reveals a potent therapeutical target for averting tumor vascularization, emerging in bevacizumab, the first humanized anti-VEGF-A antibody for treating recurrent Glioblastoma multiforme. To expand our knowledge about VEGF effects in glial cells, we cultivated rat astrocytes in medium containing VEGF for 1 and 2 days. To investigate the effects of VEGF on GJIC, we microinjected neurobiotin into a single cell and monitored dye-spreading into adjacent cells. These experiments showed that VEGF significantly enhances astrocytic GJIC compared with controls. Cell proliferation measured by BrdU-labeling also revealed a significant increase of astrocytic mitose rates subsequent to 1 day of VEGF exposure, whereas longer VEGF treatment for 2 days did not have additive effects. To study cell-dynamics of astrocytes subsequent to VEGF treatment, we additionally transfected astrocytes with LifeAct-RFP. Live-cell imaging and quantitative analysis of these cells with aid of confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed higher process movement of VEGF-treated astrocytes. In conclusion, VEGF strongly affects cell proliferation, GJIC, and motility in astrocytes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of DDT on hepatic gap junctional intercellular communication in rats.

    PubMed

    Tateno, C; Ito, S; Tanaka, M; Oyamada, M; Yoshitake, A

    1994-03-01

    The effects of in vivo exposure to DDT on hepatic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and connexin gene/protein expression in Sprague-Dawley rats were examined by in vivo/in vitro dye-transfer assay, immunohistochemical staining, and by Western and Northern blot analyses. In the dose-response study, three dose levels of DDT (5, 25 and 50 mg/kg/day) were administered orally to rats once a day for 2 weeks. The average size of the dye spread after injection of Lucifer Yellow and the area of Cx32 spots per hepatocyte decreased in a dose-dependent manner, but there was no effect on the number of Cx32 spots per hepatocyte. In the time-course study, DDT (50 mg/kg/day) was administered orally once a day for up to 6 weeks. Hepatic GJIC decreased at week 1 but recovered at week 6. The average area of Cx32 spots per hepatocyte gradually decreased at weeks 2 and 4, and remained at the same level at week 6, correlating with the decreased Cx32 protein level in plasma membranes. The average area of Cx26 spots per hepatocyte in the peripheral zones clearly decreased at week 1, but quickly recovered at week 2 and increased at week 6; however, no clear change of the Cx26 protein level in plasma membranes was observed. No changes of Cx32 and Cx26 mRNA levels were observed in DDT groups. These results suggest that DDT, a liver tumor-promoting agent, inhibits hepatic GJIC in vivo dose-dependently in rats and that aberrant Cx32 and Cx26 protein expression and/or localization may be responsible for this effect.

  6. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  7. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  8. The tight junction protein ZO-2 and Janus kinase 1 mediate intercellular communications in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Patecki, Margret; Kusch, Angelika; Korenbaum, Elena; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jak1 in vascular smooth muscle cells via ZO-2 N-terminal fragment. {yields} Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation and ZO-2 localization to the sites of homotypic intercellular contacts. {yields} The urokinase receptor uPAR regulates ZO-2/Jak1 functional association. {yields} The ZO-2/Jak1/uPAR signaling complex is required for vascular smooth muscle cells functional network formation. -- Abstract: Recent evidence points to a multifunctional role of ZO-2, the tight junction protein of the MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like) family. Though ZO-2 has been found in cell types lacking tight junction structures, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), little is known about ZO-2 function in these cells. We provide evidence that ZO-2 mediates specific homotypic cell-to-cell contacts between VSMC. Using mass spectrometry we found that ZO-2 is associated with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak1. By generating specific ZO-2 constructs we further found that the N-terminal fragment of ZO-2 molecule is responsible for this interaction. Adenovirus-based expression of Jak1 inactive mutant demonstrated that Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. By means of RNA silencing, expression of Jak1 mutant form and fluorescently labeled ZO-2 fusion protein we further specified that active Jak1, but not Jak1 inactive mutant, mediates ZO-2 localization to the sites of intercellular contacts. We identified the urokinase receptor uPAR as a pre-requisite for these cellular events. Functional requirement of the revealed signaling complex for VSMC network formation was confirmed in experiments using Matrigel and in contraction assay. Our findings imply involvement of the ZO-2 tight junction independent signaling complex containing Jak1 and uPAR in VSMC intercellular communications. This mechanism may contribute to vascular remodeling in occlusive cardiovascular diseases and in arteriogenesis.

  9. Intercellular calcium waves in the fire-diffuse-fire framework: Green's function for gap-junctional coupling.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jamie; Timofeeva, Yulia

    2010-11-01

    Calcium is a crucial component in a plethora of cellular processes involved in cell birth, life, and death. Intercellular calcium waves that can spread through multiple cells provide one form of cellular communication mechanism between various parts of cell tissues. Here we introduce a simple, yet biophysically realistic model for the propagation of intercellular calcium waves based on the fire-diffuse-fire type model for calcium dynamics. Calcium release sites are considered to be discretely distributed along individual linear cells that are connected by gap junctions and a solution of this model can be found in terms of the Green's function for this system. We develop the "sum-over-trips" formalism that takes into account the boundary conditions at gap junctions providing a generalization of the original sum-over-trips approach for constructing the response function for branched neural dendrites. We obtain the exact solution of the Green's function in the Laplace (frequency) domain for an infinite array of cells and show that this Green's function can be well approximated by its truncated version. This allows us to obtain an analytical traveling wave solution for an intercellular calcium wave and analyze the speed of solitary wave propagation as a function of physiologically important system parameters. Periodic and irregular traveling waves can be also sustained by the proposed model.

  10. Changing patterns of gap junctional intercellular communication and connexin distribution in mouse epidermis and hair follicles during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, R; Pitts, J D; Hodgins, M B

    1997-12-01

    In the mouse embryo between embryonic days 12 (E12) and 16, regular arrays of epidermal placodes on the mystacial pad develop into whisker follicles. This system was chosen for analysis of gap junctional intercellular communication during differentiation. The patterns of communication were studied by microinjection of the tracers Lucifer yellow-CH (LY-CH) and neurobiotin (NB), while immunofluorescent staining was used to study distribution of connexins 26 and 43. Extensive communication was seen between keratinocytes in developing hair pegs or, in later-stage hair follicles, in the germinative matrix. Coupling between adjacent hair pegs via interfollicular epidermis was not observed. Coupling also became restricted as follicular cells differentiated to form outer root sheath, inner root sheath, and hair shaft. Extensive gap junctional coupling is characteristic of keratinocytes that are rapidly proliferating (as in hair pegs and germinative matrix). Follicular keratinocytes commence differentiation shortly before restriction of gap junctional coupling becomes evident. Dermal mesenchymal cells undergoing different modes of differentiation also exhibit differences in gap junctional coupling, as evidenced by poor transfer of LY-CH between cells in dermal condensations of hair follicles compared with extensive transfer elsewhere in the dermis. LY-CH and NB were not transferred between epidermal or follicular epithelium and mesenchyme, arguing against a direct role for gap junctions permeable to known second messenger molecules or nucleotides in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in this system. The distribution of connexins 26 and 43 in epidermis and hair follicles changed during differentiation but there was no correlation with changing patterns of dye transfer, indicating an unexpected degree of complexity in the relationship between gap junctional intercellular communication and connexin protein distribution during development.

  11. ESCRT-III assembly and cytokinetic abscission are induced by tension release in the intercellular bridge.

    PubMed

    Lafaurie-Janvore, Julie; Maiuri, Paolo; Wang, Irène; Pinot, Mathieu; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste; Betz, Timo; Balland, Martial; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-03-29

    The last step of cell division, cytokinesis, produces two daughter cells that remain connected by an intercellular bridge. This state often represents the longest stage of the division process. Severing the bridge (abscission) requires a well-described series of molecular events, but the trigger for abscission remains unknown. We found that pulling forces exerted by daughter cells on the intercellular bridge appear to regulate abscission. Counterintuitively, these forces prolonged connection, whereas a release of tension induced abscission. Tension release triggered the assembly of ESCRT-III (endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III), which was followed by membrane fission. This mechanism may allow daughter cells to remain connected until they have settled in their final locations, a process potentially important for tissue organization and morphogenesis.

  12. Noise magnetic fields abolish the gap junction intercellular communication suppression induced by 50 hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qunli; Ke, Xueqin; Gao, Xiangwei; Fu, Yiti; Lu, Deqiang; Chiang, Huai; Xu, Zhengping

    2006-05-01

    Previously, we have reported that exposure to 50 Hz coherent sinusoidal magnetic fields (MF) for 24 h inhibits gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mammalian cells at an intensity of 0.4 mT and enhances the inhibition effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at 0.2 mT. In the present study, we further explored the effects of incoherent noise MF on MF-induced GJIC inhibition. GJIC was determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. The rate of fluorescence recovery (R) at 10 min after photobleaching was adopted as the functional index of GJIC. The R-value of NIH3T3 cells exposed to 50 Hz sinusoidal MF at 0.4 mT for 24 h was 30.85 +/- 14.70%, while the cells in sham exposure group had an R-value of 46.36 +/- 20.68%, demonstrating that the GJIC of NIH3T3 cells was significantly inhibited by MF exposure (P < .05). However, there were no significant differences in the R-values of the sham exposure, MF-plus-noise MF exposure (R: 49.58 +/- 19.38%), and noise MF exposure groups (R: 46.74 +/- 21.14%) (P > .05), indicating that the superposition of a noise MF alleviated the suppression of GJIC induced by the 50 Hz MF. In addition, although MF at an intensity of 0.2 mT synergistically enhanced TPA-induced GJIC inhibition (R: 24.90 +/- 13.50% vs. 35.82 +/- 17.18%, P < .05), further imposition of a noise MF abolished the synergistic effect of coherent MF (R: 32.51 +/- 18.37%). Overall, the present data clearly showed that although noise MF itself had no effect on GJIC of NIH3T3 cells, its superposition onto a coherent sinusoidal MF at the same intensity abolished MF-induced GJIC suppression. This is the first report showing that noise MF neutralizes 50 Hz MF-induced biological effect by using a signaling component as the test endpoint.

  13. Estrogenic compounds inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse Leydig TM3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwase, Yumiko . E-mail: Iwase.Yumiko@mg.m-pharma.co.jp; Fukata, Hideki . E-mail: fukata@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Mori, Chisato . E-mail: cmori@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2006-05-01

    Some estrogenic compounds are reported to cause testicular disorders in humans and/or experimental animals by direct action on Leydig cells. In carcinogenesis and normal development, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays an essential role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, we examine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic estrogen), 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen), and genistein (GEN, a phytoestrogen) on GJIC between mouse Leydig TM3 cells using Lucifer yellow microinjection. The three compounds tested produced GJIC inhibition in the TM3 cells after 24 h. Gradually, 10 {mu}M DES began to inhibit GJIC for 24 h and this effect was observed until 72 h. On the other hand, both 20 {mu}M E{sub 2} and 25 {mu}M GEN rapidly inhibited GJIC in 6 h and 2 h, respectively. The effects continued until 24 h, but weakened by 72 h. Furthermore, a combined effect at {mu}M level between DES and E{sub 2} on GJIC inhibition was observed, but not between GEN and E{sub 2}. DES and E{sub 2} showed GJIC inhibition at low dose levels (nearly physiological estrogen levels) after 72 h, but GEN did not. DES-induced GJIC inhibition at 10 pM and 10 {mu}M was completely counteracted by ICI 182,780 (ICl), an estrogen receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the inhibitory effects on GJIC with E{sub 2} (10 pM and 20 {mu}M) and GEN (25 {mu}M) were partially blocked by ICI or calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and were completely blocked by the combination of ICI and calphostin C. These results demonstrate that DES inhibits GJIC between Leydig cells via the estrogen receptor (ER), and that E{sub 2} and GEN inhibit GJIC via ER and PKC. These estrogenic compounds may have different individual nongenotoxic mechanism including PKC pathway on testicular carcinogenesis or development.

  14. Functional Molecular Junctions Derived from Double Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sohyeon; Hwang, Eunhee; Cho, Yunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2017-09-25

    Information processing using molecular junctions is becoming more important as devices are miniaturized to the nanoscale. Herein, we report functional molecular junctions derived from double self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) intercalated between soft graphene electrodes. Newly assembled molecular junctions are fabricated by placing a molecular SAM/(top) electrode on another molecular SAM/(bottom) electrode by using a contact-assembly technique. Double SAMs can provide tunneling conjugation across the van der Waals gap between the terminals of each monolayer and exhibit new electrical functions. Robust contact-assembled molecular junctions can act as platforms for the development of equivalent contact molecular junctions between top and bottom electrodes, which can be applied independently to different kinds of molecules to enhance either the structural complexity or the assembly properties of molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Infection Remodels Connexin43-Mediated Gap Junction Intercellular Communication In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Rahul; Banerjee, Kaveri; Bose, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gap junctions (GJs) form intercellular channels which directly connect the cytoplasm between neighboring cells to facilitate the transfer of ions and small molecules. GJs play a major role in the pathogenesis of infection-associated inflammation. Mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins (Cxs), cause dysmyelination and leukoencephalopathy. In multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), Cx43 was shown to be modulated in the central nervous system (CNS). The mechanism behind Cx43 alteration and its role in MS remains unexplored. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infection-induced demyelination is one of the best-studied experimental animal models for MS. Our studies demonstrated that MHV infection downregulated Cx43 expression at protein and mRNA levels in vitro in primary astrocytes obtained from neonatal mouse brains. After infection, a significant amount of Cx43 was retained in endoplasmic reticulum/endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate complex (ER/ERGIC) and GJ plaque formation was impaired at the cell surface, as evidenced by a reduction of the Triton X-100 insoluble fraction of Cx43. Altered trafficking and impairment of GJ plaque formation may cause the loss of functional channel formation in MHV-infected primary astrocytes, as demonstrated by a reduced number of dye-coupled cells after a scrape-loading Lucifer yellow dye transfer assay. Upon MHV infection, a significant downregulation of Cx43 was observed in the virus-infected mouse brain. This study demonstrates that astrocytic Cx43 expression and function can be modulated due to virus stress and can be an appropriate model to understand the basis of cellular mechanisms involved in the alteration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in CNS neuroinflammation. IMPORTANCE We found that MHV infection leads to the downregulation of Cx43 in vivo in the CNS. In addition, results show that MHV infection impairs Cx43 expression in addition

  16. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Infection Remodels Connexin43-Mediated Gap Junction Intercellular Communication In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Basu, Rahul; Banerjee, Kaveri; Bose, Abhishek; Das Sarma, Jayasri

    2015-12-16

    Gap junctions (GJs) form intercellular channels which directly connect the cytoplasm between neighboring cells to facilitate the transfer of ions and small molecules. GJs play a major role in the pathogenesis of infection-associated inflammation. Mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins (Cxs), cause dysmyelination and leukoencephalopathy. In multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), Cx43 was shown to be modulated in the central nervous system (CNS). The mechanism behind Cx43 alteration and its role in MS remains unexplored. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infection-induced demyelination is one of the best-studied experimental animal models for MS. Our studies demonstrated that MHV infection downregulated Cx43 expression at protein and mRNA levels in vitro in primary astrocytes obtained from neonatal mouse brains. After infection, a significant amount of Cx43 was retained in endoplasmic reticulum/endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate complex (ER/ERGIC) and GJ plaque formation was impaired at the cell surface, as evidenced by a reduction of the Triton X-100 insoluble fraction of Cx43. Altered trafficking and impairment of GJ plaque formation may cause the loss of functional channel formation in MHV-infected primary astrocytes, as demonstrated by a reduced number of dye-coupled cells after a scrape-loading Lucifer yellow dye transfer assay. Upon MHV infection, a significant downregulation of Cx43 was observed in the virus-infected mouse brain. This study demonstrates that astrocytic Cx43 expression and function can be modulated due to virus stress and can be an appropriate model to understand the basis of cellular mechanisms involved in the alteration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in CNS neuroinflammation. We found that MHV infection leads to the downregulation of Cx43 in vivo in the CNS. In addition, results show that MHV infection impairs Cx43 expression in addition to gap junction

  17. Protective effects of baicalin on LPS-induced injury in intestinal epithelial cells and intercellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Ren; Wang, Jian; Yu, Peng; Liu, Quan; Zeng, Dan; Song, Houpan; Kuang, Zaoyuan

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of baicalin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced injury in intestinal epithelial cells and intercellular tight junctions. IEC-6 cells were stimulated with LPS (1.0 μg/mL), with or without baicalin, for 24 h. The levels of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were determined using ELISA. Quantitative real-time PCR was used for determining the mRNA expression level of claudin-3, occludin, and ZO-1; Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis were used for analyzing the expression level and the distribution patterns of ZO-1 protein. Pretreatment with baicalin (10.0 μg/mL) improved LPS-stimulated cell viability and repressed IL-6 and TNF-α levels. In addition, pretreatment with baicalin up-regulated mRNA and protein expression levels of ZO-1 and kept the protein intact in IEC-6 cells injured with LPS. Baicalin has the capacity to protect IEC-6 cells and the intercellular tight junctions from LPS-induced injury. The mechanisms may be associated with inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines, and up-regulating the mRNA and protein expression of ZO-1.

  18. The B[a]P-increased intercellular communication via translocation of connexin-43 into gap junctions reduces apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tekpli, X.; Rivedal, E.; Gorria, M.; Landvik, N.E.; Rissel, M.; Dimanche-Boitrel, M.-T.; Baffet, G.; Holme, J.A.; Lagadic-Gossmann, D.

    2010-01-15

    Gap junctions are channels in plasma membrane composed of proteins called connexins. These channels are organized in special domains between cells, and provide for direct gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), allowing diffusion of signalling molecules < 1 kD. GJIC regulates cell homeostasis and notably the balance between proliferation, cell cycle arrest, cell survival and apoptosis. Here, we have investigated benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) effects on GJIC and on the subcellular localization of the major protein of gap junction: connexin-43 (Cx43). Our results showed that B[a]P increased GJIC between mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells via translocation of Cx43 from Golgi apparatus and lipid rafts into gap junction plaques. Interestingly, inhibition of GJIC by chlordane or small interference RNA directed against Cx43 enhanced B[a]P-induced apoptosis in Hepa1c1c7 cells. The increased apoptosis caused by inhibition of GJIC appeared to be mediated by ERK/MAPK pathway. It is suggested that B[a]P could induce transfer of cell survival signal or dilute cell death signal via regulation of ERK/MAPK through GJIC.

  19. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Somesh

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25792565

  20. Cross regulation of intercellular gap junction communication and paracrine signaling pathways during organogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Hildegard; Josten, Frank; Fuss, Bernhard; Bauer, Reinhard; Hoch, Michael

    2007-10-01

    The spatial and temporal coordination of patterning and morphogenesis is often achieved by paracrine morphogen signals or by the direct coupling of cells via gap junctions. How paracrine signals and gap junction communication cooperate to control the coordinated behavior of cells and tissues is mostly unknown. We found that hedgehog signaling is required for the expression of wingless and of Delta/Notch target genes in a single row of boundary cells in the foregut-associated proventriculus organ of the Drosophila embryo. These cells coordinate the movement and folding of proventricular cells to generate a multilayered organ. hedgehog and wingless regulate gap junction communication by transcriptionally activating the innexin2 gene, which encodes a member of the innexin family of gap junction proteins. In innexin2 mutants, gap junction-mediated cell-to-cell communication is strongly reduced and the proventricular cell layers fail to fold and invaginate, similarly as in hedgehog or wingless mutants. We further found that innexin2 is required in a feedback loop for the transcriptional activation of the hedgehog and wingless morphogens and of Delta in the proventriculus primordium. We propose that the transcriptional cross regulation of paracrine and gap junction-mediated signaling is essential for organogenesis in Drosophila.

  1. Regulation of connexin 43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication by Ca2+ in mouse epidermal cells is controlled by E- cadherin

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) of cultured mouse epidermal cells is mediated by a gap junction protein, connexin 43, and is dependent on the calcium concentration in the medium, with higher GJIC in a high-calcium (1.2 mM) medium. In several mouse epidermal cell lines, we found a good correlation between the level of GJIC and that of immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin, a calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecule, at cell-cell contact areas. The variant cell line P3/22 showed both low GJIC and E-cadherin protein expression in low- and high-Ca2+ media. P3/22 cells showed very low E-cadherin mRNA expression. To test directly whether E-cadherin is involved in the Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of GJIC, we transfected the E-cadherin expression vector into P3/22 cells and obtained several stable clones which expressed high levels of E-cadherin mRNA. All transfectants expressed E-cadherin molecules at cell-cell contact areas in a calcium- dependent manner. GJIC was also observed in these transfectants and was calcium dependent. These results suggest that Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of GJIC in mouse epidermal cells is directly controlled by a calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin. Furthermore, several lines of evidence suggest that GJIC control by E-cadherin involves posttranslational regulation (assembly and/or function) of the gap junction protein connexin 43. PMID:1650371

  2. Stat3 is a positive regulator of gap junctional intercellular communication in cultured, human lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neoplastic transformation of cultured cells by a number of oncogenes such as src suppresses gap junctional, intercellular communication (GJIC); however, the role of Src and its effector Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3) upon GJIC in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been defined. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed high Src activity in NSCLC biopsy samples compared to normal tissues. Here we explored the potential effect of Src and Stat3 upon GJIC, by assessing the levels of tyr418-phosphorylated Src and tyr705-phosphorylated Stat3, respectively, in a panel of NSCLC cell lines. Methods Gap junctional communication was examined by electroporating the fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow into cells grown on a transparent electrode, followed by observation of the migration of the dye to the adjacent, non-electroporated cells under fluorescence illumination. Results An inverse relationship between Src activity levels and GJIC was noted; in five lines with high Src activity GJIC was absent, while two lines with extensive GJIC (QU-DB and SK-LuCi6) had low Src levels, similar to a non-transformed, immortalised lung epithelial cell line. Interestingly, examination of the mechanism indicated that Stat3 inhibition in any of the NSCLC lines expressing high endogenous Src activity levels, or in cells where Src was exogenously transduced, did not restore GJIC. On the contrary, Stat3 downregulation in immortalised lung epithelial cells or in the NSCLC lines displaying extensive GJIC actually suppressed junctional permeability. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that although Stat3 is generally growth promoting and in an activated form it can act as an oncogene, it is actually required for gap junctional communication both in nontransformed lung epithelial cells and in certain lung cancer lines that retain extensive GJIC. PMID:23244248

  3. Subsets of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) inhibitors increase gap junctional intercellular communication in metastatic cancer cell lines independent of SUR expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is a process whereby cells share molecules and nutrients with each other by physical contact through cell membrane pores. In tumor cells, GJIC is often altered, suggesting that this process may be important in the context of cancer. Certain ion chan...

  4. Polycystins and intercellular mechanotransduction: A precise dosage of polycystin 2 is necessary for alpha-actinin reinforcement of junctions upon mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bhoonderowa, Laxsoomee; Hameurlaine, Fatima; Arbabian, Atousa; Faqir, Fahima; Amblard, François; Coscoy, Sylvie

    2016-10-15

    Polycystins 1 and 2, which are mutated in Autosomal Polycystic Kidney Disease, are involved in mechanotransduction through various mechanisms. In renal cells, polycystins not only have an important mechanotransductive role in primary cilia but are also present in intercellular contacts but their role there remains unclear. Here, we address the hypothesis that polycystins are involved in mechanotransduction via intercellular junctions, which would be expected to have consequences on tissue organization. We focused on the role of polycystin 2, which could be involved in mechanical organization at junctions either by its channel activity or by the direct recruitment of cytoskeleton components such as the F-actin cross-linker α-actinin. After mechanical stimulation of intercellular junctions in MDCK renal epithelial cells, α-actinin is rapidly recruited but this is inhibited upon overexpression of PC2 or the D509V mutant that lacks channel activity, and is also decreased upon PC2 silencing. This suggests that a precise dosage of PC2 is necessary for an adequate mechanosensitive α-actinin recruitment at junctions. At the multicellular level, a change in PC2 expression was associated with changes in velocity in confluent epithelia and during wound healing together with a loss of orientation. This study suggests that the mechanosensitive regulation of cytoskeleton by polycystins in intercellular contacts may be important in the context of ADPKD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Intercellular communication in sensory ganglia by purinergic receptors and gap junctions: implications for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hanani, Menachem

    2012-12-03

    Peripheral injury can cause abnormal activity in sensory neurons, which is a major factor in chronic pain. Recent work has shown that injury induces major changes not only in sensory neurons but also in the main type of glial cells in sensory ganglia-satellite glial cells (SGCs), and that interactions between sensory neurons and SGCs contribute to neuronal activity in pain models. The main functional changes observed in SGCs after injury are an increased gap junction-mediated coupling among these cells, and augmented sensitivity to ATP. There is evidence that the augmented gap junctions contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability in pain models, but the mechanism underlying this effect is not known. The changes in SGCs described above have been found following a wide range of injuries (both axotomy and inflammation) in somatic, orofacial and visceral regions, and therefore appear to be a general feature in chronic pain. We have found that in cultures of sensory ganglia calcium signals can spread from an SGC to neighboring cells by calcium waves, which are mediated by gap junctions and ATP acting on purinergic P2 receptors. A model is proposed to explain how augmented gap junctions and greater sensitivity to ATP can combine to produce enhanced calcium waves, which can lead to neuronal excitation. Thus this simple scheme can account for several major changes in sensory ganglia that are common to a great variety of pain models.

  6. The interaction of Streptococcus pneumoniae with plasmin mediates transmigration across endothelial and epithelial monolayers by intercellular junction cleavage.

    PubMed

    Attali, Cécile; Durmort, Claire; Vernet, Thierry; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie

    2008-11-01

    for the plasminogen recruitment at the bacterial surface in facilitating adherence of pneumococci to endothelial and epithelial cells, while active plasmin degrades intercellular junctions. This process promotes migration of pneumococci through cell barriers by a pericellular route, a prerequisite for dissemination of S. pneumoniae in the host organism.

  7. Effects of estrogen and androgen on the ultrastructure of secretory granules and intercellular junctions in regressed canine prostate.

    PubMed

    Merk, F B; Leav, I; Kwan, P W; Ofner, P

    1980-06-01

    Epithelial cells in the prostate of the castrated or hypophysectomized dog were studied by thin-section and freeze-fracture electron microscopy to determine in vivo responses to estradiol-17 beta 17-cyclopentylpropionate (ECP) and testosterone cyclopentylpropionate (TCP). Particular attention was given to changes in specific organelles and intercellular junctions that might reflect hormone action. The few secretory granules that remain in the regressed epithelium (vestigial granules) serve as markers of prior androgen responsiveness. Pharmacologic doses of ECP caused regressed glandular cells to acquire a novel phenotype. Characteristic features of these estrogen-modified glandular (EMG) cells are newly formed secretory granules and tonofilament bundles that coexist with vestigial granules, thus demonstrating bipotentiality of response. Glandular cell-tight junctions appear unaltered by the endocrine manipulations. Although EMG cells have squamous cell features, tight junctions remain intact. Desmosomes in the canine prostate are dimorphic and are classified 70F and 100F according to the width of the filaments that converge on the dense plaques. In intact dogs, 100F desmosomes are associated with basal-reserve cells, whereas only the 70F variety is found between glandular cells. TCP treatment does not alter this distribution. Following ECP administration, both 70F and 100F desmosomes are present between EMG cells. The coexistence of newly formed secretory granules and tonofilaments of 100F desmosomes in the same EMG cell represents estrogen-induced bidirectional differentiation. Our findings indicate that androgens and estrogens are individually capable of controlling the expression of secretory granules and desmosomes. In intact animals, male and female sex hormones may act in concert to direct epithelial cell differentiation of the prostate.

  8. Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication by perfluorinated fatty acids is dependent on the chain length of the fluorinated tail.

    PubMed

    Upham, B L; Deocampo, N D; Wurl, B; Trosko, J E

    1998-11-09

    Perfluorinated fatty acids (PFFAs), such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), are known peroxisome proliferators and hepatocarcinogens. A causal link between an increase in the oxidative stress by peroxisomes and tumor promotion has been proposed to explain the hepatocarcinogenicity of PFOA and PFDA. However, the down-regulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has also been linked to the tumor-promoting properties of many carcinogens. Therefore, the effect of PFFAs on GJIC in WB-rat liver epithelial cells was determined. The chain length of the PFFAs tested for an effect on GJIC ranged from 2 to 10, 16 and 18 carbons. Carbon lengths of 7 to 10 inhibited GJIC in a dose-response fashion, whereas carbon lengths of 2 to 5, 16 and 18 did not appreciably inhibit GJIC. Inhibition occurred within 15 min and was reversible, with total recovery from inhibition occurring within 30 min after the removal of the compound from the growth medium. This short time of inhibition suggests that GJIC was modified at the post-translational level. Also, this short time period was not long enough for peroxisome proliferation. The post-translational modification of the gap junction proteins was not a consequence of altered phosphorylation as determined by Western blot analysis. Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid also inhibited GJIC in a dose-response fashion similar to PFDA, indicating that the determining factor of inhibition was probably the fluorinated tail, which required 7-10 carbons. Our results suggest that PFFAs could potentially act as hepatocarcinogens at the level of gap junctions in addition to or instead of through peroxisome proliferation.

  9. Lateral assembly of N-cadherin drives tissue integrity by stabilizing adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S.; Fischer, S. C.; Schuman, E. M.; Stelzer, E. H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin interactions ensure the correct registry and anchorage of cells during tissue formation. Along the plasma membrane, cadherins form inter-junctional lattices via cis- and trans-dimerization. While structural studies have provided models for cadherin interactions, the molecular nature of cadherin binding in vivo remains unexplored. We undertook a multi-disciplinary approach combining live cell imaging of three-dimensional cell assemblies (spheroids) with a computational model to study the dynamics of N-cadherin interactions. Using a loss-of-function strategy, we demonstrate that each N-cadherin interface plays a distinct role in spheroid formation. We found that cis-dimerization is not a prerequisite for trans-interactions, but rather modulates trans-interfaces to ensure tissue stability. Using a model of N-cadherin junction dynamics, we show that the absence of cis-interactions results in low junction stability and loss of tissue integrity. By quantifying the binding and unbinding dynamics of the N-cadherin binding interfaces, we determined that mutating either interface results in a 10-fold increase in the dissociation constant. These findings provide new quantitative information on the steps driving cadherin intercellular adhesion and demonstrate the role of cis-interactions in junction stability. PMID:25589573

  10. Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication: A Functional Biomarker to Assess Adverse Effects of Toxicants and Toxins, and Health Benefits of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Upham, Brad L; Sovadinová, Iva; Babica, Pavel

    2016-12-25

    This protocol describes a scalpel loading-fluorescent dye transfer (SL-DT) technique that measures intercellular communication through gap junction channels, which is a major intercellular process by which tissue homeostasis is maintained. Interruption of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) by toxicants, toxins, drugs, etc. has been linked to numerous adverse health effects. Many genetic-based human diseases have been linked to mutations in gap junction genes. The SL-DT technique is a simple functional assay for the simultaneous assessment of GJIC in a large population of cells. The assay involves pre-loading cells with a fluorescent dye by briefly perturbing the cell membrane with a scalpel blade through a population of cells. The fluorescent dye is then allowed to traverse through gap junction channels to neighboring cells for a designated time. The assay is then terminated by the addition of formalin to the cells. The spread of the fluorescent dye through a population of cells is assessed with an epifluorescence microscope and the images are analyzed with any number of morphometric software packages that are available, including free software packages found on the public domain. This assay has also been adapted for in vivo studies using tissue slices from various organs from treated animals. Overall, the SL-DT assay can serve a broad range of in vitro pharmacological and toxicological needs, and can be potentially adapted for high throughput set-up systems with automated fluorescence microscopy imaging and analysis to elucidate more samples in a shorter time.

  11. ASC Induces Apoptosis via Activation of Caspase-9 by Enhancing Gap Junction-Mediated Intercellular Communication.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masato; Hida, Shigeaki; Fujii, Chifumi; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Ito, Kensuke; Matsumura, Tomio; Okada, Nagisa; Sakaizawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Akira; Takeoka, Michiko; Miyagawa, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) is a key adaptor molecule of inflammasomes that mediates inflammatory and apoptotic signals. Aberrant methylation-induced silencing of ASC has been observed in a variety of cancer cells, thus implicating ASC in tumor suppression, although this role remains incompletely defined especially in the context of closely neighboring cell proliferation. As ASC has been confirmed to be silenced by abnormal methylation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells as well, this cell line was investigated to characterize the precise role and mechanism of ASC in tumor progression. The effects of ASC were examined using in vitro cell cultures based on comparisons between low and high cell density conditions as well as in a xenograft murine model. ASC overexpression was established by insertion of the ASC gene into pcDNA3 and pMX-IRES-GFP vectors, the latter being packed into a retrovirus and subjected to reproducible competitive assays using parental cells as an internal control, for evaluation of cell viability. p21 and p53 were silenced using shRNA. Cell viability was suppressed in ASC-expressing transfectants as compared with control cells at high cell density conditions in in vitro culture and colony formation assays and in in vivo ectopic tumor formation trials. This suppression was not detected in low cell density conditions. Furthermore, remarkable progression of apoptosis was observed in ASC-introduced cells at a high cell density, but not at a low one. ASC-dependent apoptosis was mediated not by p21, p53, or caspase-1, but rather by cleavage of caspase-9 as well as by suppression of the NF-κB-related X-linked inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein. Caspase-9 cleavage was observed to be dependent on gap junction formation. The remarkable effect of ASC on the induction of apoptosis through caspase-9 and gap junctions revealed in this study may lead to promising new approaches in anticancer therapy.

  12. Effects of SRC and STAT3 upon gap junctional, intercellular communication in lung cancer lines.

    PubMed

    Geletu, Mulu; Guy, Stephanie; Raptis, Leda

    2013-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated a positive correlation between SRC and its effector signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), and a reverse relation between SRC and gap junctional communication (GJIC) in seven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines. Since a number of oncogenes besides SRC can affect GJIC, here we examined the actual contribution of the SRC/STAT3 axis to GJIC suppression. SRC and STAT3 activity levels were examined in SK-LuCi-6, LC-T, QU-DB, SW-1573, BH-E, Calu-6, FR-E, SK-MES, H1299, BEN, WT-E, A549 and SHP-77 cells by western blott analysis, probing with antibodies specific for SRC-ptyr418 or STAT3-ptyr705. GJIC was examined by in situ electroporation. Confluence of all cultured NSCLC cells tested induces a dramatic increase in STAT3 activity, which is independent of SRC action. In addition, the LC-T line had high STAT3-705, despite the fact that SRC-418 expression was low, indicating that other, SRC-independent factors must be responsible for STAT3 activation and GJIC suppression in these cells; however, BH-E and SHP-77 cells with low GJIC, both SRC-418 and STAT3-705 expression were low, indicating that GJIC suppression can be independent of the SRC/STAT3 axis altogether. Our results also show that STAT3 inhibition does not restore GJIC in any of the examined lines, while in the non-transformed rat F111 fibroblast line which has extensive GJIC, STAT3 inhibition actually eliminated junctional permeability. Our results indicate a further level of complexity in the relationship between SRC, STAT3 and GJIC in NSCLC than what has been previously demonstrated. In addition, STAT3 is actually required for, rather than suppressing GJIC.

  13. Alterations of Intercellular Junctions in Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells from Patients Undergoing Dialysis: Effect of Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Retana, Carmen; Sanchez, Elsa; Perez-Lopez, Alejandro; Cruz, Armando; Lagunas, Jesus; Cruz, Carmen; Vital, Socorro; Reyes, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Background: Dialysis patients are classified according to their peritoneal permeability as low transporter (LT, low solute permeability) or high transporter (HT, high solute permeability). Tight junction (TJ) proteins are critical to maintain ions, molecules and water paracellular transport through peritoneum. Exposure to peritoneal dialysis solutions causes damage to TJ in human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). We analyzed the quantity, distribution and function of TJ proteins: claudin-1, -2 and -8, ZO-1 and occludin, in HPMC cultures from LT and HT patients. Since all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) might modify the expression of TJ proteins, we studied its effect on HPMCs. ♦ Methods: Control HPMCs were isolated from human omentum, while HT or LT cells were obtained from dialysis effluents. Cells were cultured in presence of ATRA 0, 50 or 100 nM. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) measurement, immunostaining and Western blot analyses were performed. ♦ Results: HT exhibited lower TER than control and LT monolayers. Immunofluorescence for TJ was weak and discontinuous along the cell contour, in LT and HT. Furthermore, claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 expressions were decreased. In all groups, claudin-2 was localized at nuclei. We observed that ATRA improved TJ distribution and increased TJ expression in HT. This retinoid did not modify claudin-2 and -8 expressions. All-trans retinoic acid decreased TER in HT, but had no effect in LT. ♦ Conclusions: Tight junctions were altered in HPMCs from dialyzed patients. The HT monolayer has lower TER than LT, which might be associated with the peritoneal permeability in these patients. ATRA might be a therapeutic alternative to maintain mesothelial integrity, since it improved TJ localization and expression. PMID:24584604

  14. Influence of gap junction intercellular communication composed of connexin 43 on the antineoplastic effect of adriamycin in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guojun; Dong, Shuying; Yu, Meiling; Han, Xi; Zheng, Chao; Zhu, Xiaoguang; Tong, Xuhui

    2017-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) serve the principal role in the antineoplastic (cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis) effect of chemical drugs. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of GJ intercellular communication (GJIC) composed of connexin 43 (Cx43) on adriamycin cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Four cell lines (Hs578T, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3) with different degree of malignancy were used in the study. The results of western blotting and immunofluorescence revealed that, in Hs578T and MCF-7 cells, which have a low degree of malignancy, the expression levels of Cx43 and GJIC were higher than those in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells (which have a high degree of malignancy). In Hs578T and MCF-7 cells, where GJ could be formed, the function of GJ was modulated by a pharmacological potentiators [retinoid acid (RA)]/inhibitors [oleamide and 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18-α-GA)] and small interfering RNA (siRNA). In high-density cells (where GJ was formed), enhancement of GJ function by RA increased the cytotoxicity of adriamycin, while inhibition of GJ function by oleamide/18-α-GA and siRNA decreased the cytotoxicity caused by adriamycin. Notably, the modulation of GJ did not affect the survival of cells treated with adriamycin when cells were in low density (no GJ was formed). The present study illustrated the association between GJIC and the antitumor effect of adriamycin in breast cancer cells. The cytotoxicity of adriamycin on breast cancer cells was increased when the function of gap junctions was enhanced. PMID:28356970

  15. Autophagy and gap junctional intercellular communication inhibition are involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis in rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Hui; Zhuo, Liling; Han, Tao; Hu, Di; Yang, Xiaokang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Gu, Jianhong; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Liu, Zongping

    2015-04-17

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to induce hepatotoxicity, yet the underlying mechanism of how this occurs is not fully understood. In this study, Cd-induced apoptosis was demonstrated in rat liver cells (BRL 3A) with apoptotic nuclear morphological changes and a decrease in cell index (CI) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and autophagy in Cd-induced apoptosis was investigated. Cd significantly induced GJIC inhibition as well as downregulation of connexin 43 (Cx43). The prototypical gap junction blocker carbenoxolone disodium (CBX) exacerbated the Cd-induced decrease in CI. Cd treatment was also found to cause autophagy, with an increase in mRNA expression of autophagy-related genes Atg-5, Atg-7, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) conversion from cytosolic LC3-I to membrane-bound LC3-II. The autophagic inducer rapamycin (RAP) prevented the Cd-induced CI decrease, while the autophagic inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) caused a further reduction in CI. In addition, CBX promoted Cd-induced autophagy, as well as changes in expression of Atg-5, Atg-7, Beclin-1 and LC3. CQ was found to block the Cd-induced decrease in Cx43 and GJIC inhibition, whereas RAP had opposite effect. These results demonstrate that autophagy plays a protective role during Cd-induced apoptosis in BRL 3A cells during 6 h of experiment, while autophagy exacerbates Cd-induced GJIC inhibition which has a negative effect on cellular fate. - Highlights: • GJIC and autophagy is crucial for biological processes. • Cd exposure causes GJIC inhibition and autophagy increase in BRL 3A cells. • Autophagy protects Cd induced BRL 3A cells apoptosis at an early stage. • Autophagy exacerbates Cd-induced GJIC inhibition. • GJIC plays an important role in autophagy induced cell death or survival.

  16. ASC Induces Apoptosis via Activation of Caspase-9 by Enhancing Gap Junction-Mediated Intercellular Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Shigeaki; Fujii, Chifumi; Taniguchi, Shun’ichiro; Ito, Kensuke; Matsumura, Tomio; Okada, Nagisa; Sakaizawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Akira; Takeoka, Michiko; Miyagawa, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) is a key adaptor molecule of inflammasomes that mediates inflammatory and apoptotic signals. Aberrant methylation-induced silencing of ASC has been observed in a variety of cancer cells, thus implicating ASC in tumor suppression, although this role remains incompletely defined especially in the context of closely neighboring cell proliferation. As ASC has been confirmed to be silenced by abnormal methylation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells as well, this cell line was investigated to characterize the precise role and mechanism of ASC in tumor progression. The effects of ASC were examined using in vitro cell cultures based on comparisons between low and high cell density conditions as well as in a xenograft murine model. ASC overexpression was established by insertion of the ASC gene into pcDNA3 and pMX-IRES-GFP vectors, the latter being packed into a retrovirus and subjected to reproducible competitive assays using parental cells as an internal control, for evaluation of cell viability. p21 and p53 were silenced using shRNA. Cell viability was suppressed in ASC-expressing transfectants as compared with control cells at high cell density conditions in in vitro culture and colony formation assays and in in vivo ectopic tumor formation trials. This suppression was not detected in low cell density conditions. Furthermore, remarkable progression of apoptosis was observed in ASC-introduced cells at a high cell density, but not at a low one. ASC-dependent apoptosis was mediated not by p21, p53, or caspase-1, but rather by cleavage of caspase-9 as well as by suppression of the NF-κB-related X-linked inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein. Caspase-9 cleavage was observed to be dependent on gap junction formation. The remarkable effect of ASC on the induction of apoptosis through caspase-9 and gap junctions revealed in this study may lead to promising new approaches in anticancer therapy. PMID:28056049

  17. Effect of perfluorooctane sulfonate on viability, maturation and gap junctional intercellular communication of porcine oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, A; Salazar, Z; Arenas, E; Betancourt, M; Ducolomb, Y; González-Márquez, H; Casas, E; Teteltitla, M; Bonilla, E

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a broadly used man-made surfactant whose long half-life has led to bioaccumulation. This perfluorinated compound is ubiquitous in human body fluids. PFOS concentrations as high as 26μM in plasma have been reported in occupationally exposed populations, and high levels of PFOS in human follicular fluid have been associated with subfertility. However, the effect of PFOS on the maturation of oocytes in mammals has not been reported to date. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of PFOS during oocyte maturation. Results indicate that PFOS inhibits oocyte viability (Lethal Concentration50=32μM) and maturation (inhibition of maturation50=22μM) at physiologically relevant concentrations. In order to evaluate the mechanisms of oocyte maturation inhibition by PFOS, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between oocytes and granulosa cells was assessed. GJIC between granulosa cells and the oocyte was significantly affected during the first 8h of maturation. However, the inhibitory effect of PFOS on GJIC was not due to an alteration on the expression of connexin genes Cx43, Cx45 and Cx60. These findings suggest that occupationally exposed populations could be at risk, and that PFOS might affect oocyte maturation by interfering the GJIC in the cumulus-oocyte complexes during the first hours of maturation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of cathepsin K deficiency on intercellular junction proteins, luminal mucus layers, and extracellular matrix constituents in the mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Arampatzidou, Maria; Schütte, André; Hansson, Gunnar C; Saftig, Paul; Brix, Klaudia

    2012-12-01

    Cathepsin K has been shown to exhibit antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities in the mouse colon. To further elucidate its role, we used Ctsk-/- mice and demonstrated that the absence of cathepsin K was accompanied by elevated protein levels of related cysteine cathepsins (cathepsins B, L, and X) in the colon. In principle, such changes could result in altered subcellular localization; however, the trafficking of cysteine cathepsins was not affected in the colon of Ctsk-/- mice. However, cathepsin K deficiency affected the extracellular matrix constituents, as higher amounts of collagen IV and laminin were observed. Moreover, the localization pattern of the intercellular junction proteins E-cadherin and occludin was altered in the colon of Ctsk-/- mice, suggesting potential impairment of the barrier function. Thus, we used an ex vivo method for assessing the mucus layers and showed that the absence of cathepsin K had no influence on mucus organization and growth. The data of this study support the notion that cathepsin K contributes to intestinal homeostasis and tissue architecture, but the lack of cathepsin K activity is not expected to affect the mucus-depending barrier functions of the mouse colon. These results are important with regard to oral administration of cathepsin K inhibitors that are currently under investigation in clinical trials.

  19. Effects of phenolics in Empire apples on hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Sang Jun; Kang, Nam Joo; Lee, Chang Yong; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated antioxidant and antitumor-promoting activities of major phenolic phytochemicals of apples. The contents of each antioxidant in Empire apples was quantified and their contributions to total antioxidant activity of apples were determined using assay for inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced superoxide radical generation in cell culture model and expressed in vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity (VCEAC). The estimated contribution of major phenolics and vitamin C to total anitoxidant capacity of 100 g fresh Empire apples is as follows: quercetin (60.05 VCEAC) > chlorogenic acid (12.32) > phloretin (7.41) > procyanidin B2 (7.22) > vitamin C (6.61) > epicatechin (5.10) in superoxide radical scavenging assay. Recent reports suggest that the mechanism of carcinogenic process of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be associated with the inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), which is involved in tumor promotion process. Apple extracts showed the protective effects against the inhibition of GJIC by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. Quercetin exerted the strongest protective effects among major antioxidants in apples on H2O2-induced inhibition of GJIC, following epicatechin, procyanidin B2, and vitamin C, while chlorogenic acid and phloretin had no effects. Our results indicate that cancer chemopreventive activity of apples is associated with the combined antioxidant capacity and antitumor-promoting activities of diverse antioxidants.

  20. Supercritical CO(2)-extracted tomato Oleoresins enhance gap junction intercellular communications and recover from mercury chloride inhibition in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Leone, Antonella; Zefferino, Roberto; Longo, Cristiano; Leo, Lucia; Zacheo, Giuseppe

    2010-04-28

    A nutritionally relevant phytochemical such as lycopene, found in tomatoes and other fruits, has been proposed to have health-promoting effects by modulating hormonal and immune systems, metabolic pathways, and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). This work analyzes lycopene extracts, obtained from tomato and tomato added with grape seeds by using a safe and environmentally friendly extraction process, based on supercritical carbon dioxide technology (S-CO(2)). Analysis of the innovative S-CO(2)-extracted oleoresins showed peculiar chemical composition with high lycopene concentration and the presence of other carotenoids, lipids, and phenol compounds. The oleoresins showed a higher in vitro antioxidant activity compared with pure lycopene and beta-carotene and the remarkable ability to enhance the GJIC and to increase cx43 expression in keratinocytes. The oleoresins, (0.9 microM lycopene), were also able to overcome, completely, the GJIC inhibition induced by 10 nM HgCl(2), mercury(II) chloride, suggesting a possible action mechanism.

  1. [Effects of lovastatin on proliferation and gap junctional intercellular communication of human breast cancer cell MCF-7].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Mi, Man-Tian; Zhu, Jun-Dong; Zhang, Qian-Yong

    2003-03-01

    Lovastatin,an inhibitor of endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis,has been widely used in the clinical treatment of hypercholesterolemia.Recently,lovastatin has been paid more attention for its wide-range effects on human cancer cells; however,the detail mechanisms of its anti-cancer effects are not yet understood. This study was designed to investigate the effects of lovastatin on proliferation and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. After treated with lovastatin at dosages of 4,8,16 micromol/L for 1-3 days,the cell differentiation was examined with nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction test;the proliferation and distribution of cell cycles were examined with flow cytometry (FCM). Meanwhile,GJIC of MCF-7 cells was observed using the scrape-loading and dye transfer(SLDT) technique. Lovastatin could inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells significantly and 75.80 percent of cells were inhibited after treated with 16 micromol/L lovastatin for 72 hours (P< 0.05). Meanwhile, lovastatin could arrest MCF-7 cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase of cell cycle and 80 percent of cells were arrested in G(0)/G(1) phase after treated with lovastatin for 72 hours. Furthermore, lovastatin could induce the differentiation of MCF-7 cells (P< 0.01) and up-regulate GJIC in MCF-7 cells. After treated with 16 micromol/L lovastatin for 72 hours, transfer of LY fluorescence could reach 4-5 rows of cells from the scraped line. However, apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was not obvious. All these effects of lovastatin were in a dose-and time-dependent manner. It suggests that lovastatin has the capabilities of inhibiting proliferation, arresting MCF-7 cells at G(0)/G(1) phase of cell cycle and inducing differentiation. These effects of lovastatin maybe correlate with lovastatin promoting GJIC function in MCF-7 cells.

  2. Modulation of gap-junctional intercellular communication by a series of cyanobacterial samples from nature and laboratory cultures.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Kateřina; Babica, Pavel; Adamovský, Ondřej; Bláha, Luděk

    2011-07-01

    Cyanobacterial extracts have been recently shown to alter two in vitro biomarkers of tumor promotion, namely to cause inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (Blaha et al., 2010a). In the present study, we investigated GJIC-inhibitory potencies of 10 laboratory strains representing common water bloom-forming cyanobacteria (Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Cylindrospermopsis, Microcystis and Planktothrix) and six natural water bloom samples (dominated by Aphanizomenon sp. or Microcystis). The most pronounced inhibitions of GJIC in a model rat liver epithelial cell line WB-F344 were caused by methanolic extracts of Anabaena flos-aquae UTEX 1444, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae SAG 31.87, Aphanizomenon gracile RCX 06, Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii SAG 1.97, Planktothrix agardhii CCALA 159 and SAG 32.79, whereas weaker effects were induced by Aphanizomenon klebahnii CCALA 009 and no inhibition was induced by extracts of Aph. flos-aquae PCC 7905 and Aph. gracile SAG 31.79. Exudates of the laboratory cultured strains concentrated by solid phase extraction also induced species-specific inhibitory effects, but they did not necessarily correlate with the inhibitory potencies of extracts from the corresponding species. Interestingly, the GJIC-inhibitory effects may not be restricted to cyanobacteria, since exudates of two green alga species also affected GJIC, although their extracts caused no effects. The extracts from different natural water blooms inhibited GJIC with different potencies without apparent relation to bloom-species composition. Since the observed effects on GJIC did not correlate with the content of cyanotoxins microcystins and cylindrospermopsin in the tested samples, they were most likely induced by unknown compound(s). Our results indicate that putative tumor promoting compound(s) could be associated with different species of bloom-forming cyanobacteria, but

  3. Involvement of gap junctional intercellular communication in the bystander effect induced by broad-beam or microbeam heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chunlin; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo

    2006-09-01

    Most of the reported bystander responses were studied by using low dose irradiation of γ-rays and light ions such as alpha-particles. In this study, primary human fibroblasts AG1522 in confluent cultures were irradiated with either broad-beam of 100 keV/μm 12C or microbeams of 380 keV/μm 20Ne and 1260 keV/μm 40Ar. When cells were irradiated with 12C ions, the induction of micronucleus (MN) had a low-dose sensitive effect, i.e. a lower dose of irradiation gave a higher yield of MN per cell-traversal. This phenomenon was further reinforced by using a microbeam to irradiate a fraction of cells within a population. Even when only a single cell was targeted with one particle of 40Ar or 20Ne, the MN yield was increased to 1.4-fold of the non-irradiated control. When the number of microbeam targeted cells increased, the MN yield per targeted-cell decreased drastically. In addition, the bystander MN induction did not vary significantly with the number and the linear energy transfer (LET) of microbeam particles. When the culture was treated with PMA, an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), MN induction was decreased for both microbeam and broad-beam irradiations even at high-doses where all cells were hit. The present findings indicate that a GJIC-mediated signaling amplification mechanism was involved in the high-LET heavy ion irradiation induced bystander effect. Moreover, at high-doses of radiation, the bystander signals could perform a complex interaction with direct irradiation.

  4. Inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields in osteoblast-like models is dependent on cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Dean T; Huang, Jason; Ma, Defang; Wang, Paul K C

    2002-02-01

    Electromagnetic fields have been used to augment the healing of fractures because of its ability to increase new bone formation. The mechanism of how electromagnetic fields can promote new bone formation is unknown, although the interaction of electromagnetic fields with components of the plasma membrane of cells has been hypothesized to occur in bone cells. Gap junctions occur among bone forming cells, the osteoblasts, and have been hypothesized to play a role in new bone formation. Thus it was investigated whether extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields alter gap junction intercellular communication in the pre-osteoblastic model, MC3T3-E1, and the well-differentiated osteoblastic model, ROS 17/2.8. ELF magnetic field exposure systems were designed to be used for an inverted microscope stage and for a tissue culture incubator. Using these systems, it was found that magnetic fields over a frequency range from 30 to 120 Hz and field intensities up to 12.5 G dose dependently decreased gap junction intercellular communication in MC3T3-E1 cells during their proliferative phase of development. The total amount of connexin 43 protein and the distribution of connexin 43 gap junction protein between cytoplasmic and plasma membrane pools were unaltered by treatment with ELF magnetic fields. Cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) which can inhibit gap junction communication, was not altered by magnetic field exposure. Identical exposure conditions did not affect gap junction communication in the ROS 17/2.8 cell line and when MC3T3-E1 cells were more differentiated. Thus ELF magnetic fields may affect only less differentiated or pre-osteoblasts and not fully differentiated osteoblasts. Consequently, electromagnetic fields may aid in the repair of bone by effects exerted only on osteoprogenitor or pre-osteoblasts.

  5. Alix-mediated assembly of the actomyosin–tight junction polarity complex preserves epithelial polarity and epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Yvan; Qiu, Xiaohui; Gomero, Elida; Wakefield, Randall; Horner, Linda; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Han, Young-Goo; Solecki, David; Frase, Sharon; Bongiovanni, Antonella; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell polarity and epithelial barrier relies on the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton and proper positioning/assembly of intercellular junctions. However, how these processes are regulated is poorly understood. Here we reveal a key role for the multifunctional protein Alix in both processes. In a knockout mouse model of Alix, we identified overt structural changes in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and in the ependyma, such as asymmetrical cell shape and size, misplacement and abnormal beating of cilia, blebbing of the microvilli. These defects culminate in excessive cell extrusion, enlargement of the lateral ventricles and hydrocephalus. Mechanistically, we find that by interacting with F-actin, the Par complex and ZO-1, Alix ensures the formation and maintenance of the apically restricted actomyosin–tight junction complex. We propose that in this capacity Alix plays a role in the establishment of apical–basal polarity and in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier. PMID:27336173

  6. ZO-1 recruitment to α-catenin--a novel mechanism for coupling the assembly of tight junctions to adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Maiers, Jessica L; Peng, Xiao; Fanning, Alan S; DeMali, Kris A

    2013-09-01

    The formation of a barrier between epithelial cells is a fundamental determinant of cellular homeostasis, protecting underlying cells against pathogens, dehydration and damage. Assembly of the tight junction barrier is dependent upon neighboring epithelial cells binding to one another and forming adherens junctions, but the mechanism for how these processes are linked is poorly understood. Using a knockdown and substitution system, we studied whether ZO-1 binding to α-catenin is required for coupling tight junction assembly to the formation of adherens junctions. We found that preventing ZO-1 binding to α-catenin did not appear to affect adherens junctions. Rather the assembly and maintenance of the epithelial barrier were disrupted. This disruption was accompanied by alterations in the mobility of ZO-1 and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, our study identifies α-catenin binding to ZO-1 as a new mechanism for coupling the assembly of the epithelial barrier to cell-to-cell adhesion.

  7. Self assembled silicon nanowire Schottky junction assisted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stievenard, Didier; Sahli, Billel; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah; Melnyk, Oleg

    2008-03-01

    We present results on self assembled silicon nanowire Schottky junction assisted by collagen fibrous. The collagen is the principle protein of connective human tissues. It presents the double interest to be a low cost biological material with the possibility to be combed as the DNA molecule. First, the collagen was combed on OTS modified surface with gold electrodes. Second, silicon nanowires were grown on silicon substrate by CVD of silane gas (SiH4) at high temperature (500 C) using a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and gold particles as catalysts. In order to increase electrostatic interaction between the collagen and the nanowires, these latters were chemically modified by mercaptopropylmethoxysilane (MPTS), then chemically oxidized. Therefore, the nanowires were transferred from their substrate into water and a drop of it deposited on the surface. Nanowires are only bound to collagen and in particular, in electrode gaps. The formation of spontaneous Schotkty junction is demonstrated by current-voltage characteristics.

  8. Germ cell-somatic cell relationships: a comparative study of intercellular junctions during spermatogenesis in selected non-mammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sprando, R L; Russell, L D

    1987-09-01

    Specialized germ cell-somatic cell relationships were surveyed in the testis of species representative of four classes of non-mammalian vertebrates. Desmosome-like junctions were present in all classes studied. In the teleost fish studied (bluegill; Lepomis macrochirus), small, infrequent desmosomes, seen between the spherical cyst cells and spermatocytes, were characterized by poorly represented subsurface densities. In the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), similar desmosome-like junctions were found between cyst cell processes and spermatocytes. Reptilian (turtle; Pseudameys scripta) desmosome-like junctions between Sertoli cells and germ cells were heterogeneous and more numerous than those junctions found in fish and amphibians. In general, the reptilian desmosome-like junctions were extensive structures displaying 10 nm filaments associated with the Sertoli cell component of the junctions. Regions within the desmosome where the two plasma membranes converged suggested that gap junctions were a component of the desmosome-like junctions. "Desmosome-gap" junctions persisted in turtle spermatids for sometime after nuclear elongation had commenced. In birds (chicken; Gallus domesticus), "desmosome-gap" junctions, similar to those seen in turtles were described between both spermatocytes and Sertoli cells, and spermatids and Sertoli cells. These junctions were frequently lined by saccules of endoplasmic reticulum. The presence of gap junctions suggest the evolution of mechanisms for somatic cell-germ cell communication although more species should be examined to confirm this hypothesis.

  9. To build a synapse: signaling pathways in neuromuscular junction assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haitao; Xiong, Wen C.; Mei, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Synapses, as fundamental units of the neural circuitry, enable complex behaviors. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse type that forms between motoneurons and skeletal muscle fibers and that exhibits a high degree of subcellular specialization. Aided by genetic techniques and suitable animal models, studies in the past decade have brought significant progress in identifying NMJ components and assembly mechanisms. This review highlights recent advances in the study of NMJ development, focusing on signaling pathways that are activated by diffusible cues, which shed light on synaptogenesis in the brain and contribute to a better understanding of muscular dystrophy. PMID:20215342

  10. Gap junction assembly: roles for the formation plaque and regulation by the C-terminus of connexin43

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ross G.; Reynhout, James K.; TenBroek, Erica M.; Quade, Bradley J.; Yasumura, Thomas; Davidson, Kimberly G. V.; Sheridan, Judson D.; Rash, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Using an established gap junction (GJ) assembly system with experimentally reaggregated cells, we analyzed “formation plaques” (FPs), apparent sites of GJ assembly. Employing freeze-fracture electron microscopy methods combined with filipin labeling of sterols and immunolabeling for connexin43 (Cx43), we demonstrated that FPs constitute distinct membrane “domains” and that their characteristic 10-nm particles contain connexin43, thus representing precursors (i.e., GJ hemichannels) engaged in assembly. Analysis of FPs in new systems—HeLa and N2A cells—resolved questions surrounding several key but poorly understood steps in assembly, including matching of FP membranes in apposed cells, reduction in the separation between FP membranes during assembly, and the process of particle aggregation. Findings also indicated that “docking” of GJ hemichannels occurs within FP domains and contributes to reduction of intermembrane separation between FPs. Other experiments demonstrated that FPs develop following a major C-terminal truncation of Cx43 (M257), although assembly was delayed. Particle aggregation also occurred at lower densities, and densities of particles within developing GJ aggregates failed to achieve full-length levels. With regard to regulation, inhibition of assembly following protein kinase C activation failed to occur in the M257 truncation mutants, as measured by intercellular dye transfer. However, several C-terminal serine mutations failed to disrupt inhibition. PMID:22049024

  11. Gap junction assembly: roles for the formation plaque and regulation by the C-terminus of connexin43.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ross G; Reynhout, James K; TenBroek, Erica M; Quade, Bradley J; Yasumura, Thomas; Davidson, Kimberly G V; Sheridan, Judson D; Rash, John E

    2012-01-01

    Using an established gap junction (GJ) assembly system with experimentally reaggregated cells, we analyzed "formation plaques" (FPs), apparent sites of GJ assembly. Employing freeze-fracture electron microscopy methods combined with filipin labeling of sterols and immunolabeling for connexin43 (Cx43), we demonstrated that FPs constitute distinct membrane "domains" and that their characteristic 10-nm particles contain connexin43, thus representing precursors (i.e., GJ hemichannels) engaged in assembly. Analysis of FPs in new systems-HeLa and N2A cells-resolved questions surrounding several key but poorly understood steps in assembly, including matching of FP membranes in apposed cells, reduction in the separation between FP membranes during assembly, and the process of particle aggregation. Findings also indicated that "docking" of GJ hemichannels occurs within FP domains and contributes to reduction of intermembrane separation between FPs. Other experiments demonstrated that FPs develop following a major C-terminal truncation of Cx43 (M257), although assembly was delayed. Particle aggregation also occurred at lower densities, and densities of particles within developing GJ aggregates failed to achieve full-length levels. With regard to regulation, inhibition of assembly following protein kinase C activation failed to occur in the M257 truncation mutants, as measured by intercellular dye transfer. However, several C-terminal serine mutations failed to disrupt inhibition.

  12. Resveratrol induces chemosensitization to 5-fluorouracil through up-regulation of intercellular junctions, Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and apoptosis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Buhrmann, Constanze; Shayan, Parviz; Kraehe, Patricia; Popper, Bastian; Goel, Ajay; Shakibaei, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a common chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), by itself has inadequate response rates; highlighting the need for novel and improved treatment regimens for these patients. Resveratrol, a naturally-occurring polyphenol, has been linked with chemosensitizing potential and anticancer properties; however, the underlying mechanisms for these effects remain poorly understood. The effect of resveratrol in parental CRC cell lines (HCT116, SW480) and their corresponding isogenic 5-FU-chemoresistant derived clones (HCT116R, SW480R) was examined by MTT assays, intercellular junction formation and apoptosis by electron- and immunoelectron microscopy, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and NF-κB regulated gene products by western blot analysis in a 3D-alginate microenvironment. Resveratrol blocked the proliferation of all four CRC cell lines and synergized the invasion inhibitory effects of 5-FU. Interestingly, resveratrol induced a transition from 5-FU-induced formation of microvilli to a planar cell surface, which was concomitant with up-regulation of desmosomes, gap- and tight junctions (claudin-2) and adhesion molecules (E-cadherin) expression in HCT116 and HCT116R cells. Further, resveratrol significantly attenuated drug resistance through inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) factors (decreased vimentin and slug, increased E-cadherin) and down-regulation of NF-κB activation and its translocation to the nucleus and abolished NF-κB-regulated gene end-products (MMP-9, caspase-3). Moreover, this suppression was mediated through inhibition of IκBα kinase and IκBα phosphorylation and degradation. Our results demonstrate that resveratrol can potentiate the anti-tumor effects of 5-FU on CRC cells by chemosensitizing them, inhibiting an EMT phenotype via up-regulation of intercellular junctions and by down-regulation of NF-κB pathway.

  13. Exogenous expression of the amino-terminal half of the tight junction protein ZO-3 perturbs junctional complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, E S; Haskins, J; Stevenson, B R

    2000-11-13

    The functional characteristics of the tight junction protein ZO-3 were explored through exogenous expression of mutant protein constructs in MDCK cells. Expression of the amino-terminal, PSD95/dlg/ZO-1 domain-containing half of the molecule (NZO-3) delayed the assembly of both tight and adherens junctions induced by calcium switch treatment or brief exposure to the actin-disrupting drug cytochalasin D. Junction formation was monitored by transepithelial resistance measurements and localization of junction-specific proteins by immunofluorescence. The tight junction components ZO-1, ZO-2, endogenous ZO-3, and occludin were mislocalized during the early stages of tight junction assembly. Similarly, the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and beta-catenin were also delayed in their recruitment to the cell membrane, and NZO-3 expression had striking effects on actin cytoskeleton dynamics. NZO-3 expression did not alter expression levels of ZO-1, ZO-2, endogenous ZO-3, occludin, or E-cadherin; however, the amount of Triton X-100-soluble, signaling-active beta-catenin was increased in NZO-3-expressing cells during junction assembly. In vitro binding experiments showed that ZO-1 and actin preferentially bind to NZO-3, whereas both NZO-3 and the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule (CZO-3) contain binding sites for occludin and cingulin. We hypothesize that NZO-3 exerts its dominant-negative effects via a mechanism involving the actin cytoskeleton, ZO-1, and/or beta-catenin.

  14. Exogenous Expression of the Amino-Terminal Half of the Tight Junction Protein Zo-3 Perturbs Junctional Complex Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wittchen, Erika S.; Haskins, Julie; Stevenson, Bruce R.

    2000-01-01

    The functional characteristics of the tight junction protein ZO-3 were explored through exogenous expression of mutant protein constructs in MDCK cells. Expression of the amino-terminal, PSD95/dlg/ZO-1 domain-containing half of the molecule (NZO-3) delayed the assembly of both tight and adherens junctions induced by calcium switch treatment or brief exposure to the actin-disrupting drug cytochalasin D. Junction formation was monitored by transepithelial resistance measurements and localization of junction-specific proteins by immunofluorescence. The tight junction components ZO-1, ZO-2, endogenous ZO-3, and occludin were mislocalized during the early stages of tight junction assembly. Similarly, the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin were also delayed in their recruitment to the cell membrane, and NZO-3 expression had striking effects on actin cytoskeleton dynamics. NZO-3 expression did not alter expression levels of ZO-1, ZO-2, endogenous ZO-3, occludin, or E-cadherin; however, the amount of Triton X-100–soluble, signaling-active β-catenin was increased in NZO-3–expressing cells during junction assembly. In vitro binding experiments showed that ZO-1 and actin preferentially bind to NZO-3, whereas both NZO-3 and the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule (CZO-3) contain binding sites for occludin and cingulin. We hypothesize that NZO-3 exerts its dominant-negative effects via a mechanism involving the actin cytoskeleton, ZO-1, and/or β-catenin. PMID:11076967

  15. Inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication is involved in silica nanoparticles-induced H9c2 cardiomyocytes apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhong-jun; Cui, Guan-qun; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Zhi-hu; Jia, Qiang; Ng, Jack C; Peng, Cheng; Bo, Cun-xiang; Shao, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) between cardiomyocytes is essential for synchronous heart contraction and relies on connexin-containing channels. Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a major component involved in GJIC in heart tissue, and its abnormal expression is closely associated with various cardiac diseases. Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are known to induce cardiovascular toxicity. However, the mechanisms through which GJIC plays a role in cardiomyocytes apoptosis induced by SNPs remain unknown. The aim of the present study is to determine whether SNPs-decreased GJIC promotes apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes cell line (H9c2 cells) via the mitochondrial pathway using CCK-8 Kit, scrape-loading dye transfer technique, Annexin V/PI double-staining assays, and Western blot analysis. The results showed that SNPs elicited cytotoxicity in H9c2 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. SNPs also reduced GJIC in H9c2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner through downregulation of Cx43 and upregulation of P-Cx43. Inhibition of gap junctions by gap junction blocker carbenoxolone disodium resulted in decreased survival and increased apoptosis, whereas enhancement of the gap junctions by retinoic acid led to enhanced survival but decreased apoptosis. Furthermore, SNPs-induced apoptosis through the disrupted functional gap junction was correlated with abnormal expressions of the proteins involved in the mitochondrial pathway-related apoptosis such as Bcl-2/Bax, cytochrome C, Caspase-9, and Caspase-3. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that SNPs-decreased GJIC promotes apoptosis in cardiomyocytes via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, downregulation of GJIC by SNPs in cardiomyocytes is mediated through downregulation of Cx43 and upregulation of P-Cx43. These results suggest that in rat cardiomyocytes cell line, GJIC plays a protective role in SNPs-induced apoptosis and that GJIC may be one of the targets for SNPs-induced biological

  16. ROCK activity regulates functional tight junction assembly during blastocyst formation in porcine parthenogenetic embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein serine/threonine kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2) are Rho subfamily GTPase downstream effectors that regulate cell migration, intercellular adhesion, cell polarity, and cell proliferation by stimulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Inhibition of ROCK proteins affects specification of the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM) lineages, compaction, and blastocyst cavitation. However, the molecules involved in blastocyst formation are not known. Here, we examined developmental competence and levels of adherens/tight junction (AJ/TJ) constituent proteins, such as CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1, as well as expression of their respective mRNAs, after treating porcine parthenogenetic four-cell embryos with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 100 µM for 24 h. Following this treatment, the blastocyst development rates were 39.1, 20.7, 10.0, and 0% respectively. In embryos treated with 20 µM treatment, expression levels of CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1 mRNA and protein molecules were significantly reduced (P < 0.05). FITC-dextran uptake assay revealed that the treatment caused an increase in TE TJ permeability. Interestingly, the majority of the four-cell and morula embryos treated with 20 µM Y-27643 for 24 h showed defective compaction and cavitation. Taken together, our results indicate that ROCK activity may differentially affect assembly of AJ/TJs as well as regulate expression of genes encoding junctional proteins. PMID:27077008

  17. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianyong; Zhang, Guangxian; Qiu, Pengxiang; Liu, Xijuan; Wu, Yingya; Du, Biaoyan; Li, Jiefen; Zhou, Jing; Li, Jingjing; Tan, Yuhui

    2013-01-01

    The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV). This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  18. Recovery effect of onion peel extract against H2 O2 -induced inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication is mediated through quercetin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jun; Seo, Sang Gwon; Choi, Keunhwa; Kim, Jong Eun; Kang, Heerim; Chung, Min-Yu; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2014-05-01

    Cellular oxidative damage mediated by reactive oxygen species has been reported to inhibit gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). In turn, the inhibition of GJIC can be attenuated by functional food compounds with antioxidant properties. In this study, we compared the protective effects of onion peel extract (OPE) and onion flesh extract (OFE) on oxidative stress-mediated GJIC inhibition, and investigated the mechanisms of action responsible. OPE restored H2 O2 -induced GJIC inhibition to a higher degree than OFE in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. OPE was found to inhibit H2 O2 -induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Cx43. A radical scavenging assay demonstrated superiority of OPE over OFE, suggesting that the observed effects might be mediated via an antioxidant mechanism. Quercetin is the major compound that is likely to be responsible for the protective effect against H2 O2 -mediated GJIC inhibition. This study suggests that OPE, a material often discarded, may be of value for the future development of functional food products. This study demonstrates that onion peel extract (OPE) exhibits a protective effect against the inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) mediated by H2 O2 , which is likely to occur via its antioxidant activity. OPE contains significant concentrations of bioactive phenolic compounds. Reductions in oxidative stress can lead to recovery of GJIC, which has been reported to be implicated in the prevention and treatment of cancers. These findings suggest that onion peel, a common waste product, could be used as potential resources for functional food development. Onion peel could be processed into a quercetin-rich powder or a pill for the prevention of cancer and other oxidative stress-related diseases. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Gap junctions in the ovary of Drosophila melanogaster: localization of innexins 1, 2, 3 and 4 and evidence for intercellular communication via innexin-2 containing channels

    PubMed Central

    Bohrmann, Johannes; Zimmermann, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background In the Drosophila ovary, germ-line and soma cells are interconnected via gap junctions. The main gap-junction proteins in invertebrates are members of the innexin family. In order to reveal the role that innexins play in cell-cell communication during oogenesis, we investigated the localization of innexins 1, 2, 3 and 4 using immunohistochemistry, and analyzed follicle development following channel blockade. Results We found innexin 1 predominantly localized to the baso-lateral domain of follicle cells, whereas innexin 2 is positioned apico-laterally as well as apically between follicle cells and germ-line cells. Innexin 3 was observed laterally in follicle cells and also in nurse cells, and innexin 4 was detected in the oolemma up to stage 8 and in nurse-cell membranes up to stage 12. In order to test whether innexins form channels suitable for intercellular communication, we microinjected innexin antibodies in combination with a fluorescent tracer into the oocyte of stage-10 follicles. We found that dye-coupling between oocyte and follicle cells was largely reduced by innexin-2 antibodies directed against the intracellular C-terminus as well as against the intracellular loop. Analyzing in vitro, between stages 10 and 14, the developmental capacities of follicles following microinjections of innexin-2 antibodies revealed defects in follicle-cell differentiation, nurse-cell regression, oocyte growth and choriogenesis. Conclusion Our results suggest that all analyzed innexins are involved in the formation of gap junctions in the ovary. While innexins 2 and 3 are colocalized between soma cells, innexins 2 and 4 are colocalized between soma and germ-line cells. Innexin 2 is participating in cell-cell communication via hemichannels residing in the oolemma. It is obvious that gap-junctional communication between germ-line and soma cells is essential for several processes during oogenesis. PMID:19038051

  20. Analyzing phorbol ester effects on gap junctional communication: a dramatic inhibition of assembly

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The effect of 12-O-tetradeconylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on gap junction assembly between Novikoff hepatoma cells was examined. Cells were dissociated with EDTA to single cells and then reaggregated to form new junctions. When TPA (25 nM) was added to the cells at the onset of the 60-min reaggregation, dye transfer was detected at only 0.6% of the cell-cell interfaces compared to 72% for the untreated control and 74% for 4-alpha TPA, an inactive isomer of TPA. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy of reaggregated control cells showed interfaces containing an average of more than 600 aggregated intramembranous gap junction particles, while TPA-treated cells had no gap junctions. However, Lucifer yellow dye transfer between nondissociated cells via gap junctions was unaffected by 60 min of TPA treatment. Therefore, TPA dramatically inhibited gap junction assembly but did not alter channel gating nor enhance disassembly of preexisting gap junction structures. Short term TPA treatment (< 30 min) increased phosphorylation of the gap junction protein molecular weight of 43,000 (Cx43), but did not change the cellular level of Cx43. Cell surface biotinylation experiments suggested that TPA did not substantially reduce the plasma membrane concentration of Cx43. Therefore, the simple presence of Cx43 in the plasma membrane is not sufficient for gap junction assembly, and protein kinase C probably exerts an effect on assembly of gap junctions at the plasma membrane level. PMID:7806568

  1. Evolution of Microbial Quorum Sensing to Human Global Quorum Sensing: An Insight into How Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Might Be Linked to the Global Metabolic Disease Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Trosko, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The first anaerobic organism extracted energy for survival and reproduction from its source of nutrients, with the genetic means to ensure protection of its individual genome but also its species survival. While it had a means to communicate with its community via simple secreted molecules (“quorum sensing”), the eventual shift to an aerobic environment led to multi-cellular metazoan organisms, with evolutionary-selected genes to form extracellular matrices, stem cells, stem cell niches, and a family of gap junction or “connexin” genes. These germinal and somatic stem cells responded to extracellular signals that triggered intra-cellular signaling to regulate specific genes out of the total genome. These extra-cellular induced intra-cellular signals also modulated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in order to regulate the new cellular functions of symmetrical and asymmetrical cell division, cell differentiation, modes of cell death, and senescence. Within the hierarchical and cybernetic concepts, differentiated by neurons organized in the brain of the Homo sapiens, the conscious mind led to language, abstract ideas, technology, myth-making, scientific reasoning, and moral decision–making, i.e., the creation of culture. Over thousands of years, this has created the current collision between biological and cultural evolution, leading to the global “metabolic disease” crisis. PMID:27314399

  2. Evolution of Microbial Quorum Sensing to Human Global Quorum Sensing: An Insight into How Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Might Be Linked to the Global Metabolic Disease Crisis.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2016-06-15

    The first anaerobic organism extracted energy for survival and reproduction from its source of nutrients, with the genetic means to ensure protection of its individual genome but also its species survival. While it had a means to communicate with its community via simple secreted molecules ("quorum sensing"), the eventual shift to an aerobic environment led to multi-cellular metazoan organisms, with evolutionary-selected genes to form extracellular matrices, stem cells, stem cell niches, and a family of gap junction or "connexin" genes. These germinal and somatic stem cells responded to extracellular signals that triggered intra-cellular signaling to regulate specific genes out of the total genome. These extra-cellular induced intra-cellular signals also modulated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in order to regulate the new cellular functions of symmetrical and asymmetrical cell division, cell differentiation, modes of cell death, and senescence. Within the hierarchical and cybernetic concepts, differentiated by neurons organized in the brain of the Homo sapiens, the conscious mind led to language, abstract ideas, technology, myth-making, scientific reasoning, and moral decision-making, i.e., the creation of culture. Over thousands of years, this has created the current collision between biological and cultural evolution, leading to the global "metabolic disease" crisis.

  3. Gap junctional intercellular communication as a biological "Rosetta stone" in understanding, in a systems biological manner, stem cell behavior, mechanisms of epigenetic toxicology, chemoprevention and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2007-08-01

    In spite of the early speculation by Loewenstein that one of the critical distinguishing phenotypes of cancers from normal cells was the dysfunction of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), this hypothesis has not captured the attention of most birth defects and cancer researchers. Moreover, even with later demonstrations that factors that influence normal development and carcinogenesis by modulating GJIC, such as chemical teratogens and tumor-promoting chemicals, inflammatory factors, hormones and growth factors, antisense connexin genes, knockout mouse models, human inherited mutated connexin genes, si-connexin RNA, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic chemicals, it is rare that one sees any reference to these studies by the mainstream investigators in these fields. Based on the assumption that the evolutionarily conserved connexin genes found in metazoans are needed for normal development and the maintenance of health and T. Dobzhansky's statement "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution," a short review of the roles of endogenous and exogenous modulators of GJIC will be made in the context of the multistage, multimechanism process of carcinogenesis, the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis, the discovery and characterization of normal adult stem "cancer stem" cells and the observation that two distinct classes of GJIC-deficient cancer cells are known. The implications of these observations to a "systems biological" view of the role of gap junctions and the nutritional prevention and treatment of several chronic diseases and cancer will be discussed.

  4. The electrotonic location of low-resistance intercellular junctions between a pair of giant neurones in the snail Lymnaea.

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, P R; Pilkington, J B

    1986-01-01

    The passive electrotonic properties of neurones VD1 and RPD2 in the brain of the snail Lymnaea can be represented by a soma-finite cable model with closed-circuit axon termination. There is a considerable individual variation in input resistance, membrane time constant, electrotonic length and axon-soma conductance ratio, but the average values for these parameters are similar in the two neurones. The cells are tightly coupled by an electrotonic synapse giving an average steady-state coupling coefficient of 0.68 and an average resistance measured between recording sites in the cell bodies of 20 M omega. Calculations using a model consisting of a symmetrical pair of cells with standard values for the electrotonic parameters show that in this system, for a soma-soma resistance of 20 M omega, the junction cannot be more than 0.16 length constants from the cell bodies. Reduction in coupling due to membrane current losses in such short proximal axon segments is insignificant. Intra-axonal recordings indicate that most of the coupling resistance is located at the junction between VD1 and RPD2, which must therefore be closer to the cell bodies than the limiting value of 0.16 length constants assuming an electrical equivalent model which includes the standard electrotonic parameters. If all the soma-soma resistance is located at the junction, then it could be physically a single array of gap-junction particles. Despite its low conductance (1/20 M omega = 50 nS) and possibly small physical dimensions, the electrotonic synapse is more than sufficient to ensure spike synchrony in the two cells. PMID:3958976

  5. The β-actin mRNA zipcode regulates epithelial adherens junction assembly but not maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Natasha; Eromobor, Itua; Petrie, Ryan J.; Vedula, Pavan; Cruz, Lissette; Rodriguez, Alexis J.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cell-cell contact stimulates actin cytoskeleton remodeling to down-regulate branched filament polymerization-driven lamellar protrusion and subsequently to assemble linear actin filaments required for E-cadherin anchoring during adherens junction complex assembly. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that de novo protein synthesis, the β-actin 3′ UTR, and the β-actin mRNA zipcode are required for epithelial adherens junction complex assembly but not maintenance. Specifically, we demonstrate that perturbing cell-cell contact-localized β-actin monomer synthesis causes epithelial adherens junction assembly defects. Consequently, inhibiting β-actin mRNA zipcode/ZBP1 interactions with β-actin mRNA zipcode antisense oligonucleotides, to intentionally delocalize β-actin monomer synthesis, is sufficient to perturb adherens junction assembly following epithelial cell-cell contact. Additionally, we demonstrate active RhoA, the signal required to drive zipcode-mediated β-actin mRNA targeting, is localized at epithelial cell-cell contact sites in a β-actin mRNA zipcode-dependent manner. Moreover, chemically inhibiting Src kinase activity prevents the local stimulation of β-actin monomer synthesis at cell-cell contact sites while inhibiting epithelial adherens junction assembly. Together, these data demonstrate that epithelial cell-cell contact stimulates β-actin mRNA zipcode-mediated monomer synthesis to spatially regulate actin filament remodeling, thereby controlling adherens junction assembly to modulate cell and tissue adhesion. PMID:24681968

  6. Modulation of intercellular junctions by cyclic-ADT peptides as a method to reversibly increase blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Laksitorini, Marlyn D; Kiptoo, Paul K; On, Ngoc H; Thliveris, James A; Miller, Donald W; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2015-03-01

    It is challenging to deliver molecules to the brain for diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases. This is primarily because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts the entry of many molecules into the brain. In this study, cyclic-ADT peptides (ADTC1, ADTC5, and ADTC6) have been shown to modify the BBB to enhance the delivery of marker molecules [e.g., (14) C-mannitol, gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentacetate (Gd-DTPA)] to the brain via the paracellular pathways of the BBB. The hypothesis is that these peptides modulate cadherin interactions in the adherens junctions of the vascular endothelial cells forming the BBB to increase paracellular drug permeation. In vitro studies indicated that ADTC5 had the best profile to inhibit adherens junction resealing in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.3 mM) with a maximal response at 0.4 mM. Under the current experimental conditions, ADTC5 improved the delivery of (14) C-mannitol to the brain about twofold compared with the negative control in the in situ rat brain perfusion model. Furthermore, ADTC5 peptide increased in vivo delivery of Gd-DTPA to the brain of Balb/c mice when administered intravenously. In conclusion, ADTC5 has the potential to improve delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to the brain.

  7. Modulation of Intercellular Junctions by Cyclic-ADT Peptides as a Method to Reversibly Increase Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Laksitorini, Marlyn D.; Kiptoo, Paul K.; On, Ngoc H.; Thliveris, James A.; Miller, Donald W.; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2015-01-01

    It is challenging to deliver molecules to the brain for diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases. This is primarily due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts the entry of many molecules into the brain. In this study, cyclic ADT peptides (ADTC1, ADTC5, and ADTC6) have been shown to modify the BBB to enhance the delivery of marker molecules (e.g., 14C-mannitol, Gd-DTPA) to the brain via the paracellular pathways of the BBB. The hypothesis is that these peptides modulate cadherin interactions in the adherens junctions of the vascular endothelial cells forming the BBB to increase paracellular drug permeation. In vitro studies indicated that ADTC5 had the best profile to inhibit adherens junction resealing in MDCK cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.3 mM) with a maximal response at 0.4 mM. Under the current experimental conditions, ADTC5 improved the delivery of 14C-mannitol to the brain about twofold compared to the negative control in the in situ rat brain perfusion model. Furthermore, ADTC5 peptide increased in vivo delivery of Gd-DTPA to the brain of Balb/c mice when administered intravenously (i.v.). In conclusion, ADTC5 has the potential to improve delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to the brain. PMID:25640479

  8. Assembly of the Escherichia coli RuvABC resolvasome directs the orientation of Holliday junction resolution

    PubMed Central

    van Gool, Alain J.; Hajibagheri, Nasser M.A.; Stasiak, Andrzej; West, Stephen C.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic recombination can lead to the formation of intermediates in which DNA molecules are linked by Holliday junctions. Movement of a junction along DNA, by a process known as branch migration, leads to heteroduplex formation, whereas resolution of a junction completes the recombination process. Holliday junctions can be resolved in either of two ways, yielding products in which there has, or has not, been an exchange of flanking markers. The ratio of these products is thought to be determined by the frequency with which the two isomeric forms (conformers) of the Holliday junction are cleaved. Recent studies with enzymes that process Holliday junctions in Escherichia coli, the RuvABC proteins, however, indicate that protein binding causes the junction to adopt an open square-planar configuration. Within such a structure, DNA isomerization can have little role in determining the orientation of resolution. To determine the role that junction-specific protein assembly has in determining resolution bias, a defined in vitro system was developed in which we were able to direct the assembly of the RuvABC resolvasome. We found that the bias toward resolution in one orientation or the other was determined simply by the way in which the Ruv proteins were positioned on the junction. Additionally, we provide evidence that supports current models on RuvABC action in which Holliday junction resolution occurs as the resolvasome promotes branch migration. PMID:10421637

  9. ASSEMBLY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 8-ARM AND 12-ARM DNA BRANCHED JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules can be assembled into objects and networks directed by sticky-ended cohesion. The connectivity of these species is limited by the number of arms flanking the branch point. To date, the only branched junctions constructed contain six or fewer arms. We report the construction of DNA branched junctions that contain either 8 or 12 double helical arms surrounding a branch point. The design of the 8-arm junction expoits the limits of a previous approach to thwart branch migration, but the design of the 12-arm junction uses a new to principle achieve this end. The 8-arm junction is stable with 16 nucleotide pairs per arm, but the 12-arm junction has been stabilized by 24 nucleotide pairs per arm. Ferguson analysis of these junctions in combination with three, four, five, and six-arm junctions indicates a linear increase in friction constant as the number of arms increases; the four-arm junction migrates anomalously at 4°C., suggesting stacking of its domains. All strands in both the 8-arm and 12-arm junctions show similar responses to hydroxyl radical autofootprinting analysis, indicating that they lack any dominant stacking structures. The stability of the 12-arm junction demonstrates that the number of arms in a junction is not limited to the case of having adjacent identical base pairs flanking the junction. The ability to construct eight-arm and twelve-arm junctions increases the number of objects, graphs and networks that can be built from branched DNA components. In principle, the stick structure corresponding to cubic close packing is now a possible target for assembly by DNA nanotechnology. PMID:17564446

  10. The NLRP3 Inflammasome Is a Pathogen Sensor for Invasive Entamoeba histolytica via Activation of α5β1 Integrin at the Macrophage-Amebae Intercellular Junction.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Leanne; Moreau, France; Cornick, Steve; Chadee, Kris

    2015-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) is an extracellular protozoan parasite of humans that invades the colon to cause life-threatening intestinal and extra-intestinal amebiasis. Colonized Eh is asymptomatic, however, when trophozoites adhere to host cells there is a considerable inflammatory response that is critical in the pathogenesis of amebiasis. The host and/or parasite factors that trigger the inflammatory response to invading Eh are not well understood. We recently identified that Eh adherence to macrophages induces inflammasome activation and in the present study we sought to determine the molecular events upon contact that coordinates this response. Here we report that Eh contact-dependent activation of α5β1 integrin is critical for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Eh-macrophage contact triggered recruitment of α5β1 integrin and NLRP3 into the intercellular junction, where α5β1 integrin underwent activation by an integrin-binding cysteine protease on the parasite surface, termed EhCP5. As a result of its activation, α5β1 integrin induced ATP release into the extracellular space through opening of pannexin-1 channels that signalled through P2X7 receptors to deliver a critical co-stimulatory signal that activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. Both the cysteine protease activity and integrin-binding domain of EhCP5 were required to trigger α5β1 integrin that led to ATP release and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. These findings reveal engagement of α5β1 integrin across the parasite-host junction is a key regulatory step that initiates robust inflammatory responses to Eh. We propose that α5β1 integrin distinguishes Eh direct contact and functions with NLRP3 as pathogenicity sensor for invasive Eh infection.

  11. Reversal of the TPA-induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication by Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extracts: effects on MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Ran; Park, Joon-Suk; Jo, Eun-Hye; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Kim, Sun-Jung; Ra, Jeong-Chan; Aruoma, Okezie I; Lee, Yong-Soon; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2006-01-01

    Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has continued to receive attention as a folk medicine with indications for the treatment of cancers and digestive diseases. The anticarcinogenic effect of Chaga mushroom extract was investigated using a model system of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in WB-F344 normal rat liver epithelial cells. The cells were pre-incubated with Chaga mushroom extracts (5, 10, 20 microg/ml) for 24 h and this was followed by co-treatment with Chaga mushroom extracts and TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, 10 ng/ml) for 1 h. The inhibition of GJIC by TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), promoter of cancer, was prevented with treatment of Chaga mushroom extracts. Similarly, the increased phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38 protein kinases were markedly reduced in Chaga mushroom extracts-treated cells. There was no change in the JNK kinase protein level, suggesting that Chaga mushroom extracts could only block the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase. The Chaga mushroom extracts further prevented the inhibition of GJIC through the blocking of Cx43 phosphorylation. Indeed cell-to-cell communication through gap junctional channels is a critical factor in the life and death balance of cells because GJIC has an important function in maintaining tissue homeostasis through the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and adaptive functions of differentiated cells. Thus Chaga mushroom may act as a natural anticancer product by preventing the inhibition of GJIC through the inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase.

  12. The NLRP3 Inflammasome Is a Pathogen Sensor for Invasive Entamoeba histolytica via Activation of α5β1 Integrin at the Macrophage-Amebae Intercellular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Leanne; Moreau, France; Cornick, Steve; Chadee, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) is an extracellular protozoan parasite of humans that invades the colon to cause life-threatening intestinal and extra-intestinal amebiasis. Colonized Eh is asymptomatic, however, when trophozoites adhere to host cells there is a considerable inflammatory response that is critical in the pathogenesis of amebiasis. The host and/or parasite factors that trigger the inflammatory response to invading Eh are not well understood. We recently identified that Eh adherence to macrophages induces inflammasome activation and in the present study we sought to determine the molecular events upon contact that coordinates this response. Here we report that Eh contact-dependent activation of α5β1 integrin is critical for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Eh-macrophage contact triggered recruitment of α5β1 integrin and NLRP3 into the intercellular junction, where α5β1 integrin underwent activation by an integrin-binding cysteine protease on the parasite surface, termed EhCP5. As a result of its activation, α5β1 integrin induced ATP release into the extracellular space through opening of pannexin-1 channels that signalled through P2X7 receptors to deliver a critical co-stimulatory signal that activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. Both the cysteine protease activity and integrin-binding domain of EhCP5 were required to trigger α5β1 integrin that led to ATP release and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. These findings reveal engagement of α5β1 integrin across the parasite-host junction is a key regulatory step that initiates robust inflammatory responses to Eh. We propose that α5β1 integrin distinguishes Eh direct contact and functions with NLRP3 as pathogenicity sensor for invasive Eh infection. PMID:25955828

  13. Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Rakib, Md. Abdur; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Gon Sup; Han, Jae Hee; Kim, Jeong Ok

    2013-01-01

    The major conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers, c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA, have anticancer effects; however, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Evidence suggests that reversal of reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces cell death. Hence, we determined that CLA isomers enhance GJIC in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. The CLA isomers significantly enhanced GJIC of MCF-7 cells at 40 μM concentration, whereas CLA inhibited cell growth and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. CLA increased connexin43 (Cx43) expression both at the transcriptional and translational levels. CLA inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. No significant difference was observed in the efficacy of c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA. These results suggest that the anticancer effect of CLA is associated with upregulation of GJIC mediated by enhanced Cx43 expression through inactivation of NF-κB and generation of ROS in MCF-7 cells. PMID:24371460

  14. Red paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) and its main carotenoids, capsanthin and β-carotene, prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of gap-junction intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Woo-Moon; Rhee, Han Cheol; Kim, Suna

    2016-07-25

    This study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of red paprika extract (RPE) and its main carotenoids, namely, capsanthin (CST) and β-carotene (BCT), on the H2O2-induced inhibition of gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells (WB cells). We found that pre-treatment with RPE, CST and BCT protected WB cells from H2O2-induced inhibition of GJIC. RPE, CST and BCT not only recovered connexin 43 (Cx43) mRNA expression but also prevented phosphorylation of Cx43 protein by H2O2 treatment. RPE attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK, whereas pre-treatment with CST and BCT only attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 and did not affect JNK in H2O2-treated WB cells. RPE, CST and BCT significantly suppressed the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in H2O2-treated cells compared to untreated WB cells. These results suggest that dietary intake of red paprika might be helpful for lowering the risk of diseases caused by oxidative stress.

  15. Surface-modified PLGA nanosphere with chitosan improved pulmonary delivery of calcitonin by mucoadhesion and opening of the intercellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Kuno, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Shohei; Takeuchi, Hirofumi; Kawashima, Yoshiaki

    2005-02-02

    Surface-modified DL-lactide/glycolide copolymer (PLGA) nanospheres with chitosan (CS) were prepared by the emulsion solvent diffusion method for pulmonary delivery of peptide, i.e., elcatonin. The nanosphere suspension was successfully aerosolized with a nebulizer similar to the drug solution, whereas the microsphere suspensions could not be aerosolized. After pulmonary administration, CS-modified PLGA nanospheres were more slowly eliminated from the lungs than unmodified PLGA nanospheres. CS-modified PLGA nanospheres loaded with elcatonin reduced blood calcium levels to 80% of the initial calcium concentration and prolonged the pharmacological action to 24 h, which was a significantly longer duration of action than that by CS-unmodified nanospheres. These results were attributed to the retention of nanospheres adhered to the bronchial mucus and lung tissue and sustained drug release at the adherence site. In addition, CS and CS on the surface of the nanospheres enhanced the absorption of drug. The rank order of the absorption of the model drugs with CS solution was carboxyfluorescein>FITC-dextran-4 (FD-4; Mw. 4000)>FD-21 (Mw. 21,000)>FD70 (Mw. 70,000), which corresponded to the molecular weights ([Mw.] given in parentheses). The absorption-enhancing effect may have been caused by opening the intercellular tight junctions.

  16. Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by tumor-promoting organic peroxides and protection by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Upham, Brad L; Guzvić, Miodrag; Scott, Jacob; Carbone, Joseph M; Blaha, Ludek; Coe, Chad; Li, Lan Lan; Rummel, Alisa M; Trosko, James E

    2007-01-01

    Dicumyl peroxide (di-CuOOH) and benzoyl peroxide (BzOOH) act as tumor promoters in SENCAR mice, whereas di-tert-butylhydroperoxide does not. Tumor promotion requires the removal of growth suppression by inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the induction of mitogenic intracellular pathways. We showed that di-CuOOH and BzOOH both reversibly inhibited GJIC and transiently activated mitogen-activated protein kinase, specifically, the extracellular receptor kinase at noncytotoxic conditions in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells, whereas the non-tumor-promoting di-tert-butylhydroperoxide did not inhibit GJIC or activate extracellular receptor kinase. di-CuOOH but not BzOOH inhibited GJIC through a phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C-dependent mechanism. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was needed to prevent a cytotoxic, glutathione-depleting effect of BzOOH, whereas di-CuOOH was noncytotoxic and did not alter glutathione levels at all doses and times tested. Pretreatment of WB-F344 cells with resveratrol, a polyphenolic antioxidant present in red wine, prevented at physiological doses the inhibition of GJIC by di-CuOOH but not from BzOOH and was effective in significantly preventing extracellular receptor kinase activation by both peroxides. NAC did not prevent any of the peroxide effects on either GJIC or extracellular receptor kinase, suggesting a specific antioxidant effect of resveratrol.

  17. Neuropeptide Y, substance P, and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 stimulate human osteoblast osteogenic activity by enhancing gap junction intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Ma, W.H.; Liu, Y.J.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Bone homeostasis seems to be controlled by delicate and subtle “cross talk” between the nervous system and “osteo-neuromediators” that control bone remodeling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of interactions between neuropeptides and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP2) on human osteoblasts. We also investigated the effects of neuropeptides and hBMP2 on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Osteoblasts were treated with neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), or hBMP2 at three concentrations. At various intervals after treatment, cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. In addition, cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin were determined by colorimetric assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The effects of NPY, SP and hBMP on GJIC were determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The viability of cells treated with neuropeptides and hBMP2 increased significantly in a time-dependent manner, but was inversely associated with the concentration of the treatments. ALP activity and osteocalcin were both reduced in osteoblasts exposed to the combination of neuropeptides and hBMP2. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly increased by the neuropeptides and hBMP2. These results suggest that osteoblast activity is increased by neuropeptides and hBMP2 through increased GJIC. Identification of the GJIC-mediated signal transduction capable of modulating the cellular activities of bone cells represents a novel approach to studying the biology of skeletal innervation. PMID:25714881

  18. All-trans retinoic acid restores gap junctional intercellular communication between oral cancer cells with upregulation of Cx32 and Cx43 expressions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Dai, Yaohui; Huang, Yulei; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Hong, Yun; Xia, Juan; Cheng, Bin

    2013-07-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been demonstrated to inhibit tumor growth by restoration of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) via upregulation of connexin (Cx) expression in some solid tumors. However, the relationship between ATRA and GJIC remains unclear in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ATRA on the GJIC function of OSCC. We measured the effects of ATRA on the viability and cell cycle distribution of SCC9 and Tca8113 OSCC cells. The GJIC function was observed using the scrape-loading dye transfer technique, and the mRNA and protein levels of Cx32 and Cx43 were detected by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assays. ATRA inhibited the growth of OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P <0.05) and caused cell cycle arrest. ATRA-treated cells showed a 2.69-fold and 2.06-fold enhancement of GJIC in SCC9 and Tca8113 cells, respectively (P <0.05). Moreover, ATRA induced upregulation of Cx32 and Cx43 at both the mRNA and protein levels in OSCC cells. Our results indicated that restoration of GJIC via enhanced Cx32 and Cx43 expression might serve as a novel mechanism for the anti-tumor effect of ATRA in OSCC.

  19. Inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by cyanobacterial extracts--indications of novel tumor-promoting cyanotoxins?

    PubMed

    Bláha, Ludĕk; Babica, Pavel; Hilscherová, Klára; Upham, Brad L

    2010-01-01

    Toxicity and liver tumor promotion of cyanotoxins microcystins have been extensively studied. However, recent studies document that other metabolites present in the complex cyanobacterial water blooms may also have adverse health effects. In this study we used rat liver epithelial stem-like cells (WB-F344) to examine the effects of cyanobacterial extracts on two established markers of tumor promotion, inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) - ERK1/2. Extracts of cyanobacteria (laboratory cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and water blooms dominated by these species) inhibited GJIC and activated MAPKs in a dose-dependent manner (effective concentrations ranging 0.5-5mgd.w./mL). Effects were independent of the microcystin content and the strongest responses were elicited by the extracts of Aphanizomenon sp. Neither pure microcystin-LR nor cylindrospermopsin inhibited GJIC or activated MAPKs. Modulations of GJIC and MAPKs appeared to be specific to cyanobacterial extracts since extracts from green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, heterotrophic bacterium Klebsiella terrigena, and isolated bacterial lipopolysaccharides had no comparable effects. Our study provides the first evidence on the existence of unknown cyanobacterial toxic metabolites that affect in vitro biomarkers of tumor promotion, i.e. inhibition of GJIC and activation of MAPKs.

  20. Inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by cyanobacterial extracts - indications of novel tumor promoting cyanotoxins?

    PubMed Central

    Bláha, Luděk; Babica, Pavel; Hilscherová, Klára; Upham, Brad L.

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity and liver tumor promotion of cyanotoxins microcystins have been extensively studied. However, recent studies document that other metabolites present in the complex cyanobacterial water blooms may also have adverse health effects. In this study we used rat liver epithelial stem-like cells (WB-F344) to examine the effects of cyanobacterial extracts on two established markers of tumor promotion, inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) – ERK1/2. Extracts of cyanobacteria (laboratory cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and water blooms dominated by these species) inhibited GJIC and activated MAPKs in a dose-dependent manner (effective concentrations ranging 0.5 - 5 mg d.w./mL). Effects were independent of the microcystin content and the strongest responses were elicited by the extracts of Aphanizomenon sp. Neither pure microcystin-LR nor cylindrospermopsin inhibited GJIC or activated MAPKs. Modulations of GJIC and MAPKs appeared to be specific to cyanobacterial extracts since extracts from green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, heterotrophic bacterium Klebsiella terrigena, and isolated bacterial lipopolysaccharides had no comparable effects. Our study provides the first evidence on the existence of unknown cyanobacterial toxic metabolites that affect in vitro biomarkers of tumor promotion, i.e. inhibition of GJIC and activation of MAPKs. PMID:19619572

  1. Inhibition of gap junctional Intercellular communication in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells by triphenyltin chloride through MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Organotin compounds (OTCs) have been widely used as stabilizers in the production of plastic, agricultural pesticides, antifoulant plaints and wood preservation. The toxicity of triphenyltin (TPT) compounds was known for their embryotoxic, neurotoxic, genotoxic and immunotoxic effects in mammals. The carcinogenicity of TPT was not well understood and few studies had discussed the effects of OTCs on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) of cells. Method In the present study, the effects of triphenyltin chloride (TPTC) on GJIC in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells were evaluated, using the scrape-loading dye transfer technique. Results TPTC inhibited GJIC after a 30-min exposure in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Pre-incubation of cells with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor did not modify the response, but the specific MEK 1 inhibitor PD98059 and PI3K inhibitor LY294002 decreased substantially the inhibition of GJIC by TPTC. After WB-F344 cells were exposed to TPTC, phosphorylation of Cx43 increased as seen in Western blot analysis. Conclusions These results show that TPTC inhibits GJIC in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells by altering the Cx43 protein expression through both MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways. PMID:20591183

  2. CFTR in a lipid raft-TNFR1 complex modulates gap junctional intercellular communication and IL-8 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Dudez, Tecla; Borot, Florence; Huang, Song; Kwak, Brenda R.; Bacchetta, Marc; Ollero, Mario; Stanton, Bruce A.; Chanson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause a chronic inflammatory response in the lung of patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). We have showed that TNF-α signaling through the Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) was defective as determined by an inability of TNF-α to regulate gap junctional communication (GJIC) in CF cells. Here, we sought to elucidate the mechanisms linking TNF-α signaling to the functions of CFTR at the molecular level. In a MDCKI epithelial cell model expressing wild-type (WtCFTR) or mutant CFTR lacking its PDZ-interacting motif (CFTR-ΔTRL), TNF-α increased the amount of WtCFTR but not CFTR-ΔTRL in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs). This recruitment was modulated by SFK activity and associated with DRM localization of TNFR1 and c-Src. Activation of TNFR1 signaling also decreased GJIC and markedly stimulated IL-8 production in WtCFTR cells. In contrast, the absence of CFTR in DRMs was associated with abnormal TNFR1 signaling as revealed by no recruitment of TNFR1 and c-Src to lipid rafts in CFTR-ΔTRL cells and loss of regulation of GJIC and IL-8 secretion. These results suggest that localization of CFTR in lipid rafts in association with c-Src and TNFR1 provides a responsive signaling complex to regulate GJIC and cytokine signaling. PMID:18255040

  3. Possible anti-tumour-promoting activity of components in Japanese soybean fermented food, Natto: effect on gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, C; Kikuchi, N; Katou, N; Miki, T; Yanagida, F; Umeda, M

    1995-03-01

    In order to detect any protective agent against tumor formation, we examined the anti-tumor-promoting effect of a Japanese traditional soybean fermented food, Natto. Dye transfer was employed as an assay method. When fluorescent dye was microinjected into cultured BALB/3T3 cells, the dye was transformed into the neighboring cells through the gap junction. This dye transfer was blocked by the treatment with the tumor promoters 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a high concentration of NaCl and lithocholic acid (LCA). This reduction of the dye transfer by TPA treatment was not observed when the cells were pretreated with retinoic acid, an anti-tumor promoter. Thus, the recovery of the dye transfer in TPA-treated BALB/3T3 cells was proven to ge a good indicator for detecting some possible anti-tumor promoters. After extraction and fractionation of Natto, we obtained an active fraction (H1) which showed recovery of the dye transfer in TPA-treated cells. The fraction contained straight-chain saturated hydrocarbons. A comparison of the fraction and the authentic samples by GC analysis suggests that the H1 fraction contained straight-chain saturated hydrocarbons from around C30 to C32. Among these hydrocarbons, hentriacontane (C31) was found at the highest concentrations, and was shown to have the highest activity. Hentriacontane at a very low concentration of 0.65 ng/ml was shown to recover the dye transfer inhibited by the treatment with TPA as well as with NaCl and LCA.

  4. Differential pathways of claudin oligomerization and integration into tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Koval, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Tight junctions are the critical intercellular structure required to establish an epithelial barrier. Among the several classes of proteins required to form tight junctions are the tetraspan transmembrane proteins known as claudins that directly determine paracellular permeability. Considerable progress has been made in understanding how incorporation of different claudins into tight junctions increase or decrease paracellular permeability and ion selectivity. However, it has proven difficult to identify discrete steps in claudin assembly and whether claudins exist in distinct oligomerization states prior to tight junction assembly. Studies of homomeric and heteromeric claudin-claudin interactions using complementary techniques suggest a diversity of pathways used by different claudins to oligomerize and integrate into tight junctions.

  5. Collective cell guidance by cooperative intercellular forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Corey Hardin, C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Rajendran, Kavitha; Park, Chan Young; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Zhou, Enhua H.; Zaman, Muhammad H.; Butler, James P.; Weitz, David A.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Trepat, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    Cells comprising a tissue migrate as part of a collective. How collective processes are coordinated over large multi-cellular assemblies has remained unclear, however, because mechanical stresses exerted at cell-cell junctions have not been accessible experimentally. We report here maps of these stresses within and between cells comprising a monolayer. Within the cell sheet there arise unanticipated fluctuations of mechanical stress that are severe, emerge spontaneously, and ripple across the monolayer. Within that stress landscape, local cellular migrations follow local orientations of maximal principal stress. Migrations of both endothelial and epithelial monolayers conform to this behaviour, as do breast cancer cell lines before but not after the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Collective migration in these diverse systems is seen to be governed by a simple but unifying physiological principle: neighbouring cells join forces to transmit appreciable normal stress across the cell-cell junction, but migrate along orientations of minimal intercellular shear stress.

  6. Ascorbic acid 6-palmitate suppresses gap-junctional intercellular communication through phosphorylation of connexin 43 via activation of the MEK-ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Mi; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2009-01-15

    Although the health benefits of dietary antioxidants have been extensively studied, their potential negative effects remain unclear. L-Ascorbic acid 6-palmitate (AAP), a synthetic derivative of ascorbic acid (AA), is widely used as an antioxidant and preservative in foods, vitamins, drugs, and cosmetics. Previously, we found that AA exerted an antitumor effect by protecting inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), which is closely associated with tumor progression. In this study, we examined whether AAP, an amphipathic derivative of AA, has chemopreventive effects using a GJIC model. AAP and AA exhibited dose-dependent free radical-scavenging activities and inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in normal rat liver epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, however, AAP did not protect against the inhibition of GJIC induced by H(2)O(2); instead, it inhibited GJIC synergistically with H(2)O(2). AAP inhibited GJIC in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. This inhibitory effect was not due to the conjugated lipid structure of AAP, as treatment with palmitic acid alone failed to inhibit GJIC under the same conditions. The inhibition of GJIC by AAP was restored in the presence of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, but not in the presence of other signal inhibitors and antioxidant (PKC inhibitors, EGFR inhibitor, NADPH oxidase inhibitor, catalase, vitamin E, or AA), indicating the critical involvement of MEK signaling in the GJIC inhibitory activity of AAP. Phosphorylation of ERK and connexin 43 (Cx43) was observed following AAP treatment, and this was reversed by U0126. These results suggest that the AAP-induced inhibition of GJIC is mediated by the phosphorylation of Cx43 via activation of the MEK-ERK pathway. Taken together, our results indicate that AAP has a potent carcinogenic effect, and that the influence of dietary

  7. Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication in normal human breast epithelial cells after treatment with pesticides, PCBs, and PBBs, alone or in mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, K S; Wilson, M R; Hayashi, T; Chang, C C; Trosko, J E

    1996-01-01

    Chemical pollutants in the Great Lakes have found their way through the food chain into humans because of their environmental persistence and lipophilicity. Some epidemiological studies have claimed an association between metabolites of 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDT), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and breast cancer, but others have reported no such association. We examined various halogenated hydrocarbons for their capacity to inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in normal human breast epithelial cells (HBEC) when given as single compounds or as mixtures. The scrape-loading/dye transfer and fluorescent redistribution after photobleaching techniques were used to measure GJIC; immunostaining and Western and Northern analyses were performed on connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction protein and message to determine how halogenated hydrocarbons might affect GJIC. DDT, dieldrin, and toxaphene inhibited GJIC in a dose-responsive manner after 90 min treatments. Dieldrin suppressed GJIC within 30 min with no recovery after 24 hr. Inhibition of GJIC by DDT and toxaphene was partially restored after 12 hr and fully restored after 24 hr. Several PCB and PBB congeners inhibited GJIC in a dose-responsive and time-dependent manner, but GJIC was almost restored to control values 24 hr after exposure. The highest concentrations of the individual chemicals that did not inhibit GJIC was determined, and mixtures containing two of these chemicals were tested for their ability to inhibit GJIC. Significant inhibition of GJIC was observed when cells were treated with a mixture of DDT and 2,4,5-hexachlorobiphenyl (2,4,5-HCB), dieldrin and 2,4,5-HCB, or dieldrin and 2,4,5-hexabromobiphenyl (2,4,5-HBB). These results indicate that halogenated hydrocarbons, alone or in specific combinations, can alter GJIC at the post-translational level. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that DDT, dieldrin, toxaphene, 2

  8. Attenuating negative differential resistance in an electroactive self-assembled monolayer-based junction.

    PubMed

    Wassel, Ronald A; Credo, Grace M; Fuierer, Ryan R; Feldheim, Daniel L; Gorman, Christopher B

    2004-01-14

    The negative differential resistance (NDR) peak current observed in redox active self-assembled monolayer-based molecular junctions has been attenuated by controlling the composition of the molecular junction. Two approaches studied here include capping the electroactive ferrocenyl groups with beta-cyclodextrin and functionalizing the scanning tunneling microscope tip used to probe the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with n-alkanethiols of different lengths. These are the first examples of systematic modification of the magnitude of the NDR response in a molecule-based system.

  9. Plakophilin 3 mediates Rap1-dependent desmosome assembly and adherens junction maturation

    PubMed Central

    Todorovic´, Viktor; Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Godsel, Lisa M.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The pathways driving desmosome and adherens junction assembly are temporally and spatially coordinated, but how they are functionally coupled is poorly understood. Here we show that the Armadillo protein plakophilin 3 (Pkp3) mediates both desmosome assembly and E-cadherin maturation through Rap1 GTPase, thus functioning in a manner distinct from the closely related plakophilin 2 (Pkp2). Whereas Pkp2 and Pkp3 share the ability to mediate the initial phase of desmoplakin (DP) accumulation at sites of cell–cell contact, they play distinct roles in later steps: Pkp3 is required for assembly of a cytoplasmic population of DP-enriched junction precursors, whereas Pkp2 is required for transfer of the precursors to the membrane. Moreover, Pkp3 forms a complex with Rap1 GTPase, promoting its activation and facilitating desmosome assembly. We show further that Pkp3 deficiency causes disruption of an E-cadherin/Rap1 complex required for adherens junction sealing. These findings reveal Pkp3 as a coordinator of desmosome and adherens junction assembly and maturation through its functional association with Rap1. PMID:25208567

  10. Plakophilin 3 mediates Rap1-dependent desmosome assembly and adherens junction maturation.

    PubMed

    Todorovic, Viktor; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Godsel, Lisa M; Green, Kathleen J

    2014-11-15

    The pathways driving desmosome and adherens junction assembly are temporally and spatially coordinated, but how they are functionally coupled is poorly understood. Here we show that the Armadillo protein plakophilin 3 (Pkp3) mediates both desmosome assembly and E-cadherin maturation through Rap1 GTPase, thus functioning in a manner distinct from the closely related plakophilin 2 (Pkp2). Whereas Pkp2 and Pkp3 share the ability to mediate the initial phase of desmoplakin (DP) accumulation at sites of cell-cell contact, they play distinct roles in later steps: Pkp3 is required for assembly of a cytoplasmic population of DP-enriched junction precursors, whereas Pkp2 is required for transfer of the precursors to the membrane. Moreover, Pkp3 forms a complex with Rap1 GTPase, promoting its activation and facilitating desmosome assembly. We show further that Pkp3 deficiency causes disruption of an E-cadherin/Rap1 complex required for adherens junction sealing. These findings reveal Pkp3 as a coordinator of desmosome and adherens junction assembly and maturation through its functional association with Rap1.

  11. Kinase programs spatiotemporally regulate gap junction assembly and disassembly: effects on wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Solan, Joell L.; Lampe, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are highly ordered plasma membrane domains that are constantly assembled, remodeled and turned over due to the short half-life of connexins, the integral membrane proteins that form gap junctions. Connexin 43 (Cx43), by far the most widely expressed connexin, is phosphorylated at multiple serine residues in the cytoplasmic, C-terminal region allowing for exquisite cellular control over gap junctional communication. This is evident during epidermal wounding where spatiotemporal changes in connexin expression occur as cells are instructed whether to die, proliferate or migrate to promote repair. Early gap junctional communication is required for initiation of keratinocyte migration, but accelerated Cx43 turnover is also critical for proper wound healing at later stages. These events are controlled via a "kinase program" where sequential phosphorylation of Cx43 leads to reductions in Cx43’s half-life and significant depletion of gap junctions from the plasma membrane within several hours. The complex regulation of gap junction assembly and turnover affords several steps where intervention might speed wound healing. PMID:26706150

  12. Lack of tumor-promoting effects of flavonoids: studies on rat liver preneoplastic foci and on in vivo and in vitro gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Chaumontet, C; Suschetet, M; Honikman-Leban, E; Krutovskikh, V A; Berges, R; Le Bon, A M; Heberden, C; Shahin, M M; Yamasaki, H; Martel, P

    1996-01-01

    Possible tumor-promoting activity of four flavonoids, quercetin (QC), tangeretin (TG), flavone (FO), and flavanone (FN), was examined in a rat liver short-term carcinogenesis assay as well as with in vivo and in vitro assays of inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Rat hepatocarcinogenesis was induced by aflatoxin B1 treatment followed by a selection phase (2-acetylaminofluorene treatment and partial hepatectomy), then treatment with or without test chemicals (in vivo studies of antipromotion were not performed). Using glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive foci, we compared the effects of flavonoids (at 1,000 ppm in the diet) with the effects of phenobarbital (PB) on the occurrence of liver preneoplastic lesions. In addition, we studied the effects of flavonoids on GJIC in the livers derived from these experiments and in two types of cultured cells. No significant difference in the number and area of GST-P-positive foci was found after one or three months of treatment between any flavonoid group and control group. In the positive control group, PB markedly increased the numbers and areas of preneoplastic lesions at three months. Whereas PB also decreased by 60% the average size of lucifer yellow dye spread in slices of liver parenchyma free of preneoplastic lesions among the different flavonoids, only TG decreased the dye transfer in vivo: by 30% at one month and 50% at three months. With the dye transfer assay applied to a rat liver epithelial cell line (REL) and the Chinese hamster V79 metabolic cooperation assay, none of the tested flavonoids (< or = 25 microM) inhibited GJIC. Conversely, protective properties were seen for some of the compounds in antipromotion in vitro studies, because TG and FN enhanced the dye transfer in REL cells and FO, TG, and QC partly prevented the inhibition of metabolic cooperation by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Thus, taken together, our results suggest that QC, FO, and FN do

  13. Multiple connexin proteins in single intercellular channels: connexin compatibility and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    White, T W; Bruzzone, R

    1996-08-01

    In vertebrates, the protein subunits of intercellular channels found in gap junctions are encoded by a family of genes called connexins. These channels span two plasma membranes and result from the association of two half channels, or connexons, which are hexameric assemblies of connexins. Physiological analysis of channel formation and gating has revealed unique patterns of connexin-connexin interaction, and uncovered novel functional characteristics of channels containing more than one type of connexin protein. Structure-function studies have further demonstrated that unique domains within connexins participate in the regulation of different functional properties of intercellular channels. Thus, gap junctional channels can contain more than one connexin, and this structural heterogeneity has functional consequences in vitro. Moreover, emerging evidence for the existence of intercellular channels containing multiple connexins in native tissues suggests that the functional diversity generated by connexin-connexin interaction could contribute to complex communication patterns that have been observed in vivo.

  14. AII amacrine cells discriminate between heterocellular and homocellular locations when assembling connexin36-containing gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Arndt; Hilgen, Gerrit; Dorgau, Birthe; Sammler, Esther M; Weiler, Reto; Monyer, Hannah; Dedek, Karin; Hormuzdi, Sheriar G

    2014-03-15

    Electrical synapses (gap junctions) rapidly transmit signals between neurons and are composed of connexins. In neurons, connexin36 (Cx36) is the most abundant isoform; however, the mechanisms underlying formation of Cx36-containing electrical synapses are unknown. We focus on homocellular and heterocellular gap junctions formed by an AII amacrine cell, a key interneuron found in all mammalian retinas. In mice lacking native Cx36 but expressing a variant tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein at the C-terminus (KO-Cx36-EGFP), heterocellular gap junctions formed between AII cells and ON cone bipolar cells are fully functional, whereas homocellular gap junctions between two AII cells are not formed. A tracer injected into an AII amacrine cell spreads into ON cone bipolar cells but is excluded from other AII cells. Reconstruction of Cx36-EGFP clusters on an AII cell in the KO-Cx36-EGFP genotype confirmed that the number, but not average size, of the clusters is reduced - as expected for AII cells lacking a subset of electrical synapses. Our studies indicate that some neurons exhibit at least two discriminatory mechanisms for assembling Cx36. We suggest that employing different gap-junction-forming mechanisms could provide the means for a cell to regulate its gap junctions in a target-cell-specific manner, even if these junctions contain the same connexin.

  15. AII amacrine cells discriminate between heterocellular and homocellular locations when assembling connexin36-containing gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Arndt; Hilgen, Gerrit; Dorgau, Birthe; Sammler, Esther M.; Weiler, Reto; Monyer, Hannah; Dedek, Karin; Hormuzdi, Sheriar G.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Electrical synapses (gap junctions) rapidly transmit signals between neurons and are composed of connexins. In neurons, connexin36 (Cx36) is the most abundant isoform; however, the mechanisms underlying formation of Cx36-containing electrical synapses are unknown. We focus on homocellular and heterocellular gap junctions formed by an AII amacrine cell, a key interneuron found in all mammalian retinas. In mice lacking native Cx36 but expressing a variant tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein at the C-terminus (KO-Cx36-EGFP), heterocellular gap junctions formed between AII cells and ON cone bipolar cells are fully functional, whereas homocellular gap junctions between two AII cells are not formed. A tracer injected into an AII amacrine cell spreads into ON cone bipolar cells but is excluded from other AII cells. Reconstruction of Cx36–EGFP clusters on an AII cell in the KO-Cx36-EGFP genotype confirmed that the number, but not average size, of the clusters is reduced – as expected for AII cells lacking a subset of electrical synapses. Our studies indicate that some neurons exhibit at least two discriminatory mechanisms for assembling Cx36. We suggest that employing different gap-junction-forming mechanisms could provide the means for a cell to regulate its gap junctions in a target-cell-specific manner, even if these junctions contain the same connexin. PMID:24463820

  16. Inhibition of intrinsic gap-junction intercellular communication and enhancement of tumorigenicity of the rat bladder carcinoma cell line BC31 by a dominant-negative connexin 43 mutant.

    PubMed

    Krutovskikh, V A; Yamasaki, H; Tsuda, H; Asamoto, M

    1998-12-01

    The tumor-suppressive property of the connexin gap-junction proteins was postulated from the fact that their function of cell coupling is impaired in most cancer cells. However, in conflict with this notion, certain cancer cells are able to communicate through gap junctions despite their malignancy. To explain this phenomenon, we studied by using a dominant-negative strategy the effect on tumorigenicity of loss of intrinsic gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in the rat bladder carcinoma cell line BC31, which shows both expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and intercellular communication. In cells transfected with a mutant Cx43 with seven residues deleted from the internal loop at positions 130-136 (Cx43delta), transport of the resulting connexin protein to the plasma membrane occurred normally, but the GJIC of the cells was effectively abolished at the level of permeability of established gap junctions. Dominant-negative inhibition of GJIC by Cx43delta accelerated growth of BC31 cells in nude mice. In contrast, when GJIC in BC31 cells was artificially enforced by transfection of wild-type Cx43, the cells lost the capacity to grow in vivo. Decreased phosphorylation of Cx43delta suggested close interaction of the internal loop of connexin with its commonly phosphorylated domains in the C-terminal tail and involvement of this interaction in gap-junction permeability. Therefore, we conclude that the intrinsic GJIC observed in cancer cells should be considered a tumor-suppressor factor and that its level may influence malignant growth capacity.

  17. TransComb: genome-guided transcriptome assembly via combing junctions in splicing graphs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juntao; Yu, Ting; Jiang, Tao; Li, Guojun

    2016-10-19

    Transcriptome assemblers aim to reconstruct full-length transcripts from RNA-seq data. We present TransComb, a genome-guided assembler developed based on a junction graph, weighted by a bin-packing strategy and paired-end information. A newly designed extension method based on weighted junction graphs can accurately extract paths representing expressed transcripts, whether they have low or high expression levels. Tested on both simulated and real datasets, TransComb demonstrates significant improvements in both recall and precision over leading assemblers, including StringTie, Cufflinks, Bayesembler, and Traph. In addition, it runs much faster and requires less memory on average. TransComb is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/transcriptomeassembly/files/ .

  18. PTP-PEST controls motility, adherens junction assembly, and Rho GTPase activity in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, Rosario; Rengifo-Cam, William; Schaller, Michael D.; Evers, B. Mark

    2010-01-01

    An important step in carcinoma progression is loss of cell-cell adhesion leading to increased invasion and metastasis. We show here that the protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-PEST, is a critical regulator of cell-cell junction integrity and epithelial cell motility. Using colon carcinoma cells, we show that the expression level of PTP-PEST regulates cell motility. Either transient small interfering RNA or stable short hairpin RNA knockdown of PTP-PEST enhances haptotactic and chemotactic migration of KM12C colon carcinoma cells. Furthermore, KM12C cells with stably knocked down PTP-PEST exhibit a mesenchymal-like phenotype with prominent membrane ruffles and lamellae. In contrast, ectopic expression of PTP-PEST in KM20 or DLD-1 cells, which lack detectable endogenous PTP-PEST expression, suppresses haptotactic migration. Importantly, we find that PTP-PEST localizes in adherens junctions. Concomitant with enhanced motility, stable knockdown of PTP-PEST causes a disruption of cell-cell junctions. These effects are due to a defect in junctional assembly and not to a loss of E-cadherin expression. Adherens junction assembly is impaired following calcium switch in KM12C cells with stably knocked down PTP-PEST and is accompanied by an increase in the activity of Rac1 and a suppression of RhoA activity in response to cadherin engagement. Taken together, these results suggest that PTP-PEST functions as a suppressor of epithelial cell motility by controlling Rho GTPase activity and the assembly of adherens junctions. PMID:20519451

  19. Gap junctions: structure and function (Review).

    PubMed

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-01-01

    Gap junctions are plasma membrane spatial microdomains constructed of assemblies of channel proteins called connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates. The channels provide direct intercellular communication pathways allowing rapid exchange of ions and metabolites up to approximately 1 kD in size. Approximately 20 connexins are identified in the human or mouse genome, and orthologues are increasingly characterized in other vertebrates. Most cell types express multiple connexin isoforms, making likely the construction of a spectrum of heteromeric hemichannels and heterotypic gap junctions that could provide a structural basis for the charge and size selectivity of these intercellular channels. The precise nature of the potential signalling information traversing junctions in physiologically defined situations remains elusive, but extensive progress has been made in elucidating how connexins are assembled into gap junctions. Also, participation of gap junction hemichannels in the propagation of calcium waves via an extracellular purinergic pathway is emerging. Connexin mutations have been identified in a number of genetically inherited channel communication-opathies. These are detected in connexin 32 in Charcot Marie Tooth-X linked disease, in connexins 26 and 30 in deafness and skin diseases, and in connexins 46 and 50 in hereditary cataracts. Biochemical approaches indicate that many of the mutated connexins are mistargeted to gap junctions and/or fail to oligomerize correctly into hemichannels. Genetic ablation approaches are helping to map out a connexin code and point to specific connexins being required for cell growth and differentiation as well as underwriting basic intercellular communication.

  20. Biochemical analysis of connexin43 intracellular transport, phosphorylation, and assembly into gap junctional plaques

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the gap junction protein connexin43 is translated as a 42-kD protein (connexin43-NP) that is efficiently phosphorylated to a 46,000-Mr species (connexin43-P2) in gap junctional communication-competent, but not in communication-deficient, cells. In this study, we used a combination of metabolic radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation to investigate the assembly of connexin43 into gap junctions and the relationship of this event to phosphorylation of connexin43. Examination of the detergent solubility of connexin43 in communication-competent NRK cells revealed that processing of connexin43 to the P2 form was accompanied by acquisition of resistance to solubilization in 1% Triton X-100. Immunohistochemical localization of connexin43 in Triton-extracted NRK cells demonstrated that connexin43-P2 (Triton-insoluble) was concentrated in gap junctional plaques, whereas connexin43-NP (Triton-soluble) was predominantly intracellular. Using either a 20 degrees C intracellular transport block or cell-surface protein biotinylation, we determined that connexin43 was transported to the plasma membrane in the Triton-soluble connexin43-NP form. Cell-surface biotinylated connexin43-NP was processed to Triton-insoluble connexin43-P2 at 37 degrees C. Connexin43- NP was also transported to the plasma membrane in communication defective, gap junction-deficient S180 and L929 cells but was not processed to Triton-insoluble connexin43-P2. Taken together, these results demonstrate that gap junction assembly is regulated after arrival of connexin43 at the plasma membrane and is temporally associated with acquisition of insolubility in Triton X-100 and phosphorylation to the connexin43-P2 form. PMID:1659577

  1. Reciprocal influence of connexins and apical junction proteins on their expressions and functions

    PubMed Central

    Derangeon, Mickaël; Spray, David C.; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Membranes of adjacent cells form intercellular junctional complexes to mechanically anchor neighbour cells (anchoring junctions), to seal the paracellular space and to prevent diffusion of integral proteins within the plasma membrane (tight junctions) and to allow cell-to-cell diffusion of small ions and molecules (gap junctions). These different types of specialised plasma membrane microdomains, sharing common adaptor molecules, particularly zonula occludens proteins, frequently present intermingled relationships where the different proteins co-assemble into macromolecular complexes and their expressions are co-ordinately regulated. Proteins forming gap junction channels (connexins, particularly) and proteins fulfilling cell attachment or forming tight junction strands mutually influence expression and functions of one another. PMID:19046940

  2. Gap junctions are essential for murine primordial follicle assembly immediately before birth.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yijing; Huang, Kun; Xiang, Xi; Niu, Wanbao; Feng, Lizhao; Zhao, Lihua; Yan, Hao; Zhang, Hua

    2016-02-01

    The reserve of primordial follicles determines the reproductive ability of the female mammal over its reproductive life. The primordial follicle is composed of two types of cells: oocytes and surrounding pre-granulosa cells. However, the underlying mechanism regulating primordial follicle assembly is largely undefined. In this study, we found that gap junction communication (GJC) established between the ovarian cells in the perinatal mouse ovary may be involved in the process. First, gap junction structures between the oocyte and surrounding pre-granulosa cells appear at about 19.0 dpc (days post coitum). As many as 12 gap junction-related genes are upregulated at birth, implying that a complex communication may exist between ovarian cells, because specifically silencing the genes of individual gap junction proteins, such as Gja1, Gja4 or both, has no influence on primordial follicle assembly. On the other hand, non-specific blockers of GJC, such as carbenoxolone (CBX) and 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA), significantly inhibit mouse primordial follicle assembly. We proved that the temporal window for establishment of GJC in the fetal ovary is from 19.5 dpc to 1 dpp (days postpartum). In addition, the expression of ovarian somatic cell (OSC)-specific genes, such as Notch2, Foxl2 and Irx3, was negatively affected by GJC blockers, whereas oocyte-related genes, such as Ybx2, Nobox and Sohlh1, were hardly affected, implying that the establishment of GJC during this period may be more important to OSCs than to oocytes. In summary, our results indicated that GJC involves in the mouse primordial follicle assembly process at a specific temporal window that needs Notch signaling cross-talking. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  3. Charge transport in vertically aligned, self-assembled peptide nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, Mordechay; Zakrassov, Alexander; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2012-01-01

    The self-assembly propensity of peptides has been extensively utilized in recent years for the formation of supramolecular nanostructures. In particular, the self-assembly of peptides into fibrils and nanotubes makes them promising building blocks for electronic and electro-optic applications. However, the mechanisms of charge transfer in these wire-like structures, especially in ambient conditions, are not yet fully understood. We describe here a layer-by-layer deposition methodology of short self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes, which results in vertically oriented nanotubes on gold substrates. Using this novel deposition methodology, we have fabricated molecular junctions with a conductive atomic force microscopy tip as a second electrode. Studies of the junctions' current-voltage characteristics as a function of the nanotube length revealed an efficient charge transfer in these supramolecular structures, with a low current attenuation constant of 0.1 Å-1, which indicate that electron transfer is dominated by hopping. Moreover, the threshold voltage to field-emission dominated transport was found to increase with peptide length in a manner that depends on the nature of the contact with the electrodes. The flexibility in the design of the peptide monomers and the ability to control their sequential order over the nanotube by means of the layer-by-layer assembly process, which is demonstrated in this work, can be used to engineer the electronic properties of self-assembled peptide nanotubes toward device applications.

  4. Charge transport in vertically aligned, self-assembled peptide nanotube junctions.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Mordechay; Zakrassov, Alexander; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2012-01-21

    The self-assembly propensity of peptides has been extensively utilized in recent years for the formation of supramolecular nanostructures. In particular, the self-assembly of peptides into fibrils and nanotubes makes them promising building blocks for electronic and electro-optic applications. However, the mechanisms of charge transfer in these wire-like structures, especially in ambient conditions, are not yet fully understood. We describe here a layer-by-layer deposition methodology of short self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes, which results in vertically oriented nanotubes on gold substrates. Using this novel deposition methodology, we have fabricated molecular junctions with a conductive atomic force microscopy tip as a second electrode. Studies of the junctions' current-voltage characteristics as a function of the nanotube length revealed an efficient charge transfer in these supramolecular structures, with a low current attenuation constant of 0.1 Å(-1), which indicate that electron transfer is dominated by hopping. Moreover, the threshold voltage to field-emission dominated transport was found to increase with peptide length in a manner that depends on the nature of the contact with the electrodes. The flexibility in the design of the peptide monomers and the ability to control their sequential order over the nanotube by means of the layer-by-layer assembly process, which is demonstrated in this work, can be used to engineer the electronic properties of self-assembled peptide nanotubes toward device applications.

  5. Laminin-111 Stimulates Proliferation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Through a Reduction of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication via RhoA-Mediated Cx43 Phosphorylation and Dissociation of Cx43/ZO-1/Drebrin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Han Na; Kim, Mi Ok

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Gap junctions within extracellular matrix (ECM)-defined boundaries ensure synchronous activity between cells destined to become functional mediators that regulate cell behavior. However, the role of ECM in connexin (Cx) function in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) has not been elucidated. Therefore, we examined the role of laminin-111 in the control of Cx43 functions and related signal pathways in mESCs. ECM components (laminin-111, fibronectin, and collagen I) increased Cx43 phosphorylation and decreased Lucifer yellow (Ly) diffusion. In addition, laminin-111 increased the proliferation index through reduction of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), which was confirmed by 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18α-GA). Laminin-111 increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Src and protein kinase C (PKC), which were inhibited by integrin β1 antibody (Ab) and laminin receptor-1 (LR-1) Ab, respectively. In addition, inhibition of both FAK/Src and PKC blocked Cx43 phosphorylation. Laminin-111 increased the Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) activation, which was blocked by FAK/Src and PKC inhibitors, suggesting the existence of parallel pathways that merge at RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA reversed the laminin-111-induced increase of Cx43 phosphorylation and reduction of GJIC. Laminin-111 also stimulated the dissociation of Cx43/ZO-1 complex followed by disruption of Cx43/drebrin and Cx43/F-actin complexes, which were reversed by C3 (RhoA inhibitor). ZO-1 small interfering (si) RNA significantly decreased Ly diffusion. Moreover, laminin-111 decreased Cx43 labeling at the intercellular junction, whereas pretreatment with degradation inhibitors (lysosomal protease inhibitor, chloroquine; proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin) increased Cx43 expression, reversely. In conclusion, laminin-111 stimulated mESC proliferation through a reduction of GJIC via RhoA-mediated Cx43 phosphorylation and Cx43/ZO-1/drebrin complex instability-mediated Cx43

  6. Bottom-up assembly of high density molecular nanowire cross junctions at a solid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shengbin; Puigmartí-Luis, Josep; Minoia, Andrea; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Rovira, Concepció; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Amabilino, David B; De Feyter, Steven

    2008-02-14

    A monoalkylated tetrathiafulvalene derivative forms multilayer structures at the solid-liquid interface, with high density of cross junctions, which are interesting for molecular electronic circuit self-assembly.

  7. ZO-1 recruitment to α-catenin – a novel mechanism for coupling the assembly of tight junctions to adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Maiers, Jessica L.; Peng, Xiao; Fanning, Alan S.; DeMali, Kris A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The formation of a barrier between epithelial cells is a fundamental determinant of cellular homeostasis, protecting underlying cells against pathogens, dehydration and damage. Assembly of the tight junction barrier is dependent upon neighboring epithelial cells binding to one another and forming adherens junctions, but the mechanism for how these processes are linked is poorly understood. Using a knockdown and substitution system, we studied whether ZO-1 binding to α-catenin is required for coupling tight junction assembly to the formation of adherens junctions. We found that preventing ZO-1 binding to α-catenin did not appear to affect adherens junctions. Rather the assembly and maintenance of the epithelial barrier were disrupted. This disruption was accompanied by alterations in the mobility of ZO-1 and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, our study identifies α-catenin binding to ZO-1 as a new mechanism for coupling the assembly of the epithelial barrier to cell-to-cell adhesion. PMID:23813953

  8. Cooperation of bcl-2 and myc in the neoplastic transformation of normal rat liver epithelial cells is related to the down-regulation of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    DeoCampo, N D; Wilson, M R; Trosko, J E

    2000-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to isolate several rat liver epithelial cell clones containing the human bcl-2 and myc/bcl-2 genes in order to study their potential cooperative effect on neoplastic transformation and gap junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC) and to test the hypothesis that the loss of GJIC leads to tumorigenesis. Using anchorage-independent growth as a surrogate marker for neoplastic transformation, we transfected both normal rat liver epithelial cells, WB-F344, and a WB-F344 cell line overexpressing v-myc with human bcl-2 cDNA. Those cell lines that only expressed v-myc or human bcl-2 were unable to form colonies in soft agar. However, those cell lines that overexpressed both v-myc and human bcl-2 showed varying ability to form colonies in soft agar, which did not correlate with their human bcl-2 expression level. In order to test if there was a correlation between cell line growth in soft agar and the ability to communicate through gap junctions, we performed scrape load dye transfer and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays. Our results show that v-myc and human bcl-2 can cooperate in the transformation of normal cells, but the degree to which the cells are transformed is dependent on the cells' ability to communicate through gap junctions.

  9. HIV-1 gp120 Glycoprotein Interacting with Dendritic Cell-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 3-grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN) Down-Regulates Tight Junction Proteins to Disrupt the Blood Retinal Barrier and Increase Its Permeability.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi-Wen; Li, Chuan; Jiang, Ai-Ping; Ge, Shengfang; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Tai-Sheng; Jin, Xia; Wang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2016-10-28

    Approximately 70% of HIV-1 infected patients acquire ocular opportunistic infections and manifest eye disorders during the course of their illness. The mechanisms by which pathogens invade the ocular site, however, are unclear. Under normal circumstances, vascular endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which possess a well developed tight junction complex, form the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) to prevent pathogen invasion. We hypothesize that disruption of the BRB allows pathogen entry into ocular sites. The hypothesis was tested using in vitro models. We discovered that human RPE cells could bind to either HIV-1 gp120 glycoproteins or HIV-1 viral particles. Furthermore, the binding was mediated by dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) expressed on RPE cells. Upon gp120 binding to DC-SIGN, cellular NF-κB signaling was triggered, leading to the induction of matrix metalloproteinases, which subsequently degraded tight junction proteins and disrupted the BRB integrity. DC-SIGN knockdown or prior blocking with a specific antibody abolished gp120-induced matrix metalloproteinase expression and reduced the degradation of tight junction proteins. This study elucidates a novel mechanism by which HIV, type 1 invades ocular tissues and provides additional insights into the translocation or invasion process of ocular complication-associated pathogens.

  10. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  11. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  12. Phosphorylation on Ser-279 and Ser-282 of connexin43 regulates endocytosis and gap junction assembly in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kristen E.; Mitra, Shalini; Katoch, Parul; Kelsey, Linda S.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the assembly of connexins (Cxs) into gap junctions are poorly understood. Using human pancreatic tumor cell lines BxPC3 and Capan-1, which express Cx26 and Cx43, we show that, upon arrival at the cell surface, the assembly of Cx43 is impaired. Connexin43 fails to assemble, because it is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Assembly is restored upon expressing a sorting-motif mutant of Cx43, which does not interact with the AP2 complex, and by expressing mutants that cannot be phosphorylated on Ser-279 and Ser-282. The mutants restore assembly by preventing clathrin-mediated endocytosis of Cx43. Our results also document that the sorting-motif mutant is assembled into gap junctions in cells in which the expression of endogenous Cx43 has been knocked down. Remarkably, Cx43 mutants that cannot be phosphorylated on Ser-279 or Ser-282 are assembled into gap junctions only when connexons are composed of Cx43 forms that can be phosphorylated on these serines and forms in which phosphorylation on these serines is abolished. Based on the subcellular fate of Cx43 in single and contacting cells, our results document that the endocytic itinerary of Cx43 is altered upon cell–cell contact, which causes Cx43 to traffic by EEA1-negative endosomes en route to lysosomes. Our results further show that gap-junctional plaques formed of a sorting motif–deficient mutant of Cx43, which is unable to be internalized by the clathrin-mediated pathway, are predominantly endocytosed in the form of annular junctions. Thus the differential phosphorylation of Cx43 on Ser-279 and Ser-282 is fine-tuned to control Cx43’s endocytosis and assembly into gap junctions. PMID:23363606

  13. Mechanically and Electrically Robust Self-Assembled Monolayers for Large-Area Tunneling Junctions

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between mechanical deformation and the electronic properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of the oligothiophene 4-([2,2′:5′,2″:5″,2‴-quaterthiophen]-5-yl)butane-1-thiol (T4C4) in tunneling junctions using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) and eutectic Ga–In (EGaIn). We compared shifts in conductivity, transition voltages of T4C4 with increasing AFM tip loading force to alkanethiolates. While these shifts result from an increasing tilt angle from penetration of the SAM by the AFM tip for the latter, we ascribe them to distortions of the π system present in T4C4, which is more mechanically robust than alkanethiolates of comparable length; SAMs comprising T4C4 shows about five times higher Young’s modulus than alkanethiolates. Density functional theory calculations confirm that mechanical deformations shift the barrier height due to changes in the frontier orbitals caused by small rearrangements to the conformation of the quaterthiophene moiety. The mechanical robustness of T4C4 manifests as an increased tolerance to high bias in large-area EGaIn junctions suggesting that electrostatic pressure plays a significant role in the shorting of molecular junctions at high bias. PMID:28729893

  14. Collective cell guidance by cooperative intercellular forces

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, C. Corey; Angelini, Thomas E.; Rajendran, Kavitha; Park, Chan Young; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Zhou, Enhua H.; Zaman, Muhammad H.; Butler, James P.; Weitz, David A.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Trepat, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Cells comprising a tissue migrate as part of a collective. How collective processes are coordinated over large multi-cellular assemblies has remained unclear, however, because mechanical stresses exerted at cell-cell junctions have not been accessible experimentally. We report here maps of these stresses within and between cells comprising a monolayer. Within the cell sheet there arise unanticipated fluctuations of mechanical stress that are severe, emerge spontaneously, and ripple across the monolayer. This stress landscape becomes increasingly rugged, sluggish, and cooperative with increasing system density. Within that landscape, local cellular migrations follow local orientations of maximal principal stress. Migrations of both endothelial and epithelial monolayers conform to this behavior, as do breast cancer cell lines before but not after the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Collective migration in these diverse systems is seen to be governed by a simple but unifying physiological principle: neighboring cells join forces to transmit appreciable normal stress across the cell-cell junction, but migrate along orientations of minimal intercellular shear stress. PMID:21602808

  15. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development. PMID:27043020

  16. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Sung-min; Choi, Inchul; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10) is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD) of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ), and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR), supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development.

  17. Screening of anti-hypoxia/reoxygenation agents by an in vitro method. Part 2: Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activation prevented hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury in endothelial gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y W; Morita, I; Zhang, L; Shao, G; Yao, X S; Murota, S

    2000-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) induced an injury in gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) after 2 h of reoxygenation in cultured HUVEC. Free radical scavenger (DMSO) and antioxidant (SOD) did not prevent this GJIC injury at all. Protein kinase C inhibitor (calphostin C) partly blocked this injury. However, the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor genistein completely inhibited this GJIC injury. Compounds 1 [laxogenin-3-O-alpha-L-arabinosyl-(1-->6)- beta-D-glucopyranoside], 2 (macrostemososide A), 3 [laxogenin-3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha- L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside], 4 (chinenoside II), 5 (beta-sitosterol), 6 (daucosterine), 7 (ginsenoside-Rd), 29 (isocumarine), 52 (icariin), 53 (icariside), and 54 (icaritin), which showed obvious influence on H/R-induced PTK activation as stated in Part 1 (except 1), were explored for their effects on GJIC. The results showed that compounds 2-7 and 52-57 partly protected H/R-induced GJIC injury. Compounds 5 and 6 (especially 5), which showed the strongest inhibitory effects on PTK activation, completely blocked H/R-provoked GJIC injury. Compound 1, which did not influence PTK activation, failed to prevent this GJIC injury. In contrast, compound 29, which significantly promoted PTK activation, enhanced this H/R-induced GJIC injury further. Western blotting of connexin 43, an important gap junctional protein for modulating GJIC in HUVEC, revealed that interference with the gap junctional protein might be the most direct mechanism for compounds 2, 5, 29, and 53 to affect H/R-injured GJIC.

  18. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  19. Evidence for intercellular communication in mosquito renal tubules: a putative role of gap junctions in coordinating and regulating the rapid diuretic effects of neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Piermarini, Peter M.; Calkins, Travis L.

    2014-01-01

    Adult female mosquitoes require a blood meal from a vertebrate host to successfully reproduce. During a single blood feeding, a female may ingest more than the equivalent of her own body mass, resulting in an acute stress to osmotic and ionic homeostasis. In response to this stress, the renal (Malpighian) tubules mediate a rapid diuresis that commences as soon as blood is ingested. The diuresis is regulated by neuropeptides (e.g., kinins, calcitonin-like peptide) that act on receptors in the Malpighian tubule epithelium. Interestingly, the expression of these receptors is discontinuous throughout the epithelium, which raises the question as to how Malpighian tubules mount such a rapid and synchronized response to neuropeptide stimulation. Here we propose a hypothesis that gap junctions functionally couple the epithelial cells of Malpighian tubules, resulting in a coordinated physiological response to the binding of neuropeptides. We review recent, relevant literature on the electrophysiology, physiology, and molecular biology of mosquito Malpighian tubules that indicate the presence of gap junctions in the epithelium. We also provide new physiological and immunochemical data that are consistent with the proposed hypothesis. PMID:24316302

  20. Junctional actin assembly is mediated by Formin-like 2 downstream of Rac1

    PubMed Central

    Grikscheit, Katharina; Frank, Tanja; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial integrity is vitally important, and its deregulation causes early stage cancer. De novo formation of an adherens junction (AJ) between single epithelial cells requires coordinated, spatial actin dynamics, but the mechanisms steering nascent actin polymerization for cell–cell adhesion initiation are not well understood. Here we investigated real-time actin assembly during daughter cell–cell adhesion formation in human breast epithelial cells in 3D environments. We identify formin-like 2 (FMNL2) as being specifically required for actin assembly and turnover at newly formed cell–cell contacts as well as for human epithelial lumen formation. FMNL2 associates with components of the AJ complex involving Rac1 activity and the FMNL2 C terminus. Optogenetic control of Rac1 in living cells rapidly drove FMNL2 to epithelial cell–cell contact zones. Furthermore, Rac1-induced actin assembly and subsequent AJ formation critically depends on FMNL2. These data uncover FMNL2 as a driver for human epithelial AJ formation downstream of Rac1. PMID:25963818

  1. The roles of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinases in the preventive mechanisms of mushroom Phellinus linteus against the inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jong-Ho; Cho, Sung-Dae; Hu, Hongbo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Song Koo; Lee, Yong-Soon; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2002-07-01

    Modulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is a known cellular event associated with tumor promotion. The present study was undertaken to test the potential preventive effect of mushroom Phellinus linteus extract (PL) on the inhibition of GJIC, induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells (WB cells). Cells were pre-incubated with PL (5 and 25 microg/ml) for 24 h and this was followed by co-treatment with PL and H(2)O(2) (500 microM) for 1 h. PL (at 5 and 25 microg/ml) prevented the inhibition of GJIC and blocked the hyper-phosphorylation of connexin 43 by H(2)O(2). Moreover, H(2)O(2) activated p38 kinase, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in WB cells. The present study indicates that PL is able to inactivate both ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinases. However, PL did not affect the JNK pathway. For this reason, to elucidate the relation between MAP kinases and GJIC, we treated cells with PD98059 (an MEK inhibitor) and SB202190 (a p38 kinase inhibitor). These inhibitors were also found to prevent the inhibition of GJIC induced by H(2)O(2), which suggests that PL may act as a natural anticancer product by preventing the inhibition of GJIC through the inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinases. In addition, our results indicate that the p38 kinase signaling pathway may be closely related functionally to the gap junction in rat liver epithelial cells.

  2. The assembly of developing motor neurons depends on an interplay between spontaneous activity, type II cadherins and gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Montague, Karli; Lowe, Andrew S; Uzquiano, Ana; Knüfer, Athene; Astick, Marc; Price, Stephen R; Guthrie, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    A core structural and functional motif of the vertebrate central nervous system is discrete clusters of neurons or 'nuclei'. Yet the developmental mechanisms underlying this fundamental mode of organisation are largely unknown. We have previously shown that the assembly of motor neurons into nuclei depends on cadherin-mediated adhesion. Here, we demonstrate that the emergence of mature topography among motor nuclei involves a novel interplay between spontaneous activity, cadherin expression and gap junction communication. We report that nuclei display spontaneous calcium transients, and that changes in the activity patterns coincide with the course of nucleogenesis. We also find that these activity patterns are disrupted by manipulating cadherin or gap junction expression. Furthermore, inhibition of activity disrupts nucleogenesis, suggesting that activity feeds back to maintain integrity among motor neurons within a nucleus. Our study suggests that a network of interactions between cadherins, gap junctions and spontaneous activity governs neuron assembly, presaging circuit formation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Growth and assembly of cobalt oxide nanoparticle rings at liquid nanodroplets with solid junction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yilong; Powers, Alexander S; Zhang, Xiaowei; Xu, Tao; Bustillo, Karen; Sun, Litao; Zheng, Haimei

    2017-09-13

    Using liquid cell TEM, we imaged the formation of CoO nanoparticle rings. Nanoparticles nucleated and grew tracing the perimeter of droplets sitting on the SiNx solid substrate, and finally formed necklace-like rings. By tracking single nanoparticle trajectories during the ring formation and an estimation of the forces between droplets and nanoparticles using a simplified model, we found the junction of liquid nanodroplets with a solid substrate is the attractive site for CoO nanoparticles. Coalescing droplets were capable of pushing nanoparticles to the perimeter of the new droplet and nanoparticles on top of the droplets rolled off toward the perimeter. We propose that the curved surface morphology of the droplets created a force gradient that contributed to the assembly of nanoparticles at the droplet perimeter. Revealing the dynamics of nanoparticle movements and the interactions of nanoparticles with the liquid nanodroplet provides insights on developing novel self-assembly strategies for building precisely defined nanostructures on solid substrates.

  4. Ric-8A, an activator protein of Gαi, controls mammalian epithelial cell polarity for tight junction assembly and cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chishiki, Kanako; Kamakura, Sachiko; Hayase, Junya; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2017-03-01

    Correct cyst morphogenesis of epithelial cells requires apical-basal polarization, which is partly regulated by mitotic spindle orientation, a process dependent on the heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gαi and its binding protein LGN. Here, we show that in three-dimensional culture of mammalian epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, the Gαi-activating protein Ric-8A is crucial for orientation of the mitotic spindle and formation of normal cysts that comprise a single layer of polarized cells with their apical surfaces lining an inner lumen. Consistent with the involvement of LGN, cystogenesis can be well organized by ADP-ribosylated Gαi, retaining the ability to interact with LGN, but not by the interaction-defective mutant protein Gαi2 (N150I). In monolayer culture of MDCK cells, functional tight junction (TJ) assembly, a process associated with epithelial cell polarization, is significantly delayed in Ric-8A-depleted cells as well as in Gαi-depleted cells in a mitosis-independent manner. Ric-8A knockdown results in a delayed cortical delivery of Gαi and the apical membrane protein gp135, and an increased formation of intercellular lumens surrounded by membranes rich in Gαi3 and gp135. TJ development also involves LGN and its related protein AGS3. Thus, Ric-8A regulates mammalian epithelial cell polarity for TJ assembly and cystogenesis probably in concert with Gαi and LGN/AGS3. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. An ATP-dependent mechanism mediates intercellular calcium signaling in bone cell network under single cell nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Huo, Bo; Lu, Xin L; Costa, Kevin D; Xu, Qiaobing; Guo, X Edward

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the roles of intercellular gap junctions and extracellular ATP diffusion in bone cell calcium signaling propagation in bone tissue, in vitro bone cell networks were constructed by using microcontact printing and self-assembled monolayer technologies. In the network, neighboring cells were interconnected through functional gap junctions. A single cell at the center of the network was mechanically stimulated by using an AFM nanoindenter. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i)) responses of the bone cell network were recorded and analyzed. In the untreated groups, calcium propagation from the stimulated cell to neighboring cells was observed in 40% of the tests. No significant difference was observed in this percentage when the intercellular gap junctions were blocked. This number, however, decreased to 10% in the extracellular ATP-pathway-blocked group. When both the gap junction and ATP pathways were blocked, intercellular calcium waves were abolished. When the intracellular calcium store in ER was depleted, the indented cell can generate calcium transients, but no [Ca2+](i) signal can be propagated to the neighboring cells. No [Ca2+](i) response was detected in the cell network when the extracellular calcium source was removed. These findings identified the biochemical pathways involved in the calcium signaling propagation in bone cell networks. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  6. An ATP-Dependent Mechanism Mediates Intercellular Calcium Signaling in Bone Cell Network under Single Cell Nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Bo; Lu, Xin L.; Costa, Kevin D.; Xu, Qiaobing; Guo, X. Edward

    2010-01-01

    Summary To investigate the roles of intercellular gap junctions and extracellular ATP diffusion in bone cell calcium signaling propagation in bone tissue, in vitro bone cell networks were constructed by using microcontact printing and self-assembled monolayer technologies. In the network, neighboring cells were interconnected through functional gap junctions. A single cell at the center of the network was mechanically stimulated by using an AFM nanoindenter. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) responses of the bone cell network were recorded and analyzed. In the untreated groups, calcium propagation from the stimulated cell to neighboring cells was observed in 40% of the tests. No significant difference was observed in this percentage when the intercellular gap junctions were blocked. This number, however, decreased to 10% in the extracellular ATP-pathway-blocked group. When both the gap junction and ATP pathways were blocked, intercellular calcium waves were abolished. When the intracellular calcium store in ER was depleted, the indented cell can generate calcium transients, but no [Ca2+]i signal can be propagated to the neighboring cells. No [Ca2+]i response was detected in the cell network when the extracellular calcium source was removed. These findings identified the biochemical pathways involved in the calcium signaling propagation in bone cell networks. PMID:20060586

  7. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  8. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  9. Creating Sub-50 Nm Nanofluidic Junctions in PDMS Microfluidic Chip via Self-Assembly Process of Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xi; Syed, Abeer; Mao, Pan; Han, Jongyoon; Song, Yong-Ak

    2016-03-13

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the prevailing building material to make microfluidic devices due to its ease of molding and bonding as well as its transparency. Due to the softness of the PDMS material, however, it is challenging to use PDMS for building nanochannels. The channels tend to collapse easily during plasma bonding. In this paper, we present an evaporation-driven self-assembly method of silica colloidal nanoparticles to create nanofluidic junctions with sub-50 nm pores between two microchannels. The pore size as well as the surface charge of the nanofluidic junction is tunable simply by changing the colloidal silica bead size and surface functionalization outside of the assembled microfluidic device in a vial before the self-assembly process. Using the self-assembly of nanoparticles with a bead size of 300 nm, 500 nm, and 900 nm, it was possible to fabricate a porous membrane with a pore size of ~45 nm, ~75 nm and ~135 nm, respectively. Under electrical potential, this nanoporous membrane initiated ion concentration polarization (ICP) acting as a cation-selective membrane to concentrate DNA by ~1,700 times within 15 min. This non-lithographic nanofabrication process opens up a new opportunity to build a tunable nanofluidic junction for the study of nanoscale transport processes of ions and molecules inside a PDMS microfluidic chip.

  10. Gap junction channels reconstituted in two closely apposed lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ramundo-Orlando, Alfonsina; Serafino, Annalucia; Villalobo, Antonio

    2005-04-01

    Intercellular communication mediated by gap junction channels plays an important role in many cellular processes. In contrast to other channels, gap junction channels span two plasma membranes resulting in an intracellular location for both ends of the junctional pore and the regulatory sites for channel gating. This configuration presents unique challenges for detailed experimental studies of junctional channel physiology and ligand-activation in situ. Availability of an appropriate model system would significantly facilitate future studies of gap junction channel function and structure. Here we show that the double-membrane channel can be reconstituted in pairs of closely apposed lipid bilayers, as experienced in cells. We have trapped the calcium-sensitive dye, arsenazo III (AIII), partially calcium-saturated (AIII-Ca), in one population of connexin32 reconstituted-liposomes, and EGTA in a second one. In such mixtures, the interaction of EGTA with AIII-Ca was measured by a large color shift from blue to red (decreased absorbance at 652 nm). The exchange of these compounds through gap junctions was proportional to these decrements. Results indicate that these connexon-mediated interliposomal channels are functional and are inhibited by the addition of alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and by flufenamic acid, two gap junction communication inhibitors. Future use of this model system has the potential to improve our understanding of the permeability and modulation of junctional channels in its native intercellular assembly.

  11. AMP-18 facilitates assembly and stabilization of tight junctions to protect the colonic mucosal barrier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peili; Kartha, Sreedharan; Bissonnette, Marc; Hart, John; Toback, F Gary

    2012-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an injured epithelium. Development of agents that could enhance mucosal healing is a major goal in IBD therapeutics. The 18-kDa antrum mucosal protein (AMP-18) and a 21-mer peptide derived from AMP-18 stimulate accumulation of tight junction (TJ) proteins in cultured epithelial cells and mouse colonic mucosa to protect the mucosal barrier, suggesting it might be a useful agent to treat IBD. We searched for molecular mechanisms by which AMP peptide or recombinant AMP-18 act on TJs in intact cell monolayers, or those disrupted by low-calcium medium. Roles of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) / heat shock protein (hsp)25 pathway and PKCζ were investigated by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy. AMP peptide activated p38 MAPK, which subsequently phosphorylated hsp25. Accumulated phospho-hsp25 was associated with perijunctional actin. AMP-18 also induced rapid phosphorylation of PKCζ and its colocalization with perijunctional actin in Caco2/bbe cells, which was accompanied by translocation and formation of complexes of "polarity proteins" in the TJ-containing detergent-insoluble fraction. Treatment with AMP-18 also stimulated accumulation of ZO-1, ZO-2, and JAM-A in nascent TJs known to associate with the multimeric p-PKCζ/Par6/ Cdc42/ECT2·GTP/Par3 polarity protein complex. AMP-18 facilitates translocation and assembly of multiple proteins into TJs and their association with and subsequent stabilization of the actin filament network. We speculate that improved barrier function induced by AMP-18 is mediated by enhanced TJ assembly. Thus, AMP-18 may provide a promising lead to develop agents effective in healing injured colonic epithelium in IBD. Copyright © 2012 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  12. Role of redox centre in charge transport investigated by novel self-assembled conjugated polymer molecular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongrui; Dong, Huanli; Li, Tao; Hviid, Rune; Zou, Ye; Wei, Zhongming; Fu, Xiaolong; Wang, Erjing; Zhen, Yonggang; Nørgaard, Kasper; Laursen, Bo W.; Hu, Wenping

    2015-01-01

    Molecular electronics describes a field that seeks to implement electronic components made of molecular building blocks. To date, few studies have used conjugated polymers in molecular junctions despite the fact that they potentially transport charge more efficiently than the extensively investigated small-molecular systems. Here we report a novel type of molecular tunnelling junction exploring the use of conjugated polymers, which are self-assembled into ultrathin films in a distinguishable ‘planar' manner from the traditional vertically oriented small-molecule monolayers. Electrical measurements on the junctions reveal molecular-specific characteristics of the polymeric molecules in comparison with less conjugated small molecules. More significantly, we decorate redox-active functionality into polymeric backbones, demonstrating a key role of redox centre in the modulation of charge transport behaviour via energy level engineering and external stimuli, and implying the potential of employing tailor-made polymeric components as alternatives to small molecules for future molecular-scale electronics. PMID:26085081

  13. Benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide inhibits gap junction intercellular communication via phosphorylation of tumor progression locus 2 in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Kyung; Chung, Min-Yu; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-05-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (B[a]PDE), a major metabolite of benzo[a]pyrene, has been reported to function as a human carcinogen. However, the molecular mechanism of how B[a]PDE regulates signaling pathways during tumor promotion remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of B[a]PDE on the regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), one of the major carcinogenic processes, and its main regulatory signaling pathways using WB-F344 rat liver epithelial (WB-F344 RLE) cells. Treatment of benzo[a]pyrene or B[a]PDE resulted in GJIC inhibition, and B[a]PDE was more active at lower concentrations than benzo[a]pyrene in the suppression of GJIC. This suggests that B[a]PDE is a stronger GJIC inhibitor. B[a]PDE at 1 µM reversibly inhibited GJIC in WB-F344 RLE cells, which was attributable to hyperphosphorylation of connexin43 (Cx43) via phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We found that B[a]PDE induced phosphorylation of tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2), a direct upstream regulator of MEK. Tpl2 inhibitor recovered B[a]PDE-induced GJIC inhibition and attenuated B[a]PDE-induced MEK/ERK phosphorylation in WB-F344 RLE cells. Collectively, our results suggest that B[a]PDE suppresses GJIC by activating Tpl2 and subsequently the MEK/ERK pathway and Cx43 phosphorylation in WB-F344 RLE cells. These results outline the potential importance of Tpl2 as a novel therapeutic target for B[a]PDE-induced GJIC inhibition during cancer promotion.

  14. Interactive effects of inflammatory cytokine and abundant low-molecular-weight PAHs on inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication, disruption of cell proliferation control, and the AhR-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Kabátková, Markéta; Svobodová, Jana; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Mohatad, Dilshad Shaik; Šmerdová, Lenka; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav; Vondráček, Jan

    2015-01-05

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with lower molecular weight exhibit lesser genotoxicity and carcinogenicity than highly carcinogenic PAHs with a higher number of benzene rings. Nevertheless, they elicit specific effects linked with tumor promotion, such as acute inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Although inflammatory reaction may alter bioactivation and toxicity of carcinogenic PAHs, little is known about the impact of pro-inflammatory cytokines on toxic effects of the low-molecular-weight PAHs. Here, we investigated the impact of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), on the effects associated with tumor promotion and with induction of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent gene expression in rat liver epithelial cells. We found that a prolonged incubation with TNF-α induced a down-regulation of GJIC, associated with reduced expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), a major connexin isoform found in liver epithelial cells. The Cx43 down-regulation was partly mediated by the activity of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) p38 kinase. Independently of GJIC modulation, or p38 activation, TNF-α potentiated the AhR-dependent proliferative effect of a model low-molecular-weight PAH, fluoranthene, on contact-inhibited cells. In contrast, this pro-inflammatory cytokine repressed the fluoranthene-induced expression of a majority of model AhR gene targets, such as Cyp1a1, Ahrr or Tiparp. The results of the present study indicate that inflammatory reaction may differentially modulate various toxic effects of low-molecular-weight PAHs; the exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines may both strengthen (inhibition of GJIC, disruption of contact inhibition) and repress (expression of a majority of AhR-dependent genes) their impact on toxic endpoints associated with carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair; Ballas, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  16. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

    1998-02-24

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

  17. Mammalian BTBD12/SLX4 assembles a Holliday junction resolvase and is required for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Jennifer M.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Sowa, Mathew E.; O’Connell, Brenda C.; Gygi, Steven P.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Harper, J. Wade

    2009-01-01

    Summary Structure-specific endonucleases mediate repair of DNA structures formed from replication fork collapse or during double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here we identify BTBD12 as the human ortholog of the budding yeast DNA repair factor Slx4p and D. melanogaster MUS312. Human SLX4 forms a multiprotein complex with the ERCC4(XPF)-ERCC1, MUS81-EME1, and SLX1 endonucleases, and also associates with MSH2/MSH3 mismatch repair complex, telomere binding complex TERF2(TRF2)-TERF2IP(RAP1), the protein kinase PLK1 and the uncharacterized protein C20orf94. Depletion of SLX4 causes sensitivity to mitomycin C and camptothecin, and reduces the efficiency of DSB repair in vivo. SLX4 complexes cleave 3’-flap, 5’-flap and replication fork structures; yet unlike other endonucleases associated with SLX4, the SLX1-SLX4 module promotes symmetrical cleavage of static and migrating Holliday junctions (HJs), identifying SLX1-SLX4 as a HJ resolvase. Thus, SLX4 assembles a modular tool-kit for repair of specific types of DNA lesions and is critical for cellular responses to replication fork failure. PMID:19596235

  18. Butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by facilitating tight junction assembly via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Luying; Li, Zhong-Rong; Green, Robert S; Holzman, Ian R; Lin, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Butyrate, one of the SCFA, promotes the development of the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the butyrate regulation of the intestinal barrier are unknown. To test the hypothesis that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier is mediated by the regulation of the assembly of tight junctions involving the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and inulin permeability in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. We further used a calcium switch assay to study the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and determined the effect of butyrate on the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and AMPK activity. We demonstrated that the butyrate treatment increased AMPK activity and accelerated the assembly of tight junctions as shown by the reorganization of tight junction proteins, as well as the development of TER. AMPK activity was also upregulated by butyrate during calcium switch-induced tight junction assembly. Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor, inhibited the butyrate-induced activation of AMPK. The facilitating effect of butyrate on the increases in TER in standard culture media, as well as after calcium switch, was abolished by compound C. We conclude that butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by regulating the assembly of tight junctions. This dynamic process is mediated by the activation of AMPK. These results suggest an intriguing link between SCFA and the intracellular energy sensor for the development of the intestinal barrier.

  19. Butyrate Enhances the Intestinal Barrier by Facilitating Tight Junction Assembly via Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers12

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Luying; Li, Zhong-Rong; Green, Robert S.; Holzman, Ian R.; Lin, Jing

    2009-01-01

    Butyrate, one of the SCFA, promotes the development of the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the butyrate regulation of the intestinal barrier are unknown. To test the hypothesis that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier is mediated by the regulation of the assembly of tight junctions involving the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and inulin permeability in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. We further used a calcium switch assay to study the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and determined the effect of butyrate on the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and AMPK activity. We demonstrated that the butyrate treatment increased AMPK activity and accelerated the assembly of tight junctions as shown by the reorganization of tight junction proteins, as well as the development of TER. AMPK activity was also upregulated by butyrate during calcium switch-induced tight junction assembly. Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor, inhibited the butyrate-induced activation of AMPK. The facilitating effect of butyrate on the increases in TER in standard culture media, as well as after calcium switch, was abolished by compound C. We conclude that butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by regulating the assembly of tight junctions. This dynamic process is mediated by the activation of AMPK. These results suggest an intriguing link between SCFA and the intracellular energy sensor for the development of the intestinal barrier. PMID:19625695

  20. A relay mechanism between EB1 and APC facilitate STIM1 puncta assembly at endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Sherry, Ryan; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis

    2013-09-01

    The assembly of STIM1 protein puncta near endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) junctions is required for optimal activation of store-operated channels (SOC). The mechanisms controlling the translocation of STIM1 puncta to ER-PM junctions remain largely unknown. In the present study, we have explored the role of the microtubule binding protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), on STIM1 puncta and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). APC-depleted cells showed reduced STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions, instead puncta is found at the ER surrounding the cell nucleus. Reduced STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions in APC-depleted cells correlates with a strong inhibition of SOCE and diminished Orai whole-cell currents. Immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy co-localization studies indicate that, upon depletion of the ER, STIM1 dissociates from EB1 and associates to APC. Deletion analysis identified an APC-binding domain in the carboxyl terminus of STIM1 (STIM1 650-685). These results together position APC as an important element in facilitating the translocation of STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions, which in turn is required for efficient SOCE and Orai activation upon depletion of the ER.

  1. A complex of ZO-1 and the BAR-domain protein TOCA-1 regulates actin assembly at the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Krystofiak, Evan; Kachar, Bechara; Anderson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and sealing of the tight junction barrier are critically dependent on the perijunctional actin cytoskeleton, yet little is known about physical and functional links between barrier-forming proteins and actin. Here we identify a novel functional complex of the junction scaffolding protein ZO-1 and the F-BAR–domain protein TOCA-1. Using MDCK epithelial cells, we show that an alternative splice of TOCA-1 adds a PDZ-binding motif, which binds ZO-1, targeting TOCA-1 to barrier contacts. This isoform of TOCA-1 recruits the actin nucleation–promoting factor N-WASP to tight junctions. CRISPR-Cas9–mediated knockout of TOCA-1 results in increased paracellular flux and delayed recovery in a calcium switch assay. Knockout of TOCA-1 does not alter FRAP kinetics of GFP ZO-1 or occludin, but longer term (12 h) time-lapse microscopy reveals strikingly decreased tight junction membrane contact dynamics in knockout cells compared with controls. Reexpression of TOCA-1 with, but not without, the PDZ-binding motif rescues both altered flux and membrane contact dynamics. Ultrastructural analysis shows actin accumulation at the adherens junction in TOCA-1–knockout cells but unaltered freeze-fracture fibril morphology. Identification of the ZO-1/TOCA-1 complex provides novel insights into the underappreciated dependence of the barrier on the dynamic nature of cell-to-cell contacts and perijunctional actin. PMID:26063734

  2. Claudin-16 and claudin-19 interaction is required for their assembly into tight junctions and for renal reabsorption of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianghui; Renigunta, Aparna; Gomes, Antonio S; Hou, Mingli; Paul, David L; Waldegger, Siegfried; Goodenough, Daniel A

    2009-09-08

    Claudins are tight junction integral membrane proteins that are key regulators of the paracellular pathway. Defects in claudin-16 (CLDN16) and CLDN19 function result in the inherited human renal disorder familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). Previous studies showed that siRNA knockdown of CLDN16 in mice results in a mouse model for FHHNC. Here, we show that CLDN19-siRNA mice also developed the FHHNC symptoms of chronic renal wasting of magnesium and calcium together with defective renal salt handling. siRNA knockdown of CLDN19 caused a loss of CLDN16 from tight junctions in the thick ascending limb (TAL) without a decrease in CLDN16 expression level, whereas siRNA knockdown of CLDN16 produced a similar effect on CLDN19. In both mouse lines, CLDN10, CLDN18, occludin, and ZO-1, normal constituents of TAL tight junctions, remained correctly localized. CLDN16- and CLDN19-depleted tight junctions had normal barrier function but defective ion selectivity. These data, together with yeast two-hybrid binding studies, indicate that a heteromeric CLDN16 and CLDN19 interaction was required for assembling them into the tight junction structure and generating cation-selective paracellular channels.

  3. The Interaction of JRAB/MICAL-L2 with Rab8 and Rab13 Coordinates the Assembly of Tight Junctions and Adherens Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Rie; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nakatsuji, Hiroyoshi; Arase, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) is regulated by the transport of integral TJ and AJ proteins to and/or from the plasma membrane (PM) and it is tightly coordinated in epithelial cells. We previously reported that Rab13 and a junctional Rab13-binding protein (JRAB)/molecule interacting with CasL-like 2 (MICAL-L2) mediated the endocytic recycling of an integral TJ protein occludin and the formation of functional TJs. Here, we investigated the role of Rab13 and JRAB/MICAL-L2 in the transport of other integral TJ and AJ proteins claudin-1 and E-cadherin to the PM by using a Ca2+-switch model. Although knockdown of Rab13 specifically suppressed claudin-1 and occludin but not E-cadherin transport, knockdown of JRAB/MICAL-L2 and expression of its Rab13-binding domain (JRAB/MICAL-L2-C) inhibited claudin-1, occludin, and E-cadherin transport. We then identified Rab8 as another JRAB/MICAL-L2-C-binding protein. Knockdown of Rab8 inhibited the Rab13-independent transport of E-cadherin to the PM. Rab8 and Rab13 competed with each other for the binding to JRAB/MICAL-L2 and functionally associated with JRAB/MICAL-L2 at the perinuclear recycling/storage compartments and PM, respectively. These results suggest that the interaction of JRAB/MICAL-L2 with Rab8 and Rab13 coordinates the assembly of AJs and TJs. PMID:18094055

  4. Effect of trunnion roughness and length on the modular taper junction strength under typical intraoperative assembly forces.

    PubMed

    Jauch-Matt, S Y; Miles, A W; Gill, H S

    2017-01-01

    Modular hip implants are at risk of fretting-induced postoperative complications most likely initiated by micromotion between adjacent implant components. A stable fixation between ball head and stem-neck taper is critical to avoid excessive interface motions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the effect of trunnion roughness and length on the modular taper strength under typical intraoperative assembly forces. Custom-made Titanium trunnions (standard/mini taper, smooth/grooved surface finish) were assembled with modular Cobalt-chromium heads by impaction with peak forces ranging from 2kN to 6kN. After each assembly process these were disassembled with a materials testing machine to detect the pull-off force as a measure for the taper strength. As expected, the pull-off forces increased with rising peak assembly force (p < 0.001). For low and moderate assembly forces, smooth standard tapers offered higher pull-off forces compared to grooved tapers (p < 0.038). In the case of an assembly force of 2kN, mini tapers showed a higher taper strength than standard ones (p=0.037). The results of this study showed that smooth tapers provided a higher strength for taper junctions. This higher taper strength may reduce the risk of fretting-related complications especially in the most common range of intraoperative assembly forces.

  5. The Extracellular Architecture of Adherens Junctions Revealed by Crystal Structures of Type I Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    O Harrison; X Jin; S Hong; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; J Brasch; Y Wu; J Vendome; K Felsovalyi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Adherens junctions, which play a central role in intercellular adhesion, comprise clusters of type I classical cadherins that bind via extracellular domains extended from opposing cell surfaces. We show that a molecular layer seen in crystal structures of E- and N-cadherin ectodomains reported here and in a previous C-cadherin structure corresponds to the extracellular architecture of adherens junctions. In all three ectodomain crystals, cadherins dimerize through a trans adhesive interface and are connected by a second, cis, interface. Assemblies formed by E-cadherin ectodomains coated on liposomes also appear to adopt this structure. Fluorescent imaging of junctions formed from wild-type and mutant E-cadherins in cultured cells confirm conclusions derived from structural evidence. Mutations that interfere with the trans interface ablate adhesion, whereas cis interface mutations disrupt stable junction formation. Our observations are consistent with a model for junction assembly involving strong trans and weak cis interactions localized in the ectodomain.

  6. Germ Cell Intercellular Bridges

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Michael P.; Iwamori, Tokuko; Buchold, Gregory M.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Stable intercellular bridges are a conserved feature of gametogenesis in multicellular animals observed more than 100 years ago, but their function was unknown. Many of the components necessary for this structure have been identified through the study of cytokinesis in Drosophila; however, mammalian intercellular bridges have distinct properties from those of insects. Mammalian germ cell intercellular bridges are composed of general cytokinesis components with additional germ cell–specific factors including TEX14. TEX14 is an inactive kinase essential for the maintenance of stable intercellular bridges in gametes of both sexes but whose loss specifically impairs male meiosis. TEX14 acts to impede the terminal steps of abscission by competing for essential component CEP55, blocking its interaction in nongerm cells with ALIX and TSG101. Additionally, TEX14-interacting protein RBM44, whose localization in stabile intercellular bridges is limited to pachytene and secondary spermatocytes, may participate in processes such as RNA transport but is nonessential to the maintenance of intercellular bridge stability. PMID:21669984

  7. 5′ exon interactions within the human spliceosome establish a framework for exon junction complex structure and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Vienna L.; Le Hir, Hervé; Jurica, Melissa S.; Moore, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    A general consequence of pre-mRNA splicing is the stable deposition of several proteins 20–24 nucleotides (nt) upstream of exon–exon junctions on spliced mRNAs. This exon junction complex (EJC) contains factors involved in mRNA export, cytoplasmic localization, and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Here we probed the mechanism and timing of EJC assembly. Over the course of splicing, the 5′ exon is subject to numerous dynamic protein–RNA interactions involving at least nine distinct polypeptides. Within the fully assembled spliceosome, these interactions afford protection to the last 25–27 nt of the 5′ exon intermediate. Coincident with exon ligation, interactions at the 3′ end of the 5′ exon disappear, and new species associate with position −24. Mass spectrometry and Western blotting of purified H, C, and mRNP complexes revealed that at least one EJC component, REF/Aly, can interact with pre-mRNA prior to spliceosome assembly, whereas Y14, Magoh, RNPS1, UAP56, and SRm160 are found in intermediate-containing spliceosomes. Upon exon ligation, association of RNPS1, UAP56, and SRm160 is destabilized. In contrast, REF/Aly, Y14, and Magoh remain stably bound to spliced mRNA, indicating that these three proteins are components of the EJC core. PMID:12414731

  8. Synaptopodin couples epithelial contractility to α-actinin-4-dependent junction maturation.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Nivetha; Tang, Vivian W

    2015-10-26

    The epithelial junction experiences mechanical force exerted by endogenous actomyosin activities and from interactions with neighboring cells. We hypothesize that tension generated at cell-cell adhesive contacts contributes to the maturation and assembly of the junctional complex. To test our hypothesis, we used a hydraulic apparatus that can apply mechanical force to intercellular junction in a confluent monolayer of cells. We found that mechanical force induces α-actinin-4 and actin accumulation at the cell junction in a time- and tension-dependent manner during junction development. Intercellular tension also induces α-actinin-4-dependent recruitment of vinculin to the cell junction. In addition, we have identified a tension-sensitive upstream regulator of α-actinin-4 as synaptopodin. Synaptopodin forms a complex containing α-actinin-4 and β-catenin and interacts with myosin II, indicating that it can physically link adhesion molecules to the cellular contractile apparatus. Synaptopodin depletion prevents junctional accumulation of α-actinin-4, vinculin, and actin. Knockdown of synaptopodin and α-actinin-4 decreases the strength of cell-cell adhesion, reduces the monolayer permeability barrier, and compromises cellular contractility. Our findings underscore the complexity of junction development and implicate a control process via tension-induced sequential incorporation of junctional components. © 2015 Kannan and Tang.

  9. Synaptopodin couples epithelial contractility to α-actinin-4–dependent junction maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Nivetha

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial junction experiences mechanical force exerted by endogenous actomyosin activities and from interactions with neighboring cells. We hypothesize that tension generated at cell–cell adhesive contacts contributes to the maturation and assembly of the junctional complex. To test our hypothesis, we used a hydraulic apparatus that can apply mechanical force to intercellular junction in a confluent monolayer of cells. We found that mechanical force induces α-actinin-4 and actin accumulation at the cell junction in a time- and tension-dependent manner during junction development. Intercellular tension also induces α-actinin-4–dependent recruitment of vinculin to the cell junction. In addition, we have identified a tension-sensitive upstream regulator of α-actinin-4 as synaptopodin. Synaptopodin forms a complex containing α-actinin-4 and β-catenin and interacts with myosin II, indicating that it can physically link adhesion molecules to the cellular contractile apparatus. Synaptopodin depletion prevents junctional accumulation of α-actinin-4, vinculin, and actin. Knockdown of synaptopodin and α-actinin-4 decreases the strength of cell–cell adhesion, reduces the monolayer permeability barrier, and compromises cellular contractility. Our findings underscore the complexity of junction development and implicate a control process via tension-induced sequential incorporation of junctional components. PMID:26504173

  10. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrical conductivity of single molecular junctions assembled from Co- and Co3C-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Daisuke; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2014-03-01

    Single molecular junctions (SMJs) were assembled from cobalt (Co)- and Co carbide (Co3C)-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules (CNCs) and two gold electrodes inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope equipped with a specimen-piezomanipulation system. The structure and electrical transport properties of the SMJs were investigated in situ. The current density depended on the perimeter of the contact area between CNCs and the electrodes, showing that the current flowed not through the encapsulated region but rather along the graphene layers of CNCs. It was demonstrated that the properties of graphene can be applied to nanodevices using CNCs irrespective of the encapsulating materials.

  12. Lighting up gap junction channels in a flash.

    PubMed

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-10-01

    Gap junction intercellular communication channels permit the exchange of small regulatory molecules and ions between neighbouring cells and coordinate cellular activity in diverse tissue and organ systems. These channels have short half-lives and complex assembly and degradation pathways. Much of the recent work elucidating gap junction biogenesis has featured the use of connexins (Cx), the constituent proteins of gap junctions, tagged with reporter proteins such as Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and has illuminated the dynamics of channel assembly in live cells by high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. With some studies, however, there are potential short-comings associated with the GFP chimeric protein technologies. A recent report by Gaietta et al., has highlighted the use of recombinant proteins with tetracysteine tags attached to the carboxyl terminus of Cx43, which differentially labels 'old' and 'new' connexins thus opening up new avenues for studying temporal and spatial localisation of proteins and in situ trafficking events. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. LRP6 acts as a scaffold protein in cardiac gap junction assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Li, Changming; Liang, Dandan; Lv, Fei; Yuan, Tianyou; The, Erlinda; Ma, Xiue; Wu, Yahan; Zhen, Lixiao; Xie, Duanyang; Wang, Shiyi; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Jian; Shi, Jingyi; Liu, Yi; Shi, Dan; Xu, Liang; Lin, Li; Peng, Luying; Cui, Jianmin; Zhu, Weidong; Chen, Yi-Han

    2016-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is a Wnt co-receptor in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Here, we report the scaffold function of LRP6 in gap junction formation of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac LRP6 is spatially restricted to intercalated discs and binds to gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43). A deficiency in LRP6 disrupts Cx43 gap junction formation and thereby impairs the cell-to-cell coupling, which is independent of Wnt/β-catenin signalling. The defect in Cx43 gap junction resulting from LRP6 reduction is attributable to the defective traffic of de novo Cx43 proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, leading to the lysosomal degradation of Cx43 proteins. Accordingly, the hearts of conditional cardiac-specific Lrp6-knockout mice consistently exhibit overt reduction of Cx43 gap junction plaques without any abnormality in Wnt signalling and are predisposed to lethal arrhythmias. These findings uncover a distinct role of LRP6 as a platform for intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:27250245

  14. Shortstop recruits EB1/APC1 and promotes microtubule assembly at the muscle-tendon junction.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Arul; Prokop, Andreas; Yamamoto, Misato; Sugimura, Kaoru; Uemura, Tadashi; Betschinger, Joerg; Knoblich, Juergen A; Volk, Talila

    2003-07-01

    Shot (previously named Kakapo), is a Drosophila Plakin family member containing both Actin binding and microtubule binding domains. In Drosophila, it is required for a wide range of processes, including axon extension, dendrite formation, axonal terminal arborization at the neuromuscular junction, tendon cell development, and adhesion of wing epithelium. To address how Shot exerts its activity at the molecular level, we investigated the molecular interactions of Shot with candidate proteins in mature larval tendon cells. We show that Shot colocalizes with EB1/APC1 and with a compact microtubule array extending between the muscle-tendon junction and the cuticle. Shot forms a protein complex with EB1 via its C-terminal EF-hands and GAS2-containing domains. In tendon cells with reduced Shot activity, EB1/APC1 dissociate from the muscle-tendon junction, and the microtubule array elongates. The resulting tendon cell, although associated with the muscle and the cuticle ends, loses its stress resistance and elongates. Our results suggest that Shot mediates tendon stress resistance by the organization of a compact microtubule network at the muscle-tendon junction. This is achieved by Shot association with the cytoplasmic faces of the basal hemiadherens junction and with the EB1/APC1 complex.

  15. Contactin orchestrates assembly of the septate-like junctions at the paranode in myelinated peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Boyle, M E; Berglund, E O; Murai, K K; Weber, L; Peles, E; Ranscht, B

    2001-05-01

    Rapid nerve impulse conduction depends on specialized membrane domains in myelinated nerve, the node of Ranvier, the paranode, and the myelinated internodal region. We report that GPI-linked contactin enables the formation of the paranodal septate-like axo-glial junctions in myelinated peripheral nerve. Contactin clusters at the paranodal axolemma during Schwann cell myelination. Ablation of contactin in mutant mice disrupts junctional attachment at the paranode and reduces nerve conduction velocity 3-fold. The mutation impedes intracellular transport and surface expression of Caspr and leaves NF155 on apposing paranodal myelin disengaged. The contactin mutation does not affect sodium channel clustering at the nodes of Ranvier but alters the location of the Shaker-type Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 potassium channels. Thus, contactin is a crucial part in the machinery that controls junctional attachment at the paranode and ultimately the physiology of myelinated nerve.

  16. Connexin26 regulates assembly and maintenance of cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex for normal hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary deafness affects about 1 in 2000 children and GJB2 gene mutation is most frequent cause for this disease in the world. GJB2 encodes connexin26 (Cx26), a component in cochlear gap junction. Recently, we found macromolecular change of gap junction plaques with two different types of Cx26 mutation as major classification of clinical case, one is a model of dominant negative type, Cx26R75W+ and the other is conditional gene deficient mouse, Cx26f/fP0Cre as a model for insufficiency of gap junction protein [6]. Gap junction composed mainly of Cx26 and Cx30 in wild type mice formed large planar gap junction plaques (GJP). In contrast, Cx26R75W+ and Cx26f/fP0Cre showed fragmented small round GJPs around the cell border. In Cx26f/fP0Cre, some of the cells with Cx26 expression due to their cellular mosaicism showed normal large GJP with Cx26 and Cx30 only at the cell junction site between two Cx26 positive cells. These indicate that bilateral Cx26 expressions from both adjacent cells are essential for the formation of the cochlear linear GJP, and it is not compensated by other cochlear Connexins such as Connexin30. In the present study, we demonstrated a new molecular pathology in most common hereditary deafness with different types of Connexin26 mutations, and this machinery can be a new target for drag design of hereditary deafness.

  17. Systems and assemblies for transferring high power laser energy through a rotating junction

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Ryan J.; McKay, Ryan P.; Fraze, Jason D.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-01-26

    There are provided high power laser devices and systems for transmitting a high power laser beam across a rotating assembly, including optical slip rings and optical rotational coupling assemblies. These devices can transmit the laser beam through the rotation zone in free space or within a fiber.

  18. Occludin oligomeric assemblies at tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier are altered by hypoxia and reoxygenation stress.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Gwen; Willis, Colin L; Staatz, William D; Nametz, Nicole; Quigley, Carolyn A; Hom, Sharon; Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Davis, Thomas P

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxic (low oxygen) and reperfusion (post-hypoxic reoxygenation) phases of stroke promote an increase in microvascular permeability at tight junctions (TJs) of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that may lead to cerebral edema. To investigate the effect of hypoxia (Hx) and reoxygenation on oligomeric assemblies of the transmembrane TJ protein occludin, rats were subjected to either normoxia (Nx, 21% O(2), 60 min), Hx (6% O(2), 60 min), or hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R, 6% O(2), 60 min followed by 21% O(2), 10 min). After treatment, cerebral microvessels were isolated, fractionated by detergent-free density gradient centrifugation, and occludin oligomeric assemblies associated with plasma membrane lipid rafts were solubilized by perfluoro-octanoic acid (PFO) exclusively as high molecular weight protein complexes. Analysis by non-reducing and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/western blot of PFO-solubilized occludin revealed that occludin oligomeric assemblies co-localizing with 'TJ-associated' raft domains contained a high molecular weight 'structural core' that was resistant to disassembly by either SDS or a hydrophilic reducing agent ex vivo, and by Hx and H/R conditions in vivo. However, exposure of PFO-solubilized occludin oligomeric assemblies to SDS ex vivo revealed the non-covalent association of a significant amount of dimeric and monomeric occludin isoforms to the disulfide-bonded inner core, and dispersal of these non-covalently attached occludin subunits to lipid rafts of higher density in vivo was differentially promoted by Hx and H/R. Our data suggest a model of isoform interaction within occludin oligomeric assemblies at the BBB that enables occludin to simultaneously perform a structural role in inhibiting paracellular diffusion, and a signaling role involving interactions of dimeric and monomeric occludin isoforms with a variety of regulatory molecules within different plasma membrane lipid raft domains.

  19. Assembly of the cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex requires connexin 26.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Yum, Sabrina W; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Muraki, Miho; Ogawa, Kana; Karasawa, Keiko; Miwa, Asuka; Guo, Xueshui; Gotoh, Satoru; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Yamanaka, Hitomi; Ito-Kawashima, Shioko; Iizuka, Takashi; Sakurai, Takashi; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary deafness affects approximately 1 in 2,000 children. Mutations in the gene encoding the cochlear gap junction protein connexin 26 (CX26) cause prelingual, nonsyndromic deafness and are responsible for as many as 50% of hereditary deafness cases in certain populations. Connexin-associated deafness is thought to be the result of defective development of auditory sensory epithelium due to connexion dysfunction. Surprisingly, CX26 deficiency is not compensated for by the closely related connexin CX30, which is abundantly expressed in the same cochlear cells. Here, using two mouse models of CX26-associated deafness, we demonstrate that disruption of the CX26-dependent gap junction plaque (GJP) is the earliest observable change during embryonic development of mice with connexin-associated deafness. Loss of CX26 resulted in a drastic reduction in the GJP area and protein level and was associated with excessive endocytosis with increased expression of caveolin 1 and caveolin 2. Furthermore, expression of deafness-associated CX26 and CX30 in cell culture resulted in visible disruption of GJPs and loss of function. Our results demonstrate that deafness-associated mutations in CX26 induce the macromolecular degradation of large gap junction complexes accompanied by an increase in caveolar structures.

  20. Talin 1 and 2 are required for myoblast fusion, sarcomere assembly and the maintenance of myotendinous junctions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Francesco J.; Monkley, Sue J.; Wood, Malcolm R.; Critchley, David R.; Müller, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Summary Talin 1 and 2 connect integrins to the actin cytoskeleton and regulate the affinity of integrins for ligands. In skeletal muscle, talin 1 regulates the stability of myotendinous junctions (MTJs), but the function of talin 2 in skeletal muscle is not known. Here we show that MTJ integrity is affected in talin 2-deficient mice. Concomitant ablation of talin 1 and 2 leads to defects in myoblast fusion and sarcomere assembly, resembling defects in muscle lacking β1 integrins. Talin 1/2-deficient myoblasts express functionally active β1 integrins, suggesting that defects in muscle development are not primarily caused by defects in ligand binding, but rather by disruptions of the interaction of integrins with the cytoskeleton. Consistent with this finding, assembly of integrin adhesion complexes is perturbed in the remaining muscle fibers of talin 1/2-deficient mice. We conclude that talin 1 and 2 are crucial for skeletal muscle development, where they regulate myoblast fusion, sarcomere assembly and the maintenance of MTJs. PMID:19793892

  1. Morse potential-based model for contacting composite rough surfaces: Application to self-assembled monolayer junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra-Suarez, Jonatan A.; Majumdar, Shubhaditya; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Malen, Jonathan A.; Higgs, C. Fred

    2016-04-01

    This work formulates a rough surface contact model that accounts for adhesion through a Morse potential and plasticity through the Kogut-Etsion finite element-based approximation. Compared to the commonly used Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, the Morse potential provides a more accurate and generalized description for modeling covalent materials and surface interactions. An extension of this contact model to describe composite layered surfaces is presented and implemented to study a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) grown on a gold substrate placed in contact with a second gold substrate. Based on a comparison with prior experimental measurements of the thermal conductance of this SAM junction [Majumdar et al., Nano Lett. 15, 2985-2991 (2015)], the more general Morse potential-based contact model provides a better prediction of the percentage contact area than an equivalent LJ potential-based model.

  2. Pronounced Environmental Effects on Injection Currents in EGaIn Tunneling Junctions Comprising Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Large-area tunneling junctions using eutectic Ga–In (EGaIn) as a top contact have proven to be a robust, reproducible, and technologically relevant platform for molecular electronics. Thus far, the majority of studies have focused on saturated molecules with backbones consisting mainly of alkanes in which the frontier orbitals are either highly localized or energetically inaccessible. We show that self-assembled monolayers of wire-like oligophenyleneethynylenes (OPEs), which are fully conjugated, only exhibit length-dependent tunneling behavior in a low-O2 environment. We attribute this unexpected behavior to the sensitivity of injection current on environment. We conclude that, contrary to previous reports, the self-limiting layer of Ga2O3 strongly influences transport properties and that the effect is related to the wetting behavior of the electrode. This result sheds light on the nature of the electrode–molecule interface and suggests that adhesive forces play a significant role in tunneling charge-transport in large-area molecular junctions. PMID:27738488

  3. Intracellular Transport, Assembly, and Degradation of Wild-Type and Disease-linked Mutant Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    VanSlyke, Judy K.; Deschenes, Suzanne M.; Musil, Linda S.

    2000-01-01

    More than 130 different mutations in the gap junction integral plasma membrane protein connexin32 (Cx32) have been linked to the human peripheral neuropathy X-linked Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMTX). How these various mutants are processed by the cell and the mechanism(s) by which they cause CMTX are unknown. To address these issues, we have studied the intracellular transport, assembly, and degradation of three CMTX-linked Cx32 mutants stably expressed in PC12 cells. Each mutant had a distinct fate: E208K Cx32 appeared to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas both the E186K and R142W mutants were transported to perinuclear compartments from which they trafficked either to lysosomes (R142W Cx32) or back to the ER (E186K Cx32). Despite these differences, each mutant was soluble in nonionic detergent but unable to assemble into homomeric connexons. Degradation of both mutant and wild-type connexins was rapid (t1/2 < 3 h) and took place at least in part in the ER by a process sensitive to proteasome inhibitors. The mutants studied are therefore unlikely to cause disease by accumulating in degradation-resistant aggregates but instead are efficiently cleared from the cell by quality control processes that prevent abnormal connexin molecules from traversing the secretory pathway. PMID:10848620

  4. Key role of heparan sulfate chains in assembly of anchoring complex at the dermal-epidermal junction.

    PubMed

    Iriyama, Shunsuke; Tsunenaga, Makoto; Amano, Satoshi; Adachi, Eijiro

    2011-11-01

    Epidermal basement membrane forms anchoring complex composed of hemidesmosomes, anchoring filaments, lamina densa and anchoring fibrils to link epidermis to dermis. However, the anchoring complex is rarely formed in skin equivalent models, probably because of degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and heparan sulfate chains by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and heparanase, respectively. To explore the roles of ECM proteins and heparan sulfate in anchoring complex assembly, we used specific inhibitors of MMPs and heparanase, and the formation of anchoring complex was analysed in terms of polarized deposition of collagen VII, BP180 and β4 integrin at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) by means of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deposition of collagen VII was polarized to the basal side by the addition of MMP inhibitor, and the staining intensity was increased by combined treatment with MMP inhibitor and heparanase inhibitor, which enhanced anchoring fibril formation as observed by TEM. BP180 was polarized to the basal side by heparanase inhibitor, which protects HS chains, but not by MMP inhibitor. MMP inhibitor improved the polarization of β4 integrin. Hemidesmosomes were formed in the presence of each inhibitor, as observed by TEM, and formation was greatly enhanced by the combined treatment. These findings suggest that heparan sulfate chains, in addition to ECM proteins at the DEJ, play an important role in the assembly of anchoring complex, especially hemidesmosomes and anchoring fibrils. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Self-assembled molecular p/n junctions for applications in dye-sensitized solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Farnum, Byron H; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Meyer, Thomas J

    2016-09-01

    The achievement of long-lived photoinduced redox separation lifetimes has long been a central goal of molecular-based solar energy conversion strategies. The longer the redox-separation lifetime, the more time available for useful work to be extracted from the absorbed photon energy. Here we describe a novel strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy applications in which redox-separated lifetimes on the order of milliseconds to seconds can be achieved based on a simple toolkit of molecular components. Specifically, molecular chromophores (C), electron acceptors (A) and electron donors (D) were self-assembled on the surfaces of mesoporous, transparent conducting indium tin oxide nanoparticle (nanoITO) electrodes to prepare both photoanode (nanoITO|-A-C-D) and photocathode (nanoITO|-D-C-A) assemblies. Nanosecond transient-absorption and steady-state photolysis measurements show that the electrodes function microscopically as molecular analogues of semiconductor p/n junctions. These results point to a new chemical strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy conversion based on molecular excited states and electron acceptors/donors on the surfaces of transparent conducting oxide nanoparticle electrodes.

  6. Sample Preconcentration Utilizing Nanofractures Generated by Junction Gap Breakdown Assisted by Self-Assembled Monolayer of Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Chun-Ping; Amstislavskaya, Tamara G.; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Yu-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The preconcentration of proteins with low concentrations can be used to increase the sensitivity and accuracy of detection. A nonlinear electrokinetic flow is induced in a nanofluidic channel due to the overlap of electrical double layers, resulting in the fast accumulation of proteins, referred to as the exclusion-enrichment effect. The proposed chip for protein preconcentration was fabricated using simple standard soft lithography with a polydimethylsiloxane replica. This study extends our previous paper, in which gold nanoparticles were manually deposited onto the surface of a protein preconcentrator. In the present work, nanofractures were formed by utilizing the self-assembly of gold-nanoparticle-assisted electric breakdown. This reliable method for nanofracture formation, involving self-assembled monolayers of nanoparticles at the junction gap between microchannels, also decreases the required electric breakdown voltage. The experimental results reveal that a high concentration factor of 1.5×104 for a protein sample with an extremely low concentration of 1 nM was achieved in 30 min by using the proposed chip, which is faster than our previously proposed chip at the same conditions. Moreover, an immunoassay of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA was carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed chip. PMID:25970592

  7. Self-assembled molecular p/n junctions for applications in dye-sensitized solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnum, Byron H.; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2016-09-01

    The achievement of long-lived photoinduced redox separation lifetimes has long been a central goal of molecular-based solar energy conversion strategies. The longer the redox-separation lifetime, the more time available for useful work to be extracted from the absorbed photon energy. Here we describe a novel strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy applications in which redox-separated lifetimes on the order of milliseconds to seconds can be achieved based on a simple toolkit of molecular components. Specifically, molecular chromophores (C), electron acceptors (A) and electron donors (D) were self-assembled on the surfaces of mesoporous, transparent conducting indium tin oxide nanoparticle (nanoITO) electrodes to prepare both photoanode (nanoITO|-A-C-D) and photocathode (nanoITO|-D-C-A) assemblies. Nanosecond transient-absorption and steady-state photolysis measurements show that the electrodes function microscopically as molecular analogues of semiconductor p/n junctions. These results point to a new chemical strategy for dye-sensitized solar energy conversion based on molecular excited states and electron acceptors/donors on the surfaces of transparent conducting oxide nanoparticle electrodes.

  8. Optical modulation of nano-gap tunnelling junctions comprising self-assembled monolayers of hemicyanine dyes

    PubMed Central

    Pourhossein, Parisa; Vijayaraghavan, Ratheesh K.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Chiechi, Ryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Light-driven conductance switching in molecular tunnelling junctions that relies on photoisomerization is constrained by the limitations of kinetic traps and either by the sterics of rearranging atoms in a densely packed monolayer or the small absorbance of individual molecules. Here we demonstrate light-driven conductance gating; devices comprising monolayers of hemicyanine dyes trapped between two metallic nanowires exhibit higher conductance under irradiation than in the dark. The modulation of the tunnelling current occurs faster than the timescale of the measurement (∼1 min). We propose a mechanism in which a fraction of molecules enters an excited state that brings the conjugated portion of the monolayer into resonance with the electrodes. This mechanism is supported by calculations showing the delocalization of molecular orbitals near the Fermi energy in the excited and cationic states, but not the ground state and a reasonable change in conductance with respect to the effective barrier width. PMID:27272394

  9. Assembly of transverse tubule architecture in the middle and myotendinous junctional regions in developing rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Susumu; McGrath, Kelly F; Yuki, Atsumu; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Kasuga, Norikatsu; Takekura, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    The transverse (t)-tubule is responsible for the rapid inward spread of excitation from the sarcolemma to the inside of the muscle fiber, and the compartments of the t-tubule become highly and regularly organized during development. Although it is known that skeletal muscle fibers lengthen by adding sarcomeres at the myotendinous junction (MTJ) during development, no specific model exists for the assembly of new t-tubule architecture at the MTJ. We performed an electron-microscopic examination of the assembly of t-tubule architecture at the MTJ in developing rat skeletal muscle fibers. Although the longitudinally oriented t-tubule elements represent only a small fraction of the total t-tubule system in adult muscle fibers, they were observed at both A-band and I-band regions of middle and MTJ regions in early developmental stages, and gradually disappeared in the middle regions of muscle fibers during development; however, they remained in the MTJ even in adult muscle fibers. The frequency of pentads and heptads (two or three t-tubule elements with three or four elements of terminal cisternae, closely aligned with terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum) decreased during development, with sudden decrease between 7 and 10 weeks of age in the middle regions. Interestingly, although the frequency of decrease appeared to be higher in the middle region than in the MTJ regions in early (3- to 7-week) development, this pattern reversed, and the frequency of decrease was higher in the MTJ in later development (after 10 weeks of age). The MTJ maintained the features of immature membrane systems involved in e-c coupling much longer than the middle region of the fiber during development. The assembly of t-tubule architecture during postnatal development thus follows different processes in the middle and MTJ regions of skeletal muscle fibers.

  10. Desmosome assembly and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, Oxana; Green, Kathleen J

    2013-11-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that anchor intermediate filaments (IFs) to the plasma membrane, forming a supracellular scaffold that provides mechanical resilience to tissues. This anchoring function is accomplished by specialized members of the cadherin family and associated cytoskeletal linking proteins, which together form a highly organized membrane core flanked by mirror-image cytoplasmic plaques. Due to the biochemical insolubility of desmosomes, the mechanisms that govern assembly of these components into a functional organelle remained elusive. Recently developed molecular reporters and live cell imaging approaches have provided powerful new tools to monitor this finely tuned process in real time. Here we discuss studies that are beginning to decipher the machinery and regulation governing desmosome assembly and homeostasis in situ and how these mechanisms are affected during disease pathogenesis.

  11. Mesenchymal-epithelial transitions: spontaneous and cumulative syntheses of epithelial marker molecules and their assemblies to novel cell junctions connecting human hematopoietic tumor cells to carcinomatoid tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen

    2011-12-01

    Using biochemical as well as light- and electron-microscopic immunolocalization methods, in cultures of unicellular human blood tumor cells, we have studied the phenomenon of spontaneous and cumulative syntheses of certain epithelial proteins and glycoproteins and their assemblies to two major kinds of novel cell-cell junctions, adhering junctions (AJs) and junctions based on the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). More than two decades, we have selected and characterized clonal sublines of multipotential hematopoietic K562 cells, which are enriched in newly formed AJs based on cis-clusters of desmoglein Dsg2, in some sublines accompanied by desmocollin Dsc2. Both desmosomal cadherins can be anchored in a submembranous plaque containing plakoglobin and plakophilins Pkp2 and Pkp3, with or without other armadillo proteins and desmoplakin. Also, these cells are often connected by an additional, extended junction system, in which the transmembrane epithelial glycoprotein EpCAM is associated with a cytoplasmic plaque rich in several actin-binding proteins such as afadin, α-actinin, ezrin and vinculin. Both kinds of junctions contribute to connections of K562 cells into epithelioid monolayers or even three-dimensional, tissue-like structures, thus markedly changing the cell biological nature and behavior of the resulting tumor subforms (mesenchymal-epithelial transitions). We discuss molecular mechanisms involved in the formation and function of these junctions, also with respect to tumor spread and metastasis, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic consequences.

  12. A Single-Level Tunnel Model to Account for Electrical Transport through Single Molecule- and Self-Assembled Monolayer-based Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Yuan, Li; Wang, Lejia; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Thompon, Damien; del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis aimed at understanding electrical conduction in molecular tunnel junctions. We focus on discussing the validity of coherent versus incoherent theoretical formulations for single-level tunneling to explain experimental results obtained under a wide range of experimental conditions, including measurements in individual molecules connecting the leads of electromigrated single-electron transistors and junctions of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of molecules sandwiched between two macroscopic contacts. We show that the restriction of transport through a single level in solid state junctions (no solvent) makes coherent and incoherent tunneling formalisms indistinguishable when only one level participates in transport. Similar to Marcus relaxation processes in wet electrochemistry, the thermal broadening of the Fermi distribution describing the electronic occupation energies in the electrodes accounts for the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on temperature. We demonstrate that a single-level tunnel model satisfactorily explains experimental results obtained in three different molecular junctions (both single-molecule and SAM-based) formed by ferrocene-based molecules. Among other things, we use the model to map the electrostatic potential profile in EGaIn-based SAM junctions in which the ferrocene unit is placed at different positions within the molecule, and we find that electrical screening gives rise to a strongly non-linear profile across the junction. PMID:27216489

  13. Printing-based assembly of quadruple-junction four-terminal microscale solar cells and their use in high-efficiency modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Xing; Bower, Christopher A.; Bonafede, Salvatore; Wilson, John W.; Fisher, Brent; Meitl, Matthew; Yuen, Homan; Wang, Shuodao; Shen, Ling; Banks, Anthony R.; Corcoran, Christopher J.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Burroughs, Scott; Rogers, John A.

    2014-06-01

    Expenses associated with shipping, installation, land, regulatory compliance and on-going maintenance and operations of utility-scale photovoltaics can be significantly reduced by increasing the power conversion efficiency of solar modules through improved materials, device designs and strategies for light management. Single-junction cells have performance constraints defined by their Shockley-Queisser limits. Multi-junction cells can achieve higher efficiencies, but epitaxial and current matching requirements between the single junctions in the devices hinder progress. Mechanical stacking of independent multi-junction cells circumvents these disadvantages. Here we present a fabrication approach for the realization of mechanically assembled multi-junction cells using materials and techniques compatible with large-scale manufacturing. The strategy involves printing-based stacking of microscale solar cells, sol-gel processes for interlayers with advanced optical, electrical and thermal properties, together with unusual packaging techniques, electrical matching networks, and compact ultrahigh-concentration optics. We demonstrate quadruple-junction, four-terminal solar cells with measured efficiencies of 43.9% at concentrations exceeding 1,000 suns, and modules with efficiencies of 36.5%.

  14. Printing-based assembly of quadruple-junction four-terminal microscale solar cells and their use in high-efficiency modules.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xing; Bower, Christopher A; Bonafede, Salvatore; Wilson, John W; Fisher, Brent; Meitl, Matthew; Yuen, Homan; Wang, Shuodao; Shen, Ling; Banks, Anthony R; Corcoran, Christopher J; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Burroughs, Scott; Rogers, John A

    2014-06-01

    Expenses associated with shipping, installation, land, regulatory compliance and on-going maintenance and operations of utility-scale photovoltaics can be significantly reduced by increasing the power conversion efficiency of solar modules through improved materials, device designs and strategies for light management. Single-junction cells have performance constraints defined by their Shockley-Queisser limits. Multi-junction cells can achieve higher efficiencies, but epitaxial and current matching requirements between the single junctions in the devices hinder progress. Mechanical stacking of independent multi-junction cells circumvents these disadvantages. Here we present a fabrication approach for the realization of mechanically assembled multi-junction cells using materials and techniques compatible with large-scale manufacturing. The strategy involves printing-based stacking of microscale solar cells, sol-gel processes for interlayers with advanced optical, electrical and thermal properties, together with unusual packaging techniques, electrical matching networks, and compact ultrahigh-concentration optics. We demonstrate quadruple-junction, four-terminal solar cells with measured efficiencies of 43.9% at concentrations exceeding 1,000 suns, and modules with efficiencies of 36.5%.

  15. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Silvia; Engelhardt, Britta

    2015-05-25

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. © 2015 Tietz and Engelhardt.

  16. Fluid shear, intercellular stress, and endothelial cell alignment.

    PubMed

    Steward, Robert; Tambe, Dhananjay; Hardin, C Corey; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2015-04-15

    Endothelial cell alignment along the direction of laminar fluid flow is widely understood to be a defining morphological feature of vascular homeostasis. While the role of associated signaling and structural events have been well studied, associated intercellular stresses under laminar fluid shear have remained ill-defined and the role of these stresses in the alignment process has remained obscure. To fill this gap, we report here the tractions as well as the complete in-plane intercellular stress fields measured within the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer subjected to a steady laminar fluid shear of 1 Pa. Tractions, intercellular stresses, as well as their time course, heterogeneity, and anisotropy, were measured using monolayer traction microscopy and monolayer stress microscopy. Prior to application of laminar fluid flow, intercellular stresses were largely tensile but fluctuated dramatically in space and in time (317 ± 122 Pa). Within 12 h of the onset of laminar fluid flow, the intercellular stresses decreased substantially but continued to fluctuate dramatically (142 ± 84 Pa). Moreover, tractions and intercellular stresses aligned strongly and promptly (within 1 h) along the direction of fluid flow, whereas the endothelial cell body aligned less strongly and substantially more slowly (12 h). Taken together, these results reveal that steady laminar fluid flow induces prompt reduction in magnitude and alignment of tractions and intercellular stress tensor components followed by the retarded elongation and alignment of the endothelial cell body. Appreciably smaller intercellular stresses supported by cell-cell junctions logically favor smaller incidence of gap formation and thus improved barrier integrity.

  17. Fluid shear, intercellular stress, and endothelial cell alignment

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Robert; Tambe, Dhananjay; Hardin, C. Corey; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell alignment along the direction of laminar fluid flow is widely understood to be a defining morphological feature of vascular homeostasis. While the role of associated signaling and structural events have been well studied, associated intercellular stresses under laminar fluid shear have remained ill-defined and the role of these stresses in the alignment process has remained obscure. To fill this gap, we report here the tractions as well as the complete in-plane intercellular stress fields measured within the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer subjected to a steady laminar fluid shear of 1 Pa. Tractions, intercellular stresses, as well as their time course, heterogeneity, and anisotropy, were measured using monolayer traction microscopy and monolayer stress microscopy. Prior to application of laminar fluid flow, intercellular stresses were largely tensile but fluctuated dramatically in space and in time (317 ± 122 Pa). Within 12 h of the onset of laminar fluid flow, the intercellular stresses decreased substantially but continued to fluctuate dramatically (142 ± 84 Pa). Moreover, tractions and intercellular stresses aligned strongly and promptly (within 1 h) along the direction of fluid flow, whereas the endothelial cell body aligned less strongly and substantially more slowly (12 h). Taken together, these results reveal that steady laminar fluid flow induces prompt reduction in magnitude and alignment of tractions and intercellular stress tensor components followed by the retarded elongation and alignment of the endothelial cell body. Appreciably smaller intercellular stresses supported by cell-cell junctions logically favor smaller incidence of gap formation and thus improved barrier integrity. PMID:25652451

  18. Thiol-terminated monolayers on oxide-free Si: assembly of semiconductor-alkyl-S-metal junctions.

    PubMed

    Böcking, Till; Salomon, Adi; Cahen, David; Gooding, J Justin

    2007-03-13

    Self-assembled monolayers formed by thermal hydrosilylation of a trifluoroacetyl-protected alkenylthiol on Si-H surfaces, followed by removal of the protecting groups, yield essentially oxide-free monolayers suitable for the formation of Si-C11H22-S-Hg and Si-C11H22-S-Au junctions in which the alkyl chains are chemically bound to the silicon surface (via Si-C bonds) and the metal electrode (via Hg-S or Au-S bonds). Two barriers to charge transport are present in the system: at low bias the current is temperature activated and hence limited by thermionic emission over the Schottky barrier in the silicon, whereas as at high bias transport is limited by tunneling through the organic monolayer. The thiol-terminated monolayer on oxide-free silicon provides a well-characterized system allowing a careful study of the importance of the interfacial bond to the metal electrode for current transport through saturated molecules.

  19. Structures and electrical properties of single nanoparticle junctions assembled using LaC2-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Tezura, Manabu; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2016-07-14

    As the miniaturization of integrated circuits advances, electronics using single molecules and nanosize particles are being studied increasingly. Single nanoparticle junctions (SNPJs) consist of two electrodes sandwiching a single nanoparticle. Nanocarbons with nanospaces in their center, such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanocapsules (CNCs), are expected to be elements of advanced SNPJs. In this study, SNPJs were assembled using lanthanum dicarbide (LaC2)-encapsulating CNCs and two gold (Au) electrodes by a nanotip operation inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The atomic configuration and electrical resistance of the SNPJs were investigated in situ. The results implied that the electrical resistance of the SNPJ depended on the interface structures of the contacts between the CNC and Au electrodes, i.e., the contact electrical resistance, and the greatest portion of the current through the SNPJ flowed along the outermost carbon layer of the CNC. Thus, the resistance of the SNPJs using the CNCs was demonstrated and the electrical conduction mechanism of one of the CNC was discussed in this study.

  20. Structures and electrical properties of single nanoparticle junctions assembled using LaC2-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Tezura, Manabu; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2016-01-01

    As the miniaturization of integrated circuits advances, electronics using single molecules and nanosize particles are being studied increasingly. Single nanoparticle junctions (SNPJs) consist of two electrodes sandwiching a single nanoparticle. Nanocarbons with nanospaces in their center, such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanocapsules (CNCs), are expected to be elements of advanced SNPJs. In this study, SNPJs were assembled using lanthanum dicarbide (LaC2)-encapsulating CNCs and two gold (Au) electrodes by a nanotip operation inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The atomic configuration and electrical resistance of the SNPJs were investigated in situ. The results implied that the electrical resistance of the SNPJ depended on the interface structures of the contacts between the CNC and Au electrodes, i.e., the contact electrical resistance, and the greatest portion of the current through the SNPJ flowed along the outermost carbon layer of the CNC. Thus, the resistance of the SNPJs using the CNCs was demonstrated and the electrical conduction mechanism of one of the CNC was discussed in this study. PMID:27412856

  1. Structures and electrical properties of single nanoparticle junctions assembled using LaC2-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezura, Manabu; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2016-07-01

    As the miniaturization of integrated circuits advances, electronics using single molecules and nanosize particles are being studied increasingly. Single nanoparticle junctions (SNPJs) consist of two electrodes sandwiching a single nanoparticle. Nanocarbons with nanospaces in their center, such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanocapsules (CNCs), are expected to be elements of advanced SNPJs. In this study, SNPJs were assembled using lanthanum dicarbide (LaC2)-encapsulating CNCs and two gold (Au) electrodes by a nanotip operation inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The atomic configuration and electrical resistance of the SNPJs were investigated in situ. The results implied that the electrical resistance of the SNPJ depended on the interface structures of the contacts between the CNC and Au electrodes, i.e., the contact electrical resistance, and the greatest portion of the current through the SNPJ flowed along the outermost carbon layer of the CNC. Thus, the resistance of the SNPJs using the CNCs was demonstrated and the electrical conduction mechanism of one of the CNC was discussed in this study.

  2. Gap junctions and tissue business: problems and strategies for developing specific functional reagents.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A; Musil, L S

    1993-01-01

    The complex and overlapping tissue distribution of different members of the gap junctional connexin protein family is reviewed. Intermixing of different connexins in the building of intercellular channels and translational and posttranslational regulation of gap junctional channels add additional challenges to the interpretation of the possible functions played by gap junction-mediated intercellular communication in tissue business.

  3. Modelling intercellular communication and its effects on tumour invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badoual, M.; Deroulers, C.; Aubert, M.; Grammaticos, B.

    2010-12-01

    We present a model aiming at the description of intercellular communication on the invasive character of gliomas. We start from a previous model of ours based on a cellular automaton and develop a new version of it in a three-dimensional geometry. Introducing the hydrodynamic limit of the automaton we obtain a macroscopic model involving a nonlinear diffusion equation. We show that this macroscopic model is quite adequate for the description of realistic situations. Comparison of the simulations with experimental results shows agreement with the finding that the inhibition of intercellular communication (through gap junctions) tends to decrease migration. As an application of our model we estimated the possible increase in life expectancy, due to reduced cell migration mediated by the inhibition of intercellular communication, on patients suffering from gliomas. We find that the obtained increase may amount to a 20% gain in the case of unresectable tumours.

  4. Tight junctions as regulators of tissue remodelling.

    PubMed

    Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2016-10-01

    Formation of tissue barriers by epithelial and endothelial cells requires neighbouring cells to interact via intercellular junctions, which includes tight junctions. Tight junctions form a semipermeable paracellular diffusion barrier and act as signalling hubs that guide cell behaviour and differentiation. Components of tight junctions are also expressed in cell types not forming tight junctions, such as cardiomyocytes, where they associate with facia adherens and/or gap junctions. This review will focus on tight junction proteins and their importance in tissue homeostasis and remodelling with a particular emphasis on what we have learned from animal models and human diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Structure of components of an intercellular channel complex in sporulating Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; McFeat, Amanda; Fogg, Mark J.; Wilson, Keith S.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Following asymmetric cell division during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis, a forespore expressed membrane protein SpoIIQ, interacts across an intercellular space with a mother cell-expressed membrane protein, SpoIIIAH. Their interaction can serve as a molecular “ratchet” contributing to the migration of the mother cell membrane around that of the forespore in a phagocytosis-like process termed engulfment. Upon completion of engulfment, SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH are integral components of a recently proposed intercellular channel allowing passage from the mother cell into the forespore of factors required for late gene expression in this compartment. Here we show that the extracellular domains of SpoIIQ and SpoIIIAH form a heterodimeric complex in solution. The crystal structure of this complex reveals that SpoIIQ has a LytM-like zinc-metalloprotease fold but with an incomplete zinc coordination sphere and no metal. SpoIIIAH has an α-helical subdomain and a protruding β-sheet subdomain, which mediates interactions with SpoIIQ. SpoIIIAH has sequence and structural homology to EscJ, a type III secretion system protein that forms a 24-fold symmetric ring. Superposition of the structures of SpoIIIAH and EscJ reveals that the SpoIIIAH protomer overlaps with two adjacent protomers of EscJ, allowing us to generate a dodecameric SpoIIIAH ring by using structural homology. Following this superposition, the SpoIIQ chains also form a closed dodecameric ring abutting the SpoIIIAH ring, producing an assembly surrounding a 60 Å channel. The dimensions and organization of the proposed complex suggest it is a plausible model for the extracellular component of a gap junction-like intercellular channel. PMID:22431604

  6. Intercellular Ca2+ Waves: Mechanisms and Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular calcium (Ca2+) waves (ICWs) represent the propagation of increases in intracellular Ca2+ through a syncytium of cells and appear to be a fundamental mechanism for coordinating multicellular responses. ICWs occur in a wide diversity of cells and have been extensively studied in vitro. More recent studies focus on ICWs in vivo. ICWs are triggered by a variety of stimuli and involve the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. The propagation of ICWs predominately involves cell communication with internal messengers moving via gap junctions or extracellular messengers mediating paracrine signaling. ICWs appear to be important in both normal physiology as well as pathophysiological processes in a variety of organs and tissues including brain, liver, retina, cochlea, and vascular tissue. We review here the mechanisms of initiation and propagation of ICWs, the key intra- and extracellular messengers (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ATP) mediating ICWs, and the proposed physiological functions of ICWs. PMID:22811430

  7. Effect of cAMP derivates on assembly and maintenance of tight junctions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Beese, Michaela; Wyss, Kristin; Haubitz, Marion; Kirsch, Torsten

    2010-09-07

    Endothelial tight and adherens junctions control a variety of physiological processes like adhesion, paracellular transport of solutes or trafficking of activated leukocytes. Formation and maintenance of endothelial junctions largely depend on the microenvironment of the specific vascular bed and on interactions of the endothelium with adjacent cell types. Consequently, primary cultures of endothelial cells often lose their specific junctional pattern and fail to establish tight monolayer in vitro. This is also true for endothelial cells isolated from the vein of human umbilical cords (HUVEC) which are widely used as model for endothelial cell-related studies. We here compared the effect of cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and its derivates on formation and stabilization of tight junctions and on alterations in paracellular permeability in HUVEC. We demonstrated by light and confocal laser microscopy that for shorter time periods the sodium salt of 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP/Na) and for longer incubation periods 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (pCPT-cAMP) exerted the greatest effects of all compounds tested here on formation of continuous tight junction strands in HUVEC. We further demonstrated that although all compounds induced protein kinase A-dependent expression of the tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin only pCPT-cAMP slightly enhanced paracellular barrier functions. Moreover, we showed that pCPT-cAMP and 8-Br-cAMP/Na induced expression and membrane translocation of tricellulin. pCPT-cAMP and, to a lesser extend, 8-Br-cAMP/Na improved formation of continuous tight junction strands and decreased paracellular permeability in primary HUVEC. We concluded that under these conditions HUVEC represent a feasible in vitro model to study formation and disassembly of endothelial tight junctions and to characterize tight junction-associated proteins.

  8. Effect of cAMP derivates on assembly and maintenance of tight junctions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Endothelial tight and adherens junctions control a variety of physiological processes like adhesion, paracellular transport of solutes or trafficking of activated leukocytes. Formation and maintenance of endothelial junctions largely depend on the microenvironment of the specific vascular bed and on interactions of the endothelium with adjacent cell types. Consequently, primary cultures of endothelial cells often lose their specific junctional pattern and fail to establish tight monolayer in vitro. This is also true for endothelial cells isolated from the vein of human umbilical cords (HUVEC) which are widely used as model for endothelial cell-related studies. Results We here compared the effect of cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and its derivates on formation and stabilization of tight junctions and on alterations in paracellular permeability in HUVEC. We demonstrated by light and confocal laser microscopy that for shorter time periods the sodium salt of 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP/Na) and for longer incubation periods 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (pCPT-cAMP) exerted the greatest effects of all compounds tested here on formation of continuous tight junction strands in HUVEC. We further demonstrated that although all compounds induced protein kinase A-dependent expression of the tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin only pCPT-cAMP slightly enhanced paracellular barrier functions. Moreover, we showed that pCPT-cAMP and 8-Br-cAMP/Na induced expression and membrane translocation of tricellulin. Conclusions pCPT-cAMP and, to a lesser extend, 8-Br-cAMP/Na improved formation of continuous tight junction strands and decreased paracellular permeability in primary HUVEC. We concluded that under these conditions HUVEC represent a feasible in vitro model to study formation and disassembly of endothelial tight junctions and to characterize tight junction-associated proteins PMID:20822540

  9. Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor effects on epithelia. Regulation of intercellular junctions in transformed and nontransformed cell lines, basolateral polarization of c-met receptor in transformed and natural intestinal epithelia, and induction of rapid wound repair in a transformed model epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A; Bacarra, A E; Godowski, P J; Delp-Archer, C; Rosen, E M; Madara, J L

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells rest on a fibroblast sheath. Thus, factors produced by these fibroblasts may influence epithelial function in a paracrine fashion. We examined modulation of intestinal epithelial function by one such fibroblast product, scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/SF). This effect was studied in vitro by using model T84 intestinal epithelial cells. When applied to confluent T84 monolayers, HGF/SF attenuates transepithelial resistance to passive ion flow in a dose-dependent manner (maximum fall at 300 ng/ml, 28% control monolayer resistance, P < 0.001, ED50 of 1.2 nM), t1/2 of 20 h. This functional effect of HGF/SF and distribution of its receptor, c-met, are polarized to the basolateral membranes of T84 intestinal epithelial cells. HGF/SF effects on resistance are not attributable to altered transcellular resistance (opening of Cl- and/or basolateral K+ channels), cytotoxicity, or enhanced cell proliferation; they therefore represent specific regulation of paracellular tight junction resistance. Analysis with biochemically purified rodent HGF/SF and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells reveals that effects on paracellular tight junctions also occur in other nontransformed epithelia. Binding of HGF/SF to its receptor in T84 intestinal epithelial cells is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor. Because loosening of intercellular junctions between cells could facilitate separation, spreading, and migration of epithelial cells during physiologic processes such as wound resealing, we determined the effects of HGF/SF on intestinal epithelial wound resealing using our previously published in vitro model (Nusrat, A., C. Delp, and J. L. Madara. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 89:1501-1511). HGF/SF markedly enhanced wound closure (> 450% increase in rate, P < 0.001) by influencing the migratory and spreading response in not only cells adjoining the wound but also cells many positions removed from the wound. We thus speculate that HGF/SF may

  10. On the ovarian bursa of the golden hamster. II. Intercellular connections in the bursal epithelium and passage of ferritin from the cavity into lymphatics.

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, T; Shinohara, H; Matsuda, T

    1986-01-01

    Cell abutments in the ovarian bursal epithelium of the golden hamster included tight junctions, desmosome-like junctions, gap junctions and zonulae adhaerentes. The plasma membranes of adjacent epithelial cells were often closely apposed forming a zonula adherens at the apex of the intercellular space, but these did not fuse along the entire length of the intercellular space. Gap junctions and other intercellular junctions did not allow diffusion of ferritin into the junctional areas, but failed to prevent ferritin from filling the intercellular space basal to the junction. This suggested that these junctions were not continuous around the entire circumference of the cell. In general, intercellular connections in the bursal epithelium may be labile and this lability, as well as periodic distention of the bursa, may give rise to separation of epithelial cells. Ferritin injected into the bursal cavity reached lymphatics via three routes: (1) via stomata; (2) via gaps and pores; (3) via intercellular spaces. Transcellular transport did not make a major contribution to permeation of ferritin across the bursal epithelium, and ferritin particles did not enter fenestrated blood vessels within 30 minutes after injection. The variety of routes may facilitate rapid and complete drainage of fluid and cellular components from the bursal cavity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Figs. 12-13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Figs. 17-18 PMID:3693080

  11. Intercellular communication and human prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carruba, Giuseppe; Stefano, Rosalba; Cocciadiferro, Letizia; Saladino, Francesca; Di Cristina, Antonietta; Tokar, Erik; Quader, Salmann T A; Webber, Mukta M; Castagnetta, Luigi

    2002-06-01

    Gap-junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC) is required for completion of embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and regulation of cell proliferation and death. Although, as emphasized in several reports, defects or disruption of GJIC may be important in carcinogenesis, the potential role of GJIC in the onset and progression of human prostate cancer remains ill-defined. The gap junction channel-forming connexins (Cx) comprise a multigene family of highly conserved proteins that are differentially expressed in a tissue- and development-specific manner; changes in connexin expression are also commonly seen during cellular differentiation. However, when multiple connexins are concurrently expressed, gap junction channels may consist of more than one connexin species. This is important, because only certain pairings give rise to functional channels. In our studies, we investigated GJIC in a panel of both nontumorigenic (RWPE-1) and malignant (RWPE-2, LNCaP, DU-145) human prostate epithelial cells, compared to a normal rat liver epithelial F344 (WB-1) cell line, as it was found to be junctionally proficient. In addition, expression and regulation of Cx43 and Cx32 were also inspected using western blot analysis. The ability of hormones, antihormones, and the antihypertensive drug forskolin to restore GJIC in nontumorigenic and malignant human prostate epithelial cells was examined by the scrape-loading/dye transfer (SL/DT) or fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) methods using an Ultima laser cytometer. Results from both assays showed that neither nontumorigenic nor malignant prostate cells have functional GJIC. However, both estrone (E1) and forskolin (FK) induced a significant increase (4.4- and 2.8-fold, respectively) in cell-cell communication only in the RWPE-1 cells. Interestingly, the use of Matrigel, a solubilized basement membrane, as substrate for cell attachment and growth resulted in the rescue of GJIC activity in RWPE-1 cells, as

  12. Fabrication of TiO2 hierarchical architecture assembled by nanowires with anatase/TiO2(B) phase-junctions for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yong; Ouyang, Feng

    2017-05-01

    TiO2 hierarchical architecture assembled by nanowires with anatase/TiO2(B) phase-junctions was prepared by a hydrothermal process followed by calcinations. The optimum calcination treatment (450 °C) not only led to the formation of anatase/TiO2(B) phase-junctions, but also kept the morphology of 1D nanowire and hierarchical architecture well. The T-450 load 0.5 wt% Pt cocatalysts showed the best photocatalytic hydrogen production activity, with a maximum hydrogen production rate of 7808 μmol g-1 h-1. The high photocatalytic activity is ascribed to the combined effects of the following three factors: (1) the hierarchical architecture exhibits better light harvesting; (2) the larger specific surface area provides more surface active sites for the photocatalytic reaction; (3) the 1D nanowires and anatase/TiO2(B) phase-junctions both can enhance the separation of photoinduced electron-hole pairs and inhibit their recombination.

  13. Ultrastructural demonstration of Cx43 gap junctions in induced pluripotent stem cells from human cord blood.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Anja; Schubert, Madline; Hainz, Nadine; Haase, Alexandra; Martin, Ulrich; Tschernig, Thomas; Meier, Carola

    2016-11-01

    Gap junction proteins are essential for direct intercellular communication but also influence cellular differentiation and migration. The expression of various connexin gap junction proteins has been demonstrated in embryonic stem cells, with Cx43 being the most intensely studied. As Cx43 is the most prominent gap junction protein in the heart, cardiomyocyte-differentiated stem cells have been studied intensely. To date, however, little is known about the expression and the subcellular distribution of Cx43 in undifferentiated stem cells or about the structural arrangement of channels. We, therefore, here investigate expression of Cx43 in undifferentiated human cord-blood-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (hCBiPS2). For this purpose, we carried out quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. For analysis of Cx43 ultrastructure and protein assembly, we performed freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL). Cx43 expression was detected at mRNA and protein level in hCBIPS2 cells. For the first time, ultrastructural data are presented on gap junction morphology in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from cord blood: Our FRIL and electron microscopical analysis revealed the occurrence of gap junction plaques in undifferentiated iPS cells. In addition, these gap junctions were shown to contain the gap junction protein Cx43.

  14. Non-NMDA-type glutamate receptors are essential for maturation but not for initial assembly of synapses at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Andreas; Qin, Gang; Wichmann, Carolin; Kittel, Robert J; Mertel, Sara; Fouquet, Wernher; Schmidt, Manuela; Heckmann, Manfred; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2006-11-01

    The assembly of glutamatergic postsynaptic densities (PSDs) seems to involve the gradual recruitment of molecular components from diffuse cellular pools. Whether the glutamate receptors themselves are needed to instruct the structural and molecular assembly of the PSD has hardly been addressed. Here, we engineered Drosophila neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) to express none or only drastically reduced amounts of their postsynaptic non-NMDA-type glutamate receptors. At such NMJs, principal synapse formation proceeded and presynaptic active zones showed normal composition and ultrastructure as well as proper glutamate release. At the postsynaptic site, initial steps of molecular and structural assembly took place as well. However, growth of the nascent PSDs to mature size was inhibited, and proteins normally excluded from PSD membranes remained at these apparently immature sites. Intriguingly, synaptic transmission as well as glutamate binding to glutamate receptors appeared dispensable for synapse maturation. Thus, our data suggest that incorporation of non-NMDA-type glutamate receptors and likely their protein-protein interactions with additional PSD components triggers a conversion from an initial to a mature stage of PSD assembly.

  15. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies.

  16. Adenosine opposes thrombin-induced inhibition of intercellular calcium wave in corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    D'hondt, Catheleyne; Srinivas, Sangly P; Vereecke, Johan; Himpens, Bernard

    2007-04-01

    In corneal endothelial cells, intercellular Ca(2+) waves elicited by a mechanical stimulus involve paracrine intercellular communication, mediated by ATP release via connexin hemichannels, as well as gap junctional intercellular communication. Both mechanisms are inhibited by thrombin, which activates RhoA and hence results in myosin light chain phosphorylation. This study was conducted to examine the effects of adenosine, which is known to oppose thrombin-induced RhoA activation, thereby leading to myosin light chain dephosphorylation, on gap junctional intercellular communication and paracrine intercellular communication in cultured bovine corneal endothelial cells. An intercellular Ca(2+) wave was elicited by applying a mechanical stimulus to a single cell in a confluent monolayer. The area of Ca(2+) wave propagation was measured by [Ca(2+)](i) imaging using the fluorescent dye Fluo-4. Gap junctional intercellular communication was assessed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Activity of hemichannels was determined by uptake of the hydrophilic dye Lucifer yellow in a Ca(2+)-free medium containing 2 mM EGTA. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release in response to mechanical stimulation was measured using the luciferin-luciferase technique. Gap26, a connexin mimetic peptide, was used to block hemichannels. Exposure to thrombin or TRAP-6 (a selective PAR-1 agonist) inhibited the Ca(2+) wave propagation by 70%. Pretreatment with adenosine prevented this inhibitory effect of thrombin. NECA (a potent A2B agonist) and forskolin, agents known to elevate cAMP in bovine corneal endothelial cells, also suppressed the effect of thrombin. The A1 receptor agonist CPA failed to inhibit the effect of thrombin. Similar to the effects on Ca(2+) wave propagation, adenosine prevented the thrombin-induced reduction in the fluorescence recovery during photobleaching experiments. Furthermore, pretreatment with adenosine prevented both thrombin and TRAP-6 from blocking the

  17. Multifaceted Roles of Tunneling Nanotubes in Intercellular Communication

    PubMed Central

    Marzo, Ludovica; Gousset, Karine; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication and exchange of materials are vital processes in multicellular organisms during cell development, cell repair, and cell survival. In neuronal and immunological cells, intercellular transmission between neighboring cells occurs via different complex junctions or synapses. Recently, long distance intercellular connections in mammalian cells called tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been described. These structures have been found in numerous cell types and shown to transfer signals and cytosolic materials between distant cells, suggesting that they might play a prominent role in intercellular trafficking. However, these cellular connections are very heterogeneous in both structure and function, giving rise to more questions than answers as to their nature and role as intercellular conduits. To better understand and characterize the functions of TNTs, we have highlighted here the latest discoveries regarding the formation, structure, and role of TNTs in cell-to-cell spreading of various signals and materials. We first gathered information regarding their formation with an emphasis on the triggering mechanisms observed, such as stress and potentially important proteins and/or signaling pathways. We then describe the various types of transfer mechanisms, in relation to signals and cargoes that have been shown recently to take advantage of these structures for intercellular transfer. Because a number of pathogens were shown to use these membrane bridges to spread between cells we also draw attention to specific studies that point toward a role for TNTs in pathogen spreading. In particular we discuss the possible role that TNTs might play in prion spreading, and speculate on their role in neurological diseases in general. PMID:22514537

  18. Gap junctions and connexin hemichannels underpin hemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Jones, Chris I; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Moraes, Leonardo A; Munger, Stephanie J; Wright, Joy R; Ali, Marfoua S; Sage, Tanya; Kaiser, William J; Tucker, Katherine L; Stain, Christopher J; Bye, Alexander P; Jones, Sarah; Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Simon, Alexander M; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2012-05-22

    Connexins are a widespread family of membrane proteins that assemble into hexameric hemichannels, also known as connexons. Connexons regulate membrane permeability in individual cells or couple between adjacent cells to form gap junctions and thereby provide a pathway for regulated intercellular communication. We have examined the role of connexins in platelets, blood cells that circulate in isolation but on tissue injury adhere to each other and the vessel wall to prevent blood loss and to facilitate wound repair. We report the presence of connexins in platelets, notably connexin37, and that the formation of gap junctions within platelet thrombi is required for the control of clot retraction. Inhibition of connexin function modulated a range of platelet functional responses before platelet-platelet contact and reduced laser-induced thrombosis in vivo in mice. Deletion of the Cx37 gene (Gja4) in transgenic mice reduced platelet aggregation, fibrinogen binding, granule secretion, and clot retraction, indicating an important role for connexin37 hemichannels and gap junctions in platelet thrombus function. Together, these data demonstrate that platelet gap junctions and hemichannels underpin the control of hemostasis and thrombosis and represent potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) and spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND During the seminiferous epithelial cycle, restructuring takes places at the Sertoli–Sertoli and Sertoli–germ cell interface to accommodate spermatogonia/spermatogonial stem cell renewal via mitosis, cell cycle progression and meiosis, spermiogenesis and spermiation since developing germ cells, in particular spermatids, move ‘up and down’ the seminiferous epithelium. Furthermore, preleptotene spermatocytes differentiated from type B spermatogonia residing at the basal compartment must traverse the blood–testis barrier (BTB) to enter the adluminal compartment to prepare for meiosis at Stage VIII of the epithelial cycle, a process also accompanied by the release of sperm at spermiation. These cellular events that take place at the opposite ends of the epithelium are co-ordinated by a functional axis designated the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES)—BTB—basement membrane. However, the regulatory molecules that co-ordinate cellular events in this axis are not known. METHODS Literature was searched at http://www.pubmed.org and http://scholar.google.com to identify published findings regarding intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) and the regulation of this axis. RESULTS Members of the ICAM family, namely ICAM-1 and ICAM-2, and the biologically active soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) are the likely regulatory molecules that co-ordinate these events. sICAM-1 and ICAM-1 have antagonistic effects on the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier, involved in Sertoli cell BTB restructuring, whereas ICAM-2 is restricted to the apical ES, regulating spermatid adhesion during the epithelial cycle. Studies in other epithelia/endothelia on the role of the ICAM family in regulating cell movement are discussed and this information has been evaluated and integrated into studies of these proteins in the testis to create a hypothetical model, depicting how ICAMs regulate junction restructuring events during spermatogenesis. CONCLUSIONS ICAMs are crucial

  20. The gap junction cellular internet: connexin hemichannels enter the signalling limelight.

    PubMed

    Evans, W Howard; De Vuyst, Elke; Leybaert, Luc

    2006-07-01

    Cxs (connexins), the protein subunits forming gap junction intercellular communication channels, are transported to the plasma membrane after oligomerizing into hexameric assemblies called connexin hemichannels (CxHcs) or connexons, which dock head-to-head with partner hexameric channels positioned on neighbouring cells. The double membrane channel or gap junction generated directly couples the cytoplasms of interacting cells and underpins the integration and co-ordination of cellular metabolism, signalling and functions, such as secretion or contraction in cell assemblies. In contrast, CxHcs prior to forming gap junctions provide a pathway for the release from cells of ATP, glutamate, NAD+ and prostaglandin E2, which act as paracrine messengers. ATP activates purinergic receptors on neighbouring cells and forms the basis of intercellular Ca2+ signal propagation, complementing that occuring more directly via gap junctions. CxHcs open in response to various types of external changes, including mechanical, shear, ionic and ischaemic stress. In addition, CxHcs are influenced by intracellular signals, such as membrane potential, phosphorylation and redox status, which translate external stresses to CxHc responses. Also, recent studies demonstrate that cytoplasmic Ca2+ changes in the physiological range act to trigger CxHc opening, indicating their involvement under normal non-pathological conditions. CxHcs not only respond to cytoplasmic Ca2+, but also determine cytoplasmic Ca2+, as they are large conductance channels, suggesting a prominent role in cellular Ca2+ homoeostasis and signalling. The functions of gap-junction channels and CxHcs have been difficult to separate, but synthetic peptides that mimic short sequences in the Cx subunit are emerging as promising tools to determine the role of CxHcs in physiology and pathology.

  1. The gap junction cellular internet: connexin hemichannels enter the signalling limelight

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W. Howard; De Vuyst, Elke; Leybaert, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Cxs (connexins), the protein subunits forming gap junction intercellular communication channels, are transported to the plasma membrane after oligomerizing into hexameric assemblies called connexin hemichannels (CxHcs) or connexons, which dock head-to-head with partner hexameric channels positioned on neighbouring cells. The double membrane channel or gap junction generated directly couples the cytoplasms of interacting cells and underpins the integration and co-ordination of cellular metabolism, signalling and functions, such as secretion or contraction in cell assemblies. In contrast, CxHcs prior to forming gap junctions provide a pathway for the release from cells of ATP, glutamate, NAD+ and prostaglandin E2, which act as paracrine messengers. ATP activates purinergic receptors on neighbouring cells and forms the basis of intercellular Ca2+ signal propagation, complementing that occuring more directly via gap junctions. CxHcs open in response to various types of external changes, including mechanical, shear, ionic and ischaemic stress. In addition, CxHcs are influenced by intracellular signals, such as membrane potential, phosphorylation and redox status, which translate external stresses to CxHc responses. Also, recent studies demonstrate that cytoplasmic Ca2+ changes in the physiological range act to trigger CxHc opening, indicating their involvement under normal non-pathological conditions. CxHcs not only respond to cytoplasmic Ca2+, but also determine cytoplasmic Ca2+, as they are large conductance channels, suggesting a prominent role in cellular Ca2+ homoeostasis and signalling. The functions of gap-junction channels and CxHcs have been difficult to separate, but synthetic peptides that mimic short sequences in the Cx subunit are emerging as promising tools to determine the role of CxHcs in physiology and pathology. PMID:16761954

  2. Mouse Middle Ear Ion Homeostasis Channels and Intercellular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lisa M.; DeGagne, Jacqueline M.; Kempton, J. Beth; Hausman, Frances; Trune, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis The middle ear contains homeostatic mechanisms that control the movement of ions and fluids similar to those present in the inner ear, and are altered during inflammation. Background The normal middle ear cavity is fluid-free and air-filled to allow for effective sound transmission. Within the inner ear, the regulation of fluid and ion movement is essential for normal auditory and vestibular function. The same ion and fluid channels active in the inner ear may have similar roles with fluid regulation in the middle ear. Methods Middle and inner ears from BALB/c mice were processed for immunohistochemistry of 10 specific ion homeostasis factors to determine if similar transport and barrier mechanisms are present in the tympanic cavity. Examination also was made of BALB/c mice middle ears after transtympanic injection with heat-killed Haemophilus influenza to determine if these channels are impacted by inflammation. Results The most prominent ion channels in the middle ear included aquaporins 1, 4 and 5, claudin 3, ENaC and Na+,K+-ATPase. Moderate staining was found for GJB2, KCNJ10 and KCNQ1. The inflamed middle ear epithelium showed increased staining due to expected cellular hypertrophy. Localization of ion channels was preserved within the inflamed middle ear epithelium. Conclusions The middle ear epithelium is a dynamic environment with intrinsic mechanisms for the control of ion and water transport to keep the middle ear clear of fluids. Compromise of these processes during middle ear disease may underlie the accumulation of effusions and suggests they may be a therapeutic target for effusion control. PMID:22720014

  3. NMII forms a contractile transcellular sarcomeric network to regulate apical cell junctions and tissue geometry.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Seham; Fujita, Tomoki; Millis, Bryan A; Kozin, Elliott; Ma, Xuefei; Kawamoto, Sachiyo; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hisa, Yasuo; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Kachar, Bechara

    2013-04-22

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) is thought to be the master integrator of force within epithelial apical junctions, mediating epithelial tissue morphogenesis and tensional homeostasis. Mutations in NMII are associated with a number of diseases due to failures in cell-cell adhesion. However, the organization and the precise mechanism by which NMII generates and responds to tension along the intercellular junctional line are still not known. We discovered that periodic assemblies of bipolar NMII filaments interlace with perijunctional actin and α-actinin to form a continuous belt of muscle-like sarcomeric units (∼400-600 nm) around each epithelial cell. Remarkably, the sarcomeres of adjacent cells are precisely paired across the junctional line, forming an integrated, transcellular contractile network. The contraction/relaxation of paired sarcomeres concomitantly impacts changes in apical cell shape and tissue geometry. We show differential distribution of NMII isoforms across heterotypic junctions and evidence for compensation between isoforms. Our results provide a model for how NMII force generation is effected along the junctional perimeter of each cell and communicated across neighboring cells in the epithelial organization. The sarcomeric network also provides a well-defined target to investigate the multiple roles of NMII in junctional homeostasis as well as in development and disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene correction of integrin beta4-dependent pyloric atresia-junctional epidermolysis bullosa keratinocytes establishes a role for beta4 tyrosines 1422 and 1440 in hemidesmosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Dellambra, E; Prislei, S; Salvati, A L; Madeddu, M L; Golisano, O; Siviero, E; Bondanza, S; Cicuzza, S; Orecchia, A; Giancotti, F G; Zambruno, G; De Luca, M

    2001-11-02

    The cytoplasmic domain of beta4 integrin contains two pairs of fibronectin-like repeats separated by a connecting segment. The connecting segment harbors a putative tyrosine activation motif in which tyrosines 1422 and 1440 are phosphorylated in response to alpha6beta4 binding to laminin-5. Primary beta4-null keratinocytes, obtained from a newborn suffering from lethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa, were stably transduced with retroviruses carrying a full-length beta4 cDNA or a beta4 cDNA with phenylalanine substitutions at Tyr-1422 and Tyr-1440. Hemidesmosome assembly was evaluated on organotypic skin cultures. beta4-corrected keratinocytes were indistinguishable from normal cells in terms of alpha6beta4 expression, the localization of hemidesmosome components, and hemidesmosome structure and density, suggesting full genetic and functional correction of beta4-null keratinocytes. In cultures generated from beta4(Y1422F/Y1440F) keratinocytes, beta4 mutants as well as alpha6 integrin, HD1/plectin, and BP180 were not concentrated at the dermal-epidermal junction. Furthermore, the number of hemidesmosomes was strikingly reduced as compared with beta4-corrected keratinocytes. The rare hemidesmosomes detected in beta4(Y1422F/Y1440F) cells were devoid of sub-basal dense plates and of inner cytoplasmic plaques with keratin filament insertion. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the beta4 tyrosine activation motif is not required for the localization of alpha6beta4 at the keratinocyte plasma membrane but is essential for optimal assembly of bona fide hemidesmosomes.

  5. Gap Junctions Couple Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Orthmann-Murphy, Jennifer L.; Abrams, Charles K.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    In vertebrates, a family of related proteins called connexins form gap junctions (GJs), which are intercellular channels. In the central nervous system (CNS), GJs couple oligodendrocytes and astrocytes (O/A junctions) and adjacent astrocytes (A/A junctions), but not adjacent oligodendrocytes, forming a “glial syncytium.” Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes each express different connexins. Mutations of these connexin genes demonstrate that the proper functioning of myelin and oligodendrocytes requires the expression of these connexins. The physiological function of O/A and A/A junctions, however, remains to be illuminated. PMID:18236012

  6. Integration and Modulation of Intercellular Signaling Underlying Blood Flow Control

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular resistance networks control tissue blood flow in concert with regulating arterial perfusion pressure. In response to increased metabolic demand, vasodilation arising in arteriolar networks ascends to encompass proximal feed arteries. By reducing resistance upstream, ascending vasodilation (AVD) increases blood flow into the microcirculation. Once initiated [e.g., through local activation of K+ channels in endothelial cells (ECs)], hyperpolarization is conducted through gap junctions along the endothelium. Via EC projections through the internal elastic lamina, hyperpolarization spreads into the surrounding smooth muscle cells (SMCs) through myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJs) to promote their relaxation. Intercellular signaling through electrical signal transmission (i.e., cell-to-cell conduction) can thereby coordinate vasodilation along and among the branches of microvascular resistance networks. Perivascular sympathetic nerve fibers course through the adventitia and release norepinephrine to stimulate SMCs via α-adrenoreceptors to produce contraction. In turn, SMCs can signal ECs through MEGJs to activate K+ channels and attenuate sympathetic vasoconstriction. Activation of K+ channels along the endothelium will dissipate electrical signal transmission and inhibit AVD, thereby restricting blood flow into the microcirculation while maintaining peripheral resistance and perfusion pressure. This review explores the origins and nature of intercellular signaling governing blood flow control in skeletal muscle with respect to the interplay between AVD and sympathetic innervation. Whereas these interactions are integral to physical daily activity and athletic performance, resolving the interplay between respective signaling events provides insight into how selective interventions can improve tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery during vascular disease. PMID:26368324

  7. Gap junctional communication modulates gene transcription by altering the recruitment of Sp1 and Sp3 to connexin-response elements in osteoblast promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stains, Joseph P.; Lecanda, Fernando; Screen, Joanne; Towler, Dwight A.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins, represent a mechanism of disease in a variety of tissues. We have shown that recessive (gene deletion) or dominant (connexin45 overexpression) disruption of connexin43 function results in osteoblast dysfunction and abnormal expression of osteoblast genes, including down-regulation of osteocalcin transcription. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of gap junction-sensitive transcriptional regulation, we systematically analyzed the rat osteocalcin promoter for sensitivity to gap junctional intercellular communication. We identified an Sp1/Sp3 containing complex that assembles on a minimal element in the -70 to -57 region of the osteocalcin promoter in a gap junction-dependent manner. This CT-rich connexin-response element is necessary and sufficient to confer gap junction sensitivity to the osteocalcin proximal promoter. Repression of osteocalcin transcription occurs as a result of displacement of the stimulatory Sp1 by the inhibitory Sp3 on the promoter when gap junctional communication is perturbed. Modulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment also occurs on the collagen Ialpha1 promoter and translates into gap junction-sensitive transcriptional control of collagen Ialpha1 gene expression. Thus, regulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment to the promoter may represent a potential general mechanism for transcriptional control of target genes by signals passing through gap junctions.

  8. Gap junctional communication modulates gene transcription by altering the recruitment of Sp1 and Sp3 to connexin-response elements in osteoblast promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stains, Joseph P.; Lecanda, Fernando; Screen, Joanne; Towler, Dwight A.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins, represent a mechanism of disease in a variety of tissues. We have shown that recessive (gene deletion) or dominant (connexin45 overexpression) disruption of connexin43 function results in osteoblast dysfunction and abnormal expression of osteoblast genes, including down-regulation of osteocalcin transcription. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of gap junction-sensitive transcriptional regulation, we systematically analyzed the rat osteocalcin promoter for sensitivity to gap junctional intercellular communication. We identified an Sp1/Sp3 containing complex that assembles on a minimal element in the -70 to -57 region of the osteocalcin promoter in a gap junction-dependent manner. This CT-rich connexin-response element is necessary and sufficient to confer gap junction sensitivity to the osteocalcin proximal promoter. Repression of osteocalcin transcription occurs as a result of displacement of the stimulatory Sp1 by the inhibitory Sp3 on the promoter when gap junctional communication is perturbed. Modulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment also occurs on the collagen Ialpha1 promoter and translates into gap junction-sensitive transcriptional control of collagen Ialpha1 gene expression. Thus, regulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment to the promoter may represent a potential general mechanism for transcriptional control of target genes by signals passing through gap junctions.

  9. Bone ridge patterning during musculoskeletal assembly is mediated through SCX regulation of Bmp4 at the tendon-skeleton junction

    PubMed Central

    Blitz, Einat; Viukov, Sergey; Sharir, Amnon; Shwartz, Yulia; Galloway, Jenna L.; Price, Brian A.; Johnson, Randy L.; Tabin, Clifford J.; Schweitzer, Ronen; Zelzer, Elazar

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY During the assembly of the musculoskeletal system, bone ridges provide a stable anchoring point and stress dissipation for the attachment of muscles via tendons to the skeleton. In this study, we investigate the development of the deltoid tuberosity as a model for bone ridge formation. We show that the deltoid tuberosity develops through endochondral ossification in a two-phase process: Initiation is regulated by a signal from the tendons, whereas the subsequent growth phase is muscle-dependent. We then show that the transcription factor scleraxis (SCX) regulates Bmp4 in tendon cells at their insertion site. The inhibition of deltoid tuberosity formation and several other bone ridges in embryos in which Bmp4 expression was blocked specifically in Scx-expressing cells implicates BMP4 as a key mediator of tendon effects on bone ridge formation. This study establishes a mechanistic basis for tendon-skeleton regulatory interactions during musculoskeletal assembly and bone secondary patterning. PMID:20059955

  10. Optical measurements reveal nature of intercellular coupling across ventricular wall.

    PubMed

    Poelzing, Steven; Roth, Bradley J; Rosenbaum, David S

    2005-10-01

    Previously, we showed that intercellular uncoupling through gap junctions is an important mechanism for maintaining transmural heterogeneities of repolarization that are responsible for ventricular arrhythmias in disease states such as heart failure. However, rotational anisotropy between transmural muscle layers also may influence coupling. To determine the effect of rotational anisotropy on transmural coupling, we developed a numerical three-dimensional model of passive cardiac tissue in which rotational anisotropy was varied in a controlled fashion. Simulations of optical mapping demonstrated that spatial averaging produced a voltage decay in space best fit by a single decaying exponential compared with the theoretically predicted decay. As fiber orientation varied by 90 degrees with respect to the transmural surface, the effective transmural space constant (lambda(TM)) changed by only 0.31% in simulations. In contrast, reducing intercellular conductivity by 24% decreased lambda(TM) by 7.7%. In the canine wedge preparation (n = 5), lambda measured by optical mapping of the epicardial and subepicardial surface was similar transverse (lambda(TV) = 0.73 +/- 0.10 mm) and transmural (lambda(TM) = 0.70 +/- 0.08 mm) to subepicardial fibers. We confirmed previous findings that lambda(TM) in subepicardial layers was significantly reduced by 14 +/- 2% compared with deeper layers of myocardium, providing evidence for transmural uncoupling in the epicardial-midmyocardial interface. These data establish the theoretical and experimental basis for measuring intercellular coupling between muscle layers spanning the ventricular wall with optical mapping techniques. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that transmural uncoupling at the epicardial-midmyocardial interface may be attributable to heterogeneous expression of cardiac gap junctions and not rotational anisotropy.

  11. Modular Nuclease-Responsive DNA Three-Way Junction-Based Dynamic Assembly of a DNA Device and Its Sensing Application.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2016-04-05

    Here, we explored a modular strategy for rational design of nuclease-responsive three-way junctions (TWJs) and fabricated a dynamic DNA device in a "plug-and-play" fashion. First, inactivated TWJs were designed, which contained three functional domains: the inaccessible toehold and branch migration domains, the specific sites of nucleases, and the auxiliary complementary sequence. The actions of different nucleases on their specific sites in TWJs caused the close proximity of the same toehold and branch migration domains, resulting in the activation of the TWJs and the formation of a universal trigger for the subsequent dynamic assembly. Second, two hairpins (H1 and H2) were introduced, which could coexist in a metastable state, initially to act as the components for the dynamic assembly. Once the trigger initiated the opening of H1 via TWJs-driven strand displacement, the cascade hybridization of hairpins immediately switched on, resulting in the formation of the concatemers of H1/H2 complex appending numerous integrated G-quadruplexes, which were used to obtain label-free signal readout. The inherent modularity of this design allowed us to fabricate a flexible DNA dynamic device and detect multiple nucleases through altering the recognition pattern slightly. Taking uracil-DNA glycosylase and CpG methyltransferase M.SssI as models, we successfully realized the butt joint between the uracil-DNA glycosylase and M.SssI recognition events and the dynamic assembly process. Furthermore, we achieved ultrasensitive assay of nuclease activity and the inhibitor screening. The DNA device proposed here will offer an adaptive and flexible tool for clinical diagnosis and anticancer drug discovery.

  12. α-Catenin phosphorylation promotes intercellular adhesion through a dual-kinase mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, David J.; Desai, Ridhdhi; Ishiyama, Noboru; Folmsbee, Stephen S.; Novak, Megan N.; Flozak, Annette S.; Daugherty, Rebecca L.; Mo, Rigen; Nanavati, Dhaval; Sarpal, Ritu; Leckband, Deborah; Ikura, Mitsu; Tepass, Ulrich; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cadherin–catenin adhesion complex is a key contributor to epithelial tissue stability and dynamic cell movements during development and tissue renewal. How this complex is regulated to accomplish these functions is not fully understood. We identified several phosphorylation sites in mammalian αE-catenin (also known as catenin α-1) and Drosophila α-Catenin within a flexible linker located between the middle (M)-region and the carboxy-terminal actin-binding domain. We show that this phospho-linker (P-linker) is the main phosphorylated region of α-catenin in cells and is sequentially modified at casein kinase 2 and 1 consensus sites. In Drosophila, the P-linker is required for normal α-catenin function during development and collective cell migration, although no obvious defects were found in cadherin–catenin complex assembly or adherens junction formation. In mammalian cells, non-phosphorylatable forms of α-catenin showed defects in intercellular adhesion using a mechanical dispersion assay. Epithelial sheets expressing phosphomimetic forms of α-catenin showed faster and more coordinated migrations after scratch wounding. These findings suggest that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the α-catenin P-linker are required for normal cadherin–catenin complex function in Drosophila and mammalian cells. PMID:25653389

  13. Distribution of the feline calicivirus receptor junctional adhesion molecule a in feline tissues.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, P A; Stokol, T; Liu, H; van der List, D A; Gaffney, P M; Parker, J S

    2011-03-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that plays an important role in the assembly and maintenance of tight junctions and the establishment of epithelial cell polarity. The feline JAM-A (fJAM-A) is a functional receptor for feline calicivirus (FCV). Among natural diseases associated with FCV infection, isolates that cause oral vesicular disease are detected in epithelial cells; however, isolates that cause systemic disease are detected in multiple cell types. The distribution of an FCV receptor or receptors in feline tissues is relevant to viral pathogenesis in that it should reflect the wide latitude of clinical sequelae associated with FCV infection. The authors examined the expression of feline JAM-A in the cat by using confocal immunofluorescence localization on normal tissues, with special regard to tissue targets of naturally occurring FCV. As described in the human and the mouse, fJAM-A was widely distributed in feline tissues, where it localized at cell-cell junctions of epithelial and endothelial cells. fJAM-A was highly expressed on feline platelets, with lower levels of expression on feline peripheral blood leukocytes. Additionally, FCV infection of a feline epithelial cell monolayer causes redistribution of fJAM-A to the cytosol of infected cells. It is reasonable to propose that the spectrum of lesions caused by FCV reflects disruption of intercellular junctions that rely on fJAM-A function and tight junctional integrity.

  14. Septal Junctions in Filamentous Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Forchhammer, Karl; Maldener, Iris

    2016-02-01

    In the filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, septal junctions that traverse the septal peptidoglycan join adjacent cells, allowing intercellular communication. Perforations in the septal peptidoglycan have been observed, and proteins involved in the formation of such perforations and putative protein components of the septal junctions have been identified, but their relationships are debated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gap Junction in the Teleost Fish Lineage: Duplicated Connexins May Contribute to Skin Pattern Formation and Body Shape Determination

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2017-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow passage of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells. Gap junctions in vertebrates are composed of connexons, which are an assembly of six proteins, connexins. Docking of two connexons on the opposite cell surfaces forms a gap junction between the cytoplasm of two neighboring cells. Connexins compose a family of structurally related four-pass transmembrane proteins. In mammals, there are ~20 connexins, each of which contributes to unique permeability of gap junctions, and mutations of some connexin-encoding genes are associated with human diseases. Zebrafish has been predicted to contain 39 connexin-encoding genes; the high number can be attributed to gene duplication during fish evolution, which resulted in diversified functions of gap junctions in teleosts. The determination of body shapes and skin patterns in animal species is an intriguing question. Mathematical models suggest principle mechanisms explaining the diversification of animal morphology. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of gap junctions in fish morphological diversity, including skin pattern formation and body shape determination. This review focuses on connexins in teleosts, which are integrated in the mathematical models explaining morphological diversity of animal skin patterns and body shapes. PMID:28271062

  16. Cleavage of transmembrane junction proteins and their role in regulating epithelial homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Porfirio; Kamekura, Ryuta; Nusrat, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial tissues form a selective barrier that separates the external environment from the internal tissue milieu. Single epithelial cells are densely packed and associate via distinct intercellular junctions. Intercellular junction proteins not only control barrier properties of the epithelium but also play an important role in regulating epithelial homeostasis that encompasses cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and regulated shedding. Recent studies have revealed that several proteases target epithelial junction proteins during physiological maturation as well as in pathologic states such as inflammation and cancer. This review discusses mechanisms and biological consequences of transmembrane junction protein cleavage. The influence of junction protein cleavage products on pathogenesis of inflammation and cancer is discussed. PMID:24665393

  17. Ischemic preconditioning protects against gap junctional uncoupling in cardiac myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sundset, Rune; Cooper, Marie; Mikalsen, Svein-Ole; Ytrehus, Kirsti

    2004-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning increases the heart's tolerance to a subsequent longer ischemic period. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of gap junction communication in simulated preconditioning in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myofibroblasts. Gap junctional intercellular communication was assessed by Lucifer yellow dye transfer. Preconditioning preserved intercellular coupling after prolonged ischemia. An initial reduction in coupling in response to the preconditioning stimulus was also observed. This may protect neighboring cells from damaging substances produced during subsequent regional ischemia in vivo, and may preserve gap junctional communication required for enhanced functional recovery during subsequent reperfusion.

  18. Self-Assembly Assisted Fabrication of Dextran-Based Nanohydrogels with Reduction-Cleavable Junctions for Applications as Efficient Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Dai, Tingting; Zhou, Shuyan; Huang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Songying; Sun, Kang; Zhou, Guangdong; Dou, Hongjing

    2017-01-01

    In order to overcome the key challenge in improving both fabrication efficiency and their drug delivery capability of anti-cancer drug delivery systems (ACDDS), here polyacrylic acid (PAA) grafted dextran (Dex) nanohydrogels (NGs) with covalent crosslinked structure bearing redox sensitive disulfide crosslinking junctions (Dex-SS-PAA) were synthesized efficiently through a one-step self-assembly assisted methodology (SAA). The Dex-SS-PAA were subsequently conjugated with doxorubicin through an acid-labile hydrazone bond (Dex-SS-PAA-DOX). The in vitro drug release behavior, anti-cancer effects in vivo, and biosafety of the as-prepared acid- and redox-dual responsive biodegradable NGs were systematically investigated. The results revealed that the Dex-SS-PAA-DOX exhibited pH- and redox-controlled drug release, greatly reduced the toxicity of free DOX, while exhibiting a strong ability to inhibit the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumors. Our study demonstrated that the Dex-SS-PAA-DOX NGs are very promising candidates as ACDDS for anti-cancer therapeutics.

  19. Self-Assembly Assisted Fabrication of Dextran-Based Nanohydrogels with Reduction-Cleavable Junctions for Applications as Efficient Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Dai, Tingting; Zhou, Shuyan; Huang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Songying; Sun, Kang; Zhou, Guangdong; Dou, Hongjing

    2017-01-01

    In order to overcome the key challenge in improving both fabrication efficiency and their drug delivery capability of anti-cancer drug delivery systems (ACDDS), here polyacrylic acid (PAA) grafted dextran (Dex) nanohydrogels (NGs) with covalent crosslinked structure bearing redox sensitive disulfide crosslinking junctions (Dex-SS-PAA) were synthesized efficiently through a one-step self-assembly assisted methodology (SAA). The Dex-SS-PAA were subsequently conjugated with doxorubicin through an acid-labile hydrazone bond (Dex-SS-PAA-DOX). The in vitro drug release behavior, anti-cancer effects in vivo, and biosafety of the as-prepared acid- and redox-dual responsive biodegradable NGs were systematically investigated. The results revealed that the Dex-SS-PAA-DOX exhibited pH- and redox-controlled drug release, greatly reduced the toxicity of free DOX, while exhibiting a strong ability to inhibit the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumors. Our study demonstrated that the Dex-SS-PAA-DOX NGs are very promising candidates as ACDDS for anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:28071743

  20. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  1. The tight junction: a multifunctional complex.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Eveline E; Lynch, Robert D

    2004-06-01

    Multicellular organisms are separated from the external environment by a layer of epithelial cells whose integrity is maintained by intercellular junctional complexes composed of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, whereas gap junctions provide for intercellular communication. The aim of this review is to present an updated overview of recent developments in the area of tight junction biology. In a relatively short time, our knowledge of the tight junction has evolved from a relatively simple view of it being a permeability barrier in the paracellular space and a fence in the plane of the plasma membrane to one of it acting as a multicomponent, multifunctional complex that is involved in regulating numerous and diverse cell functions. A group of integral membrane proteins-occludin, claudins, and junction adhesion molecules-interact with an increasingly complex array of tight junction plaque proteins not only to regulate paracellular solute and water flux but also to integrate such diverse processes as gene transcription, tumor suppression, cell proliferation, and cell polarity.

  2. Axonal Ensheathment and Intercellular Barrier Formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blauth, Kevin; Banerjee, Swati; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells are critical players in every major aspect of nervous system development, function, and disease. Other than their traditional supportive role, glial cells perform a variety of important functions such as myelination, synapse formation and plasticity, and establishment of blood–brain and blood–nerve barriers in the nervous system. Recent studies highlight the striking functional similarities between Drosophila and vertebrate glia. In both systems, glial cells play an essential role in neural ensheathment thereby isolating the nervous system and help to create a local ionic microenvironment for conduction of nerve impulses. Here, we review the anatomical aspects and the molecular players that underlie ensheathment during different stages of nervous system development in Drosophila and how these processes lead to the organization of neuroglial junctions. We also discuss some key aspects of the invertebrate axonal ensheathment and junctional organization with that of vertebrate myelination and axon–glial interactions. Finally, we highlight the importance of intercellular junctions in barrier formation in various cellular contexts in Drosophila. We speculate that unraveling the genetic and molecular mechanisms of ensheathment across species might provide key insights into human myelin-related disorders and help in designing therapeutic interventions. PMID:20801419

  3. Opto-electrical studies of self-assembled monolayer diodes and bulk hetero-junction organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndobe, Alexandre

    The present dissertation is the result of our studies of the optical and electrical properties of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) diodes and bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic(BOPV) devices. In our studies of SAM diodes, we fabricated solid-state mixtures of two different kinds of molecules; 1,4 benzene-dimethane-thiol (MeBDT) and 1-pentanethiol (PT). By varying the concentration r of MeBDT with respect to PT, we can go from a regime of isolated molecular wires (10--8 < r 10-3). For r = 0, we found that a potential barrier dominated the transport properties of the device. In the isolated molecules regime, the conductance of MeBDT dominates the transport. In this regime, because of the linearity of the conductance with respect to r, we were able to obtain a "single molecule resistance" at V = 0.1 V of RM = 6x 10--9 . In the aggregated molecules regime, an ohmic response in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics was observed for bias voltages ≤ 0.5V with the appearance of a new band in the differential conductance around V = 0 along with a new double band in the optical gap at 2.4eV resulting in yellow/red photoluminescence emission. Opto-electrical studies of BOPV devices reveal that there are very few similarities between these types of solar cells and conventional solar cells. From simulations and experiemental measurements of the I-V characteristics, we found that while the open voltage circuit (Voc) is important for engineers, it carries no intrinsic information of the device. It cannot exceed the built-in potential of the device (Vbuilt--in ). The later origin was found to be dependent on electrode work function difference for a non-Ohmic contact configuration and on the active layer's blend in an Ohmic contact configuration. In a bid to improve BOPV device performance, we added to the blend spin 1/2 radical molecules. At concentration ( ≤2%), an increase in device performance was observed. The principal cause for this increase was the increase in

  4. Gap junctions, pannexins and pain.

    PubMed

    Spray, David C; Hanani, Menachem

    2017-06-22

    Enhanced expression and function of gap junctions and pannexin (Panx) channels have been associated with both peripheral and central mechanisms of pain sensitization. At the level of the sensory ganglia, evidence includes augmented gap junction and pannexin1 expression in glial cells and neurons in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models and increased synchrony and enhanced cross-excitation among sensory neurons by gap junction-mediated coupling. In spinal cord and in suprapinal areas, evidence is largely limited to increased expression of relevant proteins, although in several rodent pain models, hypersensitivity is reduced by treatment with gap junction/Panx1 channel blocking compounds. Moreover, targeted modulation of Cx43 expression was shown to modulate pain thresholds, albeit in somewhat contradictory ways, and mice lacking Panx1 expression globally or in specific cell types show depressed hyperalgesia. We here review the evidence for involvement of gap junctions and Panx channels in a variety of animal pain studies and then discuss ways in which gap junctions and Panx channels may mediate their action in pain processing. This discussion focusses on spread of signals among satellite glial cells, in particular intercellular Ca(2+) waves, which are propagated through both gap junction and Panx1-dependent routes and have been associated with the phenomenon of spreading depression and the malady of migraine headache with aura. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Intercellular communication within the rat anterior pituitary gland: X. Immunohistocytochemistry of S-100 and connexin 43 of folliculo-stellate cells in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Mabuchi, Yoshio; Sakuma, Eisuke; Horiuchi, Osamu; Yashiro, Takashi; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Hashimoto, Yasuo; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Herbert, Damon C; Soji, Tsuyoshi

    2004-05-01

    Since Rinehart and Farquhar reported the presence of agranulated cells in the anterior pituitary gland in 1953, the functions of the folliculo-stellate cell remain to be clarified. Intercellular junctions have been described in the monkey, rat, and teleost anterior pituitary glands, indicating the existence of cell-to-cell communication within the organ. We pointed to their possible role in the rapid dissemination of information through a complex interconnecting system of follicles involving gap junctions. The gap junctional/folliculo-stellate cellular network was essential in the maturation and regulation of the pituitary gland system such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. It has been was shown that a network participated in the conduction of electrophysiological information over a long distance using the ion Ca(++), which propagates to other folliculo-stellate cells by signaling through gap junctions. Sixty-day-old male rats were used in this study for light microscopic immunohistochemistry of S-100 protein, type I collagen, and connexin 43, and for electron microscopy to observe the morphological relationships between the cellular networks of folliculo-stellate cells and granulated pituitary cells. Clusters of anti-S-100 protein-positive cells were clearly observed in a region of the hypophysis tentatively named the transition zone. Anti-S-100 protein-positive cells and their cytoplasmic processes were also present in the anterior lobe and assembled together to form follicular lumina. Type I collagen was clearly shown outlining the incomplete lobular or ductule-like structure making cell cords in the anterior pituitary gland. Numerous microvilli were present within the follicular lumen while around the lumina, junctional specializations including gap junctions were positive for the connexin 43 protein. A nonuniform distribution of the connexin 43-positive sites were observed. Small or dot-shaped positive sites were noted where two clusters of cells

  6. COEXISTENCE OF GAP AND SEPTATE JUNCTIONS IN AN INVERTEBRATE EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, A. J.; Revel, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The intercellular junctions of the epithelium lining the hepatic caecum of Daphnia were examined. Electron microscope investigations involved both conventionally fixed material and tissue exposed to a lanthanum tracer of the extracellular space. Both septate junctions and gap junctions occur between the cells studied. The septate junctions lie apically and resemble those commonly discerned between cells of other invertebrates. They are atypical in that the high electron opacity of the extracellular space obscures septa in routine preparations. The gap junctions are characterized by a uniform 30 A space between apposed cell membranes. Lanthanum treatment of gap junctions reveals an array of particles of 95 A diameter and 120 A separation lying in the plane of the junction. As this pattern closely resembles that described previously in vertebrates, it appears that the gap junction is phylogenetically widespread. In view of evidence that the gap junction mediates intercellular electrotonic coupling, the assignment of a coupling role to other junctions, notably the septate junction, must be questioned wherever these junctions coexist. PMID:5563454

  7. Dilated intercellular spaces as a marker of GERD.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Lori A; Orlando, Roy C

    2009-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is typically heralded by the substernal burning pain of heartburn. On endoscopic examination, about one third of GERD subjects with heartburn have erosive disease, and the remainder have nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). Unlike patients with erosive disease, those with NERD (approximately 50%) often do not respond to therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), raising the question of whether they have NERD and, if they do, whether the cause of their symptoms is similar to those who respond to PPIs. Recently, biopsies established that subjects with heartburn and PPI-responsive NERD, like those with erosive esophagitis, have lesions within the esophageal epithelium known as dilated intercellular space (DIS). In this article, we discuss the physicochemical basis for DIS in acid-injured esophageal epithelium and its significance in GERD. Although DIS is not pathognomic of GERD, it is a marker of a break in the epithelial (junctional) barrier reflecting an increase in paracellular permeability.

  8. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Scheuring, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  9. Retinoids regulate the formation and degradation of gap junctions in androgen-responsive human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Linda; Katoch, Parul; Johnson, Kristen E; Batra, Surinder K; Mehta, Parmender P

    2012-01-01

    The retinoids, the natural or synthetic derivatives of Vitamin A (retinol), are essential for the normal development of prostate and have been shown to modulate prostate cancer progression in vivo as well as to modulate growth of several prostate cancer cell lines. 9-cis-retinoic acid and all-trans-retinoic acid are the two most important metabolites of retinol. Gap junctions, formed of proteins called connexins, are ensembles of intercellular channels that permit the exchange of small growth regulatory molecules between adjoining cells. Gap junctional communication is instrumental in the control of cell growth. We examined the effect of 9-cis-retinoic acid and all-trans retinoic acid on the formation and degradation of gap junctions as well as on junctional communication in an androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, which expressed retrovirally introduced connexin32, a connexin expressed by the luminal cells and well-differentiated cells of prostate tumors. Our results showed that 9-cis-retinoic acid and all-trans retinoic acid enhanced the assembly of connexin32 into gap junctions. Our results further showed that 9-cis-retinoic acid and all-trans-retinoic acid prevented androgen-regulated degradation of gap junctions, post-translationally, independent of androgen receptor mediated signaling. Finally, our findings showed that formation of gap junctions sensitized connexin32-expressing LNCaP cells to the growth modifying effects of 9-cis-retinoic acid, all-trans-retinoic acid and androgens. Thus, the effects of retinoids and androgens on growth and the formation and degradation of gap junctions and their function might be related to their ability to modulate prostate growth and cancer.

  10. Plant-derived triterpene celastrol ameliorates oxygen glucose deprivation-induced disruption of endothelial barrier assembly via inducing tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Zhao, Jia; Rong, Jianhui

    2016-12-01

    The integrity and functions of blood-brain barrier (BBB) are regulated by the expression and organization of tight junction proteins. The present study was designed to explore whether plant-derived triterpenoid celastrol could regulate tight junction integrity in murine brain endothelial bEnd3 cells. We disrupted the tight junctions between endothelial bEnd3 cells by oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). We investigated the effects of celastrol on the permeability of endothelial monolayers by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). To clarify the tight junction composition, we analyzed the expression of tight junction proteins by RT-PCR and Western blotting techniques. We found that celastrol recovered OGD-induced TEER loss in a concentration-dependent manner. Celastrol induced occludin, claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) in endothelial cells. As a result, celastrol effectively maintained tight junction integrity and inhibited macrophage migration through endothelial monolayers against OGD challenge. Further mechanistic studies revealed that celastrol induced the expression of occludin and ZO-1) via activating MAPKs and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We also observed that celastrol regulated claudin-5 expression through different mechanisms. The present study demonstrated that celastrol effectively protected tight junction integrity against OGD-induced damage. Thus, celastrol could be a drug candidate for the treatment of BBB dysfunction in various diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  12. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  13. Intercellular Communication in the Adaptive Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arup

    2004-03-01

    Higher organisms, like humans, have an adaptive immune system that can respond to pathogens that have not been encountered before. T lymphocytes (T cells) are the orchestrators of the adaptive immune response. They interact with cells, called antigen presenting cells (APC), that display molecular signatures of pathogens. Recently, video microscopy experiments have revealed that when T cells detect antigen on APC surfaces, a spatially patterned supramolecular assembly of different types of molecules forms in the junction between cell membranes. This recognition motif is implicated in information transfer between APC and T cells, and so, is labeled the immunological synapse. The observation of synapse formation sparked two broad questions: How does the synapse form? Why does the synapse form? I will describe progress made in answering these fundamental questions in biology by synergistic use of statistical mechanical theory/computation, chemical engineering principles, and genetic and biochemical experiments. The talk will also touch upon mechanisms that may underlie the extreme sensitivity with which T cells discriminate between self and non-self.

  14. Lens ion homeostasis relies on the assembly and/or stability of large connexin 46 gap junction plaques on the broad sides of differentiating fiber cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Catherine; Nowak, Roberta B.; Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; Biswas, Sondip K.; Lo, Woo-Kuen; Mathias, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens consists of layers of tightly packed fiber cells, forming a transparent and avascular organ that is important for focusing light onto the retina. A microcirculation system, facilitated by a network of gap junction channels composed of connexins 46 and 50 (Cx46 and Cx50), is hypothesized to maintain and nourish lens fiber cells. We measured lens impedance in mice lacking tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1, an actin pointed-end capping protein), CP49 (a lens-specific intermediate filament protein), or both Tmod1 and CP49. We were surprised to find that simultaneous loss of Tmod1 and CP49, which disrupts cytoskeletal networks in lens fiber cells, results in increased gap junction coupling resistance, hydrostatic pressure, and sodium concentration. Protein levels of Cx46 and Cx50 in Tmod1−/−;CP49−/− double-knockout (DKO) lenses were unchanged, and electron microscopy revealed normal gap junctions. However, immunostaining and quantitative analysis of three-dimensional confocal images showed that Cx46 gap junction plaques are smaller and more dispersed in DKO differentiating fiber cells. The localization and sizes of Cx50 gap junction plaques in DKO fibers were unaffected, suggesting that Cx46 and Cx50 form homomeric channels. We also demonstrate that gap junction plaques rest in lacunae of the membrane-associated actin-spectrin network, suggesting that disruption of the actin-spectrin network in DKO fibers may interfere with gap junction plaque accretion into micrometer-sized domains or alter the stability of large plaques. This is the first work to reveal that normal gap junction plaque localization and size are associated with normal lens coupling conductance. PMID:25740157

  15. Cell junctions in the gut of Protura.

    PubMed

    Xué, L; Romano, D

    1992-01-01

    The main cell junctions in the intestinal tract of a small group of apterygotan insects, Protura, were examined in conventional thin sections, tracer-infiltrated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The smooth septate junctions in the midgut of collembolan Tomocerus minor were also studied for comparison. Pleated septate junctions are found in foregut, hindgut and Malpighian papillae. They exhibit regular septa crossing the intercellular clefts in thin sections; and the septa with a pronounced zig-zag appearance run parallel to form a honeycomb structure in tracer-impregnated sections. After freeze-fracture undulating rows of intramembranous particles (IMPs) are visible on the P face. Smooth septate junctions are observed in the midgut. The intercellular septa often run in pairs for long tracts and exhibit a wavy course in lanthanum impregnated sections. The IMPs exhibited on the E face are usually separated one from another. Twin arrangement of particle rows is also apparent on the replicas. Gap junctions are frequent in both the midgut and hindgut and possess the conventional characteristics of 'inverted gap junction' with E face connexons. These results provide further evidence relating Protura closely to Collembola as well as to primitive arthropods.

  16. ‘Gap Junctions and Cancer: Communicating for 50 Years’

    PubMed Central

    Aasen, Trond; Mesnil, Marc; Naus, Christian C.; Lampe, Paul D.; Laird, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    Fifty years ago, tumour cells were found to lack electrical coupling, leading to the hypothesis that loss of direct intercellular communication is commonly associated with cancer onset and progression. Subsequent studies linked this phenomenon to gap junctions composed of connexin proteins. While many studies support the notion that connexins are tumour suppressors, recent evidence suggests that, in some tumour types, they may facilitate specific stages of tumour progression through both junctional and non-junctional signalling pathways. This Timeline article highlights the milestones connecting gap junctions to cancer, and underscores important unanswered questions, controversies and therapeutic opportunities in the field. PMID:27782134

  17. [Intracellular calcium channels, hormone receptors and intercellular calcium waves].

    PubMed

    Tordjmann, T; Tran, D; Berthon, B; Jacquemin, E; Guillon, G; Combettes, L; Claret, M

    1998-01-01

    from permeabilized PP and PV hepatocytes. In permeabilized PP and PV hepatocytes, internal Ca2+ stores displayed the same loading-kinetics, the responses to InsP3 were similar, and the sizes of InsP3-sensitive compartment were not different. In a further study, we investigated by video microscopy in fura2-loaded multicellular systems of rat hepatocytes, the mechanisms controlling intercellular propagation of the Ca2+ wave and coordination of Ca2+ signals induced by the different hormones. Using focal microperfusion which allows local perfusion of any cell of the multiplet, rapid agonist removal during the Ca2+ response and microinjection, we found that second messengers and [Ca2+]i rises in one hepatocyte cannot trigger Ca2+ responses in connected adjacent cells, suggesting that diffusion across gap junctions, while required for coordination, is not sufficient by itself for the propagation of the intercellular Ca2+ wave. In addition, focal microperfusion and intermediate cell disruption experiments revealed very fine functional differences (hormonal delay, frequency of [Ca2+]i oscillations) between hormone-induced Ca2+ signals, even between two adjacent connected hepatocytes. Recent unpublished results performed in suspensions of PP and PV rat hepatocytes supported the view of a major role played by vasopressin receptors (V1a) in genesis and orientation of the Ca2+ wave. Vasopressin binding sites, V1a mRNAs detected by RNAse Protection Assay, and vasopressin-induced InsP3 production, were more abundant in PV than in PP cells. A gradient of hormone receptors could orientate the propagation of the Ca2+ wave in multicellular systems and in liver cell plate. These results suggest that the intercellular Ca2+ wave in multicellular systems of rat hepatocytes is propagated through mechanisms involving at least three factors. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  18. The rate of charge tunneling is insensitive to polar terminal groups in self-assembled monolayers in Ag(TS)S(CH2)(n)M(CH2)(m)T//Ga2O3/EGaIn junctions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyo Jae; Bowers, Carleen M; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-08

    This paper describes a physical-organic study of the effect of uncharged, polar, functional groups on the rate of charge transport by tunneling across self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based large-area junctions of the form Ag(TS)S(CH2)(n)M(CH2)(m)T//Ga2O3/EGaIn. Here Ag(TS) is a template-stripped silver substrate, -M- and -T are "middle" and "terminal" functional groups, and EGaIn is eutectic gallium-indium alloy. Twelve uncharged polar groups (-T = CN, CO2CH3, CF3, OCH3, N(CH3)2, CON(CH3)2, SCH3, SO2CH3, Br, P(O)(OEt)2, NHCOCH3, OSi(OCH3)3), having permanent dipole moments in the range 0.5 < μ < 4.5, were incorporated into the SAM. A comparison of the electrical characteristics of these junctions with those of junctions formed from n-alkanethiolates led to the conclusion that the rates of charge tunneling are insensitive to the replacement of terminal alkyl groups with the terminal polar groups in this set. The current densities measured in this work suggest that the tunneling decay parameter and injection current for SAMs terminated in nonpolar n-alkyl groups, and polar groups selected from common polar organic groups, are statistically indistinguishable.

  19. Possible Involvement of Tight Junctions, Extracellular Matrix and Nuclear Receptors in Epithelial Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa-Tomikawa, Naoki; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Satohisa, Seiro; Nishiura, Keisuke; Chiba, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions localized at the most apical end of the lateral plasma membrane. They consist of four kinds of transmembrane proteins (occludin, claudins, junctional adhesion molecules, and tricellulin) and huge numbers of scaffolding proteins and contribute to the paracellular barrier and fence function. The mutation and deletion of these proteins impair the functions of tight junctions and cause various human diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent studies on transmembrane proteins of tight junctions and highlight the functional significance of tight junctions, extracellular matrix, and nuclear receptors in epithelial differentiation. PMID:22162632

  20. Evidence for an organized lattice in the intercellular space of vestibular sensory cat epithelia.

    PubMed

    Favre, D; Sans, A

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular space between sensory hair cells and nerve endings and between supporting cells of the vestibular epithelia in the cat contains a fine network of microstructures arranged obliquely between the cell membranes of adjacent cells. In situ immersion-perfusion fixation, electron microscopy complemented by lanthanum negative-contrast and freeze-fracture methods suggest that these intercellular structures are tubular with an external diameter between 3 and 6 nm and an internal diameter of 1.5 nm. They could serve as intercytoplasmic tunnels. We discuss the evidence concerning the analogy between the present microchannels and the passageways regularly arranged in the intercellular space of gap-junctions which would permit the transport of low molecular weight substances from one cell to other.

  1. 1,4-naphthoquinones: from oxidative damage to cellular and inter-cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Lars-Oliver; Hou, Xiaoqing; Jacob, Claus

    2014-09-17

    Naphthoquinones may cause oxidative stress in exposed cells and, therefore, affect redox signaling. Here, contributions of redox cycling and alkylating properties of quinones (both natural and synthetic, such as plumbagin, juglone, lawsone, menadione, methoxy-naphthoquinones, and others) to cellular and inter-cellular signaling processes are discussed: (i) naphthoquinone-induced Nrf2-dependent modulation of gene expression and its potentially beneficial outcome; (ii) the modulation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor by naphthoquinones, resulting in altered gap junctional intercellular communication. Generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of redox signaling are properties of naphthoquinones that render them interesting leads for the development of novel compounds of potential use in various therapeutic settings.

  2. Relationship between intercellular communication and adriamycin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradley, C; Freshney, R I; Pitts, J

    1994-01-01

    The adriamycin chemosensitivity and extent of gap junctional intercellular communication were assessed in a panel of seven human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Communication was assessed by autoradiographic detection of transfer of 3H uridine nucleotides between coupled cells. The strength of coupling varied widely between the cell lines and they could be separated into 3 groups: those which exhibited strong coupling, L-DAN and A549; those which exhibited weak coupling, SK-MES-1, Calu-3 and NCI-H125; and an intermediate group, WIL and NCI-H23. Adriamycin chemosensitivity was assessed by both clonogenic and MTT assays. The range of IC50 values as measured by either assay was extremely narrow, with no important differences between the lines. Thus, despite the wide spectrum of intercellular communication observed in these lines, this did not correlate with their adriamycin resistance.

  3. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  4. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  5. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  6. Modeling assemblies of biological cells exposed to electric fields.

    PubMed

    Fear, E C; Stuchly, M A

    1998-10-01

    Gap junctions are channels through the cell membrane that electrically connect the interiors of neighboring cells. Most cells are connected by gap junctions, and gaps play an important role in local intercellular communication by allowing for the exchange of certain substances between cells. Gap communication has been observed to change when cells are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) fields. In this work, we examine the behavior of cells connected by gap junctions when exposed to electric fields, in order to better understand the influence of the presence of gap junctions on cell behavior. This may provide insights into the interactions between biological cells and weak, low-frequency EM fields. Specifically, we model gaps in greater detail than is usually the case, and use the finite element method (FEM) to solve the resulting geometrically complex cell models. The responses of gap-connected cell configurations to both dc and time harmonic fields are investigated and compared with those of similarly shaped (equivalent) cells. To further assess the influence of the gap junctions, properties such as gap size, shape, and conductivity are varied. Our findings indicate that simple models, such as equivalent cells, are sufficient for describing the behavior of small gap-connected cell configurations exposed to dc electric fields. With larger configurations, some adjustments to the simple models are necessary to account for the presence of the gaps. The gap junctions complicate the frequency behavior of gap-connected cell assemblies. An equivalent cell exhibits low-pass behavior. Gaps effectively add a bandstop filter in series with the low-pass behavior, thus lowering the relaxation frequency. The characteristics of this bandstop filter change with changes to gap properties. Comparison of the FEM results to those obtained with simple models indicates that more complex models are required to represent gap-connected cells.

  7. The discovery of epidermal tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Sugawara, Koji; Tsuruta, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    It was previously thought that the skin barrier is composed singly by the stratum corneum. However, this concept was overturned by the report of Tsukita's group in 2002. They convinced us that tight junctions exist in the stratum granulosum of the epidermis, with the constituent proteins being occludin, claudin-1 and claudin-4. However, more than 30 years before this, Hashimoto et al. described the possible existence of tight junctions in the epidermis in 'Intercellular spaces of the human epidermis as demonstrated with lanthanum' in 1971. Dr. Hashimoto observed lanthanum nitrate-injected human skin by electron microscopy. He discovered that the injected lanthanum penetrated the intercellular spaces of the basal and spinous layers of the epidermis and then moved towards the skin surface until penetration was halted in the granular cell layer near the stratum corneum. He described the cell-to-cell adhesion structures that blocked the movement of lanthanum as 'truly tight junctions'. Thus, this was the first description of the existence of tight junctions in the epidermis. However, the presence of these structures was denied by others and was forgotten. Thanks to the discovery of claudin, the existence of tight junctions between epidermal keratinocytes was finally confirmed. It is interesting that Hashimoto's finding was eventually proved to be correct three decades later as a result of progress in molecular biology. This article encourages us to recognize the importance of careful observation in the molecular biology era. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Molecular Diffusion through Cyanobacterial Septal Junctions.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique

    2017-01-03

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as filaments in which intercellular molecular exchange takes place. During the differentiation of N2-fixing heterocysts, regulators are transferred between cells. In the diazotrophic filament, vegetative cells that fix CO2 through oxygenic photosynthesis provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with fixed nitrogen. Intercellular molecular transfer has been traced with fluorescent markers, including calcein, 5-carboxyfluorescein, and the sucrose analogue esculin, which are observed to move down their concentration gradient. In this work, we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays in the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to measure the temperature dependence of intercellular transfer of fluorescent markers. We find that the transfer rate constants are directly proportional to the absolute temperature. This indicates that the "septal junctions" (formerly known as "microplasmodesmata") linking the cells in the filament allow molecular exchange by simple diffusion, without any activated intermediate state. This constitutes a novel mechanism for molecular transfer across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, in addition to previously characterized mechanisms for active transport and facilitated diffusion. Cyanobacterial septal junctions are functionally analogous to the gap junctions of metazoans.

  9. Intercellular Redistribution of cAMP Underlies Selective Suppression of Cancer Cell Growth by Connexin26

    PubMed Central

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Mathis, Sandra A.; Zucker, Shoshanna N.; Nicholson, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Connexins (Cx), which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s) still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations. PMID:24312655

  10. Dynamic gap junctional communication: a delimiting model for tissue responses.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, G J; Brink, P R; Ramanan, S V

    1994-01-01

    Gap junctions are aqueous intercellular channels formed by a diverse class of membrane-spanning proteins, known as connexins. These aqueous pores provide partial cytoplasmic continuity between cells in most tissues, and are freely permeable to a host of physiologically relevant second messenger molecules/ionic species (e.g., Ca2+, IP3, cAMP, cGMP). Despite the fact that these second messenger molecules/ionic species have been shown to alter junctional patency, there is no clear basis for understanding how dynamic and transient changes in the intracellular concentration of second messenger molecules might modulate the extent of intercellular communication among coupled cells. Thus, we have modified the tissue monolayer model of Ramanan and Brink (1990) to account for both the up-regulatory and down-regulatory effects on junctions by second messenger molecules that diffuse through gap junctions. We have chosen the vascular wall as our morphological correlate because of its anisotropy and large investment of gap junctions. The model allows us to illustrate the putative behavior of gap junctions under a variety of physiologically relevant conditions. The modeling studies demonstrated that transient alterations in intracellular second messenger concentrations are capable of producing 50-125% changes in the number of cells recruited into a functional syncytial unit, after activation of a single cell. Moreover, the model conditions required to demonstrate such physiologically relevant changes in intercellular diffusion among coupled cells are commonly observed in intact tissues and cultured cells. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7811948

  11. Patterning of Wound-Induced Intercellular Ca2+ Flashes in a Developing Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Narciso, Cody; Wu, Qinfeng; Brodskiy, Pavel; Garston, George; Baker, Ruth; Fletcher, Alexander; Zartman, Jeremiah

    2015-01-01

    Differential mechanical force distributions are increasingly recognized to provide important feedback into the control of an organ’s final size and shape. As a second messenger that integrates and relays mechanical information to the cell, calcium ions (Ca2+) are a prime candidate for providing important information on both the overall mechanical state of the tissue and resulting behavior at the individual-cell level during development. Still, how the spatiotemporal properties of Ca2+ transients reflect the underlying mechanical characteristics of tissues is still poorly understood. Here we use an established model system of an epithelial tissue, the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, to investigate how tissue properties impact the propagation of Ca2+ transients induced by laser ablation. The resulting intercellular Ca2+ flash is found to be mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and depends on gap junction communication. Further, we find that intercellular Ca2+ transients show spatially nonuniform characteristics across the proximal-distal (PD) axis of the larval wing imaginal disc, which exhibit a gradient in cell size and anisotropy. A computational model of Ca2+ transients is employed to identify the principle factors explaining the spatiotemporal patterning dynamics of intercellular Ca2+ flashes. The relative Ca2+ flash anisotropy is principally explained by local cell shape anisotropy. Further, Ca2+ velocities are relatively uniform throughout the wing disc, irrespective of cell size or anisotropy. This can be explained by the opposing effects of cell diameter and cell elongation on intercellular Ca2+ propagation. Thus, intercellular Ca2+ transients follow lines of mechanical tension at velocities that are largely independent of tissue heterogeneity and reflect the mechanical state of the underlying tissue. PMID:26331891

  12. Patterning of wound-induced intercellular Ca2+ flashes in a developing epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narciso, Cody; Wu, Qinfeng; Brodskiy, Pavel; Garston, George; Baker, Ruth; Fletcher, Alexander; Zartman, Jeremiah

    2015-10-01

    Differential mechanical force distributions are increasingly recognized to provide important feedback into the control of an organ’s final size and shape. As a second messenger that integrates and relays mechanical information to the cell, calcium ions (Ca2+) are a prime candidate for providing important information on both the overall mechanical state of the tissue and resulting behavior at the individual-cell level during development. Still, how the spatiotemporal properties of Ca2+ transients reflect the underlying mechanical characteristics of tissues is still poorly understood. Here we use an established model system of an epithelial tissue, the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, to investigate how tissue properties impact the propagation of Ca2+ transients induced by laser ablation. The resulting intercellular Ca2+ flash is found to be mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and depends on gap junction communication. Further, we find that intercellular Ca2+ transients show spatially non-uniform characteristics across the proximal-distal axis of the larval wing imaginal disc, which exhibit a gradient in cell size and anisotropy. A computational model of Ca2+ transients is employed to identify the principle factors explaining the spatiotemporal patterning dynamics of intercellular Ca2+ flashes. The relative Ca2+ flash anisotropy is principally explained by local cell shape anisotropy. Further, Ca2+ velocities are relatively uniform throughout the wing disc, irrespective of cell size or anisotropy. This can be explained by the opposing effects of cell diameter and cell elongation on intercellular Ca2+ propagation. Thus, intercellular Ca2+ transients follow lines of mechanical tension at velocities that are largely independent of tissue heterogeneity and reflect the mechanical state of the underlying tissue.

  13. Control and plasticity of intercellular calcium waves in astrocytes: a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Thomas; Venance, Laurent; Giaume, Christian

    2002-06-15

    Intercellular Ca2+ waves in astrocytes are thought to serve as a pathway of long-range signaling. The waves can propagate by the diffusion of molecules through gap junctions and across the extracellular space. In rat striatal astrocytes, the gap-junctional route was shown to be dominant. To analyze the interplay of the processes involved in wave propagation, a mathematical model of this system has been developed. The kinetic description of Ca2+ signaling within a single cell accounts for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) generation, including its activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+, IP3-induced Ca2+ liberation from intracellular stores and various other Ca2+ transports, and cytoplasmic diffusion of IP3 and Ca2+. When cells are coupled by gap junction channels in a two-dimensional array, IP3 generation in one cell triggers Ca2+ waves propagating across some tens of cells. The spatial range of wave propagation is limited, yet depends sensitively on the Ca2+-mediated regeneration of the IP3 signal. Accordingly, the term "limited regenerative signaling" is proposed. The gap-junctional permeability for IP3 is the crucial permissive factor for wave propagation, and heterogeneity of gap-junctional coupling yields preferential pathways of wave propagation. Processes involved in both signal initiation (activation of IP3 production caused by receptor agonist) and regeneration (activation of IP3 production by Ca2+, loading of the Ca2+ stores) are found to exert the main control on the wave range. The refractory period of signaling strongly depends on the refilling kinetics of the Ca2+ stores. Thus the model identifies multiple steps that may be involved in the regulation of this intercellular signaling pathway.

  14. Target-Catalyzed DNA Four-Way Junctions for CRET Imaging of MicroRNA, Concatenated Logic Operations, and Self-Assembly of DNA Nanohydrogels for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Xiu, Bao; Ye, Jiayan; Dong, Ying

    2015-10-21

    Here we report a target-catalyzed DNA four-way junction (DNA-4WJ) on the basis of toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement reaction (TM-SDR), which is readily applied in enzyme-free amplified chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) imaging of microRNA. In this system, the introduction of target microRNA-let-7a (miR-let-7a) activates a cascade of assembly steps with four DNA hairpins, followed by a disassembly step in which the target microRNA is displaced and released from DNA-4WJ to catalyze the self-assembly of additional branched junctions. As a result, G-quadruplex subunit sequences and fluorophore fluorescein amidite (FAM) are encoded in DNA-4WJ in a close proximity, stimulating a CRET process in the presence of hemin/K(+) to form horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme that catalyzes the generation of luminol/H2O2 chemiluminescence (CL), which further transfers to FAM. The background signal is easily reduced using magnetic graphene oxide (MGO) to remove unreacted species through magnetic separation, which makes a great contribution to improve the detection sensitivity and achieves a detection limit as low as 6.9 fM microRNA-let-7a (miR-let-7a). In addition, four-input concatenated logic circuits with an automatic reset function have been successfully constructed relying on the architecture of the proposed DNA-4WJ. More importantly, DNA nanohydrogels are self-assembled using DNA-4WJs as building units after centrifugation, which are driven by liquid crystallization and dense packaging of building units. Moreover, the DNA nanohydrogels are readily functionalized by incorporating with aptamers, bioimaging agents, and drug loading sites, which thus are served as efficient nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery and cancer therapy with high loading capacity and excellent biocompatibility.

  15. Development of intercellular communication during the epithelial reorganization of a renal cell line (LLC-PK1).

    PubMed

    Rabito, C A; Jarrell, J A; Abraham, E H

    1987-01-25

    Junctional permeability determinations after microinjection of the fluorescent tracer, Lucifer Yellow CH, show that the cells in confluent monolayers of the renal epithelial cell lines LLC-PK1 and A6 are interconnected by intercellular junctions. This cell-to-cell communication network permits the fluorescent dye to diffuse from the microinjected cell into multiple adjacent neighboring cells. Cell-to-cell diffusion of the fluorescent dye was not observed at pH 6.0. Full recovery occurred, however, when the pH of the extracellular medium was adjusted to 7.4. To provide a sensitive index of the averaged efficacy of junctional communication, we measured the number of cells that survived ouabain treatment in a 50% mixture of wild and ouabain-resistant mutant LLC-PK1 cells. Electron probe microanalysis in uncoupled cells showed that ouabain treatment produced two populations of cells, with totally different intracellular Na+ and K+ content. Under this condition, only 50% of the population survived after 48 h of treatment. When ouabain treatment was initiated 24 h after plating, however, 100% survival was observed, and the cells contained uniform intracellular Na+ and K+ concentration. This finding is consistent with the theory that this protective effect is mediated through the presence of the functional communicating intercellular junctions. When ouabain was applied at different times after plating, full protection is reached by 2 h. The early development of cell-to-cell communication, which precedes the development of the occluding junctions and several transport systems by several hours, is consistent with the involvement of the intercellular junctions in the synchronization of the polarization process.

  16. Intercellular Transfer of a Soluble Viral Superantigen

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Melissa; Mix, Denise; Reilly, Andrew A.; Yang Ye, Xiang; Winslow, Gary M.

    2000-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) superantigens (vSAgs) can undergo intercellular transfer in vivo and in vitro such that a vSAg can be presented to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II proteins on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that do not express the superantigen. This process may allow T-cell activation to occur prior to viral infection. Consistent with these findings, vSAg produced by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was readily transferred to class II IE and IA (H-2k and H-2d) proteins on a B-cell lymphoma or mouse splenocytes. Fixed class II-expressing acceptor cells were used to demonstrate that the vSAg, but not the class II proteins, underwent intercellular transfer, indicating that vSAg binding to class II MHC could occur directly at the cell surface. Intercellular transfer also occurred efficiently to splenocytes from endogenous retrovirus-free mice, indicating that other proviral proteins were not involved. Presentation of vSAg7 produced by a class II-negative, furin protease-deficient CHO variant (FD11) was unsuccessful, indicating that proteolytic processing was a requisite event and that proteolytic activity could not be provided by an endoprotease on the acceptor APC. Furthermore, vSAg presentation was effected using cell-free supernatant from class II-negative, vSAg-positive cells, indicating that a soluble molecule, most likely produced by proteolytic processing, was sufficient to stimulate T cells. Because the membrane-proximal endoproteolytic cleavage site in the vSAg (residues 68 to 71) was not necessary for intercellular transfer, the data support the notion that the carboxy-terminal endoproteolytic cleavage product is an active vSAg moiety. PMID:10954523

  17. Transient inter-cellular polymeric linker.

    PubMed

    Ong, Siew-Min; He, Lijuan; Thuy Linh, Nguyen Thi; Tee, Yee-Han; Arooz, Talha; Tang, Guping; Tan, Choon-Hong; Yu, Hanry

    2007-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineered constructs with bio-mimicry cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions are useful in regenerative medicine. In cell-dense and matrix-poor tissues of the internal organs, cells support one another via cell-cell interactions, supplemented by small amount of the extra-cellular matrices (ECM) secreted by the cells. Here we connect HepG2 cells directly but transiently with inter-cellular polymeric linker to facilitate cell-cell interaction and aggregation. The linker consists of a non-toxic low molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI) backbone conjugated with multiple hydrazide groups that can aggregate cells within 30 min by reacting with the aldehyde handles on the chemically modified cell-surface glycoproteins. The cells in the cellular aggregates proliferated; and maintained the cortical actin distribution of the 3D cell morphology while non-aggregated cells died over 7 days of suspension culture. The aggregates lost distinguishable cell-cell boundaries within 3 days; and the ECM fibers became visible around cells from day 3 onwards while the inter-cellular polymeric linker disappeared from the cell surfaces over time. The transient inter-cellular polymeric linker can be useful for forming 3D cellular and tissue constructs without bulk biomaterials or extensive network of engineered ECM for various applications.

  18. Characterizing Intercellular Signaling Peptides in Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Romanova, Elena V.; Hatcher, Nathan G.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2009-01-01

    Intercellular signaling peptides (SPs) coordinate the activity of cells and influence organism behavior. SPs, a chemically and structurally diverse group of compounds responsible for transferring information between neurons, are broadly involved in neural plasticity, learning and memory, as well as in drug addiction phenomena. Historically, SP discovery and characterization has tracked advances in measurement capabilities. Today, a suite of analytical technologies is available to investigate individual SPs, as well as entire intercellular signaling complements, in samples ranging from individual cells to entire organisms. Immunochemistry and in situ hybridization are commonly used for following preselected SPs. Discovery-type investigations targeting the transcriptome and proteome are accomplished using high-throughput characterization technologies such as microarrays and mass spectrometry. By integrating directed approaches with discovery approaches, multiplatform studies fill critical gaps in our knowledge of drug-induced alterations in intercellular signaling. Throughout the past 35 years, the National Institute on Drug Abuse has made significant resources available to scientists that study the mechanisms of drug addiction. The roles of SPs in the addiction process are highlighted, as are the analytical approaches used to detect and characterize them. PMID:18722391

  19. Mechanically Induced Intercellular Calcium Communication in Confined Endothelial Structures

    PubMed Central

    Junkin, Michael; Lu, Yi; Long, Juexuan; Deymier, Pierre A.; Hoying, James B.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2012-01-01

    Calcium signaling in the diverse vascular structures is regulated by a wide range of mechanical and biochemical factors to maintain essential physiological functions of the vasculature. To properly transmit information, the intercellular calcium communication mechanism must be robust against various conditions in the cellular microenvironment. Using plasma lithography geometric confinement, we investigate mechanically induced calcium wave propagation in networks of human umbilical vein endothelial cells organized. Endothelial cell networks with confined architectures were stimulated at the single cell level, including using capacitive force probes. Calcium wave propagation in the network was observed using fluorescence calcium imaging. We show that mechanically induced calcium signaling in the endothelial networks is dynamically regulated against a wide range of probing forces and repeated stimulations. The calcium wave is able to propagate consistently in various dimensions from monolayers to individual cell chains, and in different topologies from linear patterns to cell junctions. Our results reveal that calcium signaling provides a robust mechanism for cell-cell communication in networks of endothelial cells despite the diversity of the microenvironmental inputs and complexity of vascular structures. PMID:23267827

  20. Mitotic cells form actin-based bridges with adjacent cells to provide intercellular communication during rounding

    PubMed Central

    Fykerud, Tone A.; Knudsen, Lars M.; Totland, Max Z.; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Brech, Andreas; Leithe, Edward

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to achieve accurate chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells undergo a dramatic change in morphology to obtain a spherical shape during mitosis. Interphase cells communicate directly with each other by exchanging ions and small molecules via gap junctions, which have important roles in controlling cell growth and differentiation. As cells round up during mitosis, the gap junctional communication between mitotic cells and adjacent interphase cells ceases. Whether mitotic cells use alternative mechanisms for mediating direct cell-cell communication during rounding is currently unknown. Here, we have studied the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis. We further demonstrate that mitotic cells are able to form actin-based plasma membrane bridges with adjacent cells during rounding. These structures, termed “mitotic nanotubes,” were found to be involved in mediating the transport of cytoplasm, including Rab11-positive vesicles, between mitotic cells and adjacent cells. Moreover, a subpool of the gap-junction channel protein connexin43 localized in these intercellular bridges during mitosis. Collectively, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis and identify actin-based plasma membrane bridges as a novel means of communication between mitotic cells and adjacent cells during rounding. PMID:27625181

  1. Spatial organization of the extracellular matrix regulates cell–cell junction positioning

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Qingzong; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Deshiere, Alexandre; Balland, Martial; Guillou, Hervé; Filhol, Odile; Théry, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The organization of cells into epithelium depends on cell interaction with both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and adjacent cells. The role of cell–cell adhesion in the regulation of epithelial topology is well-described. ECM is better known to promote cell migration and provide a structural scaffold for cell anchoring, but its contribution to multicellular morphogenesis is less well-understood. We developed a minimal model system to investigate how ECM affects the spatial organization of intercellular junctions. Fibronectin micropatterns were used to constrain the location of cell–ECM adhesion. We found that ECM affects the degree of stability of intercellular junction positioning and the magnitude of intra- and intercellular forces. Intercellular junctions were permanently displaced, and experienced large perpendicular tensional forces as long as they were positioned close to ECM. They remained stable solely in regions deprived of ECM, where they were submitted to lower tensional forces. The heterogeneity of the spatial organization of ECM induced anisotropic distribution of mechanical constraints in cells, which seemed to adapt their position to minimize both intra- and intercellular forces. These results uncover a morphogenetic role for ECM in the mechanical regulation of cells and intercellular junction positioning. PMID:22307605

  2. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazumichi; Stopfer, Mark

    2013-12-02

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, signaling among neurons is most commonly mediated by chemical synapses. At these synapses neurotransmitter released by presynaptic neurons is detected by receptors on the postsynaptic neurons, leading to an influx of ions through the receptors themselves or through channels activated by intracellular signaling downstream of the receptors. But neurons can communicate with each other in a more direct way, by passing signals composed of small molecules and ions through pores called gap junctions. Gap junctions that transmit electrical signals are called electrical synapses. Unlike most chemical synapses, electrical synapses interact through axon-to-axon or dendrite-to-dendrite contacts. Found throughout the nervous system, they are probably best known for linking the relatively few inhibitory, GABAergic, neurons into large, effective networks within vertebrate brains. They are particularly important early in development before the formation of most chemical synapses, but recent work shows gap junctions play important roles in the adult nervous system, too. Gap junctions are sometimes thought to be mere passageways between cells. But, as recent work shows, their properties can be complex and surprising. Gap junctions help generate, propagate, and regulate neural oscillations, can filter electrical signals, and can be modulated in a variety of ways. Here we discuss recent work highlighting the diversity and importance of gap junctions throughout the nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure, regulation and function of gap junctions in liver

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of 2 hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of 6 connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Liver gap junctions are directed through a broad variety of mechanisms ranging from epigenetic control of connexin expression to posttranslational regulation of gap junction activity. This paper reviews established and novel aspects regarding the architecture, control and functional relevance of liver gap junctions. PMID:27001459

  4. Structure, Regulation and Function of Gap Junctions in Liver.

    PubMed

    Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of two hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of six connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Liver gap junctions are directed through a broad variety of mechanisms ranging from epigenetic control of connexin expression to post-translational regulation of gap junction activity. This paper reviews established and novel aspects regarding the architecture, control and functional relevance of liver gap junctions.

  5. Gap junctional communication during limb cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Kosher, R A

    1991-03-01

    The onset of cartilage differentiation in the developing limb bud is characterized by a transient cellular condensation process in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells become closely apposed to one another prior to initiating cartilage matrix deposition. During this condensation process intimate cell-cell interactions occur which are necessary to trigger chondrogenic differentiation. In the present study, we demonstrate that extensive cell-cell communication via gap junctions as assayed by the intercellular transfer of lucifer yellow dye occurs during condensation and the onset of overt chondrogenesis in high density micromass cultures prepared from the homogeneous population of chondrogenic precursor cells comprising the distal subridge region of stage 25 embryonic chick wing buds. Furthermore, in heterogeneous micromass cultures prepared from the mesodermal cells of whole stage 23/24 limb buds, extensive gap junctional communication is limited to differentiating cartilage cells, while the nonchondrogenic cells of the cultures that are differentiating into the connective tissue lineage exhibit little or no intercellular communication via gap junctions. These results provide a strong incentive for considering and further investigating the possible involvement of cell-cell communication via gap junctions in the regulation of limb cartilage differentiation.

  6. Intercellular electrical communication in the heart: a new, active role for the intercalated disk.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Rengasayee; Poelzing, Steven; Gourdie, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac conduction is the propagation of electrical excitation through the heart and is responsible for triggering individual myocytes to contract in synchrony. Canonically, this process has been thought to occur electrotonically, by means of direct flow of ions from cell to cell. The intercalated disk (ID), the site of contact between adjacent myocytes, has been viewed as a structure composed of mechanical junctions that stabilize the apposition of cell membranes and gap junctions which constitute low resistance pathways between cells. However, emerging evidence suggests a more active role for structures within the ID in mediating intercellular electrical communication by means of non-canonical ephaptic mechanisms. This review will discuss the role of the ID in the context of the canonical, electrotonic view of conduction and highlight new, emerging possibilities of its playing a more active role in ephaptic coupling between cardiac myocytes.

  7. Parametric analysis of intercellular ice propagation during cryosurgery, simulated using monte carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Stott, Shannon L; Irimia, Daniel; Karlsson, Jens O M

    2004-04-01

    A microscale theoretical model of intracellular ice formation (IIF) in a heterogeneous tissue volume comprising a tumor mass and surrounding normal tissue is presented. Intracellular ice was assumed to form either by intercellular ice propagation or by processes that are not affected by the presence of ice in neighboring cells (e.g., nucleation or mechanical rupture). The effects of cryosurgery on a 2D tissue consisting of 10(4) cells were simulated using a lattice Monte Carlo technique. A parametric analysis was performed to assess the specificity of IIF-related cell damage and to identify criteria for minimization of collateral damage to the healthy tissue peripheral to the tumor. Among the parameters investigated were the rates of interaction-independent IIF and intercellular ice propagation in the tumor and in the normal tissue, as well as the characteristic length scale of thermal gradients in the vicinity of the cryosurgical probe. Model predictions suggest gap junctional intercellular communication as a potential new target for adjuvant therapies complementing the cryosurgical procedure.

  8. [Cytokines and their role in intercellular interactions].

    PubMed

    Pal'tsev, M A

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines include interferons, colony-stimulating factors, interleukins and growth factors. 6 groups of cytokines are distinguished depending on the direction of their function. They provide regulation of intercellular interaction, initiate nonspecific inflammatory response, control growth and differentiation of hematopoietic and residential cells, activate the cells of the inflammatory infiltrate, stimulate hematopoiesis. Regulation of the cytokine activity is brought about at the level of their secretion, expression of the cytokines receptors as well as by means of other cytokines and soluble cytokine-binding factors and inhibitors. The use of cytokines and antibodies against them, receptor antagonists and soluble cytokine receptors is increasing for immunotherapy of various diseases.

  9. Substrate roughness induces the development of defective E-cadherin junctions in human gingival keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The entry of bacteria or harmful substances through the epithelial seal of human gingival keratinocytes (HGKs) in the junctional epithelium (JE) is blocked by specialized intercellular junctions such as E-cadherin junctions (ECJs). However, the influence of roughened substrates, which may occur due to apical migration of the JE, root planing, or peri-implantitis, on the development of the ECJs of HGKs remains largely unknown. Methods HGKs were cultured on substrates with varying levels of roughness, which were prepared by rubbing hydrophobic polystyrene dishes with silicon carbide papers. The activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was inhibited with SP600125 or by transfection with JNK short hairpin RNA. The development of intercellular junctions was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy or confocal laser scanning microscopy after immunohistochemical staining of the cells for E-cadherin. The expression level of phospho-JNK was assessed by immunoblotting. Results HGKs developed tight intercellular junctions devoid of wide intercellular gaps on smooth substrates and on rough substrates with low-nanometer dimensions (average roughness [Ra]=121.3±13.4 nm), although the ECJs of HGKs on rough substrates with low-nanometer dimensions developed later than those of HGKs on smooth substrates. In contrast, HGKs developed short intercellular junctions with wide intercellular gaps on rough substrates with mid- or high-nanometer dimensions (Ra=505.3±115.3 nm, 867.0±168.6 nm). Notably, the stability of the ECJs was low on the rough substrates, as demonstrated by the rapid destruction of the cell junction following calcium depletion. Inhibition of JNK activity promoted ECJ development in HGKs. JNK was closely associated with cortical actin in the regulation of ECJs in HGKs. Conclusions These results indicate that on rough substrates with nanometer dimensions, the ECJs of HGKs develop slowly or defectively, and that this effect can be reversed by inhibiting JNK

  10. Anillin regulates cell-cell junction integrity by organizing junctional accumulation of Rho-GTP and actomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Ciara C.; Jin, Meiyan; Breznau, Elaina B.; Espino, Rhogelyn; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Goryachev, Andrew B.; Miller, Ann L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anillin is a scaffolding protein that organizes and stabilizes actomyosin contractile rings and was previously thought to function primarily in cytokinesis [1–10]. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model system to examine Anillin’s role in the intact vertebrate epithelium, we find that a population of Anillin surprisingly localizes to epithelial cell-cell junctions throughout the cell cycle, whereas it was previously thought to be nuclear during interphase [5, 11]. Further, we show that Anillin plays a critical role in regulating cell-cell junction integrity. Both tight junctions and adherens junctions are disrupted when Anillin is knocked down, leading to altered cell shape and increased intercellular spaces. Anillin interacts with Rho, F-actin, and Myosin II [3, 8, 9], all of which regulate cell-cell junction structure and function. When Anillin is knocked down, active Rho (Rho-GTP), F-actin, and Myosin II are misregulated at junctions. Indeed, increased dynamic “flares” of Rho-GTP are observed at cell-cell junctions, while overall junctional F-actin and Myosin II accumulation is reduced when Anillin is depleted. We propose that Anillin is required for proper Rho-GTP distribution at cell-cell junctions and for maintenance of a robust apical actomyosin belt, which is required for cell-cell junction integrity. These results reveal a novel role for Anillin in regulating epithelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:24835458

  11. Molecular Diffusion through Cyanobacterial Septal Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nieves-Morión, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as filaments in which intercellular molecular exchange takes place. During the differentiation of N2-fixing heterocysts, regulators are transferred between cells. In the diazotrophic filament, vegetative cells that fix CO2 through oxygenic photosynthesis provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with fixed nitrogen. Intercellular molecular transfer has been traced with fluorescent markers, including calcein, 5-carboxyfluorescein, and the sucrose analogue esculin, which are observed to move down their concentration gradient. In this work, we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays in the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to measure the temperature dependence of intercellular transfer of fluorescent markers. We find that the transfer rate constants are directly proportional to the absolute temperature. This indicates that the “septal junctions” (formerly known as “microplasmodesmata”) linking the cells in the filament allow molecular exchange by simple diffusion, without any activated intermediate state. This constitutes a novel mechanism for molecular transfer across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, in addition to previously characterized mechanisms for active transport and facilitated diffusion. Cyanobacterial septal junctions are functionally analogous to the gap junctions of metazoans. PMID:28049144

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of intercellular ice propagation in a micropatterned tissue construct.

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Daniel; Karlsson, Jens O M

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the effects of cell-cell interaction on intracellular ice formation (IIF) is required to design optimized protocols for cryopreservation of tissue. To determine the effects of cell-cell interactions during tissue freezing, without confounding effects from uncontrolled factors (such as time in culture, cell geometry, and cell-substrate interactions), HepG2 cells were cultured in pairs on glass coverslips micropatterned with polyethylene glycol disilane, such that each cell interacted with exactly one adjacent cell. Assuming the cell pair to be a finite state system, being either in an unfrozen state (no ice in either cell), a singlet state (IIF in one cell only), or a doublet state (IIF in both cells), the kinetics of state transitions were theoretically modeled and cryomicroscopically measured. The rate of intercellular ice propagation, estimated from the measured singlet state probability, increased in the first 24 h of culture and remained steady thereafter. In cell pairs cultured for 24 h and treated with the gap junction blocker 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid before freezing, the intercellular ice propagation rate was lower than in untreated controls (p < 0.001), but significantly greater than zero (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that gap junctions mediate some, but not all, mechanisms of ice propagation in tissue. PMID:11916845

  13. The calcium ATPase SERCA2 regulates desmoplakin dynamics and intercellular adhesive strength through modulation of PKCα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Ryan P.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Somasundaram, Agila; Simpson, Cory L.; Prakriya, Murali; Denning, Mitchell F.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2011-01-01

    Darier's disease (DD) is an inherited autosomal-dominant skin disorder characterized histologically by loss of adhesion between keratinocytes. DD is typically caused by mutations in sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), a major regulator of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in the skin. However, a defined role for SERCA2 in regulating intercellular adhesion remains poorly understood. We found that diminution of SERCA2 function by pharmacological inhibition or siRNA silencing in multiple human epidermal-derived cell lines was sufficient to disrupt desmosome assembly and weaken intercellular adhesive strength. Specifically, SERCA2-deficient cells exhibited up to a 60% reduction in border translocation of desmoplakin (DP), the desmosomal cytolinker protein necessary for intermediate filament (IF) anchorage to sites of robust cell-cell adhesion. In addition, loss of SERCA2 impaired the membrane translocation of protein kinase C α (PKCα), a known regulator of DP-IF association and desmosome assembly, to the plasma membrane by up to 70%. Exogenous activation of PKCα in SERCA2-deficient cells was sufficient to rescue the defective DP localization, desmosome assembly, and intercellular adhesive strength to levels comparable to controls. Our findings indicate that SERCA2-deficiency is sufficient to impede desmosome assembly and weaken intercellular adhesive strength via a PKCα-dependent mechanism, implicating SERCA2 as a novel regulator of PKCα signaling.—Hobbs, R. P., Amargo, E. V., Somasundaram, A., Simpson, C. L., Prakriya, M., Denning, M. F., Green, K. J. The calcium ATPase SERCA2 regulates desmoplakin dynamics and intercellular adhesive strength through modulation of PKCα signaling. PMID:21156808

  14. Epidermal tight junctions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Brandner, J M; Zorn-Kruppa, M; Yoshida, T; Moll, I; Beck, L A; De Benedetto, A

    2015-01-01

    The skin, the largest organ of the body, is an essential barrier that under homeostatic conditions efficiently protects and/or minimizes damage from both environmental (e.g. microorganisms, physical trauma, ultraviolet radiation) and endogenous (e.g., cancers, inflammation) factors. This formidable barrier function resides mainly in the epidermis, a dynamic, highly-stratified epithelium. The epidermis has 2 major barrier structures: stratum corneum, the outmost layer and tight junctions, intercellular junctions that seal adjacent keratinocytes in the stratum granulosum, found below the stratum corneum. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of tight junction function, composition and regulation. Herein we review what is known about tight junctions in healthy skin and keratinocyte culture systems and highlight the dynamic crosstalk observed between tight junctions and the cutaneous immune system. Finally we discuss the preliminary observations suggesting that tight junction function or protein expression may be relevant for the pathogenesis of a number of common cutaneous inflammatory and neoplastic conditions.

  15. Epidermal tight junctions in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandner, JM; Zorn-Kruppa, M; Yoshida, T; Moll, I; Beck, LA; De Benedetto, A

    2014-01-01

    The skin, the largest organ of the body, is an essential barrier that under homeostatic conditions efficiently protects and/or minimizes damage from both environmental (e.g. microorganisms, physical trauma, ultraviolet radiation) and endogenous (e.g., cancers, inflammation) factors. This formidable barrier function resides mainly in the epidermis, a dynamic, highly-stratified epithelium. The epidermis has 2 major barrier structures: stratum corneum, the outmost layer and tight junctions, intercellular junctions that seal adjacent keratinocytes in the stratum granulosum, found below the stratum corneum. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of tight junction function, composition and regulation. Herein we review what is known about tight junctions in healthy skin and keratinocyte culture systems and highlight the dynamic crosstalk observed between tight junctions and the cutaneous immune system. Finally we discuss the preliminary observations suggesting that tight junction function or protein expression may be relevant for the pathogenesis of a number of common cutaneous inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. PMID:25838981

  16. Intercellular Communication—Filling in the Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Meiners, Sally; Baron-Epel, Orna; Schindler, Melvin

    1988-01-01

    Coordination and synchrony of a variety of cellular activities in tissues of plants and animals occur as a consequence of the transfer of low molecular weight biosynthetic and signaling molecules through specialized structures (plasmodesmata in plant cells and gap junctions in mammalian cells) that form aqueous channels between contacting cells. Investigations with rat liver demonstrated that cell-cell communication is mediated by a 32 kilodalton polypeptide that forms a hexameric pore structure in the plasma membrane. Following association with the same structure in a contiguous cell, a trans-double membrane channel is created that has been termed a gap junction. In plant tissue, long tubelike structures called plasmodesmata are suggested to serve a similar cell-cell linking function between cytoplasmic compartments. Although morphologically distinct, dynamic observations suggest similarities in transport properties between gap junctions and plasmodesmata. Recent work now provides evidence that these functional similarities may reflect a more profound identity between the paradigm animal gap junction polypeptide (32 kilodalton rat liver polypeptide) and an immunologically homologous protein localized to plant plasma membrane/cell wall fractions that may be a component of plasmodesmata. PMID:16666225

  17. On the structural organization of isolated bovine lens fiber junctions.

    PubMed

    Zampighi, G; Simon, S A; Robertson, J D; McIntosh, T J; Costello, M J

    1982-04-01

    Junctions between fiber cells of bovine lenses have been isolated in milligram quantities, without using detergents or proteases. The structure of the isolated junctions has been studied by thin-section, negative-stain, and freeze-fracture electron microscopy and by x-ray diffraction. The junctions are large and most often have an undulating surface topology as determined by thin sectioning and freeze-fracture. These undulations resemble the tongue-and-groove interdigitations between lens fiber cells previously seen by others (D. H. Dickson and G. W. Crock, 1972, Invest. Ophthalmol. 11:809-815). In sections, the isolated junctions display a pentalamellar structure approximately 13-14 nm in overall thickness, which is significantly thinner than liver gap junctions. Each junctional membrane contains in the plane of the lipid bilayers distinct units arranged in a square lattice with a center-to-center spacing of 6.6 nm. Freeze-fracture replicas of the junctions fractured transversely show that the repeating units extend across the entire thickness of each membrane. Each unit is probably constructed from four identical subunits, with each subunit containing a protein of an apparent molecular weight of 27,000. We conclude that the lens junctions are structurally and chemically, different from gap junctions and could represent a new kind of intercellular contact, not simply another crystalline state of the gap junction protein.

  18. Development of schizogenous intercellular spaces in plants

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune

    2015-01-01

    Gas exchange is essential for multicellular organisms. In contrast to the circulatory systems of animals, land plants have tissues with intercellular spaces (ICSs), called aerenchyma, that are critical for efficient gas exchange. Plants form ICSs by two different mechanisms: schizogeny, where localized cell separation creates spaces; and lysogeny, where cells die to create ICSs. In schizogenous ICS formation, specific molecular mechanisms regulate the sites of cell separation and coordinate extensive reorganization of cell walls. Emerging evidence suggests the involvement of extracellular signaling, mediated by peptide ligands and leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases, in the regulation of cell wall remodeling during cell separation. Recent work on the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha has demonstrated a critical role for a plasma membrane-associated plant U-box E3 ubiquitin ligase in ICS formation. In this review, I discuss the mechanism of schizogenous ICS formation, focusing on the potential role of extracellular signaling in the regulation of cell separation. PMID:26191071

  19. Establishment of cell-cell junctions depends on the oligomeric states of VE-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Bibert, Stéphanie; Ayari, Hélène; Riveline, Daniel; Concord, Evelyne; Hermant, Bastien; Vernet, Thierry; Gulino-Debrac, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    Specifically expressed at intercellular adherens junctions of endothelial cells, VE-cadherin is a receptor that exhibits particular self-association properties. Indeed, in vitro studies demonstrated that the extracellular part of VE-cadherin elaborates Ca++-dependent hexameric structures. We hypothesized that this assembly could be at the basis of a new cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion mechanism. To verify this assumption, we first demonstrated that VE-cadherin can elaborate hexamers at the cell surface of confluent endothelial cells. Second, mutations were introduced within the extracellular part of VE-cadherin to destabilize the hexamer. Following an in vitro screening, three mutants were selected, among which, one is able to elaborate only dimers. The selected mutations were expressed as C-terminal Green Fluorescent Protein fusions in CHO cells. Despite their capacity to elaborate nascent cell-cell contacts, the mutants seem to be rapidly degraded and or internalized. Altogether, our results suggest that the formation of VE-cadherin hexamers protects this receptor and might allow the elaboration of mature endothelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:18343874

  20. Engineering of synthetic intercellular communication systems.

    PubMed

    Bacchus, William; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of synthetic devices that provide precise fine-tuning of transgene expression has revolutionized the field of biology. The design and construction of sophisticated and reliable genetic control circuits have increased dramatically in complexity in recent years. The norm when creating such circuits is to program the whole network in a single cell. Although this has been greatly successful, the time will soon come when the capacity of a single cell is no longer adequate. Therefore, synthetic biology-inspired research has started to shift towards a multicellular approach in which specialized cells are constructed and then interconnected, enabling the creation of higher-order networks that do not face the same limitations as single cells. This approach is conceptually appealing in many respects. The fact that overall workload can be easily divided between cells eliminates the problem of limited program capacity of a single cell. Furthermore, engineering of specialized cells will enable a plug-and-play approach in which cells are combined into multicellular consortia depending on the requested task. Recent advances in synthetic biology to implement intercellular communication and multicellular consortia have demonstrated an impressive arsenal of new devices with novel functions that are unprecedented even in engineered single cells. Engineering of such devices have been achieved in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells, all of which is covered in this review. The introduction of synthetic intercellular communication into the cell engineering toolbox will open up new frontiers and will greatly contribute to the future success of synthetic biology and its clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. STUDIES ON AN EPITHELIAL (GLAND) CELL JUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Werner R.; Kanno, Yoshinobu

    1964-01-01

    Membrane permeability of an epithelial cell junction (Drosophila salivary gland) was examined with intracellular microelectrodes and with fluorescent tracers. In contrast to the non-junctional cell membrane surface, which has a low permeability to ions (10-4 mho/cm2), the junctional membrane surface is highly permeable. In fact, it introduces no substantial restriction to ion flow beyond that in the cytoplasm; the resistance through a chain of cells (150 Ω cm) is only slightly greater than in extruded cytoplasm (100 Ω cm). The diffusion resistance along the intercellular space to the exterior, on the other hand, is very high. Here, there exists an ion barrier of, at least, 104Ω cm2. As a result, small ions and fluorescein move rather freely from one cell to the next, but do not leak appreciably through the intercellular space to the exterior. The organ here, rather than the single cell, appears to be the unit of ion environment. The possible underlying structural aspects are discussed. PMID:14206423

  2. Assembling carbon fiber-graphene-carbon fiber hetero-structures into 1D-2D-1D junction fillers and patterned structures for improved microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huimin; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Song, Wei-Li; Bian, Xing-Ming; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Chen, Mingji; Yuan, Xujin; Chen, Haosen; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    Since carbon-based structures of various dimensions, including one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional (2D) graphene and three-dimensional (3D) carbon foams, have attracted significant attention as microwave absorption fillers, we present an exceptional hetero-junction filler with a 1D-2D-1D feature, achieved by manipulating 2D graphene into 1D carbon fibers in the fiber-extruding process under the electric field. The as-fabricated 1D-2D-1D structural fillers exhibited much-improved dielectric properties and promoted microwave absorption performance in their composites, which is linked to the establishment of enhanced polarization capability, the generation of increased electric loss pathway and the creation of more favorable electromagnetic energy consumption conditions. The results suggest that employing 2D graphene in the 1D-2D-1D nanostructures played the critical role in tuning the electromagnetic response ability, because of its intrinsic electric advantages and dimensional features. To broaden the effective absorption bandwidth, periodic pattern-absorbing structures were designed, which showed combined absorption advantages for various thicknesses. Our strategy for fabricating 1D-2D-1D structural fillers illuminates a universal approach for manipulating dimensions and structures in the nanotechnology.

  3. Calcium Wave Propagation Triggered by Local Mechanical Stimulation as a Method for Studying Gap Junctions and Hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Iyyathurai, Jegan; Himpens, Bernard; Bultynck, Geert; D'hondt, Catheleyne

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is essential for the coordination and synchronization of cellular processes. Gap junction channels play an important role to communicate between cells and organs, including the brain, lung, liver, lens, retina, and heart. Gap junctions enable a direct route for ions like calcium and potassium, and low molecular weight compounds, such as inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, and various kinds of metabolites to pass between cells. Intercellular calcium wave propagation evoked by a local mechanical stimulus is one of the gap junction assays to study intercellular communication. In experimental settings, an intercellular calcium wave can be elicited by applying a mechanical stimulus to a single cell. Here, we describe the use of monolayers of primary bovine corneal endothelial cells as a model to study intercellular communication. Calcium wave propagation was assayed by imaging fluorescent calcium in bovine corneal endothelial cells loaded with a fluorescent calcium dye using a confocal microscope. Spatial changes in intercellular calcium concentration following mechanical stimulation were measured in the mechanical stimulated cell and in the neighboring cells. The active area (i.e., total surface area of responsive cells) of a calcium wave can be measured and used for studying the function and regulation of gap junction channels as well as hemichannels in a variety of cell systems.

  4. Multisite electrophysiological recordings by self-assembled loose-patch-like junctions between cultured hippocampal neurons and mushroom-shaped microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Shmoel, Nava; Rabieh, Noha; Ojovan, Silviya M.; Erez, Hadas; Maydan, Eilon; Spira, Micha E.

    2016-01-01

    Substrate integrated planar microelectrode arrays is the “gold standard” method for millisecond-resolution, long-term, large-scale, cell-noninvasive electrophysiological recordings from mammalian neuronal networks. Nevertheless, these devices suffer from drawbacks that are solved by spike-detecting, spike-sorting and signal-averaging techniques which rely on estimated parameters that require user supervision to correct errors, merge clusters and remove outliers. Here we show that primary rat hippocampal neurons grown on micrometer sized gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμE) functionalized simply by poly-ethylene-imine/laminin undergo self-assembly processes to form loose patch-like hybrid structures. More than 90% of the hybrids formed in this way record monophasic positive action potentials (APs). Of these, 34.5% record APs with amplitudes above 300 μV and up to 5,085 μV. This self-assembled neuron-gMμE configuration improves the recording quality as compared to planar MEA. This study characterizes and analyzes the electrophysiological signaling repertoire generated by the neurons-gMμE configuration, and discusses prospects to further improve the technology. PMID:27256971

  5. Interplay between tight junctions & adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hannah K; Maiers, Jessica L; DeMali, Kris A

    2017-09-01

    Cell-cell adhesions are critical for the development and maintenance of tissues. Present at sites of cell-cell contact are the adherens junctions and tight junctions. The adherens junctions mediate cell-cell adhesion via the actions of nectins and cadherins. The tight junctions regulate passage of ions and small molecules between cells and establish cell polarity. Historically, the adherens and tight junctions have been thought of as discrete complexes. However, it is now clear that a high level of interdependency exists between the two junctional complexes. The adherens junctions and tight junctions are physically linked, by the zonula occludens proteins, and linked via signaling molecules including several polarity complexes and actin cytoskeletal modifiers. This review will first describe the individual components of both the adherens and tight junctions and then discuss the coupling of the two complexes with an emphasis on the signaling links and physical interactions between the two junctional complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-08-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies.

  7. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies. PMID:27503836

  8. A history of gap junction structure: hexagonal arrays to atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Grosely, Rosslyn; Sorgen, Paul L

    2013-02-01

    Gap junctions are specialized membrane structures that provide an intercellular pathway for the propagation and/or amplification of signaling cascades responsible for impulse propagation, cell growth, and development. Prior to the identification of the proteins that comprise gap junctions, elucidation of channel structure began with initial observations of a hexagonal nexus connecting apposed cellular membranes. Concomitant with technological advancements spanning over 50 years, atomic resolution structures are now available detailing channel architecture and the cytoplasmic domains that have helped to define mechanisms governing the regulation of gap junctions. Highlighted in this review are the seminal structural studies that have led to our current understanding of gap junction biology.

  9. Senescent cells communicate via intercellular protein transfer

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Anat; Perelmutter, Meirav; Gal, Hilah; Burton, Dominick G.A.; Ovadya, Yossi; Vadai, Ezra; Geiger, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells mostly rely on extracellular molecules to transfer signals to other cells. However, in stress conditions, more robust mechanisms might be necessary to facilitate cell–cell communications. Cellular senescence, a stress response associated with permanent exit from the cell cycle and the development of an immunogenic phenotype, limits both tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Paradoxically, the long-term presence of senescent cells can promote tissue damage and aging within their microenvironment. Soluble factors secreted from senescent cells mediate some of these cell-nonautonomous effects. However, it is unknown whether senescent cells impact neighboring cells by other mechanisms. Here we show that senescent cells directly transfer proteins to neighboring cells and that this process facilitates immune surveillance of senescent cells by natural killer (NK) cells. We found that transfer of proteins to NK and T cells is increased in the murine preneoplastic pancreas, a site where senescent cells are present in vivo. Proteomic analysis and functional studies of the transferred proteins revealed that the transfer is strictly dependent on cell–cell contact and CDC42-regulated actin polymerization and is mediated at least partially by cytoplasmic bridges. These findings reveal a novel mode of intercellular communication by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance and might impact tumorigenesis and tissue aging. PMID:25854920

  10. Intercellular communication lessons in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bang, Claudia; Antoniades, Charalambos; Antonopoulos, Alexios S; Eriksson, Ulf; Franssen, Constantijn; Hamdani, Nazha; Lehmann, Lorenz; Moessinger, Christine; Mongillo, Marco; Muhl, Lars; Speer, Thimoteus; Thum, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Cell-cell or inter-organ communication allows the exchange of information and messages, which is essential for the coordination of cell/organ functions and the maintenance of homeostasis. It has become evident that dynamic interactions of different cell types play a major role in the heart, in particular during the progression of heart failure, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Heart failure is associated with compensatory structural and functional changes mostly in cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, which finally lead to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Intercellular communication within the heart is mediated mostly via direct cell-cell interaction or the release of paracrine signalling mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. However, recent studies have focused on the exchange of genetic information via the packaging into vesicles as well as the crosstalk of lipids and other paracrine molecules within the heart and distant organs, such as kidney and adipose tissue, which might all contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. In this review, we discuss emerging communication networks and respective underlying mechanisms which could be involved in cardiovascular disease conditions and further emphasize promising therapeutic targets for drug development. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  11. Intercellular crosstalk in human malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Dvořánková, Barbora; Szabo, Pavol; Kodet, Ondřej; Strnad, Hynek; Kolář, Michal; Lacina, Lukáš; Krejčí, Eliška; Naňka, Ondřej; Šedo, Aleksi; Smetana, Karel

    2017-05-01

    Incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing globally. While the initial stages of tumors can be easily treated by a simple surgery, the therapy of advanced stages is rather limited. Melanoma cells spread rapidly through the body of a patient to form multiple metastases. Consequently, the survival rate is poor. Therefore, emphasis in melanoma research is given on early diagnosis and development of novel and more potent therapeutic options. The malignant melanoma is arising from melanocytes, cells protecting mitotically active keratinocytes against damage caused by UV light irradiation. The melanocytes originate in the neural crest and consequently migrate to the epidermis. The relationship between the melanoma cells, the melanocytes, and neural crest stem cells manifests when the melanoma cells are implanted to an early embryo: they use similar migratory routes as the normal neural crest cells. Moreover, malignant potential of these melanoma cells is overdriven in this experimental model, probably due to microenvironmental reprogramming. This observation demonstrates the crucial role of the microenvironment in melanoma biology. Indeed, malignant tumors in general represent complex ecosystems, where multiple cell types influence the growth of genetically mutated cancer cells. This concept is directly applicable to the malignant melanoma. Our review article focuses on possible strategies to modify the intercellular crosstalk in melanoma that can be employed for therapeutic purposes.

  12. Parameter estimation methods for chaotic intercellular networks.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Inés P; Ullner, Ekkehard; Zaikin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated simulation-based techniques for parameter estimation in chaotic intercellular networks. The proposed methodology combines a synchronization-based framework for parameter estimation in coupled chaotic systems with some state-of-the-art computational inference methods borrowed from the field of computational statistics. The first method is a stochastic optimization algorithm, known as accelerated random search method, and the other two techniques are based on approximate Bayesian computation. The latter is a general methodology for non-parametric inference that can be applied to practically any system of interest. The first method based on approximate Bayesian computation is a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme that generates a series of random parameter realizations for which a low synchronization error is guaranteed. We show that accurate parameter estimates can be obtained by averaging over these realizations. The second ABC-based technique is a Sequential Monte Carlo scheme. The algorithm generates a sequence of "populations", i.e., sets of randomly generated parameter values, where the members of a certain population attain a synchronization error that is lesser than the error attained by members of the previous population. Again, we show that accurate estimates can be obtained by averaging over the parameter values in the last population of the sequence. We have analysed how effective these methods are from a computational perspective. For the numerical simulations we have considered a network that consists of two modified repressilators with identical parameters, coupled by the fast diffusion of the autoinducer across the cell membranes.

  13. Minireview: Steroid/Nuclear Receptor-Regulated Dynamics of Occluding and Anchoring Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Bhumika J.

    2014-01-01

    A diverse set of physiological signals control intercellular interactions by regulating the structure and function of occluding junctions (tight junctions) and anchoring junctions (adherens junctions and desmosomes). These plasma membrane junctions are comprised of multiprotein complexes of transmembrane and cytoplasmic peripheral plasma membrane proteins. Evidence from many hormone-responsive tissues has shown that expression, modification, molecular interactions, stability, and localization of junctional complex-associated proteins can be targeted by nuclear hormone receptors and their ligands through transcriptional and nontranscriptional mechanisms. The focus of this minireview is to discuss molecular, cellular, and physiological studies that directly link nuclear receptor- and ligand-triggered signaling pathways to the regulation of occluding and anchoring junction dynamics. PMID:25203673

  14. Expression of claudins, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 in canine organs

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Changhwan; Shin, Da-Hye; Lee, Dongoh; Kang, Su-Myung; Seok, Ju-Hyung; Kang, Hee Young; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions are the outermost structures of intercellular junctions and are classified as transmembrane proteins. These factors form selective permeability barriers between cells, act as paracellular transporters and regulate structural and functional polarity of cells. Although tight junctions have been previously studied, comparison of the transcriptional-translational levels of these molecules in canine organs remains to be investigated. In the present study, organ-specific expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 was examined in the canine duodenum, lung, liver and kidney. Results of immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the tight junctions were localized in intestinal villi and glands of the duodenum, bronchiolar epithelia and alveolar walls of the lung, endometrium and myometrium of the hepatocytes, and the distal tubules and glomeruli of the kidney. These results suggest that tight junctions are differently expressed in organs, and therefore may be involved in organ-specific functions to maintain physiological homeostasis. PMID:27600198

  15. Bile Salts at Low pH Cause Dilation of Intercellular Spaces in In Vitro Stratified Primary Esophageal Cells, Possibly by Modulating Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Sayak; Reveiller, Marie; Toia, Liana; Ivanov, Andrei I; Zhou, Zhongren; Redmond, Eileen M; Godfrey, Tony E; Peters, Jeffrey H

    2016-03-01

    The presence of dilated intercellular spaces in the stratified squamous lining of the esophagus is the pathognomonic feature of reflux esophagitis secondary to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition to stomach acid, bile salts are major constituents of gastroesophageal refluxate. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of bile salts cocktail at different pHs on epithelial junctions in an in vitro transwell model of stratified esophageal squamous epithelium. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) immortalized primary esophageal EPC1 cells were grown on polyester transwell surfaces in calcium-enriched media. The cells exhibited gradual stratification into an 11-layered squamous epithelium over 7 days, together with epithelial barrier function as indicated by increased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). This stratified epithelium demonstrated well-formed tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes as visualized by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. When exposed to short pulses of bile salts at pH 5, but not either condition alone, there was loss of stratification and decrease in TEER, concomitant with disruption of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and desmosomes, leading to the appearance of dilated intercellular spaces. At the cellular level, bile salts at pH 5 activated the Wnt pathway (indicated by increased β-catenin Ser552 phosphorylation). In conclusion, in our in vitro transwell model bile salts at pH 5, but not bile salts or media at pH 5 alone, modulate Wnt signaling, disrupt different junctional complexes, and cause increased permeability of stratified squamous esophageal epithelium. These changes approximate the appearance of dilated intercellular space similar to that found in GERD patients.

  16. Structural and functional diversity of cadherin at the adherens junction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Adhesion between cells is essential to the evolution of multicellularity. Indeed, morphogenesis in animals requires firm but flexible intercellular adhesions that are mediated by subcellular structures like the adherens junction (AJ). A key component of AJs is classical cadherins, a group of transmembrane proteins that maintain dynamic cell–cell associations in many animal species. An evolutionary reconstruction of cadherin structure and function provides a comprehensive framework with which to appreciate the diversity of morphogenetic mechanisms in animals. PMID:21708975

  17. Inhibitory effects of organochlorine pesticides on intercellular transfer of Lucifer Yellow in cultured bovine oviductal cells.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, U; Pöhland, R

    1999-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), methoxychlor (MXC), and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gammaHCH, lindane) on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in cultured bovine oviductal cells. GJIC was evaluated by microinjecting fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow and observing the inhibition of the spreading of dye into adjacent cells. After incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C, a dose-dependent inhibition of GJIC was observed over a concentration range of 16 to 128 microM DDT, MXC, or gammaHCH compared with nonexposed controls. A significant inhibition began at 32 microM DDT, MXC, or gammaHCH. After incubation for 5 h, a dose-dependent inhibition of GJIC was obtained in the concentration range from 8 to 64 microM of the pesticides. The first significant inhibitory effect on GJIC was caused by 8 microM DDT, 16 microM MXC, and 32 microM gammaHCH. The 128 microM concentration of the pesticides was toxic. At pesticide concentration of 64 microM, the decrease in dye-coupling observed was not due to lethal cell injury, as is indicated by the use of trypan blue dye exclusion. After removal of 64 microM DDT from the culture medium, intercellular communication was reestablished within 3 h. Measurement of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i in fura-2/AM-loaded oviductal cells showed that the inhibition of GJIC by addition of DDT, MXC, or gammaHCH was not associated with a detectable increase in [Ca2+]i. Coincubation of the DDT with dibutyryl-cAMP prevented the 64 microM DDT-induced inhibition of intercellular communication in adherent oviduct cells. It is suggested that organochlorine pesticides can influence cells responsible for reproduction.

  18. Degradation of connexins and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Matthias M.; Kells, Rachael M.; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin proteins are short-lived within the cell, whether present in the secretory pathway or in gap junction plaques. Their levels can be modulated by their rate of degradation. Connexins, at different stages of assembly, are degraded through the proteasomal, endo-/lysosomal, and phago-/lysosomal pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about connexin and gap junction degradation including the signals and protein-protein interactions that participate in their targeting for degradation. PMID:24486527

  19. Regulation of Endothelial Adherens Junctions by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells form a semipermeable, regulated barrier that limits the passage of fluid, small molecules, and leukocytes between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. The adherens junction, a major mechanism of intercellular adhesion, is comprised of transmembrane cadherins forming homotypic interactions between adjacent cells and associated cytoplasmic catenins linking the cadherins to the cytoskeleton. Inflammatory conditions promote the disassembly of the adherens junction and a loss of intercellular adhesion, creating openings or gaps in the endothelium through which small molecules diffuse and leukocytes transmigrate. Tyrosine kinase signaling has emerged as a central regulator of the inflammatory response, partly through direct phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the adherens junction components. This review discusses the findings that support and those that argue against a direct effect of cadherin and catenin phosphorylation in the disassembly of the adherens junction. Recent findings indicate a complex interaction between kinases, phosphatases, and the adherens junction components that allow a fine regulation of the endothelial permeability to small molecules, leukocyte migration, and barrier resealing. PMID:26556953

  20. Mitochondria Know No Boundaries: Mechanisms and Functions of Intercellular Mitochondrial Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Torralba, Daniel; Baixauli, Francesc; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria regulate multiple cell processes, including calcium signaling, apoptosis and cell metabolism. Mitochondria contain their own circular genome encoding selected subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Recent findings reveal that, in addition to being maternally inherited, mitochondria can traverse cell boundaries and thus be horizontally transferred between cells. Although, the physiological relevance of this phenomenon is still under debate, mitochondria uptake rescues mitochondrial respiration defects in recipient cells and regulates signaling, proliferation or chemotherapy resistance in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we outline the pathophysiological consequences of horizontal mitochondrial transfer and offer a perspective on the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating their intercellular transmission, including tunneling nanotubes, extracellular vesicles, cellular fusion, and GAP junctions. The physiological relevance of mitochondrial transfer and the potential therapeutic application of this exchange for treating mitochondrial-related diseases are discussed. PMID:27734015

  1. Intercellular Ca(2+) wave propagation in human retinal pigment epithelium cells induced by mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Abu Khamidakh, A E; Juuti-Uusitalo, K; Larsson, K; Skottman, H; Hyttinen, J

    2013-03-01

    Ca(2+) signaling is vitally important in cellular physiological processes and various drugs also affect Ca(2+) signaling. Thus, knowledge of Ca(2+) dynamics is important toward understanding cell biology, as well as the development of drug-testing assays. ARPE-19 cells are widely used for modeling human retinal pigment epithelium functions and drug-testing, but intercellular communication has not been assessed in these cells. In this study, we investigated intercellular Ca(2+) communication induced by mechanical stimulation in ARPE-19 cells. An intercellular Ca(2+) wave was induced in ARPE-19 monolayer by point mechanical stimulation of a single cell. Dynamic changes of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in the monolayer were tracked with fluorescence microscopy imaging using Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2 in presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+), after depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin, and after application of gap junction blocker α-glycyrrhetinic acid and P2-receptor blocker suramin. Normalized fluorescence values, reflecting amplitude of [Ca(2+)](i) increase, and percentage of responsive cells were calculated to quantitatively characterize Ca(2+) wave propagation. Mechanical stimulation of a single cell within a confluent monolayer of ARPE-19 cells initiated an increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which propagated to neighboring cells in a wave-like manner. Ca(2+) wave propagated to up to 14 cell tiers in control conditions. The absence of extracellular Ca(2+) reduced [Ca(2+)](i) increase in the cells close to the site of mechanical stimulation, whereas the depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin blocked the wave spreading to distant cells. The gap junction blocker α-glycyrrhetinic acid reduced [Ca(2+)](i) increase in the cell tiers close to the site of mechanical stimulation, indicating involvement of gap junctions in Ca(2+) wave propagation. The P2-receptor blocker suramin reduced the percentage

  2. Intercellular transfer along the trichomes of the invasive terminal heterocyst forming cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CS-505.

    PubMed

    Plominsky, Álvaro M; Delherbe, Nathalie; Mandakovic, Dinka; Riquelme, Brenda; González, Karen; Bergman, Birgitta; Mariscal, Vicente; Vásquez, Mónica

    2015-03-01

    Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CS-505 is an invasive freshwater filamentous cyanobacterium that when grown diazotrophically may develop trichomes of up to 100 vegetative cells while differentiating only two end heterocysts, the sole sites for their N2-fixation process. We examined the diazotrophic growth and intercellular transfer mechanisms in C. raciborskii CS-505. Subjecting cultures to a combined-nitrogen-free medium to elicit N2 fixation, the trichome length remained unaffected while growth rates decreased. The structures and proteins for intercellular communication showed that while a continuous periplasmic space was apparent along the trichomes, the putative septal junction sepJ gene is divided into two open reading frames and lacks several transmembrane domains unlike the situation in Anabaena, differentiating a 5-fold higher frequency of heterocysts. FRAP analyses also showed that the dyes calcein and 5-CFDA were taken up by heterocysts and vegetative cells, and that the transfer from heterocysts and 'terminal' vegetative cells showed considerably higher transfer rates than that from vegetative cells located in the middle of the trichomes. The data suggest that C. raciborskii CS-505 compensates its low-frequency heterocyst phenotype by a highly efficient transfer of the fixed nitrogen towards cells in distal parts of the trichomes (growing rapidly) while cells in central parts suffers (slow growth).

  3. Connexin43 expression levels influence intercellular coupling and cell proliferation of native murine cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Kanter, Evelyn M; Laing, James G; Aprhys, Colette; Johns, David C; Kardami, Elissavet; Yamada, Kathryn A

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about connexin expression and function in murine cardiac fibroblasts. The authors isolated native ventricular fibroblasts from adult mice and determined that although they expressed both connexin43 (Cx43) and connexin45 (Cx45), the relative abundance of Cx45 was greater than that of Cx43 in fibroblasts compared to myocytes, and the electrophoretic mobility of both Cx43 and Cx45 differed in fibroblasts and in myocytes. Increasing Cx43 expression by adenoviral infection increased intercellular coupling, whereas decreasing Cx43 expression by genetic ablation decreased coupling. Interestingly, increasing Cx43 expression reduced fibroblast proliferation, whereas decreasing Cx43 expression increased proliferation. These data demonstrate that native fibroblasts isolated from the mouse heart exhibit intercellular coupling via gap junctions containing both Cx43 and Cx45. Fibroblast proliferation is inversely related to the expression level of Cx43. Thus, connexin expression and remodeling is likely to alter fibroblast function, maintenance of the extracellular matrix, and ventricular remodeling in both normal and diseased hearts.

  4. Rickettsia Sca4 Reduces Vinculin-Mediated Intercellular Tension to Promote Spread.

    PubMed

    Lamason, Rebecca L; Bastounis, Effie; Kafai, Natasha M; Serrano, Ricardo; Del Álamo, Juan C; Theriot, Julie A; Welch, Matthew D

    2016-10-20

    Spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are human pathogens that infect cells in the vasculature. They disseminate through host tissues by a process of cell-to-cell spread that involves protrusion formation, engulfment, and vacuolar escape. Other bacterial pathogens rely on actin-based motility to provide a physical force for spread. Here, we show that SFG species Rickettsia parkeri typically lack actin tails during spread and instead manipulate host intercellular tension and mechanotransduction to promote spread. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified surface cell antigen 4 (Sca4) as a secreted effector of spread that specifically promotes protrusion engulfment. Sca4 interacts with the cell-adhesion protein vinculin and blocks association with vinculin's binding partner, α-catenin. Using traction and monolayer stress microscopy, we show that Sca4 reduces vinculin-dependent mechanotransduction at cell-cell junctions. Our results suggest that Sca4 relieves intercellular tension to promote protrusion engulfment, which represents a distinctive strategy for manipulating cytoskeletal force generation to enable spread.

  5. Homotypic gap junctional communication associated with metastasis increases suppression increases with PKA kinase activity and is unaffected by P13K inhibition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Loss of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between cancer cells is a common characteristic of malignant transformation. This communication is mediated by connexin proteins that make up the functional units of gap junctions. Connexins are highly regulated at the protein level and phosp...

  6. Molecular mechanisms of intercellular communication: transmembrane signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; George, J.S.; Siegel, H.N.; McGregor, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    This short discussion of transmembrane signaling depicts a particular class of signaling devices whose functional characteristics may well be representative of broader classes of membrane switches. These multicomponent aggregates are characterized by tight organization of interacting components which function by conformational interactions to provide sensitive, amplified, rapid, and modulated responses. It is clear that the essential role of such switches in cell-cell interactions necessitated their appearance early in the history of the development of multicellular organisms. It also seems clear that once such devices made their appearance, the conformationally interactive moieties were firmly locked into a regulatory relationship. Since modification of interacting components could perturb or interfere with the functional integrity of the whole switch, genetic drift was only permitted at the input and outflow extremes. However, the GTP binding moiety and its interacting protein domains on contiguous portions of the receptor and readout components were highly conserved. The observed stringent evolutionary conservation of the molecular features of these membrane switches thus applies primarily to the central (GTP binding) elements. An extraordinary degree of variation was permitted within the domains of signal recognition and enzymatic output. Thus, time and evolution have adapted the central logic of the regulatory algorithm to serve a great variety of cellular purposes and to recognize a great variety of chemical and physical signals. This is exemplified by the richness of the hormonal and cellular dialogues found in primates such as man. Here the wealth of intercellular communiation can support the composition and performance of symphonies and the study of cellular immunology.

  7. Parameter Estimation Methods for Chaotic Intercellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mariño, Inés P.; Ullner, Ekkehard; Zaikin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated simulation-based techniques for parameter estimation in chaotic intercellular networks. The proposed methodology combines a synchronization–based framework for parameter estimation in coupled chaotic systems with some state–of–the–art computational inference methods borrowed from the field of computational statistics. The first method is a stochastic optimization algorithm, known as accelerated random search method, and the other two techniques are based on approximate Bayesian computation. The latter is a general methodology for non–parametric inference that can be applied to practically any system of interest. The first method based on approximate Bayesian computation is a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme that generates a series of random parameter realizations for which a low synchronization error is guaranteed. We show that accurate parameter estimates can be obtained by averaging over these realizations. The second ABC–based technique is a Sequential Monte Carlo scheme. The algorithm generates a sequence of “populations”, i.e., sets of randomly generated parameter values, where the members of a certain population attain a synchronization error that is lesser than the error attained by members of the previous population. Again, we show that accurate estimates can be obtained by averaging over the parameter values in the last population of the sequence. We have analysed how effective these methods are from a computational perspective. For the numerical simulations we have considered a network that consists of two modified repressilators with identical parameters, coupled by the fast diffusion of the autoinducer across the cell membranes. PMID:24282513

  8. Methoxychlor and Vinclozolin Induce Rapid Changes in Intercellular and Intracellular Signaling in Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Babica, Pavel; Zurabian, Rimma; Kumar, Esha R.; Chopra, Rajus; Mianecki, Maxwell J.; Park, Joon-Suk; Jaša, Libor; Trosko, James E.; Upham, Brad L.

    2016-01-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) and vinclozolin (VIN) are well-recognized endocrine disrupting chemicals known to alter epigenetic regulations and transgenerational inheritance; however, non-endocrine disruption endpoints are also important. Thus, we determined the effects of MXC and VIN on the dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. Both chemicals induced a rapid dysregulation of GJIC at non-cytotoxic doses, with 30 min EC50 values for GJIC inhibition being 10 µM for MXC and 126 µM for VIN. MXC inhibited GJIC for at least 24 h, while VIN effects were transient and GJIC recovered after 4 h. VIN induced rapid hyperphosphorylation and internalization of gap junction protein connexin43, and both chemicals also activated MAPK ERK1/2 and p38. Effects on GJIC were not prevented by MEK1/2 inhibitor, but by an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), resveratrol, and in the case of VIN, also, by a p38 inhibitor. Estrogen (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) modulators (estradiol, ICI 182,780, HPTE, testosterone, flutamide, VIN M2) did not attenuate MXC or VIN effects on GJIC. Our data also indicate that the effects were elicited by the parental compounds of MXC and VIN. Our study provides new evidence that MXC and VIN dysregulate GJIC via mechanisms involving rapid activation of PC-PLC occurring independently of ER- or AR-dependent genomic signaling. Such alterations of rapid intercellular and intracellular signaling events involved in regulations of gene expression, tissue development, function and homeostasis, could also contribute to transgenerational epigenetic effects of endocrine disruptors. PMID:27413106

  9. Methoxychlor and Vinclozolin Induce Rapid Changes in Intercellular and Intracellular Signaling in Liver Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Babica, Pavel; Zurabian, Rimma; Kumar, Esha R; Chopra, Rajus; Mianecki, Maxwell J; Park, Joon-Suk; Jaša, Libor; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2016-09-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) and vinclozolin (VIN) are well-recognized endocrine disrupting chemicals known to alter epigenetic regulations and transgenerational inheritance; however, non-endocrine disruption endpoints are also important. Thus, we determined the effects of MXC and VIN on the dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. Both chemicals induced a rapid dysregulation of GJIC at non-cytotoxic doses, with 30 min EC50 values for GJIC inhibition being 10 µM for MXC and 126 µM for VIN. MXC inhibited GJIC for at least 24 h, while VIN effects were transient and GJIC recovered after 4 h. VIN induced rapid hyperphosphorylation and internalization of gap junction protein connexin43, and both chemicals also activated MAPK ERK1/2 and p38. Effects on GJIC were not prevented by MEK1/2 inhibitor, but by an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), resveratrol, and in the case of VIN, also, by a p38 inhibitor. Estrogen (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) modulators (estradiol, ICI 182,780, HPTE, testosterone, flutamide, VIN M2) did not attenuate MXC or VIN effects on GJIC. Our data also indicate that the effects were elicited by the parental compounds of MXC and VIN. Our study provides new evidence that MXC and VIN dysregulate GJIC via mechanisms involving rapid activation of PC-PLC occurring independently of ER- or AR-dependent genomic signaling. Such alterations of rapid intercellular and intracellular signaling events involved in regulations of gene expression, tissue development, function and homeostasis, could also contribute to transgenerational epigenetic effects of endocrine disruptors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Relative Roles of Gap Junction Channels and Cytoplasm in Cell-to-Cell Diffusion of Fluorescent Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranyos, Richard G. A.; Caveney, Stanley; Miller, James G.; Petersen, Nils O.

    1987-04-01

    Intercellular (tissue) diffusion of molecules requires cytoplasmic diffusion and diffusion through gap junctional (or cell-to-cell) channels. The rates of tissue and cytoplasmic diffusion of fluorescent tracers, expressed as an effective diffusion coefficient, De, and a cytoplasmic diffusion coefficient, Dcyt, have been measured among the developing epidermal cells of a larval beetle, Tenebrio molitor L., to determine the contribution of the junctional channels to intercellular diffusion. Tracer diffusion was measured by injecting fluorescent tracers into cells and quantitating the rate of subsequent spread into adjacent cells. Cytoplasmic diffusion was determined by fluorescence photobleaching. These experiments show that gap junctional channels constitute approximately 70-80% of the total cell-to-cell resistance to the diffusion of organic tracers at high concentrations in this tissue. At low concentrations, however, the binding of tracer to cytoplasm slows down the cytoplasmic diffusion, which may limit intercellular diffusion.

  11. Switch in Gap Junction Protein Expression is Associated with Selective Changes in Junctional Permeability During Keratinocyte Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissette, Janice L.; Kumar, Nalin M.; Gilula, Norton B.; Hall, James E.; Dotto, G. Paolo

    1994-07-01

    Gap junctional communication provides a mechanism for regulating multicellular activities by allowing the exchange of small diffusible molecules between neighboring cells. The diversity of gap junction proteins may exist to form channels that have different permeability properties. We report here that induction of terminal differentiation in mouse primary keratinocytes by calcium results in a specific switch in gap junction protein expression. Expression of α_1 (connexin 43) and β_2 (connexin 26) gap junction proteins is down-modulated, whereas that of β_3 (connexin 31) and β_4 (connexin 31.1) proteins is induced. Although both proliferating and differentiating keratinocytes are electrically coupled, there are significant changes in the permeability properties of the junctions to small molecules. In parallel with the changes in gap junction protein expression during differentiation, the intercellular transfer of the small dyes neurobiotin, carboxyfluorescein, and Lucifer yellow is significantly reduced, whereas that of small metabolites, such as nucleotides and amino acids, proceeds unimpeded. Thus, a switch in gap junction protein expression in differentiating keratinocytes is accompanied by selective changes in junctional permeability that may play an important role in the coordinate control of the differentiation process.

  12. Slit Diaphragms Contain Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Bornheimer, Scott; Kudlicka, Krystyna; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2009-01-01

    Slit diaphragms are essential components of the glomerular filtration apparatus, as changes in these junctions are the hallmark of proteinuric diseases. Slit diaphragms, considered specialized adherens junctions, contain both unique membrane proteins (e.g., nephrin, podocin, and Neph1) and typical adherens junction proteins (e.g., P-cadherin, FAT, and catenins). Whether slit diaphragms also contain tight junction proteins is unknown. Here, immunofluorescence, immunogold labeling, and cell fractionation demonstrated that rat slit diaphragms contain the tight junction proteins JAM-A (junctional adhesion molecule A), occludin, and cingulin. We found these proteins in the same protein complexes as nephrin, podocin, CD2AP, ZO-1, and Neph1 by cosedimentation, coimmunoprecipitation, and pull-down assays. PAN nephrosis increased the protein levels of JAM-A, occludin, cingulin, and ZO-1 several-fold in glomeruli and loosened their attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. These data extend current information about the molecular composition of slit diaphragms by demonstrating the presence of tight junction proteins, although slit diaphragms lack the characteristic morphologic features of tight junctions. The contribution of these proteins to the assembly of slit diaphragms and potential signaling cascades requires further investigation. PMID:19478094

  13. Cell Cycle Checkpoint Proteins p21 and Hus1 Regulating Intercellular Signaling Induced By Alpha Particle Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Jun; Hang, Haiying

    In recent years, the attentions for radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been paid on the intercellular signaling events connecting the irradiated and non-irradiated cells. p21 is a member of the Cip/Kip family and plays essential roles in cell cycle progression arrest after cellular irradiation. DNA damage checkpoint protein Hus1 is a member of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex and functions as scaffold at the damage sites to facilitate the activation of downstream effectors. Using the medium trasfer method and the cells of MEF, MEF (p21-/-), MEF (p21-/-Hus1-/-) as either medium donor or receptor cells, it was found that with 5cGy alpha particle irradiation, the bystander cells showed a significant induction of -H2AX for normal MEFs (p¡0.05). However, the absence of p21 resulted in deficiency in inducing bystander effects. Further results indicated p21 affected the intercellular DNA damage signaling mainly through disrupting the production or release of the damage signals from irradiated cells. When Hus1 and p21 were both knocked out, an obvious induction of -H2AX recurred in bystander cells and the induction of -H2AX was GJIC (gap junction-mediated intercellular communication) dependent, indicating the interrelationship between p21 and Hus1 regulated the production and relay of DNA damage signals from irradiated cells to non-irradiated bystander cells.

  14. The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The structural organization and protein composition of lens fiber junctions isolated from adult bovine and calf lenses were studied using combined electron microscopy, immunolocalization with monoclonal and polyclonal anti-MIP and anti-MP70 (two putative gap junction-forming proteins), and freeze-fracture and label-fracture methods. The major intrinsic protein of lens plasma membranes (MIP) was localized in single membranes and in an extensive network of junctions having flat and undulating surface topologies. In wavy junctions, polyclonal and monoclonal anti-MIPs labeled only the cytoplasmic surface of the convex membrane of the junction. Label-fracture experiments demonstrated that the convex membrane contained MIP arranged in tetragonal arrays 6-7 nm in unit cell dimension. The apposing concave membrane of the junction displayed fracture faces without intramembrane particles or pits. Therefore, wavy junctions are asymmetric structures composed of MIP crystals abutted against particle-free membranes. In thin junctions, anti-MIP labeled the cytoplasmic surfaces of both apposing membranes with varying degrees of asymmetry. In thin junctions, MIP was found organized in both small clusters and single membranes. These small clusters also abut against particle-free apposing membranes, probably in a staggered or checkerboard pattern. Thus, the structure of thin and wavy junctions differed only in the extent of crystallization of MIP, a property that can explain why this protein can produce two different antibody-labeling patterns. A conclusion of this study is that wavy and thin junctions do not contain coaxially aligned channels, and, in these junctions, MIP is unlikely to form gap junction-like channels. We suggest MIP may behave as an intercellular adhesion protein which can also act as a volume-regulating channel to collapse the lens extracellular space. Junctions constructed of MP70 have a wider overall thickness (18-20 nm) and are abundant in the cortical regions

  15. Novel transport function of adherens junction revealed by live imaging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chiao; Yang, Wen-Ting; Cheng, Lien-Chieh; Lin, Chiao-Ming; Ho, Yu-Huei; Lin, Pei-Yi; Chen, Bi-Chang; Rickoll, Wayne L; Hsu, Jui-Chou

    2015-08-07

    Adherens junctions are known for their role in mediating cell-cell adhesion. DE-cadherin and Echinoid are the principle adhesion molecules of adherens junctions in Drosophila epithelia. Here, using live imaging to trace the movement of endocytosed Echinoid vesicles in the epithelial cells of Drosophila embryos, we demonstrate that Echinoid vesicles co-localize and move with Rab5-or Rab11-positive endosomes. Surprisingly, these Echinoid-containing endosomes undergo directional cell-to-cell movement, through adherens junctions. Consistent with this, cell-to-cell movement of Echinoid vesicles requires the presence of DE-cadherin at adherens junctions. Live imaging further revealed that Echinoid vesicles move along adherens junction-associated microtubules into adjacent cells, a process requiring a kinesin motor. Importantly, DE-cadherin- and EGFR-containing vesicles also exhibit intercellular movement. Together, our results unveil a transport function of adherens junctions. Furthermore, this adherens junctions-based intercellular transport provides a platform for the exchange of junctional proteins and signaling receptors between neighboring cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-invasive microfluidic gap junction assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sisi; Lee, Luke P

    2010-03-01

    Gap junctions are protein channels between cells that allow direct electrical and metabolic coupling via the exchange of biomolecules and ions. Their expression, though ubiquitous in most mammalian cell types, is especially important for the proper functioning of cardiac and neuronal systems. Many existing methods for studying gap junction communication suffer from either unquantifiable data or difficulty of use. Here, we measure the extent of dye spread and effective diffusivities through gap junction connected cells using a quantitative microfluidic cell biology platform. After loading dye by hydrodynamic focusing of calcein/AM, dye transfer dynamics into neighboring, unexposed cells can be monitored via timelapse fluorescent microscopy. By using a selective microfluidic dye loading over a confluent layer of cells, we found that high expression of gap junctions in C6 cells transmits calcein across the monolayer with an effective diffusivity of 3.4 x 10(-13) m(2)/s, which are highly coupled by Cx43. We also found that the gap junction blocker 18alpha-GA works poorly in the presence of serum even at high concentrations (50 microM); however, it is highly effective down to 2.5 microM in the absence of serum. Furthermore, when the drug is washed out, dye spread resumes rapidly within 1 min for all doses, indicating the drug does not affect transcriptional regulation of connexins in these Cx43+ cells, in contrast to previous studies. This integrated microfluidic platform enables the in situ monitoring of gap junction communication, yielding dynamic information about intercellular molecular transfer and pharmacological inhibition and recovery.

  17. Chemical Tumor Promoters, Oncogenes and Growth Factors: Modulators of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Bennett and D.C. Spray, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor , NY, 1985, p. 289. 5. Madhukar, B.V., J.E. Trosko and C.C. Chang. in Cell...P.D. Hoerger. Cold Spring Harbor Labo- ratory, Cold Spring Harbor , N.Y., 1988. p. 139. 42. Lacey, S.W.. Amer. 1. Med. Sci. 29:39 (1986). 43

  18. The Role of Chemical Inhibition of Gap-Junctional Intercellular Communication in Toxicology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Communication Between Rat Liver zoithelial Cells M.S. Rczabek, J.t. Trosko, C. Jone, and S.D. Sleiqht. FireMaster BP-6 (FM), a mixture of polybrominated...V79 cells." Cell Biol. Toxicol., 3:1-15, 1987. T.J. Kavanagh, C.C. Chang, and J.E. Trosko, "Effect of the polybrominated biphenyls, Firemaster BP

  19. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise.

    PubMed

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah N; Moseley, Pope L

    2016-03-15

    A single layer of enterocytes and tight junctions (intercellular multiprotein complexes) form the intestinal epithelial barrier that controls transport of molecules through transcellular and paracellular pathways. A dysfunctional or "leaky" intestinal tight junction barrier allows augmented permeation of luminal antigens, endotoxins, and bacteria into the blood stream. Various substances and conditions have been shown to affect the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The primary focus of the present review is to analyze the effects of exertional or nonexertional (passive hyperthermia) heat stress on tight junction barrier function in in vitro and in vivo (animals and humans) models. Our secondary focus is to review changes in tight junction proteins in response to exercise or hyperthermic conditions. Finally, we discuss some pharmacological or nutritional interventions that may affect the cellular mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier during heat stress or exercise.

  20. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Zuhl, Micah N.; Moseley, Pope L.

    2015-01-01

    A single layer of enterocytes and tight junctions (intercellular multiprotein complexes) form the intestinal epithelial barrier that controls transport of molecules through transcellular and paracellular pathways. A dysfunctional or “leaky” intestinal tight junction barrier allows augmented permeation of luminal antigens, endotoxins, and bacteria into the blood stream. Various substances and conditions have been shown to affect the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The primary focus of the present review is to analyze the effects of exertional or nonexertional (passive hyperthermia) heat stress on tight junction barrier function in in vitro and in vivo (animals and humans) models. Our secondary focus is to review changes in tight junction proteins in response to exercise or hyperthermic conditions. Finally, we discuss some pharmacological or nutritional interventions that may affect the cellular mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier during heat stress or exercise. PMID:26359485

  1. Herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D relocates nectin-1 from intercellular contacts.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Arjun K; Rothlauf, Paul W; Krummenacher, Claude

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) uses the cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 as a receptor to enter neurons and epithelial cells. The viral glycoprotein D (gD) is used as a non-canonical ligand for nectin-1. The gD binding site on nectin-1 overlaps with a functional adhesive site involved in nectin-nectin homophilic trans-interaction. Consequently, when nectin-1 is engaged with a cellular ligand at cell junctions, the gD binding site is occupied. Here we report that HSV gD is able to disrupt intercellular homophilic trans-interaction of nectin-1 and induce a rapid redistribution of nectin-1 from cell junctions. This movement does not require the receptor's interaction with the actin-binding adaptor afadin. Interaction of nectin-1 with afadin is also dispensable for virion surfing along nectin-1-rich filopodia. Cells seeded on gD-coated surfaces also fail to accumulate nectin-1 at cell contact. These data indicate that HSV gD affects nectin-1 locally through direct interaction and more globally through signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Steroid hormone effects on intercellular communication between term pregnant human myometrial cells before labor.

    PubMed

    Ciray, H N; Bäckström, T; Ulmsten, U; Roomans, G M

    1996-08-01

    The appearance of gap junctions (GJs) between myometrial smooth muscle cells is one of the major events associated with the onset of labor. We have employed dye-coupling and electrical-current injection techniques to study the mechanisms by which steroid hormones regulate GJs in term pregnant myometrium of women before labor. Progesterone (P4) did not alter the input resistance (Ro) of the tissues when added to Tyrode's solution, which was used as control treatment. Octanol, the putative gap junctional uncoupling agent, increased the Ro of the cells compared to the control and P4-treated groups. The membrane potential (Em) did not differ between these groups. However, when P4 was applied after the tissue was perfused with estradiol (E2), the results changed dramatically: the Em hyperpolarized, and the Ro increased. Octanol increased the Ro in E2-treated tissues, but did not affect the Em. Consecutive application of E2, octanol, E2, and P4 resulted in rapid changes in the Ro of the cells. Dye-coupling was mostly detected between cells from controls and E2-treated tissues. These results indicate that P4 exerts its effects in the presence of E2 and that P4 has rapid effects on the intercellular communication between human myometrial cells.

  3. Functional assessment of gap junctions in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures of human tendon cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Kuzma-Kuzniarska, Maria; Yapp, Clarence; Pearson-Jones, Thomas W; Jones, Andrew K; Hulley, Philippa A

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction-mediated intercellular communication influences a variety of cellular activities. In tendons, gap junctions modulate collagen production, are involved in strain-induced cell death, and are involved in the response to mechanical stimulation. The aim of the present study was to investigate gap junction-mediated intercellular communication in healthy human tendon-derived cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The FRAP is a noninvasive technique that allows quantitative measurement of gap junction function in living cells. It is based on diffusion-dependent redistribution of a gap junction-permeable fluorescent dye. Using FRAP, we showed that human tenocytes form functional gap junctions in monolayer and three-dimensional (3-D) collagen I culture. Fluorescently labeled tenocytes following photobleaching rapidly reacquired the fluorescent dye from neighboring cells, while HeLa cells, which do not communicate by gap junctions, remained bleached. Furthermore, both 18 β-glycyrrhetinic acid and carbenoxolone, standard inhibitors of gap junction activity, impaired fluorescence recovery in tendon cells. In both monolayer and 3-D cultures, intercellular communication in isolated cells was significantly decreased when compared with cells forming many cell-to-cell contacts. In this study, we used FRAP as a tool to quantify and experimentally manipulate the function of gap junctions in human tenocytes in both two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D cultures.

  4. Functional assessment of gap junctions in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures of human tendon cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma-Kuzniarska, Maria; Yapp, Clarence; Pearson-Jones, Thomas W.; Jones, Andrew K.; Hulley, Philippa A.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction-mediated intercellular communication influences a variety of cellular activities. In tendons, gap junctions modulate collagen production, are involved in strain-induced cell death, and are involved in the response to mechanical stimulation. The aim of the present study was to investigate gap junction-mediated intercellular communication in healthy human tendon-derived cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The FRAP is a noninvasive technique that allows quantitative measurement of gap junction function in living cells. It is based on diffusion-dependent redistribution of a gap junction-permeable fluorescent dye. Using FRAP, we showed that human tenocytes form functional gap junctions in monolayer and three-dimensional (3-D) collagen I culture. Fluorescently labeled tenocytes following photobleaching rapidly reacquired the fluorescent dye from neighboring cells, while HeLa cells, which do not communicate by gap junctions, remained bleached. Furthermore, both 18 β-glycyrrhetinic acid and carbenoxolone, standard inhibitors of gap junction activity, impaired fluorescence recovery in tendon cells. In both monolayer and 3-D cultures, intercellular communication in isolated cells was significantly decreased when compared with cells forming many cell-to-cell contacts. In this study, we used FRAP as a tool to quantify and experimentally manipulate the function of gap junctions in human tenocytes in both two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D cultures.

  5. Dioscin augments HSV-tk-mediated suicide gene therapy for melanoma by promoting connexin-based intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Wu, Yingya; Liu, Xijuan; Tan, Yuhui; Du, Biaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a promising strategy against melanoma. However, the low efficiency of the gene transfer technique can limit its application. Our preliminary data showed that dioscin, a glucoside saponin, could upregulate the expression of connexins Cx26 and Cx43, major components of gap junctions, in melanoma cells. We hypothesized that dioscin may increase the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) through increasing the formation of gap junctions. Further analysis showed that dioscin indeed could increase the gap junctional intercellular communication in B16 melanoma cells, resulting in more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in B16tk cells. By contrast, overexpression of dominant negative Cx43 impaired the cell-cell communication of B16 cells and subsequently weakened the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV gene therapy. In vivo, combination treatment with dioscin and GCV of tumor-bearing mice with 30% positive B16tk cells and 70% wild-type B16 cells caused a significant reduction in tumor volume and weight compared to treatment with GCV or dioscin alone. Taken together, these results demonstrated that dioscin could augment the bystander effect of the HSV-tk/GCV system through increasing connexin-mediated gap junction coupling. PMID:27903977

  6. Remodelling of cellular excitation (reaction) and intercellular coupling (diffusion) by chronic atrial fibrillation represented by a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Henggui; Garratt, Clifford J.; Kharche, Sanjay; Holden, Arun V.

    2009-06-01

    Human atrial tissue is an excitable system, in which myocytes are excitable elements, and cell-to-cell electrotonic interactions are via diffusive interactions of cell membrane potentials. We developed a family of excitable system models for human atrium at cellular, tissue and anatomical levels for both normal and chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) conditions. The effects of AF-induced remodelling of cell membrane ionic channels (reaction kinetics) and intercellular gap junctional coupling (diffusion) on atrial excitability, conduction of excitation waves and dynamics of re-entrant excitation waves are quantified. Both ionic channel and gap junctional coupling remodelling have rate dependent effects on atrial propagation. Membrane channel conductance remodelling allows the propagation of activity at higher rates than those sustained in normal tissue or in tissue with gap junctional remodelling alone. Membrane channel conductance remodelling is essential for the propagation of activity at rates higher than 300/min as seen in AF. Spatially heterogeneous gap junction coupling remodelling increased the risk of conduction block, an essential factor for the genesis of re-entry. In 2D and 3D anatomical models, the dynamical behaviours of re-entrant excitation waves are also altered by membrane channel modelling. This study provides insights to understand the pro-arrhythmic effects of AF-induced reaction and diffusion remodelling in atrial tissue.

  7. DIFFERENTIATION OF THE JUNCTIONAL COMPLEX OF SURFACE CELLS IN THE DEVELOPING FUNDULUS BLASTODERM

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Thomas L.; Trinkaus, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the junctional complex between surface cells was investigated in blastula, mid gastrula, late gastrula, and early embryo of the teleost fish Fundulus heteroclitus. In blastulae, the intercellular complex is simple and consists of an apical region where the adjacent membranes are closely apposed (40–60 A) and in places touch, an intermediate zone with a wider intercellular space (> 100 A), and incipient desmosomes. In gastrulae, there are frequent points of fusion of membranes along the apical zone of the complex. Dilatations and an increased number of desmosomes in different stages of development are found along the intermediate zone. In mid gastrula, a close or gap junction with an intercellular space of 20 A occurs below the level of the desmosomes. In late gastrula, the gap junction is reduced in extent and desmosomes are better developed. In the early embryo, the basic organization of the complex is the same, although the deeply situated close junctions are no longer apparent and desmosomes and their associated system of filaments are well developed. At this time, the junctional complex is comparable to that of many epithelia and consists of an apical zonula occludens, a short zonula adherens, and deeply situated maculae adherentes. PMID:5545331

  8. Plasmodesmata: intercellular tunnels facilitating transport of macromolecules in plants.

    PubMed

    Kragler, Friedrich

    2013-04-01

    In plants, intercellular structures named plasmodesmata (PD) form a continuous cytoplasmic network between neighboring cells. PD pores provide channels for intercellular symplasmic (cell-to-cell) transport throughout most tissues of the plant body. Cell-defining proteins, such as transcription factors, and regulatory non-coding sequences, such as short interfering RNA, micro RNA, protein-encoding messenger RNAs, viroids, and viral RNA/DNA genomes move via PD channels to adjacent cells. PD-mediated intercellular transport of macromolecules is a regulated process depending on the tissue, developmental stage, and nature of the transported macromolecule. In this review, PD channels and their similarity to tunneling nanotubes present in animals are highlighted. In addition, homeodomain protein movement and cellular components regulating transport are discussed.

  9. Galectin-3 Regulates Desmoglein-2 and Intestinal Epithelial Intercellular Adhesion*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kun; Rankin, Carl R.; Nava, Porfirio; Sumagin, Ronen; Kamekura, Ryuta; Stowell, Sean R.; Feng, Mingli; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2014-01-01

    The desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins, and desmocollins mediate strong intercellular adhesion. Human intestinal epithelial cells express the desmoglein-2 isoform. A proteomic screen for Dsg2-associated proteins in intestinal epithelial cells identified a lectin referred to as galectin-3 (Gal3). Gal3 bound to N-linked β-galactosides in Dsg2 extracellular domain and co-sedimented with caveolin-1 in lipid rafts. Down-regulation of Gal3 protein or incubation with lactose, a galactose-containing disaccharide that competitively inhibits galectin binding to Dsg2, decreased intercellular adhesion in intestinal epithelial cells. In the absence of functional Gal3, Dsg2 protein was internalized from the plasma membrane and degraded in the proteasome. These results report a novel role of Gal3 in stabilizing a desmosomal cadherin and intercellular adhesion in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24567334

  10. Intercellular carbon nanotube translocation assessed by flow cytometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Iris; Boggetto, Nicole; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Venturelli, Enrica; Béoutis, Marie-Lys; Péchoux, Christine; Luciani, Nathalie; Wilhelm, Claire; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-09-12

    The fate of carbon nanotubes in the organism is still controversial. Here, we propose a statistical high-throughput imaging method to localize and quantify functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes in cells. We give the first experimental evidence of an intercellular translocation of carbon nanotubes. This stress-induced longitudinal transfer of nanomaterials is mediated by cell-released microvesicles known as vectors for intercellular communication. This finding raises new critical issues for nanotoxicology, since carbon nanotubes could be disseminated by circulating extracellular cell-released vesicles and visiting several cells in the course of their passage into the organism.

  11. Microtubules regulate disassembly of epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; McCall, Ingrid C; Babbin, Brian; Samarin, Stanislav N; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background Epithelial tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) form the apical junctional complex (AJC) which regulates cell-cell adhesion, paracellular permeability and cell polarity. The AJC is anchored on cytoskeletal structures including actin microfilaments and microtubules. Such cytoskeletal interactions are thought to be important for the assembly and remodeling of apical junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of microtubules in disassembly of the AJC in intestinal epithelial cells using a model of extracellular calcium depletion. Results Calcium depletion resulted in disruption and internalization of epithelial TJs and AJs along with reorganization of perijunctional F-actin into contractile rings. Microtubules reorganized into dense plaques positioned inside such F-actin rings. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole prevented junctional disassembly and F-actin ring formation. Stabilization of microtubules with either docetaxel or pacitaxel blocked contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated internalization of junctional proteins into a subapical cytosolic compartment. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of microtubule motors, kinesins, prevented contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated disassembly of apical junctions. Kinesin-1 was enriched at the AJC in cultured epithelial cells and it also accumulated at epithelial cell-cell contacts in normal human colonic mucosa. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated association of kinesin-1 with the E-cadherin-catenin complex. Conclusion Our data suggest that microtubules play a role in disassembly of the AJC during calcium depletion by regulating formation of contractile F-actin rings and internalization of AJ/TJ proteins. PMID:16509970

  12. Free Radical-Initiated and Gap Junction-Mediated Bystander Effect due to Nonuniform Distribution of Incorporated Radioactivity in a Three-Dimensional Tissue Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Anupam; Hill, Helene Z.; Stein, Dana; Rao, Dandamudi V.; Howell, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the biological effects of nonuniform distribution of radioactivity in mammalian cells, we have developed a novel three-dimensional tissue culture model. Chinese hamster V79 cells were labeled with tritiated thymidine and mixed with unlabeled cells, and multicellular clusters (~1.6 mm in diameter) were formed by gentle centrifugation. The short-range β particles emitted by 3H impart only self-irradiation of labeled cells without significant cross-irradiation of unlabeled bystander cells. The clusters were assembled in the absence or presence of 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and/or 100 µM lindane. DMSO is a hydroxyl radical scavenger, whereas lindane is an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular communication. The clusters were maintained at 10.5°C for 72 h to allow 3H decays to accumulate and then dismantled, and the cells were plated for colony formation. When 100% of the cells were labeled, the surviving fraction was exponentially dependent on the mean level of radioactivity per labeled cell. A two-component exponential response was observed when either 50 or 10% of the cells were labeled. Though both DMSO and lindane significantly protected the unlabeled or bystander cells when 50 or 10% of the cells were labeled, the effect of lindane was greater than that of DMSO. In both cases, the combined treatment (DMSO + lindane) elicited maximum protection of the bystander cells. These results suggest that the bystander effects caused by nonuniform distributions of radioactivity are affected by the fraction of cells that are labeled. Furthermore, at least a part of these bystander effects are initiated by free radicals and are likely to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication. PMID:11175669

  13. Approaching the cellular mechanism that supports the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Sambade, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Plant viruses spread cell-to-cell in infected plants by exploiting plasmodesmata (PD), gatable channels in the cell wall that provide cytoplasmic passageways for the trafficking of informational macromolecules. Since it became known that the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) depends on virus-encoded movement protein (MP), the mechanism by which this protein mediates in the targeting of this virus to PD is subject to intense studies. TMV movement occurs in a non-encapsidated form and thus promises to reveal important host functions involved in the intra-and intercellular trafficking of RNA molecules. We have recently presented new evidence that the cell-to-cell trafficking of TMV RNA (vRNA) involves the formation and intracellular trafficking of distinct MP particles. Upon assembly, these particles detach from cortical microtubule (MT) sites and then move with the flow of ER through the cell. During passage the particles continue to undergo transient interactions with MT which may guide the particles to their destination. The comprehensive analysis of particle composition may lead to important insights into the regulation of RNA transport in plants and may also reveal potential similarities to RNA transport mechanisms in animals and humans. PMID:19704702

  14. Approaching the cellular mechanism that supports the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Sambade, Adrian; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Plant viruses spread cell-to-cell in infected plants by exploiting plasmodesmata (PD), gatable channels in the cell wall that provide cytoplasmic passageways for the trafficking of informational macromolecules. Since it became known that the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) depends on virus-encoded movement protein (MP), the mechanism by which this protein mediates in the targeting of this virus to PD is subject to intense studies. TMV movement occurs in a non-encapsidated form and thus promises to reveal important host functions involved in the intra-and intercellular trafficking of RNA molecules. We have recently presented new evidence that the cell-to-cell trafficking of TMV RNA (vRNA) involves the formation and intracellular trafficking of distinct MP particles. Upon assembly, these particles detach from cortical microtubule (MT) sites and then move with the flow of ER through the cell. During passage the particles continue to undergo transient interactions with MT which may guide the particles to their destination. The comprehensive analysis of particle composition may lead to important insights into the regulation of RNA transport in plants and may also reveal potential similarities to RNA transport mechanisms in animals and humans.

  15. Internalization of adhesion junction proteins and their association with recycling endosome marker proteins in rat seminiferous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Young, J'Nelle S; Takai, Yoshimi; Kojic, Katarina L; Vogl, A Wayne

    2012-03-01

    Tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs) are elaborate cytoskeleton-related structures that are formed in association with intercellular junctions in the seminiferous epithelium. They consist of a cylindrical double-membrane core composed of the plasma membranes of the two attached cells, cuffed by a dendritic network of actin filaments. TBCs are proposed to be subcellular machines that internalize intercellular junctions during the extensive junction remodeling that occurs during spermatogenesis. At the apical sites of attachment between Sertoli cells and spermatids, junction disassembly is part of the sperm release mechanism. In this study, we used immunological probes to explore junction internalization and recycling at apical TBCs in the rat seminiferous epithelium. We demonstrate that β1-integrin and nectin 2 were concentrated at the ends of TBCs and for the first time show that the early endosome marker RAB5A was also distinctly localized at the ends of TBCs that appear to be the 'bulbar' regions of the complexes. Significantly, we also demonstrate that the 'long-loop' recycling endosome marker RAB11A was co-distributed with nectin 2 at junctions with early spermatids deeper in the epithelium. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that TBCs associated with late spermatids internalize adhesion junctions and also indicate that some of the internalized junction proteins may be recycled to form junctions with the next generation of spermatids.

  16. Different roles of cadherins in the assembly and structural integrity of the desmosome complex

    PubMed Central

    Lowndes, Molly; Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Shafraz, Omer; Borghi, Nicolas; Harmon, Robert M.; Green, Kathleen J.; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Nelson, W. James

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adhesion between cells is established by the formation of specialized intercellular junctional complexes, such as desmosomes. Desmosomes contain isoforms of two members of the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, desmocollins (Dsc) and desmogleins (Dsg), but their combinatorial roles in desmosome assembly are not understood. To uncouple desmosome assembly from other cell–cell adhesion complexes, we used micro-patterned substrates of Dsc2aFc and/or Dsg2Fc and collagen IV; we show that Dsc2aFc, but not Dsg2Fc, was necessary and sufficient to recruit desmosome-specific desmoplakin into desmosome puncta and produce strong adhesive binding. Single-molecule force spectroscopy showed that monomeric Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, formed Ca2+-dependent homophilic bonds, and that Dsg2 formed Ca2+-independent heterophilic bonds with Dsc2a. A W2A mutation in Dsc2a inhibited Ca2+-dependent homophilic binding, similar to classical cadherins, and Dsc2aW2A, but not Dsg2W2A, was excluded from desmosomes in MDCK cells. These results indicate that Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, is required for desmosome assembly through homophilic Ca2+- and W2-dependent binding, and that Dsg2 might be involved later in regulating a switch to Ca2+-independent adhesion in mature desmosomes. PMID:24610950

  17. Different roles of cadherins in the assembly and structural integrity of the desmosome complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, M; Rakshit, S; Shafraz, O; Borghi, N; Harmon, R M; Green, K J; Sivasankar, S; Nelson, W J

    2014-05-15

    Adhesion between cells is established by the formation of specialized intercellular junctional complexes, such as desmosomes. Desmosomes comprise two members of the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, desmocollin (Dsc) and desmoglein (Dsg), but their combinatorial roles in desmosome assembly is not understood. To uncouple desmosome assembly from other cell-cell adhesion complexes, we used micro-patterned substrates of Dsc2aFc and/or Dsg2Fc and collagen IV; we show that Dsc2aFc, but not Dsg2Fc, was necessary and sufficient to recruit desmosome-specific desmoplakin into desmosome puncta and produce strong adhesive binding. Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy showed that monomeric Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, formed Ca2+-dependent homophilic bonds, and that Dsg2 formed Ca2+-independent heterophilic bonds with Dsc2a. A W2A mutation in Dsc2a inhibited Ca2+-dependent homophilic binding, similar to classical cadherins, and Dsc2aW2A, but not Dsg2W2A, was excluded from desmosomes in MDCK cells. These results indicate that Dsc2a, not Dsg2, is required for desmosome assembly via homophilic Ca2+- and W2/strand swap-dependent binding, and that Dsg2 may be involved later in regulating a switch to Ca2+-independent adhesion in mature desmosomes.

  18. Binding to F-actin guides cadherin cluster assembly, stability, and movement

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Soonjin; Troyanovsky, Regina B.

    2013-01-01

    The cadherin extracellular region produces intercellular adhesion clusters through trans- and cis-intercadherin bonds, and the intracellular region connects these clusters to the cytoskeleton. To elucidate the interdependence of these binding events, cadherin adhesion was reconstructed from the minimal number of structural elements. F-actin–uncoupled adhesive clusters displayed high instability and random motion. Their assembly required a cadherin cis-binding interface. Coupling these clusters with F-actin through an α-catenin actin-binding domain (αABD) dramatically extended cluster lifetime and conferred direction to cluster motility. In addition, αABD partially lifted the requirement for the cis-interface for cluster assembly. Even more dramatic enhancement of cadherin clustering was observed if αABD was joined with cadherin through a flexible linker or if it was replaced with an actin-binding domain of utrophin. These data present direct evidence that binding to F-actin stabilizes cadherin clusters and cooperates with the cis-interface in cadherin clustering. Such cooperation apparently synchronizes extracellular and intracellular binding events in the process of adherens junction assembly. PMID:23547031

  19. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  20. Signalling at tight junctions during epithelial differentiation and microbial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zihni, Ceniz; Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2014-08-15

    Tight junctions are a component of the epithelial junctional complex, and they form the paracellular diffusion barrier that enables epithelial cells to create cellular sheets that separate compartments with different compositions. The assembly and function of tight junctions are intimately linked to the actomyosin cytoskeleton and, hence, are under the control of signalling mechanisms that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. Tight junctions not only receive signals that guide their assembly and function, but transmit information to the cell interior to regulate cell proliferation, migration and survival. As a crucial component of the epithelial barrier, they are often targeted by pathogenic viruses and bacteria, aiding infection and the development of disease. In this Commentary, we review recent progress in the understanding of the molecular signalling mechanisms that drive junction assembly and function, and the signalling processes by which tight junctions regulate cell behaviour and survival. We also discuss the way in which junctional components are exploited by pathogenic viruses and bacteria, and how this might affect junctional signalling mechanisms. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  2. Coordination of Intercellular Ca2+ Signaling in Endothelial Cell Tubes of Mouse Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Socha, Matthew J.; Domeier, Timothy L.; Behringer, Erik J.; Segal, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that Ca2+ responses to G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation are coordinated between neighboring endothelial cells of resistance arteries. Methods Endothelial cell tubes were freshly isolated from superior epigastric arteries of C57BL/6 mice. Intercellular coupling was tested using microinjection of propidium iodide. Following loading with fluo-4 dye, intracellular Ca2+ responses to ACh were imaged with confocal microscopy. Results Cell-to-cell transfer of propidium iodide confirmed functional gap junction channels. 1 μM ACh evoked Ca2+ responses [9.8±0.8/min, (F/F0)=3.11±0.2] which pseudo-linescan analysis revealed to be composed of Ca2+ waves and spatially-restricted Ca2+ release events. 100 nM ACh induced Ca2+ responses of lower frequency (4.5±0.7/min) and amplitude (F/F0=1.95±0.11) composed primarily of spatially-restricted events. The interval between Ca2+ waves in Adjacent cells (0.79±0.12 s) was shorter (P<0.05) than between Nonadjacent cells (1.56±0.25 s). Spatially-restricted Ca2+ release events had similar frequencies and latencies between Adjacent and Nonadjacent cells. Inhibiting intracellular Ca2+ release with 2-APB, Xestospongin C or thapsigargin eliminated Ca2+ responses. Conclusions With moderate GPCR stimulation, localized Ca2+ release events predominate among cells. Greater GPCR stimulation evokes coordinated intercellular Ca2+ waves via the endoplasmic reticulum. Calcium signaling during GPCR activation is complex among cells, varying with stimulus intensity and proximity to actively signaling cells. PMID:22860994

  3. Bystander effects as manifestation of intercellular communication of DNA damage and of the cellular oxidative status.

    PubMed

    Klammer, Holger; Mladenov, Emil; Li, Fanghua; Iliakis, George

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) and other genotoxic agents (targeted cells) can communicate their DNA damage response (DDR) status to cells that have not been directly irradiated (bystander cells). The term radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) describes facets of this phenomenon, but its molecular underpinnings are incompletely characterized. Consequences of DDR in bystander cells have been extensively studied and include transformation and mutation induction; micronuclei, chromosome aberration and sister chromatid exchange formation; as well as modulations in gene expression, proliferation and differentiation patterns. A fundamental question arising from such observations is why targeted cells induce DNA damage in non-targeted, bystander cells threatening thus their genomic stability and risking the induction of cancer. Here, we review and synthesize available literature to gather support for a model according to which targeted cells modulate as part of DDR their redox status and use it as a source to generate signals for neighboring cells. Such signals can be either small molecules transported to adjacent non-targeted cells via gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC), or secreted factors that can reach remote, non-targeted cells by diffusion or through the circulation. We review evidence that such signals can induce in the recipient cell modulations of redox status similar to those seen in the originating targeted cell - occasionally though self-amplifying feedback loops. The resulting increase of oxidative stress in bystander cells induces, often in conjunction with DNA replication, the observed DDR-like responses that are at times strong enough to cause apoptosis. We reason that RIBE reflect the function of intercellular communication mechanisms designed to spread within tissues, or the entire organism, information about DNA damage inflicted to individual, constituent cells. Such responses are

  4. Ultrastructural pathology of endothelial tight junctions in human brain oedema.

    PubMed

    Castejón, Orlando J

    2012-01-01

    Cortical biopsies of patients with the diagnosis of complicated brain trauma, congenital hydrocephalus, brain vascular anomaly, and brain tumour are studied with the electron microscope using cortical biopsies of different cortical brain regions to analyze the alterations of endothelial junctions, and their participation in the pathogenesis of human brain oedema. In moderate oedema, most endothelial tight junctions are structurally closed and intact, while in some cases of severe oedema, the opening of tight endothelial junctions is observed. In very severe brain oedema, a considerable enlargement of interjunctional pockets of extracellular space is also seen suggesting that in highly increased cerebrovascular permeability, the endothelial junctions are open in their entire extent, and that an intercellular or paracellular route through interendothelial clefts for transferring haematogenous oedema fluid from blood to the capillary basement membrane and the brain parenchyma is formed, contributing to the formation of brain oedema. High intensity brain trauma, seizures, osmotic forces, hypoxic conditions, and alteration of tight junctions proteins would explain the opening of endothelial junctions in severe and complicated brain oedema. In congenital hydrocephalus, the capillary wall shows evident signs of blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterized by closed and open interendothelial junctions, increased endothelial vesicular and vacuolar transport, thin and fragmented basement membrane with areas of focal thickening, and discontinuous perivascular astrocytic end-feet. The perivascular space is notably dilated and widely communicated with the enlarged extracellular space in the neuropil, showing the contribution of damaged endothelial junction to the formation of interstitial or hydrocephalic brain oedema. Altered expression of tight junction proteins could cause a blood-brain barrier breakdown following brain injury and hypoxic conditions leading to brain oedema

  5. The role of gap junctions in inflammatory and neoplastic disorders (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Pui; Laxton, Victoria; Srivastava, Saurabh; Chan, Yin Wah Fiona; Tse, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexin proteins, mediating both electrical and biochemical signals between cells. The ability of gap junction proteins to regulate immune responses, cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and carcinogenesis makes them attractive therapeutic targets for treating inflammatory and neoplastic disorders in different organ systems. Alterations in gap junction profile and expression levels are observed in hyperproliferative skin disorders, lymphatic vessel diseases, inflammatory lung diseases, liver injury and neoplastic disorders. It is now recognized that the therapeutic effects mediated by traditional pharmacological agents are dependent upon gap junction communication and may even act by influencing gap junction expression or function. Novel strategies for modulating the function or expression of connexins, such as the use of synthetic mimetic peptides and siRNA technology are considered. PMID:28098880

  6. The role of gap junctions in inflammatory and neoplastic disorders (Review).

    PubMed

    Wong, Pui; Laxton, Victoria; Srivastava, Saurabh; Chan, Yin Wah Fiona; Tse, Gary

    2017-03-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexin proteins, mediating both electrical and biochemical signals between cells. The ability of gap junction proteins to regulate immune responses, cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and carcinogenesis makes them attractive therapeutic targets for treating inflammatory and neoplastic disorders in different organ systems. Alterations in gap junction profile and expression levels are observed in hyperproliferative skin disorders, lymphatic vessel diseases, inflammatory lung diseases, liver injury and neoplastic disorders. It is now recognized that the therapeutic effects mediated by traditional pharmacological agents are dependent upon gap junction communication and may even act by influencing gap junction expression or function. Novel strategies for modulating the function or expression of connexins, such as the use of synthetic mimetic peptides and siRNA technology are considered.

  7. Endothelial Cell-to-Cell Junctions: Adhesion and Signaling in Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lampugnani, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Besides intercellular recognition and adhesion, which are primarily performed by the transmembrane components, many of the molecules associated in endothelial cell-to-cell junctions initiate or regulate signal transmission. Clustering of molecules at junctions has the consequence of allowing new local interactions to direct specific cellular responses with crucial effects on the physiology and pathology of the endothelium and, more generally, of the vascular system. The implication is that cell-to-cell junctions could be envisaged as molecular targets for different types of therapeutic intervention. These could be directed to “cure” the defects of endothelial junctions that accompany several pathologies or to reversibly open them in a controlled way for the efficient delivery of drugs to the tissues. These aims can become more and more approachable as the knowledge of the molecular organization and function of endothelial junctions increases and their organ and tissue specificities become understood. PMID:23028127

  8. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  9. Serotonin-induced intercellular calcium waves in salivary glands of the blowfly Calliphora erythrocephala.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, B; Walz, B

    1997-01-01

    1. Blowfly salivary glands have been used extensively as a model system for the analysis of inositol phosphate-dependent signal transduction. To detect and characterize changes in intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) that might be expected to be triggered by stimulation with serotonin (5-HT), we have carried out digital calcium-imaging experiments on intact glands using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. 2. 5-HT (1-10 nM) induced repetitive transient increases in [Ca2+]i, i.e. Ca2+ spikes whose frequency was a function of agonist concentration (EC50 = 2.8 nM). 3. Pre-incubation in EGTA decreased the frequency but did not inhibit spiking. Thapsigargin abolished periodic spike activity indicating that the [Ca2+]i rise results from Ca2+ release. Neither caffeine (10 mM) nor ryanodine (10 and 50 microM) induced increases in [Ca2+]i. 4. Oscillatory activity in individual cells was synchronized by regenerative intercellular Ca2+ waves that propagated over distances greater than 400 microm. Colliding waves annihilated each other. 5. Desynchronization of the oscillation pattern by 100 microM 1-octanol suggests the involvement of gap junctions and an intracellular messenger in wave propagation. 6. Local stimulation of glands elicited [Ca2+]i elevations in the stimulated area, but not in adjacent cells, indicating that local increases in [Ca2+]i are not sufficient to trigger Ca2+ waves. However, local stimulation was capable of evoking propagating Ca2+ waves when combined with low-dose 5-HT stimulation of the whole gland. 7. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that: (1) Ca2+ acts as the intercellular messenger and modulates its own release via positive and negative feedback on the inosital 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor, and (2) sensitization of the InsP3 receptor to Ca2+ by InsP3 is required for the propagation of intercellular Ca2+ waves, as proposed for intracellular Ca2+ waves in Xenopus oocytes. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9097929

  10. Molecular mechanisms regulating formation, trafficking and processing of annular gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Falk, Matthias M; Bell, Cheryl L; Kells Andrews, Rachael M; Murray, Sandra A

    2016-05-24

    Internalization of gap junction plaques results in the formation of annular gap junction vesicles. The factors that regulate the coordinated internalization of the gap junction plaques to form annular gap junction vesicles, and the subsequent events involved in annular gap junction processing have only relatively recently been investigated in detail. However it is becoming clear that while annular gap junction vesicles have been demonstrated to be degraded by autophagosomal and endo-lysosomal pathways, they undergo a number of additional processing events. Here, we characterize the morphology of the annular gap junction vesicle and review the current knowledge of the processes involved in their formation, fission, fusion, and degradation. In addition, we address the possibility for connexin protein recycling back to the plasma membrane to contribute to gap junction formation and intercellular communication. Information on gap junction plaque removal from the plasma membrane and the subsequent processing of annular gap junction vesicles is critical to our understanding of cell-cell communication as it relates to events regulating development, cell homeostasis, unstable proliferation of cancer cells, wound healing, changes in the ischemic heart, and many other physiological and pathological cellular phenomena.

  11. ZO-1 controls endothelial adherens junctions, cell–cell tension, angiogenesis, and barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Tornavaca, Olga; Chia, Minghao; Dufton, Neil; Almagro, Lourdes Osuna; Conway, Daniel E.; Randi, Anna M.; Schwartz, Martin A.; Matter, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular junctions are crucial for mechanotransduction, but whether tight junctions contribute to the regulation of cell–cell tension and adherens junctions is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the tight junction protein ZO-1 regulates tension acting on VE-cadherin–based adherens junctions, cell migration, and barrier formation of primary endothelial cells, as well as angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. ZO-1 depletion led to tight junction disruption, redistribution of active myosin II from junctions to stress fibers, reduced tension on VE-cadherin and loss of junctional mechanotransducers such as vinculin and PAK2, and induced vinculin dissociation from the α-catenin–VE-cadherin complex. Claudin-5 depletion only mimicked ZO-1 effects on barrier formation, whereas the effects on mechanotransducers were rescued by inhibition of ROCK and phenocopied by JAM-A, JACOP, or p114RhoGEF down-regulation. ZO-1 was required for junctional recruitment of JACOP, which, in turn, recruited p114RhoGEF. ZO-1 is thus a central regulator of VE-cadherin–dependent endothelial junctions that orchestrates the spatial actomyosin organization, tuning cell–cell tension, migration, angiogenesis, and barrier formation. PMID:25753039

  12. ZO-1 controls endothelial adherens junctions, cell-cell tension, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Tornavaca, Olga; Chia, Minghao; Dufton, Neil; Almagro, Lourdes Osuna; Conway, Daniel E; Randi, Anna M; Schwartz, Martin A; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S

    2015-03-16

    Intercellular junctions are crucial for mechanotransduction, but whether tight junctions contribute to the regulation of cell-cell tension and adherens junctions is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the tight junction protein ZO-1 regulates tension acting on VE-cadherin-based adherens junctions, cell migration, and barrier formation of primary endothelial cells, as well as angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. ZO-1 depletion led to tight junction disruption, redistribution of active myosin II from junctions to stress fibers, reduced tension on VE-cadherin and loss of junctional mechanotransducers such as vinculin and PAK2, and induced vinculin dissociation from the α-catenin-VE-cadherin complex. Claudin-5 depletion only mimicked ZO-1 effects on barrier formation, whereas the effects on mechanotransducers were rescued by inhibition of ROCK and phenocopied by JAM-A, JACOP, or p114RhoGEF down-regulation. ZO-1 was required for junctional recruitment of JACOP, which, in turn, recruited p114RhoGEF. ZO-1 is thus a central regulator of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial junctions that orchestrates the spatial actomyosin organization, tuning cell-cell tension, migration, angiogenesis, and barrier formation.

  13. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    Conductus 969 West Maude Avenue ř ’AEOTR. 19 4 0 0 75 Sunnyvale CA 94086 9. SPONSORING MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ’C 510 N’_ ; i )N !’->.G...the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in the community) was the bi-epitaxial structure [4...achieved. 2.1 Junctions At the time of proposal, the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in

  14. Upregulation of transmembrane endothelial junction proteins in human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Schmidt, Dörthe; Schoenauer, Roman; Brokopp, Chad; Agarkova, Irina; Bozinov, Oliver; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2010-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are among the most prevalent cerebrovascular malformations, and endothelial cells seem to play a major role in the disease. However, the underlying mechanisms, including endothelial intercellular communication, have not yet been fully elucidated. In this article, the authors focus on the endothelial junction proteins CD31, VE-cadherin, and occludin as important factors for functional cell-cell contacts known as vascular adhesion molecules and adherence and tight junctions. Thirteen human CCM specimens and 6 control tissue specimens were cryopreserved and examined for the presence of VE-cadherin, occludin, and CD31 by immunofluorescence staining. Protein quantification was performed by triplicate measurements using western blot analysis. Immunofluorescent analyses of the CCM sections revealed a discontinuous pattern of dilated microvessels and capillaries as well as increased expression of occludin, VE-cadherin, and CD31 in the intima and in the enclosed parenchymal tissue compared with controls. Protein quantification confirmed these findings by showing upregulation of the levels of these proteins up to 2-6 times. A protocol enabling the molecular and morphological examination of the intercellular contact proteins in human CCM was validated. The abnormal and discontinuous pattern in these endothelial cell-contact proteins compared with control tissue explains the loose intercellular junctions that are considered to be one of the causes of CCM-associated bleeding or transendothelial oozing of erythrocytes. Despite the small number of specimens, this study demonstrates for the first time a quantitative analysis of endothelial junction proteins in human CCM.

  15. Capturing intercellular sugar-mediated ligand-receptor recognitions via a simple yet highly biospecific interfacial system.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Deng, Si-Si; Zang, Yi; Gu, Zhen; He, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Guo-Rong; Chen, Kaixian; James, Tony D; Li, Jia; Long, Yi-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular ligand-receptor recognitions are crucial natural interactions that initiate a number of biological and pathological events. We present here the simple construction of a unique class of biomimetic interfaces based on a graphene-mediated self-assembly of glycosyl anthraquinones to a screen-printed electrode for the detection of transmembrane glycoprotein receptors expressed on a hepatoma cell line. We show that an electroactive interface confined with densely clustered galactosyl ligands is able to ingeniously recognize the asialoglycoprotein receptors on live Hep-G2 cells employing simple electrochemical techniques. The only facility used is a personal laptop in connection with a cheap and portable electrochemical workstation.

  16. Capturing intercellular sugar-mediated ligand-receptor recognitions via a simple yet highly biospecific interfacial system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Deng, Si-Si; Zang, Yi; Gu, Zhen; He, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Guo-Rong; Chen, Kaixian; James, Tony D.; Li, Jia; Long, Yi-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular ligand-receptor recognitions are crucial natural interactions that initiate a number of biological and pathological events. We present here the simple construction of a unique class of biomimetic interfaces based on a graphene-mediated self-assembly of glycosyl anthraquinones to a screen-printed electrode for the detection of transmembrane glycoprotein receptors expressed on a hepatoma cell line. We show that an electroactive interface confined with densely clustered galactosyl ligands is able to ingeniously recognize the asialoglycoprotein receptors on live Hep-G2 cells employing simple electrochemical techniques. The only facility used is a personal laptop in connection with a cheap and portable electrochemical workstation. PMID:23892317

  17. Capturing intercellular sugar-mediated ligand-receptor recognitions via a simple yet highly biospecific interfacial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Deng, Si-Si; Zang, Yi; Gu, Zhen; He, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Guo-Rong; Chen, Kaixian; James, Tony D.; Li, Jia; Long, Yi-Tao

    2013-07-01

    Intercellular ligand-receptor recognitions are crucial natural interactions that initiate a number of biological and pathological events. We present here the simple construction of a unique class of biomimetic interfaces based on a graphene-mediated self-assembly of glycosyl anthraquinones to a screen-printed electrode for the detection of transmembrane glycoprotein receptors expressed on a hepatoma cell line. We show that an electroactive interface confined with densely clustered galactosyl ligands is able to ingeniously recognize the asialoglycoprotein receptors on live Hep-G2 cells employing simple electrochemical techniques. The only facility used is a personal laptop in connection with a cheap and portable electrochemical workstation.

  18. Structural basis for the selective permeability of channels made of communicating junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ek-Vitorin, Jose F.; Burt, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    The open state(s) of gap junction channels is evident from their permeation by small ions in response to an applied intercellular (transjunctional/transchannel) voltage gradient. That an open channel allows variable amounts of current to transit from cell-to-cell in the face of a constant intercellular voltage difference indicates channel open/closing can be complete or partial. The physiological significance of such open state options is, arguably, the main concern of junctional regulation. Because gap junctions are permeable to many substances, it is sensible to inquire whether and how each open state influences the intercellular diffusion of molecules as valuable as, but less readily detected than current-carrying ions. Presumably, structural changes perceived as shifts in channel conductivity would significantly alter the transjunctional diffusion of molecules whose limiting diameter approximates the pore’s limiting diameter. Moreover, changes in junctional permeability to some molecules might occur without evident changes in conductivity, either at macroscopic or single channel level. Open gap junction channels allow the exchange of cytoplasmic permeants between contacting cells by simple diffusion. The identity of such permeants, and the functional circumstances and consequences of their junctional exchange presently constitute the most urgent (and demanding) themes of the field. Here, we consider the necessity for regulating this exchange, the possible mechanism(s) and structural elements likely involved in such regulation, and how regulatory phenomena could be perceived as changes in chemical vs. electrical coupling; an overall reflection on our collective knowledge of junctional communication is then applied to suggest new avenues of research. PMID:22342665

  19. Unique Cell Type-Specific Junctional Complexes in Vascular Endothelium of Human and Rat Liver Sinusoids

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Beate K.; Peitsch, Wiebke K.; Demory, Alexandra; Dörflinger, Yvette; Schledzewski, Kai; Schmieder, Astrid; Schemmer, Peter; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Schirmacher, Peter; Goerdt, Sergij

    2012-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ), i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ) transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis. PMID:22509281

  20. Sustained inhibition of rat myometrial gap junctions and contractions by lindane

    PubMed Central

    Loch-Caruso, Rita K; Criswell, Kay A; Grindatti, Carmen M; Brant, Kelly A

    2003-01-01

    Background Gap junctions increase in size and abundance coincident with parturition, forming an intercellular communication network that permits the uterus to develop the forceful, coordinated contractions necessary for delivery of the fetus. Lindane, a pesticide used in the human and veterinary treatment of scabies and lice as well as in agricultural applications, inhibits uterine contractions in vitro, inhibits myometrial gap junctions, and has been associated with prolonged gestation length in rats. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether brief exposures to lindane would elicit sustained inhibition of rat uterine contractile activity and myometrial gap junction intercellular communication. Methods To examine effects on uterine contraction, longitudinal uterine strips isolated from late gestation (day 20) rats were exposed to lindane in muscle baths and monitored for changes in spontaneous phasic contractions during and after exposure to lindane. Lucifer yellow dye transfer between myometrial cells in culture was used to monitor gap junction intercellular communication. Results During a 1-h exposure, 10 micro M and 100 micro M lindane decreased peak force and frequency of uterine contraction but 1 micro M lindane did not. After removal of the exposure buffer, contraction force remained significantly depressed in uterine strips exposed to 100 micro M lindane, returning to less than 50% basal levels 5 h after cessation of lindane exposure. In cultured myometrial myocytes, significant sustained inhibition of Lucifer yellow dye transfer was observed 24 h after lindane exposures as brief as 10 min and as low as 0.1 micro M lindane. Conclusion Brief in vitro exposures to lindane have long-term effects on myometrial functions that are necessary for parturition, inhibiting spontaneous phasic contractions in late gestation rat uterus and gap junction intercellular communication in myometrial cell cultures. PMID:14567758

  1. Transfection of C6 Glioma Cells with Connexin 43 cDNA: Analysis of Expression, Intercellular Coupling, and Cell Proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Caveney, S.; Kidder, G. M.; Naus, C. C. G.

    1991-03-01

    C6 glioma cells express low levels of the gap junction protein connexin 43 and its mRNA and display very weak dye coupling. When implanted into the rat cerebrum, these cells quickly give rise to a large glioma. To investigate the role of gap junctions in the tumor characteristics of these cells, we have used Lipofectin-mediated transfection to introduce a full-length cDNA encoding connexin 43. Several transfected clones were obtained that exhibited various amounts of connexin 43 mRNA transcribed from the inserted cDNA. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed an increase in the amount of connexin 43 immunoreactivity in the transfected cells, being localized at areas of intercellular contact as well as in the cytoplasm. The level of dye coupling was also assessed and found to correlate with the amount of connexin 43 mRNA. When cell proliferation was followed over several days, cells expressing the transfected cDNA grew more slowly than nontransfected cells. These transfected cells will be useful in examining the role of gap junctions in tumorigenesis.

  2. Inhibition of connexin43 gap junction channels by the endocrine disruptor ioxynil

    SciTech Connect

    Leithe, Edward; Kjenseth, Ane; Bruun, Jarle; Sirnes, Solveig; Rivedal, Edgar

    2010-08-15

    Gap junctions are intercellular plasma membrane domains containing channels that mediate transport of ions, metabolites and small signaling molecules between adjacent cells. Gap junctions play important roles in a variety of cellular processes, including regulation of cell growth and differentiation, maintenance of tissue homeostasis and embryogenesis. The constituents of gap junction channels are a family of trans-membrane proteins called connexins, of which the best-studied is connexin43. Connexin43 functions as a tumor suppressor protein in various tissue types and is frequently dysregulated in human cancers. The pesticide ioxynil has previously been shown to act as an endocrine disrupting chemical and has multiple effects on the thyroid axis. Furthermore, both ioxynil and its derivative ioxynil octanoate have been reported to induce tumors in animal bioassays. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the possible tumorigenic effects of these compounds are unknown. In the present study we show that ioxynil and ioxynil octanoate are strong inhibitors of connexin43 gap junction channels. Both compounds induced rapid loss of connexin43 gap junctions at the plasma membrane and increased connexin43 degradation. Ioxynil octanoate, but not ioxynil, was found to be a strong activator of ERK1/2. The compounds also had different effects on the phosphorylation status of connexin43. Taken together, the data show that ioxynil and ioxynil octanoate are potent inhibitors of intercellular communication via gap junctions.

  3. Gap Junction Enhancer Potentiates Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2012-11-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs due to its ability to damage DNA and induce apoptosis. However, increasing reports of side effects and drug resistance indicate the limitation of cisplatin in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies showed that inhibition of gap junctions diminishes the cytotoxic effect and contributes to drug resistance. Therefore, identification of molecules that counteract gap junctional inhibition without decreasing the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin could be used in combinational treatment, potentiating cisplatin efficacy and preventing resistance. This study investigates the effects of combinational treatment of cisplatin and PQ1, a gap junction enhancer, in T47D breast cancer cells. Our results showed that combinational treatment of PQ1 and cisplatin increased gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) as well as expressions of connexins (Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43), and subsequently decreased cell viability. Ki67, a proliferation marker, was decreased by 75% with combinational treatment. Expressions of pro-apoptotic factors (cleaved caspase-3/-8/-9 and bax) were increased by the combinational treatment with PQ1 and cisplatin; whereas, the pro-survival factor, bcl-2, was decreased by the combinational treatment. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the combinational treatment with gap junction enhancers can counteract cisplatin induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication and reduction of connexin expression, thereby increasing the efficacy of cisplatin in cancer cells.

  4. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β.

  5. Intercellular trafficking and protein delivery by a herpesvirus structural protein.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G; O'Hare, P

    1997-01-24

    We show that the HSV-1 structural protein VP22 has the remarkable property of intercellular transport, which is so efficient that following expression in a subpopulation the protein spreads to every cell in a monolayer, where it concentrates in the nucleus and binds chromatin. VP22 movement was observed both after delivery of DNA by transfection or microinjection and during virus infection. Moreover, we demonstrate that VP22 trafficking occurs via a nonclassical Golgi-independent mechanism. Sensitivity to cytochalasin D treatment suggests that VP22 utilizes a novel trafficking pathway that involves the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, we demonstrate intercellular transport of a VP22 fusion protein after endogenous synthesis or exogenous application, indicating that VP22 may have potential in the field of protein delivery.

  6. Inter-Cellular Forces Orchestrate Contact Inhibition of Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Davis, John R.; Luchici, Andrei; Mosis, Fuad; Thackery, James; Salazar, Jesus A.; Mao, Yanlan; Dunn, Graham A.; Betz, Timo; Miodownik, Mark; Stramer, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) is a multifaceted process that causes many cell types to repel each other upon collision. During development, this seemingly uncoordinated reaction is a critical driver of cellular dispersion within embryonic tissues. Here, we show that Drosophila hemocytes require a precisely orchestrated CIL response for their developmental dispersal. Hemocyte collision and subsequent repulsion involves a stereotyped sequence of kinematic stages that are modulated by global changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Tracking actin retrograde flow within hemocytes in vivo reveals synchronous reorganization of colliding actin networks through engagement of an inter-cellular adhesion. This inter-cellular actin-clutch leads to a subsequent build-up in lamellar tension, triggering the development of a transient stress fiber, which orchestrates cellular repulsion. Our findings reveal that the physical coupling of the flowing actin networks during CIL acts as a mechanotransducer, allowing cells to haptically sense each other and coordinate their behaviors. PMID:25799385

  7. Bacterial nanotubes: a conduit for intercellular molecular trade.

    PubMed

    Baidya, Amit K; Bhattacharya, Saurabh; Dubey, Gyanendra P; Mamou, Gideon; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2017-09-26

    Bacteria use elaborate molecular machines for intercellular contact-dependent interactions. We discuss a relatively less explored type of intercellular connections mediated by tubular membranous bridges, termed nanotubes. Increasing evidence suggests that nanotube structures mediate cytoplasmic molecular trade among neighboring cells of the same and different species. Further, nanotubes were found to facilitate both antagonistic and cooperative interspecies interactions, thereby allowing the emergence of new non-heritable phenotypes in multicellular bacterial communities. We propose that nanotube-mediated cytoplasmic sharing represents a widespread form of bacterial interactions in nature, providing an enormous potential for the emergence of new features. Here we review the current knowledge on bacterial nanotubes, and highlight the gaps in our current understanding of their operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation of the δ-opioid receptor promotes cutaneous wound healing by affecting keratinocyte intercellular adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bigliardi, P L; Neumann, C; Teo, Y L; Pant, A; Bigliardi-Qi, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In addition to its analgesic functions, the peripheral opioid receptor system affects skin homeostasis by influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion; also, wound healing is altered in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice (DOPr–/–). Hence, we investigated δ-opioid receptor effects on the expression of several proteins of the desmosomal junction complex and on the migratory behaviour of keratinocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression levels of desmosomal cadherins in wild-type and DOPr–/– mice, and the morphology of intercellular adhesion in human keratinocytes were analysed by immunofluorescence. To investigate the δ-opioid receptor activation pathway, protein expression was studied using Western blot and its effect on cellular migration determined by in vitro live cell migration recordings from human keratinocytes. KEY RESULTS Expression of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins 1 and 4, was up-regulated in skin from DOPr–/– mice, and down-regulated in δ-opioid receptor-overexpressing human keratinocytes. The localization of desmoplakin expression was rearranged from linear arrays emanating from cell borders to puncta in cell periphery, resulting in less stable intercellular adhesion. Migration and wound recovery were enhanced in human keratinocyte monolayers overexpressing δ-opioid receptors in vitro. These δ-opioid receptor effects were antagonized by specific PKCα/β inhibition indicating they were mediated through the PKC signalling pathway. Finally, cells overexpressing δ-opioid receptors developed characteristically long but undirected protrusions containing filamentous actin and δ-opioid receptors, indicating an enhanced migratory phenotype. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Opioid receptors affect intercellular adhesion and wound healing mechanisms, underlining the importance of a cutaneous neuroendocrine system in wound healing and skin homeostasis. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on

  9. Activation of the δ-opioid receptor promotes cutaneous wound healing by affecting keratinocyte intercellular adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bigliardi, P L; Neumann, C; Teo, Y L; Pant, A; Bigliardi-Qi, M

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its analgesic functions, the peripheral opioid receptor system affects skin homeostasis by influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion; also, wound healing is altered in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice (DOPr(-/-) ). Hence, we investigated δ-opioid receptor effects on the expression of several proteins of the desmosomal junction complex and on the migratory behaviour of keratinocytes. Expression levels of desmosomal cadherins in wild-type and DOPr(-/-) mice, and the morphology of intercellular adhesion in human keratinocytes were analysed by immunofluorescence. To investigate the δ-opioid receptor activation pathway, protein expression was studied using Western blot and its effect on cellular migration determined by in vitro live cell migration recordings from human keratinocytes. Expression of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins 1 and 4, was up-regulated in skin from DOPr(-/-) mice, and down-regulated in δ-opioid receptor-overexpressing human keratinocytes. The localization of desmoplakin expression was rearranged from linear arrays emanating from cell borders to puncta in cell periphery, resulting in less stable intercellular adhesion. Migration and wound recovery were enhanced in human keratinocyte monolayers overexpressing δ-opioid receptors in vitro. These δ-opioid receptor effects were antagonized by specific PKCα/β inhibition indicating they were mediated through the PKC signalling pathway. Finally, cells overexpressing δ-opioid receptors developed characteristically long but undirected protrusions containing filamentous actin and δ-opioid receptors, indicating an enhanced migratory phenotype. Opioid receptors affect intercellular adhesion and wound healing mechanisms, underlining the importance of a cutaneous neuroendocrine system in wound healing and skin homeostasis. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http

  10. Modulation of intercellular ROS signaling of human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Wibke; Bauer, Georg

    2009-11-01

    Tumor cells are resistant against apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling but can be resensitized by the inhibition of catalase. Hydrogen peroxide exhibits a dual role in the modulation of intercellular ROS signaling. When suboptimal concentrations of the catalase inhibitior 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) are applied, additional exogenous hydrogen peroxide shifts apoptosis induction to its optimum. When hydrogen peroxide is added at optimal concentrations of 3-AT, or when higher concentrations of 3-AT are applied, the subsequent consumption between HOCl and hydrogen peroxide blunts overall apoptosis induction. These supraoptimal conditions can be brought back to the optimum through excess myeloperoxidase (MPO), partial removal of hydrogen peroxide through the catalase mimetic EUK-134 or partial inhibition of NADPH oxidase. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) interferes with HOCl signaling through consumption of hydrogen peroxide. Site-specific generation of hydroxyl radicals at the cell membrane of tumor cells induces apoptosis, whereas random HOCl-superoxide anion interaction, and ferrous iron-induced Fenton chemistry of HOCl inhibit intercellular ROS signaling.

  11. Bulk-boundary correspondence from the intercellular Zak phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Jun-Won; Behrends, Jan; Bardarson, Jens H.

    2017-01-01

    The Zak phase γ , the generalization of the Berry phase to Bloch wave functions in solids, is often used to characterize inversion-symmetric one-dimensional (1D) topological insulators. Due to its dependence on the real-space origin and unit cell, however, there is an ambiguity in its use in a bulk-boundary correspondence. Here, we extract an origin-independent part of γ , the so-called intercellular Zak phase γinter, and show that it is a bulk quantity that unambiguously predicts the number of surface modes. Specifically, a neutral finite 1D tight-binding system has ns=γinter/π (mod 2) in-gap surface modes below the Fermi level if there exists a commensurate inversion-symmetric bulk unit cell. We demonstrate this in two steps: First, we verify that ±e γinter/2 π (mod e ) equals the extra charge accumulation in the surface region in a terminated system of a translationally invariant 1D insulator, while the remnant part of γ , the intracellular Zak phase γintra, corresponds to the electronic part of the bulk's unit-cell dipole moment. Second, we show that the extra charge accumulation is related to the number of surface modes when the unit cell is inversion symmetric. We study several tight-binding models to quantitatively check both the relation between the extra charge accumulation and the intercellular Zak phase, and the bulk-boundary correspondence using the intercellular Zak phase.

  12. Exosomes as mediators of intercellular communication: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Santocki, Michał; Ptak, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Cells of multicellular organisms exchange informative signals by diverse mechanisms. Recent findings uncovered the special role of extracellular vesicles, especially exosomes, in intercellular communication. Exosomes, present in all tested human bodily fluids, carry various functional compounds including proteins, lipids, and diverse RNA molecules. The composition of exosome cargo in vivo is likely formed by a regulated selection of specific components and can express the current status of the exosome-secreting cell. Therefore, particular emphasis is now placed on the extremely high potential of exosomes as essentially noninvasive prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers, but also as therapeutic nanocarriers, especially after the discovery that their cargo as well as cell-targeting specificity could be shaped in vitro. In addition, targeting the exosomes mediating pathological intercellular communication may also express high therapeutic potential. Hence, numerous studies are conducted to explore the profile and function of exosomes and their cargo in health and disease and to shape their properties to facilitate their clinical application. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of exosomes in different physiological and pathological mechanisms of intercellular communication with a particular focus on the use of exosomes in the diagnosis and treatment of various inflammatory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders as well as malignant neoplasms.

  13. Myosins in cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katy C.; Cheney, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of cell-cell junctions was a fundamental step in metazoan evolution, and human health depends on the formation and function of cell junctions. Although it has long been known that actin and conventional myosin have important roles in cell junctions, research has begun to reveal the specific functions of the different forms of conventional myosin. Exciting new data also reveals that a growing number of unconventional myosins have important roles in cell junctions. Experiments showing that cell junctions act as mechanosensors have also provided new impetus to understand the functions of myosins and the forces they exert. In this review we will summarize recent developments on the roles of myosins in cell junctions. PMID:22954512

  14. Architecture of tight junctions and principles of molecular composition

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Anderson, James M.

    2014-01-01

    The tight junction creates an intercellular barrier limiting paracellular movement of solutes and material across epithelia. Currently many proteins have been identified as components of the tight junction and understanding their architectural organization and interactions is critical to understanding the biology of the barrier. In general the architecture can be conceptualized into compartments with the transmembrane barrier proteins (claudins, occludin, JAM-A, etc.), linked to peripheral scaffolding proteins (such as ZO-1, afadin, MAGI1, etc.) which are in turned linked to actin and microtubules through numerous linkers (cingulin, myosins, protein 4.1, etc.). Within this complex network are associated many signaling proteins that affect the barrier and broader cell functions. The PDZ domain is a commonly used motif to specifically link individual junction protein pairs. Here we review some of the key proteins defining the tight junction and general themes of their organization with the perspective that much will be learned about function by characterizing the detailed architecture and subcompartments within the junction. PMID:25171873

  15. Claudin-6 localized in tight junctions of rat podocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linning; Yaoita, Eishin; Nameta, Masaaki; Zhang, Ying; Cuellar, Lino Munoz; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Xu, Bo; Yoshida, Yutaka; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2008-06-01

    Tight junctions rarely exist in podocytes of the normal renal glomerulus, whereas they are the main intercellular junctions of podocytes in nephrosis and in the early stage of development. Claudins have been identified as tight junction-specific integral membrane proteins. Those of podocytes, however, remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the expression and localization of claudin-6 in the rat kidney, especially in podocytes. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR revealed that the neonatal kidney expressed much higher levels of claudin-6 than the adult kidney. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed intense claudin-6 staining in most of the tubules and glomeruli in neonates. The staining in tubules declined distinctly in adults, whereas staining in glomeruli was well preserved during development. Claudin-6 in glomeruli was distributed along the glomerular capillary wall and colocalized with zonula occludens-1. The staining became conspicuous after kidney perfusion with protamine sulfate (PS) to increase tight junctions in podocytes. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that immunogold particles for claudin-6 were accumulated at close cell-cell contact sites of podocytes in PS-perfused kidneys, whereas a very limited number of immunogold particles were detected, mainly on the basal cell membrane and occasionally at the slit diaphragm and close cell-cell contact sites in normal control kidneys. In puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis, immunogold particles were also found mainly at cell-contact sites of podocytes. These findings indicate that claudin-6 is a transmembrane protein of tight junctions in podocytes during development and under pathological conditions.

  16. Gap Junctions in the Control of Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Duling, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Direct intercellular communication via gap junctions is critical in the control and coordination of vascular function. In the cardiovascular system, gap junctions are made up of one or more of four connexin proteins: Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45. The expression of more than one gap-junction protein in the vasculature is not redundant. Rather, vascular connexins work in concert, first during the development of the cardiovascular system, and then in integrating smooth muscle and endothelial cell function, and in coordinating cell function along the length of the vessel wall. In addition, connexin-based channels have emerged as an important signaling pathway in the astrocyte-mediated neurovascular coupling. Direct electrical communication between endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells via gap junctions is thought to play a relevant role in the control of vasomotor tone, providing the signaling pathway known as endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Consistent with the importance of gap junctions in the regulation of vasomotor tone and arterial blood pressure, the expression of connexins is altered in diseases associated with vascular complications. In this review, we discuss the participation of connexin-based channels in the control of vascular function in physiologic and pathologic conditions, with a special emphasis on hypertension and diabetes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 251–266. PMID:18831678

  17. β-Catenin Serves as a Clutch between Low and High Intercellular E-Cadherin Bond Strengths

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Saumendra; Feng, Yunfeng; Wirtz, Denis; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of invasive pathological outcomes originate from the loss of epithelial phenotype and involve either loss of function or downregulation of transmembrane adhesive receptor complexes, including Ecadherin (Ecad) and binding partners β-catenin and α-catenin at adherens junctions. Cellular pathways regulating wild-type β-catenin level, or direct mutations in β-catenin that affect the turnover of the protein have been shown to contribute to cancer development, through induction of uncontrolled proliferation of transformed tumor cells, particularly in colon cancer. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we show that depletion of β-catenin or the prominent cancer-related S45 deletion mutation in β-catenin present in human colon cancers both weaken tumor intercellular Ecad/Ecad bond strength and diminishes the capacity of specific extracellular matrix proteins—including collagen I, collagen IV, and laminin V—to modulate intercellular Ecad/Ecad bond strength through α-catenin and the kinase activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3β). Thus, in addition to regulating tumor cell proliferation, cancer-related mutations in β-catenin can influence tumor progression by weakening the adhesion of tumor cells to one another through reduced individual Ecad/Ecad bond strength and cellular adhesion to specific components of the extracellular matrix and the basement membrane. PMID:24268141

  18. Molecular organization of tricellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mikio; Izumi, Yasushi; Oda, Yukako; Higashi, Tomohito; Iwamoto, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    When the apicolateral border of epithelial cells is compared with a polygon, its sides correspond to the apical junctional complex, where cell adhesion molecules assemble from the plasma membranes of two adjacent cells. On the other hand, its vertices correspond to tricellular contacts, where the corners of three cells meet. Vertebrate tricellular contacts have specialized structures of tight junctions, termed tricellular tight junctions (tTJs). tTJs were identified by electron microscopic observations more than 40 years ago, but have been largely forgotten in epithelial cell biology since then. The identification of tricellulin and angulin family proteins as tTJ-associated membrane proteins has enabled us to study tTJs in terms of not only the paracellular barrier function but also unknown characteristics of epithelial cell corners via molecular biological approaches.

  19. Effect of perchloroethylene and its metabolites on intercellular communication in clone 9 rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Benane, S.G.; Blackman, C.F.; House, D.E.

    1996-08-09

    Gap junction intercellular communication (IC) is thought to be important in chemical carcinogenesis as abnormalities in IC have been found in cancer cells. Perchloroethylene (PERC) is metabolized in rodent liver to dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), which are rodent liver carcinogens. Chloral hydrate (CH) and trichloroethanol (TCEth) are kidney metabolites. We used Lucifer yellow scrape-load dye transfer as a measure of IC to look at the effect of PERC, DCA, TCA, CH, and TCEth on Clone 9 cell cultures (normal rat liver cells). Four independent experiments were performed for each chemical using exposure times of 1, 4, 6, 24, 48, and 168 h. Concentrations for each chemical varied and were based on preliminary data on effect and cytotoxicity. To compare the relative effectiveness of each chemical to cause biological change, we identified the lowest concentration needed to produce 50% reduction in IC, were PERC (0.3 mM) >> TCA (3.8 mM) > TCEth (6.6 mM) = CH (7.0 mM) >> DCA (41 mM). Time-course data indicated that PERC, DCA, and TCA produced reduction in IC in a similar fashion, but 5 mM CH or TCEth exhibited variances from these results and may indicate specific cell responses to these chemicals. The mechanism(s) responsible for inhibition of IC by these structurally related chemicals needs to be established. 44 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Connexin expression and intercellular communication in two- and three-dimensional in vitro cultures of human bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Knuechel, R.; Siebert-Wellnhofer, A.; Traub, O.; Dermietzel, R.

    1996-01-01

    The identification of gap-junctional proteins (connexins) and the preparation of related antibodies provides new tools to study patterns of intercellular communication in tumors. Focusing on the biology of human bladder carcinoma, we compared the expression of gap-junctional proteins (connexins Cx26, Cx32, and Cx43) with a dye-coupling assay for gap-junctional intercellular communication in three cell lines with different urothelial differentiation. The cell lines HCV-29, RT4, and J82 were initially grown as monolayers of different ages. Connexin expression was found mostly positive over the time of culture and found constantly negative only in J82 cells for Cx26 and HCV-29 cells for Cx32. In HCV-29 cells, Cx26 increased in positivity over the time of culture. Western blotting with the antibodies confirmed the findings. Comparisons of dye transfer using Lucifer Yellow showed an increase of coupling in the normal urothelial cell line HCV-29 in contrast to a decrease of coupling in the tumor cell lines. Data were extended by multicellular spheroid (MCS) co-cultures with the stromal fibroblast line N1. In three-dimensional cultures as MCSs, Cx26 was increased in proximity of RT4 tumor cells to fibroblasts, and positivity was maintained in J82 cells. E-cadherin expression in cell lines showed no change in dependence of growth state. The data suggest that Cx26 plays a role in negative growth control or differentiation of urothelial cells. Preliminary comparative data on normal and neoplastic urothelium show all three connexins in normal urothelium, in contrast to varying amounts of Cx43 and low amounts of Cx32 in tumors and evident loss of Cx26 in low-grade tumors. Discrepancies between monolayer and MCS cultures are most likely due to higher differentiation in MCSs, and the continuation of systematic work with heterologous MCSs is indicated for more information on the role of gap-junctional proteins in human tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6

  1. An electrostatic mechanism for Ca2+-mediated regulation of gap junction channels

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brad C.; Purdy, Michael D.; Baker, Kent A.; Acharya, Chayan; McIntire, William E.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhang, Qinghai; Harris, Andrew L.; Abagyan, Ruben; Yeager, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Gap junction channels mediate intercellular signalling that is crucial in tissue development, homeostasis and pathologic states such as cardiac arrhythmias, cancer and trauma. To explore the mechanism by which Ca2+ blocks intercellular communication during tissue injury, we determined the X-ray crystal structures of the human Cx26 gap junction channel with and without bound Ca2+. The two structures were nearly identical, ruling out both a large-scale structural change and a local steric constriction of the pore. Ca2+ coordination sites reside at the interfaces between adjacent subunits, near the entrance to the extracellular gap, where local, side chain conformational rearrangements enable Ca2+chelation. Computational analysis revealed that Ca2+-binding generates a positive electrostatic barrier that substantially inhibits permeation of cations such as K+ into the pore. Our results provide structural evidence for a unique mechanism of channel regulation: ionic conduction block via an electrostatic barrier rather than steric occlusion of the channel pore. PMID:26753910

  2. A novel adhering junction in the apical ciliary apparatus of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis (Rotifera, Monogononta).

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Lupetti, P; Lane, N J

    1996-10-01

    Cultures of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis were examined with regard to their interepithelial junctions after infiltration with the extracellular tracer lanthanum, freeze-fracturing or quick-freeze deep-etching. The lateral borders between ciliated cells have an unusual apical adhering junction. This apical part of their intercellular cleft looks desmosome-like, but it is characterized by unusual intramembranous E-face clusters of particles. Deep-etching reveals that these are packed together in short rows which lie parallel to one another in orderly arrays. The true membrane surface in these areas features filaments in the form of short ribbons; these are produced by projections, possibly part of the glycocalyx, emerging from the membranes, between which the electron-dense tracer lanthanum permeates. These projections appear to overlap with each other in the centre of the intercellular cleft; this would provide a particularly flexible adaptation to maintain cell-cell contact and coordination as a consequence. The filamentous ribbons may be held in position by the intramembranous particle arrays since both have a similar size and distribution. These contacts are quite different from desmosomes and appear to represent a distinct new category of adhesive cell-cell junction. Beneath these novel structures, conventional pleated septate junctions are found, exhibiting the undulating intercellular ribbons typical of this junctional type, as well as the usual parallel alignments of intramembranous rows of EF grooves and PF particles. Below these are found gap junctions as close-packed plaques of intramembranous particles on either the P-face or E-face. After freeze-fracturing, the complementary fracture face to the particles shows pits, usually on the P-face, arrayed with a very precise hexagonal pattern.

  3. Tricellular Tight Junctions in the Inner Ear.

    PubMed

    Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro; Katsuno, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are structures that seal the space between the epithelial cell sheets. In the inner ear, the barrier function of TJs is indispensable for the separation of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces, which is essential for the generation and maintenance of the endocochlear potential (EP). TJs are formed by the intercellular binding of membrane proteins, known as claudins, and mutations in these proteins cause deafness in humans and mice. Within the epithelial cell sheet, however, a bound structure is present at the site where the corners of three cells meet (tricellular tight junctions (tTJs)), and the maintenance of the barrier function at this location cannot be explained by the claudins alone. Tricellulin and the angulin family of proteins (angulin-1/LSR, angulin-2/ILDR1, and angulin-3/ILDR2) have been identified as tTJ-associated proteins. Tricellulin and ILDR1 are localized at the tTJ and alterations in these proteins have been reported to be involved in deafness. In this review, we will present the current state of knowledge for tTJs.

  4. Tricellular Tight Junctions in the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are structures that seal the space between the epithelial cell sheets. In the inner ear, the barrier function of TJs is indispensable for the separation of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces, which is essential for the generation and maintenance of the endocochlear potential (EP). TJs are formed by the intercellular binding of membrane proteins, known as claudins, and mutations in these proteins cause deafness in humans and mice. Within the epithelial cell sheet, however, a bound structure is present at the site where the corners of three cells meet (tricellular tight junctions (tTJs)), and the maintenance of the barrier function at this location cannot be explained by the claudins alone. Tricellulin and the angulin family of proteins (angulin-1/LSR, angulin-2/ILDR1, and angulin-3/ILDR2) have been identified as tTJ-associated proteins. Tricellulin and ILDR1 are localized at the tTJ and alterations in these proteins have been reported to be involved in deafness. In this review, we will present the current state of knowledge for tTJs. PMID:27195292

  5. Anillin-dependent organization of septin filaments promotes intercellular bridge elongation and Chmp4B targeting to the abscission site.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Matthew J; Liu, Jinghe; Lavoie, Brigitte D; Wilde, Andrew

    2014-01-22

    The final step of cytokinesis is abscission when the intercellular bridge (ICB) linking the two new daughter cells is broken. Correct construction of the ICB is crucial for the assembly of factors involved in abscission, a failure in which results in aneuploidy. Using live imaging and subdiffraction microscopy, we identify new anillin-septin cytoskeleton-dependent stages in ICB formation and maturation. We show that after the formation of an initial ICB, septin filaments drive ICB elongation during which tubules containing anillin-septin rings are extruded from the ICB. Septins then generate sites of further constriction within the mature ICB from which they are subsequently removed. The action of the anillin-septin complex during ICB maturation also primes the ICB for the future assembly of the ESCRT III component Chmp4B at the abscission site. These studies suggest that the sequential action of distinct contractile machineries coordinates the formation of the abscission site and the successful completion of cytokinesis.

  6. Role of gap junction channel in the development of beat-to-beat action potential repolarization variability and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Janos; Banyasz, Tamas; Szentandrassy, Norbert; Kistamas, Kornel; Nanasi, Peter P; Satin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The short-term beat-to-beat variability of cardiac action potential duration (SBVR) occurs as a random alteration of the ventricular repolarization duration. SBVR has been suggested to be more predictive of the development of lethal arrhythmias than the action potential prolongation or QT prolongation of ECG alone. The mechanism underlying SBVR is not completely understood but it is known that SBVR depends on stochastic ion channel gating, intracellular calcium handling and intercellular coupling. Coupling of single cardiomyocytes significantly decreases the beat-to-beat changes in action potential duration (APD) due to the electrotonic current flow between neighboring cells. The magnitude of this electrotonic current depends on the intercellular gap junction resistance. Reduced gap junction resistance causes greater electrotonic current flow between cells, and reduces SBVR. Myocardial ischaemia (MI) is known to affect gap junction channel protein expression and function. MI increases gap junction resistance that leads to slow conduction, APD and refractory period dispersion, and an increase in SBVR. Ultimately, development of reentry arrhythmias and fibrillation are associated post-MI. Antiarrhythmic drugs have proarrhythmic side effects requiring alternative approaches. A novel idea is to target gap junction channels. Specifically, the use of gap junction channel enhancers and inhibitors may help to reveal the precise role of gap junctions in the development of arrhythmias. Since cell-to-cell coupling is represented in SBVR, this parameter can be used to monitor the degree of coupling of myocardium.

  7. Role of tight junctions in signal transduction: an update

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Kenichi; Kojima, Takashi; Sawada, Norimasa; Himi, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs), which are the most apically located of the intercellular junctional complexes, have a barrier function and a fence function. Recent studies show that they also participate in signal transduction mechanisms. TJs are modulated by intracellular signaling pathways including protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-ϰB, to affect the epithelial barrier function in response to diverse stimuli. TJs are also regulated by various cytokines, growth factors, and hormones via signaling pathways. To investigate the regulation of TJ molecules via signaling pathways in human epithelial cells under normal and pathological conditions, we established a novel model of human telomerase reverse transcriptase-transfected human epithelial cells. In this review, we describe the recent progress in our understanding of the role of TJs for signal transduction under normal conditions in upper airway epithelium, pancreatic duct epithelial cells, hepatocytes, and endometrial epithelial cells, and in pathological conditions including cancer and infection. PMID:26417329

  8. Modulation of metabolic communication through gap junction channels by transjunctional voltage; synergistic and antagonistic effects of gating and ionophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Prado, Nicolás; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.

    2011-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels assembled from connexin (Cx) proteins provide a structural basis for direct electrical and metabolic cell-cell communication. Here, we focus on gating and permeability properties of Cx43/Cx45 heterotypic GJs exhibiting asymmetries of both voltage-gating and transjunctional flux (Jj) of fluorescent dyes depending on transjunctional voltage (Vj). Relatively small differences in the resting potential of communicating cells can substantially reduce or enhance this flux at relative negativity or positivity on Cx45 side, respectively. Similarly, series of Vj pulses resembling bursts of action potentials (APs) reduce Jj when APs initiate in the cell expressing Cx43 and increase Jj when APs initiate in the cell expressing Cx45. Jj of charged fluorescent dyes is affected by ionophoresis and Vj-gating and the asymmetry of Jj-Vj dependence in heterotypic GJs is enhanced or reduced when ionophoresis and Vj-gating work in a synergistic or antagonistic manner, respectively. Modulation of cell-to-cell transfer of metabolites and signaling molecules by Vj may occur in excitable as well as non-excitable tissues and may be more expressed in the border between normal and pathological regions where intercellular gradients of membrane potential and concentration of ions are substantially altered. PMID:21930112

  9. Graphene/silicon nanowire Schottky junction for enhanced light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guifeng; Zhu, Hongwei; Wang, Kunlin; Wei, Jinquan; Li, Xinming; Shu, Q