Science.gov

Sample records for interface based model

  1. Systems Engineering Interfaces: A Model Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fosse, Elyse; Delp, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Currently: Ops Rev developed and maintains a framework that includes interface-specific language, patterns, and Viewpoints. Ops Rev implements the framework to design MOS 2.0 and its 5 Mission Services. Implementation de-couples interfaces and instances of interaction Future: A Mission MOSE implements the approach and uses the model based artifacts for reviews. The framework extends further into the ground data layers and provides a unified methodology.

  2. Interface Management for a NASA Flight Project Using Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Shull, Thomas A.; Infeld, Samatha; Price, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The goal of interface management is to identify, define, control, and verify interfaces; ensure compatibility; provide an efficient system development; be on time and within budget; while meeting stakeholder requirements. This paper will present a successful seven-step approach to interface management used in several NASA flight projects. The seven-step approach using Model Based Systems Engineering will be illustrated by interface examples from the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The MISSE-X was being developed as an International Space Station (ISS) external platform for space environmental studies, designed to advance the technology readiness of materials and devices critical for future space exploration. Emphasis will be given to best practices covering key areas such as interface definition, writing good interface requirements, utilizing interface working groups, developing and controlling interface documents, handling interface agreements, the use of shadow documents, the importance of interface requirement ownership, interface verification, and product transition.

  3. Developing a User-process Model for Designing Menu-based Interfaces: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ju, Boryung; Gluck, Myke

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to organize menu items based on a user-process model and implement a new version of current software for enhancing usability of interfaces. A user-process model was developed, drawn from actual users' understanding of their goals and strategies to solve their information needs by using Dervin's Sense-Making Theory…

  4. Approximation of skewed interfaces with tensor-based model reduction procedures: Application to the reduced basis hierarchical model reduction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlberger, Mario; Smetana, Kathrin

    2016-09-01

    In this article we introduce a procedure, which allows to recover the potentially very good approximation properties of tensor-based model reduction procedures for the solution of partial differential equations in the presence of interfaces or strong gradients in the solution which are skewed with respect to the coordinate axes. The two key ideas are the location of the interface either by solving a lower-dimensional partial differential equation or by using data functions and the subsequent removal of the interface of the solution by choosing the determined interface as the lifting function of the Dirichlet boundary conditions. We demonstrate in numerical experiments for linear elliptic equations and the reduced basis-hierarchical model reduction approach that the proposed procedure locates the interface well and yields a significantly improved convergence behavior even in the case when we only consider an approximation of the interface.

  5. Dynamic Distribution and Layouting of Model-Based User Interfaces in Smart Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscher, Dirk; Lehmann, Grzegorz; Schwartze, Veit; Blumendorf, Marco; Albayrak, Sahin

    The developments in computer technology in the last decade change the ways of computer utilization. The emerging smart environments make it possible to build ubiquitous applications that assist users during their everyday life, at any time, in any context. But the variety of contexts-of-use (user, platform and environment) makes the development of such ubiquitous applications for smart environments and especially its user interfaces a challenging and time-consuming task. We propose a model-based approach, which allows adapting the user interface at runtime to numerous (also unknown) contexts-of-use. Based on a user interface modelling language, defining the fundamentals and constraints of the user interface, a runtime architecture exploits the description to adapt the user interface to the current context-of-use. The architecture provides automatic distribution and layout algorithms for adapting the applications also to contexts unforeseen at design time. Designers do not specify predefined adaptations for each specific situation, but adaptation constraints and guidelines. Furthermore, users are provided with a meta user interface to influence the adaptations according to their needs. A smart home energy management system serves as running example to illustrate the approach.

  6. Development and Implementation of an Extensible Interface-Based Spatiotemporal Geoprocessing and Modeling Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Ames, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    This poster presents an object oriented and interface-based spatiotemporal data processing and modeling toolbox that can be extended by third parties to include complete suites of new tools through the implementation of simple interfaces. The resulting software implementation includes both a toolbox and workflow designer or "model builder" constructed using the underlying open source DotSpatial library and MapWindow desktop GIS. The unique contribution of this research and software development activity is in the creation and use of an extensibility architecture for both specific tools (through a so-called "ITool" interface) and batches of tools (through a so-called "IToolProvider" interface.) This concept is introduced to allow for seamless integration of geoprocessing tools from various sources (e.g. distinct libraries of spatiotemporal processing code) - including online sources - within a single user environment. In this way, the IToolProvider interface allows developers to wrap large existing collections of data analysis code without having to re-write it for interoperability. Additionally, developers do not need to design the user interfaces for loading, displaying or interacting with their specific tools, but rather can simply implement the provided interfaces and have their tools and tool collections appear in the toolbox alongside other tools. The demonstration software presented here is based on an implementation of the interfaces and sample tool libraries using the C# .NET programming language. This poster will include a summary of the interfaces as well as a demonstration of the system using the Whitebox Geospatial Analysis Tools (GAT) as an example case of a large number of existing tools that can be exposed to users through this new system. Vector analysis tools which are native in DotSpatial are linked to the Whitebox raster analysis tools in the model builder environment for ease of execution and consistent/repeatable use. We expect that this

  7. Operating Comfort Prediction Model of Human-Machine Interface Layout for Cabin Based on GEP.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In view of the evaluation and decision-making problem of human-machine interface layout design for cabin, the operating comfort prediction model is proposed based on GEP (Gene Expression Programming), using operating comfort to evaluate layout scheme. Through joint angles to describe operating posture of upper limb, the joint angles are taken as independent variables to establish the comfort model of operating posture. Factor analysis is adopted to decrease the variable dimension; the model's input variables are reduced from 16 joint angles to 4 comfort impact factors, and the output variable is operating comfort score. The Chinese virtual human body model is built by CATIA software, which will be used to simulate and evaluate the operators' operating comfort. With 22 groups of evaluation data as training sample and validation sample, GEP algorithm is used to obtain the best fitting function between the joint angles and the operating comfort; then, operating comfort can be predicted quantitatively. The operating comfort prediction result of human-machine interface layout of driller control room shows that operating comfort prediction model based on GEP is fast and efficient, it has good prediction effect, and it can improve the design efficiency.

  8. Operating Comfort Prediction Model of Human-Machine Interface Layout for Cabin Based on GEP

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In view of the evaluation and decision-making problem of human-machine interface layout design for cabin, the operating comfort prediction model is proposed based on GEP (Gene Expression Programming), using operating comfort to evaluate layout scheme. Through joint angles to describe operating posture of upper limb, the joint angles are taken as independent variables to establish the comfort model of operating posture. Factor analysis is adopted to decrease the variable dimension; the model's input variables are reduced from 16 joint angles to 4 comfort impact factors, and the output variable is operating comfort score. The Chinese virtual human body model is built by CATIA software, which will be used to simulate and evaluate the operators' operating comfort. With 22 groups of evaluation data as training sample and validation sample, GEP algorithm is used to obtain the best fitting function between the joint angles and the operating comfort; then, operating comfort can be predicted quantitatively. The operating comfort prediction result of human-machine interface layout of driller control room shows that operating comfort prediction model based on GEP is fast and efficient, it has good prediction effect, and it can improve the design efficiency. PMID:26448740

  9. MaxMod: a hidden Markov model based novel interface to MODELLER for improved prediction of protein 3D models.

    PubMed

    Parida, Bikram K; Panda, Prasanna K; Misra, Namrata; Mishra, Barada K

    2015-02-01

    Modeling the three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins assumes great significance because of its manifold applications in biomolecular research. Toward this goal, we present MaxMod, a graphical user interface (GUI) of the MODELLER program that combines profile hidden Markov model (profile HMM) method with Clustal Omega program to significantly improve the selection of homologous templates and target-template alignment for construction of accurate 3D protein models. MaxMod distinguishes itself from other existing GUIs of MODELLER software by implementing effortless modeling of proteins using templates that bear modified residues. Additionally, it provides various features such as loop optimization, express modeling (a feature where protein model can be generated directly from its sequence, without any further user intervention) and automatic update of PDB database, thus enhancing the user-friendly control of computational tasks. We find that HMM-based MaxMod performs better than other modeling packages in terms of execution time and model quality. MaxMod is freely available as a downloadable standalone tool for academic and non-commercial purpose at http://www.immt.res.in/maxmod/. PMID:25636267

  10. MaxMod: a hidden Markov model based novel interface to MODELLER for improved prediction of protein 3D models.

    PubMed

    Parida, Bikram K; Panda, Prasanna K; Misra, Namrata; Mishra, Barada K

    2015-02-01

    Modeling the three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins assumes great significance because of its manifold applications in biomolecular research. Toward this goal, we present MaxMod, a graphical user interface (GUI) of the MODELLER program that combines profile hidden Markov model (profile HMM) method with Clustal Omega program to significantly improve the selection of homologous templates and target-template alignment for construction of accurate 3D protein models. MaxMod distinguishes itself from other existing GUIs of MODELLER software by implementing effortless modeling of proteins using templates that bear modified residues. Additionally, it provides various features such as loop optimization, express modeling (a feature where protein model can be generated directly from its sequence, without any further user intervention) and automatic update of PDB database, thus enhancing the user-friendly control of computational tasks. We find that HMM-based MaxMod performs better than other modeling packages in terms of execution time and model quality. MaxMod is freely available as a downloadable standalone tool for academic and non-commercial purpose at http://www.immt.res.in/maxmod/.

  11. Establishing a Novel Modeling Tool: A Python-Based Interface for a Neuromorphic Hardware System

    PubMed Central

    Brüderle, Daniel; Müller, Eric; Davison, Andrew; Muller, Eilif; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    Neuromorphic hardware systems provide new possibilities for the neuroscience modeling community. Due to the intrinsic parallelism of the micro-electronic emulation of neural computation, such models are highly scalable without a loss of speed. However, the communities of software simulator users and neuromorphic engineering in neuroscience are rather disjoint. We present a software concept that provides the possibility to establish such hardware devices as valuable modeling tools. It is based on the integration of the hardware interface into a simulator-independent language which allows for unified experiment descriptions that can be run on various simulation platforms without modification, implying experiment portability and a huge simplification of the quantitative comparison of hardware and simulator results. We introduce an accelerated neuromorphic hardware device and describe the implementation of the proposed concept for this system. An example setup and results acquired by utilizing both the hardware system and a software simulator are demonstrated. PMID:19562085

  12. Establishing a novel modeling tool: a python-based interface for a neuromorphic hardware system.

    PubMed

    Brüderle, Daniel; Müller, Eric; Davison, Andrew; Muller, Eilif; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2009-01-01

    Neuromorphic hardware systems provide new possibilities for the neuroscience modeling community. Due to the intrinsic parallelism of the micro-electronic emulation of neural computation, such models are highly scalable without a loss of speed. However, the communities of software simulator users and neuromorphic engineering in neuroscience are rather disjoint. We present a software concept that provides the possibility to establish such hardware devices as valuable modeling tools. It is based on the integration of the hardware interface into a simulator-independent language which allows for unified experiment descriptions that can be run on various simulation platforms without modification, implying experiment portability and a huge simplification of the quantitative comparison of hardware and simulator results. We introduce an accelerated neuromorphic hardware device and describe the implementation of the proposed concept for this system. An example setup and results acquired by utilizing both the hardware system and a software simulator are demonstrated. PMID:19562085

  13. Toward a Model-Based Predictive Controller Design in Brain–Computer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kamrunnahar, M.; Dias, N. S.; Schiff, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    A first step in designing a robust and optimal model-based predictive controller (MPC) for brain–computer interface (BCI) applications is presented in this article. An MPC has the potential to achieve improved BCI performance compared to the performance achieved by current ad hoc, nonmodel-based filter applications. The parameters in designing the controller were extracted as model-based features from motor imagery task-related human scalp electroencephalography. Although the parameters can be generated from any model-linear or non-linear, we here adopted a simple autoregressive model that has well-established applications in BCI task discriminations. It was shown that the parameters generated for the controller design can as well be used for motor imagery task discriminations with performance (with 8–23% task discrimination errors) comparable to the discrimination performance of the commonly used features such as frequency specific band powers and the AR model parameters directly used. An optimal MPC has significant implications for high performance BCI applications. PMID:21267657

  14. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interface (BCI): model order selection for autoregressive spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Dennis J; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2008-06-01

    People can learn to control EEG features consisting of sensorimotor rhythm amplitudes and can use this control to move a cursor in one or two dimensions to a target on a screen. Cursor movement depends on the estimate of the amplitudes of sensorimotor rhythms. Autoregressive models are often used to provide these estimates. The order of the autoregressive model has varied widely among studies. Through analyses of both simulated and actual EEG data, the present study examines the effects of model order on sensorimotor rhythm measurements and BCI performance. The results show that resolution of lower frequency signals requires higher model orders and that this requirement reflects the temporal span of the model coefficients. This is true for both simulated EEG data and actual EEG data during brain-computer interface (BCI) operation. Increasing model order, and decimating the signal were similarly effective in increasing spectral resolution. Furthermore, for BCI control of two-dimensional cursor movement, higher model orders produced better performance in each dimension and greater independence between horizontal and vertical movements. In sum, these results show that autoregressive model order selection is an important determinant of BCI performance and should be based on criteria that reflect system performance.

  15. Illustration interface of accident progression in PWR by quick inference based on multilevel flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, H.; Ouyang, J.; Niwa, Y.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, a new accident inference method is proposed by using a goal and function oriented modeling method called Multilevel Flow Model focusing on explaining the causal-consequence relations and the objective of automatic action in the accident of nuclear power plant. Users can easily grasp how the various plant parameters will behave and how the various safety facilities will be activated sequentially to cope with the accident until the nuclear power plants are settled into safety state, i.e., shutdown state. The applicability of the developed method was validated by the conduction of internet-based 'view' experiment to the voluntary respondents, and in the future, further elaboration of interface design and the further introduction of instruction contents will be developed to make it become the usable CAI system. (authors)

  16. Model based generalization analysis of common spatial pattern in brain computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangquan; Meng, Jianjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2010-01-01

    In the motor imagery based Brain Computer Interface (BCI) research, Common Spatial Pattern (CSP) algorithm is used widely as a spatial filter on multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Recently the overfitting effect of CSP has been gradually noticed, but what influence the overfitting is still unclear. In this work, the generalization of CSP is investigated by a simple linear mixing model. Several factors in this model are discussed, and the simulation results indicate that channel numbers and the correlation between signals influence the generalization of CSP significantly. A larger number of training trials and a longer time length of the trial would prevent overfitting. The experiments on real data also verify our conclusion. PMID:21886674

  17. Towards asynchronous brain-computer interfaces: a P300-based approach with statistical models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihong; Wang, Chuanchu; Guan, Cuntai

    2007-01-01

    Asynchronous control is a critical issue in developing brain-computer interfaces for real-life applications, where the machine should be able to detect the occurrence of a mental command. In this paper we propose a computational approach for robust asynchronous control using the P300 signal, in a variant of oddball paradigm. First, we use Gaussian models in the support vector margin space to describe various types of EEG signals that are present in an asynchronous P300-based BCI. This allows us to derive a probability measure of control state given EEG observations. Second, we devise a recursive algorithm to detect and locate control states in ongoing EEG. Experimental results indicate that our system allows information transfer at approx. 20bit/min at low false alarm rate (1/min). PMID:18003145

  18. A microfluidics-based in vitro model of the gastrointestinal human-microbe interface.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pranjul; Fritz, Joëlle V; Glaab, Enrico; Desai, Mahesh S; Greenhalgh, Kacy; Frachet, Audrey; Niegowska, Magdalena; Estes, Matthew; Jäger, Christian; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Zenhausern, Frederic; Wilmes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the human gastrointestinal microbiome are associated with several diseases. To infer causality, experiments in representative models are essential, but widely used animal models exhibit limitations. Here we present a modular, microfluidics-based model (HuMiX, human-microbial crosstalk), which allows co-culture of human and microbial cells under conditions representative of the gastrointestinal human-microbe interface. We demonstrate the ability of HuMiX to recapitulate in vivo transcriptional, metabolic and immunological responses in human intestinal epithelial cells following their co-culture with the commensal Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) grown under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the co-culture of human epithelial cells with the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides caccae and LGG results in a transcriptional response, which is distinct from that of a co-culture solely comprising LGG. HuMiX facilitates investigations of host-microbe molecular interactions and provides insights into a range of fundamental research questions linking the gastrointestinal microbiome to human health and disease.

  19. A microfluidics-based in vitro model of the gastrointestinal human–microbe interface

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pranjul; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Glaab, Enrico; Desai, Mahesh S.; Greenhalgh, Kacy; Frachet, Audrey; Niegowska, Magdalena; Estes, Matthew; Jäger, Christian; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Zenhausern, Frederic; Wilmes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the human gastrointestinal microbiome are associated with several diseases. To infer causality, experiments in representative models are essential, but widely used animal models exhibit limitations. Here we present a modular, microfluidics-based model (HuMiX, human–microbial crosstalk), which allows co-culture of human and microbial cells under conditions representative of the gastrointestinal human–microbe interface. We demonstrate the ability of HuMiX to recapitulate in vivo transcriptional, metabolic and immunological responses in human intestinal epithelial cells following their co-culture with the commensal Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) grown under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the co-culture of human epithelial cells with the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides caccae and LGG results in a transcriptional response, which is distinct from that of a co-culture solely comprising LGG. HuMiX facilitates investigations of host–microbe molecular interactions and provides insights into a range of fundamental research questions linking the gastrointestinal microbiome to human health and disease. PMID:27168102

  20. Phase interface effects in the total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rongzong; Wu, Huiying

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, phase interface effects, including the differences in thermophysical properties between solid and liquid phases and the numerical diffusion across phase interface, are investigated for the recently developed total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change, which has high computational efficiency by avoiding iteration procedure and linear equation system solving. For the differences in thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat) between solid and liquid phases, a novel reference specific heat is introduced to improve the total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model, which makes the thermal conductivity and specific heat decoupled. Therefore, the differences in thermal conductivity and specific heat can be handled by the dimensionless relaxation time and equilibrium distribution function, respectively. As for the numerical diffusion across phase interface, it is revealed for the first time and found to be induced by solid-liquid phase change. To reduce such numerical diffusion, multiple-relaxation-time collision scheme is exploited, and a special value (one fourth) for the so-called "magic" parameter, a combination of two relaxation parameters, is found. Numerical tests show that the differences in thermophysical properties can be correctly handled and the numerical diffusion across phase interface can be dramatically reduced. Finally, theoretical analyses are carried out to offer insights into the roles of the reference specific heat and "magic" parameter in the treatments of phase interface effects.

  1. Downsizer - A Graphical User Interface-Based Application for Browsing, Acquiring, and Formatting Time-Series Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward-Garrison, Christian; Markstrom, Steven L.; Hay, Lauren E.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Downsizer is a computer application that selects, downloads, verifies, and formats station-based time-series data for environmental-resource models, particularly the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System. Downsizer implements the client-server software architecture. The client presents a map-based, graphical user interface that is intuitive to modelers; the server provides streamflow and climate time-series data from over 40,000 measurement stations across the United States. This report is the Downsizer user's manual and provides (1) an overview of the software design, (2) installation instructions, (3) a description of the graphical user interface, (4) a description of selected output files, and (5) troubleshooting information.

  2. KNOWBOT; An adaptive data base interface

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, A.S.; Koen, B.U. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on an adaptive interface KNOWBOT designed to solve some of the problems that face the users of large centralized data bases. The interface applies the neural network approach to information retrieval from a data base. The data base is a subset of the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System. The interface KNOWBOT preempts an existing data base interface and works in conjunction with it. By design, KNOWBOT starts as a tabula rasa but acquires knowledge through its interactions with the user and the data base. The interface uses its gained knowledge to personalize the data base retrieval process and to induce new queries. The interface also forgets the information that is no longer needed by the user. These self-organizing features of the interface reduce the scope of the data base to the subsets that are highly relevant to the user needs. A proof-of-principal version of this interface has been implemented in Common LISP on a Texas Instruments Explorer I workstation. Experiments with KNOWBOT have been successful in demonstrating the robustness of the model especially with induction and self-organization. This paper describes the design of KNOWBOT and presents some of the experimental results.

  3. A Diffuse Interface Model with Immiscibility Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Arpit; Freund, Jonathan B.; Pantano, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    A new, simple, and computationally efficient interface capturing scheme based on a diffuse interface approach is presented for simulation of compressible multiphase flows. Multi-fluid interfaces are represented using field variables (interface functions) with associated transport equations that are augmented, with respect to an established formulation, to enforce a selected interface thickness. The resulting interface region can be set just thick enough to be resolved by the underlying mesh and numerical method, yet thin enough to provide an efficient model for dynamics of well-resolved scales. A key advance in the present method is that the interface regularization is asymptotically compatible with the thermodynamic mixture laws of the mixture model upon which it is constructed. It incorporates first-order pressure and velocity non-equilibrium effects while preserving interface conditions for equilibrium flows, even within the thin diffused mixture region. We first quantify the improved convergence of this formulation in some widely used one-dimensional configurations, then show that it enables fundamentally better simulations of bubble dynamics. Demonstrations include both a spherical bubble collapse, which is shown to maintain excellent symmetry despite the Cartesian mesh, and a jetting bubble collapse adjacent a wall. Comparisons show that without the new formulation the jet is suppressed by numerical diffusion leading to qualitatively incorrect results. PMID:24058207

  4. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  5. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic knowledgebase and web-based interface for rapid model ranking and querying

    EPA Science Inventory

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific pa...

  6. Human-arm-and-hand-dynamic model with variability analyses for a stylus-based haptic interface.

    PubMed

    Fu, Michael J; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2012-12-01

    Haptic interface research benefits from accurate human arm models for control and system design. The literature contains many human arm dynamic models but lacks detailed variability analyses. Without accurate measurements, variability is modeled in a very conservative manner, leading to less than optimal controller and system designs. This paper not only presents models for human arm dynamics but also develops inter- and intrasubject variability models for a stylus-based haptic device. Data from 15 human subjects (nine male, six female, ages 20-32) were collected using a Phantom Premium 1.5a haptic device for system identification. In this paper, grip-force-dependent models were identified for 1-3-N grip forces in the three spatial axes. Also, variability due to human subjects and grip-force variation were modeled as both structured and unstructured uncertainties. For both forms of variability, the maximum variation, 95 %, and 67 % confidence interval limits were examined. All models were in the frequency domain with force as input and position as output. The identified models enable precise controllers targeted to a subset of possible human operator dynamics. PMID:22692923

  7. Human-arm-and-hand-dynamic model with variability analyses for a stylus-based haptic interface.

    PubMed

    Fu, Michael J; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2012-12-01

    Haptic interface research benefits from accurate human arm models for control and system design. The literature contains many human arm dynamic models but lacks detailed variability analyses. Without accurate measurements, variability is modeled in a very conservative manner, leading to less than optimal controller and system designs. This paper not only presents models for human arm dynamics but also develops inter- and intrasubject variability models for a stylus-based haptic device. Data from 15 human subjects (nine male, six female, ages 20-32) were collected using a Phantom Premium 1.5a haptic device for system identification. In this paper, grip-force-dependent models were identified for 1-3-N grip forces in the three spatial axes. Also, variability due to human subjects and grip-force variation were modeled as both structured and unstructured uncertainties. For both forms of variability, the maximum variation, 95 %, and 67 % confidence interval limits were examined. All models were in the frequency domain with force as input and position as output. The identified models enable precise controllers targeted to a subset of possible human operator dynamics.

  8. PyRosetta: a script-based interface for implementing molecular modeling algorithms using Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Lyskov, Sergey; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: PyRosetta is a stand-alone Python-based implementation of the Rosetta molecular modeling package that allows users to write custom structure prediction and design algorithms using the major Rosetta sampling and scoring functions. PyRosetta contains Python bindings to libraries that define Rosetta functions including those for accessing and manipulating protein structure, calculating energies and running Monte Carlo-based simulations. PyRosetta can be used in two ways: (i) interactively, using iPython and (ii) script-based, using Python scripting. Interactive mode contains a number of help features and is ideal for beginners while script-mode is best suited for algorithm development. PyRosetta has similar computational performance to Rosetta, can be easily scaled up for cluster applications and has been implemented for algorithms demonstrating protein docking, protein folding, loop modeling and design. Availability: PyRosetta is a stand-alone package available at http://www.pyrosetta.org under the Rosetta license which is free for academic and non-profit users. A tutorial, user's manual and sample scripts demonstrating usage are also available on the web site. Contact: pyrosetta@graylab.jhu.edu PMID:20061306

  9. Mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated soils: what makes interfaces an indispensable part of a physically-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikooee, E.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The foundations of the current theories for hydraulics and mechanics of unsaturated soils have been mainly based on the empirically introduced equations. There are various characteristics of unsaturated soils for which lots of different empirical equations have been proposed such as hydraulic conductivity, water retention curve, and effective stress parameter. One of the remarkable challenges which all current models face is hysteresis, i.e., for a certain matric suction, values of saturation, hydraulic conductivity and effective stress parameter in drying state and wetting are different. Conventional models of hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils try to account for the hysteresis phenomenon by means of different empirical equations for each hydraulic path. Hassanizadeh and Gray (1993) claimed that the hysteresis in capillary pressure-saturation curves can be modelled through the inclusion of air-water interfaces as a new independent variable [1]. It has recently been stated that the same conjecture can be made for suction stress [2]. Therefore, it seems to better portray hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils, interfaces are required as an indispensable part of the framework [3, 4]. This presentation aims at introducing the drawbacks of current theories of hydraulics and mechanics of unsaturated soils. For this purpose, the role of interfaces in the mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated soils is explained and different possibilities to account for the contribution of interfaces are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future research directions are set forth. References[1] Hassanizadeh, S.M. & Gray, W.G.: Thermodynamic basis of capillary pressure in porous media. Water Resour.Res. 29(1993), 3389-3405.[2] Nikooee, E., Habibagahi, G., Hassanizadeh, S.M. & Ghahramani, A.: Effective Stress in unsaturated Soils: a thermodynamic approach based on the interfacial energy and hydromechanical coupling. Transport porous Med. 96

  10. Multi-gas interaction modeling on decorated semiconductor interfaces: A novel Fermi distribution-based response isotherm and the inverse hard/soft acid/base concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laminack, William; Gole, James

    2015-12-01

    A unique MEMS/NEMS approach is presented for the modeling of a detection platform for mixed gas interactions. Mixed gas analytes interact with nanostructured decorating metal oxide island sites supported on a microporous silicon substrate. The Inverse Hard/Soft acid/base (IHSAB) concept is used to assess a diversity of conductometric responses for mixed gas interactions as a function of these nanostructured metal oxides. The analyte conductometric responses are well represented using a combination diffusion/absorption-based model for multi-gas interactions where a newly developed response absorption isotherm, based on the Fermi distribution function is applied. A further coupling of this model with the IHSAB concept describes the considerations in modeling of multi-gas mixed analyte-interface, and analyte-analyte interactions. Taking into account the molecular electronic interaction of both the analytes with each other and an extrinsic semiconductor interface we demonstrate how the presence of one gas can enhance or diminish the reversible interaction of a second gas with the extrinsic semiconductor interface. These concepts demonstrate important considerations in the array-based formats for multi-gas sensing and its applications.

  11. A Diffuse Interface Model for solid-liquid-air dissolution problems based on a porous medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Quintard, M.; Debenest, G.; Laouafa, F.

    2011-12-01

    The underground cavities may be dissolved by the flows of groundwater where the dissolution mainly happens at the liquid-solid interface. In many real cases, the cavities are not occupied only by the water, but also the gas phase, e.g., air, or other gases. In this case, there are solid-liquid-gas three phases. Normally, the air does not participate the dissolution. However, it may influence the dissolution as the position of the solid-liquid interface may gradually lower down with the dissolution process. Simulating the dissolution problems with multi- moving interfaces is a difficult task but rather interesting to study the evolution of the underground cavities. In this paper, we propose a diffuse interface model (DIM) to simulate the three-phase dissolution problem, based on a porous medium theory and a volume averaging theory te{Whitaker1999,Golfier2002,Quintard1994}. The interface is regarded as a continuous layer where the phase indicator (mainly for solid-liquid interface) and phase saturation (mainly for liquid-gas interface) vary rapidly but smoothly. The DIM equations enable us to simulate the moving interface under a fixed mesh system, instead of a deformed or moving mesh. Suppose we have three phases, solid, liquid and gas. The solid phase contains only species A. The gas phase contains only the air. The volume averaging theory is used to upscale the balance equations. The final DIM equations are presented below. The balance equation of solid phase can be written as {partialrho_{s}(1-\\varepsilon_{f})}/{partial t}=-K_{sl} where \\varepsilonf represents the volume fraction of the fluids (liquid+gas) and Ksl refers to the mass exchange between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Ksl cam be expressed as K_{sl}=rho_{l}alpha(omega_{eq}-Omega_{Al}). The balance equations of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho_{l}\\varepsilon_{f}S_{l}}/{partial t}+nabla\\cdot(rho_{l}{V}_{l})= K_{sl}. The balance equation of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho

  12. Processes and Problems in the Formative Evaluation of an Interface to the Foundational Model of Anatomy Knowledge Base

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Linda G.; Chung, Emily; Detwiler, Landon T.; Mejino, José L.V.; Agoncillo, Augusto V.; Brinkley, James F.; Rosse, Cornelius

    2005-01-01

    The Digital Anatomist Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) is a large semantic network of more than 100,000 terms that refer to the anatomical entities, which together with 1.6 million structural relationships symbolically represent the physical organization of the human body. Evaluation of such a large knowledge base by domain experts is challenging because of the sheer size of the resource and the need to evaluate not just classes but also relationships. To meet this challenge, the authors have developed a relation-centric query interface, called Emily, that is able to query the entire range of classes and relationships in the FMA, yet is simple to use by a domain expert. Formative evaluation of this interface considered the ability of Emily to formulate queries based on standard anatomy examination questions, as well as the processing speed of the query engine. Results show that Emily is able to express 90% of the examination questions submitted to it and that processing time is generally 1 second or less, but can be much longer for complex queries. These results suggest that Emily will be a very useful tool, not only for evaluating the FMA, but also for querying and evaluating other large semantic networks. PMID:15492037

  13. A learning scheme for reach to grasp movements: on EMG-based interfaces using task specific motion decoding models.

    PubMed

    Liarokapis, Minas V; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Kyriakopoulos, Kostas J; Manolakos, Elias S

    2013-09-01

    A learning scheme based on random forests is used to discriminate between different reach to grasp movements in 3-D space, based on the myoelectric activity of human muscles of the upper-arm and the forearm. Task specificity for motion decoding is introduced in two different levels: Subspace to move toward and object to be grasped. The discrimination between the different reach to grasp strategies is accomplished with machine learning techniques for classification. The classification decision is then used in order to trigger an EMG-based task-specific motion decoding model. Task specific models manage to outperform "general" models providing better estimation accuracy. Thus, the proposed scheme takes advantage of a framework incorporating both a classifier and a regressor that cooperate advantageously in order to split the task space. The proposed learning scheme can be easily used to a series of EMG-based interfaces that must operate in real time, providing data-driven capabilities for multiclass problems, that occur in everyday life complex environments.

  14. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERMcode (GCR Event-Based Risk Model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERMcode calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERMcode also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERMcode for application to thick target experiments. The GERMcode provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their

  15. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERM Code (GCR Event-Based Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERM code calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERM code also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERM code accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERM code for application to thick target experiments. The GERM code provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their

  16. Microprocessor-based interface for oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    Ocean floor imaging system incorporates five identical microprocessor-based interface units each assigned to specific sonar instrument to simplify system. Central control module based on same microprocessor eliminates need for custom tailoring hardware interfaces for each instrument.

  17. A knowledge-based reactive-transport approach for the modeling of biogeochemical cycles at the continent-ocean interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, P.; Aguilera, D.; Jourabchi, P.; Meile, C.; van Cappellen, P.; Vanderborght, J.-P.

    2003-04-01

    Reactive-transport models (RTMs) are traditionally developed and used to investigate the fate and transport of a selected set of chemical constituents within a given compartment of the earth, mainly at the local or subregional scale. As a result, existing RTMs tend to be environment and application specific. For instance, at the continent-ocean interface, RTMs have been used to simulate, among others, biogeochemical dynamics in rivers, estuaries, coastal areas, aquifers, and sediments. The development of upscaling protocols, where RTMs of interconnected environments are progressively aggregated into larger system units is critical for merging marine and continental approaches to biogeochemical cycles. However, one of the major challenges to achieve this goal is in the realistic and consistent representation of highly complex reaction networks that characterize the chemical dynamics of the natural environments present along the continent-ocean continuum (rivers, estuaries, coastal areas, sediments). The expanding knowledge about (bio)geochemical transformation processes achieved via field- and laboratory-based experiments needs also to be made available and integrated consistently (i.e. with comparable level of complexities) across traditional disciplinary barriers, by utilizing the unifying conceptual and mathematical principles underlying all RTMs. Our modeling approach, based on a modular concept, offers the necessary flexibility for the implementation of new theoretical and experimental information on the rates and pathways of biogeochemical reactions. A key component of our reaction network simulator is the "Knowledge Base", which acts as a single evolving repository of up-to-date information on biogeochemical processes. The development of self-consistent, "Knowledge-Based" biogeochemical reaction network modules, which can be merged with existing transport models of the various compartments of the hydrosphere along the continent-ocean continuum, creates a

  18. A graphical interface based model for wind turbine drive train dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Manwell, J.F.; McGowan, J.G.; Abdulwahid, U.; Rogers, A.; McNiff, B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of a wind turbine drive train dynamics code that has been under development at the University of Massachusetts, under National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) support. The code is intended to be used to assist in the proper design and selection of drive train components. This work summarizes the development of the equations of motion for the model, and discusses the method of solution. In addition, a number of comparisons with analytical solutions and experimental field data are given. The summary includes conclusions and suggestions for future work on the model. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  19. A virtual reality interface for pre-planning of surgical operations based on a customized model of the patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Lenar, Janusz; Sitnik, Robert; Verdonschot, Nico

    2012-03-01

    We present a human-computer interface that enables the operator to plan a surgical procedure on the musculoskeletal (MS) model of the patient's lower limbs, send the modified model to the bio-mechanical analysis module, and export the scenario parameters to the surgical navigation system. The interface provides the operator with tools for: importing customized MS model of the patient, cutting bones and manipulating/removal of bony fragments, repositioning muscle insertion points, muscle removal and placing implants. After planning the operator exports the modified MS model for bio-mechanical analysis of the functional outcome. If the simulation result is satisfactory the exported scenario data may be directly used during the actual surgery. The advantages of the developed interface are the possibility of installing it in various hardware configurations and coherent operation regardless of the devices used. The hardware configurations proposed to be used with the interface are: (a) a standard computer keyboard and mouse, and a 2-D display, (b) a touch screen as a single device for both input and output, or (c) a 3-D display and a haptic device for natural manipulation of 3-D objects. The interface may be utilized in two main fields. Experienced surgeons may use it to simulate their intervention plans and prepare input data for a surgical navigation system while student or novice surgeons can use it for simulating results of their hypothetical procedure. The interface has been developed in the TLEMsafe project (www.tlemsafe.eu) funded by the European Commission FP7 program.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A CHEMICAL PROCESS MODELING ENVIRONMENT BASED ON CAPE-OPEN INTERFACE STANDARDS AND THE MICROSOFT .NET FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical process simulation has long been used as a design tool in the development of chemical plants, and has long been considered a means to evaluate different design options. With the advent of large scale computer networks and interface models for program components, it is po...

  1. Transport, Interfaces, and Modeling in Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 11 February 2002 - 30 September 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, E. A.

    2008-10-01

    Results for a-Si characteristics/modeling; photocarrier drift mobilities in a-Si;H, ..mu..c-Si:H, CIGS; hole-conducting polymers as p-layer for a-Si and c-Si; IR spectra of p/i and n/i interfaces in a-Si.

  2. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  3. A Cross-Cultural Usability Study on the Internationalization of User Interfaces Based on an Empirical Five Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Joyram

    2009-01-01

    With the internationalization of e-commerce, it is no longer viable to design one user interface for all environments. Web-based applications and services can be accessed from all over the globe. To account for this globalization process, software developers need to understand that simply accounting for language translation of their websites for…

  4. Computational design of patterned interfaces using reduced order models

    PubMed Central

    Vattré, A. J.; Abdolrahim, N.; Kolluri, K.; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Patterning is a familiar approach for imparting novel functionalities to free surfaces. We extend the patterning paradigm to interfaces between crystalline solids. Many interfaces have non-uniform internal structures comprised of misfit dislocations, which in turn govern interface properties. We develop and validate a computational strategy for designing interfaces with controlled misfit dislocation patterns by tailoring interface crystallography and composition. Our approach relies on a novel method for predicting the internal structure of interfaces: rather than obtaining it from resource-intensive atomistic simulations, we compute it using an efficient reduced order model based on anisotropic elasticity theory. Moreover, our strategy incorporates interface synthesis as a constraint on the design process. As an illustration, we apply our approach to the design of interfaces with rapid, 1-D point defect diffusion. Patterned interfaces may be integrated into the microstructure of composite materials, markedly improving performance. PMID:25169868

  5. Geographic information system/watershed model interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Geographic information systems allow for the interactive analysis of spatial data related to water-resources investigations. A conceptual design for an interface between a geographic information system and a watershed model includes functions for the estimation of model parameter values. Design criteria include ease of use, minimal equipment requirements, a generic data-base management system, and use of a macro language. An application is demonstrated for a 90.1-square-kilometer subbasin of the Patuxent River near Unity, Maryland, that performs automated derivation of watershed parameters for hydrologic modeling.

  6. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Valone, Steven M; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Germann, T. C.

    2011-01-31

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  7. A diagnostic interface for the ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic (ICON) modelling framework based on the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy v2.50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Bastian; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Numerical climate and weather models have advanced to finer scales, accompanied by large amounts of output data. The model systems hit the input and output (I/O) bottleneck of modern high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We aim to apply diagnostic methods online during the model simulation instead of applying them as a post-processing step to written output data, to reduce the amount of I/O. To include diagnostic tools into the model system, we implemented a standardised, easy-to-use interface based on the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) into the ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic (ICON) modelling framework. The integration of the diagnostic interface into the model system is briefly described. Furthermore, we present a prototype implementation of an advanced online diagnostic tool for the aggregation of model data onto a user-defined regular coarse grid. This diagnostic tool will be used to reduce the amount of model output in future simulations. Performance tests of the interface and of two different diagnostic tools show, that the interface itself introduces no overhead in form of additional runtime to the model system. The diagnostic tools, however, have significant impact on the model system's runtime. This overhead strongly depends on the characteristics and implementation of the diagnostic tool. A diagnostic tool with high inter-process communication introduces large overhead, whereas the additional runtime of a diagnostic tool without inter-process communication is low. We briefly describe our efforts to reduce the additional runtime from the diagnostic tools, and present a brief analysis of memory consumption. Future work will focus on optimisation of the memory footprint and the I/O operations of the diagnostic interface.

  8. A new interface element with progressive damage and osseointegration for modeling of interfaces in hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Caouette, Christiane; Bureau, Martin N; Lavigne, Martin; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Nuño, Natalia

    2013-03-01

    Finite element models of orthopedic implants such as hip resurfacing femoral components usually rely on contact elements to model the load-bearing interfaces that connect bone, cement and implant. However, contact elements cannot simulate progressive degradation of bone-cement interfaces or osseointegration. A new interface element is developed to alleviate these shortcomings. This element is capable of simulating the nonlinear progression of bone-cement interface debonding or bone-implant interface osseointegration, based on mechanical stimuli in normal and tangential directions. The new element is applied to a hip resurfacing femoral component with a stem made of a novel biomimetic composite material. Three load cases are applied sequentially to simulate the 6-month period required for osseointegration of the stem. The effect of interdigitation depth of the bone-cement interface is found to be negligible, with only minor variations of micromotions. Numerical results show that the biomimetic stem progressively osseointegrates (alpha averages 0.7 on the stem surface, with spot-welds) and that bone-stem micromotions decrease below 10 microm. Osseointegration also changes the load path within the femoral bone: a decrease of 300 microepsilon was observed in the femoral head, and the inferomedial part of the femoral neck showed a slight increase of 165 microepsilon. There was also increased stress in the implant stem (from 7 to 11 MPa after osseointegration), indicating that part of the load is supported through the stem. The use of the new osseointegratable interface element has shown the osseointegration potential of the biomimetic stem. Its ability to model partially osseointegrated interfaces based on the mechanical conditions at the interface means that the new element could be used to study load transfer and osseointegration patterns on other models of uncemented hip resurfacing femoral components.

  9. A Process Based Approach to Modeling Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions Across the Air-Surface Interface of Manure from Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Aneja, V.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are an important concern due to their contribution to odor and their potential to form PMfine. CAFO manure surface emissions occur from barns floors, during waste storage and treatment, and following land application. There is a need for a process based model, which will provide a method for quantifying emissions in different production, management and environmental conditions. A process based air-surface interface mass transfer model with chemical reactions was developed based on theoretical principles and related published information on H2S emissions. Different approaches were used to calculate the three main components of the model: the dissociation constant, the Henry’s law constant, and the overall mass transport coefficient. The dissociation constant was calculated based on thermodynamic principles and was corrected for the ionic strength of the manure. Similarly, the Henry’s law constant was also calculated based on thermodynamic principles. The overall mass transfer coefficient was developed using a previously published air-surface interface mass transport model, which considered the most important properties affecting mass transport to be the diffusivity of H2S in air, the air viscosity, and the air density. These parameters were modeled using dimensional analysis, which identified the variables that needed to be measured to determine the relevant constant and exponents values. By using the previously published study’s model and their measured constant and exponent values, an appropriate overall mass transfer coefficient was developed. Sensitivity analysis of the process based air-surface interface mass transfer model showed predicted fluxes to be most dependent on manure sulfide concentration and manure pH, and to a smaller extent on wind speed and manure temperature. Model predicted fluxes were compared with measured H2S flux and meteorological and physiochemical

  10. An Agent-Based Interface to Terrestrial Ecological Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Nemani, Ramakrishna; Pang, Wan-Lin; Votava, Petr; Etzioni, Oren

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a flexible agent-based ecological forecasting system that combines multiple distributed data sources and models to provide near-real-time answers to questions about the state of the Earth system We build on novel techniques in automated constraint-based planning and natural language interfaces to automatically generate data products based on descriptions of the desired data products.

  11. Implantable Graphene-based Neural Electrode Interfaces for Electrophysiology and Neurochemistry in In Vivo Hyperacute Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ta-Chung; Chuang, Min-Chieh; Chu, Chao-Yi; Huang, Wei-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Chao-Ting; Chu, Wei-Lin; Chen, San-Yuan; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-13

    Implantable microelectrode arrays have attracted considerable interest due to their high temporal and spatial resolution recording of neuronal activity in tissues. We herein presented an implantable multichannel neural probe with multiple real-time monitoring of neural-chemical and neural-electrical signals by a nonenzymatic neural-chemical interface, which was designed by creating the newly developed reduced graphene oxide-gold oxide (rGO/Au2O3) nanocomposite electrode. The modified electrode on the neural probe was prepared by a facile one-step cyclic voltammetry (CV) electrochemical method with simultaneous occurrence of gold oxidation and GOs reduction to induce the intimate attachment by electrostatic interaction using chloride ions (Cl(-)). The rGO/Au2O3-modified electrode at a low deposition scan rate of 10 mVs(-1) displayed significantly improved electrocatalytic activity due to large active areas and well-dispersive attached rGO sheets. The in vitro amperometric response to H2O2 demonstrated a fast response of less than 5 s and a very low detection limit of 0.63 μM. In in vivo hyperacute stroke model, the concentration of H2O2 was measured as 100.48 ± 4.52 μM for rGO/Au2O3 electrode within 1 h photothrombotic stroke, which was much higher than that (71.92 μM ± 2.52 μM) for noncoated electrode via in vitro calibration. Simultaneously, the somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) test provided reliable and precise validation for detecting functional changes of neuronal activities. This newly developed implantable probe with localized rGO/Au2O3 nanocomposite electrode can serve as a rapid and reliable sensing platform for practical H2O2 detection in the brain or for other neural-chemical molecules in vivo. PMID:26653098

  12. Ray tracing in discontinuous velocity model with implicit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxing; Yang, Qin; Meng, Xianhai; Li, Jigang

    2016-07-01

    Ray tracing in the velocity model containing complex discontinuities is still facing many challenges. The main difficulty arises from the detection of the spatial relationship between the rays and the interfaces that are usually described in non-linear parametric forms. We propose a novel model representation method that can facilitate the implementation of classical shooting-ray methods. In the representation scheme, each interface is expressed as the zero contour of a signed distance field. A multi-copy strategy is adopted to describe the volumetric properties within blocks. The implicit description of the interface makes it easier to detect the ray-interface intersection. The direct calculation of the intersection point is converted into the problem of judging the signs of a ray segment's endpoints. More importantly, the normal to the interface at the intersection point can be easily acquired according to the signed distance field of the interface. The multiple storage of the velocity property in the proximity of the interface can provide accurate and unambiguous velocity information of the intersection point. Thus, the departing ray path can be determined easily and robustly. In addition, the new representation method can describe velocity models containing very complex geological structures, such as faults, salt domes, intrusions, and pinches, without any simplification. The examples on synthetic and real models validate the robustness and accuracy of the ray tracing based on the proposed model representation scheme.

  13. Microcanonical model for interface formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rucklidge, A.; Zaleski, S.

    1988-04-01

    We describe a new cellular automaton model which allows us to simulate separation of phases. The model is an extension of existing cellular automata for the Ising model, such as Q2R. It conserves particle number and presents the qualitative features of spinodal decomposition. The dynamics is deterministic and does not require random number generators. The spins exchange energy with small local reservoirs or demons. The rate of relaxation to equilibrium is investigated, and the results are compared to the Lifshitz-Slyozov theory.

  14. Modeling Europa's Ice-Ocean Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsenousy, A.; Vance, S.; Bills, B. G.

    2014-12-01

    This work focuses on modeling the ice-ocean interface on Jupiter's Moon (Europa); mainly from the standpoint of heat and salt transfer relationship with emphasis on the basal ice growth rate and its implications to Europa's tidal response. Modeling the heat and salt flux at Europa's ice/ocean interface is necessary to understand the dynamics of Europa's ocean and its interaction with the upper ice shell as well as the history of active turbulence at this area. To achieve this goal, we used McPhee et al., 2008 parameterizations on Earth's ice/ocean interface that was developed to meet Europa's ocean dynamics. We varied one parameter at a time to test its influence on both; "h" the basal ice growth rate and on "R" the double diffusion tendency strength. The double diffusion tendency "R" was calculated as the ratio between the interface heat exchange coefficient αh to the interface salt exchange coefficient αs. Our preliminary results showed a strong double diffusion tendency R ~200 at Europa's ice-ocean interface for plausible changes in the heat flux due to onset or elimination of a hydrothermal activity, suggesting supercooling and a strong tendency for forming frazil ice.

  15. Transistor-based interface circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2004-02-24

    Among the embodiments of the present invention is an apparatus that includes a transistor, a servo device, and a current source. The servo device is operable to provide a common base mode of operation of the transistor by maintaining an approximately constant voltage level at the transistor base. The current source is operable to provide a bias current to the transistor. A first device provides an input signal to an electrical node positioned between the emitter of the transistor and the current source. A second device receives an output signal from the collector of the transistor.

  16. Transistor-based interface circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2007-02-13

    Among the embodiments of the present invention is an apparatus that includes a transistor, a servo device, and a current source. The servo device is operable to provide a common base mode of operation of the transistor by maintaining an approximately constant voltage level at the transistor base. The current source is operable to provide a bias current to the transistor. A first device provides an input signal to an electrical node positioned between the emitter of the transistor and the current source. A second device receives an output signal from the collector of the transistor.

  17. Asymptotic curved interface models in piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpilli, Michele

    2016-10-01

    We study the electromechanical behavior of a thin interphase, constituted by a piezoelectric anisotropic shell-like thin layer, embedded between two generic three-dimensional piezoelectric bodies by means of the asymptotic analysis in a general curvilinear framework. After defining a small real dimensionless parameter ε, which will tend to zero, we characterize two different limit models and their associated limit problems, the so-called weak and strong piezoelectric curved interface models, respectively. Moreover, we identify the non-classical electromechanical transmission conditions at the interface between the two three-dimensional bodies.

  18. Molecular modeling of cracks at interfaces in nanoceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavia, F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2013-10-01

    Toughness in Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) is achieved if crack deflection can occur at the fiber/matrix interface, preventing crack penetration into the fiber and enabling energy-dissipating fiber pullout. To investigate toughening in nanoscale CMCs, direct atomistic models are used to study how matrix cracks behave as a function of the degree of interfacial bonding/sliding, as controlled by the density of C interstitial atoms, at the interface between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a diamond matrix. Under all interface conditions studied, incident matrix cracks do not penetrate into the nanotube. Under increased loading, weaker interfaces fail in shear while stronger interfaces do not fail and, instead, the CNT fails once the stress on the CNT reaches its tensile strength. An analytic shear lag model captures all of the micromechanical details as a function of loading and material parameters. Interface deflection versus fiber penetration is found to depend on the relative bond strengths of the interface and the CNT, with CNT failure occurring well below the prediction of the toughness-based continuum He-Hutchinson model. The shear lag model, in contrast, predicts the CNT failure point and shows that the nanoscale embrittlement transition occurs at an interface shear strength scaling as τs~ɛσ rather than τs~σ typically prevailing for micron scale composites, where ɛ and σ are the CNT failure strain and stress, respectively. Interface bonding also lowers the effective fracture strength in SWCNTs, due to formation of defects, but does not play a role in DWCNTs having interwall coupling, which are weaker than SWCNTs but less prone to damage in the outerwall.

  19. Analysing organic transistors based on interface approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Yuto; Mori, Takehiko

    2014-01-15

    Temperature-dependent characteristics of organic transistors are analysed thoroughly using interface approximation. In contrast to amorphous silicon transistors, it is characteristic of organic transistors that the accumulation layer is concentrated on the first monolayer, and it is appropriate to consider interface charge rather than band bending. On the basis of this model, observed characteristics of hexamethylenetetrathiafulvalene (HMTTF) and dibenzotetrathiafulvalene (DBTTF) transistors with various surface treatments are analysed, and the trap distribution is extracted. In turn, starting from a simple exponential distribution, we can reproduce the temperature-dependent transistor characteristics as well as the gate voltage dependence of the activation energy, so we can investigate various aspects of organic transistors self-consistently under the interface approximation. Small deviation from such an ideal transistor operation is discussed assuming the presence of an energetically discrete trap level, which leads to a hump in the transfer characteristics. The contact resistance is estimated by measuring the transfer characteristics up to the linear region.

  20. User interface for ground-water modeling: Arcview extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsou, M.-S.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation for ground-water modeling often involves handling large input and output data sets. A geographic information system (GIS) provides an integrated platform to manage, analyze, and display disparate data and can greatly facilitate modeling efforts in data compilation, model calibration, and display of model parameters and results. Furthermore, GIS can be used to generate information for decision making through spatial overlay and processing of model results. Arc View is the most widely used Windows-based GIS software that provides a robust user-friendly interface to facilitate data handling and display. An extension is an add-on program to Arc View that provides additional specialized functions. An Arc View interface for the ground-water flow and transport models MODFLOW and MT3D was built as an extension for facilitating modeling. The extension includes preprocessing of spatially distributed (point, line, and polygon) data for model input and postprocessing of model output. An object database is used for linking user dialogs and model input files. The Arc View interface utilizes the capabilities of the 3D Analyst extension. Models can be automatically calibrated through the Arc View interface by external linking to such programs as PEST. The efficient pre- and postprocessing capabilities and calibration link were demonstrated for ground-water modeling in southwest Kansas.

  1. Monitoring and Control Interface Based on Virtual Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Ricardo F.; Adam-Medina, Manuel; García-Beltrán, Carlos D.; Olivares-Peregrino, Víctor H.; Juárez-Romero, David; Guerrero-Ramírez, Gerardo V.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a toolbox based on a monitoring and control interface (MCI) is presented and applied in a heat exchanger. The MCI was programed in order to realize sensor fault detection and isolation and fault tolerance using virtual sensors. The virtual sensors were designed from model-based high-gain observers. To develop the control task, different kinds of control laws were included in the monitoring and control interface. These control laws are PID, MPC and a non-linear model-based control law. The MCI helps to maintain the heat exchanger under operation, even if a temperature outlet sensor fault occurs; in the case of outlet temperature sensor failure, the MCI will display an alarm. The monitoring and control interface is used as a practical tool to support electronic engineering students with heat transfer and control concepts to be applied in a double-pipe heat exchanger pilot plant. The method aims to teach the students through the observation and manipulation of the main variables of the process and by the interaction with the monitoring and control interface (MCI) developed in LabVIEW©. The MCI provides the electronic engineering students with the knowledge of heat exchanger behavior, since the interface is provided with a thermodynamic model that approximates the temperatures and the physical properties of the fluid (density and heat capacity). An advantage of the interface is the easy manipulation of the actuator for an automatic or manual operation. Another advantage of the monitoring and control interface is that all algorithms can be manipulated and modified by the users. PMID:25365462

  2. Monitoring and control interface based on virtual sensors.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Ricardo F; Adam-Medina, Manuel; García-Beltrán, Carlos D; Olivares-Peregrino, Víctor H; Juárez-Romero, David; Guerrero-Ramírez, Gerardo V

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a toolbox based on a monitoring and control interface (MCI) is presented and applied in a heat exchanger. The MCI was programed in order to realize sensor fault detection and isolation and fault tolerance using virtual sensors. The virtual sensors were designed from model-based high-gain observers. To develop the control task, different kinds of control laws were included in the monitoring and control interface. These control laws are PID, MPC and a non-linear model-based control law. The MCI helps to maintain the heat exchanger under operation, even if a temperature outlet sensor fault occurs; in the case of outlet temperature sensor failure, the MCI will display an alarm. The monitoring and control interface is used as a practical tool to support electronic engineering students with heat transfer and control concepts to be applied in a double-pipe heat exchanger pilot plant. The method aims to teach the students through the observation and manipulation of the main variables of the process and by the interaction with the monitoring and control interface (MCI) developed in LabVIEW©. The MCI provides the electronic engineering students with the knowledge of heat exchanger behavior, since the interface is provided with a thermodynamic model that approximates the temperatures and the physical properties of the fluid (density and heat capacity). An advantage of the interface is the easy manipulation of the actuator for an automatic or manual operation. Another advantage of the monitoring and control interface is that all algorithms can be manipulated and modified by the users. PMID:25365462

  3. A microscopic model of interface related to the Burgers equation

    SciTech Connect

    De Masi, A.; Ferrari, P.A.; Vares, M.E. )

    1989-05-01

    A microscopic model for a solid-on-solid type of interface under the influence of an external field is introduced. It is proven that in equilibrium the macroscopic profile satisfies a partial differential equation which is (up to a transformation) the stationary Burgers equation. The study is based on the structure of the invariant measures for a related asymmetric simple exclusion process.

  4. Internet-based interface for STRMDEPL08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Howard W.; Asher, A. Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    The core of the computer program STRMDEPL08 that estimates streamflow depletion by a pumping well with one of four analytical solutions was re-written in the Javascript software language and made available through an internet-based interface (web page). In the internet-based interface, the user enters data for one of the four analytical solutions, Glover and Balmer (1954), Hantush (1965), Hunt (1999), and Hunt (2003), and the solution is run for constant pumping for a desired number of simulation days. Results are returned in tabular form to the user. For intermittent pumping, the interface allows the user to request that the header information for an input file for the stand-alone executable STRMDEPL08 be created. The user would add the pumping information to this header information and run the STRMDEPL08 executable that is available for download through the U.S. Geological Survey. Results for the internet-based and stand-alone versions of STRMDEPL08 are shown to match.

  5. Ab initio diffuse-interface model for lithiated electrode interface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stournara, Maria E.; Kumar, Ravi; Qi, Yue; Sheldon, Brian W.

    2016-07-01

    The study of chemical segregation at interfaces, and in particular the ability to predict the thickness of segregated layers via analytical expressions or computational modeling, is a fundamentally challenging topic in the design of novel heterostructured materials. This issue is particularly relevant for the phase-field (PF) methodology, which has become a prominent tool for describing phase transitions. These models rely on phenomenological parameters that pertain to the interfacial energy and thickness, quantities that cannot be experimentally measured. Instead of back-calculating these parameters from experimental data, here we combine a set of analytical expressions based on the Cahn-Hilliard approach with ab initio calculations to compute the gradient energy parameter κ and the thickness λ of the segregated Li layer at the LixSi-Cu interface. With this bottom-up approach we calculate the thickness λ of the Li diffuse interface to be on the order of a few nm, in agreement with prior experimental secondary ion mass spectrometry observations. Our analysis indicates that Li segregation is primarily driven by solution thermodynamics, while the strain contribution in this system is relatively small. This combined scheme provides an essential first step in the systematic evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters of the PF methodology, and we believe that it can serve as a framework for the development of quantitative interface models in the field of Li-ion batteries.

  6. Ab initio diffuse-interface model for lithiated electrode interface evolution.

    PubMed

    Stournara, Maria E; Kumar, Ravi; Qi, Yue; Sheldon, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The study of chemical segregation at interfaces, and in particular the ability to predict the thickness of segregated layers via analytical expressions or computational modeling, is a fundamentally challenging topic in the design of novel heterostructured materials. This issue is particularly relevant for the phase-field (PF) methodology, which has become a prominent tool for describing phase transitions. These models rely on phenomenological parameters that pertain to the interfacial energy and thickness, quantities that cannot be experimentally measured. Instead of back-calculating these parameters from experimental data, here we combine a set of analytical expressions based on the Cahn-Hilliard approach with ab initio calculations to compute the gradient energy parameter κ and the thickness λ of the segregated Li layer at the Li_{x}Si-Cu interface. With this bottom-up approach we calculate the thickness λ of the Li diffuse interface to be on the order of a few nm, in agreement with prior experimental secondary ion mass spectrometry observations. Our analysis indicates that Li segregation is primarily driven by solution thermodynamics, while the strain contribution in this system is relatively small. This combined scheme provides an essential first step in the systematic evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters of the PF methodology, and we believe that it can serve as a framework for the development of quantitative interface models in the field of Li-ion batteries. PMID:27575197

  7. Individual-Based Modeling of Tuberculosis in a User-Friendly Interface: Understanding the Epidemiological Role of Population Heterogeneity in a City

    PubMed Central

    Prats, Clara; Montañola-Sales, Cristina; Gilabert-Navarro, Joan F.; Valls, Joaquim; Casanovas-Garcia, Josep; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan; López, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    For millennia tuberculosis (TB) has shown a successful strategy to survive, making it one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases. This resilient behavior is based not only on remaining hidden in most of the infected population, but also by showing slow evolution in most sick people. The course of the disease within a population is highly related to its heterogeneity. Thus, classic epidemiological approaches with a top-down perspective have not succeeded in understanding its dynamics. In the past decade a few individual-based models were built, but most of them preserved a top-down view that makes it difficult to study a heterogeneous population. We propose an individual-based model developed with a bottom-up approach to studying the dynamics of pulmonary TB in a certain population, considered constant. Individuals may belong to the following classes: healthy, infected, sick, under treatment, and treated with a probability of relapse. Several variables and parameters account for their age, origin (native or immigrant), immunodeficiency, diabetes, and other risk factors (smoking and alcoholism). The time within each infection state is controlled, and sick individuals may show a cavitated disease or not that conditions infectiousness. It was implemented in NetLogo because it allows non-modelers to perform virtual experiments with a user-friendly interface. The simulation was conducted with data from Ciutat Vella, a district of Barcelona with an incidence of 67 TB cases per 100,000 inhabitants in 2013. Several virtual experiments were performed to relate the disease dynamics with the structure of the infected subpopulation (e.g., the distribution of infected times). Moreover, the short-term effect of health control policies on modifying that structure was studied. Results show that the characteristics of the population are crucial for the local epidemiology of TB. The developed user-friendly tool is ready to test control strategies of disease in any city in the

  8. Individual-Based Modeling of Tuberculosis in a User-Friendly Interface: Understanding the Epidemiological Role of Population Heterogeneity in a City.

    PubMed

    Prats, Clara; Montañola-Sales, Cristina; Gilabert-Navarro, Joan F; Valls, Joaquim; Casanovas-Garcia, Josep; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan; López, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    For millennia tuberculosis (TB) has shown a successful strategy to survive, making it one of the world's deadliest infectious diseases. This resilient behavior is based not only on remaining hidden in most of the infected population, but also by showing slow evolution in most sick people. The course of the disease within a population is highly related to its heterogeneity. Thus, classic epidemiological approaches with a top-down perspective have not succeeded in understanding its dynamics. In the past decade a few individual-based models were built, but most of them preserved a top-down view that makes it difficult to study a heterogeneous population. We propose an individual-based model developed with a bottom-up approach to studying the dynamics of pulmonary TB in a certain population, considered constant. Individuals may belong to the following classes: healthy, infected, sick, under treatment, and treated with a probability of relapse. Several variables and parameters account for their age, origin (native or immigrant), immunodeficiency, diabetes, and other risk factors (smoking and alcoholism). The time within each infection state is controlled, and sick individuals may show a cavitated disease or not that conditions infectiousness. It was implemented in NetLogo because it allows non-modelers to perform virtual experiments with a user-friendly interface. The simulation was conducted with data from Ciutat Vella, a district of Barcelona with an incidence of 67 TB cases per 100,000 inhabitants in 2013. Several virtual experiments were performed to relate the disease dynamics with the structure of the infected subpopulation (e.g., the distribution of infected times). Moreover, the short-term effect of health control policies on modifying that structure was studied. Results show that the characteristics of the population are crucial for the local epidemiology of TB. The developed user-friendly tool is ready to test control strategies of disease in any city in the

  9. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  10. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  11. The effect of interface properties on nickel base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, M.; Grossman, T.; Senemeier, M.; Wright, K.

    1995-01-01

    This program was performed to assess the extent to which mechanical behavior models can predict the properties of sapphire fiber/nickel aluminide matrix composites and help guide their development by defining improved combinations of matrix and interface coating. The program consisted of four tasks: 1) selection of the matrices and interface coating constituents using a modeling-based approach; 2) fabrication of the selected materials; 3) testing and evaluation of the materials; and 4) evaluation of the behavior models to develop recommendations. Ni-50Al and Ni-20AI-30Fe (a/o) matrices were selected which gave brittle and ductile behavior, respectively, and an interface coating of PVD YSZ was selected which provided strong bonding to the sapphire fiber. Significant fiber damage and strength loss was observed in the composites which made straightforward comparison of properties with models difficult. Nevertheless, the models selected generally provided property predictions which agreed well with results when fiber degradation was incorporated. The presence of a strong interface bond was felt to be detrimental in the NiAI MMC system where low toughness and low strength were observed.

  12. A general graphical user interface for automatic reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liceaga, Carlos A.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1991-01-01

    Reported here is a general Graphical User Interface (GUI) for automatic reliability modeling of Processor Memory Switch (PMS) structures using a Markov model. This GUI is based on a hierarchy of windows. One window has graphical editing capabilities for specifying the system's communication structure, hierarchy, reconfiguration capabilities, and requirements. Other windows have field texts, popup menus, and buttons for specifying parameters and selecting actions. An example application of the GUI is given.

  13. Jammed acid-base reactions at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Davis, Julianne M; Kruk, Jennifer J; Konek, Christopher T; Scheidt, Karl A; Geiger, Franz M

    2008-11-19

    Using nonlinear optics, we show that acid-base chemistry at aqueous/solid interfaces tracks bulk pH changes at low salt concentrations. In the presence of 10 to 100 mM salt concentrations, however, the interfacial acid-base chemistry remains jammed for hours, until it finally occurs within minutes at a rate that follows the kinetic salt effect. For various alkali halide salts, the delay times increase with increasing anion polarizability and extent of cation hydration and lead to massive hysteresis in interfacial acid-base titrations. The resulting implications for pH cycling in these systems are that interfacial systems can spatially and temporally lag bulk acid-base chemistry when the Debye length approaches 1 nm.

  14. Transforming Collaborative Process Models into Interface Process Models by Applying an MDA Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarte, Ivanna M.; Chiotti, Omar; Villarreal, Pablo D.

    Collaborative business models among enterprises require defining collaborative business processes. Enterprises implement B2B collaborations to execute these processes. In B2B collaborations the integration and interoperability of processes and systems of the enterprises are required to support the execution of collaborative processes. From a collaborative process model, which describes the global view of the enterprise interactions, each enterprise must define the interface process that represents the role it performs in the collaborative process in order to implement the process in a Business Process Management System. Hence, in this work we propose a method for the automatic generation of the interface process model of each enterprise from a collaborative process model. This method is based on a Model-Driven Architecture to transform collaborative process models into interface process models. By applying this method, interface processes are guaranteed to be interoperable and defined according to a collaborative process.

  15. The heat dissipation model and desensitizing mechanism of the HMX/additive interfaces: a theoretical investigation based on linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) is a high-energy explosive with high sensitivity. The heat dissipation of the HMX/additive interface is a key issue in understanding the hot spot formation and desensitizing mechanism of mixture explosive. In this work, we derive new formulae to calculate the heat dissipation rate for a set of HMX/additive interfaces, and build a physical model to describe the energy dissipation time and distance in mixture explosive. Four kinds of additives are considered: 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, graphite, paraffin and fluoropolymers. At low strength loading, we prove that the heat dissipation rate is proportional to the square of frequency, and suggest a way to decrease the sensitivity of the explosive. At medium strength loading, the viscosity coefficient and friction coefficient of interface are calculated. The desensitizing abilities of additives to HMX are discussed systematically.

  16. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1991-01-01

    Some of the many analytical models in human-computer interface design that are currently being developed are described. The usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design is evaluated. Can the use of analytical models be recommended to interface designers? The answer, based on the empirical research summarized here, is: not at this time. There are too many unanswered questions concerning the validity of models and their ability to meet the practical needs of design organizations.

  17. ModelMate - A graphical user interface for model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    ModelMate is a graphical user interface designed to facilitate use of model-analysis programs with models. This initial version of ModelMate supports one model-analysis program, UCODE_2005, and one model software program, MODFLOW-2005. ModelMate can be used to prepare input files for UCODE_2005, run UCODE_2005, and display analysis results. A link to the GW_Chart graphing program facilitates visual interpretation of results. ModelMate includes capabilities for organizing directories used with the parallel-processing capabilities of UCODE_2005 and for maintaining files in those directories to be identical to a set of files in a master directory. ModelMate can be used on its own or in conjunction with ModelMuse, a graphical user interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST.

  18. Constructing a starting 3D shear velocity model with sharp interfaces for SEM-based upper mantle tomography in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Larmat, C. S.; Maceira, M.

    2013-12-01

    this work we propose instead to directly tackle the non-linearity of the inverse problem by using stochastic methods to construct a 3D starting model with a good estimate of the depths of the main layering interfaces. We present preliminary results of the construction of such a starting 3D model based on: (1) Regionalizing the study area to define provinces within which lateral variations are smooth; (2) Applying trans-dimensional stochastic inversion (Bodin et al., 2012) to obtain accurate 1D models in each province as well as the corresponding error distribution, constrained by receiver function and surface wave dispersion data as well as the previously constructed 3D model (name), and (3) connecting these models laterally using data-driven smoothing operators to obtain a starting 3D model with errors. References Bodin, T.,et al. 2012, Transdimensional inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B02301, doi:10.1029/2011JB008560. Yuan and Romanowicz, 2013, in revison. Yuan, H., et al. 2011, 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International, 184: 1237-1260. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2010.04901.x Yuan, H. & Romanowicz, B., 2010. Lithospheric layering in the North American Craton, Nature, 466, 1063-1068.

  19. Modeling Neutral Hydrogen in the Heliospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Brand, Pontus

    2010-03-01

    Observational data of neutral atoms provides us with a 1 AU picture of the neutral atom flux in the heliosphere. The large mean free paths of neutrals allow us to infer properties of their distant source, as well as the properties of the intermediary medium. Energetic neutral hydrogen, for example, travels on almost straight trajectories, so that the particles observed coming from a particular direction were created from energetic protons along that line of sight. Similarly, low energy interstellar atoms are attenuated and deflected as they enter the heliosphere, and this deflection tells us something about the structure of the heliospheric interface. Of course, to infer quantitative features of the global heliosphere from neutral atom observations at 1 AU, we need accurate models that capture the 3D structure of the heliosphere. In this paper we present our MHD-plasma/kinetic-neutral model of the heliospheric interface that uses a Lorentzian distribution function to approximate a suprathermal tail on the solar wind proton distribution due to pick-up ions. We investigate the effect the k parameter of the Lorentzian function has on the overall solution and the flux of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). ENA fluxes are also compared to ``pre-IBEX'' spacecraft data.

  20. Radiation budget measurement/model interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Ciesielski, P.; Randel, D.; Stevens, D.

    1983-01-01

    This final report includes research results from the period February, 1981 through November, 1982. Two new results combine to form the final portion of this work. They are the work by Hanna (1982) and Stevens to successfully test and demonstrate a low-order spectral climate model and the work by Ciesielski et al. (1983) to combine and test the new radiation budget results from NIMBUS-7 with earlier satellite measurements. Together, the two related activities set the stage for future research on radiation budget measurement/model interfacing. Such combination of results will lead to new applications of satellite data to climate problems. The objectives of this research under the present contract are therefore satisfied. Additional research reported herein includes the compilation and documentation of the radiation budget data set a Colorado State University and the definition of climate-related experiments suggested after lengthy analysis of the satellite radiation budget experiments.

  1. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model - Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts which reflect every detail of the finished product. Ideally, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) they must provide numerical control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) they must enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in space missions. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. The research performed during the fellowship period investigated the transition process from the solid CAD model to the FEA stress analysis model with the final goal of creating an automatic interface between the two. During the period of the fellowship a detailed multi-year program for the development of such an interface was created. The ultimate goal of this program will be the development of a fully parameterized automatic ProE/FEA translator for parts and assemblies, with the incorporation of data base management into the solution, and ultimately including computational fluid dynamics and thermal modeling in the interface.

  2. Atomic Models of Strong Solids Interfaces Viewed as Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staffell, I.; Shang, J. L.; Kendall, K.

    2014-02-01

    This paper looks back through the 1960s to the invention of carbon fibres and the theories of Strong Solids. In particular it focuses on the fracture mechanics paradox of strong composites containing weak interfaces. From Griffith theory, it is clear that three parameters must be considered in producing a high strength composite:- minimising defects; maximising the elastic modulus; and raising the fracture energy along the crack path. The interface then introduces two further factors:- elastic modulus mismatch causing crack stopping; and debonding along a brittle interface due to low interface fracture energy. Consequently, an understanding of the fracture energy of a composite interface is needed. Using an interface model based on atomic interaction forces, it is shown that a single layer of contaminant atoms between the matrix and the reinforcement can reduce the interface fracture energy by an order of magnitude, giving a large delamination effect. The paper also looks to a future in which cars will be made largely from composite materials. Radical improvements in automobile design are necessary because the number of cars worldwide is predicted to double. This paper predicts gains in fuel economy by suggesting a new theory of automobile fuel consumption using an adaptation of Coulomb's friction law. It is demonstrated both by experiment and by theoretical argument that the energy dissipated in standard vehicle tests depends only on weight. Consequently, moving from metal to fibre construction can give a factor 2 improved fuel economy performance, roughly the same as moving from a petrol combustion drive to hydrogen fuel cell propulsion. Using both options together can give a factor 4 improvement, as demonstrated by testing a composite car using the ECE15 protocol.

  3. Variational Implicit Solvation with Solute Molecular Mechanics: From Diffuse-Interface to Sharp-Interface Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Zhao, Yanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Central in a variational implicit-solvent description of biomolecular solvation is an effective free-energy functional of the solute atomic positions and the solute-solvent interface (i.e., the dielectric boundary). The free-energy functional couples together the solute molecular mechanical interaction energy, the solute-solvent interfacial energy, the solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and the electrostatic energy. In recent years, the sharp-interface version of the variational implicit-solvent model has been developed and used for numerical computations of molecular solvation. In this work, we propose a diffuse-interface version of the variational implicit-solvent model with solute molecular mechanics. We also analyze both the sharp-interface and diffuse-interface models. We prove the existence of free-energy minimizers and obtain their bounds. We also prove the convergence of the diffuse-interface model to the sharp-interface model in the sense of Γ-convergence. We further discuss properties of sharp-interface free-energy minimizers, the boundary conditions and the coupling of the Poisson–Boltzmann equation in the diffuse-interface model, and the convergence of forces from diffuse-interface to sharp-interface descriptions. Our analysis relies on the previous works on the problem of minimizing surface areas and on our observations on the coupling between solute molecular mechanical interactions with the continuum solvent. Our studies justify rigorously the self consistency of the proposed diffuse-interface variational models of implicit solvation. PMID:24058213

  4. Modeling Neutral Hydrogen in the Heliospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N.

    2009-05-01

    Observational data of neutral atoms provides us with a 1 AU picture of the neutral atom flux in the heliosphere. The large mean free paths of neutrals allow us to infer properties of their distant source, as well as the properties of the intermediary medium. Energetic neutral hydrogen, for example, travels on almost straight trajectories, so that the particles observed coming from a particular direction were created from energetic protons along that line of sight. Similarly, low energy interstellar atoms are attenuated and deflected as they enter the heliosphere, and this deflection tells us something about the structure of the heliospheric interface. Of course, to infer quantitative features of the global heliosphere from neutral atom observations at 1 AU, we need accurate models that capture the 3D structure of the heliosphere. We will present an advanced MHD-neutral model of the heliosphere which is 3D, employs kinetic neutral Hydrogen, and incorporates a suprathermal tail on the solar wind proton distribution to approximate pick-up ions. We will demonstrate that with the help of such a model, we can test various hypotheses regarding the heliospheric boundary via forward modeling and comparison with data.

  5. UIVerify: A Web-Based Tool for Verification and Automatic Generation of User Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiffman, Smadar; Degani, Asaf; Heymann, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this poster, we describe a web-based tool for verification and automatic generation of user interfaces. The verification component of the tool accepts as input a model of a machine and a model of its interface, and checks that the interface is adequate (correct). The generation component of the tool accepts a model of a given machine and the user's task, and then generates a correct and succinct interface. This write-up will demonstrate the usefulness of the tool by verifying the correctness of a user interface to a flight-control system. The poster will include two more examples of using the tool: verification of the interface to an espresso machine, and automatic generation of a succinct interface to a large hypothetical machine.

  6. Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Barry H. Rabin

    2014-07-01

    12. Other advances in QNDE and related topics: Preferred Session Laser-ultrasonics Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces 41st Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation Conference QNDE Conference July 20-25, 2014 Boise Centre 850 West Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702 James A. Smith, Jeffrey M. Lacy, Barry H. Rabin, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID ABSTRACT: The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is assigned with reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU. The new LEU fuel is based on a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to complete the fuel qualification process, the laser shock technique is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being investigated to characterize interface strength in fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on specimen’s surface is intractably complex. The shock wave energy is inferred from the velocity on the backside and the depth of the impression left on the surface from the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses and strengths at the interface, a finite element model is being developed and validated by comparing numerical and experimental results for back face velocities and front face depressions with experimental results. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop a finite element model for laser

  7. Language Model Applications to Spelling with Brain-Computer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Cortes, Anderson; Manyakov, Nikolay V.; Chumerin, Nikolay; Van Hulle, Marc M.

    2014-01-01

    Within the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) community, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have raised great hopes as they provide alternative communication means for persons with disabilities bypassing the need for speech and other motor activities. Although significant advancements have been realized in the last decade, applications of language models (e.g., word prediction, completion) have only recently started to appear in BCI systems. The main goal of this article is to review the language model applications that supplement non-invasive BCI-based communication systems by discussing their potential and limitations, and to discern future trends. First, a brief overview of the most prominent BCI spelling systems is given, followed by an in-depth discussion of the language models applied to them. These language models are classified according to their functionality in the context of BCI-based spelling: the static/dynamic nature of the user interface, the use of error correction and predictive spelling, and the potential to improve their classification performance by using language models. To conclude, the review offers an overview of the advantages and challenges when implementing language models in BCI-based communication systems when implemented in conjunction with other AAL technologies. PMID:24675760

  8. Language model applications to spelling with Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mora-Cortes, Anderson; Manyakov, Nikolay V; Chumerin, Nikolay; Van Hulle, Marc M

    2014-03-26

    Within the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) community, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have raised great hopes as they provide alternative communication means for persons with disabilities bypassing the need for speech and other motor activities. Although significant advancements have been realized in the last decade, applications of language models (e.g., word prediction, completion) have only recently started to appear in BCI systems. The main goal of this article is to review the language model applications that supplement non-invasive BCI-based communication systems by discussing their potential and limitations, and to discern future trends. First, a brief overview of the most prominent BCI spelling systems is given, followed by an in-depth discussion of the language models applied to them. These language models are classified according to their functionality in the context of BCI-based spelling: the static/dynamic nature of the user interface, the use of error correction and predictive spelling, and the potential to improve their classification performance by using language models. To conclude, the review offers an overview of the advantages and challenges when implementing language models in BCI-based communication systems when implemented in conjunction with other AAL technologies.

  9. Polymer based interfaces as bioinspired 'smart skins'.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Danilo; Carpi, Federico; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2005-11-30

    This work reports on already achieved results and ongoing research on the development of complex interfaces between humans and external environment, based on organic synthetic materials and used as smart 'artificial skins'. They are conceived as wearable and flexible systems with multifunctional characteristics. Their features are designed to mimic or augment a broad-spectrum of properties shown by biological skins of humans and/or animals. The discussion is here limited to those properties whose mimicry/augmentation is achievable with currently available technologies based on polymers and oligomers. Such properties include tactile sensing, thermal sensing/regulation, environmental energy harvesting, chromatic mimetism, ultra-violet protection, adhesion and surface mediation of mobility. Accordingly, bioinspired devices and structures, proposed as suitable functional analogous of natural architectures, are analysed. They consist of organic piezoelectric sensors, thermoelectric and pyroelectric sensors and generators, photoelectric generators, thermal and ultra-violet protection systems, electro-, photo- and thermo-chromic devices, as well as structures for improved adhesion and reduced fluid-dynamic friction.

  10. Bacterial Adhesion to Hexadecane (Model NAPL)-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, S.; Zoueki, C. R.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    The rates of biodegradation of NAPLs have been shown to be influenced by the adhesion of hydrocarbon- degrading microorganisms as well as their proximity to the NAPL-water interface. Several studies provide evidence for bacterial adhesion or biofilm formation at alkane- or crude oil-water interfaces, but there is a significant knowledge gap in our understanding of the processes that influence initial adhesion of bacteria on to NAPL-water interfaces. In this study bacterial adhesion to hexadecane, and a series of NAPLs comprised of hexadecane amended with toluene, and/or with asphaltenes and resins, which are the surface active fractions of crude oils, were examined using a Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The microorganisms employed were Mycobacterium kubicae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida, which are hydrocarbon degraders or soil microorganisms. MATH assays as well as electrophoretic mobility measurements of the bacterial cells and the NAPL droplet surfaces in aqueous solutions were conducted at three solution pHs (4, 6 and 7). Asphaltenes and resins were shown to generally decrease microbial adhesion. Results of the MATH assay were not in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of bacteria- hydrocarbon interactions based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) model of free energy of interaction between the cell and NAPL droplets. In this model the free energy of interaction between two colloidal particles is predicted based on electrical double layer, van der Waals and hydrophobic forces. It is likely that the steric repulsion between bacteria and NAPL surfaces, caused by biopolymers on bacterial surfaces and aphaltenes and resins at the NAPL-water interface contributed to the decreased adhesion compared to that predicted by the XDLVO model.

  11. ShowFlow: A practical interface for groundwater modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tauxe, J.D.

    1990-12-01

    ShowFlow was created to provide a user-friendly, intuitive environment for researchers and students who use computer modeling software. What traditionally has been a workplace available only to those familiar with command-line based computer systems is now within reach of almost anyone interested in the subject of modeling. In the case of this edition of ShowFlow, the user can easily experiment with simulations using the steady state gaussian plume groundwater pollutant transport model SSGPLUME, though ShowFlow can be rewritten to provide a similar interface for any computer model. Included in this thesis is all the source code for both the ShowFlow application for Microsoft{reg sign} Windows{trademark} and the SSGPLUME model, a User's Guide, and a Developer's Guide for converting ShowFlow to run other model programs. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  12. A Long-Range Electric Field Solver for Molecular Dynamics of Fluid-Solid Interfaces Based on Atomistic-to-Continuum Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Jeremy; Jones, Reese; Zimmerman, Jonathan; Wong, Bryan; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    Understanding charge transport processes at a molecular level using computational techniques is currently hindered by a lack of appropriate models for incorporating anistropic electric fields, as occur at charged fluid/solid interfaces, in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, we develop a model for including electric fields in MD using an atomistic-to-continuum framework. Our model represents the electric potential on a finite element mesh satisfying a Poisson equation with source terms determined by the distribution of the atomic charges. The method is verified using simulations where analytical solutions are known or comparisons can be made to existing techniques. A Calculation of a salt water solution in a silicon nanochannel is performed to demonstrate the method in a target scientific application.

  13. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  14. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the additional nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation. PMID:26482394

  15. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    PubMed

    El-Helw, Hadi M; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  16. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System

    PubMed Central

    El-Helw, Hadi M.; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  17. Diffuse interface field approach to modeling arbitrarily-shaped particles at fluid-fluid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Yu. U. Wang

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel mesoscale simulation approach to modeling the evolution of solid particles segregated at fluid-fluid interfaces. The approach involves a diffuse- interface field description of each fluid phase in addition to the set of solid particles. The unique strength of the model is its generality to include particles of arbitrary shapes and orientations, as well as the ability to incorporate electrostatic particle interactions and external forces via a previous work [Millett PC, Wang YU, Acta Mater 2009;57:3101]. In this work, we verify that the model produces the correct capillary forces and contact angles by comparing with a well-defined analytical solution. In addition, simulation results of rotations of various-shaped particles at fluid-fluid interfaces, external force- induced capillary attraction/repulsion between particles, and spinodal decomposition arrest due to colloidal particle jamming at the interfaces are presented.

  18. Insect-machine interface based neurocybernetics.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Alper; Gilmour, Robert F; Sinha, Ayesa; Stern, David; Lal, Amit

    2009-06-01

    We present details of a novel bioelectric interface formed by placing microfabricated probes into insect during metamorphic growth cycles. The inserted microprobes emerge with the insect where the development of tissue around the electronics during the pupal development allows mechanically stable and electrically reliable structures coupled to the insect. Remarkably, the insects do not react adversely or otherwise to the inserted electronics in the pupae stage, as is true when the electrodes are inserted in adult stages. We report on the electrical and mechanical characteristics of this novel bioelectronic interface, which we believe would be adopted by many investigators trying to investigate biological behavior in insects with negligible or minimal traumatic effect encountered when probes are inserted in adult stages. This novel insect-machine interface also allows for hybrid insect-machine platforms for further studies. As an application, we demonstrate our first results toward navigation of flight in moths. When instrumented with equipment to gather information for environmental sensing, such insects potentially can assist man to monitor the ecosystems that we share with them for sustainability. The simplicity of the optimized surgical procedure we invented allows for batch insertions to the insect for automatic and mass production of such hybrid insect-machine platforms. Therefore, our bioelectronic interface and hybrid insect-machine platform enables multidisciplinary scientific and engineering studies not only to investigate the details of insect behavioral physiology but also to control it.

  19. Multibody dynamics model building using graphical interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macala, Glenn A.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the extremely laborious task of manually deriving equations of motion for the simulation of multibody spacecraft dynamics has largely been eliminated. Instead, the dynamicist now works with commonly available general purpose dynamics simulation programs which generate the equations of motion either explicitly or implicitly via computer codes. The user interface to these programs has predominantly been via input data files, each with its own required format and peculiarities, causing errors and frustrations during program setup. Recent progress in a more natural method of data input for dynamics programs: the graphical interface, is described.

  20. Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Gorman, G. J.; Maddison, J. R.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Shipton, J.; Collins, G. S.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2009-03-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. In this paper, we present a model-independent system, Spud, which formalises the specification of model input formats in terms of formal grammars. This is combined with an automated graphical user interface which guides users to create valid model inputs based on the grammar provided, and a generic options reading module, libspud, which minimises the development cost of adding model options. Together, this provides a user friendly, well documented, self validating user interface which is applicable to a wide range of scientific models and which minimises the developer input required to maintain and extend the model interface.

  1. Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Gorman, G. J.; Maddison, J. R.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Shipton, J.; Collins, G. S.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2008-07-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. In this paper, we present a model-independent system, Spud, which formalises the specification of model input formats in terms of formal grammars. This is combined with an automated graphical user interface which guides users to create valid model inputs based on the grammar provided, and a generic options reading module which minimises the development cost of adding model options. Together, this provides a user friendly, well documented, self validating user interface which is applicable to a wide range of scientific models and which minimises the developer input required to maintain and extend the model interface.

  2. Electrochemical Stability of Model Polymer Electrolyte/Electrode Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Daniel; Yang, Guang

    2015-03-01

    Polymer electrolytes are promising materials for high energy density rechargeable batteries. However, typical polymer electrolytes are not electrochemically stable at the charging voltage of advanced positive electrode materials. Although not yet reported in literature, decomposition is expected to adversely affect the performance and lifetime of polymer-electrolyte-based batteries. In an attempt to better understand polymer electrolyte oxidation and design stable polymer electrolyte/positive electrode interfaces, we are studying electron transfer across model interfaces comprising gold nanoparticles and organic protecting ligands assembled into monolayer films. Gold nanoparticles provide large interfacial surface area yielding a measurable electrochemical signal. They are inert and hence non-reactive with most polymer electrolytes and lithium salts. The surface can be easily modified with ligands of different chemistry and molecular weight. In our study, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) will serve as the polymer electrolyte and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide salt (LiTFSI) will be the lithium salt. The effect of ligand type and molecular weight on both optical and electrical properties of the gold nanoparticle film will be presented. Finally, the electrochemical stability of the electrode/electrolyte interface and its dependence on interfacial properties will be presented.

  3. Design of Wireless GPIB Interface Module Based on Bluetooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P.; Ma, W. J.; Huang, C. J.

    2006-10-01

    GPIB interface is widely used in the testing and control field. In this paper a wireless GPIB interface module based on Bluetooth is developed. Programming with Verilog HDL language on the hardware of ROK 101 008 and a FPGA chip, the complicated logical design of GPIB interface and the Bluetooth data processing unit are implemented. On basis of Bluetooth specifications, the software for the control computer is developed. In order to provide a standard software interface for users, a VISA library that is compatible with the VPP specifications is also designed.

  4. User's Manual for the Object User Interface (OUI): An Environmental Resource Modeling Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    The Object User Interface is a computer application that provides a framework for coupling environmental-resource models and for managing associated temporal and spatial data. The Object User Interface is designed to be easily extensible to incorporate models and data interfaces defined by the user. Additionally, the Object User Interface is highly configurable through the use of a user-modifiable, text-based control file that is written in the eXtensible Markup Language. The Object User Interface user's manual provides (1) installation instructions, (2) an overview of the graphical user interface, (3) a description of the software tools, (4) a project example, and (5) specifications for user configuration and extension.

  5. A continuum model of colloid-stabilized interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2011-06-01

    Colloids that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. Examples include bicontinuous interfacially jammed emulsion gels (bijels), which were proposed in this study by Stratford et al. [Science 309, 2198 (2005)] as a hypothetical new class of soft materials in which interpenetrating, continuous domains of two immiscible viscous fluids are maintained in a rigid state by a jammed layer of colloidal particles at their interface. We develop a continuum model for such a system that is capable of simulating the long-time evolution. A Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase flow system is combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal system along the interface. The presence of colloids introduces elastic forces at the interface between the two immiscible fluid phases. An adaptive finite element method is used to solve the model numerically. Using a variety of flow configurations in two dimensions, we demonstrate that as colloids jam on the interface and the interface crystallizes, the elastic force may be strong enough to make the interface sufficiently rigid to resist external forces, such as an applied shear flow, as well as surface tension induced coarsening in bicontinuous structures.

  6. A continuum model of colloid-stabilized interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowengrub, John

    2012-02-01

    Colloids that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. Examples include bicontinuous interfacially jammed emulsion gels (``bijels''), which were proposed in Stratford et al. (Science (2005) 309:2198) as a hypothetical new class of soft materials in which interpenetrating, continuous domains of two immiscible viscous fluids are maintained in a rigid state, by a jammed layer of colloidal particles at their interface. We develop a continuum model for such a system that is capable of simulating the long-time evolution. A Navier-Stokes- Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase flow system is combined with a surface Phase- Field-Crystal model for the microscopic colloidal system along the interface. The presence of colloids introduces elastic forces at the interface between the two immiscible fluid phases. An adaptive finite element method is used to solve the model numerically. Using a variety of flow configurations, we demonstrate that as colloids jam on the interface and the interface crystallizes, the elastic force may be strong enough to make the interface sufficiently rigid to resist external forces, such as an applied shear flow, as well as surface tension induced coarsening in bicontinuous structures.

  7. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 4; Overview and Introduction of Matlab Based Toolkits used to Interface with Optical Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part four of a series on the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The third investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The work here introduces some of the math software tools used to perform the work of the previous three papers of this series. NASA has recently approved these in-house tools for public release as open source, so this presentation also serves as a quick tutorial on their use. The tools are collections of functions written in Matlab, which interface with optical design software (CodeV, OSLO, and Zemax) using either COM or DDE communication protocol. The functions are discussed, and examples are given.

  8. Knowledge-based control of an adaptive interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    The analysis, development strategy, and preliminary design for an intelligent, adaptive interface is reported. The design philosophy couples knowledge-based system technology with standard human factors approaches to interface development for computer workstations. An expert system has been designed to drive the interface for application software. The intelligent interface will be linked to application packages, one at a time, that are planned for multiple-application workstations aboard Space Station Freedom. Current requirements call for most Space Station activities to be conducted at the workstation consoles. One set of activities will consist of standard data management services (DMS). DMS software includes text processing, spreadsheets, data base management, etc. Text processing was selected for the first intelligent interface prototype because text-processing software can be developed initially as fully functional but limited with a small set of commands. The program's complexity then can be increased incrementally. The intelligent interface includes the operator's behavior and three types of instructions to the underlying application software are included in the rule base. A conventional expert-system inference engine searches the data base for antecedents to rules and sends the consequents of fired rules as commands to the underlying software. Plans for putting the expert system on top of a second application, a database management system, will be carried out following behavioral research on the first application. The intelligent interface design is suitable for use with ground-based workstations now common in government, industrial, and educational organizations.

  9. A brain computer interface-based explorer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lijuan; Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing

    2015-04-15

    In recent years, various applications of brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been studied. In this paper, we present a hybrid BCI combining P300 and motor imagery to operate an explorer. Our system is mainly composed of a BCI mouse, a BCI speller and an explorer. Through this system, the user can access his computer and manipulate (open, close, copy, paste, and delete) files such as documents, pictures, music, movies and so on. The system has been tested with five subjects, and the experimental results show that the explorer can be successfully operated according to subjects' intentions.

  10. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts.

  11. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  12. A Robust Camera-Based Interface for Mobile Entertainment

    PubMed Central

    Roig-Maimó, Maria Francesca; Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Varona, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Camera-based interfaces in mobile devices are starting to be used in games and apps, but few works have evaluated them in terms of usability or user perception. Due to the changing nature of mobile contexts, this evaluation requires extensive studies to consider the full spectrum of potential users and contexts. However, previous works usually evaluate these interfaces in controlled environments such as laboratory conditions, therefore, the findings cannot be generalized to real users and real contexts. In this work, we present a robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment. The interface detects and tracks the user’s head by processing the frames provided by the mobile device’s front camera, and its position is then used to interact with the mobile apps. First, we evaluate the interface as a pointing device to study its accuracy, and different factors to configure such as the gain or the device’s orientation, as well as the optimal target size for the interface. Second, we present an in the wild study to evaluate the usage and the user’s perception when playing a game controlled by head motion. Finally, the game is published in an application store to make it available to a large number of potential users and contexts and we register usage data. Results show the feasibility of using this robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment in different contexts and by different people. PMID:26907288

  13. A Robust Camera-Based Interface for Mobile Entertainment.

    PubMed

    Roig-Maimó, Maria Francesca; Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Varona, Javier

    2016-02-19

    Camera-based interfaces in mobile devices are starting to be used in games and apps, but few works have evaluated them in terms of usability or user perception. Due to the changing nature of mobile contexts, this evaluation requires extensive studies to consider the full spectrum of potential users and contexts. However, previous works usually evaluate these interfaces in controlled environments such as laboratory conditions, therefore, the findings cannot be generalized to real users and real contexts. In this work, we present a robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment. The interface detects and tracks the user's head by processing the frames provided by the mobile device's front camera, and its position is then used to interact with the mobile apps. First, we evaluate the interface as a pointing device to study its accuracy, and different factors to configure such as the gain or the device's orientation, as well as the optimal target size for the interface. Second, we present an in the wild study to evaluate the usage and the user's perception when playing a game controlled by head motion. Finally, the game is published in an application store to make it available to a large number of potential users and contexts and we register usage data. Results show the feasibility of using this robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment in different contexts and by different people.

  14. A new seismically constrained subduction interface model for Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakopoulos, C.; Newman, A. V.; Thomas, A. M.; Moore-Driskell, M.; Farmer, G. T.

    2015-08-01

    We provide a detailed, seismically defined three-dimensional model for the subducting plate interface along the Middle America Trench between northern Nicaragua and southern Costa Rica. The model uses data from a weighted catalog of about 30,000 earthquake hypocenters compiled from nine catalogs to constrain the interface through a process we term the "maximum seismicity method." The method determines the average position of the largest cluster of microseismicity beneath an a priori functional surface above the interface. This technique is applied to all seismicity above 40 km depth, the approximate intersection of the hanging wall Mohorovičić discontinuity, where seismicity likely lies along the plate interface. Below this depth, an envelope above 90% of seismicity approximates the slab surface. Because of station proximity to the interface, this model provides highest precision along the interface beneath the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica, an area where marked geometric changes coincide with crustal transitions and topography observed seaward of the trench. The new interface is useful for a number of geophysical studies that aim to understand subduction zone earthquake behavior and geodynamic and tectonic development of convergent plate boundaries.

  15. Computer-Based Tools for Evaluating Graphical User Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1997-01-01

    The user interface is the component of a software system that connects two very complex system: humans and computers. Each of these two systems impose certain requirements on the final product. The user is the judge of the usability and utility of the system; the computer software and hardware are the tools with which the interface is constructed. Mistakes are sometimes made in designing and developing user interfaces because the designers and developers have limited knowledge about human performance (e.g., problem solving, decision making, planning, and reasoning). Even those trained in user interface design make mistakes because they are unable to address all of the known requirements and constraints on design. Evaluation of the user inter-face is therefore a critical phase of the user interface development process. Evaluation should not be considered the final phase of design; but it should be part of an iterative design cycle with the output of evaluation being feed back into design. The goal of this research was to develop a set of computer-based tools for objectively evaluating graphical user interfaces. The research was organized into three phases. The first phase resulted in the development of an embedded evaluation tool which evaluates the usability of a graphical user interface based on a user's performance. An expert system to assist in the design and evaluation of user interfaces based upon rules and guidelines was developed during the second phase. During the final phase of the research an automatic layout tool to be used in the initial design of graphical inter- faces was developed. The research was coordinated with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Mission Operations Laboratory's efforts in developing onboard payload display specifications for the Space Station.

  16. Simulation of evaporation of a sessile drop using a diffuse interface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefiane, Khellil; Ding, Hang; Sahu, Kirti; Matar, Omar

    2008-11-01

    We consider here the evaporation dynamics of a Newtonian liquid sessile drop using an improved diffuse interface model. The governing equations for the drop and surrounding vapour are both solved, and separated by the order parameter (i.e. volume fraction), based on the previous work of Ding et al. JCP 2007. The diffuse interface model has been shown to be successful in modelling the moving contact line problems (Jacqmin 2000; Ding and Spelt 2007, 2008). Here, a pinned contact line of the drop is assumed. The evaporative mass flux at the liquid-vapour interface is a function of local temperature constitutively and treated as a source term in the interface evolution equation, i.e. Cahn-Hilliard equation. The model is validated by comparing its predictions with data available in the literature. The evaporative dynamics are illustrated in terms of drop snapshots, and a quantitative comparison with the results using a free surface model are made.

  17. Hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: modeling versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Gerya, T.; May, D.

    2015-12-01

    A lot of evidence indicates that fluid flows exist in the subduction interface, including seismic observation, magnetotelluric imaging, heat flow modeling, etc. Fluid percolation should strongly modify rock deformation affected by fluid-induced weakening within the subduction interface. Hence, we study the fluid-rock interaction along the subduction interface using a visco-plastic hydro-mechanical model, in which rock deformation and fluid percolation are self-consistently coupled. Based on a series of 2D numerical experiments, we found two typical hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: (1) coupled and (2) decoupled. In the case of the coupled regime, the tectonic movement of the subduction interface is divided into blocks; newly generated faults are distributed uniformly , say fault band; fluid activity concentrates inside the faults. In the case of the decoupled regime, the upper layer of the subduction interface stops moving while the lower layer continues moving along with the subduction slab; a primary fault is generated at the centre of the subduction interface, or namely decoupled interface. Available observations suggests that both coupled and decoupled regimes can be observed in the nature at different scales. Systematic parameter study suggests that it is mainly the magnitude of the yield strength of subducted rocks depending on their cohesion and friction coefficient, which control the transition between the coupled and decoupled subduction interface regimes.

  18. The Interface Between Theory and Data in Structural Equation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, James B.; Bollen, Kenneth A.

    2006-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) holds the promise of providing natural scientists the capacity to evaluate complex multivariate hypotheses about ecological systems. Building on its predecessors, path analysis and factor analysis, SEM allows for the incorporation of both observed and unobserved (latent) variables into theoretically based probabilistic models. In this paper we discuss the interface between theory and data in SEM and the use of an additional variable type, the composite, for representing general concepts. In simple terms, composite variables specify the influences of collections of other variables and can be helpful in modeling general relationships of the sort commonly of interest to ecologists. While long recognized as a potentially important element of SEM, composite variables have received very limited use, in part because of a lack of theoretical consideration, but also because of difficulties that arise in parameter estimation when using conventional solution procedures. In this paper we present a framework for discussing composites and demonstrate how the use of partially reduced form models can help to overcome some of the parameter estimation and evaluation problems associated with models containing composites. Diagnostic procedures for evaluating the most appropriate and effective use of composites are illustrated with an example from the ecological literature. It is argued that an ability to incorporate composite variables into structural equation models may be particularly valuable in the study of natural systems, where concepts are frequently multifaceted and the influences of suites of variables are often of interest.

  19. Learning Machine, Vietnamese Based Human-Computer Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The sixth session of IT@EDU98 consisted of seven papers on the topic of the learning machine--Vietnamese based human-computer interface, and was chaired by Phan Viet Hoang (Informatics College, Singapore). "Knowledge Based Approach for English Vietnamese Machine Translation" (Hoang Kiem, Dinh Dien) presents the knowledge base approach, which…

  20. Empirical rheological model for rough or grooved bonded interfaces.

    PubMed

    Belloncle, Valentina Vlasie; Rousseau, Martine

    2007-12-01

    In the industrial sector, it is common to use metal/adhesive/metal structural bonds. The cohesion of such structures can be improved by preliminary chemical treatments (degreasing with solvents, alkaline, or acid pickling), electrochemical treatments (anodising), or mechanical treatments (abrasion, sandblasting, grooving) of the metallic plates. All these pretreatments create some asperities, ranging from roughnesses to grooves. On the other hand, in damage solid mechanics and in non-destructive testing, rheological models are used to measure the strength of bonded interfaces. However, these models do not take into account the interlocking of the adhesive in the porosities. Here, an empirical rheological model taking into account the interlocking effects is developed. This model depends on a characteristic parameter representing the average porosity along the interface, which considerably simplifies the corresponding stress and displacement jump conditions. The paper deals with the influence of this interface model on the ultrasonic guided modes of the structure. PMID:17659313

  1. An adaptive interface (KNOWBOT) for nuclear power industry data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive interface, KNOWBOT, has been designed to solve some of the problems that face the users of large centralized databases. The interface applies the neural network approach to information retrieval from a database. The database is a subset of the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). KNOWBOT preempts an existing database interface and works in conjunction with it. By design, KNOWBOT starts as a tabula rasa but acquires knowledge through its interactions with the user and the database. The interface uses its gained knowledge to personalize the database retrieval process and to induce new queries. In addition, the interface forgets the information that is no longer needed by the user. These self-organizing features of the interface reduce the scope of the database to the subsets that are highly relevant to the user needs. A proof-of-principle version of this interface has been implemented in Common LISP on a Texas Instruments Explorer I workstation. Experiments with KNOWBOT have successfully demonstrated the robustness of the model especially with induction and self-organization.

  2. Monitoring of intratidal lung mechanics: a Graphical User Interface for a model-based decision support system for PEEP-titration in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Buehler, S; Lozano-Zahonero, S; Schumann, S; Guttmann, J

    2014-12-01

    In mechanical ventilation, a careful setting of the ventilation parameters in accordance with the current individual state of the lung is crucial to minimize ventilator induced lung injury. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has to be set to prevent collapse of the alveoli, however at the same time overdistension should be avoided. Classic approaches of analyzing static respiratory system mechanics fail in particular if lung injury already prevails. A new approach of analyzing dynamic respiratory system mechanics to set PEEP uses the intratidal, volume-dependent compliance which is believed to stay relatively constant during one breath only if neither atelectasis nor overdistension occurs. To test the success of this dynamic approach systematically at bedside or in an animal study, automation of the computing steps is necessary. A decision support system for optimizing PEEP in form of a Graphical User Interface (GUI) was targeted. Respiratory system mechanics were analyzed using the gliding SLICE method. The resulting shapes of the intratidal compliance-volume curve were classified into one of six categories, each associated with a PEEP-suggestion. The GUI should include a graphical representation of the results as well as a quality check to judge the reliability of the suggestion. The implementation of a user-friendly GUI was successfully realized. The agreement between modelled and measured pressure data [expressed as root-mean-square (RMS)] tested during the implementation phase with real respiratory data from two patient studies was below 0.2 mbar for data taken in volume controlled mode and below 0.4 mbar for data taken in pressure controlled mode except for two cases with RMS < 0.6 mbar. Visual inspections showed, that good and medium quality data could be reliably identified. The new GUI allows visualization of intratidal compliance-volume curves on a breath-by-breath basis. The automatic categorisation of curve shape into one of six shape

  3. Monitoring of intratidal lung mechanics: a Graphical User Interface for a model-based decision support system for PEEP-titration in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Buehler, S; Lozano-Zahonero, S; Schumann, S; Guttmann, J

    2014-12-01

    In mechanical ventilation, a careful setting of the ventilation parameters in accordance with the current individual state of the lung is crucial to minimize ventilator induced lung injury. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has to be set to prevent collapse of the alveoli, however at the same time overdistension should be avoided. Classic approaches of analyzing static respiratory system mechanics fail in particular if lung injury already prevails. A new approach of analyzing dynamic respiratory system mechanics to set PEEP uses the intratidal, volume-dependent compliance which is believed to stay relatively constant during one breath only if neither atelectasis nor overdistension occurs. To test the success of this dynamic approach systematically at bedside or in an animal study, automation of the computing steps is necessary. A decision support system for optimizing PEEP in form of a Graphical User Interface (GUI) was targeted. Respiratory system mechanics were analyzed using the gliding SLICE method. The resulting shapes of the intratidal compliance-volume curve were classified into one of six categories, each associated with a PEEP-suggestion. The GUI should include a graphical representation of the results as well as a quality check to judge the reliability of the suggestion. The implementation of a user-friendly GUI was successfully realized. The agreement between modelled and measured pressure data [expressed as root-mean-square (RMS)] tested during the implementation phase with real respiratory data from two patient studies was below 0.2 mbar for data taken in volume controlled mode and below 0.4 mbar for data taken in pressure controlled mode except for two cases with RMS < 0.6 mbar. Visual inspections showed, that good and medium quality data could be reliably identified. The new GUI allows visualization of intratidal compliance-volume curves on a breath-by-breath basis. The automatic categorisation of curve shape into one of six shape

  4. SN_GUI: a graphical user interface for snowpack modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreitzhofer, G.; Fierz, C.; Lehning, M.

    2004-10-01

    SNOWPACK is a physical snow cover model. The model not only serves as a valuable research tool, but also runs operationally on a network of high Alpine automatic weather and snow measurement sites. In order to facilitate the operation of SNOWPACK and the interpretation of the results obtained by this model, a user-friendly graphical user interface for snowpack modeling, named SN_GUI, was created. This Java-based and thus platform-independent tool can be operated in two modes, one designed to fulfill the requirements of avalanche warning services (e.g. by providing information about critical layers within the snowpack that are closely related to the avalanche activity), and the other one offering a variety of additional options satisfying the needs of researchers. The user of SN_GUI is graphically guided through the entire process of creating snow cover simulations. The starting point is the efficient creation of input parameter files for SNOWPACK, followed by the launching of SNOWPACK with a variety of parameter settings. Finally, after the successful termination of the run, a number of interactive display options may be used to visualize the model output. Among these are vertical profiles and time profiles for many parameters. Besides other features, SN_GUI allows the use of various color, time and coordinate scales, and the comparison of measured and observed parameters.

  5. The Knowledge Base Interface for Parametric Grid Information

    SciTech Connect

    Hipp, James R.; Simons, Randall W.; Young, Chris J.

    1999-08-03

    The parametric grid capability of the Knowledge Base (KBase) provides an efficient robust way to store and access interpolatable information that is needed to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. To meet both the accuracy and performance requirements of operational monitoring systems, we use an approach which combines the error estimation of kriging with the speed and robustness of Natural Neighbor Interpolation. The method involves three basic steps: data preparation, data storage, and data access. In past presentations we have discussed in detail the first step. In this paper we focus on the latter two, describing in detail the type of information which must be stored and the interface used to retrieve parametric grid data from the Knowledge Base. Once data have been properly prepared, the information (tessellation and associated value surfaces) needed to support the interface functionality, can be entered into the KBase. The primary types of parametric grid data that must be stored include (1) generic header information; (2) base model, station, and phase names and associated ID's used to construct surface identifiers; (3) surface accounting information; (4) tessellation accounting information; (5) mesh data for each tessellation; (6) correction data defined for each surface at each node of the surfaces owning tessellation (7) mesh refinement calculation set-up and flag information; and (8) kriging calculation set-up and flag information. The eight data components not only represent the results of the data preparation process but also include all required input information for several population tools that would enable the complete regeneration of the data results if that should be necessary.

  6. The Michigan Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) Graphical User Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, D.; Gombosi, T.; Toth, G.; Ridley, A.

    2007-05-01

    The Michigan Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) is a powerful tool available for the community that has been used to model from the Sun to Earth and beyond. As a research tool, however, it still requires user experience with parallel compute clusters and visualization tools. Thus, we have developed a graphical user interface (GUI) that assists with configuring, compiling, and running the SWMF, as well as visualizing the model output. This is accomplished through a portable web interface. Live examples will be demonstrated and visualization of several archived events will be shown.

  7. Description of waste pretreatment and interfacing systems dynamic simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Garbrick, D.J.; Zimmerman, B.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation Model was created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates for both high level and low level waste so that the vitrification of tank waste can be completed according to the milestones defined in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). In order to achieve this objective, the processes upstream and downstream of the pretreatment facilities must also be included. The simulation model starts with retrieval of tank waste and ends with vitrification for both low level and high level wastes. This report describes the results of three simulation cases: one based on suggested average facility processing rates, one with facility rates determined so that approximately 6 new DSTs are required, and one with facility rates determined so that approximately no new DSTs are required. It appears, based on the simulation results, that reasonable facility processing rates can be selected so that no new DSTs are required by the TWRS program. However, this conclusion must be viewed with respect to the modeling assumptions, described in detail in the report. Also included in the report, in an appendix, are results of two sensitivity cases: one with glass plant water recycle steams recycled versus not recycled, and one employing the TPA SST retrieval schedule versus a more uniform SST retrieval schedule. Both recycling and retrieval schedule appear to have a significant impact on overall tank usage.

  8. A Universal Intelligent System-on-Chip Based Sensor Interface

    PubMed Central

    Mattoli, Virgilio; Mondini, Alessio; Mazzolai, Barbara; Ferri, Gabriele; Dario, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The need for real-time/reliable/low-maintenance distributed monitoring systems, e.g., wireless sensor networks, has been becoming more and more evident in many applications in the environmental, agro-alimentary, medical, and industrial fields. The growing interest in technologies related to sensors is an important indicator of these new needs. The design and the realization of complex and/or distributed monitoring systems is often difficult due to the multitude of different electronic interfaces presented by the sensors available on the market. To address these issues the authors propose the concept of a Universal Intelligent Sensor Interface (UISI), a new low-cost system based on a single commercial chip able to convert a generic transducer into an intelligent sensor with multiple standardized interfaces. The device presented offers a flexible analog and/or digital front-end, able to interface different transducer typologies (such as conditioned, unconditioned, resistive, current output, capacitive and digital transducers). The device also provides enhanced processing and storage capabilities, as well as a configurable multi-standard output interface (including plug-and-play interface based on IEEE 1451.3). In this work the general concept of UISI and the design of reconfigurable hardware are presented, together with experimental test results validating the proposed device. PMID:22163624

  9. Analysis of models for curvature driven motion of interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Drew E.

    Interfacial energies frequently appear in models arising in materials science and engineering. To dissipate energy in these systems, the interfaces will often move by a curvature dependent velocity. The present work details the mathematical analysis of some models for curvature dependent motion of interfaces. In particular we focus on two types, thresholding schemes and phase field models. With regard to thresholding schemes, we give a new proof of the convergence of the Merriman-Bence-Osher thresholding algorithm to motion by mean curvature. This new proof does not rely on the scheme satisfying a comparison principle. The technique shows promise in proving the convergence of thresholding schemes for more general motions, such as fourth-order motions and motions of higher codimension interfaces. The application of the proof technique to these more general schemes is discussed, along with rigorous consistency estimates. With regard to phase-field models, we examine the L 2-gradient flow of a second order gradient model for phase transitions, introduced by Fonseca and Mantegazza. In the case of radial symmetry we demonstrate that the diffuse interfacial dynamics converge to motion by mean curvature as the width of the interface decreases to zero. This is in accordance with the first-order Allen-Cahn model for phase transitions. But unlike the Allen-Cahn model, the gradient flow for the Fonseca-Mantegazza model is a fourth-order parabolic PDE. This creates new and novel difficulties in its analysis.

  10. A distributed data component for the open modeling interface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the volume of collected data continues to increase in the environmental sciences, so does the need for effective means for accessing those data. We have developed an Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) data component that retrieves input data for model components from environmental information syste...

  11. Diffuse Interface Model for Microstructure Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Britta

    A phase-field model for a general class of multi-phase metallic alloys is proposed which describes both, multi-phase solidification phenomena as well as polycrystalline grain structures. The model serves as a computational method to simulate the motion and kinetics of multiple phase boundaries and enables the visualization of the diffusion processes and of the phase transitions in multi-phase systems. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate the capability of the phase-field model to recover a variety of complex experimental growth structures. In particular, the phase-field model can be used to simulate microstructure evolutions in eutectic, peritectic and monotectic alloys. In addition, polycrystalline grain structures with effects such as wetting, grain growth, symmetry properties of adjacent triple junctions in thin film samples and stability criteria at multiple junctions are described by phase-field simulations.

  12. A diffuse interface Lox/hydrogen transcritical flame model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Pierre; Giovangigli, Vincent; Matuszewski, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    We present a diffuse-interface all-pressure flame model that transitions smoothly between subcritical and supercritical conditions. The model involves a non-equilibrium liquid/gas diffuse interface of van der Waals/Korteweg type embedded into a non-ideal multicomponent reactive fluid. The multicomponent transport fluxes are evaluated in their thermodynamic form in order to avoid singularities at thermodynamic mechanical stability limits. The model also takes into account condensing liquid water in order to avoid thermodynamic chemical instabilities. The resulting equations are used to investigate the interface between cold dense and hot light oxygen as well as the structure of diffusion flames between cold dense oxygen and gaseous-like hydrogen at all pressures, either subcritical or supercritical.

  13. Streamflow forecasting using the modular modeling system and an object-user interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeton, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), developed a computer program to provide a general framework needed to couple disparate environmental resource models and to manage the necessary data. The Object-User Interface (OUI) is a map-based interface for models and modeling data. It provides a common interface to run hydrologic models and acquire, browse, organize, and select spatial and temporal data. One application is to assist river managers in utilizing streamflow forecasts generated with the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System running in the Modular Modeling System (MMS), a distributed-parameter watershed model, and the National Weather Service Extended Streamflow Prediction (ESP) methodology.

  14. An interface model for dosage adjustment connects hematotoxicity to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Meille, C; Iliadis, A; Barbolosi, D; Frances, N; Freyer, G

    2008-12-01

    When modeling is required to describe pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics simultaneously, it is difficult to link time-concentration profiles and drug effects. When patients are under chemotherapy, despite the huge amount of blood monitoring numerations, there is a lack of exposure variables to describe hematotoxicity linked with the circulating drug blood levels. We developed an interface model that transforms circulating pharmacokinetic concentrations to adequate exposures, destined to be inputs of the pharmacodynamic process. The model is materialized by a nonlinear differential equation involving three parameters. The relevance of the interface model for dosage adjustment is illustrated by numerous simulations. In particular, the interface model is incorporated into a complex system including pharmacokinetics and neutropenia induced by docetaxel and by cisplatin. Emphasis is placed on the sensitivity of neutropenia with respect to the variations of the drug amount. This complex system including pharmacokinetic, interface, and pharmacodynamic hematotoxicity models is an interesting tool for analysis of hematotoxicity induced by anticancer agents. The model could be a new basis for further improvements aimed at incorporating new experimental features. PMID:19107581

  15. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Belmonte-Beitia, J; Woolley, T E; Scott, J G; Maini, P K; Gaffney, E A

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility.

  16. NASA: Model development for human factors interfacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an intensive literature review in the general topics of human error analysis, stress and job performance, and accident and safety analysis revealed no usable techniques or approaches for analyzing human error in ground or space operations tasks. A task review model is described and proposed to be developed in order to reduce the degree of labor intensiveness in ground and space operations tasks. An extensive number of annotated references are provided.

  17. Molecular Modeling of Water Interfaces: From Molecular Spectroscopy to Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-04-28

    Understanding aqueous interfaces at the molecular level is not only fundamentally important, but also highly relevant for a variety of disciplines. For instance, electrode-water interfaces are relevant for electrochemistry, as are mineral-water interfaces for geochemistry and air-water interfaces for environmental chemistry; water-lipid interfaces constitute the boundaries of the cell membrane, and are thus relevant for biochemistry. One of the major challenges in these fields is to link macroscopic properties such as interfacial reactivity, solubility, and permeability as well as macroscopic thermodynamic and spectroscopic observables to the structure, structural changes, and dynamics of molecules at these interfaces. Simulations, by themselves, or in conjunction with appropriate experiments, can provide such molecular-level insights into aqueous interfaces. In this contribution, we review the current state-of-the-art of three levels of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation: ab initio, force field, and coarse-grained. We discuss the advantages, the potential, and the limitations of each approach for studying aqueous interfaces, by assessing computations of the sum-frequency generation spectra and surface tension. The comparison of experimental and simulation data provides information on the challenges of future MD simulations, such as improving the force field models and the van der Waals corrections in ab initio MD simulations. Once good agreement between experimental observables and simulation can be established, the simulation can be used to provide insights into the processes at a level of detail that is generally inaccessible to experiments. As an example we discuss the mechanism of the evaporation of water. We finish by presenting an outlook outlining four future challenges for molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous interfacial systems. PMID:27010817

  18. Critical interfaces and duality in the Ashkin-Teller model

    SciTech Connect

    Picco, Marco; Santachiara, Raoul

    2011-06-15

    We report on the numerical measures on different spin interfaces and Fortuin-Kasteleyn (FK) cluster boundaries in the Askhin-Teller (AT) model. For a general point on the AT critical line, we find that the fractal dimension of a generic spin cluster interface can take one of four different possible values. In particular we found spin interfaces whose fractal dimension is d{sub f}=3/2 all along the critical line. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the boundaries of FK clusters was found to satisfy all along the AT critical line a duality relation with the fractal dimension of their outer boundaries. This result provides clear numerical evidence that such duality, which is well known in the case of the O(n) model, exists in an extended conformal field theory.

  19. SIF-based fracture criterion for interface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xing

    2016-06-01

    The complex stress intensity factor K governing the stress field of an interface crack tip may be split into two parts, i.e., hat{K} and s^{-iɛ}, so that K=hat{K}s^{-iɛ}, s is a characteristic length and ɛ is the oscillatory index. hat{K} has the same dimension as the classical stress intensity factor and characterizes the interface crack tip field. That means a criterion for interface cracks may be formulated directly with hat{K}, as Irwin (ASME J. Appl. Mech. 24:361-364, 1957) did in 1957 for the classical fracture mechanics. Then, for an interface crack, it is demonstrated that the quasi Mode I and Mode II tip fields can be defined and distinguished from the coupled mode tip fields. Built upon SIF-based fracture criteria for quasi Mode I and Mode II, the stress intensity factor (SIF)-based fracture criterion for mixed mode interface cracks is proposed and validated against existing experimental results.

  20. Designers' models of the human-computer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillan, Douglas J.; Breedin, Sarah D.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding design models of the human-computer interface (HCI) may produce two types of benefits. First, interface development often requires input from two different types of experts: human factors specialists and software developers. Given the differences in their backgrounds and roles, human factors specialists and software developers may have different cognitive models of the HCI. Yet, they have to communicate about the interface as part of the design process. If they have different models, their interactions are likely to involve a certain amount of miscommunication. Second, the design process in general is likely to be guided by designers' cognitive models of the HCI, as well as by their knowledge of the user, tasks, and system. Designers do not start with a blank slate; rather they begin with a general model of the object they are designing. The author's approach to a design model of the HCI was to have three groups make judgments of categorical similarity about the components of an interface: human factors specialists with HCI design experience, software developers with HCI design experience, and a baseline group of computer users with no experience in HCI design. The components of the user interface included both display components such as windows, text, and graphics, and user interaction concepts, such as command language, editing, and help. The judgments of the three groups were analyzed using hierarchical cluster analysis and Pathfinder. These methods indicated, respectively, how the groups categorized the concepts, and network representations of the concepts for each group. The Pathfinder analysis provides greater information about local, pairwise relations among concepts, whereas the cluster analysis shows global, categorical relations to a greater extent.

  1. Simplified Virtual Instrument Design Based on Mini Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Wenshi

    The most simplified virtual instrument (SVI) is designed through the mini-interface board (seven components), general PC Sound card and MATLAB programs. To deal with the limits followed by our mini-interface board, we cram necessary filters and noise-depressor into PC in form of software. The other key technologies include impedance matching for optimal signal transportation and near-infrared wavelength selection for improving the acquisition signal sensitivity in verification tests aiming at smile versus calm. Also three important contrast cases are discussed to support further our design validity. This work may enhance the base on brain health monitoring at home.

  2. Digital interface of electronic transformers based on embedded system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Qiufeng; Qi, Yincheng

    2008-10-01

    Benefited from digital interface of electronic transformers, information sharing and system integration in substation can be realized. An embedded system-based digital output scheme of electronic transformers is proposed. The digital interface is designed with S3C44B0X 32bit RISC microprocessor as the hardware platform. The μCLinux operation system (OS) is transplanted on ARM7 (S3C44B0X). Applying Ethernet technology as the communication mode in the substation automation system is a new trend. The network interface chip RTL8019AS is adopted. Data transmission is realized through the in-line TCP/IP protocol of uClinux embedded OS. The application result and character analysis show that the design can meet the real-time and reliability requirements of IEC60044-7/8 electronic voltage/current instrument transformer standards.

  3. Interfaces between phases in a lattice model of microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K. A.

    1987-02-01

    A lattice model which has recently been developed to aid the study of microemulsions is briefly reviewed. The local-density mean-field equations are presented and the interfacial profiles and surface tensions are computed using a variational method. These density profiles describing the interface between oil rich and water rich phases, both of which are isotropic, are structured and nonmonotonic. Some comments about a perturbation expansion which confirms these conclusions are made. It is possible to compute the surface tension to high numerical accuracy using the variational procedure. This permits discussion of the question of wetting of the oil-water interface by a microemulsion phase. The interfacial tensions along the oil-water-microemulsion coexistence line are ultra-low. The oil-water interface is not wet by microemulsion throughout most of the bicontinuous regime.

  4. Spud and FLML: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Maddison, J. R.; Gorman, G. J.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Shipton, J.; Collins, G. S.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. We present a model-independent system, Spud[1], which formalises the specification of model input formats in terms of formal grammars. This is combined with an automatically generated graphical user interface which guides users to create valid model inputs based on the grammar provided, and a generic options reading module which minimises the development cost of adding model options. We further present FLML, the Fluidity Markup Language. FLML applies Spud to the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM) resulting in a graphically driven system which radically improves the usability of ICOM. As well as a step forward for ICOM, FLML illustrates how the Spud system can be applied to an existing complex ocean model highlighting the potential of Spud as a user interface for other codes in the ocean modelling community. [1] Ham, D. A. et.al, Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 1, 125-146, 2008.

  5. Damage evolution of bi-body model composed of weakly cemented soft rock and coal considering different interface effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zenghui; Lv, Xianzhou; Wang, Weiming; Tan, Yunliang

    2016-01-01

    Considering the structure effect of tunnel stability in western mining of China, three typical kinds of numerical model were respectively built as follows based on the strain softening constitutive model and linear elastic-perfectly plastic model for soft rock and interface: R-M, R-C(s)-M and R-C(w)-M. Calculation results revealed that the stress-strain relation and failure characteristics of the three models vary between each other. The combination model without interface or with a strong interface presented continuous failure, while weak interface exhibited 'cut off' effect. Thus, conceptual models of bi-material model and bi-body model were established. Then numerical experiments of tri-axial compression were carried out for the two models. The relationships between stress evolution, failure zone and deformation rate fluctuations as well as the displacement of interface were detailed analyzed. Results show that two breakaway points of deformation rate actually demonstrate the starting and penetration of the main rupture, respectively. It is distinguishable due to the large fluctuation. The bi-material model shows general continuous failure while bi-body model shows 'V' type shear zone in weak body and failure in strong body near the interface due to the interface effect. With the increasing of confining pressure, the 'cut off' effect of weak interface is not obvious. These conclusions lay the theoretical foundation for further development of constitutive model for soft rock-coal combination body. PMID:27066329

  6. A Dual-Scale Approach for Modeling Turbulent Two-Phase Interface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent liquid/gas phase interface dynamics are at the core of many applicatons. For example, in atomizing flows, the properties of the resulting liquid spray are determined by the interplay of fluid and surface tension forces. The resulting dynamics typically span 4-6 orders of magnitude in length scales, making DNS exceedingly expensive. This motivates the need for modeling approaches based on spatial filtering or ensemble averaging. In this talk, a dual-scale modeling approach is presented to describe turbulent two-phase interface dynamics in a LES-type spatial filtering context. To close the unclosed terms related to the phase interface arising from filtering the Navier-Stokes equation, a resolved realization of the phase interface dynamics is explicitly filtered. This resolved realization is maintained on a high resolution over-set mesh using a Refined Local Surface Grid approach employing an un-split, geometric, bounded, and conservative Volume of Fluid method. The required model for the resolved realization of the interface advection velocity includes the effects of sub-filter surface tension, dissipation, and turbulent eddies. Results of the dual-scale model will be compared to recent DNS by McCaslin & Desjardins of an interface in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Supported by NSF Grant CBET-1054272 and the 2014 CTR Summer Program.

  7. A polarizable continuum model for molecules at spherical diffuse interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Remigio, Roberto; Mozgawa, Krzysztof; Cao, Hui; Weijo, Ville; Frediani, Luca

    2016-03-01

    We present an extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate solvent effects at diffuse interfaces with spherical symmetry, such as nanodroplets and micelles. We derive the form of the Green's function for a spatially varying dielectric permittivity with spherical symmetry and exploit the integral equation formalism of the PCM for general dielectric environments to recast the solvation problem into a continuum solvation framework. This allows the investigation of the solvation of ions and molecules in nonuniform dielectric environments, such as liquid droplets, micelles or membranes, while maintaining the computationally appealing characteristics of continuum solvation models. We describe in detail our implementation, both for the calculation of the Green's function and for its subsequent use in the PCM electrostatic problem. The model is then applied on a few test systems, mainly to analyze the effect of interface curvature on solvation energetics.

  8. A polarizable continuum model for molecules at spherical diffuse interfaces.

    PubMed

    Di Remigio, Roberto; Mozgawa, Krzysztof; Cao, Hui; Weijo, Ville; Frediani, Luca

    2016-03-28

    We present an extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate solvent effects at diffuse interfaces with spherical symmetry, such as nanodroplets and micelles. We derive the form of the Green's function for a spatially varying dielectric permittivity with spherical symmetry and exploit the integral equation formalism of the PCM for general dielectric environments to recast the solvation problem into a continuum solvation framework. This allows the investigation of the solvation of ions and molecules in nonuniform dielectric environments, such as liquid droplets, micelles or membranes, while maintaining the computationally appealing characteristics of continuum solvation models. We describe in detail our implementation, both for the calculation of the Green's function and for its subsequent use in the PCM electrostatic problem. The model is then applied on a few test systems, mainly to analyze the effect of interface curvature on solvation energetics. PMID:27036423

  9. Computer modelling of nanoscale diffusion phenomena at epitaxial interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailov, M.; Ranguelov, B.

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines an important area in the application of computer modelling to interface phenomena. Being relevant to the fundamental physical problem of competing atomic interactions in systems with reduced dimensionality, these phenomena attract special academic attention. On the other hand, from a technological point of view, detailed knowledge of the fine atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces correlates with a large number of practical problems in materials science. Typical examples are formation of nanoscale surface patterns, two-dimensional superlattices, atomic intermixing at an epitaxial interface, atomic transport phenomena, structure and stability of quantum wires on surfaces. We discuss here a variety of diffusion mechanisms that control surface-confined atomic exchange, formation of alloyed atomic stripes and islands, relaxation of pure and alloyed atomic terraces, diffusion of clusters and their stability in an external field. The computational model refines important details of diffusion of adatoms and clusters accounting for the energy barriers at specific atomic sites: smooth domains, terraces, steps and kinks. The diffusion kinetics, integrity and decomposition of atomic islands in an external field are considered in detail and assigned to specific energy regions depending on the cluster stability in mass transport processes. The presented ensemble of diffusion scenarios opens a way for nanoscale surface design towards regular atomic interface patterns with exotic physical features.

  10. Broadening the interface bandwidth in simulation based training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    Currently most computer based simulations rely exclusively on computer generated graphics to create the simulation. When training is involved, the method almost exclusively used to display information to the learner is text displayed on the cathode ray tube. MICROEXPERT Systems is concentrating on broadening the communications bandwidth between the computer and user by employing a novel approach to video image storage combined with sound and voice output. An expert system is used to combine and control the presentation of analog video, sound, and voice output with computer based graphics and text. Researchers are currently involved in the development of several graphics based user interfaces for NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy. Here, the focus is on the human factors considerations, software modules, and hardware components being used to develop these interfaces.

  11. Role of melt behavior in modifying oxidation distribution using an interface incorporated model in selective laser melting of aluminum-based material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dongdong; Dai, Donghua

    2016-08-01

    A transient three dimensional model for describing the molten pool dynamics and the response of oxidation film evolution in the selective laser melting of aluminum-based material is proposed. The physical difference in both sides of the scan track, powder-solid transformation and temperature dependent physical properties are taken into account. It shows that the heat energy tends to accumulate in the powder material rather than in the as-fabricated part, leading to the formation of the asymmetrical patterns of the temperature contour and the attendant larger dimensions of the molten pool in the powder phase. As a higher volumetric energy density is applied (≥1300 J/mm3), a severe evaporation is produced with the upward direction of velocity vector in the irradiated powder region while a restricted operating temperature is obtained in the as-fabricated part. The velocity vector continuously changes from upward direction to the downward one as the scan speed increases from 100 mm/s to 300 mm/s, promoting the generation of the debris of the oxidation films and the resultant homogeneous distribution state in the matrix. For the applied hatch spacing of 50 μm, a restricted remelting phenomenon of the as-fabricated part is produced with the upward direction of the convection flow, significantly reducing the turbulence of the thermal-capillary convection on the breaking of the oxidation films, and therefore, the connected oxidation films through the neighboring layers are typically formed. The morphology and distribution of the oxidation are experimentally acquired, which are in a good agreement with the results predicted by simulation.

  12. Analysis and Management of Large-Scale Activities Based on Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaofan; Ji, Jingwei; Lu, Ligang; Wang, Zhiyi

    Based on the concepts of system safety engineering, life-cycle and interface that comes from American system safety standard MIL-STD-882E, and apply them to the process of risk analysis and management of large-scale activities. Identify the involved personnel, departments, funds and other contents throughout the life cycle of large-scale activities. Recognize and classify the ultimate risk sources of people, objects and environment of large-scale activities from the perspective of interface. Put forward the accident cause analysis model according to the previous large-scale activities' accidents and combine with the analysis of the risk source interface. Analyze the risks of each interface and summary various types of risks the large-scale activities faced. Come up with the risk management consciousness, policies and regulations, risk control and supervision departments improvement ideas.

  13. A visual interface for the SUPERFLEX hydrological modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Fenicia, F.; Kavetski, D.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2012-04-01

    The SUPERFLEX framework is a modular modelling system for conceptual hydrological modelling at the catchment scale. This work reports the development of a visual interface for the SUPERFLEX model. This aims to enhance the communication between the hydrologic experimentalists and modelers, in particular further bridging the gap between the field soft data and the modeler's knowledge. In collaboration with field experimentalists, modelers can visually and intuitively hypothesize different model architectures and combinations of reservoirs, select from a library of constructive functions to describe the relationship between reservoirs' storage and discharge, specify the shape of lag functions and, finally, set parameter values. The software helps hydrologists take advantage of any existing insights into the study site, translate it into a conceptual hydrological model and implement it within a computationally robust algorithm. This tool also helps challenge and contrast competing paradigms such as the "uniqueness of place" vs "one model fits all". Using this interface, hydrologists can test different hypotheses and model representations, and stepwise build deeper understanding of the watershed of interest.

  14. Water velocity at water-air interface is not zero: Comment on "Three-dimensional quantification of soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and image-based modeling" by Saoirse R. Tracy et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. X.; Fan, X. Y.; Li, Z. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Tracy et al. (2015, doi: 10.1002/2014WR016020) assumed in their recent paper that water velocity at the water-air interface is zero in their pore-scale simulations of water flow in 3-D soil images acquired using X-ray computed tomography. We comment that such a treatment is physically wrong, and explain that it is the water-velocity gradient in the direction normal to the water-air interface, rather than the water velocity, that should be assumed to be zero at the water-air interface if one needs to decouple the water flow and the air flow. We analyze the potential errors caused by incorrectly taking water velocity at the water-air interface zero based on two simple examples, and conclude that it is not physically sound to make such a presumption because its associated errors are unpredictable.

  15. Symmetric model of compressible granular mixtures with permeable interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurel, Richard; Le Martelot, Sébastien; Tosello, Robert; Lapébie, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    Compressible granular materials are involved in many applications, some of them being related to energetic porous media. Gas permeation effects are important during their compaction stage, as well as their eventual chemical decomposition. Also, many situations involve porous media separated from pure fluids through two-phase interfaces. It is thus important to develop theoretical and numerical formulations to deal with granular materials in the presence of both two-phase interfaces and gas permeation effects. Similar topic was addressed for fluid mixtures and interfaces with the Discrete Equations Method (DEM) [R. Abgrall and R. Saurel, "Discrete equations for physical and numerical compressible multiphase mixtures," J. Comput. Phys. 186(2), 361-396 (2003)] but it seemed impossible to extend this approach to granular media as intergranular stress [K. K. Kuo, V. Yang, and B. B. Moore, "Intragranular stress, particle-wall friction and speed of sound in granular propellant beds," J. Ballist. 4(1), 697-730 (1980)] and associated configuration energy [J. B. Bdzil, R. Menikoff, S. F. Son, A. K. Kapila, and D. S. Stewart, "Two-phase modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials: A critical examination of modeling issues," Phys. Fluids 11, 378 (1999)] were present with significant effects. An approach to deal with fluid-porous media interfaces was derived in Saurel et al. ["Modelling dynamic and irreversible powder compaction," J. Fluid Mech. 664, 348-396 (2010)] but its validity was restricted to weak velocity disequilibrium only. Thanks to a deeper analysis, the DEM is successfully extended to granular media modelling in the present paper. It results in an enhanced version of the Baer and Nunziato ["A two-phase mixture theory for the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in reactive granular materials," Int. J. Multiphase Flow 12(6), 861-889 (1986)] model as symmetry of the formulation is now preserved. Several computational examples are

  16. Penalty-Based Finite Element Interface Technology for Analysis of Homogeneous and Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averill, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    An effective and robust interface element technology able to connect independently modeled finite element subdomains has been developed. This method is based on the use of penalty constraints and allows coupling of finite element models whose nodes do not coincide along their common interface. Additionally, the present formulation leads to a computational approach that is very efficient and completely compatible with existing commercial software. A significant effort has been directed toward identifying those model characteristics (element geometric properties, material properties, and loads) that most strongly affect the required penalty parameter, and subsequently to developing simple 'formulae' for automatically calculating the proper penalty parameter for each interface constraint. This task is especially critical in composite materials and structures, where adjacent sub-regions may be composed of significantly different materials or laminates. This approach has been validated by investigating a variety of two-dimensional problems, including composite laminates.

  17. 3-D shear lag model for the analysis of interface damage in ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dharani, L.R.; Ji, F.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper a micromechanics analytical model is presented for characterizing the behavior of a unidirectional brittle matrix composite containing initial matrix flaws, specifically, as they approach a fiber-matrix interface. It is contemplated that when a matrix crack impinges on the interface it may go around the fiber or go through the fiber by breaking it or debond the fiber/matrix interface. It has been experimentally observed that the crack front does not remain straight, rather it bows once it impinges on a row of fibers. If a unit cell approach is used, the problem is clearly non-axisymmetric and three-dimensional. Since most of the previous analyses dealing with self-similar cracking and interface debonding have considered axisymmetric cracking or two-dimensional planar geometries, the development of an analytical micromechanics model using a 3-D (non-axisymmetric) formulation is needed. The model is based on the consistent shear lag constitutive relations and does account for the large stiffness of the ceramic matrix. Since the present consistent shear lag model is for Cartesian coordinates, we have first derived the consistent shear lag constitutive relations in cylindrical coordinates. The governing equations are obtained by minimizing the potential energy in which the three displacements are represented by means of finite exponential series. Since the full field stresses and displacements are known, the strain energy release rates for self-similar extension of the matrix crack (Gp) and the interface debonding (Gd) are calculated using the Compliance method. The competition between various failure modes will be assessed based on the above strain energy release rates and the corresponding critical (toughness) values. The type of interfaces addressed include fictional, elastic, and gradient with varying properties (interphase). An extensive parametric study will be presented involving different constitutive properties and interface conditions.

  18. Diffuse interface modeling of a radial vapor bubble collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaletti, Francesco; Marino, Luca; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    A diffuse interface model is exploited to study in details the dynamics of a cavitation vapor bubble, by including phase change, transition to supercritical conditions, shock wave propagation and thermal conduction. The numerical experiments show that the actual dynamic is a sequence of collapses and rebounds demonstrating the importance of nonequilibrium phase changes. In particular the transition to supercritical conditions avoids the full condensation and leads to shockwave emission after the collapse and to successive bubble rebound.

  19. Mathematical modeling of the interaction between an insoluble solid particle and a solidifying interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalina, Adrian Vasile

    When a moving solidification front intercepts an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena can occur: instantaneous engulfment, continuous pushing of the particle, or particle pushing followed by engulfment. Various mathematical models, aiming to predict the critical solidification velocity for the pushing/engulfment transition, have been published in the literature. However, their predictions were not confirmed by the recent experimental measurements performed in microgravity conditions. The aim of this dissertation is to further continue the study of the interaction particle/solidifying interface through mathematical modeling. In this respect, two new analytical models were developed. In addition, a finite difference numerical approach is proposed. The first analytical model, the Equilibrium Breakdown Model, reveals the fact that the particle/solidifying interface interaction is not a steady state process, as assumed in the previously published models. Its simple formulation makes it attractive for practical purposes such as manufacturing of composite materials. The second model, i.e., the Dynamic Model, is more complex and, for the first time, it is able to capture and explain interesting phenomena that escaped the steady state analyses of previously published models. It shows that steady state interaction is only a particular case that can occur only at sub-critical solidification velocity. In this work, both analytical models were successfully validated against experimental data produced under microgravity conditions. The numerical approach, based on an interface tracking procedure, consists in the development of two distinct models, i.e., a solidification model and a fluid flow model. These two models together can give a more comprehensive picture of the particle/interface interaction. The solidification model has the capability to accommodate changes of the solid/liquid interface temperature because of capillarity and solute redistribution. It

  20. Modeling the Effect of Interface Wear on Fatigue Hysteresis Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on fatigue hysteresis behavior in carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and interface wear, fibers fracture, slip and pull-out, have been considered. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. Upon first loading to fatigue peak stress and subsequent cyclic loading, the fibers failure probabilities and fracture locations were determined by combining the interface wear model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the global load sharing criterion. The effects of matrix properties, i.e., matrix cracking characteristic strength and matrix Weibull modulus, interface properties, i.e., interface shear stress and interface debonded energy, fiber properties, i.e., fiber Weibull modulus and fiber characteristic strength, and cycle number on fibers failure, hysteresis loops and interface slip, have been investigated. The hysteresis loops under fatigue loading from the present analytical method were in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey M. Smith, James A. Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-03-31

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  2. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Medlin, Douglas; Zimmerman, Jonathan; Hattar, Khalid; Foiles, Stephen

    Incorporating anisotropy into thermodynamic treatments of interfaces dates back to over a century ago. For a given orientation of two abutting grains in a pure metal, depressions in the grain boundary (GB) energy may exist as a function of GB inclination, defined by the plane normal. Therefore, an initially flat GB may facet resulting in a hill-and-valley structure. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model of GB faceting that is capable of capturing anisotropic GB energies and mobilities, and accounting for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the role of each of the interface properties on the faceting behavior. As a demonstration, we consider the Σ 5 < 001 > tilt GB in iron, where faceting along the { 310 } and { 210 } planes was experimentally observed. Linear stability analysis and numerical examples highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. On the whole, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the spatio-temporal evolution of highly anisotropic GBs in polycrystalline metals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Smith, James A.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-03-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  4. Phononic band structures and stability analysis using radial basis function method with consideration of different interface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi-zhong; Wei, Chun-qiu; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a meshless radial basis function (RBF) collocation method is developed to calculate the phononic band structures taking account of different interface models. The present method is validated by using the analytical results in the case of perfect interfaces. The stability is fully discussed based on the types of RBFs, the shape parameters and the node numbers. And the advantages of the proposed RBF method compared to the finite element method (FEM) are also illustrated. In addition, the influences of the spring-interface model and the three-phase model on the wave band gaps are investigated by comparing with the perfect interfaces. For different interface models, the effects of various interface conditions, length ratios and density ratios on the band gap width are analyzed. The comparison results of the two models show that the weakly bonded interface has a significant effect on the properties of phononic crystals. Besides, the band structures of the spring-interface model have certain similarities and differences with those of the three-phase model.

  5. A Graph Based Interface for Representing Volume Visualization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, James M.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses a graph based user interface for representing the results of the volume visualization process. As images are rendered, they are connected to other images in a graph based on their rendering parameters. The user can take advantage of the information in this graph to understand how certain rendering parameter changes affect a dataset, making the visualization process more efficient. Because the graph contains more information than is contained in an unstructured history of images, the image graph is also helpful for collaborative visualization and animation.

  6. fNIRS-based brain-computer interfaces: a review.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Noman; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that allows the use of brain activity to control computers or other external devices. It can, by bypassing the peripheral nervous system, provide a means of communication for people suffering from severe motor disabilities or in a persistent vegetative state. In this paper, brain-signal generation tasks, noise removal methods, feature extraction/selection schemes, and classification techniques for fNIRS-based BCI are reviewed. The most common brain areas for fNIRS BCI are the primary motor cortex and the prefrontal cortex. In relation to the motor cortex, motor imagery tasks were preferred to motor execution tasks since possible proprioceptive feedback could be avoided. In relation to the prefrontal cortex, fNIRS showed a significant advantage due to no hair in detecting the cognitive tasks like mental arithmetic, music imagery, emotion induction, etc. In removing physiological noise in fNIRS data, band-pass filtering was mostly used. However, more advanced techniques like adaptive filtering, independent component analysis (ICA), multi optodes arrangement, etc. are being pursued to overcome the problem that a band-pass filter cannot be used when both brain and physiological signals occur within a close band. In extracting features related to the desired brain signal, the mean, variance, peak value, slope, skewness, and kurtosis of the noised-removed hemodynamic response were used. For classification, the linear discriminant analysis method provided simple but good performance among others: support vector machine (SVM), hidden Markov model (HMM), artificial neural network, etc. fNIRS will be more widely used to monitor the occurrence of neuro-plasticity after neuro-rehabilitation and neuro-stimulation. Technical breakthroughs in the future are expected via bundled-type probes, hybrid EEG-fNIRS BCI, and through the detection of initial dips. PMID:25674060

  7. fNIRS-based brain-computer interfaces: a review.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Noman; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that allows the use of brain activity to control computers or other external devices. It can, by bypassing the peripheral nervous system, provide a means of communication for people suffering from severe motor disabilities or in a persistent vegetative state. In this paper, brain-signal generation tasks, noise removal methods, feature extraction/selection schemes, and classification techniques for fNIRS-based BCI are reviewed. The most common brain areas for fNIRS BCI are the primary motor cortex and the prefrontal cortex. In relation to the motor cortex, motor imagery tasks were preferred to motor execution tasks since possible proprioceptive feedback could be avoided. In relation to the prefrontal cortex, fNIRS showed a significant advantage due to no hair in detecting the cognitive tasks like mental arithmetic, music imagery, emotion induction, etc. In removing physiological noise in fNIRS data, band-pass filtering was mostly used. However, more advanced techniques like adaptive filtering, independent component analysis (ICA), multi optodes arrangement, etc. are being pursued to overcome the problem that a band-pass filter cannot be used when both brain and physiological signals occur within a close band. In extracting features related to the desired brain signal, the mean, variance, peak value, slope, skewness, and kurtosis of the noised-removed hemodynamic response were used. For classification, the linear discriminant analysis method provided simple but good performance among others: support vector machine (SVM), hidden Markov model (HMM), artificial neural network, etc. fNIRS will be more widely used to monitor the occurrence of neuro-plasticity after neuro-rehabilitation and neuro-stimulation. Technical breakthroughs in the future are expected via bundled-type probes, hybrid EEG-fNIRS BCI, and through the detection of initial dips.

  8. fNIRS-based brain-computer interfaces: a review

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, Noman; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that allows the use of brain activity to control computers or other external devices. It can, by bypassing the peripheral nervous system, provide a means of communication for people suffering from severe motor disabilities or in a persistent vegetative state. In this paper, brain-signal generation tasks, noise removal methods, feature extraction/selection schemes, and classification techniques for fNIRS-based BCI are reviewed. The most common brain areas for fNIRS BCI are the primary motor cortex and the prefrontal cortex. In relation to the motor cortex, motor imagery tasks were preferred to motor execution tasks since possible proprioceptive feedback could be avoided. In relation to the prefrontal cortex, fNIRS showed a significant advantage due to no hair in detecting the cognitive tasks like mental arithmetic, music imagery, emotion induction, etc. In removing physiological noise in fNIRS data, band-pass filtering was mostly used. However, more advanced techniques like adaptive filtering, independent component analysis (ICA), multi optodes arrangement, etc. are being pursued to overcome the problem that a band-pass filter cannot be used when both brain and physiological signals occur within a close band. In extracting features related to the desired brain signal, the mean, variance, peak value, slope, skewness, and kurtosis of the noised-removed hemodynamic response were used. For classification, the linear discriminant analysis method provided simple but good performance among others: support vector machine (SVM), hidden Markov model (HMM), artificial neural network, etc. fNIRS will be more widely used to monitor the occurrence of neuro-plasticity after neuro-rehabilitation and neuro-stimulation. Technical breakthroughs in the future are expected via bundled-type probes, hybrid EEG-fNIRS BCI, and through the detection of initial dips. PMID:25674060

  9. Region based Brain Computer Interface for a home control application.

    PubMed

    Akman Aydin, Eda; Bay, Omer Faruk; Guler, Inan

    2015-08-01

    Environment control is one of the important challenges for disabled people who suffer from neuromuscular diseases. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) provides a communication channel between the human brain and the environment without requiring any muscular activation. The most important expectation for a home control application is high accuracy and reliable control. Region-based paradigm is a stimulus paradigm based on oddball principle and requires selection of a target at two levels. This paper presents an application of region based paradigm for a smart home control application for people with neuromuscular diseases. In this study, a region based stimulus interface containing 49 commands was designed. Five non-disabled subjects were attended to the experiments. Offline analysis results of the experiments yielded 95% accuracy for five flashes. This result showed that region based paradigm can be used to select commands of a smart home control application with high accuracy in the low number of repetitions successfully. Furthermore, a statistically significant difference was not observed between the level accuracies.

  10. Modeling Complex Cross-Systems Software Interfaces Using SysML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandutianu, Sanda; Morillo, Ron; Simpson, Kim; Liepack, Otfrid; Bonanne, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The complex flight and ground systems for NASA human space exploration are designed, built, operated and managed as separate programs and projects. However, each system relies on one or more of the other systems in order to accomplish specific mission objectives, creating a complex, tightly coupled architecture. Thus, there is a fundamental need to understand how each system interacts with the other. To determine if a model-based system engineering approach could be utilized to assist with understanding the complex system interactions, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) sponsored a task to develop an approach for performing cross-system behavior modeling. This paper presents the results of applying Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) principles using the System Modeling Language (SysML) to define cross-system behaviors and how they map to crosssystem software interfaces documented in system-level Interface Control Documents (ICDs).

  11. Organizing the public health-clinical health interface: theoretical bases.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Michèle; Reinharz, Daniel; Gauthier, Jacques-Bernard

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of the interface between public health and clinical health within the context of the search for networking approaches geared to a more integrated delivery of health services. The articulation of an operative interface is complicated by the fact that the definition of networking modalities involves complex intra- and interdisciplinary and intra- and interorganizational systems across which a new transversal dynamics of intervention practices and exchanges between service structures must be established. A better understanding of the situation is reached by shedding light on the rationale underlying the organizational methods that form the bases of the interface between these two sectors of activity. The Quebec experience demonstrates that neither the structural-functionalist approach, which emphasizes remodelling establishment structures and functions as determinants of integration, nor the structural-constructivist approach, which prioritizes distinct fields of practice in public health and clinical health, adequately serves the purpose of networking and integration. Consequently, a theoretical reframing is imperative. In this regard, structuration theory, which fosters the simultaneous study of methods of inter-structure coordination and inter-actor cooperation, paves the way for a better understanding of the situation and, in turn, to the emergence of new integration possibilities.

  12. Near infrared spectroscopy based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganatha, Sitaram; Hoshi, Yoko; Guan, Cuntai

    2005-04-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) provides users with an alternative output channel other than the normal output path of the brain. BCI is being given much attention recently as an alternate mode of communication and control for the disabled, such as patients suffering from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or "locked-in". BCI may also find applications in military, education and entertainment. Most of the existing BCI systems which rely on the brain's electrical activity use scalp EEG signals. The scalp EEG is an inherently noisy and non-linear signal. The signal is detrimentally affected by various artifacts such as the EOG, EMG, ECG and so forth. EEG is cumbersome to use in practice, because of the need for applying conductive gel, and the need for the subject to be immobile. There is an urgent need for a more accessible interface that uses a more direct measure of cognitive function to control an output device. The optical response of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) denoting brain activation can be used as an alternative to electrical signals, with the intention of developing a more practical and user-friendly BCI. In this paper, a new method of brain-computer interface (BCI) based on NIRS is proposed. Preliminary results of our experiments towards developing this system are reported.

  13. Delft FEWS: an open interface that connects models and data streams for operational forecasting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rooij, Erik; Werner, Micha

    2010-05-01

    Many of the operational forecasting systems that are in use today are centred around a single modelling suite. Over the years these systems and the required data streams have been tailored to provide a closed-knit interaction with their underlying modelling components. However, as time progresses it becomes a challenge to integrate new technologies into these model centric operational systems. Often the software used to develop these systems is out of date, or the original designers of these systems are no longer available. Additionally, the changing of the underlying models may requiring the complete system to be changed. This then becomes an extensive effort, not only from a software engineering point of view, but also from a training point of view. Due to significant time and resources being committed to re-training the forecasting teams that interact with the system on a daily basis. One approach to reducing the effort required in integrating new models and data is through an open interface architecture, and through the use of defined interfaces and standards in data exchange. This approach is taken by the Delft-FEWS operational forecasting shell, which has now been applied in some 40 operational forecasting centres across the world. The Delft-FEWS framework provides several interfaces that allow models and data in differing formats to be flexibly integrated with the system. The most common approach to the integration of modes is through the Delft-FEWS Published Interface. This is an XML based data exchange format that supports the exchange of time series data, as well as vector and gridded data formats. The Published Interface supports standardised data formats such as GRIB and the NetCDF-CF standard. A wide range of models has been integrated with the system through this approach, and these are used operationally across the forecasting centres using Delft FEWS. Models can communicate directly with the interface of Delft-FEWS, or through a SOAP service. This

  14. A biological model for controlling interface growth and morphology.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Holm, Elizabeth Ann

    2004-01-01

    Biological systems create proteins that perform tasks more efficiently and precisely than conventional chemicals. For example, many plants and animals produce proteins to control the freezing of water. Biological antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit the solidification process, even below the freezing point. These molecules bond to specific sites at the ice/water interface and are theorized to suppress solidification chemically or geometrically. In this project, we investigated the theoretical and experimental data on AFPs and performed analyses to understand the unique physics of AFPs. The experimental literature was analyzed to determine chemical mechanisms and effects of protein bonding at ice surfaces, specifically thermodynamic freezing point depression, suppression of ice nucleation, decrease in dendrite growth kinetics, solute drag on the moving solid/liquid interface, and stearic pinning of the ice interface. Stearic pinning was found to be the most likely candidate to explain experimental results, including freezing point depression, growth morphologies, and thermal hysteresis. A new stearic pinning model was developed and applied to AFPs, with excellent quantitative results. Understanding biological antifreeze mechanisms could enable important medical and engineering applications, but considerable future work will be necessary.

  15. Pen-based Interfaces for Engineering and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahovich, Thomas F.

    Sketches are an important problem-solving tool in many fields. This is particularly true of engineering design, where sketches facilitate creativity by providing an efficient medium for expressing ideas. However, despite the importance of sketches in engineering practice, current engineering software still relies on traditional mouse and keyboard interfaces, with little or no capabilities to handle free-form sketch input. With recent advances in machine-interpretation techniques, it is now becoming possible to create practical interpretation-based interfaces for such software. In this chapter, we report on our efforts to create interpretation techniques to enable pen-based engineering applications. We describe work on two fundamental sketch understanding problems. The first is sketch parsing, the task of clustering pen strokes or geometric primitives into individual symbols. The second is symbol recognition, the task of classifying symbols once they have been located by a parser. We have used the techniques that we have developed to construct several pen-based engineering analysis tools. These are used here as examples to illustrate our methods. We have also begun to use our techniques to create pen-based tutoring systems that scaffold students in solving problems in the same way they would ordinarily solve them with paper and pencil. The chapter concludes with a brief discussion of these systems.

  16. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, F.; Medlin, D. L.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Hattar, K.; Foiles, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Interfaces, free or internal, greatly influence the physical properties and stability of materials microstructures. Of particular interest are the processes that occur due to anisotropic interfacial properties. In the case of grain boundaries (GBs) in metals, several experimental observations revealed that an initially flat GB may facet into hill-and-valley structures with well defined planes and corners/edges connecting them. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model that is capable of accounting for strongly anisotropic GB properties and capturing the formation of hill-and-valley morphologies. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the various factors affecting GB faceting and subsequent facet coarsening. More specifically, our formulation incorporates higher order expansions to account for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. As a demonstration of the modeling capability, we consider the Σ5 <001 > tilt GB in body-centered-cubic iron, where faceting along the {210} and {310} planes was experimentally observed. Atomistic calculations were utilized to determine the inclination-dependent GB energy, which was then used as an input in our model. Linear stability analysis and simulation results highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. Broadly speaking, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the microstructural stability of polycrystalline systems with highly anisotropic GBs.

  17. A symbolic/subsymbolic interface protocol for cognitive modeling

    PubMed Central

    Simen, Patrick; Polk, Thad

    2009-01-01

    Researchers studying complex cognition have grown increasingly interested in mapping symbolic cognitive architectures onto subsymbolic brain models. Such a mapping seems essential for understanding cognition under all but the most extreme viewpoints (namely, that cognition consists exclusively of digitally implemented rules; or instead, involves no rules whatsoever). Making this mapping reduces to specifying an interface between symbolic and subsymbolic descriptions of brain activity. To that end, we propose parameterization techniques for building cognitive models as programmable, structured, recurrent neural networks. Feedback strength in these models determines whether their components implement classically subsymbolic neural network functions (e.g., pattern recognition), or instead, logical rules and digital memory. These techniques support the implementation of limited production systems. Though inherently sequential and symbolic, these neural production systems can exploit principles of parallel, analog processing from decision-making models in psychology and neuroscience to explain the effects of brain damage on problem solving behavior. PMID:20711520

  18. Groundwater modeling and remedial optimization design using graphical user interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Deschaine, L.M.

    1997-05-01

    The ability to accurately predict the behavior of chemicals in groundwater systems under natural flow circumstances or remedial screening and design conditions is the cornerstone to the environmental industry. The ability to do this efficiently and effectively communicate the information to the client and regulators is what differentiates effective consultants from ineffective consultants. Recent advances in groundwater modeling graphical user interfaces (GUIs) are doing for numerical modeling what Windows{trademark} did for DOS{trademark}. GUI facilitates both the modeling process and the information exchange. This Test Drive evaluates the performance of two GUIs--Groundwater Vistas and ModIME--on an actual groundwater model calibration and remedial design optimization project. In the early days of numerical modeling, data input consisted of large arrays of numbers that required intensive labor to input and troubleshoot. Model calibration was also manual, as was interpreting the reams of computer output for each of the tens or hundreds of simulations required to calibrate and perform optimal groundwater remedial design. During this period, the majority of the modelers effort (and budget) was spent just getting the model running, as opposed to solving the environmental challenge at hand. GUIs take the majority of the grunt work out of the modeling process, thereby allowing the modeler to focus on designing optimal solutions.

  19. A Strategy Based on Protein-Protein Interface Motifs May Help in Identifying Drug Off-Targets

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth; Gursoy, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Networks are increasingly used to study the impact of drugs at the systems level. From the algorithmic standpoint, a drug can ‘attack’ nodes or edges of a protein-protein interaction network. In this work, we propose a new network strategy, “The Interface Attack”, based on protein-protein interfaces. Similar interface architectures can occur between unrelated proteins. Consequently, in principle, a drug that binds to one has a certain probability of binding others. The interface attack strategy simultaneously removes from the network all interactions that consist of similar interface motifs. This strategy is inspired by network pharmacology and allows inferring potential off-targets. We introduce a network model which we call “Protein Interface and Interaction Network (P2IN)”, which is the integration of protein-protein interface structures and protein interaction networks. This interface-based network organization clarifies which protein pairs have structurally similar interfaces, and which proteins may compete to bind the same surface region. We built the P2IN of p53 signaling network and performed network robustness analysis. We show that (1) ‘hitting’ frequent interfaces (a set of edges distributed around the network) might be as destructive as eleminating high degree proteins (hub nodes); (2) frequent interfaces are not always topologically critical elements in the network; and (3) interface attack may reveal functional changes in the system better than attack of single proteins. In the off-target detection case study, we found that drugs blocking the interface between CDK6 and CDKN2D may also affect the interaction between CDK4 and CDKN2D. PMID:22817115

  20. Planning a port interface for an ocean incineration system: computer-model user's manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glucksman, M.A.; Marcus, H.S.

    1986-06-01

    The User's Manual is written to accompany the computer model developed in the report, Planning a Port Interface For An Ocean Incineration System. The model is based on SYMPHONY (TM) a Lotus Development Corp. product. Apart from the requirement for the software, the model needs an IBM PC compatible personal computer with at least 576 kilobytes of RAM. The model assumes the viewpoint of a planner that has yet to choose a particular type of vessel and port technology. The model contains four types of information: physical parameters of system alternatives, government regulations, risks associated with different system alternatives, and relevant background information.

  1. Spherical wave reflection in layered media with rough interfaces: Three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Cordioli, Julio; Guillon, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    In the context of sediment characterization, layer interface roughnesses may be responsible for sound-speed profile measurement uncertainties. To study the roughness influence, a three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a layered seafloor with rough interfaces is necessary. Although roughness scattering has an abundant literature, 3D modeling of spherical wave reflection on rough interfaces is generally limited to a single interface (using Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral) or computationally expensive techniques (finite difference or finite element method). In this work, it is demonstrated that the wave reflection over a layered medium with irregular interfaces can be modeled as a sum of integrals over each interface. The main approximations of the method are the tangent-plane approximation, the Born approximation (multiple reflection between interfaces are neglected) and flat-interface approximation for the transmitted waves into the sediment. The integration over layer interfaces results in a method with reasonable computation cost.

  2. Spherical wave reflection in layered media with rough interfaces: Three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Cordioli, Julio; Guillon, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    In the context of sediment characterization, layer interface roughnesses may be responsible for sound-speed profile measurement uncertainties. To study the roughness influence, a three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a layered seafloor with rough interfaces is necessary. Although roughness scattering has an abundant literature, 3D modeling of spherical wave reflection on rough interfaces is generally limited to a single interface (using Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral) or computationally expensive techniques (finite difference or finite element method). In this work, it is demonstrated that the wave reflection over a layered medium with irregular interfaces can be modeled as a sum of integrals over each interface. The main approximations of the method are the tangent-plane approximation, the Born approximation (multiple reflection between interfaces are neglected) and flat-interface approximation for the transmitted waves into the sediment. The integration over layer interfaces results in a method with reasonable computation cost. PMID:27586741

  3. Rule-based interface generation on mobile devices for structured documentation.

    PubMed

    Kock, Ann-Kristin; Andersen, Björn; Handels, Heinz; Ingenerf, Josef

    2014-01-01

    In many software systems to date, interactive graphical user interfaces (GUIs) are represented implicitly in the source code, together with the application logic. Hence, the re-use, development, and modification of these interfaces is often very laborious. Flexible adjustments of GUIs for various platforms and devices as well as individual user preferences are furthermore difficult to realize. These problems motivate a software-based separation of content and GUI models on the one hand, and application logic on the other. In this project, a software solution for structured reporting on mobile devices is developed. Clinical content archetypes developed in a previous project serve as the content model while the Android SDK provides the GUI model. The necessary bindings between the models are specified using the Jess Rule Language. PMID:25160197

  4. Functional regeneration of ligament-bone interface using a triphasic silk-based graft.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongguo; Fan, Jiabing; Sun, Liguo; Liu, Xincheng; Cheng, Pengzhen; Fan, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    The biodegradable silk-based scaffold with unique mechanical property and biocompatibility represents a favorable ligamentous graft for tissue-engineering anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the low efficiency of ligament-bone interface restoration barriers the isotropic silk graft to common ACL therapeutics. To enhance the regeneration of the silk-mediated interface, we developed a specialized stratification approach implementing a sequential modification on isotropic silk to constitute a triphasic silk-based graft in which three regions respectively referring to ligament, cartilage and bone layers of interface were divided, followed by respective biomaterial coating. Furthermore, three types of cells including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), chondrocytes and osteoblasts were respectively seeded on the ligament, cartilage and bone region of the triphasic silk graft, and the cell/scaffold complex was rolled up as a multilayered graft mimicking the stratified structure of native ligament-bone interface. In vitro, the trilineage cells loaded on the triphasic silk scaffold revealed a high proliferative capacity as well as enhanced differentiation ability into their corresponding cell lineage. 24 weeks postoperatively after the construct was implanted to repair the ACL defect in rabbit model, the silk-based ligamentous graft exhibited the enhancement of osseointegration detected by a robust pullout force and formation of three-layered structure along with conspicuously corresponding matrix deposition via micro-CT and histological analysis. These findings potentially broaden the application of silk-based ligamentous graft for ACL reconstruction and further large animal study. PMID:27566867

  5. Numerical simulations of the moving contact line problem using a diffuse-interface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzaal, Muhammad; Sibley, David; Duncan, Andrew; Yatsyshin, Petr; Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Nold, Andreas; Savva, Nikos; Schmuck, Markus; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Moving contact lines are a ubiquitous phenomenon both in nature and in many modern technologies. One prevalent way of numerically tackling the problem is with diffuse-interface (phase-field) models, where the classical sharp-interface model of continuum mechanics is relaxed to one with a finite thickness fluid-fluid interface, capturing physics from mesoscopic lengthscales. The present work is devoted to the study of the contact line between two fluids confined by two parallel plates, i.e. a dynamically moving meniscus. Our approach is based on a coupled Navier-Stokes/Cahn-Hilliard model. This system of partial differential equations allows a tractable numerical solution to be computed, capturing diffusive and advective effects in a prototypical case study in a finite-element framework. Particular attention is paid to the static and dynamic contact angle of the meniscus advancing or receding between the plates. The results obtained from our approach are compared to the classical sharp-interface model to elicit the importance of considering diffusion and associated effects. We acknowledge financial support from European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  6. Modeling small-signal response of GaN-based metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor gate stack in spill-over regime: Effect of barrier resistance and interface states

    SciTech Connect

    Capriotti, M. E-mail: dionyz.pogany@tuwien.ac.at; Fleury, C.; Oposich, M.; Bethge, O.; Strasser, G.; Pogany, D. E-mail: dionyz.pogany@tuwien.ac.at; Lagger, P.; Ostermaier, C.

    2015-01-14

    We provide theoretical and simulation analysis of the small signal response of SiO{sub 2}/AlGaN/GaN metal insulator semiconductor (MIS) capacitors from depletion to spill over region, where the AlGaN/SiO{sub 2} interface is accumulated with free electrons. A lumped element model of the gate stack, including the response of traps at the III-N/dielectric interface, is proposed and represented in terms of equivalent parallel capacitance, C{sub p}, and conductance, G{sub p}. C{sub p} -voltage and G{sub p} -voltage dependences are modelled taking into account bias dependent AlGaN barrier dynamic resistance R{sub br} and the effective channel resistance. In particular, in the spill-over region, the drop of C{sub p} with the frequency increase can be explained even without taking into account the response of interface traps, solely by considering the intrinsic response of the gate stack (i.e., no trap effects) and the decrease of R{sub br} with the applied forward bias. Furthermore, we show the limitations of the conductance method for the evaluation of the density of interface traps, D{sub it}, from the G{sub p}/ω vs. angular frequency ω curves. A peak in G{sub p}/ω vs. ω occurs even without traps, merely due to the intrinsic frequency response of gate stack. Moreover, the amplitude of the G{sub p}/ω vs. ω peak saturates at high D{sub it}, which can lead to underestimation of D{sub it}. Understanding the complex interplay between the intrinsic gate stack response and the effect of interface traps is relevant for the development of normally on and normally off MIS high electron mobility transistors with stable threshold voltage.

  7. Modeling small-signal response of GaN-based metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor gate stack in spill-over regime: Effect of barrier resistance and interface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capriotti, M.; Lagger, P.; Fleury, C.; Oposich, M.; Bethge, O.; Ostermaier, C.; Strasser, G.; Pogany, D.

    2015-01-01

    We provide theoretical and simulation analysis of the small signal response of SiO2/AlGaN/GaN metal insulator semiconductor (MIS) capacitors from depletion to spill over region, where the AlGaN/SiO2 interface is accumulated with free electrons. A lumped element model of the gate stack, including the response of traps at the III-N/dielectric interface, is proposed and represented in terms of equivalent parallel capacitance, Cp, and conductance, Gp. Cp -voltage and Gp -voltage dependences are modelled taking into account bias dependent AlGaN barrier dynamic resistance Rbr and the effective channel resistance. In particular, in the spill-over region, the drop of Cp with the frequency increase can be explained even without taking into account the response of interface traps, solely by considering the intrinsic response of the gate stack (i.e., no trap effects) and the decrease of Rbr with the applied forward bias. Furthermore, we show the limitations of the conductance method for the evaluation of the density of interface traps, Dit, from the Gp/ω vs. angular frequency ω curves. A peak in Gp/ω vs. ω occurs even without traps, merely due to the intrinsic frequency response of gate stack. Moreover, the amplitude of the Gp/ω vs. ω peak saturates at high Dit, which can lead to underestimation of Dit. Understanding the complex interplay between the intrinsic gate stack response and the effect of interface traps is relevant for the development of normally on and normally off MIS high electron mobility transistors with stable threshold voltage.

  8. Facial pressure zones of an oronasal interface for noninvasive ventilation: a computer model analysis* **

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Luana Souto; Talaia, Pedro; Drummond, Marta; Natal-Jorge, Renato

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of an oronasal interface (OI) for noninvasive ventilation, using a three-dimensional (3D) computational model with the ability to simulate and evaluate the main pressure zones (PZs) of the OI on the human face. METHODS: We used a 3D digital model of the human face, based on a pre-established geometric model. The model simulated soft tissues, skull, and nasal cartilage. The geometric model was obtained by 3D laser scanning and post-processed for use in the model created, with the objective of separating the cushion from the frame. A computer simulation was performed to determine the pressure required in order to create the facial PZs. We obtained descriptive graphical images of the PZs and their intensity. RESULTS: For the graphical analyses of each face-OI model pair and their respective evaluations, we ran 21 simulations. The computer model identified several high-impact PZs in the nasal bridge and paranasal regions. The variation in soft tissue depth had a direct impact on the amount of pressure applied (438-724 cmH2O). CONCLUSIONS: The computer simulation results indicate that, in patients submitted to noninvasive ventilation with an OI, the probability of skin lesion is higher in the nasal bridge and paranasal regions. This methodology could increase the applicability of biomechanical research on noninvasive ventilation interfaces, providing the information needed in order to choose the interface that best minimizes the risk of skin lesion. PMID:25610506

  9. Optics of an opal modeled with a stratified effective index and the effect of the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, Isabelle; Moufarej, Elias; Laliotis, Athanasios; Bloch, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Reflection and transmission for an artificial opal are described through a model of stratified medium based upon a one-dimensional variation of an effective index. The model is notably applicable to a Langmuir-Blodgett type disordered opal. Light scattering is accounted for by a phenomenological absorption. The interface region between the opal and the substrate -or the vacuum- induces a periodicity break in the photonic crystal arrangement, which exhibits a prominent influence on the reflection, notably away from the Bragg reflection peak. Experimental results are compared to our model. The model is extendable to inverse opals, stacked cylinders, or irradiation by evanescent waves

  10. The electrical behavior of GaAs-insulator interfaces - A discrete energy interface state model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazior, T. E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the electrical behavior of GaAs Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) structures and the high density discrete energy interface states (0.7 and 0.9 eV below the conduction band) was investigated utilizing photo- and thermal emission from the interface states in conjunction with capacitance measurements. It was found that all essential features of the anomalous behavior of GaAs MIS structures, such as the frequency dispersion and the C-V hysteresis, can be explained on the basis of nonequilibrium charging and discharging of the high density discrete energy interface states.

  11. Interfacing MATLAB and Python Optimizers to Black-Box Environmental Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. S.; Leung, K.; Tolson, B.

    2009-12-01

    A common approach for utilizing environmental models in a management or policy-analysis context is to incorporate them into a simulation-optimization framework - where an underlying process-based environmental model is linked with an optimization search algorithm. The optimization search algorithm iteratively adjusts various model inputs (i.e. parameters or design variables) in order to minimize an application-specific objective function computed on the basis of model outputs (i.e. response variables). Numerous optimization algorithms have been applied to the simulation-optimization of environmental systems and this research investigated the use of optimization libraries and toolboxes that are readily available in MATLAB and Python - two popular high-level programming languages. Inspired by model-independent calibration codes (e.g. PEST and UCODE), a small piece of interface software (known as PIGEON) was developed. PIGEON allows users to interface Python and MATLAB optimizers with arbitrary black-box environmental models without writing any additional interface code. An initial set of benchmark tests (involving more than 20 MATLAB and Python optimization algorithms) were performed to validate the interface software - results highlight the need to carefully consider such issues as numerical precision in output files and enforcement (or not) of parameter limits. Additional benchmark testing considered the problem of fitting isotherm expressions to laboratory data - with an emphasis on dual-mode expressions combining non-linear isotherms with a linear partitioning component. With respect to the selected isotherm fitting problems, derivative-free search algorithms significantly outperformed gradient-based algorithms. Attempts to improve gradient-based performance, via parameter tuning and also via several alternative multi-start approaches, were largely unsuccessful.

  12. Growth/reflectance model interface for wheat and corresponding model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.; Sieron, R.; Odenweller, J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of modeling to explore the possibility of discovering new and useful crop condition indicators which might be available from the Thematic Mapper and to connect these symptoms to the biological causes in the crop is discussed. A crop growth model was used to predict the day to day growth features of the crop as it responds biologically to the various environmental factors. A reflectance model was used to predict the character of the interaction of daylight with the predicted growth features. An atmospheric path radiance was added to the reflected daylight to simulate the radiance appearing at the sensor. Finally, the digitized data sent to a ground station were calculated. The crop under investigation is wheat.

  13. Design of video interface conversion system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Heng; Wang, Xiang-jun

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a FPGA based video interface conversion system that enables the inter-conversion between digital and analog video. Cyclone IV series EP4CE22F17C chip from Altera Corporation is used as the main video processing chip, and single-chip is used as the information interaction control unit between FPGA and PC. The system is able to encode/decode messages from the PC. Technologies including video decoding/encoding circuits, bus communication protocol, data stream de-interleaving and de-interlacing, color space conversion and the Camera Link timing generator module of FPGA are introduced. The system converts Composite Video Broadcast Signal (CVBS) from the CCD camera into Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS), which will be collected by the video processing unit with Camera Link interface. The processed video signals will then be inputted to system output board and displayed on the monitor.The current experiment shows that it can achieve high-quality video conversion with minimum board size.

  14. A Natural Language Interface Concordant with a Knowledge Base.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-Jin; Park, Seong-Bae; Park, Se-Young

    2016-01-01

    The discordance between expressions interpretable by a natural language interface (NLI) system and those answerable by a knowledge base is a critical problem in the field of NLIs. In order to solve this discordance problem, this paper proposes a method to translate natural language questions into formal queries that can be generated from a graph-based knowledge base. The proposed method considers a subgraph of a knowledge base as a formal query. Thus, all formal queries corresponding to a concept or a predicate in the knowledge base can be generated prior to query time and all possible natural language expressions corresponding to each formal query can also be collected in advance. A natural language expression has a one-to-one mapping with a formal query. Hence, a natural language question is translated into a formal query by matching the question with the most appropriate natural language expression. If the confidence of this matching is not sufficiently high the proposed method rejects the question and does not answer it. Multipredicate queries are processed by regarding them as a set of collected expressions. The experimental results show that the proposed method thoroughly handles answerable questions from the knowledge base and rejects unanswerable ones effectively. PMID:26904105

  15. A Natural Language Interface Concordant with a Knowledge Base

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yong-Jin; Park, Seong-Bae; Park, Se-Young

    2016-01-01

    The discordance between expressions interpretable by a natural language interface (NLI) system and those answerable by a knowledge base is a critical problem in the field of NLIs. In order to solve this discordance problem, this paper proposes a method to translate natural language questions into formal queries that can be generated from a graph-based knowledge base. The proposed method considers a subgraph of a knowledge base as a formal query. Thus, all formal queries corresponding to a concept or a predicate in the knowledge base can be generated prior to query time and all possible natural language expressions corresponding to each formal query can also be collected in advance. A natural language expression has a one-to-one mapping with a formal query. Hence, a natural language question is translated into a formal query by matching the question with the most appropriate natural language expression. If the confidence of this matching is not sufficiently high the proposed method rejects the question and does not answer it. Multipredicate queries are processed by regarding them as a set of collected expressions. The experimental results show that the proposed method thoroughly handles answerable questions from the knowledge base and rejects unanswerable ones effectively. PMID:26904105

  16. A Natural Language Interface Concordant with a Knowledge Base.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-Jin; Park, Seong-Bae; Park, Se-Young

    2016-01-01

    The discordance between expressions interpretable by a natural language interface (NLI) system and those answerable by a knowledge base is a critical problem in the field of NLIs. In order to solve this discordance problem, this paper proposes a method to translate natural language questions into formal queries that can be generated from a graph-based knowledge base. The proposed method considers a subgraph of a knowledge base as a formal query. Thus, all formal queries corresponding to a concept or a predicate in the knowledge base can be generated prior to query time and all possible natural language expressions corresponding to each formal query can also be collected in advance. A natural language expression has a one-to-one mapping with a formal query. Hence, a natural language question is translated into a formal query by matching the question with the most appropriate natural language expression. If the confidence of this matching is not sufficiently high the proposed method rejects the question and does not answer it. Multipredicate queries are processed by regarding them as a set of collected expressions. The experimental results show that the proposed method thoroughly handles answerable questions from the knowledge base and rejects unanswerable ones effectively.

  17. Analytical model for radiative transfer including the effects of a rough material interface.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Thomas E; Kellems, Anthony R

    2016-08-20

    The reflected and transmitted radiance due to a source located above a water surface is computed based on models for radiative transfer in continuous optical media separated by a discontinuous air-water interface with random surface roughness. The air-water interface is described as the superposition of random, unresolved roughness on a deterministic realization of a stochastic wave surface at resolved scales. Under the geometric optics assumption, the bidirectional reflection and transmission functions for the air-water interface are approximated by applying regular perturbation methods to Snell's law and including the effects of a random surface roughness component. Formal analytical solutions to the radiative transfer problem under the small-angle scattering approximation account for the effects of scattering and absorption as light propagates through the atmosphere and water and also capture the diffusive effects due to the interaction of light with the rough material interface that separates the two optical media. Results of the analytical models are validated against Monte Carlo simulations, and the approximation to the bidirectional reflection function is also compared to another well-known analytical model.

  18. Analytical model for radiative transfer including the effects of a rough material interface.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Thomas E; Kellems, Anthony R

    2016-08-20

    The reflected and transmitted radiance due to a source located above a water surface is computed based on models for radiative transfer in continuous optical media separated by a discontinuous air-water interface with random surface roughness. The air-water interface is described as the superposition of random, unresolved roughness on a deterministic realization of a stochastic wave surface at resolved scales. Under the geometric optics assumption, the bidirectional reflection and transmission functions for the air-water interface are approximated by applying regular perturbation methods to Snell's law and including the effects of a random surface roughness component. Formal analytical solutions to the radiative transfer problem under the small-angle scattering approximation account for the effects of scattering and absorption as light propagates through the atmosphere and water and also capture the diffusive effects due to the interaction of light with the rough material interface that separates the two optical media. Results of the analytical models are validated against Monte Carlo simulations, and the approximation to the bidirectional reflection function is also compared to another well-known analytical model. PMID:27556978

  19. A robust and flexible Geospatial Modeling Interface (GMI) for environmental model deployment and evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper provides an overview of the GMI (Geospatial Modeling Interface) simulation framework for environmental model deployment and assessment. GMI currently provides access to multiple environmental models including AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W), Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis 2 (NLEA...

  20. Modeling and diagnosing interface mix in layered ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Clark, D. S.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing at the fuel-ablator interface of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion can arise from an unfavorable in-flight Atwood number between the cryogenic DT fuel and the ablator. High-Z dopant is typically added to the ablator to control the Atwood number, but recent high-density carbon (HDC) capsules have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) without this added dopant. Highly resolved post-shot modeling of these implosions shows that there was significant mixing of ablator material into the dense DT fuel. This mix lowers the fuel density and results in less overall compression, helping to explain the measured ratio of down scattered-to-primary neutrons. Future experimental designs will seek to improve this issue through adding dopant and changing the x-ray spectra with a different hohlraum wall material. To test these changes, we are designing an experimental platform to look at the growth of this mixing layer. This technique uses side-on radiography to measure the spatial extent of an embedded high-Z tracer layer near the interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics. PMID:26069968

  2. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography.

    PubMed

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics.

  3. Modeling the Electrical Contact Resistance at Steel-Carbon Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimmo, Ayoola T.; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    In the aluminum smelting industry, electrical contact resistance at the stub-carbon (steel-carbon) interface has been recurrently reported to be of magnitudes that legitimately necessitate concern. Mitigating this via finite element modeling has been the focus of a number of investigations, with the pressure- and temperature-dependent contact resistance relation frequently cited as a factor that limits the accuracy of such models. In this study, pressure- and temperature-dependent relations are derived from the most extensively cited works that have experimentally characterized the electrical contact resistance at these contacts. These relations are applied in a validated thermo-electro-mechanical finite element model used to estimate the voltage drop across a steel-carbon laboratory setup. By comparing the models' estimate of the contact electrical resistance with experimental measurements, we deduce the applicability of the different relations over a range of temperatures. The ultimate goal of this study is to apply mathematical modeling in providing pressure- and temperature-dependent relations that best describe the steel-carbon electrical contact resistance and identify the best fit relation at specific thermodynamic conditions.

  4. Optimization-based interactive segmentation interface for multiregion problems.

    PubMed

    Baxter, John S H; Rajchl, Martin; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2016-04-01

    Interactive segmentation is becoming of increasing interest to the medical imaging community in that it combines the positive aspects of both manual and automated segmentation. However, general-purpose tools have been lacking in terms of segmenting multiple regions simultaneously with a high degree of coupling between groups of labels. Hierarchical max-flow segmentation has taken advantage of this coupling for individual applications, but until recently, these algorithms were constrained to a particular hierarchy and could not be considered general-purpose. In a generalized form, the hierarchy for any given segmentation problem is specified in run-time, allowing different hierarchies to be quickly explored. We present an interactive segmentation interface, which uses generalized hierarchical max-flow for optimization-based multiregion segmentation guided by user-defined seeds. Applications in cardiac and neonatal brain segmentation are given as example applications of its generality. PMID:27335892

  5. Direct interfaces for smart skins based on FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A.; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando

    2009-05-01

    Many artificial skins for robotics are based on piezoresistive films that cover an array of electrodes. Local preprocessing is a must in these systems to reduce errors and interferences and cope with the large amount of data provided by the sensor. This paper presents circuitry based on an FPGA to implement the interface to the artificial skin. The approach consists of a direct connection. The analog to digital conversion procedure is simple. It consists of measuring the discharging time of a capacitor through the resistance we want to read. This first proposed approach needs isolated tactels, so the raw sensor has to be fabricated in this way. If the tactile array is large, the strategy is not feasible. For instance, up to 288 pins are required to implement the interface with an array of 16x16 tactels. The proposal of this work for this case is to replace passive integrators by active ones. The result is a circuitry that allows the cancellation of interferences due to parasitic resistors and the sharing of the addressing tracks. Moreover, the FPGA allows the processing of data from the tactile sensor at a very high rate. This is because the high number of I/O pins of the device allows the conversion of many channels (in our case one per column) in parallel. The internal processing of the tactile image can also be done in parallel. This means we could be able to respond to very high demanding tasks in terms of dynamic requirements, like slippage detection. This also means we can run complex algorithms at real time, so a smart, programmable and powerful sensor is obtained.

  6. Parallelization of a hydrological model using the message passing interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Yiping; Li, Tiejian; Sun, Liqun; Chen, Ji

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the natural processes, hydrological models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) are becoming larger and more complex with increasing computation time. Additionally, other procedures such as model calibration, which may require thousands of model iterations, can increase running time and thus further reduce rapid modeling and analysis. Using the widely-applied SWAT as an example, this study demonstrates how to parallelize a serial hydrological model in a Windows® environment using a parallel programing technology—Message Passing Interface (MPI). With a case study, we derived the optimal values for the two parameters (the number of processes and the corresponding percentage of work to be distributed to the master process) of the parallel SWAT (P-SWAT) on an ordinary personal computer and a work station. Our study indicates that model execution time can be reduced by 42%–70% (or a speedup of 1.74–3.36) using multiple processes (two to five) with a proper task-distribution scheme (between the master and slave processes). Although the computation time cost becomes lower with an increasing number of processes (from two to five), this enhancement becomes less due to the accompanied increase in demand for message passing procedures between the master and all slave processes. Our case study demonstrates that the P-SWAT with a five-process run may reach the maximum speedup, and the performance can be quite stable (fairly independent of a project size). Overall, the P-SWAT can help reduce the computation time substantially for an individual model run, manual and automatic calibration procedures, and optimization of best management practices. In particular, the parallelization method we used and the scheme for deriving the optimal parameters in this study can be valuable and easily applied to other hydrological or environmental models.

  7. Enhancement of galloping-based wind energy harvesting by synchronized switching interface circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liya; Liang, Junrui; Tang, Lihua; Yang, Yaowen; Liu, Haili

    2015-04-01

    Galloping phenomenon has attracted extensive research attention for small-scale wind energy harvesting. In the reported literature, the dynamics and harvested power of a galloping-based energy harvesting system are usually evaluated with a resistive AC load; these characteristics might shift when a practical harvesting interface circuit is connected for extracting useful DC power. In the family of piezoelectric energy harvesting interface circuits, synchronized switching harvesting on inductor (SSHI) has demonstrated its advantage for enhancing the harvested power from existing base vibrations. This paper investigates the harvesting capability of a galloping-based wind energy harvester using SSHI interfaces, with a focus on comparing the performances of Series SSHI (S-SSHI) and Parallel SSHI (P-SSHI) with that of a standard DC interface, in terms of power at various wind speeds. The prototyped galloping-based piezoelectric energy harvester (GPEH) comprises a piezoelectric cantilever attached with a square-sectioned bluff body made of foam. Equivalent circuit model (ECM) of the GPEH is established and system-level circuit simulations with SSHI and standard interfaces are performed and validated with wind tunnel tests. The benefits of SSHI compared to standard circuit become more significant when the wind speed gets higher; while SSHI circuits lose the benefits at small wind speeds. In both experiment and simulation, the superiority of P-SSHI is confirmed while S-SSHI demands further investigation. The power output is increased by 43.75% with P-SSHI compared to the standard circuit at a wind speed of 6m/s.

  8. An MEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI).

    PubMed

    Mellinger, Jürgen; Schalk, Gerwin; Braun, Christoph; Preissl, Hubert; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Birbaumer, Niels; Kübler, Andrea

    2007-07-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow for communicating intentions by mere brain activity, not involving muscles. Thus, BCIs may offer patients who have lost all voluntary muscle control the only possible way to communicate. Many recent studies have demonstrated that BCIs based on electroencephalography (EEG) can allow healthy and severely paralyzed individuals to communicate. While this approach is safe and inexpensive, communication is slow. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides signals with higher spatiotemporal resolution than EEG and could thus be used to explore whether these improved signal properties translate into increased BCI communication speed. In this study, we investigated the utility of an MEG-based BCI that uses voluntary amplitude modulation of sensorimotor mu and beta rhythms. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio, we present a simple spatial filtering method that takes the geometric properties of signal propagation in MEG into account, and we present methods that can process artifacts specifically encountered in an MEG-based BCI. Exemplarily, six participants were successfully trained to communicate binary decisions by imagery of limb movements using a feedback paradigm. Participants achieved significant mu rhythm self control within 32 min of feedback training. For a subgroup of three participants, we localized the origin of the amplitude modulated signal to the motor cortex. Our results suggest that an MEG-based BCI is feasible and efficient in terms of user training.

  9. Formulation of consumables management models: Mission planning processor payload interface definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torian, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Consumables models required for the mission planning and scheduling function are formulated. The relation of the models to prelaunch, onboard, ground support, and postmission functions for the space transportation systems is established. Analytical models consisting of an orbiter planning processor with consumables data base is developed. A method of recognizing potential constraint violations in both the planning and flight operations functions, and a flight data file storage/retrieval of information over an extended period which interfaces with a flight operations processor for monitoring of the actual flights is presented.

  10. Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces: A new Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard surface- phase-field-crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Colloid particles that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. The fluids together with the interfacial colloids form an emulsion with interesting material properties and offer an important route to new soft materials. A promising approach to simulate these emulsions was presented in Aland [Phys. FluidsPHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.3584815 23, 062103 (2011)], where a Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase fluid system was combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal particles along the interface. Unfortunately this model leads to spurious velocities which require very fine spatial and temporal resolutions to accurately and stably simulate. In this paper we develop an improved Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard-surface phase-field-crystal model based on the principles of mass conservation and thermodynamic consistency. To validate our approach, we derive a sharp interface model and show agreement with the improved diffuse interface model. Using simple flow configurations, we show that the new model has much better properties and does not lead to spurious velocities. Finally, we demonstrate the solid-like behavior of the crystallized interface by simulating the fall of a solid ball through a colloid-laden multiphase fluid.

  11. Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces: A new Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard surface- phase-field-crystal model.

    PubMed

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Colloid particles that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. The fluids together with the interfacial colloids form an emulsion with interesting material properties and offer an important route to new soft materials. A promising approach to simulate these emulsions was presented in Aland et al. [Phys. Fluids 23, 062103 (2011)], where a Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase fluid system was combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal particles along the interface. Unfortunately this model leads to spurious velocities which require very fine spatial and temporal resolutions to accurately and stably simulate. In this paper we develop an improved Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard-surface phase-field-crystal model based on the principles of mass conservation and thermodynamic consistency. To validate our approach, we derive a sharp interface model and show agreement with the improved diffuse interface model. Using simple flow configurations, we show that the new model has much better properties and does not lead to spurious velocities. Finally, we demonstrate the solid-like behavior of the crystallized interface by simulating the fall of a solid ball through a colloid-laden multiphase fluid. PMID:23214691

  12. Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces: A new Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard surface-phase-field-crystal model

    PubMed Central

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Colloid particles that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. The fluids together with the interfacial colloids form an emulsion with interesting material properties and offer an important route to new soft materials. A promising approach to simulate these emulsions was presented in Aland et al. [Phys. Fluids 23, 062103 (2011)], where a Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase fluid system was combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal particles along the interface. Unfortunately this model leads to spurious velocities which require very fine spatial and temporal resolutions to accurately and stably simulate. In this paper we develop an improved Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard-surface phase-field-crystal model based on the principles of mass conservation and thermodynamic consistency. To validate our approach, we derive a sharp interface model and show agreement with the improved diffuse interface model. Using simple flow configurations, we show that the new model has much better properties and does not lead to spurious velocities. Finally, we demonstrate the solid-like behavior of the crystallized interface by simulating the fall of a solid ball through a colloid-laden multiphase fluid. PMID:23214691

  13. Brain-computer interface based on intermodulation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaogang; Chen, Zhikai; Gao, Shangkai; Gao, Xiaorong

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Most recent steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems have used a single frequency for each target, so that a large number of targets require a large number of stimulus frequencies and therefore a wider frequency band. However, human beings show good SSVEP responses only in a limited range of frequencies. Furthermore, this issue is especially problematic if the SSVEP-based BCI takes a PC monitor as a stimulator, which is only capable of generating a limited range of frequencies. To mitigate this issue, this study presents an innovative coding method for SSVEP-based BCI by means of intermodulation frequencies. Approach. Simultaneous modulations of stimulus luminance and color at different frequencies were utilized to induce intermodulation frequencies. Luminance flickered at relatively large frequency (10, 12, 15 Hz), while color alternated at low frequency (0.5, 1 Hz). An attractive feature of the proposed method was that it would substantially increase the number of targets at a single flickering frequency by altering color modulated frequencies. Based on this method, the BCI system presented in this study realized eight targets merely using three flickering frequencies. Main results. The online results obtained from 15 subjects (14 healthy and 1 with stroke) revealed that an average classification accuracy of 93.83% and information transfer rate (ITR) of 33.80 bit min-1 were achieved using our proposed SSVEP-based BCI system. Specifically, 5 out of the 15 subjects exhibited an ITR of 40.00 bit min-1 with a classification accuracy of 100%. Significance. These results suggested that intermodulation frequencies could be adopted as steady responses in BCI, for which our system could be used as a practical BCI system.

  14. Graphical User Interface for Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, R. Caitlyn

    2009-01-01

    The J-2X Engine (built by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne,) in the Upper Stage of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, will only start within a certain range of temperature and pressure for Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen propellants. The purpose of the Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model is to verify that in all reasonable conditions the temperature and pressure of the propellants are within the required J-2X engine start boxes. In order to run the simulation, test variables must be entered at all reasonable values of parameters such as heat leak and mass flow rate. To make this testing process as efficient as possible in order to save the maximum amount of time and money, and to show that the J-2X engine will start when it is required to do so, a graphical user interface (GUI) was created to allow the input of values to be used as parameters in the Simulink Model, without opening or altering the contents of the model. The GUI must allow for test data to come from Microsoft Excel files, allow those values to be edited before testing, place those values into the Simulink Model, and get the output from the Simulink Model. The GUI was built using MATLAB, and will run the Simulink simulation when the Simulate option is activated. After running the simulation, the GUI will construct a new Microsoft Excel file, as well as a MATLAB matrix file, using the output values for each test of the simulation so that they may graphed and compared to other values.

  15. Haptic Interfaces: Getting in Touch with Web-based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussell, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Explains haptic computer interfaces for Web sites that relay touch-sensory feedback to the user. Discusses the importance of touch to cognition and learning; whether haptics can improve performance and learning; haptic interfaces for accessibility for blind and physically impaired users; comparisons of haptic devices; barriers to implementation;…

  16. An SPH model for multiphase flows with complex interfaces and large density differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Zong, Z.; Liu, M. B.; Zou, L.; Li, H. T.; Shu, C.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, an improved SPH model for multiphase flows with complex interfaces and large density differences is developed. The multiphase SPH model is based on the assumption of pressure continuity over the interfaces and avoids directly using the information of neighboring particles' densities or masses in solving governing equations. In order to improve computational accuracy and to obtain smooth pressure fields, a corrected density re-initialization is applied. A coupled dynamic solid boundary treatment (SBT) is implemented both to reduce numerical oscillations and to prevent unphysical particle penetration in the boundary area. The density correction and coupled dynamics SBT algorithms are modified to adapt to the density discontinuity on fluid interfaces in multiphase simulation. A cut-off value of the particle density is set to avoid negative pressure, which can lead to severe numerical difficulties and may even terminate the simulations. Three representative numerical examples, including a Rayleigh-Taylor instability test, a non-Boussinesq problem and a dam breaking simulation, are presented and compared with analytical results or experimental data. It is demonstrated that the present SPH model is capable of modeling complex multiphase flows with large interfacial deformations and density ratios.

  17. Textured hydroxyapatite interface onto biomedical titanium-based coatings.

    PubMed

    Manso, Miguel; Herrero, P; Fernández, M; Langlet, M; Martínez-Duart, J M

    2003-03-15

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) bioceramic coatings grown onto titanium-nitride (TiN) buffer layers by the aerosol-gel procedure present interfaces with a preferred growth orientation. These coatings were crystallized at 800 degrees C and subsequently etched to ease the study of the interface by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. Ion beam milling was applied to cross-section samples to analyze the interface structures using transmission electron microscopy. At the interface, the HAP crystals showed a <002> orientation. It was shown by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling that O atoms diffuse into the nitride interlayer, indicating that the formation of O channels in the HAP structure is the driving force inducing the textured film. The outstanding biocompatible properties of both the materials and properties of their interface suggest that HAP/TiN structures are particularly well suited for endoprosthetic applications.

  18. Driven Interfaces: From Flow to Creep Through Model Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agoritsas, Elisabeth; García-García, Reinaldo; Lecomte, Vivien; Truskinovsky, Lev; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2016-08-01

    The response of spatially extended systems to a force leading their steady state out of equilibrium is strongly affected by the presence of disorder. We focus on the mean velocity induced by a constant force applied on one-dimensional interfaces. In the absence of disorder, the velocity is linear in the force. In the presence of disorder, it is widely admitted, as well as experimentally and numerically verified, that the velocity presents a stretched exponential dependence in the force (the so-called `creep law'), which is out of reach of linear response, or more generically of direct perturbative expansions at small force. In dimension one, there is no exact analytical derivation of such a law, even from a theoretical physical point of view. We propose an effective model with two degrees of freedom, constructed from the full spatially extended model, that captures many aspects of the creep phenomenology. It provides a justification of the creep law form of the velocity-force characteristics, in a quasistatic approximation. It allows, moreover, to capture the non-trivial effects of short-range correlations in the disorder, which govern the low-temperature asymptotics. It enables us to establish a phase diagram where the creep law manifests itself in the vicinity of the origin in the force-system-size-temperature coordinates. Conjointly, we characterise the crossover between the creep regime and a linear-response regime that arises due to finite system size.

  19. Driven Interfaces: From Flow to Creep Through Model Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agoritsas, Elisabeth; García-García, Reinaldo; Lecomte, Vivien; Truskinovsky, Lev; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2016-09-01

    The response of spatially extended systems to a force leading their steady state out of equilibrium is strongly affected by the presence of disorder. We focus on the mean velocity induced by a constant force applied on one-dimensional interfaces. In the absence of disorder, the velocity is linear in the force. In the presence of disorder, it is widely admitted, as well as experimentally and numerically verified, that the velocity presents a stretched exponential dependence in the force (the so-called `creep law'), which is out of reach of linear response, or more generically of direct perturbative expansions at small force. In dimension one, there is no exact analytical derivation of such a law, even from a theoretical physical point of view. We propose an effective model with two degrees of freedom, constructed from the full spatially extended model, that captures many aspects of the creep phenomenology. It provides a justification of the creep law form of the velocity-force characteristics, in a quasistatic approximation. It allows, moreover, to capture the non-trivial effects of short-range correlations in the disorder, which govern the low-temperature asymptotics. It enables us to establish a phase diagram where the creep law manifests itself in the vicinity of the origin in the force-system-size-temperature coordinates. Conjointly, we characterise the crossover between the creep regime and a linear-response regime that arises due to finite system size.

  20. Modelling the inhomogeneous SiC Schottky interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, P. M.; Pérez-Tomás, A.; Shah, V. A.; Vavasour, O.; Donchev, E.; Pang, J. S.; Myronov, M.; Fisher, C. A.; Jennings, M. R.; Leadley, D. R.; Mawby, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, the I-V-T dataset of a Schottky diode has been accurately modelled, parameterised, and fully fit, incorporating the effects of interface inhomogeneity, patch pinch-off and resistance, and ideality factors that are both heavily temperature and voltage dependent. A Ni/SiC Schottky diode is characterised at 2 K intervals from 20 to 320 K, which, at room temperature, displays low ideality factors (n < 1.01) that suggest that these diodes may be homogeneous. However, at cryogenic temperatures, excessively high (n > 8), voltage dependent ideality factors and evidence of the so-called "thermionic field emission effect" within a T0-plot, suggest significant inhomogeneity. Two models are used, each derived from Tung's original interactive parallel conduction treatment of barrier height inhomogeneity that can reproduce these commonly seen effects in single temperature I-V traces. The first model incorporates patch pinch-off effects and produces accurate and reliable fits above around 150 K, and at current densities lower than 10-5 A cm-2. Outside this region, we show that resistive effects within a given patch are responsible for the excessive ideality factors, and a second simplified model incorporating these resistive effects as well as pinch-off accurately reproduces the entire temperature range. Analysis of these fitting parameters reduces confidence in those fits above 230 K, and questions are raised about the physical interpretation of the fitting parameters. Despite this, both methods used are shown to be useful tools for accurately reproducing I-V-T data over a large temperature range.

  1. Modeling Geometry and Progressive Failure of Material Interfaces in Plain Weave Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Cheng, Ron-Bin

    2010-01-01

    A procedure combining a geometrically nonlinear, explicit-dynamics contact analysis, computer aided design techniques, and elasticity-based mesh adjustment is proposed to efficiently generate realistic finite element models for meso-mechanical analysis of progressive failure in textile composites. In the procedure, the geometry of fiber tows is obtained by imposing a fictitious expansion on the tows. Meshes resulting from the procedure are conformal with the computed tow-tow and tow-matrix interfaces but are incongruent at the interfaces. The mesh interfaces are treated as cohesive contact surfaces not only to resolve the incongruence but also to simulate progressive failure. The method is employed to simulate debonding at the material interfaces in a ceramic-matrix plain weave composite with matrix porosity and in a polymeric matrix plain weave composite without matrix porosity, both subject to uniaxial cyclic loading. The numerical results indicate progression of the interfacial damage during every loading and reverse loading event in a constant strain amplitude cyclic process. However, the composites show different patterns of damage advancement.

  2. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models.

    PubMed

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer. PMID:27445657

  3. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models

    PubMed Central

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer. PMID:27445657

  4. Interfacing comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with advanced aeromechanics and vortex wake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying

    This dissertation describes three aspects of the comprehensive rotorcraft analysis. First, a physics-based methodology for the modeling of hydraulic devices within multibody-based comprehensive models of rotorcraft systems is developed. This newly proposed approach can predict the fully nonlinear behavior of hydraulic devices, and pressure levels in the hydraulic chambers are coupled with the dynamic response of the system. The proposed hydraulic device models are implemented in a multibody code and calibrated by comparing their predictions with test bench measurements for the UH-60 helicopter lead-lag damper. Predicted peak damping forces were found to be in good agreement with measurements, while the model did not predict the entire time history of damper force to the same level of accuracy. The proposed model evaluates relevant hydraulic quantities such as chamber pressures, orifice flow rates, and pressure relief valve displacements. This model could be used to design lead-lag dampers with desirable force and damping characteristics. The second part of this research is in the area of computational aeroelasticity, in which an interface between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD) is established. This interface enables data exchange between CFD and CSD with the goal of achieving accurate airloads predictions. In this work, a loose coupling approach based on the delta-airloads method is developed in a finite-element method based multibody dynamics formulation, DYMORE. To validate this aerodynamic interface, a CFD code, OVERFLOW-2, is loosely coupled with a CSD program, DYMORE, to compute the airloads of different flight conditions for Sikorsky UH-60 aircraft. This loose coupling approach has good convergence characteristics. The predicted airloads are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, although not for all flight conditions. In addition, the tight coupling interface between the CFD program, OVERFLOW

  5. A DIFFUSE-INTERFACE APPROACH FOR MODELING TRANSPORT, DIFFUSION AND ADSORPTION/DESORPTION OF MATERIAL QUANTITIES ON A DEFORMABLE INTERFACE*

    PubMed Central

    Teigen, Knut Erik; Li, Xiangrong; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Fan; Voigt, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented to solve two-phase problems involving a material quantity on an interface. The interface can be advected, stretched, and change topology, and material can be adsorbed to or desorbed from it. The method is based on the use of a diffuse interface framework, which allows a simple implementation using standard finite-difference or finite-element techniques. Here, finite-difference methods on a block-structured adaptive grid are used, and the resulting equations are solved using a non-linear multigrid method. Interfacial flow with soluble surfactants is used as an example of the application of the method, and several test cases are presented demonstrating its accuracy and convergence. PMID:21373370

  6. Definition of common support equipment and space station interface requirements for IOC model technology experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard A.; Waiss, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the common support equipment and Space Station interface requirements for the IOC (initial operating capabilities) model technology experiments. In particular, each principal investigator for the proposed model technology experiment was contacted and visited for technical understanding and support for the generation of the detailed technical backup data required for completion of this study. Based on the data generated, a strong case can be made for a dedicated technology experiment command and control work station consisting of a command keyboard, cathode ray tube, data processing and storage, and an alert/annunciator panel located in the pressurized laboratory.

  7. Modeling of the cell-electrode interface noise for microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Yuan, Jie; Chan, Mansun

    2012-12-01

    Microelectrodes are widely used in the physiological recording of cell field potentials. As microelectrode signals are generally in the μV range, characteristics of the cell-electrode interface are important to the recording accuracy. Although the impedance of the microelectrode-solution interface has been well studied and modeled in the past, no effective model has been experimentally verified to estimate the noise of the cell-electrode interface. Also in existing interface models, spectral information is largely disregarded. In this work, we developed a model for estimating the noise of the cell-electrode interface from interface impedances. This model improves over existing noise models by including the cell membrane capacitor and frequency dependent impedances. With low-noise experiment setups, this model is verified by microelectrode array (MEA) experiments with mouse muscle myoblast cells. Experiments show that the noise estimated from this model has <;10% error, which is much less than estimations from existing models. With this model, noise of the cell-electrode interface can be estimated by simply measuring interface impedances. This model also provides insights for micro- electrode design to achieve good recording signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. EMG-based and gaze-tracking-based man-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Federico; Rossi, Danilo De

    2009-01-01

    A great demand for brain-machine and, more generally, man-machine interfaces is arising nowadays, pushed by several promising scientific and technological results, which are encouraging the concentration of efforts in this field. The possibility of measuring, processing and decoding brain activity, so as to interpret neural signals, is often looked at as a possibility to bypass lost or damaged neural and/or motor structures. Beyond that, such interfaces currently show a potential for applications in other fields, space science being certainly one of them. At present, the concept of "reading" the brain to detect intended actions and use these to control external devices is being studied with several technical and methodological approaches; among these, interfaces based on electroencephalographic signals play today a prominent role. Within such a context, the aim of this section is to present a brief survey on two types of noninvasive man-machine interfaces based on a different approach. In particular, they rely on the extraction of control signals from the user with techniques that adopt electromyography and gaze tracking. Working principles, implementations, typical features, and applications of these two types of interfaces are reported.

  9. Development of a non-linear finite element modelling of the below-knee prosthetic socket interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Lord, M; Turner-Smith, A R; Roberts, V C

    1995-12-01

    A non-linear finite element model has been established to predict the pressure and shear stress distribution at the limb-socket interface in below-knee amputees with consideration of the skin-liner interface friction and slip. In this model, the limb tissue and socket liner were respectively meshed into 954 and 450 three-dimensional eight-node isoparametric brick elements, based on measurements of an individual's amputated limb surface; the bone was meshed into three-dimensional six-node triangular prism elements, based on radiographic measurements of the individual's residual limb. The socket shell was assumed to be a rigid boundary. An important feature of this model is the use of 450 interface elements (ABAQUS INTER4) which mimic the interface friction condition. The results indicate that a maximum pressure of 226 kPa, shear stress of 53 kPa and less than 4 mm slip exist at the skin-liner interface when the full body weight of 800 N is applied to the limb. The results also show that the coefficient of friction is a very sensitive parameter in determining the interface pressures, shear stresses and slip. With the growth of coefficient of friction, the shear stresses will increase, while the pressure and slip will decrease.

  10. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

    2009-12-16

    Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the

  11. Pyroelectric energy harvesting using liquid-based switchable thermal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, G; Ju, YS

    2013-01-15

    The pyroelectric effect offers an intriguing solid-state approach for harvesting ambient thermal energy to power distributed networks of sensors and actuators that are remotely located or otherwise difficult to access. There have been, however, few device-level demonstrations due to challenges in converting spatial temperature gradients into temporal temperature oscillations necessary for pyroelectric energy harvesting. We demonstrate the feasibility of a device concept that uses liquid-based thermal interfaces for rapid switching of the thermal conductance between a pyroelectric material and a heat source/sink and can thereby deliver high output power density. Using a thin film of a pyroelectric co-polymer together with a macroscale mechanical actuator, we operate pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting cycles at frequencies close to 1 Hz. Film-level power densities as high as 110 mW/cm(3) were achieved, limited by slow heat diffusion across a glass substrate. When combined with a laterally interdigitated electrode array and a MEMS actuator, the present design offers an attractive option for compact high-power density thermal energy harvesters. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge-based graphical interfaces for presenting technical information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiner, Steven

    1988-01-01

    Designing effective presentations of technical information is extremely difficult and time-consuming. Moreover, the combination of increasing task complexity and declining job skills makes the need for high-quality technical presentations especially urgent. We believe that this need can ultimately be met through the development of knowledge-based graphical interfaces that can design and present technical information. Since much material is most naturally communicated through pictures, our work has stressed the importance of well-designed graphics, concentrating on generating pictures and laying out displays containing them. We describe APEX, a testbed picture generation system that creates sequences of pictures that depict the performance of simple actions in a world of 3D objects. Our system supports rules for determining automatically the objects to be shown in a picture, the style and level of detail with which they should be rendered, the method by which the action itself should be indicated, and the picture's camera specification. We then describe work on GRIDS, an experimental display layout system that addresses some of the problems in designing displays containing these pictures, determining the position and size of the material to be presented.

  13. Towards a Communication Brain Computer Interface Based on Semantic Relations

    PubMed Central

    Geuze, Jeroen; Farquhar, Jason; Desain, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates a possible Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based on semantic relations. The BCI determines which prime word a subject has in mind by presenting probe words using an intelligent algorithm. Subjects indicate when a presented probe word is related to the prime word by a single finger tap. The detection of the neural signal associated with this movement is used by the BCI to decode the prime word. The movement detector combined both the evoked (ERP) and induced (ERD) responses elicited with the movement. Single trial movement detection had an average accuracy of 67%. The decoding of the prime word had an average accuracy of 38% when using 100 probes and 150 possible targets, and 41% after applying a dynamic stopping criterium, reducing the average number of probes to 47. The article shows that the intelligent algorithm used to present the probe words has a significantly higher performance than a random selection of probes. Simulations demonstrate that the BCI also works with larger vocabulary sizes, and the performance scales logarithmically with vocabulary size. PMID:24516552

  14. Triboelectrification based motion sensor for human-machine interfacing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiqing; Chen, Jun; Wen, Xiaonan; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Jin; Su, Yuanjie; Zhu, Guang; Wu, Wenzuo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-05-28

    We present triboelectrification based, flexible, reusable, and skin-friendly dry biopotential electrode arrays as motion sensors for tracking muscle motion and human-machine interfacing (HMI). The independently addressable, self-powered sensor arrays have been utilized to record the electric output signals as a mapping figure to accurately identify the degrees of freedom as well as directions and magnitude of muscle motions. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique was employed to analyse the frequency spectra of the obtained electric signals and thus to determine the motion angular velocities. Moreover, the motion sensor arrays produced a short-circuit current density up to 10.71 mA/m(2), and an open-circuit voltage as high as 42.6 V with a remarkable signal-to-noise ratio up to 1000, which enables the devices as sensors to accurately record and transform the motions of the human joints, such as elbow, knee, heel, and even fingers, and thus renders it a superior and unique invention in the field of HMI. PMID:24779702

  15. Recent Findings Based on Airborne Measurements at the Interface of Coastal California Clouds and Clear Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorooshian, A.; Crosbie, E.; Wang, Z.; Chuang, P. Y.; Craven, J. S.; Coggon, M. M.; Brunke, M.; Zeng, X.; Jonsson, H.; Woods, R. K.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent aircraft field experiments with the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter have targeted interfaces between clear and cloudy areas along the California coast. These campaigns, based out of Marina, California in the July-August time frame, include the Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE, 2011), Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE, 2013), and the Biological Ocean Atmospheric Study (BOAS, 2015). Results will be presented related to (i) aqueous processing of natural and anthropogenic emissions, (ii) vertical re-distribution of ocean micronutrients, and (iii) stratocumulus cloud clearings and notable thermodynamic and aerosol contrasts across the clear-cloudy interface. The results have implications for modeling and observational studies of marine boundary layer clouds, especially in relation to aerosol-cloud interactions.

  16. Adaptively deformed mesh based interface method for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wan, Decheng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Mesh deformation methods are a versatile strategy for solving partial differential equations (PDEs) with a vast variety of practical applications. However, these methods break down for elliptic PDEs with discontinuous coefficients, namely, elliptic interface problems. For this class of problems, the additional interface jump conditions are required to maintain the well-posedness of the governing equation. Consequently, in order to achieve high accuracy and high order convergence, additional numerical algorithms are required to enforce the interface jump conditions in solving elliptic interface problems. The present work introduces an interface technique based adaptively deformed mesh strategy for resolving elliptic interface problems. We take the advantages of the high accuracy, flexibility and robustness of the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method to construct an adaptively deformed mesh based interface method for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients. The proposed method generates deformed meshes in the physical domain and solves the transformed governed equations in the computational domain, which maintains regular Cartesian meshes. The mesh deformation is realized by a mesh transformation PDE, which controls the mesh redistribution by a source term. The source term consists of a monitor function, which builds in mesh contraction rules. Both interface geometry based deformed meshes and solution gradient based deformed meshes are constructed to reduce the L∞ and L2 errors in solving elliptic interface problems. The proposed adaptively deformed mesh based interface method is extensively validated by many numerical experiments. Numerical results indicate that the adaptively deformed mesh based interface method outperforms the original MIB method for dealing with elliptic interface problems. PMID:22586356

  17. DPSM technique for ultrasonic field modelling near fluid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sourav; Kundu, Tribikram; Alnuaimi, Nasser A

    2007-06-01

    Distributed point source method (DPSM) is gradually gaining popularity in the field of non-destructive evaluation (NDE). DPSM is a semi-analytical technique that can be used to calculate the ultrasonic fields produced by transducers of finite dimension placed in homogeneous or non-homogeneous media. This technique has been already used to model ultrasonic fields in homogeneous and multi-layered fluid structures. In this paper the method is extended to model the ultrasonic fields generated in both fluid and solid media near a fluid-solid interface when the transducer is placed in the fluid half-space near the interface. Most results in this paper are generated by the newly developed DPSM technique that requires matrix inversion. This technique is identified as the matrix inversion based DPSM technique. Some of these results are compared with the results produced by the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral based DPSM technique. Theory behind both matrix inversion based and Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral based DPSM techniques is presented in this paper. The matrix inversion based DPSM technique is found to be very efficient for computing the ultrasonic field in non-homogeneous materials. One objective of this study is to model ultrasonic fields in both solids and fluids generated by the leaky Rayleigh wave when finite size transducers are inclined at Rayleigh critical angles. This phenomenon has been correctly modelled by the technique. It should be mentioned here that techniques based on paraxial assumptions fail to model the critical reflection phenomenon. Other advantages of the DPSM technique compared to the currently available techniques for transducer radiation modelling are discussed in the paper under Introduction.

  18. Microchannel-based regenerative scaffold for chronic peripheral nerve interfacing in amputees

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Akhil; Tahilramani, Mayank; Bentley, John T.; Gore, Russell K.; Millard, Daniel; Mukhatyar, Vivek J.; Joseph, Anish; Haque, Adel; Stanley, Garrett B.; English, Arthur W.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2015-01-01

    Neurally controlled prosthetics that cosmetically and functionally mimic amputated limbs remain a clinical need because state of the art neural prosthetics only provide a fraction of a natural limb’s functionality. Here, we report on the fabrication and capability of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and epoxy-based SU-8 photoresist microchannel scaffolds to serve as viable constructs for peripheral nerve interfacing though in vitro and in vivo studies in a sciatic nerve amputee model where the nerve lacks distal reinnervation targets. These studies showed microchannels with 100 μm × 100 μm cross-sectional areas support and direct the regeneration/migration of axons, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts through the microchannels with space available for future maturation of the axons. Investigation of the nerve in the distal segment, past the scaffold, showed a high degree of organization, adoption of the microchannel architecture forming ‘microchannel fascicles’, reformation of endoneurial tubes and axon myelination, and a lack of aberrant and unorganized growth that might be characteristic of neuroma formation. Separate chronic terminal in vivo electrophysiology studies utilizing the microchannel scaffolds with permanently integrated microwire electrodes were conducted to evaluate interfacing capabilities. In all devices a variety of spontaneous, sensory evoked and electrically evoked single and multi-unit action potentials were recorded after five months of implantation. Together, these findings suggest that microchannel scaffolds are well suited for chronic implantation and peripheral nerve interfacing to promote organized nerve regeneration that lends itself well to stable interfaces. Thus this study establishes the basis for the advanced fabrication of large-electrode count, wireless microchannel devices that are an important step towards highly functional, bi-directional peripheral nerve interfaces. PMID:25522974

  19. Microchannel-based regenerative scaffold for chronic peripheral nerve interfacing in amputees.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Akhil; Tahilramani, Mayank; Bentley, John T; Gore, Russell K; Millard, Daniel C; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Joseph, Anish; Haque, Adel S; Stanley, Garrett B; English, Arthur W; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2015-02-01

    Neurally controlled prosthetics that cosmetically and functionally mimic amputated limbs remain a clinical need because state of the art neural prosthetics only provide a fraction of a natural limb's functionality. Here, we report on the fabrication and capability of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and epoxy-based SU-8 photoresist microchannel scaffolds to serve as viable constructs for peripheral nerve interfacing through in vitro and in vivo studies in a sciatic nerve amputee model where the nerve lacks distal reinnervation targets. These studies showed microchannels with 100 μm × 100 μm cross-sectional areas support and direct the regeneration/migration of axons, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts through the microchannels with space available for future maturation of the axons. Investigation of the nerve in the distal segment, past the scaffold, showed a high degree of organization, adoption of the microchannel architecture forming 'microchannel fascicles', reformation of endoneurial tubes and axon myelination, and a lack of aberrant and unorganized growth that might be characteristic of neuroma formation. Separate chronic terminal in vivo electrophysiology studies utilizing the microchannel scaffolds with permanently integrated microwire electrodes were conducted to evaluate interfacing capabilities. In all devices a variety of spontaneous, sensory evoked and electrically evoked single and multi-unit action potentials were recorded after five months of implantation. Together, these findings suggest that microchannel scaffolds are well suited for chronic implantation and peripheral nerve interfacing to promote organized nerve regeneration that lends itself well to stable interfaces. Thus this study establishes the basis for the advanced fabrication of large-electrode count, wireless microchannel devices that are an important step towards highly functional, bi-directional peripheral nerve interfaces.

  20. Scale separation for multi-scale modeling of free-surface and two-phase flows with the conservative sharp interface method

    SciTech Connect

    Han, L.H. Hu, X.Y. Adams, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a scale separation approach for multi-scale modeling of free-surface and two-phase flows with complex interface evolution. By performing a stimulus-response operation on the level-set function representing the interface, separation of resolvable and non-resolvable interface scales is achieved efficiently. Uniform positive and negative shifts of the level-set function are used to determine non-resolvable interface structures. Non-resolved interface structures are separated from the resolved ones and can be treated by a mixing model or a Lagrangian-particle model in order to preserve mass. Resolved interface structures are treated by the conservative sharp-interface model. Since the proposed scale separation approach does not rely on topological information, unlike in previous work, it can be implemented in a straightforward fashion into a given level set based interface model. A number of two- and three-dimensional numerical tests demonstrate that the proposed method is able to cope with complex interface variations accurately and significantly increases robustness against underresolved interface structures.

  1. Introducing a new open source GIS user interface for the SWAT model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is a robust watershed modelling tool. It typically uses the ArcSWAT interface to create its inputs. ArcSWAT is public domain software which works in the licensed ArcGIS environment. The aim of this paper was to develop an open source user interface ...

  2. Fundamental processes of exciton scattering at organic solar-cell interfaces: One-dimensional model calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Yoshimitsu; Iizuka, Hideyuki; Sato, Kosuke; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental processes of exciton scattering at organic solar-cell interfaces were studied using a one-dimensional tight-binding model and by performing a time-evolution simulation of electron–hole pair wave packets. We found the fundamental features of exciton scattering: the scattering promotes not only the dissociation of excitons and the generation of interface-bound (charge-transferred) excitons but also the transmission and reflection of excitons depending on the electron and hole interface offsets. In particular, the dissociation increases in a certain region of an interface offset, while the transmission shows resonances with higher-energy bound-exciton and interface bound-exciton states. We also studied the effects of carrier-transfer and potential modulations at the interface and the scattering of charged excitons, and we found trap dissociations where one of the carriers is trapped around the interface after the dissociation.

  3. Role-based and Adaptive user interface designs in a Teledermatology consult system: a way to secure and a way to enhance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi Jung; Speedie, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    User interface design is one of the most important parts of developing applications. Nowadays, a quality user interface must not only accommodate interaction between machines and users, but also needs to recognize the differences and provide functionalities for users from role-to-role or even individual-to-individual. With the web-based application of our Teledermatology consult system, the development environment provides us highly useful opportunities to create dynamic user interfaces, which lets us to gain greater access control and has the potential to increase efficiency of the system. We will describe the two models of user interfaces in our system: Role-based and Adaptive.

  4. Two graphical user interfaces for managing and analyzing MODFLOW groundwater-model scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Scenario Manager and Scenario Analyzer are graphical user interfaces that facilitate the use of calibrated, MODFLOW-based groundwater models for investigating possible responses to proposed stresses on a groundwater system. Scenario Manager allows a user, starting with a calibrated model, to design and run model scenarios by adding or modifying stresses simulated by the model. Scenario Analyzer facilitates the process of extracting data from model output and preparing such display elements as maps, charts, and tables. Both programs are designed for users who are familiar with the science on which groundwater modeling is based but who may not have a groundwater modeler’s expertise in building and calibrating a groundwater model from start to finish. With Scenario Manager, the user can manipulate model input to simulate withdrawal or injection wells, time-variant specified hydraulic heads, recharge, and such surface-water features as rivers and canals. Input for stresses to be simulated comes from user-provided geographic information system files and time-series data files. A Scenario Manager project can contain multiple scenarios and is self-documenting. Scenario Analyzer can be used to analyze output from any MODFLOW-based model; it is not limited to use with scenarios generated by Scenario Manager. Model-simulated values of hydraulic head, drawdown, solute concentration, and cell-by-cell flow rates can be presented in display elements. Map data can be represented as lines of equal value (contours) or as a gradated color fill. Charts and tables display time-series data obtained from output generated by a transient-state model run or from user-provided text files of time-series data. A display element can be based entirely on output of a single model run, or, to facilitate comparison of results of multiple scenarios, an element can be based on output from multiple model runs. Scenario Analyzer can export display elements and supporting metadata as a Portable

  5. An Energy Approach to a Micromechanics Model Accounting for Nonlinear Interface Debonding.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.; Huang, Y.; Geubelle, P. H.; Liu, C.; Breitenfeld, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a micromechanics model to study the effect of nonlinear interface debonding on the constitutive behavior of composite materials. While implementing this micromechanics model into a large simulation code on solid rockets, we are challenged by problems such as tension/shear coupling and the nonuniform distribution of displacement jump at the particle/matrix interfaces. We therefore propose an energy approach to solve these problems. This energy approach calculates the potential energy of the representative volume element, including the contribution from the interface debonding. By minimizing the potential energy with respect to the variation of the interface displacement jump, the traction balanced interface debonding can be found and the macroscopic constitutive relations established. This energy approach has the ability to treat different load conditions in a unified way, and the interface cohesive law can be in any arbitrary forms. In this paper, the energy approach is verified to give the same constitutive behaviors as reported before.

  6. Development of a graphical user interface in GIS raster format for the finite difference ground-water model code, MODFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzer, T.; Hansen, D.T.; Greer, W.; Sebhat, M.

    1996-12-31

    A geographic information system (GIS) was used in developing a graphical user interface (GUI) for use with the US Geological Survey`s finite difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW. The GUI permits the construction of a MODFLOW based ground-water flow model from scratch in a GIS environment. The model grid, input data and output are stored as separate raster data sets which may be viewed, edited, and manipulated in a graphic environment. Other GIS data sets can be displayed with the model data sets for reference and evaluation. The GUI sets up a directory structure for storage of the files associated with the ground-water model and the raster data sets created by the interface. The GUI stores model coefficients and model output as raster values. Values stored by these raster data sets are formatted for use with the ground-water flow model code.

  7. A COMSOL-GEMS interface for modeling coupled reactive-transport geochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Vahid Jafari; Li, Chang; Verba, Circe; Ideker, Jason H.; Isgor, O. Burkan

    2016-07-01

    An interface was developed between COMSOL MultiphysicsTM finite element analysis software and (geo)chemical modeling platform, GEMS, for the reactive-transport modeling of (geo)chemical processes in variably saturated porous media. The two standalone software packages are managed from the interface that uses a non-iterative operator splitting technique to couple the transport (COMSOL) and reaction (GEMS) processes. The interface allows modeling media with complex chemistry (e.g. cement) using GEMS thermodynamic database formats. Benchmark comparisons show that the developed interface can be used to predict a variety of reactive-transport processes accurately. The full functionality of the interface was demonstrated to model transport processes, governed by extended Nernst-Plank equation, in Class H Portland cement samples in high pressure and temperature autoclaves simulating systems that are used to store captured carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs.

  8. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing web-user interface.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T; Filippov, Igor V; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a web-based tool for structure activity relationship and quantitative structure activity relationship modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms-Random Forest, Support Vector Machine, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting, so forth. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity.

  9. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing web-user interface.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T; Filippov, Igor V; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a web-based tool for structure activity relationship and quantitative structure activity relationship modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms-Random Forest, Support Vector Machine, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting, so forth. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity. PMID:25362883

  10. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing Web-user interface

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Iwona E.; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T.; Filippov, Igor V.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a Web-based tool for SAR and QSAR modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms – Random Forest, Support Vector Machine (SVM), Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting etc. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity. PMID:25362883

  11. Electronic Structure at Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Magnesium based Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Janakiraman; Siegel, Donald

    2015-03-01

    Magnesium is a promising multivalent element for use in next generation electrochemical energy storage systems. However, a wide range of challenges such as low coulombic efficiency, low/varying capacity and cyclability need to be resolved in order to realize Mg based batteries. Many of these issues can be related to interfacial phenomena between the Mg anode and common electrolytes. Ab-initio based computational models of these interfaces can provide insights on the interfacial interactions that can be difficult to probe experimentally. In this work we present ab-initio computations of common electrolyte solvents (THF, DME) in contact with two model electrode surfaces namely -- (i) an ``SEI-free'' electrode based on Mg metal and, (ii) a ``passivated'' electrode consisting of MgO. We perform GW calculations to predict the reorganization of the molecular orbitals (HOMO/LUMO) upon contact with the these surfaces and their alignment with respect to the Fermi energy of the electrodes. These computations are in turn compared with more efficient GGA (PBE) & Hybrid (HSE) functional calculations. The results obtained from these computations enable us to qualitatively describe the stability of these solvent molecules at electrode-electrolyte interfaces

  12. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26884745

  14. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26884745

  15. Sketch-based geologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, M. P.; Jackson, M.; Hampson, G.; Brazil, E. V.; de Carvalho, F.; Coda, C.; Sousa, M. C.; Zhang, Z.; Geiger, S.

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) maps and cross-sections, and 3D conceptual models, are fundamental tools for understanding, communicating and modeling geology. Yet geologists lack dedicated and intuitive tools that allow rapid creation of such figures and models. Standard drawing packages produce only 2D figures that are not suitable for quantitative analysis. Geologic modeling packages can produce 3D models and are widely used in the groundwater and petroleum communities, but are often slow and non-intuitive to use, requiring the creation of a grid early in the modeling workflow and the use of geostatistical methods to populate the grid blocks with geologic information. We present an alternative approach to rapidly create figures and models using sketch-based interface and modelling (SBIM). We leverage methods widely adopted in other industries to prototype complex geometries and designs. The SBIM tool contains built-in geologic rules that constrain how sketched lines and surfaces interact. These rules are based on the logic of superposition and cross-cutting relationships that follow from rock-forming processes, including deposition, deformation, intrusion and modification by diagenesis or metamorphism. The approach allows rapid creation of multiple, geologically realistic, figures and models in 2D and 3D using a simple, intuitive interface. The user can sketch in plan- or cross-section view. Geologic rules are used to extrapolate sketched lines in real time to create 3D surfaces. Quantitative analysis can be carried our directly on the models. Alternatively, they can be output as simple figures or imported directly into other modeling tools. The software runs on a tablet PC and can be used in a variety of settings including the office, classroom and field. The speed and ease of use of SBIM enables multiple interpretations to be developed from limited data, uncertainty to be readily appraised, and figures and models to be rapidly updated to incorporate new data or concepts.

  16. A Prototype Mouse-Based Interface to Drug Related Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, R. G.; Edwards, Mary-Ellen

    1985-01-01

    The Drug-Interface, prototype system built to facilitate retrieval of drug related information, automatically connects to DIALOG Information Retrieval Service via available networks, aids user in formulating and/or revising search strategy, sends query to DIALOG, displays results of search, and downloads relevant pieces into Macintosh data file.…

  17. A CASE STUDY USING THE EPA'S WATER QUALITY MODELING SYSTEM, THE WINDOWS INTERFACE FOR SIMULATING PLUMES (WISP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wisp, the Windows Interface for Simulating Plumes, is designed to be an easy-to-use windows platform program for aquatic modeling. Wisp inherits many of its capabilities from its predecessor, the DOS-based PLUMES (Baumgartner, Frick, Roberts, 1994). These capabilities have been ...

  18. Display analysis with the optimal control model of the human operator. [pilot-vehicle display interface and information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, S.; Levison, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Application of the optimal control model of the human operator to problems in display analysis is discussed. Those aspects of the model pertaining to the operator-display interface and to operator information processing are reviewed and discussed. The techniques are then applied to the analysis of advanced display/control systems for a Terminal Configured Vehicle. Model results are compared with those obtained in a large, fixed-base simulation.

  19. An on-chip micromagnet frictionometer based on magnetically driven colloids for nano-bio interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinghao; Goudu, Sandhya Rani; Torati, Sri Ramulu; Lim, Byeonghwa; Kim, Kunwoo; Kim, CheolGi

    2016-09-21

    A novel method based on remotely controlled magnetic forces of bio-functionalized superparamagnetic colloids using micromagnet arrays was devised to measure frictional force at the sub-picoNewton (pN) scale for bio-nano-/micro-electromechanical system (bio-NEMS/MEMS) interfaces in liquid. The circumferential motion of the colloids with phase-locked angles around the periphery of the micromagnets under an in-plane rotating magnetic field was governed by a balance between tangential magnetic force and drag force, which consists of viscous and frictional forces. A model correlating the phase-locked angles of the steady colloid rotation was formulated and validated by measuring the angles under controlled magnetic forces. Hence, the frictional forces on the streptavidin/Teflon interface between the colloids and the micromagnet arrays were obtained using the magnetic forces at the phase-locked angles. The friction coefficient for the streptavidin/Teflon interface was estimated to be approximately 0.036 regardless of both vertical force in the range of a few hundred pN and velocity in the range of a few tenths of μm s(-1). PMID:27456049

  20. Investigation of piezoelectric impedance-based health monitoring of structure interface debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Li; Chen, Guofeng; Chen, Xiaoming; Qu, Wenzhong

    2016-04-01

    Various damages might occur during the solid rocket motor (SRM) manufacturing/operational phase, and the debonding of propellant/insulator/composite case interfaces is one of damage types which determine the life of a motor. The detection of such interface debonding damage will be beneficial for developing techniques for reliable nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Piezoelectric sensors are widely used for structural health monitoring technique. In particular, electromechanical impedance (EMI) techniques give simple and low-cost solutions for detecting damage in various structures. In this work, piezoelectric EMI structural health monitoring technique is applied to identify the debonding condition of propellant/insulator interface structure using finite element method and experimental investigation. A three-dimensional coupled field finite element model is developed using the software ANSYS and the harmonic analysis is conducted for high-frequency impedance analysis procedure. In the experimental study, the impedance signals were measured from PZT and MFC sensors outside attached to composite case monitoring the different debonding conditions between the propellant and insulator. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) based damage index is conducted to quantify the changes i n impedance for different de bonding conditions and frequency range. Simulation and experimental results confirmed that the EMI technique can be used effectively for detecting the debonding damage in SRM and is expected to be useful for future application of real SRM's SHM.

  1. An on-chip micromagnet frictionometer based on magnetically driven colloids for nano-bio interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinghao; Goudu, Sandhya Rani; Torati, Sri Ramulu; Lim, Byeonghwa; Kim, Kunwoo; Kim, CheolGi

    2016-09-21

    A novel method based on remotely controlled magnetic forces of bio-functionalized superparamagnetic colloids using micromagnet arrays was devised to measure frictional force at the sub-picoNewton (pN) scale for bio-nano-/micro-electromechanical system (bio-NEMS/MEMS) interfaces in liquid. The circumferential motion of the colloids with phase-locked angles around the periphery of the micromagnets under an in-plane rotating magnetic field was governed by a balance between tangential magnetic force and drag force, which consists of viscous and frictional forces. A model correlating the phase-locked angles of the steady colloid rotation was formulated and validated by measuring the angles under controlled magnetic forces. Hence, the frictional forces on the streptavidin/Teflon interface between the colloids and the micromagnet arrays were obtained using the magnetic forces at the phase-locked angles. The friction coefficient for the streptavidin/Teflon interface was estimated to be approximately 0.036 regardless of both vertical force in the range of a few hundred pN and velocity in the range of a few tenths of μm s(-1).

  2. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  3. A Comprehension Based Analysis of Autoflight System Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett (Technical Monitor); Polson, Peter G.

    2003-01-01

    This cooperative agreement supported Dr. Peter Polson's participation in two interrelated research programs. The first was the development of the Situation-Goal-Behavior (SGB) Model that is both a formal description of an avionics system's logic and behavior and a representation of a system that can be understood by avionics designers, pilots, and training developers. The second was the development of a usability inspection method based on an approximate model, RAFIV, of pilot interactions with the Flight Management System (FMS). The main purpose of this report is to integrate the two models and provide a context in order to better characterize the accomplishments of this research program. A major focus of both the previous and this Cooperative Agreement was the development of usability evaluation methods that can be effectively utilized during all phases of the design, development, and certification process of modern avionics systems. The current efforts to validate these methods have involved showing that they generate useful analyses of known operational and training problems with the current generation of avionics systems in modern commercial airliners. This report is organized into seven sections. Following the overview, the second section describes the Goal-Situation-Behavior model and its applications. The next section summarizes the foundations of the RAFIV model and describes the model in some detail. The contents of both these sections are derived from previous reports referenced in footnotes. The fourth section integrates these two models into a complete design evaluation and training development framework. The fifth section contains conclusions and possible future directions for research. References are in Section 6. Section 7 contains the titles and abstracts of the papers paper describing in more detail the results of this research program.

  4. Neural bases of syntax-semantics interface processing.

    PubMed

    Malaia, Evguenia; Newman, Sharlene

    2015-06-01

    The binding problem-question of how information between the modules of the linguistic system is integrated during language processing-is as yet unresolved. The remarkable speed of language processing and comprehension (Pulvermüller et al. 2009) suggests that at least coarse semantic information (e.g. noun animacy) and syntactically-relevant information (e.g. verbal template) are integrated rapidly to allow for coarse comprehension. This EEG study investigated syntax-semantics interface processing during word-by-word sentence reading. As alpha-band neural activity serves as an inhibition mechanism for local networks, we used topographical distribution of alpha power to help identify the timecourse of the binding process. We manipulated the syntactic parameter of verbal event structure, and semantic parameter of noun animacy in reduced relative clauses (RRCs, e.g. "The witness/mansion seized/protected by the agent was in danger"), to investigate the neural bases of interaction between syntactic and semantic networks during sentence processing. The word-by-word stimulus presentation method in the present experiment required manipulation of both syntactic structure and semantic features in the working memory. The results demonstrated a gradient distribution of early components (biphasic posterior P1-N2 and anterior N1-P2) over function words "by" and "the", and the verb, corresponding to facilitation or conflict resulting from the syntactic (telicity) and semantic (animacy) cues in the preceding portion of the sentence. This was followed by assimilation of power distribution in the α band at the second noun. The flattened distribution of α power during the mental manipulation with high demand on working memory-thematic role re-assignment-demonstrates a state of α equilibrium with strong functional coupling between posterior and anterior regions. These results demonstrate that the processing of semantic and syntactic features during sentence comprehension proceeds

  5. Neural bases of syntax-semantics interface processing.

    PubMed

    Malaia, Evguenia; Newman, Sharlene

    2015-06-01

    The binding problem-question of how information between the modules of the linguistic system is integrated during language processing-is as yet unresolved. The remarkable speed of language processing and comprehension (Pulvermüller et al. 2009) suggests that at least coarse semantic information (e.g. noun animacy) and syntactically-relevant information (e.g. verbal template) are integrated rapidly to allow for coarse comprehension. This EEG study investigated syntax-semantics interface processing during word-by-word sentence reading. As alpha-band neural activity serves as an inhibition mechanism for local networks, we used topographical distribution of alpha power to help identify the timecourse of the binding process. We manipulated the syntactic parameter of verbal event structure, and semantic parameter of noun animacy in reduced relative clauses (RRCs, e.g. "The witness/mansion seized/protected by the agent was in danger"), to investigate the neural bases of interaction between syntactic and semantic networks during sentence processing. The word-by-word stimulus presentation method in the present experiment required manipulation of both syntactic structure and semantic features in the working memory. The results demonstrated a gradient distribution of early components (biphasic posterior P1-N2 and anterior N1-P2) over function words "by" and "the", and the verb, corresponding to facilitation or conflict resulting from the syntactic (telicity) and semantic (animacy) cues in the preceding portion of the sentence. This was followed by assimilation of power distribution in the α band at the second noun. The flattened distribution of α power during the mental manipulation with high demand on working memory-thematic role re-assignment-demonstrates a state of α equilibrium with strong functional coupling between posterior and anterior regions. These results demonstrate that the processing of semantic and syntactic features during sentence comprehension proceeds

  6. Penalty-Based Interface Technology for Prediction of Delamination Growth in Laminated Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averill, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    An effective interface element technology has been developed for connecting and simulating crack growth between independently modeled finite element subdomains (e.g., composite plies). This method has been developed using penalty constraints and allows coupling of finite element models whose nodes do not necessarily coincide along their common interface. Additionally, the present formulation leads to a computational approach that is very efficient and completely compatible with existing commercial software. The present interface element has been implemented in the commercial finite element code ABAQUS as a User Element Subroutine (UEL), making it easy to test the approach for a wide range of problems. The interface element technology has been formulated to simulate delamination growth in composite laminates. Thanks to its special features, the interface element approach makes it possible to release portions of the interface surface whose length is smaller than that of the finite elements. In addition, the penalty parameter can vary within the interface element, allowing the damage model to be applied to a desired fraction of the interface between the two meshes. Results for double cantilever beam DCB, end-loaded split (ELS) and fixed-ratio mixed mode (FRMM) specimens are presented. These results are compared to measured data to assess the ability of the present damage model to simulate crack growth.

  7. Intuitive user interface for mobile devices based on visual motion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan; Rangaswamy, Karthik; Zhou, ZhiYing

    2007-02-01

    The small form factor and unergonomic keys of mobile phones call for new and more natural approaches in user interface (UI) design. In this paper, we propose intuitive motion-based UI controls for mobile devices with built-in cameras based on the visual detection of the device's self-motion. We developed a car-racing game to test our new interface, and we conducted a user study to evaluate the accuracy, sensitivity, responsiveness and usability of our proposed system. Results show that our motion-based interface is well received by the users and clearly preferred over traditional button-based controls.

  8. A Contextual Model for Identity Management (IdM) Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The usability of Identity Management (IdM) systems is highly dependent upon design that simplifies the processes of identification, authentication, and authorization. Recent findings reveal two critical problems that degrade IdM usability: (1) unfeasible techniques for managing various digital identifiers, and (2) ambiguous security interfaces.…

  9. The JigCell model builder: a spreadsheet interface for creating biochemical reaction network models.

    PubMed

    Vass, Marc T; Shaffer, Clifford A; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Watson, Layne T; Tyson, John J

    2006-01-01

    Converting a biochemical reaction network to a set of kinetic rate equations is tedious and error prone. We describe known interface paradigms for inputing models of intracellular regulatory networks: graphical layout (diagrams), wizards, scripting languages, and direct entry of chemical equations. We present the JigCell Model Builder, which allows users to define models as a set of reaction equations using a spreadsheet (an example of direct entry of equations) and outputs model definitions in the Systems Biology Markup Language, Level 2. We present the results of two usability studies. The spreadsheet paradigm demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing the number of errors made by modelers when compared to hand conversion of a wiring diagram to differential equations. A comparison of representatives of the four interface paradigms for a simple model of the cell cycle was conducted which measured time, mouse clicks, and keystrokes to enter the model, and the number of screens needed to view the contents of the model. All four paradigms had similar data entry times. The spreadsheet and scripting language approaches require significantly fewer screens to view the models than do the wizard or graphical layout approaches.

  10. Interface reaction between nickel-base self-fluxing alloy coating and steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsubo, F.; Era, H.; Kishitake, K.

    2000-06-01

    The interface reaction between a nickel-base, self-fluxing alloy coating and a steel substrate has been investigated to examine the formation of “pores,” which are observed along the interface of used boiler tubes. It was found that lumpy precipitates form along the interface instead of pores after heating at high temperatures and that the precipitates are of Fe2B boride. The adhesion strength of the coating is not decreased by the formation of Fe2B precipitates along the interface because of the increase of the adhesion due to interdiffusion.

  11. Swimming of a model ciliate near an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Ardekani, A M

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the role of the hydrodynamic forces on a swimming microorganism near an air-liquid interface is studied. The lubrication theory is utilized to analyze hydrodynamic effects within the narrow gap between a flat interface and a small swimmer. By using an archetypal low-Reynolds-number swimming model called "squirmer," we find that the magnitude of the vertical swimming velocity is on the order of O(εlnε), where ε is the ratio of the gap width to the swimmer's body size. The reduced swimming velocity near an interface can explain experimental observations of the aggregation of microorganisms near a liquid interface. PMID:23848775

  12. A New Tool for Inundation Modeling: Community Modeling Interface for Tsunamis (ComMIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V. V.; Moore, C. W.; Greenslade, D. J. M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Badal, R.; Synolakis, C. E.; Kânoğlu, U.

    2011-11-01

    Almost 5 years after the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tragedy, the 10 August 2009 Andaman tsunami demonstrated that accurate forecasting is possible using the tsunami community modeling tool Community Model Interface for Tsunamis (ComMIT). ComMIT is designed for ease of use, and allows dissemination of results to the community while addressing concerns associated with proprietary issues of bathymetry and topography. It uses initial conditions from a precomputed propagation database, has an easy-to-interpret graphical interface, and requires only portable hardware. ComMIT was initially developed for Indian Ocean countries with support from the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To date, more than 60 scientists from 17 countries in the Indian Ocean have been trained and are using it in operational inundation mapping.

  13. User-specific interfaces for clinical data-management systems: an object-based approach.

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, R.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple user-specific visual interfaces are desirable in any computer-based clinical data-management system that is used by different people with different jobs to perform. The programming and maintenance problems of supporting multiple user interfaces to a single information system can be addressed by separating user-interface functionality from data-management subsystems, and by building user interfaces from object-based software components whose functionality is bound to an underlying server-client data-management architecture. Experience with this approach in a patient-tracking system suggests that this object-based approach is viable in the design of a user interface for a clinical information system. PMID:1482880

  14. Modeling Auditory-Haptic Interface Cues from an Analog Multi-line Telephone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Bittner, Rachael M.

    2012-01-01

    The Western Electric Company produced a multi-line telephone during the 1940s-1970s using a six-button interface design that provided robust tactile, haptic and auditory cues regarding the "state" of the communication system. This multi-line telephone was used as a model for a trade study comparison of two interfaces: a touchscreen interface (iPad)) versus a pressure-sensitive strain gauge button interface (Phidget USB interface controllers). The experiment and its results are detailed in the authors' AES 133rd convention paper " Multimodal Information Management: Evaluation of Auditory and Haptic Cues for NextGen Communication Dispays". This Engineering Brief describes how the interface logic, visual indications, and auditory cues of the original telephone were synthesized using MAX/MSP, including the logic for line selection, line hold, and priority line activation.

  15. From Fulcher to PLEVALEX: Issues in Interface Design, Validity and Reliability in Internet Based Language Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia Laborda, Jesus

    2007-01-01

    Interface design and ergonomics, while already studied in much of educational theory, have not until recently been considered in language testing (Fulcher, 2003). In this paper, we revise the design principles of PLEVALEX, a fully operational prototype Internet based language testing platform. Our focus here is to show PLEVALEX's interfaces and…

  16. Multimodal Media Center Interface Based on Speech, Gestures and Haptic Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Markku; Hakulinen, Jaakko; Hella, Juho; Rajaniemi, Juha-Pekka; Melto, Aleksi; Mäkinen, Erno; Rantala, Jussi; Heimonen, Tomi; Laivo, Tuuli; Soronen, Hannu; Hansen, Mervi; Valkama, Pellervo; Miettinen, Toni; Raisamo, Roope

    We present a multimodal media center interface based on speech input, gestures, and haptic feedback (hapticons). In addition, the application includes a zoomable context + focus GUI in tight combination with speech output. The resulting interface is designed for and evaluated with different user groups, including visually and physically impaired users. Finally, we present the key results from its user evaluation and public pilot studies.

  17. A phase field dislocation dynamics model for a bicrystal interface system: An investigation into dislocation slip transmission across cube-on-cube interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.; Hunter, A.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Koslowski, M.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we present a phase field dislocation dynamics formulation designed to treat a system comprised of two materials differing in moduli and lattice parameters that meet at a common interface. We apply the model to calculate the critical stress τcrit required to transmit a perfect dislocation across the bimaterial interface with a cube-on-cube orientation relationship. The calculation of τcrit accounts for the effects of: 1) the lattice mismatch (misfit or coherency stresses), 2) the elastic moduli mismatch (Koehler forces or image stresses), and 3) the formation of the residual dislocation in the interface. Our results show that the value of τcrit associated with the transmission of a dislocation from material 1 to material 2 is not the same as that from material 2 to material 1. Dislocation transmission from the material with the lower shear modulus and larger lattice parameter tends to be easier than the reverse and this apparent asymmetry in τcrit generally increases with increases in either lattice or moduli mismatch or both. In efforts to clarify the roles of lattice and moduli mismatch, we construct an analytical model for τcrit based on the formation energy of the residual dislocation. We show that path dependence in this energetic barrier can explain the asymmetry seen in the calculated τcrit values.

  18. A phase field dislocation dynamics model for a bicrystal interface system: An investigation into dislocation slip transmission across cube-on-cube interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Y.; Hunter, A.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Koslowski, M.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we present a phase field dislocation dynamics formulation designed to treat a system comprised of two materials differing in moduli and lattice parameters that meet at a common interface. We apply the model to calculate the critical stress τcrit required to transmit a perfect dislocation across the bimaterial interface with a cube-on-cube orientation relationship. The calculation of τcrit accounts for the effects of: 1) the lattice mismatch (misfit or coherency stresses), 2) the elastic moduli mismatch (Koehler forces or image stresses), and 3) the formation of the residual dislocation in the interface. Our results show that themore » value of τcrit associated with the transmission of a dislocation from material 1 to material 2 is not the same as that from material 2 to material 1. Dislocation transmission from the material with the lower shear modulus and larger lattice parameter tends to be easier than the reverse and this apparent asymmetry in τcrit generally increases with increases in either lattice or moduli mismatch or both. In efforts to clarify the roles of lattice and moduli mismatch, we construct an analytical model for τcrit based on the formation energy of the residual dislocation. We show that path dependence in this energetic barrier can explain the asymmetry seen in the calculated τcrit values.« less

  19. Task discrimination from myoelectric activity: a learning scheme for EMG-based interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liarokapis, Minas V; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Kyriakopoulos, Kostas J

    2013-06-01

    A learning scheme based on Random Forests is used to discriminate the task to be executed using only myoelectric activity from the upper limb. Three different task features can be discriminated: subspace to move towards, object to be grasped and task to be executed (with the object). The discrimination between the different reach to grasp movements is accomplished with a random forests classifier, which is able to perform efficient features selection, helping us to reduce the number of EMG channels required for task discrimination. The proposed scheme can take advantage of both a classifier and a regressor that cooperate advantageously to split the task space, providing better estimation accuracy with task-specific EMG-based motion decoding models, as reported in [1] and [2]. The whole learning scheme can be used by a series of EMG-based interfaces, that can be found in rehabilitation cases and neural prostheses.

  20. Building Interfaces: Mechanisms, fabrication, and applications at the biotic/abiotic interface for silk fibroin based bioelectronic and biooptical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenckle, Mark

    Recent efforts in bioelectronics and biooptics have led to a shift in the materials and form factors used to make medical devices, including high performance, implantable, and wearable sensors. In this context, biopolymer-based devices must be processed to interface the soft, curvilinear biological world with the rigid, inorganic world of traditional electronics and optics. This poses new material-specific fabrication challenges in designing such devices, which in turn requires further understanding of the fundamental physical behaviors of the materials in question. As a biopolymer, silk fibroin protein has remarkable promise in this space, due to its bioresorbability, mechanical strength, optical clarity, ability to be reshaped on the micro- and nano-scale, and ability to stabilize labile compounds. Application of this material to devices at the biotic/abiotic interface will require the development of fabrication techniques for nano-patterning, lithography, multilayer adhesion, and transfer printing in silk materials. In this work, we address this need through fundamental study of the thermal and diffusional properties of silk protein as it relates to these fabrication strategies. We then leverage these properties to fabricate devices well suited to the biotic/abiotic interface in three areas: shelf-ready sensing, implantable transient electronics, and wearable biosensing. These example devices will illustrate the advantages of silk in this class of bioelectronic and biooptical devices, from fundamentals through application, and contribute to a silk platform for the development of future devices that combine biology with high technology.

  1. Discrete Kalman Filter based Sensor Fusion for Robust Accessibility Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghersi, I.; Mariño, M.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    Human-machine interfaces have evolved, benefiting from the growing access to devices with superior, embedded signal-processing capabilities, as well as through new sensors that allow the estimation of movements and gestures, resulting in increasingly intuitive interfaces. In this context, sensor fusion for the estimation of the spatial orientation of body segments allows to achieve more robust solutions, overcoming specific disadvantages derived from the use of isolated sensors, such as the sensitivity of magnetic-field sensors to external influences, when used in uncontrolled environments. In this work, a method for the combination of image-processing data and angular-velocity registers from a 3D MEMS gyroscope, through a Discrete-time Kalman Filter, is proposed and deployed as an alternate user interface for mobile devices, in which an on-screen pointer is controlled with head movements. Results concerning general performance of the method are presented, as well as a comparative analysis, under a dedicated test application, with results from a previous version of this system, in which the relative-orientation information was acquired directly from MEMS sensors (3D magnetometer-accelerometer). These results show an improved response for this new version of the pointer, both in terms of precision and response time, while keeping many of the benefits that were highlighted for its predecessor, giving place to a complementary method for signal acquisition that can be used as an alternative-input device, as well as for accessibility solutions.

  2. Optical switch based on the electrically controlled liquid crystal interface.

    PubMed

    Komar, Andrei A; Tolstik, Alexei L; Melnikova, Elena A; Muravsky, Alexander A

    2015-06-01

    The peculiarities of the linearly polarized light beam reflection at the interface within the bulk of a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell with different orientations of the director are analyzed. Two methods to create the interface are considered. Combination of the planar and homeotropic orientations of the NLC director is realized by means of a spatially structured electrode under the applied voltage. In-plane patterned azimuthal alignment of the NLC director is created by the patterned rubbing alignment technique. All possible orthogonal orientations of the LC director are considered; the configurations for realization of total internal reflection are determined. The revealed relationship between the propagation of optical beams in a liquid crystal material and polarization of laser radiation has enabled realization of the spatial separation for the orthogonally polarized light beams at the interface between two regions of NLC with different director orientations (domains). Owing to variations in the applied voltage and, hence, in the refractive index gradient, the light beam propagation directions may be controlled electrically. PMID:26192675

  3. Mesh Smoothing Algorithm Applied to a Finite Element Model of the Brain for Improved Brain-Skull Interface.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Mireille E; Miller, Logan E; Urban, Jillian E; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    The brain-skull interface plays an important role in the strain and pressure response of the brain due to impact. In this study, a finite element (FE) model was developed from a brain atlas, representing an adult brain, by converting each 1mm isotropic voxel into a single element of the same size using a custom code developed in MATLAB. This model includes the brain (combined cerebrum and cerebellum), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), ventricles, and a rigid skull. A voxel-based approach to develop a FE model causes the outer surface of each part to be stair-stepped, which may affect the stress and strain measurements at interfaces between parts. To improve the interaction between the skull, CSF, and brain surfaces, a previously developed mesh smoothing algorithm based on a Laplacian non-shrinking smoothing algorithm was applied to the FE model. This algorithm not only applies smoothing to the surface of the model, but also to the interfaces between the brain, CSF, and skull, while preserving volume and element quality. Warpage, jacobian, aspect ratio, and skew were evaluated and reveal that >99% of the elements retain good element quality. Future work includes implementation of contact definitions to accurately represent the brain-skull interface and to ultimately better understand and predict head injury. PMID:25996716

  4. Reconciling lattice and continuum models for polymers at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleer, G. J.; Skvortsov, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that lattice and continuum descriptions for polymers at interfaces are, in principle, equivalent. In order to compare the two models quantitatively, one needs a relation between the inverse extrapolation length c as used in continuum theories and the lattice adsorption parameter Δχs (defined with respect to the critical point). So far, this has been done only for ideal chains with zero segment volume in extremely dilute solutions. The relation Δχs(c) is obtained by matching the boundary conditions in the two models. For depletion (positive c and Δχs) the result is very simple: Δχs = ln(1 + c/5). For adsorption (negative c and Δχs) the ideal-chain treatment leads to an unrealistic divergence for strong adsorption: c decreases without bounds and the train volume fraction exceeds unity. This due to the fact that for ideal chains the volume filling cannot be accounted for. We extend the treatment to real chains with finite segment volume at finite concentrations, for both good and theta solvents. For depletion the volume filling is not important and the ideal-chain result Δχs = ln(1 + c/5) is generally valid also for non-ideal chains, at any concentration, chain length, or solvency. Depletion profiles can be accurately described in terms of two length scales: ρ = tanh2[(z + p)/δ], where the depletion thickness (distal length) δ is a known function of chain length and polymer concentration, and the proximal length p is a known function of c (or Δχs) and δ. For strong repulsion p = 1/c (then the proximal length equals the extrapolation length), for weaker repulsion p depends also on chain length and polymer concentration (then p is smaller than 1/c). In very dilute solutions we find quantitative agreement with previous analytical results for ideal chains, for any chain length, down to oligomers. In more concentrated solutions there is excellent agreement with numerical self-consistent depletion profiles, for both weak and strong

  5. Transparent mediation-based access to multiple yeast data sources using an ontology driven interface

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae is recognized as a model system representing a simple eukaryote whose genome can be easily manipulated. Information solicited by scientists on its biological entities (Proteins, Genes, RNAs...) is scattered within several data sources like SGD, Yeastract, CYGD-MIPS, BioGrid, PhosphoGrid, etc. Because of the heterogeneity of these sources, querying them separately and then manually combining the returned results is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists most of whom are not bioinformatics expert. It also reduces and limits the use that can be made on the available data. Results To provide transparent and simultaneous access to yeast sources, we have developed YeastMed: an XML and mediator-based system. In this paper, we present our approach in developing this system which takes advantage of SB-KOM to perform the query transformation needed and a set of Data Services to reach the integrated data sources. The system is composed of a set of modules that depend heavily on XML and Semantic Web technologies. User queries are expressed in terms of a domain ontology through a simple form-based web interface. Conclusions YeastMed is the first mediation-based system specific for integrating yeast data sources. It was conceived mainly to help biologists to find simultaneously relevant data from multiple data sources. It has a biologist-friendly interface easy to use. The system is available at http://www.khaos.uma.es/yeastmed/. PMID:22372975

  6. Mathematical analysis of a sharp-diffuse interfaces model for seawater intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, C.; Diédhiou, M. M.; Rosier, C.

    2015-10-01

    We consider a new model mixing sharp and diffuse interface approaches for seawater intrusion phenomena in free aquifers. More precisely, a phase field model is introduced in the boundary conditions on the virtual sharp interfaces. We thus include in the model the existence of diffuse transition zones but we preserve the simplified structure allowing front tracking. The three-dimensional problem then reduces to a two-dimensional model involving a strongly coupled system of partial differential equations of parabolic type describing the evolution of the depths of the two free surfaces, that is the interface between salt- and freshwater and the water table. We prove the existence of a weak solution for the model completed with initial and boundary conditions. We also prove that the depths of the two interfaces satisfy a coupled maximum principle.

  7. Coherent description of transport across the water interface: From nanodroplets to climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Trinh, Thuat T.; Lervik, Anders; Badam, Vijay Kumar; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-03-01

    Transport of mass and energy across the vapor-liquid interface of water is of central importance in a variety of contexts such as climate models, weather forecasts, and power plants. We provide a complete description of the transport properties of the vapor-liquid interface of water with the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Transport across the planar interface is then described by 3 interface transfer coefficients where 9 more coefficients extend the description to curved interfaces. We obtain all coefficients in the range 260-560 K by taking advantage of water evaporation experiments at low temperatures, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005 rigid-water-molecule model at high temperatures, and square gradient theory to represent the whole range. Square gradient theory is used to link the region where experiments are possible (low vapor pressures) to the region where nonequilibrium molecular dynamics can be done (high vapor pressures). This enables a description of transport across the planar water interface, interfaces of bubbles, and droplets, as well as interfaces of water structures with complex geometries. The results are likely to improve the description of evaporation and condensation of water at widely different scales; they open a route to improve the understanding of nanodroplets on a small scale and the precision of climate models on a large scale.

  8. Modulation Depth Estimation and Variable Selection in State-Space Models for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid developments in neural interface technology are making it possible to record increasingly large signal sets of neural activity. Various factors such as asymmetrical information distribution and across-channel redundancy may, however, limit the benefit of high-dimensional signal sets, and the increased computational complexity may not yield corresponding improvement in system performance. High-dimensional system models may also lead to overfitting and lack of generalizability. To address these issues, we present a generalized modulation depth measure using the state-space framework that quantifies the tuning of a neural signal channel to relevant behavioral covariates. For a dynamical system, we develop computationally efficient procedures for estimating modulation depth from multivariate data. We show that this measure can be used to rank neural signals and select an optimal channel subset for inclusion in the neural decoding algorithm. We present a scheme for choosing the optimal subset based on model order selection criteria. We apply this method to neuronal ensemble spike-rate decoding in neural interfaces, using our framework to relate motor cortical activity with intended movement kinematics. With offline analysis of intracortical motor imagery data obtained from individuals with tetraplegia using the BrainGate neural interface, we demonstrate that our variable selection scheme is useful for identifying and ranking the most information-rich neural signals. We demonstrate that our approach offers several orders of magnitude lower complexity but virtually identical decoding performance compared to greedy search and other selection schemes. Our statistical analysis shows that the modulation depth of human motor cortical single-unit signals is well characterized by the generalized Pareto distribution. Our variable selection scheme has wide applicability in problems involving multisensor signal modeling and estimation in biomedical engineering systems. PMID

  9. Modulation depth estimation and variable selection in state-space models for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malik, Wasim Q; Hochberg, Leigh R; Donoghue, John P; Brown, Emery N

    2015-02-01

    Rapid developments in neural interface technology are making it possible to record increasingly large signal sets of neural activity. Various factors such as asymmetrical information distribution and across-channel redundancy may, however, limit the benefit of high-dimensional signal sets, and the increased computational complexity may not yield corresponding improvement in system performance. High-dimensional system models may also lead to overfitting and lack of generalizability. To address these issues, we present a generalized modulation depth measure using the state-space framework that quantifies the tuning of a neural signal channel to relevant behavioral covariates. For a dynamical system, we develop computationally efficient procedures for estimating modulation depth from multivariate data. We show that this measure can be used to rank neural signals and select an optimal channel subset for inclusion in the neural decoding algorithm. We present a scheme for choosing the optimal subset based on model order selection criteria. We apply this method to neuronal ensemble spike-rate decoding in neural interfaces, using our framework to relate motor cortical activity with intended movement kinematics. With offline analysis of intracortical motor imagery data obtained from individuals with tetraplegia using the BrainGate neural interface, we demonstrate that our variable selection scheme is useful for identifying and ranking the most information-rich neural signals. We demonstrate that our approach offers several orders of magnitude lower complexity but virtually identical decoding performance compared to greedy search and other selection schemes. Our statistical analysis shows that the modulation depth of human motor cortical single-unit signals is well characterized by the generalized Pareto distribution. Our variable selection scheme has wide applicability in problems involving multisensor signal modeling and estimation in biomedical engineering systems. PMID

  10. Toward efficient fiber-based quantum interface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soshenko, Vladimir; Vorobyov, Vadim V.; Bolshedvorsky, Stepan; Lebedev, Nikolay; Akimov, Alexey V.; Sorokin, Vadim; Smolyaninov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    NV center in diamond is attracting a lot of attention in quantum information processing community [1]. Been spin system in clean and well-controlled environment of diamond it shows outstanding performance as quantum memory even at room temperature, spin control with single shot optical readout and possibility to build up quantum registers even on single NV center. Moreover, NV centers could be used as high-resolution sensitive elements of detectors of magnetic or electric field, temperature, tension, force or rotation. For all of these applications collection of the light emitted by NV center is crucial point. There were number of approaches suggested to address this issue, proposing use of surface plasmoms [2], manufacturing structures in diamond [3] etc. One of the key feature of any practically important interface is compatibility with the fiber technology. Several groups attacking this problem using various approaches. One of them is placing of nanodiamonds in the holes of photonic crystal fiber [4], another is utilization of AFM to pick and place nanodiamond on the tapered fiber[5]. We have developed a novel technique of placing a nanodiamond with single NV center on the tapered fiber by controlled transfer of a nanodiamond from one "donor" tapered fiber to the "target" clean tapered fiber. We verify our ability to transfer only single color centers by means of measurement of second order correlation function. With this technique, we were able to double collection efficiency of confocal microscope. The majority of the factors limiting the collection of photons via optical fiber are technical and may be removed allowing order of magnitude improved in collection. We also discuss number of extensions of this technique to all fiber excitation and integration with nanostructures. References: [1] Marcus W. Doherty, Neil B. Manson, Paul Delaney, Fedor Jelezko, Jörg Wrachtrup, Lloyd C.L. Hollenberg , " The nitrogen-vacancy colour centre in diamond," Physics Reports

  11. Properties of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Si interface: An ab initio study of a model geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Höffling, Benjamin; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2014-05-15

    The In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001)-Si(001) heterojunction is studied by means of the ab initio density functional theory, quasiparticle corrections, and the supercell method. We construct a model interface based on the idea of a coincidence lattice, only Si-O interface bonds and biaxially strained In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The properties of the interface and their consequences for the junction are mainly described in terms of electronic band levels and charge redistribution. The results indicate a type II heterostructure caused by interface dipole alteration due to electron rearrangements.

  12. Pig dorsum model for examining impaired wound healing at the skin-implant interface of percutaneous devices

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Brian Mueller; Betz, Daniel Holod; Ford, Taylor Ann; Beck, James Peter; Bloebaum, Roy Drake; Jeyapalina, Sujee

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous medical devices are indispensable in contemporary clinical practice, but the associated incidence of low to moderate mortality infections represents a significant economic and personal cost to patients and healthcare providers. Percutaneous osseointegrated prosthetics also suffer from a similar risk of infection, limiting their clinical acceptance and usage in patients with limb loss. We hypothesized that transepidermal water loss management (TEWL) at the skin-implant interface may improve and maintain a stable skin-to-implant interface. In this study, skin reactions in a 3-month, pig dorsum model were assessed using standard histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative image analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis of peri-implant tissue explants showed evidence of: continuous healing (cytokeratin 6+), hypergranulation tissue (procollagen+), hyper-vascularity (Collagen 4+), and the presence of fibrocytes (CD45+ and procollagen type 1+). Importantly, the gross skin response was correlated to a previous load-bearing percutaneous osseointegrated prosthetic sheep study conducted in our lab. The skin responses of the two models indicated a potentially shared mechanism of wound healing behavior at the skin-implant interface. Although TEWL management did not reduce skin migration at the skin-implant interface, the correlation of qualitative and quantitative measures validated the pig dorsum model as a high-throughput platform for translational science based percutaneous interface investigations in the future. PMID:23832453

  13. Interfacing air pathway models with other media models for impact assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.L.

    1980-10-01

    The assessment of the impacts/effects of a coal conversion industry on human health, ecological systems, property and aesthetics requires knowledge about effluent and fugitive emissions, dispersion of pollutants in abiotic media, chemical and physical transformations of pollutants during transport, and pollutant fate passing through biotic pathways. Some of the environmental impacts that result from coal conversion facility effluents are subtle, acute, subacute or chronic effects in humans and other ecosystem members, acute or chronic damage of materials and property, odors, impaired atmospheric visibility, and impacts on local, regional and global weather and climate. This great variety of impacts and effects places great demands on the abiotic and biotic numerical simulators (modelers) in terms of time and space scales, transformation rates, and system structure. This paper primarily addresses the demands placed on the atmospheric analyst. The paper considers the important air pathway processes, the interfacing of air pathway models with other media models, and the classes of air pathway models currently available. In addition, a strong plea is made for interaction and communication between all modeling groups to promote efficient construction of intermedia models that truly interface across pathway boundaries.

  14. Ab-initio molecular modeling of interfaces in tantalum-carbon system

    SciTech Connect

    Balani, Kantesh; Mungole, Tarang; Bakshi, Srinivasa Rao; Agarwal, Arvind

    2012-03-15

    Processing of ultrahigh temperature TaC ceramic material with sintering additives of B{sub 4}C and reinforcement of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) gives rise to possible formation of several interfaces (Ta{sub 2}C-TaC, TaC-CNT, Ta{sub 2}C-CNT, TaB{sub 2}-TaC, and TaB{sub 2}-CNT) that could influence the resultant properties. Current work focuses on interfaces developed during spark plasma sintering of TaC-system and performing ab initio molecular modeling of the interfaces generated during processing of TaC-B{sub 4}C and TaC-CNT composites. The energy of the various interfaces has been evaluated and compared with TaC-Ta{sub 2}C interface. The iso-surface electronic contours are extracted from the calculations eliciting the enhanced stability of TaC-CNT interface by 72.2%. CNTs form stable interfaces with Ta{sub 2}C and TaB{sub 2} phases with a reduction in the energy by 35.8% and 40.4%, respectively. The computed Ta-C-B interfaces are also compared with experimentally observed interfaces in high resolution TEM images.

  15. Stochastic modelling of a large subduction interface earthquake in Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois-Holden, C.; Zhao, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Wellington region, home of New Zealand's capital city, is cut by a number of major right-lateral strike slip faults, and is underlain by the currently locked west-dipping subduction interface between the down going Pacific Plate, and the over-riding Australian Plate. A potential cause of significant earthquake loss in the Wellington region is a large magnitude (perhaps 8+) "subduction earthquake" on the Australia-Pacific plate interface, which lies ~23 km beneath Wellington City. "It's Our Fault" is a project involving a comprehensive study of Wellington's earthquake risk. Its objective is to position Wellington city to become more resilient, through an encompassing study of the likelihood of large earthquakes, and the effects and impacts of these earthquakes on humans and the built environment. As part of the "It's Our Fault" project, we are working on estimating ground motions from potential large plate boundary earthquakes. We present the latest results on ground motion simulations in terms of response spectra and acceleration time histories. First we characterise the potential interface rupture area based on previous geodetically-derived estimates interface of slip deficit. Then, we entertain a suitable range of source parameters, including various rupture areas, moment magnitudes, stress drops, slip distributions and rupture propagation directions. Our comprehensive study also includes simulations from historical large world subduction events translated into the New Zealand subduction context, such as the 2003 M8.3 Tokachi-Oki Japan earthquake and the M8.8 2010 Chili earthquake. To model synthetic seismograms and the corresponding response spectra we employed the EXSIM code developed by Atkinson et al. (2009), with a regional attenuation model based on the 3D attenuation model for the lower North-Island which has been developed by Eberhart-Phillips et al. (2005). The resulting rupture scenarios all produce long duration shaking, and peak ground

  16. A Menu-Driven Interface to Unix-Based Resources

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth A.

    1989-01-01

    Unix has often been overlooked in the past as a viable operating system for anyone other than computer scientists. Its terseness, non-mnemonic nature of the commands, and the lack of user-friendly software to run under it are but a few of the user-related reasons which have been cited. It is, nevertheless, the operating system of choice in many cases. This paper describes a menu-driven interface to Unix which provides user-friendlier access to the software resources available on the computers running under Unix.

  17. A phase-field point-particle model for particle-laden interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chuan; Botto, Lorenzo

    2014-11-01

    The irreversible attachment of solid particles to fluid interfaces is exploited in a variety of applications, such as froth flotation and Pickering emulsions. Critical in these applications is to predict particle transport in and near the interface, and the two-way coupling between the particles and the interface. While it is now possible to carry out particle-resolved simulations of these systems, simulating relatively large systems with many particles remains challenging. We present validation studies and preliminary results for a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation method, in which the dynamics of the interface is fully-resolved by a phase-field approach, while the particles are treated in the ``point-particle'' approximation. With this method, which represents a compromise between the competing needs of resolving particle and interface scale phenomena, we are able to simulate the adsorption of a large number of particles in the interface of drops, and particle-interface interactions during the spinodal coarsening of a multiphase system. While this method models the adsorption phenomenon efficiently and with reasonable accuracy, it still requires understanding subtle issues related to the modelling of hydrodynamic and capillary forces for particles in contact with interface.

  18. A coupled damage-plasticity model for the cyclic behavior of shear-loaded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2015-12-01

    The present work proposes a novel thermodynamically consistent model for the behavior of interfaces under shear (i.e. mode-II) cyclic loading conditions. The interface behavior is defined coupling damage and plasticity. The admissible states' domain is formulated restricting the tangential interface stress to non-negative values, which makes the model suitable e.g. for interfaces with thin adherends. Linear softening is assumed so as to reproduce, under monotonic conditions, a bilinear mode-II interface law. Two damage variables govern respectively the loss of strength and of stiffness of the interface. The proposed model needs the evaluation of only four independent parameters, i.e. three defining the monotonic mode-II interface law, and one ruling the fatigue behavior. This limited number of parameters and their clear physical meaning facilitate experimental calibration. Model predictions are compared with experimental results on fiber reinforced polymer sheets externally bonded to concrete involving different load histories, and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  19. Clast-based kinematic vorticity gauges: The effects of slip at matrix/clast interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Scott E.; Lenferink, Hendrik J.; Price, Nancy A.; Marsh, Jeffrey H.; Koons, Peter O.; West, David P., Jr.; Beane, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    Clast-based methods for estimating the mean kinematic vorticity number Wm are compromised by strain localization at the clast margins. Localization increases with modal matrix mica content as determined with samples from the Sandhill Corner mylonite zone - a crustal-scale, high-strain, strike-slip shear zone in Maine. Using these samples, we estimate Wm with the oblique quartz shape-preferred orientation and rigid-clast rotation methods. The rigid-clast rotation method yields much lower values for Wm than the quartz method. To investigate whether or not slip at the matrix/clast interface can explain the discrepancy in calculated Wm, we conducted numerical modeling of rigid clasts enveloped by a low viscosity layer, both embedded within a shearing viscous matrix. Within this dynamic framework, we carried out numerical sensitivity analyses in which we varied the viscosity ratio between the lubricating layer and the surrounding matrix, the thickness of the lubricating layer, and the kinematic vorticity number of the bulk flow. Our data and numerical results succeed in explaining why Wm estimates from clast-based rotational methods are typically lower than estimates from other methods, and this has implications for testing hypotheses related, for example, to vorticity partitioning in oblique convergent settings, crustal-scale extrusion or channel flow, and exhumation of ultra-high pressure rocks, all of which rely on robust estimates of Wm. The relation between the shape preferred orientations of clasts and modal mica content lead to the hypothesis that mica is the cause of the lubrication at clast/matrix interfaces. If so, then we surmise that mica fish should be self-lubricating and would therefore form an end-member shape preferred orientation, regardless of matrix modal mica content. The unique role of mica allows us to speculate about the bounds on viscosity contrast between the matrix and lubricated clast interfaces.

  20. Modeling interface roughness scattering in a layered seabed for normal-incident chirp sonar signals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dajun; Hefner, Brian T

    2012-04-01

    Downward looking sonar, such as the chirp sonar, is widely used as a sediment survey tool in shallow water environments. Inversion of geo-acoustic parameters from such sonar data precedes the availability of forward models. An exact numerical model is developed to initiate the simulation of the acoustic field produced by such a sonar in the presence of multiple rough interfaces. The sediment layers are assumed to be fluid layers with non-intercepting rough interfaces.

  1. Self-consistent quantum mechanical model for the description of excitation energy transfers in molecules at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Curutchet, Carles; Cammi, Roberto; Mennucci, Benedetta; Corni, Stefano

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present a quantum mechanical model to study excitation energy transfers in molecular systems located in the vicinity of an interface. The model is based on an approximate solution of the time-dependent density functional theory equations and solvent effects are introduced in terms of the integral equation formalism version of the polarizable continuum model. A unique characteristic of this model is that environment induced polarizing effects on the interacting molecules and screening effects on their interaction are included in a coherent and self-consistent way. The model is applied to different situations of the ethylene dimer in the vicinity of an air/water interface and compared with an alternative quantum electrodynamics approach. PMID:16942244

  2. Optical simulation of photovoltaic modules with multiple textured interfaces using the matrix-based formalism OPTOS.

    PubMed

    Tucher, Nico; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Gebrewold, Habtamu; Kiefel, Peter; Höhn, Oliver; Hauser, Hubert; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2016-07-11

    The OPTOS formalism is a matrix-based approach to determine the optical properties of textured optical sheets. It is extended within this work to enable the modelling of systems with an arbitrary number of textured, plane-parallel interfaces. A matrix-based system description is derived that accounts for the optical reflection and transmission interaction between all textured interfaces. Using OPTOS, we calculate reflectance and absorptance of complete photovoltaic module stacks, which consist of encapsulated silicon solar cells featuring textures that operate in different optical regimes. As exemplary systems, solar cells with and without module encapsulation are shown to exhibit a considerable absorptance gain if the random pyramid front side texture is combined with a diffractive rear side grating. A variation of the sunlight's angle of incidence reveals that the grating gain is almost not affected for incoming polar angles up to 60°. Considering as well the good agreement with alternative simulation techniques, OPTOS is demonstrated to be a versatile and efficient method for the optical analysis of photovoltaic modules. PMID:27410896

  3. Optical simulation of photovoltaic modules with multiple textured interfaces using the matrix-based formalism OPTOS.

    PubMed

    Tucher, Nico; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Gebrewold, Habtamu; Kiefel, Peter; Höhn, Oliver; Hauser, Hubert; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2016-07-11

    The OPTOS formalism is a matrix-based approach to determine the optical properties of textured optical sheets. It is extended within this work to enable the modelling of systems with an arbitrary number of textured, plane-parallel interfaces. A matrix-based system description is derived that accounts for the optical reflection and transmission interaction between all textured interfaces. Using OPTOS, we calculate reflectance and absorptance of complete photovoltaic module stacks, which consist of encapsulated silicon solar cells featuring textures that operate in different optical regimes. As exemplary systems, solar cells with and without module encapsulation are shown to exhibit a considerable absorptance gain if the random pyramid front side texture is combined with a diffractive rear side grating. A variation of the sunlight's angle of incidence reveals that the grating gain is almost not affected for incoming polar angles up to 60°. Considering as well the good agreement with alternative simulation techniques, OPTOS is demonstrated to be a versatile and efficient method for the optical analysis of photovoltaic modules.

  4. Diffusion-controlled interface kinetics-inclusive system-theoretic propagation models for molecular communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A. K.; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Inspired by biological systems, molecular communication has been proposed as a new communication paradigm that uses biochemical signals to transfer information from one nano device to another over a short distance. The biochemical nature of the information transfer process implies that for molecular communication purposes, the development of molecular channel models should take into consideration diffusion phenomenon as well as the physical/biochemical kinetic possibilities of the process. The physical and biochemical kinetics arise at the interfaces between the diffusion channel and the transmitter/receiver units. These interfaces are herein termed molecular antennas. In this paper, we present the deterministic propagation model of the molecular communication between an immobilized nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver, where the emission and reception kinetics are taken into consideration. Specifically, we derived closed-form system-theoretic models and expressions for configurations that represent different communication systems based on the type of molecular antennas used. The antennas considered are the nanopores at the transmitter and the surface receptor proteins/enzymes at the receiver. The developed models are simulated to show the influence of parameters such as the receiver radius, surface receptor protein/enzyme concentration, and various reaction rate constants. Results show that the effective receiver surface area and the rate constants are important to the system's output performance. Assuming high rate of catalysis, the analysis of the frequency behavior of the developed propagation channels in the form of transfer functions shows significant difference introduce by the inclusion of the molecular antennas into the diffusion-only model. It is also shown that for t > > 0 and with the information molecules' concentration greater than the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constant of the systems, the inclusion of surface receptors proteins and enzymes in the models

  5. Predicting the pKa and stability of organic acids and bases at an oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M P; Olsson, M H M; Stipp, S L S

    2014-06-10

    We have used density functional theory and the implicit solvent model, COSMO-RS, to investigate how the acidity constant, pKa, of organic acids and bases adsorbed at the organic compound-aqueous solution interface changes, compared to its value in the aqueous phase. The pKa determine the surface charge density of the molecules that accumulate at the fluid-fluid interface. We have estimated the pKa by comparing the stability of the protonated and unprotonated forms of a series of molecules in the bulk aqueous solution and at an interface where parts of each molecule reside in the hydrophobic phase and the rest remains in the hydrophilic phase. We found that the pKa for acids is shifted by ∼1 pH unit to higher values compared to the bulk water pKa, whereas they are shifted to lower values by a similar amount for bases. Because this pKa shift is similar in magnitude for each of the molecules studied, we propose that the pKa for molecules at a water-organic compound interface can easily be predicted by adding a small shift to the aqueous pKa. This shift is general and correlates with the functional group. We also found that the relative composition of molecules at the fluid-fluid interface is not the same as in the bulk. For example, species such as carboxylic acids are enriched at the interface, where they can dominate surface properties, even when they are a modest component in the bulk fluid. For high surface concentrations of carboxylic acid groups at an interface, such as a self-assembled monolayer, we have demonstrated that the pKa depends on the degree of deprotonation through direct hydrogen bonding between protonated and deprotonated acidic headgroups.

  6. Near interface oxide trap capture kinetics in metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors: Modeling and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauza, D.

    1998-12-01

    The traps situated in the oxide in the vicinity of the Si-SiO2 interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors, are studied. This is achieved using a new technique, based on the measurement of drain current transients and called T-CDLTS (tunnel-current deep level transient spectroscopy). For this, the traps are repeatedly filled with majority carriers using gate pulses which bias the device in accumulation. Each time the device returns in inversion, the drain current transient induced by the filling of the traps with minority carriers is monitored. A model for extracting the interface trap depth concentration profiles from the current transients is derived. It is based on Shockley-Read-Hall's statistics [R. N. Hall, Phys. Rev. 87, 387 (1952), W. Shockley and W. T. Read, Phys. Rev. 87, 835 (1952)] and on the Heiman and Warfield tunneling model [F. P. Heiman and G. Warfield, IEEE Trans. Electron Devices ED-12, 167 (1965)]. The slow trap densities measured in a virgin device agree with those obtained in state-of-the-art MOS transistors using noise measurements. In virgin and stressed devices they also compare favorably with the trap densities obtained using a recently proposed charge pumping technique. The evolution, with the experimental conditions, of the trap concentrations measured is discussed with respect to that expected from the model. In some experimental conditions, a very good agreement is obtained while in some others, discrepancies are observed. These discrepancies are discussed as regard to the hypothesis introduced in the model.

  7. The GIS weasel - An interface for the development of spatial information in modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viger, R.J.; Markstrom, S.M.; Leavesley, G.H.; ,

    2005-01-01

    The GIS Weasel is a map and Graphical User Interface (GUI) driven tool that has been developed as an aid to modelers in the delineation, characterization of geographic features, and their parameterization for use in distributed or lumped parameter physical process models. The interface does not require user expertise in geographic information systems (GIS). The user does need knowledge of how the model will use the output from the GIS Weasel. The GIS Weasel uses Workstation ArcInfo and its the Grid extension. The GIS Weasel will run on all platforms that Workstation ArcInfo runs (i.e. numerous flavors of Unix and Microsoft Windows).The GIS Weasel requires an input ArcInfo grid of some topographical description of the Area of Interest (AOI). This is normally a digital elevation model, but can be the surface of a ground water table or any other data that flow direction can be resolved from. The user may define the AOI as a custom drainage area based on an interactively specified watershed outlet point, or use a previously created map. The user is then able to use any combination of the GIS Weasel's tool set to create one or more maps for depicting different kinds of geographic features. Once the spatial feature maps have been prepared, then the GIS Weasel s many parameterization routines can be used to create descriptions of each element in each of the user s created maps. Over 200 parameterization routines currently exist, generating information about shape, area, and topological association with other features of the same or different maps, as well many types of information based on ancillary data layers such as soil and vegetation properties. These tools easily integrate other similarly formatted data sets.

  8. Ab initio modelling of UN grain boundary interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotomin, E. A.; Zhukovkii, Yu F.; Bocharov, D.; Gryaznov, D.

    2012-08-01

    The uranium mononitride (UN) is a material considered as a promising candidate for Generation-IV nuclear reactor fuels. Unfortunately, oxygen in air affects UN fuel performance and stability. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of oxygen adsorption and further UN oxidation in the bulk and at surface. Recently, we performed a detailed study on oxygen interaction with UN surface using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We were able to identify an atomistic mechanism of UN surface oxidation consisting of several important steps, starting with the oxygen molecule dissociation and finishing with oxygen atom incorporation into vacancies on the surface. However, in reality most of processes occur at the interfaces and on UN grain boundaries. In this study, we present the results of first DFT calculations on O behaviour inside UN grain boundaries performed using GGA exchange-correlation functional PW91 as implemented into the VASP computer code. We consider a simple interface (310)[001](36.8°) tilt grain boundary. The N vacancy formation energies and energies of O incorporation into pre-existing vacancies in the grain boundaries as well as O solution energies were compared with those obtained for the UN (001) and (110) surfaces

  9. Multi-scale modeling of mycosubtilin lipopeptides at the air/water interface: structure and optical second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Loison, Claire; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Benichou, Emmanuel; Besson, Françoise; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2014-02-01

    Monolayers of the lipopeptide mycosubtilin are studied at the air/water interface. Their structure is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. All-atom models suggest that the lipopeptide is flexible and aggregates at the interface. To achieve simulation times of several microseconds, a coarse-grained (CG) model based on the MARTINI force field was also used. These CG simulations describe the formation of half-micelles at the interface for surface densities up to 1 lipopeptide per nm(2). In these aggregates, the tyrosine side chain orientation is found to be constrained: on average, its main axis, as defined along the C-OH bond, aligns along the interface normal and points towards the air side. The origin of the optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from mycosubtilin monolayers at the air/water interface is also investigated. The molecular hyperpolarizability of the lipopeptide is obtained from quantum chemistry calculations. The tyrosine side chain contribution to the hyperpolarizability is found to be dominant. The orientation distribution of tyrosine, associated with a dominant hyperpolarizability component along the C-OH bond of the tyrosine, yields a ratio of the susceptibility elements χ((2))(ZZZ)/χ((2))(ZXX) consistent with the experimental measurements recently reported by M. N. Nasir et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 19919].

  10. Multi-scale modeling of mycosubtilin lipopeptides at the air/water interface: structure and optical second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Loison, Claire; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Benichou, Emmanuel; Besson, Françoise; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2014-02-01

    Monolayers of the lipopeptide mycosubtilin are studied at the air/water interface. Their structure is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. All-atom models suggest that the lipopeptide is flexible and aggregates at the interface. To achieve simulation times of several microseconds, a coarse-grained (CG) model based on the MARTINI force field was also used. These CG simulations describe the formation of half-micelles at the interface for surface densities up to 1 lipopeptide per nm(2). In these aggregates, the tyrosine side chain orientation is found to be constrained: on average, its main axis, as defined along the C-OH bond, aligns along the interface normal and points towards the air side. The origin of the optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from mycosubtilin monolayers at the air/water interface is also investigated. The molecular hyperpolarizability of the lipopeptide is obtained from quantum chemistry calculations. The tyrosine side chain contribution to the hyperpolarizability is found to be dominant. The orientation distribution of tyrosine, associated with a dominant hyperpolarizability component along the C-OH bond of the tyrosine, yields a ratio of the susceptibility elements χ((2))(ZZZ)/χ((2))(ZXX) consistent with the experimental measurements recently reported by M. N. Nasir et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 19919]. PMID:24346061

  11. General atomistic approach for modeling metal-semiconductor interfaces using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stradi, Daniele; Martinez, Umberto; Blom, Anders; Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    Metal-semiconductor contacts are a pillar of modern semiconductor technology. Historically, their microscopic understanding has been hampered by the inability of traditional analytical and numerical methods to fully capture the complex physics governing their operating principles. Here we introduce an atomistic approach based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function, which includes all the relevant ingredients required to model realistic metal-semiconductor interfaces and allows for a direct comparison between theory and experiments via I -Vbias curve simulations. We apply this method to characterize an Ag/Si interface relevant for photovoltaic applications and study the rectifying-to-Ohmic transition as a function of the semiconductor doping. We also demonstrate that the standard "activation energy" method for the analysis of I -Vbias data might be inaccurate for nonideal interfaces as it neglects electron tunneling, and that finite-size atomistic models have problems in describing these interfaces in the presence of doping due to a poor representation of space-charge effects. Conversely, the present method deals effectively with both issues, thus representing a valid alternative to conventional procedures for the accurate characterization of metal-semiconductor interfaces.

  12. Nanoscale neuroelectronic interface based on open-ended nanocoax arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, Jeffrey R.; Rizal, Binod; Burns, Michael J.; Yeom, Jee; Heyse, Shannon; Archibald, Michelle; Shepard, Stephen; McMahon, Gregory; Chiles, Thomas C.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2012-02-01

    We describe the development of a nanoscale neuroelectronic array with submicron pixelation for recording and stimulation with high spatial resolution. The device is composed of an array of nanoscale coaxial electrodes, either network- or individually-configured. As a neuroelectronic interface, it will employ noninvasive real-time capacitive coupling to the plasma membrane with potential for extracellular recording of intra- and interneural synaptic activity, with one target being precision measurement of electrical signals associated with induced and spontaneous synapse firing in pre- and post-synaptic somata. Subarrays or even individual pixels can also be actuated for precisely-localized stimulation. We report initial results from measurements using the rat adrenal pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, which terminally differentiates in response to nerve growth factor, as well as SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in response to retinoic acid, characterizing the basic performance of the fabricated device.

  13. Sparse representation-based classification scheme for motor imagery-based brain-computer interface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Younghak; Lee, Seungchan; Lee, Junho; Lee, Heung-No

    2012-10-01

    Motor imagery (MI)-based brain-computer interface systems (BCIs) normally use a powerful spatial filtering and classification method to maximize their performance. The common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm is a widely used spatial filtering method for MI-based BCIs. In this work, we propose a new sparse representation-based classification (SRC) scheme for MI-based BCI applications. Sensorimotor rhythms are extracted from electroencephalograms and used for classification. The proposed SRC method utilizes the frequency band power and CSP algorithm to extract features for classification. We analyzed the performance of the new method using experimental datasets. The results showed that the SRC scheme provides highly accurate classification results, which were better than those obtained using the well-known linear discriminant analysis classification method. The enhancement of the proposed method in terms of the classification accuracy was verified using cross-validation and a statistical paired t-test (p < 0.001).

  14. A Mediator-Based Approach to Resolving Interface Heterogeneity of Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Philipp; Rosenberg, Florian; Michlmayr, Anton; Huber, Andreas; Dustdar, Schahram

    In theory, service-oriented architectures are based on the idea of increasing flexibility in the selection of internal and external business partners using loosely-coupled services. However, in practice this flexibility is limited by the fact that partners need not only to provide the same service, but to do so via virtually the same interface in order to actually be interchangeable easily. Invocation-level mediation may be used to overcome this issue — by using mediation interface differences can be resolved transparently at runtime. In this chapter we discuss the basic ideas of mediation, with a focus on interface-level mediation. We show how interface mediation is integrated into our dynamic Web service invocation framework DAIOS, and present three different mediation strategies, one based on structural message similarity, one based on semantically annotated WSDL, and one which is embedded into the VRESCo SOA runtime, a larger research project with explicit support for service mediation.

  15. A Hyperbolic Ontology Visualization Tool for Model Application Programming Interface Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, Cody

    2011-01-01

    Spacecraft modeling, a critically important portion in validating planned spacecraft activities, is currently carried out using a time consuming method of mission to mission model implementations and integration. A current project in early development, Integrated Spacecraft Analysis (ISCA), aims to remedy this hindrance by providing reusable architectures and reducing time spent integrating models with planning and sequencing tools. The principle objective of this internship was to develop a user interface for an experimental ontology-based structure visualization of navigation and attitude control system modeling software. To satisfy this, a number of tree and graph visualization tools were researched and a Java based hyperbolic graph viewer was selected for experimental adaptation. Early results show promise in the ability to organize and display large amounts of spacecraft model documentation efficiently and effectively through a web browser. This viewer serves as a conceptual implementation for future development but trials with both ISCA developers and end users should be performed to truly evaluate the effectiveness of continued development of such visualizations.

  16. A comparison of molecular dynamics and diffuse interface model predictions of Lennard-Jones fluid evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbante, Paolo; Frezzotti, Aldo; Gibelli, Livio

    2014-12-09

    The unsteady evaporation of a thin planar liquid film is studied by molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones fluid. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a diffuse interface model in which capillary Korteweg contributions are added to hydrodynamic equations, in order to obtain a unified description of the liquid bulk, liquid-vapor interface and vapor region. Particular care has been taken in constructing a diffuse interface model matching the thermodynamic and transport properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The comparison of diffuse interface model and molecular dynamics results shows that, although good agreement is obtained in equilibrium conditions, remarkable deviations of diffuse interface model predictions from the reference molecular dynamics results are observed in the simulation of liquid film evaporation. It is also observed that molecular dynamics results are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained from a composite model which describes the liquid film by a standard hydrodynamic model and the vapor by the Boltzmann equation. The two mathematical model models are connected by kinetic boundary conditions assuming unit evaporation coefficient.

  17. Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Interactions through Structure-Based Interface Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Jeffrey R.; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The formation of protein-protein complexes is essential for proteins to perform their physiological functions in the cell. Mutations that prevent the proper formation of the correct complexes can have serious consequences for the associated cellular processes. Since experimental determination of protein-protein binding affinity remains difficult when performed on a large scale, computational methods for predicting the consequences of mutations on binding affinity are highly desirable. We show that a scoring function based on interface structure profiles collected from analogous protein-protein interactions in the PDB is a powerful predictor of protein binding affinity changes upon mutation. As a standalone feature, the differences between the interface profile score of the mutant and wild-type proteins has an accuracy equivalent to the best all-atom potentials, despite being two orders of magnitude faster once the profile has been constructed. Due to its unique sensitivity in collecting the evolutionary profiles of analogous binding interactions and the high speed of calculation, the interface profile score has additional advantages as a complementary feature to combine with physics-based potentials for improving the accuracy of composite scoring approaches. By incorporating the sequence-derived and residue-level coarse-grained potentials with the interface structure profile score, a composite model was constructed through the random forest training, which generates a Pearson correlation coefficient >0.8 between the predicted and observed binding free-energy changes upon mutation. This accuracy is comparable to, or outperforms in most cases, the current best methods, but does not require high-resolution full-atomic models of the mutant structures. The binding interface profiling approach should find useful application in human-disease mutation recognition and protein interface design studies. PMID:26506533

  18. Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Interactions through Structure-Based Interface Profiles.

    PubMed

    Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    The formation of protein-protein complexes is essential for proteins to perform their physiological functions in the cell. Mutations that prevent the proper formation of the correct complexes can have serious consequences for the associated cellular processes. Since experimental determination of protein-protein binding affinity remains difficult when performed on a large scale, computational methods for predicting the consequences of mutations on binding affinity are highly desirable. We show that a scoring function based on interface structure profiles collected from analogous protein-protein interactions in the PDB is a powerful predictor of protein binding affinity changes upon mutation. As a standalone feature, the differences between the interface profile score of the mutant and wild-type proteins has an accuracy equivalent to the best all-atom potentials, despite being two orders of magnitude faster once the profile has been constructed. Due to its unique sensitivity in collecting the evolutionary profiles of analogous binding interactions and the high speed of calculation, the interface profile score has additional advantages as a complementary feature to combine with physics-based potentials for improving the accuracy of composite scoring approaches. By incorporating the sequence-derived and residue-level coarse-grained potentials with the interface structure profile score, a composite model was constructed through the random forest training, which generates a Pearson correlation coefficient >0.8 between the predicted and observed binding free-energy changes upon mutation. This accuracy is comparable to, or outperforms in most cases, the current best methods, but does not require high-resolution full-atomic models of the mutant structures. The binding interface profiling approach should find useful application in human-disease mutation recognition and protein interface design studies.

  19. A scattering model for nano-textured interfaces and its application in opto-electrical simulations of thin-film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, K.; Fischer, M.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Zeman, M.

    2012-04-01

    We present a scattering model based on the scalar scattering theory that allows estimating far field scattering properties in both transmission and reflection for nano-textured interfaces. We first discuss the theoretical formulation of the scattering model and validate it for nano-textures with different morphologies. Second, we combine the scattering model with the opto-electric asa simulation software and evaluate this combination by simulating and measuring the external parameters and the external quantum efficiency of solar cells with different interface morphologies. This validation shows that the scattering model is able to predict the influence of nano-textured interfaces on the solar cell performance. The scattering model presented in this manuscript can support designing nano-textured interfaces with optimized morphologies.

  20. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a large number of human-computer interface (HCI) researchers have investigated building analytical models of the user, which are often implemented as computer models. These models simulate the cognitive processes and task knowledge of the user in ways that allow a researcher or designer to estimate various aspects of an interface's usability, such as when user errors are likely to occur. This information can lead to design improvements. Analytical models can supplement design guidelines by providing designers rigorous ways of analyzing the information-processing requirements of specific tasks (i.e., task analysis). These models offer the potential of improving early designs and replacing some of the early phases of usability testing, thus reducing the cost of interface design. This paper describes some of the many analytical models that are currently being developed and evaluates the usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design. This paper will focus on computational, analytical models, such as the GOMS model, rather than less formal, verbal models, because the more exact predictions and task descriptions of computational models may be useful to designers. The paper also discusses some of the practical requirements for using analytical models in complex design organizations such as NASA.

  1. A multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus interface for electron momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, C.G.; Deng, J.K.; Su, G.L.; Zhou, H.; Ren, X.G.

    2004-09-01

    A versatile multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus (USB) interface was designed and has been used on the electron momentum spectromenter. Digitized data were first buffered in a FIFO memory in an event-by-event mode with a check bit, and then transferred to computer through the USB interface. USB interface combined with a microcontroller unit provides much flexibility for data acquisition and experimental controls. The operation performance of the system is demonstrated in the measurement of electron momentum spectra of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} molecules.

  2. A CLIPS-based tool for aircraft pilot-vehicle interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Thomas D.; Rogers, Steven P.

    1991-01-01

    The Pilot-Vehicle Interface of modern aircraft is the cognitive, sensory, and psychomotor link between the pilot, the avionics modules, and all other systems on board the aircraft. To assist pilot-vehicle interface designers, a C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) based tool was developed that allows design information to be stored in a table that can be modified by rules representing design knowledge. Developed for the Apple Macintosh, the tool allows users without any CLIPS programming experience to form simple rules using a point and click interface.

  3. A Graphical User Interface for Parameterizing Biochemical Models of Photosynthesis and Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornfeld, A.; Van der Tol, C.; Berry, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in optical remote sensing of photosynthesis offer great promise for estimating gross primary productivity (GPP) at leaf, canopy and even global scale. These methods -including solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) emission, fluorescence spectra, and hyperspectral features such as the red edge and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) - can be used to greatly enhance the predictive power of global circulation models (GCMs) by providing better constraints on GPP. The way to use measured optical data to parameterize existing models such as SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes) is not trivial, however. We have therefore extended a biochemical model to include fluorescence and other parameters in a coupled treatment. To help parameterize the model, we then use nonlinear curve-fitting routines to determine the parameter set that enables model results to best fit leaf-level gas exchange and optical data measurements. To make the tool more accessible to all practitioners, we have further designed a graphical user interface (GUI) based front-end to allow researchers to analyze data with a minimum of effort while, at the same time, allowing them to change parameters interactively to visualize how variation in model parameters affect predicted outcomes such as photosynthetic rates, electron transport, and chlorophyll fluorescence. Here we discuss the tool and its effectiveness, using recently-gathered leaf-level data.

  4. A Quadratic Spline based Interface (QUASI) reconstruction algorithm for accurate tracking of two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwakar, S. V.; Das, Sarit K.; Sundararajan, T.

    2009-12-01

    A new Quadratic Spline based Interface (QUASI) reconstruction algorithm is presented which provides an accurate and continuous representation of the interface in a multiphase domain and facilitates the direct estimation of local interfacial curvature. The fluid interface in each of the mixed cells is represented by piecewise parabolic curves and an initial discontinuous PLIC approximation of the interface is progressively converted into a smooth quadratic spline made of these parabolic curves. The conversion is achieved by a sequence of predictor-corrector operations enforcing function ( C0) and derivative ( C1) continuity at the cell boundaries using simple analytical expressions for the continuity requirements. The efficacy and accuracy of the current algorithm has been demonstrated using standard test cases involving reconstruction of known static interface shapes and dynamically evolving interfaces in prescribed flow situations. These benchmark studies illustrate that the present algorithm performs excellently as compared to the other interface reconstruction methods available in literature. Quadratic rate of error reduction with respect to grid size has been observed in all the cases with curved interface shapes; only in situations where the interface geometry is primarily flat, the rate of convergence becomes linear with the mesh size. The flow algorithm implemented in the current work is designed to accurately balance the pressure gradients with the surface tension force at any location. As a consequence, it is able to minimize spurious flow currents arising from imperfect normal stress balance at the interface. This has been demonstrated through the standard test problem of an inviscid droplet placed in a quiescent medium. Finally, the direct curvature estimation ability of the current algorithm is illustrated through the coupled multiphase flow problem of a deformable air bubble rising through a column of water.

  5. Primary Care Practice-Based Research Networks: Working at the Interface Between Research and Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mold, James W.; Peterson, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to describe the emerging role of primary care practice-based in research, quality improvement (QI), and translation of research into practice (TRIP). METHODS We gathered information from the published literature, discussions with PBRN leaders, case examples, and our own personal experience to describe a role for PBRNs that comfortably bridges the gap between research and QI, discovery and application, academicians and practitioners—a role that may lead to the establishment of true learning communities. We provide specific recommendations for network directors, network clinicians, and other potential stakeholders. RESULTS PBRNs function at the interface between research and QI, an interface called TRIP by some members of the research community. In doing so, PBRNs are helping to clarify the difficulty of applying study findings to everyday care as an inappropriate disconnect between discovery and implementation, research and practice. Participatory models are emerging in which stakeholders agree on their goals; apply their collective knowledge, skills, and resources to accomplish these goals; and use research and QI methods when appropriate. CONCLUSIONS PBRNs appear to be evolving from clinical laboratories into learning communities, proving grounds for generalizable solutions to clinical problems, and engines for improvement of primary care delivery systems. PMID:15928213

  6. Biological sensing and interface design in gold island film based localized plasmon transducers.

    PubMed

    Bendikov, Tatyana A; Rabinkov, Aharon; Karakouz, Tanya; Vaskevich, Alexander; Rubinstein, Israel

    2008-10-01

    Discontinuous, island-type gold films (typically < or = 10 nm nominal thickness) prepared by evaporation of the metal on transparent substrates show a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) extinction in the visible-to-NIR range and can be used as optical transducers for monitoring local refractive index change. Such transducers, operated in the transmission configuration, provide an effective scheme for label-free biological sensing using basic spectrophotometric equipment. Optimization of the sensitivity of LPSR transducers requires consideration of the distance between the metal island surface and the bound analyte, strongly affecting the optical response due to the fast decay of the evanescent field of localized plasmons. In the present work Au island based LSPR transducers were used to monitor antibody-antigen interactions, demonstrating the effect of the biorecognition interface thickness. Evaporated Au island films derivatized with IgG or hCG antigens were used as biological recognition elements for selective sensing of antibody binding, distinguishing between specific and nonspecific interactions. The LSPR results are supported by XPS and ellipsometry data as well as by AFM and HRSEM imaging, the latter providing actual visualization of the two protein binding steps. Increase of the recognition interface thickness leads to a concomitant decrease in the extinction and wavelength sensitivity, generally conforming to a model of an exponentially decaying surface plasmon (SP) evanescent field.

  7. Interface design for DE based stack-actuators considering various application cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochmann, Helge; von Heckel, Benedikt; Hoffstadt, Thorben; Maas, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Transducers based on dielectric elastomers (DE) are able to fulfill various requirements as generator, sensor and actuator applications. Depending on the application their design implementation differs. An advantageous transducer topology to improve the strain and force are DE stack-transducers which consist of multiple layers of DE films coated with a compliant electrode. Their actuation behavior is strongly depended on the total number of layers and the mechanical interface to its environment. Considering different application cases customized actuator designs are proposed and the utilized manufacturing process is briefly presented. Within this publication a FE model is used to simulate the deformation under consideration of various mechanical boundaries. After-wards, experimental investigations are conducted to verify the simulation results. Actuator configurations with different mechanical interfaces are analyzed regarding their static actuation behavior. Furthermore, dynamic tests were conducted to show differences between actuators made from silicone and polyurethane (PUR). In summary, the tests confirm the results of the FE analysis and provide promising results appropriate for various future applications.

  8. Modelling and simulations of multi-component lipid membranes and open membranes via diffuse interface approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Du, Qiang

    2008-03-01

    Diffuse interface (phase field) models are developed for multi-component vesicle membranes with different lipid compositions and membranes with free boundary. These models are used to simulate the deformation of membranes under the elastic bending energy and the line tension energy with prescribed volume and surface area constraints. By comparing our numerical simulations with recent biological experiments, it is demonstrated that the diffuse interface models can effectively capture the rich phenomena associated with the multi-component vesicle transformation and thus offering great functionality in their simulation and modelling.

  9. CAMAC 488 module: 68,000 based GPIB interface module

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, K.C.

    1985-03-01

    What kind of hardware and software should be used to interface GPIB devices with the existing computer system. One idea was to use a commercially available Multibus card, BLC 8488 from National Semiconductor, whose on-board Z80 would manage the GPIB read/write functions and handshakes. With this card, one could make a hardware system which would consist of (1) CAMAC 080, (2) Multibus crate, (3) M. Shea's M68000, (4) M080, (5) BLC 8488 and (6) memory board. And the software considered for such a hardware package was GAS, which had been an established software package for communication between the ACNET computer system and smart CAMAC modules. However, a second idea was to put everything on a two-wide CAMAC module. The author pursued the second idea and came up with a two-wide CAMAC module called C488. The author describes the hardware - block diagrams, circuit blocks, front panel and hardware tests. He also refers to the software - system, modules and applications.

  10. Framework for non-coherent interface models at finite displacement jumps and finite strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosen, Niels Saabye; Ristinmaa, Matti; Mosler, Jörn

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with a novel constitutive framework suitable for non-coherent interfaces, such as cracks, undergoing large deformations in a geometrically exact setting. For this type of interface, the displacement field shows a jump across the interface. Within the engineering community, so-called cohesive zone models are frequently applied in order to describe non-coherent interfaces. However, for existing models to comply with the restrictions imposed by (a) thermodynamical consistency (e.g., the second law of thermodynamics), (b) balance equations (in particular, balance of angular momentum) and (c) material frame indifference, these models are essentially fiber models, i.e. models where the traction vector is collinear with the displacement jump. This constraints the ability to model shear and, in addition, anisotropic effects are excluded. A novel, extended constitutive framework which is consistent with the above mentioned fundamental physical principles is elaborated in this paper. In addition to the classical tractions associated with a cohesive zone model, the main idea is to consider additional tractions related to membrane-like forces and out-of-plane shear forces acting within the interface. For zero displacement jump, i.e. coherent interfaces, this framework degenerates to existing formulations presented in the literature. For hyperelasticity, the Helmholtz energy of the proposed novel framework depends on the displacement jump as well as on the tangent vectors of the interface with respect to the current configuration - or equivalently - the Helmholtz energy depends on the displacement jump and the surface deformation gradient. It turns out that by defining the Helmholtz energy in terms of the invariants of these variables, all above-mentioned fundamental physical principles are automatically fulfilled. Extensions of the novel framework necessary for material degradation (damage) and plasticity are also covered.

  11. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-05-14

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7-36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs.

  12. Interface Cohesive Elements to Model Matrix Crack Evolution in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the transverse matrix (resin) cracking developed in multidirectional composite laminates loaded in tension was numerically investigated by a finite element (FE) model implemented in the commercially available software Abaqus/Explicit 6.10. A theoretical solution using the equivalent constraint model (ECM) of the damaged laminate developed by Soutis et al. was employed to describe matrix cracking evolution and compared to the proposed numerical approach. In the numerical model, interface cohesive elements were inserted between neighbouring finite elements that run parallel to fibre orientation in each lamina to simulate matrix cracking with the assumption of equally spaced cracks (based on experimental measurements and observations). The stress based traction-separation law was introduced to simulate initiation of matrix cracking and propagation under mixed-mode loading. The numerically predicted crack density was found to depend on the mesh size of the model and the material fracture parameters defined for the cohesive elements. Numerical predictions of matrix crack density as a function of applied stress are in a good agreement to experimentally measured and theoretically (ECM) obtained values, but some further refinement will be required in near future work.

  13. Comprehensive Metadata Query Interface for Heterogeneous Data Archives Based on Open-Source PostgreSQL ORDBMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, I.; Samokhvalov, N.; Bonnarel, F.; Chilingarian, I.

    2007-10-01

    We use the PostgreSQL DBMS for storing XML metadata, described by the IVOA Characterization Data Model. Initial XML type support in PostgreSQL has recently been implemented. We make heavy use of this feature in order to provide a comprehensive search capability over the Characterisation metadata tree. We built a prototype of the Characterization metadata query service, implementing two access methods: (1) HTTP-GET/POST based interface, which implements almost direct translation of the query parameter name into XPath of the data model element in the XML serialization; (2) Web-Service based interface to receive XQuery which is also directly translated into XPath. This service will be used in the ASPID-SR archive, containing science-ready data obtained with the Russian 6-m telescope.

  14. ASV3 dial-in interface recommendation for the Repository Based Software Engineering (RBSE) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide insight into the approach and design of the Cooperative User Interface (CUI). The CUI is being developed based on Hypercard technology and will provide the same look and feel as is provided by the NASA Electronic Library System (NELS) X-Window interface. The interaction between the user and ASCII-LIB is presented as well as the set of Hypercard Cards with which the user will work.

  15. A multilayered sharp interface model of coupled freshwater and saltwater flow in coastal systems: model development and application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1990-01-01

    The model allows for regional simulation of coastal groundwater conditions, including the effects of saltwater dynamics on the freshwater system. Vertically integrated freshwater and saltwater flow equations incorporating the interface boundary condition are solved within each aquifer. Leakage through confining layers is calculated by Darcy's law, accounting for density differences across the layer. The locations of the interface tip and toe, within grid blocks, are tracked by linearly extrapolating the position of the interface. The model has been verified using available analytical solutions and experimental results and applied to the Soquel-Aptos basin, Santa Cruz County, California. -from Author

  16. Theoretical modelling of the semiconductor-electrolyte interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelling, Patrick Kenneth

    We have developed tight-binding models of transition metal oxides. In contrast to many tight-binding models, these models include a description of electron-electron interactions. After parameterizing to bulk first-principles calculations, we demonstrated the transferability of the model by calculating atomic and electronic structure of rutile surfaces, which compared well with experiment and first-principles calculations. We also studied the structure of twist grain boundaries in rutile. Molecular dynamics simulations using the model were also carried out to describe polaron localization. We have also demonstrated that tight-binding models can be constructed to describe metallic systems. The computational cost tight-binding simulations was greatly reduced by incorporating O(N) electronic structure methods. We have also interpreted photoluminesence experiments on GaAs electrodes in contact with an electrolyte using drift-diffusion models. Electron transfer velocities were obtained by fitting to experimental results.

  17. Ligand-based virtual screening interface between PyMOL and LiSiCA.

    PubMed

    Dilip, Athira; Lešnik, Samo; Štular, Tanja; Janežič, Dušanka; Konc, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening of large small-molecule databases is an important step in the early stages of drug development. It is based on the similarity principle and is used to reduce the chemical space of large databases to a manageable size where chosen ligands can be experimentally tested. Ligand-based virtual screening can also be used to identify bioactive molecules with different basic scaffolds compared to already known bioactive molecules, thus having the potential to increase the structural variability of compounds. Here, we present an interface between the popular molecular graphics system PyMOL and the ligand-based virtual screening software LiSiCA available at http://insilab.org/lisica-plugin and demonstrate how this interface can be used in the early stages of drug discovery process.Graphical AbstractLigand-based virtual screening interface between PyMOL and LiSiCA. PMID:27606012

  18. A simple interface sharpening technique with a hyperbolic tangent function applied to compressible two-fluid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonomura, Taku; Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujii, Kozo

    2014-02-01

    A simple interface sharpening technique based on hyperbolic tangent interpolation, which was proposed in the previous study [F. Xiao, Y. Honma, K. Kono, A simple algebraic interface capturing scheme using hyperbolic tangent function, Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 48 (2005) 1023-1040], is applied to the compressible two-fluid modeling. The implementation of this scheme is very simple: the interpolation of the volume fraction in the monotonicity-upwind-scheme-for-conservation-law (MUSCL) solver is just replaced by the hyperbolic tangent interpolation, while the MUSCL interpolations for other variables are maintained. This technique is limited for the region near the interface to prevent the spurious oscillations of a minor phase. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional problems are solved, and the results are compared with those of the original MUSCL solver. The results show that the interface is significantly sharpened with this technique, and its sharpness is well controlled by one parameter. In addition, the robustness of the scheme does not change with sharpening the interface in the range we investigated.

  19. Control of enterprise interfaces for supply chain enterprise modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Interrante, L.D.; Macfarlane, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    There is a current trend for manufacturing enterprises in a supply chain of a particular industry to join forces in an attempt to promote efficiencies and improve competitive position. Such alliances occur in the context of specific legal and business agreements such that each enterprise retains a majority of its business and manufacturing information as private and shares other information with its trading partners. Shared information may include enterprise demand projections, capacities, finished goods inventories, and aggregate production schedules. Evidence of the trend toward information sharing includes the recent emphases on vendor-managed inventories, quick response, and Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The increased competition brought on by the global marketplace is driving industries to consider the advantages of trading partner agreements. Aggregate-level forecasts, supply-chain production smoothing, and aggregate-level inventory policies can reduce holding costs, record-keeping overhead, and lead time in product development. The goal of this research is to orchestrate information exchange among trading partners to allow for aggregate-level analysis to enhance supply chain efficiency. The notion of Enterprise Interface Control (EIC) is introduced as a means of accomplishing this end.

  20. Model of bound interface dynamics for coupled magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politi, P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Stamps, R. L.; Ferré, J.

    2011-08-01

    A domain wall in a ferromagnetic system will move under the action of an external magnetic field. Ultrathin Co layers sandwiched between Pt have been shown to be a suitable experimental realization of a weakly disordered 2D medium in which to study the dynamics of 1D interfaces (magnetic domain walls). The behavior of these systems is encapsulated in the velocity-field response v(H) of the domain walls. In a recent paper [P. J. Metaxas , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.237206 104, 237206 (2010)] we studied the effect of ferromagnetic coupling between two such ultrathin layers, each exhibiting different v(H) characteristics. The main result was the existence of bound states over finite-width field ranges, wherein walls in the two layers moved together at the same speed. Here we discuss in detail the theory of domain wall dynamics in coupled systems. In particular, we show that a bound creep state is expected for vanishing H and we give the analytical, parameter free expression for its velocity which agrees well with experimental results.

  1. Model of dynamic self-assembly in ferromagnetic suspensions at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, D. L.; Straube, A. V.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.

    2013-09-01

    Ferromagnetic microparticles suspended at the interface between immiscible liquids and energized by an external alternating magnetic field show a rich variety of self-assembled structures, from linear snakes to radial asters. In order to obtain insight into the fundamental physical mechanisms and the overall balance of forces governing self-assembly, we develop a modeling approach based on analytical solutions of the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. These analytical expressions for the self-consistent hydrodynamic flows are then employed to modify effective interactions between the particles, which in turn are formulated in terms of the time-averaged quantities. Our method allows effective computational verification of the mechanisms of self-assembly and leads to a testable prediction, e.g., on the transitions between various patterns versus viscosity of the solvent.

  2. Analytic Element Modeling of Steady Interface Flow in Multilayer Aquifers Using AnAqSim.

    PubMed

    Fitts, Charles R; Godwin, Joshua; Feiner, Kathleen; McLane, Charles; Mullendore, Seth

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the analytic element modeling approach implemented in the software AnAqSim for simulating steady groundwater flow with a sharp fresh-salt interface in multilayer (three-dimensional) aquifer systems. Compared with numerical methods for variable-density interface modeling, this approach allows quick model construction and can yield useful guidance about the three-dimensional configuration of an interface even at a large scale. The approach employs subdomains and multiple layers as outlined by Fitts (2010) with the addition of discharge potentials for shallow interface flow (Strack 1989). The following simplifying assumptions are made: steady flow, a sharp interface between fresh- and salt water, static salt water, and no resistance to vertical flow and hydrostatic heads within each fresh water layer. A key component of this approach is a transition to a thin fixed minimum fresh water thickness mode when the fresh water thickness approaches zero. This allows the solution to converge and determine the steady interface position without a long transient simulation. The approach is checked against the widely used numerical codes SEAWAT and SWI/MODFLOW and a hypothetical application of the method to a coastal wellfield is presented.

  3. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI) based neuroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Schürholz, Markus; Caggiano, Vittorio; Wildgruber, Moritz; Caria, Andrea; Hammer, Eva Maria; Halder, Sebastian; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1) motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2) motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3) passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery) and (4) active (overt) movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants). Group 1 (n = 9) received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements), group 2 (n = 8) contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements) and group 3 (n = 7) sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements). We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements) improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and passive

  4. Numerical investigations on the osseointegration of uncemented endoprostheses based on bio-active interface theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, André; Nackenhorst, Udo

    2012-09-01

    In order to simulate the osseointegration of bone implants, a bio-active interface theory is necessary. The thin bone-implant interface layer is described by the Drucker-Prager plasticity model. The formulation of bone mineral density depends on the local mechanical environment. For the simulation of the osseointegration of bone implants a bio-active interface theory is suggested. A thin bone-implant interface layer is described by a Drucker-Prager plasticity model. An evolution rule for the bone mineral density is formulated in dependency of the local mechanical environment. The time dependent ingrowth is modeled by a hardening rule which modifies the Drucker-Prager yield-surface cone in the principle stress state in dependency of the local bone mineral density. The osseointegration process is limited by the violation of a so called micromotion threshold. This relative motion in the implant-bone interface is computed by dynamic loads of daily motion activity. For parameter studies on detailed 3D models model reduction techniques are introduced. The applicability is demonstrated on a hip-joint prosthesis which is in clinical usage.

  5. Dynamic Impedance Model of the Skin-Electrode Interface for Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Cortés Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes. PMID:25942010

  6. Dynamic impedance model of the skin-electrode interface for transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Cortés Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes. PMID:25942010

  7. Accelerated lattice Boltzmann model for colloidal suspensions rheology and interface morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Hassan

    Colloids are ubiquitous in the food, medical, cosmetic, polymer, water purification and pharmaceutical industries. Colloids thermal, mechanical and storage properties are highly dependent on their interface morphology and their rheological behavior. Numerical methods provide a cheap and reliable virtual laboratory for the study of colloids. However efficiency is a major concern to address when using numerical methods for practical applications. This work introduces the main building-blocks for an improved lattice Boltzmann-based numerical tool designed for the study of colloidal rheology and interface morphology. The efficiency of the proposed model is enhanced by using the recently developed and validated migrating multi-block algorithms for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The migrating multi-block was used to simulate single component, multi-component, multiphase and single component multiphase flows. Results were validated by experimental, numerical and analytical solutions. The contamination of the fluid-fluid interface influences the colloids morphology. This issue was addressed by the introduction of the hybrid LBM for surfactant-covered droplets. The module was used for the simulation of surfactant-covered droplet deformation under shear and uniaxial extensional flows respectively and under buoyancy. Validation with experimental and theoretical results was provided. Colloids are non-Newtonian fluids which exhibit rich rheological behavior. The suppression of coalescence module is the part of the proposed model which facilitates the study of colloids rheology. The model results for the relative viscosity were in agreement with some theoretical results. Biological suspensions such as blood are macro-colloids by nature. The study of the blood flow in the microvasculature was heuristically approached by assuming the red blood cells as surfactant covered droplets. The effects of interfacial tension on the flow velocity and the droplet exclusion from the walls

  8. Modeling of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor structure considering the effects of interface traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Xiao Rong; Zheng, Xue Jun; Tian, Li; Zhu, Zhe

    2015-06-01

    An improved model, in which the interface traps effects are considered, is developed by combining with quantum mechanical model, dipole switching theory and silicon physics of metal-oxide-semiconductor structure to describe the electrical properties of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) structure. Using the model, the effects of the interface traps on the surface potential (ϕSi) of the semiconductor, the low frequency (LF) capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics and memory window of MFIS structure are simulated, and the results show that the ϕSi- V and LF C-V curves are shifted toward the positive-voltage direction and the memory window become worse as the density of the interface trap states increases. This paper is expected to provide some guidance to the design and performance improvement of MFIS structure devices. In addition, the improved model can be integrated into electronic design automation (EDA) software for circuit simulation.

  9. Enabling Data Fusion via a Common Data Model and Programming Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindholm, D. M.; Wilson, A.

    2011-12-01

    Much progress has been made in scientific data interoperability, especially in the areas of metadata and discovery. However, while a data user may have improved techniques for finding data, there is often a large chasm to span when it comes to acquiring the desired subsets of various datasets and integrating them into a data processing environment. Some tools such as OPeNDAP servers and the Unidata Common Data Model (CDM) have introduced improved abstractions for accessing data via a common interface, but they alone do not go far enough to enable fusion of data from multidisciplinary sources. Although data from various scientific disciplines may represent semantically similar concepts (e.g. time series), the user may face widely varying structural representations of the data (e.g. row versus column oriented), not to mention radically different storage formats. It is not enough to convert data to a common format. The key to fusing scientific data is to represent each dataset with consistent sampling. This can best be done by using a data model that expresses the functional relationship that each dataset represents. The domain of those functions determines how the data can be combined. The Visualization for Algorithm Development (VisAD) Java API has provided a sophisticated data model for representing the functional nature of scientific datasets for well over a decade. Because VisAD is largely designed for its visualization capabilities, the data model can be cumbersome to use for numerical computation, especially for those not comfortable with Java. Although both VisAD and the implementation of the CDM are written in Java, neither defines a pure Java interface that others could implement and program to, further limiting potential for interoperability. In this talk, we will present a solution for data integration based on a simple discipline-agnostic scientific data model and programming interface that enables a dataset to be defined in terms of three variable types

  10. Conceptual model analysis of interaction at a concrete-Boom Clay interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sanheng; Jacques, Diederik; Govaerts, Joan; Wang, Lian

    In many concepts for deep disposal of high-level radioactive waste, cementitious materials are used in the engineered barriers. For example, in Belgium the engineered barrier system is based on a considerable amount of cementitious materials as buffer and backfill in the so-called supercontainer embedded in the hosting geological formation. A potential hosting formation is Boom Clay. Insight in the interaction between the high-pH pore water of the cementitious materials and neutral-pH Boom Clay pore water is required. Two problems are quite common for modeling of such a system. The first one is the computational cost due to the long timescale model assessments envisaged for the deep disposal system. Also a very fine grid (in sub-millimeter), especially at interfaces has to be used in order to accurately predict the evolution of the system. The second one is whether to use equilibrium or kinetic reaction models. The objectives of this paper are twofold. First, we develop an efficient coupled reactive transport code for this diffusion-dominated system by making full use of multi-processors/cores computers. Second, we investigate how sensitive the system is to chemical reaction models especially when pore clogging due to mineral precipitation is considered within the cementitious system. To do this, we selected two portlandite dissolution models, i.e., equilibrium (fastest) and diffusion-controlled model with precipitation of a calcite layer around portlandite particles (diffusion-controlled dissolution). The results show that with shrinking core model portlandite dissolution and calcite precipitation are much slower than with the equilibrium model. Also diffusion-controlled dissolution smooths out dissolution fronts compared to the equilibrium model. However, only a slight difference with respect to the clogging time can be found even though we use a very small diffusion coefficient (10-20 m2/s) in the precipitated calcite layer.

  11. An Efficient User Interface Design for Nursing Information System Based on Integrated Patient Order Information.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Hui; Kuo, Ming-Chuan; Weng, Shu-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    A user friendly interface can enhance the efficiency of data entry, which is crucial for building a complete database. In this study, two user interfaces (traditional pull-down menu vs. check boxes) are proposed and evaluated based on medical records with fever medication orders by measuring the time for data entry, steps for each data entry record, and the complete rate of each medical record. The result revealed that the time for data entry is reduced from 22.8 sec/record to 3.2 sec/record. The data entry procedures also have reduced from 9 steps in the traditional one to 3 steps in the new one. In addition, the completeness of medical records is increased from 20.2% to 98%. All these results indicate that the new user interface provides a more user friendly and efficient approach for data entry than the traditional interface. PMID:27332405

  12. An Efficient User Interface Design for Nursing Information System Based on Integrated Patient Order Information.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Hui; Kuo, Ming-Chuan; Weng, Shu-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    A user friendly interface can enhance the efficiency of data entry, which is crucial for building a complete database. In this study, two user interfaces (traditional pull-down menu vs. check boxes) are proposed and evaluated based on medical records with fever medication orders by measuring the time for data entry, steps for each data entry record, and the complete rate of each medical record. The result revealed that the time for data entry is reduced from 22.8 sec/record to 3.2 sec/record. The data entry procedures also have reduced from 9 steps in the traditional one to 3 steps in the new one. In addition, the completeness of medical records is increased from 20.2% to 98%. All these results indicate that the new user interface provides a more user friendly and efficient approach for data entry than the traditional interface.

  13. Developing A Web-based User Interface for Semantic Information Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Keller, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    While there are now a number of languages and frameworks that enable computer-based systems to search stored data semantically, the optimal design for effective user interfaces for such systems is still uncle ar. Such interfaces should mask unnecessary query detail from users, yet still allow them to build queries of arbitrary complexity without significant restrictions. We developed a user interface supporting s emantic query generation for Semanticorganizer, a tool used by scient ists and engineers at NASA to construct networks of knowledge and dat a. Through this interface users can select node types, node attribute s and node links to build ad-hoc semantic queries for searching the S emanticOrganizer network.

  14. User Interface Models for Multidisciplinary Bibliographic Information Dissemination Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipperer, W. C.

    Two information dissemination centers at University of California at Los Angeles and University of Georgia studied the interactions between computer based search facilities and their users. The study, largely descriptive in nature, investigated the interaction processes between data base users and profile analysis or information specialists in…

  15. Size effects in martensitic microstructures: Finite-strain phase field model versus sharp-interface approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tůma, K.; Stupkiewicz, S.; Petryk, H.

    2016-10-01

    A finite-strain phase field model for martensitic phase transformation and twinning in shape memory alloys is developed and confronted with the corresponding sharp-interface approach extended to interfacial energy effects. The model is set in the energy framework so that the kinetic equations and conditions of mechanical equilibrium are fully defined by specifying the free energy and dissipation potentials. The free energy density involves the bulk and interfacial energy contributions, the latter describing the energy of diffuse interfaces in a manner typical for phase-field approaches. To ensure volume preservation during martensite reorientation at finite deformation within a diffuse interface, it is proposed to apply linear mixing of the logarithmic transformation strains. The physically different nature of phase interfaces and twin boundaries in the martensitic phase is reflected by introducing two order-parameters in a hierarchical manner, one as the reference volume fraction of austenite, and thus of the whole martensite, and the second as the volume fraction of one variant of martensite in the martensitic phase only. The microstructure evolution problem is given a variational formulation in terms of incremental fields of displacement and order parameters, with unilateral constraints on volume fractions explicitly enforced by applying the augmented Lagrangian method. As an application, size-dependent microstructures with diffuse interfaces are calculated for the cubic-to-orthorhombic transformation in a CuAlNi shape memory alloy and compared with the sharp-interface microstructures with interfacial energy effects.

  16. Fullerene film on metal surface: Diffusion of metal atoms and interface model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-jie; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian; Wang, Peng; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Wang, Jia-Ou; Wu, Rui; Qian, Hai-Jie; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2014-05-12

    We try to understand the fact that fullerene film behaves as n-type semiconductor in electronic devices and establish a model describing the energy level alignment at fullerene/metal interfaces. The C{sub 60}/Ag(100) system was taken as a prototype and studied with photoemission measurements. The photoemission spectra revealed that the Ag atoms of the substrate diffused far into C{sub 60} film and donated electrons to the molecules. So the C{sub 60} film became n-type semiconductor with the Ag atoms acting as dopants. The C{sub 60}/Ag(100) interface should be understood as two sub-interfaces on both sides of the molecular layer directly contacting with the substrate. One sub-interface is Fermi level alignment, and the other is vacuum level alignment.

  17. Model-based neuroimaging for cognitive computing.

    PubMed

    Poznanski, Roman R

    2009-09-01

    The continuity of the mind is suggested to mean the continuous spatiotemporal dynamics arising from the electrochemical signature of the neocortex: (i) globally through volume transmission in the gray matter as fields of neural activity, and (ii) locally through extrasynaptic signaling between fine distal dendrites of cortical neurons. If the continuity of dynamical systems across spatiotemporal scales defines a stream of consciousness then intentional metarepresentations as templates of dynamic continuity allow qualia to be semantically mapped during neuroimaging of specific cognitive tasks. When interfaced with a computer, such model-based neuroimaging requiring new mathematics of the brain will begin to decipher higher cognitive operations not possible with existing brain-machine interfaces.

  18. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  19. Atomistic Cohesive Zone Models for Interface Decohesion in Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, Vesselin I.; Saether, Erik; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2009-01-01

    Using a statistical mechanics approach, a cohesive-zone law in the form of a traction-displacement constitutive relationship characterizing the load transfer across the plane of a growing edge crack is extracted from atomistic simulations for use within a continuum finite element model. The methodology for the atomistic derivation of a cohesive-zone law is presented. This procedure can be implemented to build cohesive-zone finite element models for simulating fracture in nanocrystalline or ultrafine grained materials.

  20. Fragment-based docking: development of the CHARMMing Web user interface as a platform for computer-aided drug design.

    PubMed

    Pevzner, Yuri; Frugier, Emilie; Schalk, Vinushka; Caflisch, Amedeo; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-09-22

    Web-based user interfaces to scientific applications are important tools that allow researchers to utilize a broad range of software packages with just an Internet connection and a browser. One such interface, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics), facilitates access to the powerful and widely used molecular software package CHARMM. CHARMMing incorporates tasks such as molecular structure analysis, dynamics, multiscale modeling, and other techniques commonly used by computational life scientists. We have extended CHARMMing's capabilities to include a fragment-based docking protocol that allows users to perform molecular docking and virtual screening calculations either directly via the CHARMMing Web server or on computing resources using the self-contained job scripts generated via the Web interface. The docking protocol was evaluated by performing a series of "re-dockings" with direct comparison to top commercial docking software. Results of this evaluation showed that CHARMMing's docking implementation is comparable to many widely used software packages and validates the use of the new CHARMM generalized force field for docking and virtual screening.

  1. Fragment-Based Docking: Development of the CHARMMing Web User Interface as a Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Web-based user interfaces to scientific applications are important tools that allow researchers to utilize a broad range of software packages with just an Internet connection and a browser.1 One such interface, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics), facilitates access to the powerful and widely used molecular software package CHARMM. CHARMMing incorporates tasks such as molecular structure analysis, dynamics, multiscale modeling, and other techniques commonly used by computational life scientists. We have extended CHARMMing’s capabilities to include a fragment-based docking protocol that allows users to perform molecular docking and virtual screening calculations either directly via the CHARMMing Web server or on computing resources using the self-contained job scripts generated via the Web interface. The docking protocol was evaluated by performing a series of “re-dockings” with direct comparison to top commercial docking software. Results of this evaluation showed that CHARMMing’s docking implementation is comparable to many widely used software packages and validates the use of the new CHARMM generalized force field for docking and virtual screening. PMID:25151852

  2. Atomistic modeling of the Au droplet-GaAs interface for size-selective nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakong, Sung; Du, Yaojun A.; Kratzer, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Density functional theory calculations within both the local density approximation and the generalized gradient approximation are used to study Au-catalyzed growth under near-equilibrium conditions. We discuss both the chemical equilibrium of a GaAs nanowire with an As2 gas atmosphere and the mechanical equilibrium between the capillary forces at the nanowire tip. For the latter goal, the interface between the gold nanoparticle and the nanowire is modeled atomically within a slab approach, and the interface energies are evaluated from the total energies of the model systems. We discuss three growth regimes, one catalyzed by an (almost) pure Au particle, an intermediate alloy-catalyzed growth regime, and a Ga-catalyzed growth regime. Using the interface energies calculated from the atomic models, as well as the surface energies of the nanoparticle and the nanowire sidewalls, we determine the optimized geometry of the nanoparticle-capped nanowire by minimizing the free energy of a continuum model. Under typical experimental conditions of 10-4 Pa As2 and 700 K, our results in the local density approximation are insensitive to the Ga concentration in the nanoparticle. In these growth conditions, the energetically most favored interface has an interface energy of around 45 meV/Å2, and the correspondingly optimized droplet on top of a GaAs nanowire is somewhat larger than a hemisphere and forms a contact angle around 130∘ for both pure Au and Au-Ga alloy nanoparticles.

  3. Modeling time-coincident ultrafast electron transfer and solvation processes at molecule-semiconductor interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lesheng; Giokas, Paul G.; Moran, Andrew M. E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu; Kanai, Yosuke E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu

    2014-06-21

    Kinetic models based on Fermi's Golden Rule are commonly employed to understand photoinduced electron transfer dynamics at molecule-semiconductor interfaces. Implicit in such second-order perturbative descriptions is the assumption that nuclear relaxation of the photoexcited electron donor is fast compared to electron injection into the semiconductor. This approximation breaks down in systems where electron transfer transitions occur on 100-fs time scale. Here, we present a fourth-order perturbative model that captures the interplay between time-coincident electron transfer and nuclear relaxation processes initiated by light absorption. The model consists of a fairly small number of parameters, which can be derived from standard spectroscopic measurements (e.g., linear absorbance, fluorescence) and/or first-principles electronic structure calculations. Insights provided by the model are illustrated for a two-level donor molecule coupled to both (i) a single acceptor level and (ii) a density of states (DOS) calculated for TiO{sub 2} using a first-principles electronic structure theory. These numerical calculations show that second-order kinetic theories fail to capture basic physical effects when the DOS exhibits narrow maxima near the energy of the molecular excited state. Overall, we conclude that the present fourth-order rate formula constitutes a rigorous and intuitive framework for understanding photoinduced electron transfer dynamics that occur on the 100-fs time scale.

  4. The Effects of Metaphorical Interface on Germane Cognitive Load in Web-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheon, Jongpil; Grant, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a metaphorical interface on germane cognitive load in Web-based instruction. Based on cognitive load theory, germane cognitive load is a cognitive investment for schema construction and automation. A new instrument developed in a previous study was used to measure students' mental activities…

  5. GUIDON-WATCH: A Graphic Interface for Viewing a Knowledge-Based System. Technical Report #14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richer, Mark H.; Clancey, William J.

    This paper describes GUIDON-WATCH, a graphic interface that uses multiple windows and a mouse to allow a student to browse a knowledge base and view reasoning processes during diagnostic problem solving. The GUIDON project at Stanford University is investigating how knowledge-based systems can provide the basis for teaching programs, and this…

  6. Atomistic Modeling of Corrosion Events at the Interface between a Metal and Its Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    Atomistic simulation is a powerful tool for probing the structure and properties of materials and the nature of chemical reactions. Corrosion is a complex process that involves chemical reactions occurring at the interface between a material and its environment and is, therefore, highly suited to study by atomistic modeling techniques. In this paper, the complex nature of corrosion processes and mechanisms is briefly reviewed. Various atomistic methods for exploring corrosion mechanisms are then described, and recent applications in the literature surveyed. Several instances of the application of atomistic modeling to corrosion science are then reviewed in detail, including studies ofmore » the metal-water interface, the reaction of water on electrified metallic interfaces, the dissolution of metal atoms from metallic surfaces, and the role of competitive adsorption in controlling the chemical nature and structure of a metallic surface. Some perspectives are then given concerning the future of atomistic modeling in the field of corrosion science.« less

  7. Numerical Modelling of Subduction Plate Interface, Technical Advances for Outstanding Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Ruh, J.; Pranger, C. C.; Zheng, L.; van Dinther, Y.; May, D.; Gerya, T.; Burov, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    The subduction zone interface is the place of the largest earthquakes on earth. Compared to the size of a subduction zone itself, it constitutes a very thin zone (few kilometers) with effective rheological behaviour that varies as a function of pressure, temperature, loading, nature of the material locally embedded within the interface as well as the amount of water, melts and CO2. Capturing the behaviour of this interface and its evolution in time is crucial, yet modelling it is not an easy task. In the last decade, thermo-mechanical models of subduction zone have flourished in the literature. They mostly focused on the long-term dynamics of the subduction; e.g. flat subduction, slab detachment or exhumation. The models were validated models against PTt path of exhumed material as well as topography. The models that could reproduce the data all included a mechanically weak subduction channel made of extremely weak and non cohesive material. While this subduction channel model is very convenient at large scale and might apply to some real subduction zones, it does not capture the many geological field evidences that point out the exhumation of very large slice of almost pristine oceanic crust along localised shear zone. Moreover, modelling of sismological and geodetic data using short term tectonic modelling approach also point out that large localised patches rupture within the subduction interface, which is in accordance with geological data but not with large-scale long-term tectonic models. I will present how high resolution models permit to produce slicing at the subduction interface and give clues on how the plate coupling and effective location of the plate interface vary over a few millions of year time scale. I will then discuss the implication of these new high-resolution long-term models of subduction zone on earthquake generation, report progress in the development of self-consistent thermomechanical codes which can handle large strain, high resolution

  8. Java-based graphical user interface for the MRUI quantitation package.

    PubMed

    Naressi, A; Couturier, C; Devos, J M; Janssen, M; Mangeat, C; de Beer, R; Graveron-Demilly, D

    2001-05-01

    This article describes the Java-based version of the magnetic resonance user interface (MRUI) quantitation package. This package allows MR spectroscopists to easily perform time-domain analysis of in vivo MR spectroscopy data. We show that the Java programming language is very well suited for developing highly interactive graphical software applications such as the MRUI software. We have also established that MR quantitation algorithms, programmed in other languages, can easily be embedded into the Java-based MRUI by using the Java native interface (JNI). This new graphical user interface (GUI) has been conceived for the processing of large data sets and uses prior knowledge data-bases to make interactive quantitation algorithms more userfriendly.

  9. Modeling study of the influence of mixing on the fluxes of nutrients through the water column redox-interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, E.

    2009-04-01

    In this study we used a coupled hydrophysical-biogeochemical O-N-S-P-Mn-Fe- model based on ROLM (Yakushev et al., 2007) and GOTM (Burchard et al., 2006). Processes of organic matter (OM) formation and decay, the reduction and oxidation of species of nitrogen, sulphur, manganese, iron, as well as transformation of phosphorus species are parameterized. The model considered phytoplankton, zooplankton and bacteria. The model allowed to simulate the main features of the vertically balanced biogeochemical structure of the redox interfaces (i.e observed in the Black Sea, Gotland Deep, Oslo Fjord). Numerical experiments allowed to demonstrate how the changes in vertical mixing (from Kz=10-6 m2s-1 to Kz=10-4 m2s-1) affect the distributions of the considered parameters and the rates of their transformation. The received estimates allowed to analyze the influence of the water column redox interfaces on the fluxes of nutrients, in particular phosphate, in different conditions. Burchard, H., Bolding, K., Kuehn, W., Meister, A., Neumann, T., Umlauf, L. 2006. Description of a flexible and extendable physical-biogeochemical model system for the water column. J.of Mar.Sys., 61: 180-211. Yakushev E.V., Pollehne F., Jost G. et al. 2007. Analysis of the water column oxic/anoxic interface in the Black and Baltic seas with a Redox-Layer Model. Mar. Chem., 107: 388-410.

  10. Diffuse photon remission along unique spiral paths on a cylindrical interface is modeled by photon remission along a straight line on a semi-infinite interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anqi; Piao, Daqing; Yao, Gang; Bunting, Charles F; Jiang, Yuhao

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate that, for a long cylindrical applicator that interfaces concavely or convexly with a scattering-dominant medium, a unique set of spiral-shaped directions exist on the tissue-applicator interface, along which the diffuse photon remission is essentially modeled by the photon remission along a straight line on a semi-infinite interface. This interesting phenomenon, which is validated in steady state in this work by finite-element and Monte Carlo methods, may be particularly useful for simplifying deeper-tissue sensing in endoscopic imaging geometry.

  11. Java-based Graphical User Interface for MAVERIC-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, Suk Jai

    2005-01-01

    A computer program entitled "Marshall Aerospace Vehicle Representation in C II, (MAVERIC-II)" is a vehicle flight simulation program written primarily in the C programming language. It is written by James W. McCarter at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The goal of the MAVERIC-II development effort is to provide a simulation tool that facilitates the rapid development of high-fidelity flight simulations for launch, orbital, and reentry vehicles of any user-defined configuration for all phases of flight. MAVERIC-II has been found invaluable in performing flight simulations for various Space Transportation Systems. The flexibility provided by MAVERIC-II has allowed several different launch vehicles, including the Saturn V, a Space Launch Initiative Two-Stage-to-Orbit concept and a Shuttle-derived launch vehicle, to be simulated during ascent and portions of on-orbit flight in an extremely efficient manner. It was found that MAVERIC-II provided the high fidelity vehicle and flight environment models as well as the program modularity to allow efficient integration, modification and testing of advanced guidance and control algorithms. In addition to serving as an analysis tool for techno logy development, many researchers have found MAVERIC-II to be an efficient, powerful analysis tool that evaluates guidance, navigation, and control designs, vehicle robustness, and requirements. MAVERIC-II is currently designed to execute in a UNIX environment. The input to the program is composed of three segments: 1) the vehicle models such as propulsion, aerodynamics, and guidance, navigation, and control 2) the environment models such as atmosphere and gravity, and 3) a simulation framework which is responsible for executing the vehicle and environment models and propagating the vehicle s states forward in time and handling user input/output. MAVERIC users prepare data files for the above models and run the simulation program. They can see the output on screen and/or store in

  12. New Model for Multimedia Interfaces to Online Public Access Catalogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pejtersen, Annelise Mark

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Book House, an interactive, multimedia online public access catalog (OPAC) developed in Denmark that uses icons, text, and animation. An alternative design model that addresses problems in OPACs is described; and database design, system navigation, use for fiction retrieval, and evaluation are discussed. (20 references) (MES)

  13. Knowledge of Native Protein-Protein Interfaces Is Sufficient To Construct Predictive Models for the Selection of Binding Candidates.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2015-10-26

    Selection of putative binding poses is a challenging part of virtual screening for protein-protein interactions. Predictive models to filter out binding candidates with the highest binding affinities comprise scoring functions that assign a score to each binding pose. Existing scoring functions are typically deduced by collecting statistical information about interfaces of native conformations of protein complexes along with interfaces of a large generated set of non-native conformations. However, the obtained scoring functions become biased toward the method used to generate the non-native conformations, i.e., they may not recognize near-native interfaces generated with a different method. The present study demonstrates that knowledge of only native protein-protein interfaces is sufficient to construct well-discriminative predictive models for the selection of binding candidates. Here we introduce a new scoring method that comprises a knowledge-based potential called KSENIA deduced from structural information about the native interfaces of 844 crystallographic protein-protein complexes. We derive KSENIA using convex optimization with a training set composed of native protein complexes and their near-native conformations obtained using deformations along the low-frequency normal modes. As a result, our knowledge-based potential has only marginal bias toward a method used to generate putative binding poses. Furthermore, KSENIA is smooth by construction, which allows it to be used along with rigid-body optimization to refine the binding poses. Using several test benchmarks, we demonstrate that our method discriminates well native and near-native conformations of protein complexes from non-native ones. Our methodology can be easily adapted to the recognition of other types of molecular interactions, such as protein-ligand, protein-RNA, etc. KSENIA will be made publicly available as a part of the SAMSON software platform at https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software . PMID

  14. The integration of a novice user interface into a professional modeling tool.

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Hmelo, C. E.; Day, R. S.; Shirey, W. E.; Huang, Q.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a software tool, the Oncology Thinking Cap (OncoTCAP) and reports on our efforts to develop a novice user interface to simplify the task of describing biological models of cancer and its treatment. Oncology Thinking Cap includes a modeling tool for making relationships explicit and provide dynamic feedback about the interaction between cancer cell kinetics, treatments, and patient outcomes. OncoTCAP supports student learning by making normally invisible processes visible and providing a representational tool that can be used to conduct thought experiments. We also describe our novice interface and report the results of initial usability testing. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9929305

  15. Controlling Kondo-like Scattering at the SrTiO3-based Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Han, K.; Palina, N.; Zeng, S. W.; Huang, Z.; Li, C. J.; Zhou, W. X.; Wan, D.-Y.; Zhang, L. C.; Chi, X.; Guo, R.; Chen, J. S.; Venkatesan, T.; Rusydi, A.; Ariando, A

    2016-01-01

    The observation of magnetic interaction at the interface between nonmagnetic oxides has attracted much attention in recent years. In this report, we show that the Kondo-like scattering at the SrTiO3-based conducting interface is enhanced by increasing the lattice mismatch and growth oxygen pressure PO2. For the 26-unit-cell LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface with lattice mismatch being 3.0%, the Kondo-like scattering is observed when PO2 is beyond 1 mTorr. By contrast, when the lattice mismatch is reduced to 1.0% at the (La0.3Sr0.7)(Al0.65Ta0.35)O3/SrTiO3 (LSAT/STO) interface, the metallic state is always preserved up to PO2 of 100 mTorr. The data from Hall measurement and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy reveal that the larger amount of localized Ti3+ ions are formed at the LAO/STO interface compared to LSAT/STO. Those localized Ti3+ ions with unpaired electrons can be spin-polarized to scatter mobile electrons, responsible for the Kondo-like scattering observed at the LAO/STO interface. PMID:27147407

  16. Controlling Kondo-like Scattering at the SrTiO3-based Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Han, K; Palina, N; Zeng, S W; Huang, Z; Li, C J; Zhou, W X; Wan, D-Y; Zhang, L C; Chi, X; Guo, R; Chen, J S; Venkatesan, T; Rusydi, A; Ariando

    2016-05-05

    The observation of magnetic interaction at the interface between nonmagnetic oxides has attracted much attention in recent years. In this report, we show that the Kondo-like scattering at the SrTiO3-based conducting interface is enhanced by increasing the lattice mismatch and growth oxygen pressure PO2. For the 26-unit-cell LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface with lattice mismatch being 3.0%, the Kondo-like scattering is observed when PO2 is beyond 1 mTorr. By contrast, when the lattice mismatch is reduced to 1.0% at the (La0.3Sr0.7)(Al0.65Ta0.35)O3/SrTiO3 (LSAT/STO) interface, the metallic state is always preserved up to PO2 of 100 mTorr. The data from Hall measurement and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy reveal that the larger amount of localized Ti(3+) ions are formed at the LAO/STO interface compared to LSAT/STO. Those localized Ti(3+) ions with unpaired electrons can be spin-polarized to scatter mobile electrons, responsible for the Kondo-like scattering observed at the LAO/STO interface.

  17. A subject-independent pattern-based Brain-Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Andreas M.; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Rana, Mohit; Pasqualotto, Emanuele; Buyukturkoglu, Korhan; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Kai-Keng; Tejos, Cristián; Zamorano, Francisco; Aboitiz, Francisco; Birbaumer, Niels; Ruiz, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    While earlier Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) studies have mostly focused on modulating specific brain regions or signals, new developments in pattern classification of brain states are enabling real-time decoding and modulation of an entire functional network. The present study proposes a new method for real-time pattern classification and neurofeedback of brain states from electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. It involves the creation of a fused classification model based on the method of Common Spatial Patterns (CSPs) from data of several healthy individuals. The subject-independent model is then used to classify EEG data in real-time and provide feedback to new individuals. In a series of offline experiments involving training and testing of the classifier with individual data from 27 healthy subjects, a mean classification accuracy of 75.30% was achieved, demonstrating that the classification system at hand can reliably decode two types of imagery used in our experiments, i.e., happy emotional imagery and motor imagery. In a subsequent experiment it is shown that the classifier can be used to provide neurofeedback to new subjects, and that these subjects learn to “match” their brain pattern to that of the fused classification model in a few days of neurofeedback training. This finding can have important implications for future studies on neurofeedback and its clinical applications on neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26539089

  18. A subject-independent pattern-based Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Ray, Andreas M; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Rana, Mohit; Pasqualotto, Emanuele; Buyukturkoglu, Korhan; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Kai-Keng; Tejos, Cristián; Zamorano, Francisco; Aboitiz, Francisco; Birbaumer, Niels; Ruiz, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    While earlier Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) studies have mostly focused on modulating specific brain regions or signals, new developments in pattern classification of brain states are enabling real-time decoding and modulation of an entire functional network. The present study proposes a new method for real-time pattern classification and neurofeedback of brain states from electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. It involves the creation of a fused classification model based on the method of Common Spatial Patterns (CSPs) from data of several healthy individuals. The subject-independent model is then used to classify EEG data in real-time and provide feedback to new individuals. In a series of offline experiments involving training and testing of the classifier with individual data from 27 healthy subjects, a mean classification accuracy of 75.30% was achieved, demonstrating that the classification system at hand can reliably decode two types of imagery used in our experiments, i.e., happy emotional imagery and motor imagery. In a subsequent experiment it is shown that the classifier can be used to provide neurofeedback to new subjects, and that these subjects learn to "match" their brain pattern to that of the fused classification model in a few days of neurofeedback training. This finding can have important implications for future studies on neurofeedback and its clinical applications on neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26539089

  19. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    group of awake and behaving animals. These unique findings provide preliminary evidence that efferent, volitional motor potentials can be recorded from the microchannel-based peripheral neural interface; a critical requirement for any neural interface intended to facilitate direct neural control of external technologies. PMID:25605627

  20. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    group of awake and behaving animals. These unique findings provide preliminary evidence that efferent, volitional motor potentials can be recorded from the microchannel-based peripheral neural interface; a critical requirement for any neural interface intended to facilitate direct neural control of external technologies.

  1. Designing speech-based interfaces for telepresence robots for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Katherine M; Flynn, Kelsey; McHugh, Amelia; Yanco, Holly A; Kontak, David

    2013-06-01

    People with cognitive and/or motor impairments may benefit from using telepresence robots to engage in social activities. To date, these robots, their user interfaces, and their navigation behaviors have not been designed for operation by people with disabilities. We conducted an experiment in which participants (n=12) used a telepresence robot in a scavenger hunt task to determine how they would use speech to command the robot. Based upon the results, we present design guidelines for speech-based interfaces for telepresence robots.

  2. A Process and Environment Aware Sierra/SolidMechanics Cohesive Zone Modeling Capability for Polymer/Solid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E. D.; Chambers, Robert S.; Hughes, Lindsey Gloe; Kropka, Jamie Michael; Stavig, Mark E.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    The performance and reliability of many mechanical and electrical components depend on the integrity of po lymer - to - solid interfaces . Such interfaces are found in adhesively bonded joints, encapsulated or underfilled electronic modules, protective coatings, and laminates. The work described herein was aimed at improving Sandia's finite element - based capability to predict interfacial crack growth by 1) using a high fidelity nonlinear viscoelastic material model for the adhesive in fracture simulations, and 2) developing and implementing a novel cohesive zone fracture model that generates a mode - mixity dependent toughness as a natural consequence of its formulation (i.e., generates the observed increase in interfacial toughness wi th increasing crack - tip interfacial shear). Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations were used to study fundamental material/interfa cial physics so as to develop a fuller understanding of the connection between molecular structure and failure . Also reported are test results that quantify how joint strength and interfacial toughness vary with temperature.

  3. Microenvironment temperature prediction between body and seat interface using autoregressive data-driven model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuofu; Wang, Lin; Luo, Zhongming; Heusch, Andrew I; Cascioli, Vincenzo; McCarthy, Peter W

    2015-11-01

    There is a need to develop a greater understanding of temperature at the skin-seat interface during prolonged seating from the perspectives of both industrial design (comfort/discomfort) and medical care (skin ulcer formation). Here we test the concept of predicting temperature at the seat surface and skin interface during prolonged sitting (such as required from wheelchair users). As caregivers are usually busy, such a method would give them warning ahead of a problem. This paper describes a data-driven model capable of predicting thermal changes and thus having the potential to provide an early warning (15- to 25-min ahead prediction) of an impending temperature that may increase the risk for potential skin damages for those subject to enforced sitting and who have little or no sensory feedback from this area. Initially, the oscillations of the original signal are suppressed using the reconstruction strategy of empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Consequentially, the autoregressive data-driven model can be used to predict future thermal trends based on a shorter period of acquisition, which reduces the possibility of introducing human errors and artefacts associated with longer duration "enforced" sitting by volunteers. In this study, the method had a maximum predictive error of <0.4 °C when used to predict the temperature at the seat and skin interface 15 min ahead, but required 45 min data prior to give this accuracy. Although the 45 min front loading of data appears large (in proportion to the 15 min prediction), a relative strength derives from the fact that the same algorithm could be used on the other 4 sitting datasets created by the same individual, suggesting that the period of 45 min required to train the algorithm is transferable to other data from the same individual. This approach might be developed (along with incorporation of other measures such as movement and humidity) into a system that can give caregivers prior warning to help avoid

  4. Microenvironment temperature prediction between body and seat interface using autoregressive data-driven model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuofu; Wang, Lin; Luo, Zhongming; Heusch, Andrew I; Cascioli, Vincenzo; McCarthy, Peter W

    2015-11-01

    There is a need to develop a greater understanding of temperature at the skin-seat interface during prolonged seating from the perspectives of both industrial design (comfort/discomfort) and medical care (skin ulcer formation). Here we test the concept of predicting temperature at the seat surface and skin interface during prolonged sitting (such as required from wheelchair users). As caregivers are usually busy, such a method would give them warning ahead of a problem. This paper describes a data-driven model capable of predicting thermal changes and thus having the potential to provide an early warning (15- to 25-min ahead prediction) of an impending temperature that may increase the risk for potential skin damages for those subject to enforced sitting and who have little or no sensory feedback from this area. Initially, the oscillations of the original signal are suppressed using the reconstruction strategy of empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Consequentially, the autoregressive data-driven model can be used to predict future thermal trends based on a shorter period of acquisition, which reduces the possibility of introducing human errors and artefacts associated with longer duration "enforced" sitting by volunteers. In this study, the method had a maximum predictive error of <0.4 °C when used to predict the temperature at the seat and skin interface 15 min ahead, but required 45 min data prior to give this accuracy. Although the 45 min front loading of data appears large (in proportion to the 15 min prediction), a relative strength derives from the fact that the same algorithm could be used on the other 4 sitting datasets created by the same individual, suggesting that the period of 45 min required to train the algorithm is transferable to other data from the same individual. This approach might be developed (along with incorporation of other measures such as movement and humidity) into a system that can give caregivers prior warning to help avoid

  5. Role of bulk and of interface contacts in the behavior of lattice model dimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Tiana, G; Provasi, D; Broglia, R A

    2003-05-01

    Some dimeric proteins first fold and then dimerize (three-state dimers) while others first dimerize and then fold (two-state dimers). Within the framework of a minimal lattice model, we can distinguish between sequences following one or the other mechanism on the basis of the distribution of the ground state energy between bulk and interface contacts. The topology of contacts is very different for the bulk than for the interface: while the bulk displays a rich network of interactions, the dimer interface is built up of a set of essentially independent contacts. Consequently, the two sets of interactions play very different roles both, in the folding and in the evolutionary history of the protein. Three-state dimers, where a large fraction of energy is concentrated in few contacts buried in the bulk, and where the relative contact energy of interface contacts is considerably smaller than that associated with bulk contacts, fold according to a hierarchical pathway controlled by local elementary structures, as also happens in the folding of single-domain monomeric proteins. On the other hand, two-state dimers display a relative contact energy of interface contacts, which is larger than the corresponding quantity associated with the bulk. In this case, the assembly of the interface stabilizes the system and leads the two chains to fold. The specific properties of three-state dimers acquired through evolution are expected to be more robust than those of two-state dimers; a fact that has consequences on proteins connected with viral diseases.

  6. Modeling the Assembly of Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles at Oil-Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xin

    2015-10-27

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), I model the interfacial adsorption and self-assembly of polymer-grafted nanoparticles at a planar oil-water interface. The amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles irreversibly adsorb to the interface and create a monolayer covering the interface. The polymer chains of the adsorbed nanoparticles are significantly deformed by surface tension to conform to the interface. I quantitatively characterize the properties of the particle-laden interface and the structure of the monolayer in detail at different surface coverages. I observe that the monolayer of particles grafted with long polymer chains undergoes an intriguing liquid-crystalline-amorphous phase transition in which the relationship between the monolayer structure and the surface tension/pressure of the interface is elucidated. Moreover, my results indicate that the amorphous state at high surface coverage is induced by the anisotropic distribution of the randomly grafted chains on each particle core, which leads to noncircular in-plane morphology formed under excluded volume effects. These studies provide a fundamental understanding of the interfacial behavior of polymer-grafted nanoparticles for achieving complete control of the adsorption and subsequent self-assembly. PMID:26439456

  7. Operando X-ray Investigation of Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Model Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We employed operando anomalous surface X-ray diffraction to investigate the buried interface between the cathode and the electrolyte of a model solid oxide fuel cell with atomic resolution. The cell was studied under different oxygen pressures at elevated temperatures and polarizations by external potential control. Making use of anomalous X-ray diffraction effects at the Y and Zr K-edges allowed us to resolve the interfacial structure and chemical composition of a (100)-oriented, 9.5 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal electrolyte below a La0.6Sr0.4CoO3−δ (LSC) electrode. We observe yttrium segregation toward the YSZ/LSC electrolyte/electrode interface under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, the interface becomes Y depleted. The yttrium segregation is corroborated by an enhanced outward relaxation of the YSZ interfacial metal ion layer. At the same time, an increase in point defect concentration in the electrolyte at the interface was observed, as evidenced by reduced YSZ crystallographic site occupancies for the cations as well as the oxygen ions. Such changes in composition are expected to strongly influence the oxygen ion transport through this interface which plays an important role for the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The structure of the interface is compared to the bare YSZ(100) surface structure near the microelectrode under identical conditions and to the structure of the YSZ(100) surface prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. PMID:27346923

  8. Model studies of Rayleigh instabilities via microdesigned interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2000-10-17

    The energetic and kinetic properties of surfaces play a critical role in defining the microstructural changes that occur during sintering and high-temperature use of ceramics. Characterization of surface diffusion in ceramics is particularly difficult, and significant variations in reported values of surface diffusivities arise even in well-studied systems. Effects of impurities, surface energy anisotropy, and the onset of surface attachment limited kinetics (SALK) are believed to contribute to this variability. An overview of the use of Rayleigh instabilities as a means of characterizing surface diffusivities is presented. The development of models of morphological evolution that account for effects of surface energy anisotropy is reviewed, and the potential interplay between impurities and surface energy anisotropy is addressed. The status of experimental studies of Rayleigh instabilities in sapphire utilizing lithographically introduced pore channels of controlled geometry and crystallography is summarized. Results of model studies indicate that impurities can significantly influence both the spatial and temporal characteristics of Rayleigh instabilities; this is attributed at least in part to impurity effects on the surface energy anisotropy. Related model experiments indicate that the onset of SALK may also contribute significantly to apparent variations in surface diffusion coefficients.

  9. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  10. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  11. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  12. A novel task-oriented optimal design for P300-based brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Dewen

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The number of items of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) should be adjustable in accordance with the requirements of the specific tasks. To address this issue, we propose a novel task-oriented optimal approach aimed at increasing the performance of general P300 BCIs with different numbers of items. Approach. First, we proposed a stimulus presentation with variable dimensions (VD) paradigm as a generalization of the conventional single-character (SC) and row-column (RC) stimulus paradigms. Furthermore, an embedding design approach was employed for any given number of items. Finally, based on the score-P model of each subject, the VD flash pattern was selected by a linear interpolation approach for a certain task. Main results. The results indicate that the optimal BCI design consistently outperforms the conventional approaches, i.e., the SC and RC paradigms. Specifically, there is significant improvement in the practical information transfer rate for a large number of items. Significance. The results suggest that the proposed optimal approach would provide useful guidance in the practical design of general P300-based BCIs.

  13. A novel task-oriented optimal design for P300-based brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Dewen

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The number of items of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) should be adjustable in accordance with the requirements of the specific tasks. To address this issue, we propose a novel task-oriented optimal approach aimed at increasing the performance of general P300 BCIs with different numbers of items. Approach. First, we proposed a stimulus presentation with variable dimensions (VD) paradigm as a generalization of the conventional single-character (SC) and row-column (RC) stimulus paradigms. Furthermore, an embedding design approach was employed for any given number of items. Finally, based on the score-P model of each subject, the VD flash pattern was selected by a linear interpolation approach for a certain task. Main results. The results indicate that the optimal BCI design consistently outperforms the conventional approaches, i.e., the SC and RC paradigms. Specifically, there is significant improvement in the practical information transfer rate for a large number of items. Significance. The results suggest that the proposed optimal approach would provide useful guidance in the practical design of general P300-based BCIs.

  14. WINDOW-WALL INTERFACE CORRECTION FACTORS: THERMAL MODELING OF INTEGRATED FENESTRATION AND OPAQUE ENVELOPE SYSTEMS FOR IMPROVED PREDICTION OF ENERGY USE

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, Mahabir S; Ravi, Dr. Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    The boundary conditions for thermal modeling of fenestration systems assume an adiabatic condition between the fenestration system installed and the opaque envelope system. This theoretical adiabatic boundary condition may not be appropriate owing to heat transfer at the interfaces, particularly for aluminum- framed windows affixed to metal- framed walls. In such scenarios, the heat transfer at the interface may increase the discrepancy between real world thermal indices and laboratory measured or calculated indices based on NFRC Rating System.This paper discusses the development of window-wall Interface Correction Factors (ICF) to improve energy impacts of building envelope systems

  15. Real-time distributed simulation using the Modular Modeling System interfaced to a Bailey NETWORK 90 system

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M.; Turso, J.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Garcia, H.E.; Ghie, M.H. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Dharap, S. . Dept. of Computer Science); Lee, S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Universit

    1991-01-01

    The Modular Modeling System was adapted for real-time simulation testing of diagnostic expert systems in 1987. The early approach utilized an available general purpose mainframe computer which operated the simulation and diagnostic program in the multitasking environment of the mainframe. That research program was subsequently expanded to intelligent distributed control applications incorporating microprocessor based controllers with the aid of an equipment grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Bailey NETWORK 90 microprocessor-based control system, acquired with the NSF grant, has been operational since April of 1990 and has been interfaced to both VAX mainframe and PC simulations of power plant processes in order to test and demonstrate advanced control and diagnostic concepts. This paper discusses the variety of techniques that have been used and which are under development to interface simulations and other distributed control functions to the Penn State Bailey system.

  16. Real-time distributed simulation using the Modular Modeling System interfaced to a Bailey NETWORK 90 system

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M.; Turso, J.A.; Garcia, H.E.; Ghie, M.H.; Dharap, S.; Lee, S.

    1991-12-31

    The Modular Modeling System was adapted for real-time simulation testing of diagnostic expert systems in 1987. The early approach utilized an available general purpose mainframe computer which operated the simulation and diagnostic program in the multitasking environment of the mainframe. That research program was subsequently expanded to intelligent distributed control applications incorporating microprocessor based controllers with the aid of an equipment grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Bailey NETWORK 90 microprocessor-based control system, acquired with the NSF grant, has been operational since April of 1990 and has been interfaced to both VAX mainframe and PC simulations of power plant processes in order to test and demonstrate advanced control and diagnostic concepts. This paper discusses the variety of techniques that have been used and which are under development to interface simulations and other distributed control functions to the Penn State Bailey system.

  17. A Home Ignition Assessment Model Applied to Structures in the Wildland-Urban Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Werth, David; Gupta, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    The issue of exterior fire threat to buildings, from either wildfires in the wildland-urban interface or neighboring structure fires, is critically important. To address this, theWildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program was initiated. The WIRHD program developed a tool, theWildFIREWizard, that will allow homeowners to estimate the external fire threat to their homes based on specific features and characteristics of the homes and yards. The software then makes recommendations to reduce the threat. The inputs include the structural and material features of the home and information about any ignition sources or flammable objects in its immediate vicinity, known as the home ignition zone. The tool comprises an ignition assessment model that performs explicit calculations of the radiant and convective heating of the building envelope from the potential ignition sources. This article describes a series of material ignition and flammability tests that were performed to calibrate and/or validate the ignition assessment model. The tests involved exposing test walls with different external siding types to radiant heating and/or direct flame contact.The responses of the test walls were used to determine the conditions leading to melting, ignition, or any other mode of failure of the walls. Temperature data were used to verify the model predictions of temperature rises and ignition times of the test walls.

  18. Schottky barriers and interface structure at silicide-silicon interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthai, C. C.; Rees, N. V.; Shen, T. H.

    Schottky barriers at metal-semiconductor interfaces have attracted much interest in recent years. One of the principal interests has centred on the mechanism for Fermi level pinning. The sililcide-silicon interface has been proposed as a system which is described by the metal induced gap states model. We have performed calculations on the NiSi 2/Si(111) type A and type B interfaces as well as the NiSi 2/Si(100) interface. In addition we have also studied the CoSi 2/Si interface. For the NiSi 2/Si(111) interface, we have further investigated the influence of point defects and hydrostatic pressure on the Schottky barrier height. Based on the results of our calculations we conclude that these interfaces do indeed subscribe to the MIGS model. We also present the results of some total energy calculations and discuss these with experimental observations.

  19. Evaluating a Web-Based Interface for Internet Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Newman, Dava J.; Sebrechts, Marc M.; Doarn, Charles R.

    1997-01-01

    The objective is to introduce the usability engineering methodology, heuristic evaluation, to the design and development of a web-based telemedicine system. Using a set of usability criteria, or heuristics, one evaluator examined the Spacebridge to Russia web-site for usability problems. Thirty-four usability problems were found in this preliminary study and all were assigned a severity rating. The value of heuristic analysis in the iterative design of a system is shown because the problems can be fixed before deployment of a system and the problems are of a different nature than those found by actual users of the system. It was therefore determined that there is potential value of heuristic evaluation paired with user testing as a strategy for optimal system performance design.

  20. Photometric model of diffuse surfaces described as a distribution of interfaced Lambertian facets.

    PubMed

    Simonot, Lionel

    2009-10-20

    The Lambertian model for diffuse reflection is widely used for the sake of its simplicity. Nevertheless, this model is known to be inaccurate in describing a lot of real-world objects, including those that present a matte surface. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a photometric model where the surfaces are described as a distribution of facets where each facet consists of a flat interface on a Lambertian background. Compared to the Lambertian model, it includes two additional physical parameters: an interface roughness parameter and the ratio between the refractive indices of the background binder and of the upper medium. The Torrance-Sparrow model--distribution of strictly specular facets--and the Oren-Nayar model--distribution of strictly Lambertian facets--appear as special cases. PMID:19844317

  1. Laboratory measurements and theoretical modeling of seismoelectric interface response and coseismic wave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schakel, M. D.; Slob, E. C.; Heller, H. K. J.; Smeulders, D. M. J.

    2011-04-01

    A full-waveform seismoelectric numerical model incorporating the directivity pattern of a pressure source is developed. This model provides predictions of coseismic electric fields and the electromagnetic waves that originate from a fluid/porous-medium interface. An experimental setup in which coseismic electric fields and interface responses are measured is constructed. The seismo-electric origin of the signals is confirmed. The numerically predicted polarity reversal of the interfacial signal and seismoelectric effects due to multiple scattering are detected in the measurements. Both the simulated coseismic electric fields and the electromagnetic waves originating from interfaces agree with the measurements in terms of travel times, waveform, polarity, amplitude, and spatial amplitude decay, demonstrating that seismoelectric effects are comprehensively described by theory.

  2. Time integration for diffuse interface models for two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aland, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    We propose a variant of the θ-scheme for diffuse interface models for two-phase flow, together with three new linearization techniques for the surface tension. These involve either additional stabilizing force terms, or a fully implicit coupling of the Navier–Stokes and Cahn–Hilliard equation. In the common case that the equations for interface and flow are coupled explicitly, we find a time step restriction which is very different to other two-phase flow models and in particular is independent of the grid size. We also show that the proposed stabilization techniques can lift this time step restriction. Even more pronounced is the performance of the proposed fully implicit scheme which is stable for arbitrarily large time steps. We demonstrate in a Taylor-flow application that this superior coupling between flow and interface equation can decrease the computation time by several orders of magnitude.

  3. Nonlinear stress deformation behavior of interfaces stabilized by food-based ingredients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, L. M. C.; Humblet-Hua, K. N. P.; van Kempen, S. E. H. J.

    2014-11-01

    Interfaces stabilized by food-based ingredients, such as proteins or glycolipids, often display nonlinear behavior when subjected to oscillatory dilatational deformations, even at the lowest deformation amplitudes which can currently be applied experimentally. Here we show that classical approaches to extract dilatational properties, based on the Young-Laplace equation, may not always be suitable to analyze data. We discuss a number of examples of food-ingredient stabilized interfaces (interfaces stabilized by protein fibrils, protein-polysaccharide complexes and oligosaccharide-fatty aid conjugates) and show how an analysis of the dynamic surface tension signal using Lissajous plots and a protocol which includes deformation amplitude and droplet size variations, can be used to obtain a more detailed and accurate description of their nonlinear dilatational behavior.

  4. Nonlinear stress deformation behavior of interfaces stabilized by food-based ingredients.

    PubMed

    Sagis, L M C; Humblet-Hua, K N P; van Kempen, S E H J

    2014-11-19

    Interfaces stabilized by food-based ingredients, such as proteins or glycolipids, often display nonlinear behavior when subjected to oscillatory dilatational deformations, even at the lowest deformation amplitudes which can currently be applied experimentally. Here we show that classical approaches to extract dilatational properties, based on the Young-Laplace equation, may not always be suitable to analyze data. We discuss a number of examples of food-ingredient stabilized interfaces (interfaces stabilized by protein fibrils, protein-polysaccharide complexes and oligosaccharide-fatty aid conjugates) and show how an analysis of the dynamic surface tension signal using Lissajous plots and a protocol which includes deformation amplitude and droplet size variations, can be used to obtain a more detailed and accurate description of their nonlinear dilatational behavior.

  5. Thin Interface Asymptotics for an Energy/Entropy Approach to Phase-Field Models with Unequal Conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.; Anderson, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Karma and Rapped recently developed a new sharp interface asymptotic analysis of the phase-field equations that is especially appropriate for modeling dendritic growth at low undercoolings. Their approach relieves a stringent restriction on the interface thickness that applies in the conventional asymptotic analysis, and has the added advantage that interfacial kinetic effects can also be eliminated. However, their analysis focussed on the case of equal thermal conductivities in the solid and liquid phases; when applied to a standard phase-field model with unequal conductivities, anomalous terms arise in the limiting forms of the boundary conditions for the interfacial temperature that are not present in conventional sharp-interface solidification models, as discussed further by Almgren. In this paper we apply their asymptotic methodology to a generalized phase-field model which is derived using a thermodynamically consistent approach that is based on independent entropy and internal energy gradient functionals that include double wells in both the entropy and internal energy densities. The additional degrees of freedom associated with the generalized phased-field equations can be chosen to eliminate the anomalous terms that arise for unequal conductivities.

  6. Cellular-automata models of solid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cho-Kun; Kier, Lemont B

    2007-11-01

    A series of cellular-automata (CA) models have been created, simulating relationships between water (or aqueous solutions) and solid surfaces of differing hydropathic (i.e., hydrophilic or hydrophobic) nature. Both equilibrium- and dynamic-flow models were examined, employing simple breaking and joining rules to simulate the hydropathic interactions. The CA simulations show that water accumulates near hydrophilic surfaces and avoids hydrophobic surfaces, forming concave-up and concave-down meniscuses, resp., under equilibrium conditions. In the dynamic-flow simulations, the flow rate of water was found to increase past a wall surface as the surface became less hydrophilic, reaching a maximum rate when the solid surface was of intermediate hydropathic state, and then declining with further increase in the hydrophobicity of the surface. Solution simulations show that non-polar solutes tend to achieve higher concentrations near hydrophobic-wall surfaces, whereas other hydrophobic/hydrophilic combinations of solutes and surfaces do not show such accumulations. Physical interpretations of the results are presented, as are some possible biological consequences. PMID:18027370

  7. Diffuse interface models of locally inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Aland, Sebastian; Egerer, Sabine; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2014-11-15

    We present a new diffuse interface model for the dynamics of inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid with inertial forces. A new feature of this work is the implementation of the local inextensibility condition in the diffuse interface context. Local inextensibility is enforced by using a local Lagrange multiplier, which provides the necessary tension force at the interface. We introduce a new equation for the local Lagrange multiplier whose solution essentially provides a harmonic extension of the multiplier off the interface while maintaining the local inextensibility constraint near the interface. We also develop a local relaxation scheme that dynamically corrects local stretching/compression errors thereby preventing their accumulation. Asymptotic analysis is presented that shows that our new system converges to a relaxed version of the inextensible sharp interface model. This is also verified numerically. To solve the equations, we use an adaptive finite element method with implicit coupling between the Navier-Stokes and the diffuse interface inextensibility equations. Numerical simulations of a single vesicle in a shear flow at different Reynolds numbers demonstrate that errors in enforcing local inextensibility may accumulate and lead to large differences in the dynamics in the tumbling regime and smaller differences in the inclination angle of vesicles in the tank-treading regime. The local relaxation algorithm is shown to prevent the accumulation of stretching and compression errors very effectively. Simulations of two vesicles in an extensional flow show that local inextensibility plays an important role when vesicles are in close proximity by inhibiting fluid drainage in the near contact region. PMID:25246712

  8. Diffuse interface models of locally inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid

    PubMed Central

    Aland, Sebastian; Egerer, Sabine; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We present a new diffuse interface model for the dynamics of inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid with inertial forces. A new feature of this work is the implementation of the local inextensibility condition in the diffuse interface context. Local inextensibility is enforced by using a local Lagrange multiplier, which provides the necessary tension force at the interface. We introduce a new equation for the local Lagrange multiplier whose solution essentially provides a harmonic extension of the multiplier off the interface while maintaining the local inextensibility constraint near the interface. We also develop a local relaxation scheme that dynamically corrects local stretching/compression errors thereby preventing their accumulation. Asymptotic analysis is presented that shows that our new system converges to a relaxed version of the inextensible sharp interface model. This is also verified numerically. To solve the equations, we use an adaptive finite element method with implicit coupling between the Navier-Stokes and the diffuse interface inextensibility equations. Numerical simulations of a single vesicle in a shear flow at different Reynolds numbers demonstrate that errors in enforcing local inextensibility may accumulate and lead to large differences in the dynamics in the tumbling regime and smaller differences in the inclination angle of vesicles in the tank-treading regime. The local relaxation algorithm is shown to prevent the accumulation of stretching and compression errors very effectively. Simulations of two vesicles in an extensional flow show that local inextensibility plays an important role when vesicles are in close proximity by inhibiting fluid drainage in the near contact region. PMID:25246712

  9. Simple adaptive sparse representation based classification schemes for EEG based brain-computer interface applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Younghak; Lee, Seungchan; Ahn, Minkyu; Cho, Hohyun; Jun, Sung Chan; Lee, Heung-No

    2015-11-01

    One of the main problems related to electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems is the non-stationarity of the underlying EEG signals. This results in the deterioration of the classification performance during experimental sessions. Therefore, adaptive classification techniques are required for EEG based BCI applications. In this paper, we propose simple adaptive sparse representation based classification (SRC) schemes. Supervised and unsupervised dictionary update techniques for new test data and a dictionary modification method by using the incoherence measure of the training data are investigated. The proposed methods are very simple and additional computation for the re-training of the classifier is not needed. The proposed adaptive SRC schemes are evaluated using two BCI experimental datasets. The proposed methods are assessed by comparing classification results with the conventional SRC and other adaptive classification methods. On the basis of the results, we find that the proposed adaptive schemes show relatively improved classification accuracy as compared to conventional methods without requiring additional computation.

  10. Microfluidic interface technology based on stereolithography for glass-based lab-on-a-chips.

    PubMed

    Han, Song-I; Han, Ki-Ho

    2013-01-01

    As lab-on-a-chips are developed for on-chip integrated microfluidic systems with multiple functions, the development of microfluidic interface (MFI) technology to enable integration of complex microfluidic systems becomes increasingly important and faces many technical difficulties. Such difficulties include the need for more complex structures, the possibility of biological or chemical cross-contamination between functional compartments, and the possible need for individual compartments fabricated from different substrate materials. This chapter introduces MFI technology, based on rapid stereolithography, for a glass-based miniaturized genetic sample preparation system, as an example of a complex lab-on-a-chip that could include functional elements such as; solid-phase DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, and capillary electrophoresis. To enable the integration of a complex lab-on-a-chip system in a single chip, MFI technology based on stereolithography provides a simple method for realizing complex arrangements of one-step plug-in microfluidic interconnects, integrated microvalves for microfluidic control, and optical windows for on-chip optical processes.

  11. Human machine interface by using stereo-based depth extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chao-Kang; Wu, Chi-Hao; Lin, Hsueh-Yi; Chang, Ting-Ting; Lin, Tung-Yang; Huang, Po-Kuan

    2014-03-01

    The ongoing success of three-dimensional (3D) cinema fuels increasing efforts to spread the commercial success of 3D to new markets. The possibilities of a convincing 3D experience at home, such as three-dimensional television (3DTV), has generated a great deal of interest within the research and standardization community. A central issue for 3DTV is the creation and representation of 3D content. Acquiring scene depth information is a fundamental task in computer vision, yet complex and error-prone. Dedicated range sensors, such as the Time­ of-Flight camera (ToF), can simplify the scene depth capture process and overcome shortcomings of traditional solutions, such as active or passive stereo analysis. Admittedly, currently available ToF sensors deliver only a limited spatial resolution. However, sophisticated depth upscaling approaches use texture information to match depth and video resolution. At Electronic Imaging 2012 we proposed an upscaling routine based on error energy minimization, weighted with edge information from an accompanying video source. In this article we develop our algorithm further. By adding temporal consistency constraints to the upscaling process, we reduce disturbing depth jumps and flickering artifacts in the final 3DTV content. Temporal consistency in depth maps enhances the 3D experience, leading to a wider acceptance of 3D media content. More content in better quality can boost the commercial success of 3DTV.

  12. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  13. Brain-computer interface based on generation of visual images.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, Pavel; Frolov, Alexander; Cantor, Charles; Fedulova, Irina; Bakhnyan, Mikhail; Zhavoronkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the task of recognizing EEG patterns that correspond to performing three mental tasks: relaxation and imagining of two types of pictures: faces and houses. The experiments were performed using two EEG headsets: BrainProducts ActiCap and Emotiv EPOC. The Emotiv headset becomes widely used in consumer BCI application allowing for conducting large-scale EEG experiments in the future. Since classification accuracy significantly exceeded the level of random classification during the first three days of the experiment with EPOC headset, a control experiment was performed on the fourth day using ActiCap. The control experiment has shown that utilization of high-quality research equipment can enhance classification accuracy (up to 68% in some subjects) and that the accuracy is independent of the presence of EEG artifacts related to blinking and eye movement. This study also shows that computationally-inexpensive bayesian classifier based on covariance matrix analysis yields similar classification accuracy in this problem as a more sophisticated Multi-class Common Spatial Patterns (MCSP) classifier.

  14. Representation-based user interfaces for the audiovisual library of the year 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, Philippe; Joly, Philippe; Lepain, Philippe; Longueville, Veronique

    1995-03-01

    The audiovisual library of the future will be based on computerized access to digitized documents. In this communication, we address the user interface issues which will arise from this new situation. One cannot simply transfer a user interface designed for the piece by piece production of some audiovisual presentation and make it a tool for accessing full-length movies in an electronic library. One cannot take a digital sound editing tool and propose it as a means to listen to a musical recording. In our opinion, when computers are used as mediations to existing contents, document representation-based user interfaces are needed. With such user interfaces, a structured visual representation of the document contents is presented to the user, who can then manipulate it to control perception and analysis of these contents. In order to build such manipulable visual representations of audiovisual documents, one needs to automatically extract structural information from the documents contents. In this communication, we describe possible visual interfaces for various temporal media, and we propose methods for the economically feasible large scale processing of documents. The work presented is sponsored by the Bibliotheque Nationale de France: it is part of the program aiming at developing for image and sound documents an experimental counterpart to the digitized text reading workstation of this library.

  15. Dentin bonding performance and interface observation of an MMA-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Junichi; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bonding performance and dentin interface acid resistance using a 4-META/MMA-TBB based restorative material (BF) compared to a conventional 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement (SB), and the effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) addition to the materials. Dentin surfaces were treated with 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 4-META containing self-etching primer (TP), followed by application of BF or SB polymer powders with or without NaF, to evaluate microtensile bond strength (µTBS) in six experimental groups; 10-3/SB, 10-3/BF, TP/SB, TP/BF, TP/SB/NaF and TP/BF/NaF. SEM observation of the resin-dentin interface was performed after acid-base challenge to evaluate interfacial dentin resistance to acid attack. TP/BF showed highest µTBS, while NaF polymers decreased µTBS. TP/BF showed funnel-shaped erosion at the interface, however, NaF polymers improved acid resistance of interface. In conclusion, BF demonstrated high µTBSs and low acid-resistance at the interface. NaF addition enhanced acid resistance but decreased µTBS.

  16. Integrated USB based readout interface for silicon strip detectors of the ATLAS SCT module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masek, P.; Linhart, V.; Granja, C.; Pospisil, S.; Husak, M.

    2011-12-01

    An integrated portable USB based readout interface for the ATLAS semiconductor trackers (SCT) has been built. The ATLAS SCT modules are large area silicon strip detectors designed for tracking of high-energy charged particles resulting in collisions on Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in CERN. These modules can be also used on small accelerators for medical or industry applications where a compact and configurable readout interface would be useful. A complete custom made PC-host software tool was written for Windows platform for control and DAQ with build-in online visualization. The new constructed interface provides integrated power, control and DAQ and configurable communication between the detector module and the controlling PC. The interface is based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and the high speed USB 2.0 standard. This design permits to operate the modules under high particle fluence while minimizing the dead time of the whole detection system. Utilization of the programmable device simplifies the operation and permits future expansion of the functionality without any hardware changes. The device includes the high voltage source for detector bias up to 500 V and it is equipped with number of devices for monitoring the operation and conditions of measurement (temperature, humidity, voltage). These features are particularly useful as the strip detector must be operated in a well controlled environment. The operation of the interface will be demonstrated on data measured with different particles from radiation sources.

  17. Interface modeling to predict well casing damage for big hill strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2012-02-01

    Oil leaks were found in well casings of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interface between the caprock and top of salt. This damage could be caused by interface movement induced by cavern volume closure due to salt creep. A three dimensional finite element model, which allows each cavern to be configured individually, was constructed to investigate shear and vertical displacements across each interface. The model contains interfaces between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interface behavior in a realistic manner. This analysis results indicate that the casings of Caverns 105 and 109 failed by shear stress that exceeded shear strength due to the horizontal movement of the top of salt relative to the caprock, and tensile stress due to the downward movement of the top of salt from the caprock, respectively. The casings of Caverns 101, 110, 111 and 114, located at the far ends of the field, are predicted to be failed by shear stress in the near future. The casings of inmost Caverns 107 and 108 are predicted to be failed by tensile stress in the near future.

  18. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D’Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs. PMID:25482337

  19. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs.

  20. A combined molecular dynamics/micromechanics/finite element approach for multiscale constitutive modeling of nanocomposites with interface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B. J.; Shin, H.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, H.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a multiscale framework based on molecular dynamic (MD) simulation, micromechanics, and finite element method (FEM). A micromechanical model, which considers influences of the interface properties, nanoparticle (NP) size, and microcracks, is developed. Then, we perform MD simulations to characterize the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite system (silica/nylon 6) with varying volume fraction and size of NPs. By comparing the MD with micromechanics results, intrinsic physical properties at interfacial region are derived. Finally, we implement the developed model in the FEM code with the derived interfacial parameters, and predict the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite at the macroscopic scale.

  1. Research on e-commerce transaction networks using multi-agent modelling and open application programming interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Chunhui; Han, Xufang; Wu, Harris

    2010-08-01

    We provide a formal definition of an e-commerce transaction network. Agent-based modelling is used to simulate e-commerce transaction networks. For real-world analysis, we studied the open application programming interfaces (APIs) from eBay and Taobao e-commerce websites and captured real transaction data. Pajek is used to visualise the agent relationships in the transaction network. We derived one-mode networks from the transaction network and analysed them using degree and betweenness centrality. Integrating multi-agent modelling, open APIs and social network analysis, we propose a new way to study large-scale e-commerce systems.

  2. A Monthly Water-Balance Model Driven By a Graphical User Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a monthly water-balance model driven by a graphical user interface, referred to as the Thornthwaite monthly water-balance program. Computations of monthly water-balance components of the hydrologic cycle are made for a specified location. The program can be used as a research tool, an assessment tool, and a tool for classroom instruction.

  3. AgRISTARS: Yield model development/soil moisture. Interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The interactions and support functions required between the crop Yield Model Development (YMD) Project and Soil Moisture (SM) Project are defined. The requirements for YMD support of SM and vice-versa are outlined. Specific tasks in support of these interfaces are defined for development of support functions.

  4. Self-Observation Model Employing an Instinctive Interface for Classroom Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Gwo-Dong; Nurkhamid; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Yang, Shu-Han; Chao, Po-Yao

    2014-01-01

    In a classroom, obtaining active, whole-focused, and engaging learning results from a design is often difficult. In this study, we propose a self-observation model that employs an instinctive interface for classroom active learning. Students can communicate with virtual avatars in the vertical screen and can react naturally according to the…

  5. EEG Classification for Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Using a Tensor Based Multiclass Multimodal Analysis Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongfei; Li, Jie; Lu, Rongrong; Gu, Rong; Cao, Lei; Gong, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems usually utilize one type of changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations for control, such as event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS), steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), and P300 evoked potentials. There is a recent trend to detect more than one of these signals in one system to create a hybrid BCI. However, in this case, EEG data were always divided into groups and analyzed by the separate processing procedures. As a result, the interactive effects were ignored when different types of BCI tasks were executed simultaneously. In this work, we propose an improved tensor based multiclass multimodal scheme especially for hybrid BCI, in which EEG signals are denoted as multiway tensors, a nonredundant rank-one tensor decomposition model is proposed to obtain nonredundant tensor components, a weighted fisher criterion is designed to select multimodal discriminative patterns without ignoring the interactive effects, and support vector machine (SVM) is extended to multiclass classification. Experiment results suggest that the proposed scheme can not only identify the different changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations induced by different types of tasks but also capture the interactive effects of simultaneous tasks properly. Therefore, it has great potential use for hybrid BCI. PMID:26880873

  6. EEG Classification for Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Using a Tensor Based Multiclass Multimodal Analysis Scheme.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongfei; Li, Jie; Lu, Rongrong; Gu, Rong; Cao, Lei; Gong, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems usually utilize one type of changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations for control, such as event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS), steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), and P300 evoked potentials. There is a recent trend to detect more than one of these signals in one system to create a hybrid BCI. However, in this case, EEG data were always divided into groups and analyzed by the separate processing procedures. As a result, the interactive effects were ignored when different types of BCI tasks were executed simultaneously. In this work, we propose an improved tensor based multiclass multimodal scheme especially for hybrid BCI, in which EEG signals are denoted as multiway tensors, a nonredundant rank-one tensor decomposition model is proposed to obtain nonredundant tensor components, a weighted fisher criterion is designed to select multimodal discriminative patterns without ignoring the interactive effects, and support vector machine (SVM) is extended to multiclass classification. Experiment results suggest that the proposed scheme can not only identify the different changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations induced by different types of tasks but also capture the interactive effects of simultaneous tasks properly. Therefore, it has great potential use for hybrid BCI. PMID:26880873

  7. Task-Based Navigation of a Taxonomy Interface to a Digital Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Christopher S. G.; Wang, Zhonghong; Chaudhry, Abdus Sattar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This is a study of hierarchical navigation; how users browse a taxonomy-based interface to an organizational repository to locate information resources. The study is part of a project to develop a taxonomy for an library and information science department to organize resources and support user browsing in a digital repository.…

  8. Investigating the Effects of Multimodal Feedback through Tracking State in Pen-Based Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Minghui; Ren, Xiangshi

    2011-01-01

    A tracking state increases the bandwidth of pen-based interfaces. However, this state is difficult to detect with default visual feedback. This paper reports on two experiments that are designed to evaluate multimodal feedback for pointing tasks (both 1D and 2D) in tracking state. In 1D pointing experiments, results show that there is a…

  9. PC-based Multiple Information System Interface (PC/MISI) design plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Hall, Philip P.

    1985-01-01

    The general design plan for the implementation of a common user interface to multiple remote information systems within a microcomputer-based environment is presented. The intent is to provide a framework for the development of detailed specifications which will be used as guidelines for the actual development of the system.

  10. Evaluating Gaze-Based Interface Tools to Facilitate Point-and-Select Tasks with Small Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. less than 12 x 12 pixels) point-and-select tasks. We conducted two…

  11. Modeling the current distribution across the depth electrode-brain interface in deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Nada; Liu, Xuguang

    2007-09-01

    The mismatch between the extensive clinical use of deep brain stimulation (DBS), which is being used to treat an increasing number of neurological disorders, and the lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms is confounded by the difficulty of measuring the spread of electric current in the brain in vivo. In this article we present a brief review of the recent computational models that simulate the electric current and field distribution in 3D space and, consequently, make estimations of the brain volume being modulated by therapeutic DBS. Such structural modeling work can be categorized into three main approaches: target-specific modeling, models of instrumentation and modeling the electrode-brain interface. Comments are made for each of these approaches with emphasis on our electrode-brain interface modeling, since the stimulating current must travel across the electrode-brain interface in order to reach the surrounding brain tissue and modulate the pathological neural activity. For future modeling work, a combined approach needs to be taken to reveal the underlying mechanisms, and both structural and dynamic models need to be clinically validated to make reliable predictions about the therapeutic effect of DBS in order to assist clinical practice.

  12. Cryo-EM Data Are Superior to Contact and Interface Information in Integrative Modeling.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Sjoerd J; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Schindler, Christina E M; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-02-23

    Protein-protein interactions carry out a large variety of essential cellular processes. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for the modeling of protein-protein interactions at a wide range of resolutions, and recent developments have caused a revolution in the field. At low resolution, cryo-EM maps can drive integrative modeling of the interaction, assembling existing structures into the map. Other experimental techniques can provide information on the interface or on the contacts between the monomers in the complex. This inevitably raises the question regarding which type of data is best suited to drive integrative modeling approaches. Systematic comparison of the prediction accuracy and specificity of the different integrative modeling paradigms is unavailable to date. Here, we compare EM-driven, interface-driven, and contact-driven integrative modeling paradigms. Models were generated for the protein docking benchmark using the ATTRACT docking engine and evaluated using the CAPRI two-star criterion. At 20 Å resolution, EM-driven modeling achieved a success rate of 100%, outperforming the other paradigms even with perfect interface and contact information. Therefore, even very low resolution cryo-EM data is superior in predicting heterodimeric and heterotrimeric protein assemblies. Our study demonstrates that a force field is not necessary, cryo-EM data alone is sufficient to accurately guide the monomers into place. The resulting rigid models successfully identify regions of conformational change, opening up perspectives for targeted flexible remodeling.

  13. An ASM/ADM model interface for dynamic plant-wide simulation.

    PubMed

    Nopens, Ingmar; Batstone, Damien J; Copp, John B; Jeppsson, Ulf; Volcke, Eveline; Alex, Jens; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2009-04-01

    Mathematical modelling has proven to be very useful in process design, operation and optimisation. A recent trend in WWTP modelling is to include the different subunits in so-called plant-wide models rather than focusing on parts of the entire process. One example of a typical plant-wide model is the coupling of an upstream activated sludge plant (including primary settler, and secondary clarifier) to an anaerobic digester for sludge digestion. One of the key challenges when coupling these processes has been the definition of an interface between the well accepted activated sludge model (ASM1) and anaerobic digestion model (ADM1). Current characterisation and interface models have key limitations, the most critical of which is the over-use of X(c) (or lumped complex) variable as a main input to the ADM1. Over-use of X(c) does not allow for variation of degradability, carbon oxidation state or nitrogen content. In addition, achieving a target influent pH through the proper definition of the ionic system can be difficult. In this paper, we define an interface and characterisation model that maps degradable components directly to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids (and their soluble analogues), as well as organic acids, rather than using X(c). While this interface has been designed for use with the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2), it is widely applicable to ADM1 input characterisation in general. We have demonstrated the model both hypothetically (BSM2), and practically on a full-scale anaerobic digester treating sewage sludge.

  14. Concentration on performance with P300-based BCI systems: a matter of interface features.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Sauer, Leandro; Valero-Aguayo, Luis; de la Torre-Luque, Alejandro; Ron-Angevin, Ricardo; Varona-Moya, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    People who suffer from severe motor disabilities have difficulties to communicate with others or to interact with their environment using natural, i.e., muscular channels. These limitations can be overcome to some extent by using brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), because such systems allow users to communicate on the basis of their brain activity only. Among the several types of BCIs for spelling purposes, those that rely on the P300 event related potential-P300-based spellers-are chosen preferentially due to their high reliability. However, they demand from the user to sustain his/her attention to the desired character over a relatively long period of time. Therefore, the user's capacity to concentrate can affect his/her performance with a P300-based speller. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis using three different interfaces: one based on the classic P300 speller paradigm, another also based on that speller but including a word predictor, and a third one that was based on the T9 interface developed for mobile phones. User performance was assessed by measuring the time to complete a spelling task and the accuracy of character selection. The d2 test was applied to assess attention and concentration. Sample (N = 14) was divided into two groups basing on of concentration scores. As a result, performance was better with the predictor-enriched interfaces: less time was needed to solve the task and participants made fewer errors (p < .05). There were also significant effects of concentration (p < .05) on performance with the standard P300 speller. In conclusion, the performance of those users with lower concentration level can be improved by providing BCIs with more interactive interfaces. These findings provide substantial evidence in order to highlight the impact of psychological features on BCI performance and should be taken into account for future assistive technology systems. PMID:26360225

  15. Concentration on performance with P300-based BCI systems: a matter of interface features.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Sauer, Leandro; Valero-Aguayo, Luis; de la Torre-Luque, Alejandro; Ron-Angevin, Ricardo; Varona-Moya, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    People who suffer from severe motor disabilities have difficulties to communicate with others or to interact with their environment using natural, i.e., muscular channels. These limitations can be overcome to some extent by using brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), because such systems allow users to communicate on the basis of their brain activity only. Among the several types of BCIs for spelling purposes, those that rely on the P300 event related potential-P300-based spellers-are chosen preferentially due to their high reliability. However, they demand from the user to sustain his/her attention to the desired character over a relatively long period of time. Therefore, the user's capacity to concentrate can affect his/her performance with a P300-based speller. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis using three different interfaces: one based on the classic P300 speller paradigm, another also based on that speller but including a word predictor, and a third one that was based on the T9 interface developed for mobile phones. User performance was assessed by measuring the time to complete a spelling task and the accuracy of character selection. The d2 test was applied to assess attention and concentration. Sample (N = 14) was divided into two groups basing on of concentration scores. As a result, performance was better with the predictor-enriched interfaces: less time was needed to solve the task and participants made fewer errors (p < .05). There were also significant effects of concentration (p < .05) on performance with the standard P300 speller. In conclusion, the performance of those users with lower concentration level can be improved by providing BCIs with more interactive interfaces. These findings provide substantial evidence in order to highlight the impact of psychological features on BCI performance and should be taken into account for future assistive technology systems.

  16. [A data interface based on USB bus technology for full auto patch-clamp system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Youlin; Hu, Yang; Qu, Anlian

    2006-04-01

    A USB bus based data interface technology for full auto Patch-Clamp system is discussed in the article. The main controller is CY2131QC (Cypress) and the logic controller is EPM3256A (Altera). Optocouplers are used to get rid of the noise from the interface. It makes the installation of the Patch-Clamp system easier by using the USB bus, and is suitable for the new generation of the Patch-Clamp system with a high speed of 1M bytes/s.

  17. [A data interface based on USB bus technology for full auto patch-clamp system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Youlin; Hu, Yang; Qu, Anlian

    2006-04-01

    A USB bus based data interface technology for full auto Patch-Clamp system is discussed in the article. The main controller is CY2131QC (Cypress) and the logic controller is EPM3256A (Altera). Optocouplers are used to get rid of the noise from the interface. It makes the installation of the Patch-Clamp system easier by using the USB bus, and is suitable for the new generation of the Patch-Clamp system with a high speed of 1M bytes/s. PMID:16706338

  18. Carbon nanotube-based multi electrode arrays for neuronal interfacing: progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bareket-Keren, Lilach; Hanein, Yael

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings have been demonstrated over the past several years as a promising material for neuronal interfacing applications. In particular, in the realm of neuronal implants, CNTs have major advantages owing to their unique mechanical and electrical properties. Here we review recent investigations utilizing CNTs in neuro-interfacing applications. Cell adhesion, neuronal engineering and multi electrode recordings with CNTs are described. We also highlight prospective advances in this field, in particular, progress toward flexible, bio-compatible CNT-based technology. PMID:23316141

  19. Real-time gesture interface based on event-driven processing from stereo silicon retinas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Haeng; Delbruck, Tobi; Pfeiffer, Michael; Park, Paul K J; Shin, Chang-Woo; Ryu, Hyunsurk Eric; Kang, Byung Chang

    2014-12-01

    We propose a real-time hand gesture interface based on combining a stereo pair of biologically inspired event-based dynamic vision sensor (DVS) silicon retinas with neuromorphic event-driven postprocessing. Compared with conventional vision or 3-D sensors, the use of DVSs, which output asynchronous and sparse events in response to motion, eliminates the need to extract movements from sequences of video frames, and allows significantly faster and more energy-efficient processing. In addition, the rate of input events depends on the observed movements, and thus provides an additional cue for solving the gesture spotting problem, i.e., finding the onsets and offsets of gestures. We propose a postprocessing framework based on spiking neural networks that can process the events received from the DVSs in real time, and provides an architecture for future implementation in neuromorphic hardware devices. The motion trajectories of moving hands are detected by spatiotemporally correlating the stereoscopically verged asynchronous events from the DVSs by using leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons. Adaptive thresholds of the LIF neurons achieve the segmentation of trajectories, which are then translated into discrete and finite feature vectors. The feature vectors are classified with hidden Markov models, using a separate Gaussian mixture model for spotting irrelevant transition gestures. The disparity information from stereovision is used to adapt LIF neuron parameters to achieve recognition invariant of the distance of the user to the sensor, and also helps to filter out movements in the background of the user. Exploiting the high dynamic range of DVSs, furthermore, allows gesture recognition over a 60-dB range of scene illuminance. The system achieves recognition rates well over 90% under a variety of variable conditions with static and dynamic backgrounds with naïve users. PMID:25420246

  20. A synchrotron-based photoemission study of the MoO{sub 3}/Co interface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuzhan; Chen Shi; Chen Wei; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Yang Ming; Qi Dongchen; Gao Xingyu

    2011-01-21

    The electronic structures at the MoO{sub 3}/Co interface were investigated using synchrotron-based ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that interfacial chemical reactions lead to the reduction of Mo oxidation states and the formation of Co-O bonds. These interfacial chemical reactions also induce a large interface dipole, which significantly increases the work function of the cobalt substrate. In addition, two interface states located at 1.0 and 2.0 eV below the Fermi level are identified. These two states overlap at film thickness of between 2-4 nm, which suggests the MoO{sub 3} intermediate layer may facilitate ohmic charge transport.

  1. Development of a Mobile User Interface for Image-based Dietary Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungye; Schap, Tusarebecca; Bosch, Marc; Maciejewski, Ross; Delp, Edward J; Ebert, David S; Boushey, Carol J

    2010-12-31

    In this paper, we present a mobile user interface for image-based dietary assessment. The mobile user interface provides a front end to a client-server image recognition and portion estimation software. In the client-server configuration, the user interactively records a series of food images using a built-in camera on the mobile device. Images are sent from the mobile device to the server, and the calorie content of the meal is estimated. In this paper, we describe and discuss the design and development of our mobile user interface features. We discuss the design concepts, through initial ideas and implementations. For each concept, we discuss qualitative user feedback from participants using the mobile client application. We then discuss future designs, including work on design considerations for the mobile application to allow the user to interactively correct errors in the automatic processing while reducing the user burden associated with classical pen-and-paper dietary records.

  2. Finding and Exploring Health Information with a Slider-Based User Interface.

    PubMed

    Pang, Patrick Cheong-Iao; Verspoor, Karin; Pearce, Jon; Chang, Shanton

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that search engines are the primary channel to access online health information, there are better ways to find and explore health information on the web. Search engines are prone to problems when they are used to find health information. For instance, users have difficulties in expressing health scenarios with appropriate search keywords, search results are not optimised for medical queries, and the search process does not account for users' literacy levels and reading preferences. In this paper, we describe our approach to addressing these problems by introducing a novel design using a slider-based user interface for discovering health information without the need for precise search keywords. The user evaluation suggests that the interface is easy to use and able to assist users in the process of discovering new information. This study demonstrates the potential value of adopting slider controls in the user interface of health websites for navigation and information discovery.

  3. Non-invasive EEG-based brain-computer interfaces in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Mikołajewska, Emilia; Mikołajewski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of consciousness (DoCs) are chronic conditions resulting usually from severe neurological deficits. The limitations of the existing diagnosis systems and methodologies cause a need for additional tools for relevant patients with DoCs assessment, including brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Recent progress in BCIs' clinical applications may offer important breakthroughs in the diagnosis and therapy of patients with DoCs. Thus the clinical significance of BCI applications in the diagnosis of patients with DoCs is hard to overestimate. One of them may be brain-computer interfaces. The aim of this study is to evaluate possibility of non-invasive EEG-based brain-computer interfaces in diagnosis of patients with DOCs in post-acute and long-term care institutions.

  4. A hybrid NMR/SAXS-based approach for discriminating oligomeric protein interfaces using Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Paolo; Shi, Lei; Liu, Gaohua; Barbieri, Christopher M.; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Grant, Thomas D.; Luft, Joseph R.; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Snell, Edward H.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David; Lange, Oliver F.; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2016-01-01

    Oligomeric proteins are important targets for structure determination in solution. While in most cases the fold of individual subunits can be determined experimentally, or predicted by homology-based methods, protein-protein interfaces are challenging to determine de novo using conventional NMR structure determination protocols. Here we focus on a member of the bet-V1 superfamily, Aha1 from Colwellia psychrerythraea. This family displays a broad range of crystallographic interfaces none of which can be reconciled with the NMR and SAXS data collected for Aha1. Unlike conventional methods relying on a dense network of experimental restraints, the sparse data are used to limit conformational search during optimization of a physically realistic energy function. This work highlights a new approach for studying minor conformational changes due to structural plasticity within a single dimeric interface in solution. PMID:25388768

  5. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells. PMID:27532662

  6. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells.

  7. First principles modeling of interfaces of lithium (thio) phosphate solid electrolytes and lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzwarth, N. A. W.; Lepley, N. D.; Al-Qawasmeh, A. N. M.; Kates, C. M.

    2014-03-01

    Computer modeling studies show that while lithium phosphate electrolytes form stable interfaces with lithium metal anodes, lithium thiophosphate electrolytes are typically structurally and chemically altered by the presence of lithium metal. On the other hand, experiments have shown that an electrochemical cell of Li/Li3PS4/Li can be cycled many times. One possible explanation of the apparent experimental stability of the Li/Li3PS4/Li system is that a stabilizing buffer layer is formed at the interface during the first few electrochemical cycles. In order to computationally explore this possibility, we examined the influence of ``thin film'' buffer layers of Li2S on the surface of the electrolyte. Using first principles techniques, stable electrolyte-buffer layer configurations were constructed and the resulting Li3PS4/Li2S and Li2S/Li interfaces were found to be structurally and chemically stable. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1105485.

  8. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.

  9. Perturbative approach to the structure of a planar interface in the Landau-de Gennes model.

    PubMed

    Pełka, Robert; Saito, Kazuya

    2006-10-01

    The structure of nearly static planar interfaces is studied within the framework of the Landau-de Gennes model with the dynamics governed by the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation. To account for the full elastic anisotropy the free energy expansion is extended to include a third order gradient term. The solutions corresponding to the in-plane or homeotropic director alignment at the interface are sought. For this purpose a consistent perturbative scheme is constructed which enables one to calculate successive corrections to the velocity and the order parameter of the interface. The implications of the solutions are discussed. The elastic anisotropy introduces asymmetry into the order parameter and free energy profiles, even for the high symmetry homeotropic configuration. The velocity of the interface with the homeotropic or in-plane alignment is enhanced or reduced, respectively. There is no reorientation of the optical axis in the boundary layer. For the class of nematogens with approximate splay-bend degeneracy the temperature dependence of the interface velocity is weakly affected by the remaining twist anisotropy. PMID:17155076

  10. Open boundary conditions for the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmarais, J. L.; Kuerten, J. G. M.

    2014-04-01

    New techniques are developed for solving multi-phase flows in unbounded domains using the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D. They extend two open boundary conditions originally designed for the Navier-Stokes equations. The non-dimensional formulation of the DIM generalizes the approach to any fluid. The equations support a steady state whose analytical approximation close to the critical point depends only on temperature. This feature enables the use of detectors at the boundaries switching between conventional boundary conditions in bulk phases and a multi-phase strategy in interfacial regions. Moreover, the latter takes advantage of the steady state approximation to minimize the interface-boundary interactions. The techniques are applied to fluids experiencing a phase transition and where the interface between the phases travels through one of the boundaries. When the interface crossing the boundary is fully developed, the technique greatly improves results relative to cases where conventional boundary conditions can be used. Limitations appear when the interface crossing the boundary is not a stable equilibrium between the two phases: the terms responsible for creating the true balance between the phases perturb the interior solution. Both boundary conditions present good numerical stability properties: the error remains bounded when the initial conditions or the far field values are perturbed. For the PML, the influence of its main parameters on the global error is investigated to make a compromise between computational costs and maximum error. The approach can be extended to multiple spatial dimensions.

  11. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain’s behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user’s motor intention during CLDA—a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to

  12. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Orsborn, Amy L; Carmena, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain's behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user's motor intention during CLDA-a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to parameter

  13. Classification of user interfaces for graph-based online analytical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, James R.

    2016-05-01

    In the domain of business intelligence, user-oriented software for conducting multidimensional analysis via Online- Analytical Processing (OLAP) is now commonplace. In this setting, datasets commonly have well-defined sets of dimensions and measures around which analysis tasks can be conducted. However, many forms of data used in intelligence operations - deriving from social networks, online communications, and text corpora - will consist of graphs with varying forms of potential dimensional structure. Hence, enabling OLAP over such data collections requires explicit definition and extraction of supporting dimensions and measures. Further, as Graph OLAP remains an emerging technique, limited research has been done on its user interface requirements. Namely, on effective pairing of interface designs to different types of graph-derived dimensions and measures. This paper presents a novel technique for pairing of user interface designs to Graph OLAP datasets, rooted in Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) driven comparisons. Attributes of the classification strategy are encoded through an AHP ontology, developed in our alternate work and extended to support pairwise comparison of interfaces. Specifically, according to their ability, as perceived by Subject Matter Experts, to support dimensions and measures corresponding to Graph OLAP dataset attributes. To frame this discussion, a survey is provided both on existing variations of Graph OLAP, as well as existing interface designs previously applied in multidimensional analysis settings. Following this, a review of our AHP ontology is provided, along with a listing of corresponding dataset and interface attributes applicable toward SME recommendation structuring. A walkthrough of AHP-based recommendation encoding via the ontology-based approach is then provided. The paper concludes with a short summary of proposed future directions seen as essential for this research area.

  14. Developing Grid based infrastructure or climate modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.; Dvorak, M.; Mickelson, S.

    2002-08-15

    In this paper we discuss the development of a high performance climate modeling system as an example of the application of Grid based technology to climate modeling. The climate simulation system at Argonne currently includes a scientific modeling interface (Espresso) written in Java which incorporates Globus middleware to facilitate climate simulations on the Grid. The climate modeling system also includes a high performance version of MM5v3.4 modified for long climate simulations on our 512 processor Linux cluster (Chiba City), an interactive web based tool to facilitate analysis and collaboration via the web, and an enhanced version of the Cave5D software capable of visualizing large climate data sets. We plan to incorporate other climate modeling systems such as the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) within Espresso to facilitate their application on computational grids.

  15. Anisotropic Thermal and Electrical Properties of Thin Thermal Interface Layers of Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Bekyarova, Elena B.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are crucial components of high density electronics and the high thermal conductivity of graphite makes this material an attractive candidate for such applications. We report an investigation of the in-plane and through-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of thin thermal interface layers of graphite nanoplatelet (GNP) based composites. The in-plane electrical conductivity exceeds its through-plane counterpart by three orders of magnitude, whereas the ratio of the thermal conductivities is about 5. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the anisotropy in the transport properties is due to the in-plane alignment of the GNPs which occurs during the formation of the thermal interface layer. Because the alignment in the thermal interface layer suppresses the through-plane component of the thermal conductivity, the anisotropy strongly degrades the performance of GNP-based composites in the geometry required for typical thermal management applications and must be taken into account in the development of GNP-based TIMs.

  16. Electrochemical Surface Potential due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Stern, Abraham C.; Levin, Yan; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2012-06-07

    Herein, we present research that suggests that the underlying physics that drive simple empirical models of anions (e.g. point charge, no polarization) to the air-water interface, with water described by SPC/E, or related partial charge models is different than when both ions and water are modeled with quantum mechanical based interactions. Specifically, we will show that the driving force of ions to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and the negative electrochemical surface potential. We will demonstrate that we can fully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory (DCT). Our research suggests that a significant part of the electrochemical surface potential in empirical models appears to be an artifact of the failure of point charge models in the vicinity of a broken symmetry. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle.

  17. Using the High-Level Based Program Interface to Facilitate the Large Scale Scientific Computing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yizi; Shang, Ling; Gao, Chuanchang; Lu, Guiming; Ye, Yuntao; Jia, Dongdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper is to make further research on facilitating the large-scale scientific computing on the grid and the desktop grid platform. The related issues include the programming method, the overhead of the high-level program interface based middleware, and the data anticipate migration. The block based Gauss Jordan algorithm as a real example of large-scale scientific computing is used to evaluate those issues presented above. The results show that the high-level based program interface makes the complex scientific applications on large-scale scientific platform easier, though a little overhead is unavoidable. Also, the data anticipation migration mechanism can improve the efficiency of the platform which needs to process big data based scientific applications. PMID:24574931

  18. a Plugin to Interface Openmodeller from Qgis for SPECIES' Potential Distribution Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel; Willmes, Christian; Bareth, Georg; Weniger, Gerd-Christian

    2016-06-01

    This contribution describes the development of a plugin for the geographic information system QGIS to interface the openModeller software package. The aim is to use openModeller to generate species' potential distribution models for various archaeological applications (site catchment analysis, for example). Since the usage of openModeller's command-line interface and configuration files can be a bit inconvenient, an extension of the QGIS user interface to handle these tasks, in combination with the management of the geographic data, was required. The implementation was realized in Python using PyQGIS and PyQT. The plugin, in combination with QGIS, handles the tasks of managing geographical data, data conversion, generation of configuration files required by openModeller and compilation of a project folder. The plugin proved to be very helpful with the task of compiling project datasets and configuration files for multiple instances of species occurrence datasets and the overall handling of openModeller. In addition, the plugin is easily extensible to take potential new requirements into account in the future.

  19. Model for the water-amorphous silica interface: the undissociated surface.

    PubMed

    Hassanali, Ali A; Singer, Sherwin J

    2007-09-27

    The physical and chemical properties of the amorphous silica-water interface are of crucial importance for a fundamental understanding of electrochemical and electrokinetic phenomena, and for various applications including chromatography, sensors, metal ion extraction, and the construction of micro- and nanoscale devices. A model for the undissociated amorphous silica-water interface reported here is a step toward a practical microscopic model of this important system. We have extended the popular BKS and SPC/E models for bulk silica and water to describe the hydrated, hydroxylated amorphous silica surface. The parameters of our model were determined using ab initio quantum chemical studies on small fragments. Our model will be useful in empirical potential studies, and as a starting point for ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. At this stage, we present a model for the undissociated surface. Our calculated value for the heat of immersion, 0.3 J x m(-2), falls within the range of reported experimental values of 0.2-0.8 J x m(-2). We also study the perturbation of water properties near the silica-water interface. The disordered surface is characterized by regions that are hydrophilic and hydrophobic, depending on the statistical variations in silanol group density.

  20. Modeling strategic use of human computer interfaces with novel hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Laura J; Poore, Joshua C; Krum, David M; Schwartz, Jana L; Coskren, William D; Jones, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Immersive software tools are virtual environments designed to give their users an augmented view of real-world data and ways of manipulating that data. As virtual environments, every action users make while interacting with these tools can be carefully logged, as can the state of the software and the information it presents to the user, giving these actions context. This data provides a high-resolution lens through which dynamic cognitive and behavioral processes can be viewed. In this report, we describe new methods for the analysis and interpretation of such data, utilizing a novel implementation of the Beta Process Hidden Markov Model (BP-HMM) for analysis of software activity logs. We further report the results of a preliminary study designed to establish the validity of our modeling approach. A group of 20 participants were asked to play a simple computer game, instrumented to log every interaction with the interface. Participants had no previous experience with the game's functionality or rules, so the activity logs collected during their naïve interactions capture patterns of exploratory behavior and skill acquisition as they attempted to learn the rules of the game. Pre- and post-task questionnaires probed for self-reported styles of problem solving, as well as task engagement, difficulty, and workload. We jointly modeled the activity log sequences collected from all participants using the BP-HMM approach, identifying a global library of activity patterns representative of the collective behavior of all the participants. Analyses show systematic relationships between both pre- and post-task questionnaires, self-reported approaches to analytic problem solving, and metrics extracted from the BP-HMM decomposition. Overall, we find that this novel approach to decomposing unstructured behavioral data within software environments provides a sensible means for understanding how users learn to integrate software functionality for strategic task pursuit.

  1. Modeling strategic use of human computer interfaces with novel hidden Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Laura J.; Poore, Joshua C.; Krum, David M.; Schwartz, Jana L.; Coskren, William D.; Jones, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Immersive software tools are virtual environments designed to give their users an augmented view of real-world data and ways of manipulating that data. As virtual environments, every action users make while interacting with these tools can be carefully logged, as can the state of the software and the information it presents to the user, giving these actions context. This data provides a high-resolution lens through which dynamic cognitive and behavioral processes can be viewed. In this report, we describe new methods for the analysis and interpretation of such data, utilizing a novel implementation of the Beta Process Hidden Markov Model (BP-HMM) for analysis of software activity logs. We further report the results of a preliminary study designed to establish the validity of our modeling approach. A group of 20 participants were asked to play a simple computer game, instrumented to log every interaction with the interface. Participants had no previous experience with the game's functionality or rules, so the activity logs collected during their naïve interactions capture patterns of exploratory behavior and skill acquisition as they attempted to learn the rules of the game. Pre- and post-task questionnaires probed for self-reported styles of problem solving, as well as task engagement, difficulty, and workload. We jointly modeled the activity log sequences collected from all participants using the BP-HMM approach, identifying a global library of activity patterns representative of the collective behavior of all the participants. Analyses show systematic relationships between both pre- and post-task questionnaires, self-reported approaches to analytic problem solving, and metrics extracted from the BP-HMM decomposition. Overall, we find that this novel approach to decomposing unstructured behavioral data within software environments provides a sensible means for understanding how users learn to integrate software functionality for strategic task pursuit. PMID

  2. Bilinear modeling of EMG signals to extract user-independent features for multiuser myoelectric interface.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takamitsu; Morimoto, Jun

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we propose a multiuser myoelectric interface that can easily adapt to novel users. When a user performs different motions (e.g., grasping and pinching), different electromyography (EMG) signals are measured. When different users perform the same motion (e.g., grasping), different EMG signals are also measured. Therefore, designing a myoelectric interface that can be used by multiple users to perform multiple motions is difficult. To cope with this problem, we propose for EMG signals a bilinear model that is composed of two linear factors: 1) user dependent and 2) motion dependent. By decomposing the EMG signals into these two factors, the extracted motion-dependent factors can be used as user-independent features. We can construct a motion classifier on the extracted feature space to develop the multiuser interface. For novel users, the proposed adaptation method estimates the user-dependent factor through only a few interactions. The bilinear EMG model with the estimated user-dependent factor can extract the user-independent features from the novel user data. We applied our proposed method to a recognition task of five hand gestures for robotic hand control using four-channel EMG signals measured from subject forearms. Our method resulted in 73% accuracy, which was statistically significantly different from the accuracy of standard nonmultiuser interfaces, as the result of a two-sample t -test at a significance level of 1%.

  3. Integration Of Heat Transfer Coefficient In Glass Forming Modeling With Special Interface Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, P.; César de Sá, J.; Grégoire, S.; Lochegnies, D.

    2007-05-01

    Numerical modeling of the glass forming processes requires the accurate knowledge of the heat exchange between the glass and the forming tools. A laboratory testing is developed to determine the evolution of the heat transfer coefficient in different glass/mould contact conditions (contact pressure, temperature, lubrication…). In this paper, trials are performed to determine heat transfer coefficient evolutions in experimental conditions close to the industrial blow-and-blow process conditions. In parallel of this work, a special interface element is implemented in a commercial Finite Element code in order to deal with heat transfer between glass and mould for non-meshing meshes and evolutive contact. This special interface element, implemented by using user subroutines, permits to introduce the previous heat transfer coefficient evolutions in the numerical modelings at the glass/mould interface in function of the local temperatures, contact pressures, contact time and kind of lubrication. The blow-and-blow forming simulation of a perfume bottle is finally performed to assess the special interface element performance.

  4. Integration Of Heat Transfer Coefficient In Glass Forming Modeling With Special Interface Element

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, P.; Gregoire, S.; Lochegnies, D.; Cesar de Sa, J.

    2007-05-17

    Numerical modeling of the glass forming processes requires the accurate knowledge of the heat exchange between the glass and the forming tools. A laboratory testing is developed to determine the evolution of the heat transfer coefficient in different glass/mould contact conditions (contact pressure, temperature, lubrication...). In this paper, trials are performed to determine heat transfer coefficient evolutions in experimental conditions close to the industrial blow-and-blow process conditions. In parallel of this work, a special interface element is implemented in a commercial Finite Element code in order to deal with heat transfer between glass and mould for non-meshing meshes and evolutive contact. This special interface element, implemented by using user subroutines, permits to introduce the previous heat transfer coefficient evolutions in the numerical modelings at the glass/mould interface in function of the local temperatures, contact pressures, contact time and kind of lubrication. The blow-and-blow forming simulation of a perfume bottle is finally performed to assess the special interface element performance.

  5. 3-D FEM Modeling of fiber/matrix interface debonding in UD composites including surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupurs, A.; Varna, J.

    2012-02-01

    Fiber/matrix interface debond growth is one of the main mechanisms of damage evolution in unidirectional (UD) polymer composites. Because for polymer composites the fiber strain to failure is smaller than for the matrix multiple fiber breaks occur at random positions when high mechanical stress is applied to the composite. The energy released due to each fiber break is usually larger than necessary for the creation of a fiber break therefore a partial debonding of fiber/matrix interface is typically observed. Thus the stiffness reduction of UD composite is contributed both from the fiber breaks and from the interface debonds. The aim of this paper is to analyze the debond growth in carbon fiber/epoxy and glass fiber/epoxy UD composites using fracture mechanics principles by calculation of energy release rate GII. A 3-D FEM model is developed for calculation of energy release rate for fiber/matrix interface debonds at different locations in the composite including the composite surface region where the stress state differs from the one in the bulk composite. In the model individual partially debonded fiber is surrounded by matrix region and embedded in a homogenized composite.

  6. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Boninger, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning. PMID:26113812

  7. Adaptive Stacked Generalization for Multiclass Motor Imagery-Based Brain Computer Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis F; Corralejo, Rebeca; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Álvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Practical motor imagery-based brain computer interface (MI-BCI) applications are limited by the difficult to decode brain signals in a reliable way. In this paper, we propose a processing framework to address non-stationarity, as well as handle spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics associated with execution of motor tasks. Stacked generalization is used to exploit the power of classifier ensembles for combining information coming from multiple sources and reducing the existing uncertainty in EEG signals. The outputs of several regularized linear discriminant analysis (RLDA) models are combined to account for temporal, spatial, and spectral information. The resultant algorithm is called stacked RLDA (SRLDA). Additionally, an adaptive processing stage is introduced before classification to reduce the harmful effect of intersession non-stationarity. The benefits of the proposed method are evaluated on the BCI Competition IV dataset 2a. We demonstrate its effectiveness in binary and multiclass settings with four different motor imagery tasks: left-hand, right-hand, both feet, and tongue movements. The results show that adaptive SRLDA outperforms the winner of the competition and other approaches tested on this multiclass dataset.

  8. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Collinger, Jennifer L; Boninger, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning.

  9. A transcutaneous power transfer interface based on a multicoil inductive link.

    PubMed

    Mirbozorgi, S A; Gosselin, B; Sawan, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a transcutaneous power transfer link based on a multicoil structure. Multicoil inductive links using 4-coil or 3-coil topologies have shown significant improvement over conventional 2-coil structures for transferring power transcutaneously across larger distances and with higher efficiency. However, such performance comes at the cost of additional inductors and capacitor in the system, which is not convenient in implantable applications. This paper presents a transcutaneous power transfer interface that takes advantage on a 3-coils inductive topology to achieve wide separation distances and high power transfer efficiency without increasing the size of the implanted device compared to a conventional 2-coil structure. In the proposed link, a middle coil is placed outside the body to act as a repeater between an external transmitting coil and an implanted receiving coil. The proposed structure allows optimizing the link parameters after implantation by changing the characteristics of the repeater coil. Simulation with a multilayer model of the biological tissues and measured results are presented for the proposed link.

  10. ANALOG I/O MODULE TEST SYSTEM BASED ON EPICS CA PROTOCOL AND ACTIVEX CA INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,YHOFF,L.

    2003-10-13

    Analog input (ADC) and output (DAC) modules play a substantial role in device level control of accelerator and large experiment physics control system. In order to get the best performance some features of analog modules including linearity, accuracy, crosstalk, thermal drift and so on have to be evaluated during the preliminary design phase. Gain and offset error calibration and thermal drift compensation (if needed) may have to be done in the implementation phase as well. A natural technique for performing these tasks is to interface the analog VO modules and GPIB interface programmable test instruments with a computer, which can complete measurements or calibration automatically. A difficulty is that drivers of analog modules and test instruments usually work on totally different platforms (vxworks VS Windows). Developing new test routines and drivers for testing instruments under VxWorks (or any other RTOS) platform is not a good solution because such systems have relatively poor user interface and developing such software requires substantial effort. EPICS CA protocol and ActiveX CA interface provide another choice, a PC and LabVIEW based test system. Analog 110 module can be interfaced from LabVIEW test routines via ActiveX CA interface. Test instruments can be controlled via LabVIEW drivers, most of which are provided by instrument vendors or by National Instruments. Labview also provides extensive data analysis and process functions. Using these functions, users can generate powerful test routines very easily. Several applications built for Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) system are described in this paper.

  11. Model based manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Lyman J.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using model based control (MBC) for robotic manipulators was investigated. A double inverted pendulum system was constructed as the experimental system for a general study of dynamically stable manipulation. The original interest in dynamically stable systems was driven by the objective of high vertical reach (balancing), and the planning of inertially favorable trajectories for force and payload demands. The model-based control approach is described and the results of experimental tests are summarized. Results directly demonstrate that MBC can provide stable control at all speeds of operation and support operations requiring dynamic stability such as balancing. The application of MBC to systems with flexible links is also discussed.

  12. Integrity of the interface between denture base and soft liner: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, G; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2012-06-01

    Aims and objectives of the study was to study the integrity of the interface between the denture base and the soft liner when the thickness of the soft liner was 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mm, and to study the integrity of the soft liner and denture base interface as influenced by aging process. 80 rectangular based specimens were fabricated using heat cured acrylic resin. The heat cured component of the specimen was fabricated from stainless steel template form by compression molding technique. Different thickness of silicone soft layer component was added to heat cured acrylic resin component of the specimen following the manufacturer's instructions to fabricate the group A, group B, group C and group D specimens. All the specimens were subjected to the same finishing and polishing procedures. The group A specimens was immediately scanned in scanning electron microscope after processing. A thermo statically controlled artificial saliva bath designed to maintain the temperature between 38 ± 4°C was used to simulate the oral condition and to age the group B, group C and group D specimens for 3 months after which they were subjected to scanning under a scanning electron microscope. All the aged specimens demonstrated two types of failures namely adhesive which occurred along the bond interface between the soft liner and the acrylic resin and adhesive and cohesive type of failure which occurred not only at the interface but also within the soft liner material itself. When the data was subjected to ANOVA, the group A specimens showed statistical significance with group B (P = 0.006), group C (P = 0.007) and group D specimens (P = 0.004), the level of significance being (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistical significance between group B and C (P = 0.98), group C and D specimens (P = 0.52), group B and D specimens (P = 0.70), the level of significance being (P < 0.05). Based on the results, statistical analysis of the results and within the

  13. Integrity of the interface between denture base and soft liner: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, G; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2012-06-01

    Aims and objectives of the study was to study the integrity of the interface between the denture base and the soft liner when the thickness of the soft liner was 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mm, and to study the integrity of the soft liner and denture base interface as influenced by aging process. 80 rectangular based specimens were fabricated using heat cured acrylic resin. The heat cured component of the specimen was fabricated from stainless steel template form by compression molding technique. Different thickness of silicone soft layer component was added to heat cured acrylic resin component of the specimen following the manufacturer's instructions to fabricate the group A, group B, group C and group D specimens. All the specimens were subjected to the same finishing and polishing procedures. The group A specimens was immediately scanned in scanning electron microscope after processing. A thermo statically controlled artificial saliva bath designed to maintain the temperature between 38 ± 4°C was used to simulate the oral condition and to age the group B, group C and group D specimens for 3 months after which they were subjected to scanning under a scanning electron microscope. All the aged specimens demonstrated two types of failures namely adhesive which occurred along the bond interface between the soft liner and the acrylic resin and adhesive and cohesive type of failure which occurred not only at the interface but also within the soft liner material itself. When the data was subjected to ANOVA, the group A specimens showed statistical significance with group B (P = 0.006), group C (P = 0.007) and group D specimens (P = 0.004), the level of significance being (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistical significance between group B and C (P = 0.98), group C and D specimens (P = 0.52), group B and D specimens (P = 0.70), the level of significance being (P < 0.05). Based on the results, statistical analysis of the results and within the

  14. Surface speciation models of calcite and dolomite/aqueous solution interfaces and their spectroscopic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, O.S.; Mielczarski, J.A.; Barres, O.; Schott, J.

    2000-03-21

    The composition and density of surface hydroxyl and carbonate groups on calcite and dolomite after contact at 25 C with solutions of different pH (3 to 12) and carbonate concentration (10{sup {minus}4} {le}{Sigma}CO{sub 2}{le} 0.1 M) were monitored by means of diffuse reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Both for calcite and dolomite, broad high-intensity absorbance bands at about 3,400 and 1,600 cm{sup {minus}1} were observed at pH below 6 and carbonate concentration below 10{sub {minus}3} M. These bands are assigned to hydroxyl groups present at the mineral surfaces. At higher pH and {Sigma}CO{sub 2}, the intensity of these bands significantly decreases. On the contrary the intensity of the broad double band at about 1,400 cm{sup {minus}1} due to carbonate species (surface and bulk) for both minerals was found to increase significantly with increasing solution pH and carbonate concentration, being the lowest at pH {le} 5 and {Sigma}CO{sub 2} {le} 10{sup {minus}3} M. These observations correlate well with the surface speciation for calcite or dolomite/aqueous solution interface predicted based on surface complexation models (SCM).

  15. Modeling molecular scale mechanics at hybrid interfaces in nanocomposite bone biomaterials and natural bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Rahul

    Composite bone biomaterials based on minerals and polymers are extensively investigated materials for total bone replacement. Mechanical response of these materials is vital for their use as implant materials. It is known that the interfaces between the components in composite biomaterials affect their overall mechanical response significantly. Therefore, it is important to understand the interfaces in composites for development of implant materials with desired mechanical properties. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the molecular interfaces in composite biomaterials. A robust potential function (force field) that is applicable to both hard and soft components is required. For the present study, we have modified the Consistent Valence Force Field (CVFF) potential function. After modification, new CVFF parameters have been developed for hydroxyapatite (HAP) (mineral phase). Force field parameters for different polymers (polyacrylic acid (PAAc)/Polycaprolactone (PCL)) are obtained from existing parameters of CVFF and ab-initio calculations. MD simulations have shown the presence of strong electrostatic interactions between HAP and PAAc. The influence of applied load on interfaces between HAP and polymers (PAAc/PCL) is also studied using steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. It has been observed that both polymers require more energy to deform in the proximity of HAP as compared to polymers alone. The load-transfer mechanisms through the interface between collagen and HAP in natural bone have also been analyzed. It has been observed that mineral and water both influence the load-carrying behavior of collagen molecule. The load applied to collagen structure is transferred to HAP crystals through the water molecules. This understanding of the nature of interfaces and their behavior under applied load in artificial and natural nanocomposites is vital for designing novel implant materials with tailored mechanical properties. The

  16. GPU-Based Visualization of 3D Fluid Interfaces using Level Set Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlec, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    We model a simple 3D fluid-interface problem using the level set method and visualize the interface as a dynamic surface. Level set methods allow implicit handling of complex topologies deformed by evolutions where sharp changes and cusps are present without destroying the representation. We present a highly optimized visualization and computation algorithm that is implemented in CUDA to run on the NVIDIA GeForce 295 GTX. CUDA is a general purpose parallel computing architecture that allows the NVIDIA GPU to be treated like a data parallel supercomputer in order to solve many computational problems in a fraction of the time required on a CPU. CUDA is compared to the new OpenCL™ (Open Computing Language), which is designed to run on heterogeneous computing environments but does not take advantage of low-level features in NVIDIA hardware that provide significant speedups. Therefore, our technique is implemented using CUDA and results are compared to a single CPU implementation to show the benefits of using the GPU and CUDA for visualizing fluid-interface problems. We solve a 1024^3 problem and experience significant speedup using the NVIDIA GeForce 295 GTX. Implementation details for mapping the problem to the GPU architecture are described as well as discussion on porting the technique to heterogeneous devices (AMD, Intel, IBM) using OpenCL. The results present a new interactive system for computing and visualizing the evolution of fluid interface problems on the GPU.

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Intergranular Fracture in Aluminum: Constitutive Relation For Interface Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E. H.

    2008-01-01

    Intergranular fracture is a dominant mode of failure in ultrafine grained materials. In the present study, the atomistic mechanisms of grain-boundary debonding during intergranular fracture in aluminum are modeled using a coupled molecular dynamics finite element simulation. Using a statistical mechanics approach, a cohesive-zone law in the form of a traction-displacement constitutive relationship, characterizing the load transfer across the plane of a growing edge crack, is extracted from atomistic simulations and then recast in a form suitable for inclusion within a continuum finite element model. The cohesive-zone law derived by the presented technique is free of finite size effects and is statistically representative for describing the interfacial debonding of a grain boundary (GB) interface examined at atomic length scales. By incorporating the cohesive-zone law in cohesive-zone finite elements, the debonding of a GB interface can be simulated in a coupled continuum-atomistic model, in which a crack starts in the continuum environment, smoothly penetrates the continuum-atomistic interface, and continues its propagation in the atomistic environment. This study is a step towards relating atomistically derived decohesion laws to macroscopic predictions of fracture and constructing multiscale models for nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained materials.

  18. Including nonequilibrium interface kinetics in a continuum model for melting nanoscaled particles

    PubMed Central

    Back, Julian M.; McCue, Scott W.; Moroney, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The melting temperature of a nanoscaled particle is known to decrease as the curvature of the solid-melt interface increases. This relationship is most often modelled by a Gibbs–Thomson law, with the decrease in melting temperature proposed to be a product of the curvature of the solid-melt interface and the surface tension. Such a law must break down for sufficiently small particles, since the curvature becomes singular in the limit that the particle radius vanishes. Furthermore, the use of this law as a boundary condition for a Stefan-type continuum model is problematic because it leads to a physically unrealistic form of mathematical blow-up at a finite particle radius. By numerical simulation, we show that the inclusion of nonequilibrium interface kinetics in the Gibbs–Thomson law regularises the continuum model, so that the mathematical blow up is suppressed. As a result, the solution continues until complete melting, and the corresponding melting temperature remains finite for all time. The results of the adjusted model are consistent with experimental findings of abrupt melting of nanoscaled particles. This small-particle regime appears to be closely related to the problem of melting a superheated particle. PMID:25399918

  19. Sketch on dynamic gesture tracking and analysis exploiting vision-based 3D interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Woontack; Kim, Namgyu; Wong, Karen; Tadenuma, Makoto

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a vision-based 3D interface exploiting invisible 3D boxes, arranged in the personal space (i.e. reachable space by the body without traveling), which allows robust yet simple dynamic gesture tracking and analysis, without exploiting complicated sensor-based motion tracking systems. Vision-based gesture tracking and analysis is still a challenging problem, even though we have witnessed rapid advances in computer vision over the last few decades. The proposed framework consists of three main parts, i.e. (1) object segmentation without bluescreen and 3D box initialization with depth information, (2) movement tracking by observing how the body passes through the 3D boxes in the personal space and (3) movement feature extraction based on Laban's Effort theory and movement analysis by mapping features to meaningful symbols using time-delay neural networks. Obviously, exploiting depth information using multiview images improves the performance of gesture analysis by reducing the errors introduced by simple 2D interfaces In addition, the proposed box-based 3D interface lessens the difficulties in both tracking movement in 3D space and in extracting low-level features of the movement. Furthermore, the time-delay neural networks lessens the difficulties in movement analysis by training. Due to its simplicity and robustness, the framework will provide interactive systems, such as ATR I-cubed Tangible Music System or ATR Interactive Dance system, with improved quality of the 3D interface. The proposed simple framework also can be extended to other applications requiring dynamic gesture tracking and analysis on the fly.

  20. The DaveMLTranslator: An Interface for DAVE-ML Aerodynamic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Melissa A.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    It can take weeks or months to incorporate a new aerodynamic model into a vehicle simulation and validate the performance of the model. The Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML) has been proposed as a means to reduce the time required to accomplish this task by defining a standard format for typical components of a flight dynamic model. The purpose of this paper is to describe an object-oriented C++ implementation of a class that interfaces a vehicle subsystem model specified in DAVE-ML and a vehicle simulation. Using the DaveMLTranslator class, aerodynamic or other subsystem models can be automatically imported and verified at run-time, significantly reducing the elapsed time between receipt of a DAVE-ML model and its integration into a simulation environment. The translator performs variable initializations, data table lookups, and mathematical calculations for the aerodynamic build-up, and executes any embedded static check-cases for verification. The implementation is efficient, enabling real-time execution. Simple interface code for the model inputs and outputs is the only requirement to integrate the DaveMLTranslator as a vehicle aerodynamic model. The translator makes use of existing table-lookup utilities from the Langley Standard Real-Time Simulation in C++ (LaSRS++). The design and operation of the translator class is described and comparisons with existing, conventional, C++ aerodynamic models of the same vehicle are given.

  1. Study on interface and frame structure of SWAT and MODFLOW models coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jinggang; Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Huicheng

    2010-05-01

    , substrate and groundwater withdrawal over short periods of time, each hydrologic response unit (HRU) needs the information that reflects spatial distribution, such as runoff curve number, characteristic parameters of soil water content, crop type, suppression factor of moisture under different irrigations, groundwater level and permeability, to veritably reflect states of interaction between surface water and groundwater. MODFLOW is a modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model developed by USGS for numerical simulation of groundwater flow in porous media. The model is physically based, and capable of reflecting spatial characteristics and movement of groundwater. The limitation of MODFLOW is its running dependence on the input of some specified conditions for tributary flow, recharge, evaporation and water uses. The model lacks a means of specifying these conditions in terms of hydrologic processes at the watershed's surface and in the soil profile. MODFLOW is designed to treat specified conditions as parameters to be determined by calibration. The accuracy of groundwater simulations is higher only when the value of these calibrated parameters corresponds to reality. However, it is very difficult. Therefore, when SWAT is used for watershed hydrological simulations, it is very necessary to couple SWAT with MODFLOW to form SWAT-MODFLOW model that keeps the advantages of the two models and realizes the appropriate quantitative analysis of watershed hydrological processes. The concrete process is that the recharge values of HRU from SWAT are assigned to MODFLOW, the groundwater flow values of cell between river and aquifer from MODFLOW are returned to SWAT, and then the temporal and spatial characteristics of watershed can be revealed reasonably. Because the smallest computational units of SWAT and MODFLOW are hydrologic response units (HRUs) and cells respectively, the conversion between HRU and CELL, that is the interface of SWAT and MODFLOW models

  2. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh Saripalli

    2002-12-31

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35{micro} CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  3. Robust Extraction Interface for Coupling Droplet-Based and Continuous Flow Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuefei; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2012-03-07

    Reliable and highly efficient extraction of droplets from oil to aqueous phase is key for downstream coupling with chemical separations and nonoptical detection methods such as amperometry and mass spectrometry. This paper presents an improved interface providing robust extraction for droplet-based poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices. The extraction interface consists of an array of cylindrical posts with narrow apertures in between. The aqueous flow channel into which droplets coalesced was simply and selectively modified to be hydrophilic, while the continuous oil phase flow channel that contained encapsulated aqueous droplets retained a hydrophobic surface. The different surfaces on both sides of the extraction region form a highly stable liquid interface between the two immiscible phases, allowing rapid droplet transfer to the aqueous stream. Entire droplets could be completely extracted within broad ranges of aqueous and oil flow rates (0 - 1 and 0.1 - 1 uL/min, respectively). After extraction, the droplet contents could be transported electrophoretically or by pressure-driven flow to a monolithically integrated emitter for nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) analysis. This interface should be amenable to the separation and identification of droplet contents and on-line monitoring of in-droplet reactions.

  4. Density functional theory based study of chlorine doped WS2-metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanana, Anuja; Mahapatra, Santanu

    2016-03-01

    Investigation of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD)-metal interface is essential for the effective functioning of monolayer TMD based field effect transistors. In this work, we employ the Density Functional Theory calculations to analyze the modulation of the electronic structure of monolayer WS2 with chlorine doping and the relative changes in the contact properties when interfaced with gold and palladium. We initially examine the atomic and electronic structures of pure and doped monolayer WS2 supercell and explore the formation of midgap states with band splitting near the conduction band edge. Further, we analyze the contact nature of the pure supercell with Au and Pd. We find that while Au is physiosorbed and forms n-type contact, Pd is chemisorped and forms p-type contact with a higher valence electron density. Next, we study the interface formed between the Cl-doped supercell and metals and observe a reduction in the Schottky barrier height (SBH) in comparison to the pure supercell. This reduction found is higher for Pd in comparison to Au, which is further validated by examining the charge transfer occurring at the interface. Our study confirms that Cl doping is an efficient mechanism to reduce the n-SBH for both Au and Pd, which form different types of contact with WS2.

  5. Haptics-based dynamic implicit solid modeling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Qin, Hong

    2004-01-01

    This paper systematically presents a novel, interactive solid modeling framework, Haptics-based Dynamic Implicit Solid Modeling, which is founded upon volumetric implicit functions and powerful physics-based modeling. In particular, we augment our modeling framework with a haptic mechanism in order to take advantage of additional realism associated with a 3D haptic interface. Our dynamic implicit solids are semi-algebraic sets of volumetric implicit functions and are governed by the principles of dynamics, hence responding to sculpting forces in a natural and predictable manner. In order to directly manipulate existing volumetric data sets as well as point clouds, we develop a hierarchical fitting algorithm to reconstruct and represent discrete data sets using our continuous implicit functions, which permit users to further design and edit those existing 3D models in real-time using a large variety of haptic and geometric toolkits, and visualize their interactive deformation at arbitrary resolution. The additional geometric and physical constraints afford more sophisticated control of the dynamic implicit solids. The versatility of our dynamic implicit modeling enables the user to easily modify both the geometry and the topology of modeled objects, while the inherent physical properties can offer an intuitive haptic interface for direct manipulation with force feedback.

  6. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    SciTech Connect

    Paumel, K.; Baque, F.; Moysan, J.; Corneloup, G.; Chatain, D.

    2011-08-15

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  7. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paumel, K.; Moysan, J.; Chatain, D.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F.

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  8. Computer modelling of the surface tension of the gas-liquid and liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2016-03-01

    This review presents the state of the art in molecular simulations of interfacial systems and of the calculation of the surface tension from the underlying intermolecular potential. We provide a short account of different methodological factors (size-effects, truncation procedures, long-range corrections and potential models) that can affect the results of the simulations. Accurate calculations are presented for the calculation of the surface tension as a function of the temperature, pressure and composition by considering the planar gas-liquid interface of a range of molecular fluids. In particular, we consider the challenging problems of reproducing the interfacial tension of salt solutions as a function of the salt molality; the simulations of spherical interfaces including the calculation of the sign and size of the Tolman length for a spherical droplet; the use of coarse-grained models in the calculation of the interfacial tension of liquid-liquid surfaces and the mesoscopic simulations of oil-water-surfactant interfacial systems.

  9. Atomic interaction mechanism for designing the interface of W/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. K.; Fu, H. M.; Sha, P. F.; Zhu, Z. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between active element Zr and W damages the W fibers and the interface and decreases the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength of the W fibers reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). From the viewpoint of atomic interaction, the W-Zr interaction can be restrained by adding minor elements that have stronger interaction with W into the alloy. The calculation about atomic interaction energy indicates that Ta and Nb preferred to segregate on the W substrate surface. Sessile drop experiment proves the prediction and corresponding in-situ coating appears at the interface. Besides, the atomic interaction mechanism was proven to be effective in many other systems by the sessile drop technique. Considering the interfacial morphology, Nb was added into the alloy to fabricate W/Zr-based BMGCs. As expected, the Nb addition effectively suppressed the W-Zr reaction and damage to W fibers. Both the compressive and tensile properties are improved obviously. PMID:25758910

  10. Feedback-based, muLti-dimensional Interface as a General Human-Computer Tech.

    2002-05-13

    FLIGHT is a 3D human-computer interface and application development software that can be used by both end users and programmers. It is based on advanced feedback and a multi-dimensional nature that more closely resembles real life interactions. The software uses a craft metaphor and allows multimodal feedback for advanced tools and navigation techniques. Overall, FLIGHT is a software that is based on the principle that as the human-computer interface is strengthened through the use ofmore » more intuitive inputs and more effective feedback, the computer itself will be for more valuable. FLIGHT has been used to visualize scientific data sets in 3D graphics at Sandia National Laboratories.« less

  11. Designing of Multi-Interface Diverging Experiments to Model Rayleigh-Taylor Growth in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Meakin, C.; Arnett, D.; Miles, A.; Robey, H.; Hansen, J.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M.

    2008-05-01

    In previous experiments on the Omega Laser, researchers studying blast-wave-driven instabilities have observed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities under conditions scaled to the He/H interface of SN1987A. Most of these experiments have been planar experiments, as the energy available proved unable to accelerate enough mass in a diverging geometry. With the advent of the NIF laser, which can deliver hundreds of kJ to an experiment, it is possible to produce 3D, blast-wave-driven, multiple-interface explosions and to study the mixing that develops. We report scaling simulations to model the interface dynamics of a multilayered, diverging Rayleigh-Taylor experiment for NIF using CALE, a hybrid adaptive Lagrangian-Eulerian code developed at LLNL. Specifically, we looked both qualitatively and quantitatively at the Rayleigh-Taylor growth and multi-interface interactions in mass-scaled, spherically divergent systems using different materials. The simulations will assist in the target design process and help choose diagnostics to maximize the information we receive in a particular shot. Simulations are critical for experimental planning, especially for experiments on large-scale facilities. *This research was sponsored by LLNL through contract LLNL B56128 and by the NNSA through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-04NA00064.

  12. Mathematical modeling of planar and spherical vapor-liquid phase interfaces for multicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celný, David; Vinš, Václav; Planková, Barbora; Hrubý, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Development of methods for accurate modeling of phase interfaces is important for understanding various natural processes and for applications in technology such as power production and carbon dioxide separation and storage. In particular, prediction of the course of the non-equilibrium phase transition processes requires knowledge of the properties of the strongly curved phase interfaces of microscopic droplets. In our work, we focus on the spherical vapor-liquid phase interfaces for binary mixtures. We developed a robust computational method to determine the density and concentration profiles. The fundamentals of our approach lie in the Cahn-Hilliard gradient theory, allowing to transcribe the functional formulation into a system of ordinary Euler-Langrange equations. This system is then split and modified into a shape suitable for iterative computation. For this task, we combine the Newton-Raphson and the shooting methods providing a good convergence speed. For the thermodynamic roperties, the PC-SAFT equation of state is used. We determine the density and concentration profiles for spherical phase interfaces at various saturation factors for the binary mixture of CO2 and C9H20. The computed concentration profiles allow to the determine the work of formation and other characteristics of the microscopic droplets.

  13. KFC2: a knowledge-based hot spot prediction method based on interface solvation, atomic density, and plasticity features.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Mitchell, Julie C

    2011-09-01

    Hot spots constitute a small fraction of protein-protein interface residues, yet they account for a large fraction of the binding affinity. Based on our previous method (KFC), we present two new methods (KFC2a and KFC2b) that outperform other methods at hot spot prediction. A number of improvements were made in developing these new methods. First, we created a training data set that contained a similar number of hot spot and non-hot spot residues. In addition, we generated 47 different features, and different numbers of features were used to train the models to avoid over-fitting. Finally, two feature combinations were selected: One (used in KFC2a) is composed of eight features that are mainly related to solvent accessible surface area and local plasticity; the other (KFC2b) is composed of seven features, only two of which are identical to those used in KFC2a. The two models were built using support vector machines (SVM). The two KFC2 models were then tested on a mixed independent test set, and compared with other methods such as Robetta, FOLDEF, HotPoint, MINERVA, and KFC. KFC2a showed the highest predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.85); however, the false positive rate was somewhat higher than for other models. KFC2b showed the best predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.62) among all methods other than KFC2a, and the False Positive Rate (FPR = 0.15) was comparable with other highly predictive methods.

  14. Ergonomic Models of Anthropometry, Human Biomechanics and Operator-Equipment Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroemer, Karl H. E. (Editor); Snook, Stover H. (Editor); Meadows, Susan K. (Editor); Deutsch, Stanley (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Committee on Human Factors was established in October 1980 by the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Council. The committee is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation. The workshop discussed the following: anthropometric models; biomechanical models; human-machine interface models; and research recommendations. A 17-page bibliography is included.

  15. A comprehensive flexoelectric model for droplet interface bilayers acting as sensors and energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancharala, Ashok; Freeman, Eric; Philen, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Droplet interface bilayers have found applications in the development of biologically-inspired mechanosensors. In this research, a comprehensive flexoelectric framework has been developed to predict the mechanoelectric capabilities of the biological membrane under mechanical excitation for sensing and energy harvesting applications. The dynamic behavior of the droplets has been modeled using nonlinear finite element analysis, coupled with a flexoelectric model for predicting the resulting material polarization. This coupled model allows for the prediction of the mechanoelectrical response of the droplets under excitation. Using the developed framework, the potential for sensing and energy harvesting through lipid membranes is investigated.

  16. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schebarchov, D; Schulze, T P; Hendy, S C

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level. PMID:24559357

  17. Evidence of meniscus interface transport in dip-pen nanolithography: An annular diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafday, Omkar A.; Vaughn, Mark W.; Weeks, Brandon L.

    2006-10-01

    Ring shaped dots were patterned with mercaptohexadecanoic acid ink by dip-pen nanolithography. These dots have an ink-free inner core surrounded by an inked annular region, making them different from the filled dots usually obtained. This suggests a different transport mechanism than the current hypothesis of bulk water meniscus transport. A meniscus interface ink transport model is proposed, and its general applicability is demonstrated by predicting the patterned dot radii of chemically diverse inks.