Science.gov

Sample records for interface based model

  1. Systems Engineering Interfaces: A Model Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fosse, Elyse; Delp, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Currently: Ops Rev developed and maintains a framework that includes interface-specific language, patterns, and Viewpoints. Ops Rev implements the framework to design MOS 2.0 and its 5 Mission Services. Implementation de-couples interfaces and instances of interaction Future: A Mission MOSE implements the approach and uses the model based artifacts for reviews. The framework extends further into the ground data layers and provides a unified methodology.

  2. Interface Management for a NASA Flight Project Using Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Shull, Thomas A.; Infeld, Samatha; Price, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The goal of interface management is to identify, define, control, and verify interfaces; ensure compatibility; provide an efficient system development; be on time and within budget; while meeting stakeholder requirements. This paper will present a successful seven-step approach to interface management used in several NASA flight projects. The seven-step approach using Model Based Systems Engineering will be illustrated by interface examples from the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The MISSE-X was being developed as an International Space Station (ISS) external platform for space environmental studies, designed to advance the technology readiness of materials and devices critical for future space exploration. Emphasis will be given to best practices covering key areas such as interface definition, writing good interface requirements, utilizing interface working groups, developing and controlling interface documents, handling interface agreements, the use of shadow documents, the importance of interface requirement ownership, interface verification, and product transition.

  3. Model Based Control Design Using SLPS "Simulink PSpice Interface"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehpour, Saeid; Kulcu, Ercan K.; Alnajjar, Hisham

    This paper elaborates on the new integration offered with the PSpice SLPS interface and the MATLAB simulink products. SLPS links the two widely used design products, PSpice and Mathwork's Simulink simulator. The SLPS simulation environment supports the substitution of an actual electronic block with an "ideal model", better known as the mathematical simulink model. Thus enabling the designer to identify and correct integration issues of electronics within a system. Moreover, stress audit can be performed by using the PSpice smoke analysis which helps to verify whether the components are working within the manufacturer's safe operating limits. It is invaluable since many companies design and test the electronics separately from the system level. Therefore, integrations usually are not discovered until the prototype level, causing critical time delays in getting a product to the market.

  4. A gradient-descent-based approach for transparent linguistic interface generation in fuzzy models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Chen, C L Philip; Pedrycz, Witold

    2010-10-01

    Linguistic interface is a group of linguistic terms or fuzzy descriptions that describe variables in a system utilizing corresponding membership functions. Its transparency completely or partly decides the interpretability of fuzzy models. This paper proposes a GRadiEnt-descEnt-based Transparent lInguistic iNterface Generation (GREETING) approach to overcome the disadvantage of traditional linguistic interface generation methods where the consideration of the interpretability aspects of linguistic interface is limited. In GREETING, the widely used interpretability criteria of linguistic interface are considered and optimized. The numeric experiments on the data sets from University of California, Irvine (UCI) machine learning databases demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the proposed GREETING method. The GREETING method is also applied to fuzzy decision tree generation. It is shown that GREETING generates better transparent fuzzy decision trees in terms of better classification rates and comparable tree sizes.

  5. A method of designing smartphone interface based on the extended user's mental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Fengmin; Bian, Jiali; Pan, Juchen; Song, Song

    2017-01-01

    The user's mental model is the core guiding theory of product design, especially practical products. The essence of practical product is a tool which is used by users to meet their needs. Then, the most important feature of a tool is usability. The design method based on the user's mental model provides a series of practical and feasible theoretical guidance for improving the usability of the product according to the user's awareness of things. In this paper, we propose a method of designing smartphone interface based on the extended user's mental model according to further research on user groups. This approach achieves personalized customization of smartphone application interface and enhance application using efficiency.

  6. Dynamic Distribution and Layouting of Model-Based User Interfaces in Smart Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscher, Dirk; Lehmann, Grzegorz; Schwartze, Veit; Blumendorf, Marco; Albayrak, Sahin

    The developments in computer technology in the last decade change the ways of computer utilization. The emerging smart environments make it possible to build ubiquitous applications that assist users during their everyday life, at any time, in any context. But the variety of contexts-of-use (user, platform and environment) makes the development of such ubiquitous applications for smart environments and especially its user interfaces a challenging and time-consuming task. We propose a model-based approach, which allows adapting the user interface at runtime to numerous (also unknown) contexts-of-use. Based on a user interface modelling language, defining the fundamentals and constraints of the user interface, a runtime architecture exploits the description to adapt the user interface to the current context-of-use. The architecture provides automatic distribution and layout algorithms for adapting the applications also to contexts unforeseen at design time. Designers do not specify predefined adaptations for each specific situation, but adaptation constraints and guidelines. Furthermore, users are provided with a meta user interface to influence the adaptations according to their needs. A smart home energy management system serves as running example to illustrate the approach.

  7. A prototype natural language interface to a large complex knowledge base, the Foundational Model of Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Distelhorst, Gregory; Srivastava, Vishrut; Rosse, Cornelius; Brinkley, James F

    2003-01-01

    We describe a constrained natural language interface to a large knowledge base, the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA). The interface, called GAPP, handles simple or nested questions that can be parsed to the form, subject-relation-object, where subject or object is unknown. With the aid of domain-specific dictionaries the parsed sentence is converted to queries in the StruQL graph-searching query language, then sent to a server we developed, called OQAFMA, that queries the FMA and returns output as XML. Preliminary evaluation shows that GAPP has the potential to be used in the evaluation of the FMA by domain experts in anatomy.

  8. Implementing a Multiple Criteria Model Base in Co-Op with a Graphical User Interface Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-23

    Decision Support System (Co-op) for Windows. The algorithms and the graphical user interfaces for these modules are implemented using Microsoft Visual ... Basic under the Windows based environment operating in a IBM compatible microcomputer. Design of the MCDM programs interface is based on general interface design principles of user control, screen design, and layout.

  9. U-10Mo/Zr Interface Modeling using a Microstructure-Based FEM Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Soulami, Ayoub; Xu, Zhijie; Joshi, Vineet V.; Burkes, Douglas; Lavender, Curt A.; McGarrah, Eric J.

    2016-04-25

    The U-10Mo in low enrichments (LEU) has been identified as the most promising alternative to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) used in the United States’ fleet of high performance research reactors (USHPRRs). The nominal configuration of the new LEU U-10Mo plate fuel comprises a U-10Mo fuel foil enriched to slightly less than 20% U-235 (0.08” to 0.02” thick), a thin Zr interlayer/diffusion barrier (25 m thick) and a relatively thick outer can of 6061 aluminum. Currently the Zr interlayer is clad by hot roll bonding. Previous studies and observations revealed a thinning of the zirconium (Zr) layer during this fuel fabrication process, which is not desirable from the fuel performance perspective. Coarse UMo grains, dendritic structures, Mo concentration segregation, carbides, and porosity are present in the as-cast material and can lead to a nonuniform UMo/Zr interface. The purpose of the current work is to investigate the effects of these microstructural parameters on the Zr coating variation. A microstructure-based finite-element method model was used in this work, and a study on the effect of homogenization on the interface between U-10Mo and Zr was conducted. The model uses actual backscattered electron–scanning electron microscopy microstructures, Mo concentrations, and mechanical properties to predict the behavior of a representative volume element under compressive loading during the rolling process. The model successfully predicted the experimentally observed thinning of the Zr layer in the as-cast material. The model also uses results from a homogenization model as an input, and a study on the effect of different levels of homogenization on the interface indicated that homogenization helps decrease this thinning. This model can be considered a predictive tool representing a first step for model integration and an input into a larger fuel fabrication performance model.

  10. Operating Comfort Prediction Model of Human-Machine Interface Layout for Cabin Based on GEP.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In view of the evaluation and decision-making problem of human-machine interface layout design for cabin, the operating comfort prediction model is proposed based on GEP (Gene Expression Programming), using operating comfort to evaluate layout scheme. Through joint angles to describe operating posture of upper limb, the joint angles are taken as independent variables to establish the comfort model of operating posture. Factor analysis is adopted to decrease the variable dimension; the model's input variables are reduced from 16 joint angles to 4 comfort impact factors, and the output variable is operating comfort score. The Chinese virtual human body model is built by CATIA software, which will be used to simulate and evaluate the operators' operating comfort. With 22 groups of evaluation data as training sample and validation sample, GEP algorithm is used to obtain the best fitting function between the joint angles and the operating comfort; then, operating comfort can be predicted quantitatively. The operating comfort prediction result of human-machine interface layout of driller control room shows that operating comfort prediction model based on GEP is fast and efficient, it has good prediction effect, and it can improve the design efficiency.

  11. Operating Comfort Prediction Model of Human-Machine Interface Layout for Cabin Based on GEP

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In view of the evaluation and decision-making problem of human-machine interface layout design for cabin, the operating comfort prediction model is proposed based on GEP (Gene Expression Programming), using operating comfort to evaluate layout scheme. Through joint angles to describe operating posture of upper limb, the joint angles are taken as independent variables to establish the comfort model of operating posture. Factor analysis is adopted to decrease the variable dimension; the model's input variables are reduced from 16 joint angles to 4 comfort impact factors, and the output variable is operating comfort score. The Chinese virtual human body model is built by CATIA software, which will be used to simulate and evaluate the operators' operating comfort. With 22 groups of evaluation data as training sample and validation sample, GEP algorithm is used to obtain the best fitting function between the joint angles and the operating comfort; then, operating comfort can be predicted quantitatively. The operating comfort prediction result of human-machine interface layout of driller control room shows that operating comfort prediction model based on GEP is fast and efficient, it has good prediction effect, and it can improve the design efficiency. PMID:26448740

  12. Establishing a Novel Modeling Tool: A Python-Based Interface for a Neuromorphic Hardware System

    PubMed Central

    Brüderle, Daniel; Müller, Eric; Davison, Andrew; Muller, Eilif; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    Neuromorphic hardware systems provide new possibilities for the neuroscience modeling community. Due to the intrinsic parallelism of the micro-electronic emulation of neural computation, such models are highly scalable without a loss of speed. However, the communities of software simulator users and neuromorphic engineering in neuroscience are rather disjoint. We present a software concept that provides the possibility to establish such hardware devices as valuable modeling tools. It is based on the integration of the hardware interface into a simulator-independent language which allows for unified experiment descriptions that can be run on various simulation platforms without modification, implying experiment portability and a huge simplification of the quantitative comparison of hardware and simulator results. We introduce an accelerated neuromorphic hardware device and describe the implementation of the proposed concept for this system. An example setup and results acquired by utilizing both the hardware system and a software simulator are demonstrated. PMID:19562085

  13. Toward a model-based predictive controller design in brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kamrunnahar, M; Dias, N S; Schiff, S J

    2011-05-01

    A first step in designing a robust and optimal model-based predictive controller (MPC) for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications is presented in this article. An MPC has the potential to achieve improved BCI performance compared to the performance achieved by current ad hoc, nonmodel-based filter applications. The parameters in designing the controller were extracted as model-based features from motor imagery task-related human scalp electroencephalography. Although the parameters can be generated from any model-linear or non-linear, we here adopted a simple autoregressive model that has well-established applications in BCI task discriminations. It was shown that the parameters generated for the controller design can as well be used for motor imagery task discriminations with performance (with 8-23% task discrimination errors) comparable to the discrimination performance of the commonly used features such as frequency specific band powers and the AR model parameters directly used. An optimal MPC has significant implications for high performance BCI applications.

  14. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain computer interface (BCI): model order selection for autoregressive spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Dennis J.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2008-06-01

    People can learn to control EEG features consisting of sensorimotor rhythm amplitudes and can use this control to move a cursor in one or two dimensions to a target on a screen. Cursor movement depends on the estimate of the amplitudes of sensorimotor rhythms. Autoregressive models are often used to provide these estimates. The order of the autoregressive model has varied widely among studies. Through analyses of both simulated and actual EEG data, the present study examines the effects of model order on sensorimotor rhythm measurements and BCI performance. The results show that resolution of lower frequency signals requires higher model orders and that this requirement reflects the temporal span of the model coefficients. This is true for both simulated EEG data and actual EEG data during brain-computer interface (BCI) operation. Increasing model order, and decimating the signal were similarly effective in increasing spectral resolution. Furthermore, for BCI control of two-dimensional cursor movement, higher model orders produced better performance in each dimension and greater independence between horizontal and vertical movements. In sum, these results show that autoregressive model order selection is an important determinant of BCI performance and should be based on criteria that reflect system performance.

  15. Horizontal annular flow modelling using a compositional based interface capturing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhizhua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Progress on a consistent approach for interface-capturing in which each component represents a different phase/fluid is described. The aim is to develop a general multi-phase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components. The method is compared against experimental results for a collapsing water column test case and a convergence study is performed. A number of numerical test cases are undertaken to demonstrate the method's ability to model arbitrary numbers of phases with arbitrary equations of state. The method is then used to simulate horizontal annular flows. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  16. An optimization-based study of equivalent circuit models for representing recordings at the neuron-electrode interface.

    PubMed

    Thakore, V; Molnar, P; Hickman, J J

    2012-08-01

    Extracellular neuroelectronic interfacing is an emerging field with important applications in the fields of neural prosthetics, biological computation, and biosensors. Traditionally, neuron-electrode interfaces have been modeled as linear point or area contact equivalent circuits but it is now being increasingly realized that such models cannot explain the shapes and magnitudes of the observed extracellular signals. Here, results were compared and contrasted from an unprecedented optimization-based study of the point contact models for an extracellular "on-cell" neuron-patch electrode and a planar neuron-microelectrode interface. Concurrent electrophysiological recordings from a single neuron simultaneously interfaced to three distinct electrodes (intracellular, "on-cell" patch, and planar microelectrode) allowed novel insights into the mechanism of signal transduction at the neuron-electrode interface. After a systematic isolation of the nonlinear neuronal contribution to the extracellular signal, a consistent underestimation of the simulated suprathreshold extracellular signals compared to the experimentally recorded signals was observed. This conclusively demonstrated that the dynamics of the interfacial medium contribute nonlinearly to the process of signal transduction at the neuron-electrode interface. Further, an examination of the optimized model parameters for the experimental extracellular recordings from sub- and suprathreshold stimulations of the neuron-electrode junctions revealed that ionic transport at the "on-cell" neuron-patch electrode is dominated by diffusion whereas at the neuron-microelectrode interface the electric double layer (EDL) effects dominate. Based on this study, the limitations of the equivalent circuit models in their failure to account for the nonlinear EDL and ionic electrodiffusion effects occurring during signal transduction at the neuron-electrode interfaces are discussed.

  17. A microfluidics-based in vitro model of the gastrointestinal human–microbe interface

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pranjul; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Glaab, Enrico; Desai, Mahesh S.; Greenhalgh, Kacy; Frachet, Audrey; Niegowska, Magdalena; Estes, Matthew; Jäger, Christian; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Zenhausern, Frederic; Wilmes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the human gastrointestinal microbiome are associated with several diseases. To infer causality, experiments in representative models are essential, but widely used animal models exhibit limitations. Here we present a modular, microfluidics-based model (HuMiX, human–microbial crosstalk), which allows co-culture of human and microbial cells under conditions representative of the gastrointestinal human–microbe interface. We demonstrate the ability of HuMiX to recapitulate in vivo transcriptional, metabolic and immunological responses in human intestinal epithelial cells following their co-culture with the commensal Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) grown under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the co-culture of human epithelial cells with the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides caccae and LGG results in a transcriptional response, which is distinct from that of a co-culture solely comprising LGG. HuMiX facilitates investigations of host–microbe molecular interactions and provides insights into a range of fundamental research questions linking the gastrointestinal microbiome to human health and disease. PMID:27168102

  18. Downsizer - A Graphical User Interface-Based Application for Browsing, Acquiring, and Formatting Time-Series Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward-Garrison, Christian; Markstrom, Steven L.; Hay, Lauren E.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Downsizer is a computer application that selects, downloads, verifies, and formats station-based time-series data for environmental-resource models, particularly the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System. Downsizer implements the client-server software architecture. The client presents a map-based, graphical user interface that is intuitive to modelers; the server provides streamflow and climate time-series data from over 40,000 measurement stations across the United States. This report is the Downsizer user's manual and provides (1) an overview of the software design, (2) installation instructions, (3) a description of the graphical user interface, (4) a description of selected output files, and (5) troubleshooting information.

  19. A chemical-structural model for coherent martensite/parent interface in Mn-based antiferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Shi, S; Wan, J F; Zuo, X W; Chen, N L; Zhang, J H; Rong, Y H

    2016-11-21

    The martensite/parent coherent interface of Mn-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) is a significant part in the research of their martensitic transformation, reversible shape memory effect and magnetic shape memory effect. In the present work, a chemical-structural model was proposed to calculate the martensite/parent coherent interfacial energy of Mn-X (X = Cu, Fe) alloys. In this model, the coherent heterophase interfacial energy consists of chemical and structural parts. Resulting from the formation process of the heterophase interface, the chemical interfacial energy is expressed as the incremental value of bond energy, while the structural part is obtained by calculating the interfacial strain energy. The results show that the structural interfacial energy plays the chief role in the total interfacial energy, and the total interfacial energy decreases as the temperature rises when the alloy composition is fixed. In addition, the preferred orientation has noteworthy influence on the total interfacial energy. Using the proposed model, interfacial energy, interfacial entropy, interfacial enthalpy and interfacial heat capacity are found to be correlated with temperature and interface preferred orientation. Furthermore, the influences of alloy composition, modulus softening, and the index of the habit plane on the results were discussed.

  20. Improved Modeling of Side-Chain–Base Interactions and Plasticity in Protein–DNA Interface Design

    PubMed Central

    Thyme, Summer B.; Baker, David; Bradley, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial sequence optimization for protein design requires libraries of discrete side-chain conformations. The discreteness of these libraries is problematic, particularly for long, polar side chains, since favorable interactions can be missed. Previously, an approach to loop remodeling where protein backbone movement is directed by side-chain rotamers predicted to form interactions previously observed in native complexes (termed “motifs”) was described. Here, we show how such motif libraries can be incorporated into combinatorial sequence optimization protocols and improve native complex recapitulation. Guided by the motif rotamer searches, we made improvements to the underlying energy function, increasing recapitulation of native interactions. To further test the methods, we carried out a comprehensive experimental scan of amino acid preferences in the I-AniI protein–DNA interface and found that many positions tolerated multiple amino acids. This sequence plasticity is not observed in the computational results because of the fixed-backbone approximation of the model. We improved modeling of this diversity by introducing DNA flexibility and reducing the convergence of the simulated annealing algorithm that drives the design process. In addition to serving as a benchmark, this extensive experimental data set provides insight into the types of interactions essential to maintain the function of this potential gene therapy reagent. PMID:22426128

  1. A Diffuse Interface Model with Immiscibility Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Arpit; Freund, Jonathan B.; Pantano, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    A new, simple, and computationally efficient interface capturing scheme based on a diffuse interface approach is presented for simulation of compressible multiphase flows. Multi-fluid interfaces are represented using field variables (interface functions) with associated transport equations that are augmented, with respect to an established formulation, to enforce a selected interface thickness. The resulting interface region can be set just thick enough to be resolved by the underlying mesh and numerical method, yet thin enough to provide an efficient model for dynamics of well-resolved scales. A key advance in the present method is that the interface regularization is asymptotically compatible with the thermodynamic mixture laws of the mixture model upon which it is constructed. It incorporates first-order pressure and velocity non-equilibrium effects while preserving interface conditions for equilibrium flows, even within the thin diffused mixture region. We first quantify the improved convergence of this formulation in some widely used one-dimensional configurations, then show that it enables fundamentally better simulations of bubble dynamics. Demonstrations include both a spherical bubble collapse, which is shown to maintain excellent symmetry despite the Cartesian mesh, and a jetting bubble collapse adjacent a wall. Comparisons show that without the new formulation the jet is suppressed by numerical diffusion leading to qualitatively incorrect results. PMID:24058207

  2. A diffuse interface model with immiscibility preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Arpit; Freund, Jonathan B.; Pantano, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    A new, simple, and computationally efficient interface capturing scheme based on a diffuse interface approach is presented for simulation of compressible multiphase flows. Multi-fluid interfaces are represented using field variables (interface functions) with associated transport equations that are augmented, with respect to an established formulation, to enforce a selected interface thickness. The resulting interface region can be set just thick enough to be resolved by the underlying mesh and numerical method, yet thin enough to provide an efficient model for dynamics of well-resolved scales. A key advance in the present method is that the interface regularization is asymptotically compatible with the thermodynamic mixture laws of the mixture model upon which it is constructed. It incorporates first-order pressure and velocity non-equilibrium effects while preserving interface conditions for equilibrium flows, even within the thin diffused mixture region. We first quantify the improved convergence of this formulation in some widely used one-dimensional configurations, then show that it enables fundamentally better simulations of bubble dynamics. Demonstrations include both a spherical-bubble collapse, which is shown to maintain excellent symmetry despite the Cartesian mesh, and a jetting bubble collapse adjacent a wall. Comparisons show that without the new formulation the jet is suppressed by numerical diffusion leading to qualitatively incorrect results.

  3. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  4. Rapid development of entity-based data models for bioinformatics with persistence object-oriented design and structured interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ezra Tsur, Elishai

    2017-01-01

    Databases are imperative for research in bioinformatics and computational biology. Current challenges in database design include data heterogeneity and context-dependent interconnections between data entities. These challenges drove the development of unified data interfaces and specialized databases. The curation of specialized databases is an ever-growing challenge due to the introduction of new data sources and the emergence of new relational connections between established datasets. Here, an open-source framework for the curation of specialized databases is proposed. The framework supports user-designed models of data encapsulation, objects persistency and structured interfaces to local and external data sources such as MalaCards, Biomodels and the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases. The proposed framework was implemented using Java as the development environment, EclipseLink as the data persistency agent and Apache Derby as the database manager. Syntactic analysis was based on J3D, jsoup, Apache Commons and w3c.dom open libraries. Finally, a construction of a specialized database for aneurysms associated vascular diseases is demonstrated. This database contains 3-dimensional geometries of aneurysms, patient's clinical information, articles, biological models, related diseases and our recently published model of aneurysms' risk of rapture. Framework is available in: http://nbel-lab.com.

  5. Human-arm-and-hand-dynamic model with variability analyses for a stylus-based haptic interface.

    PubMed

    Fu, Michael J; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2012-12-01

    Haptic interface research benefits from accurate human arm models for control and system design. The literature contains many human arm dynamic models but lacks detailed variability analyses. Without accurate measurements, variability is modeled in a very conservative manner, leading to less than optimal controller and system designs. This paper not only presents models for human arm dynamics but also develops inter- and intrasubject variability models for a stylus-based haptic device. Data from 15 human subjects (nine male, six female, ages 20-32) were collected using a Phantom Premium 1.5a haptic device for system identification. In this paper, grip-force-dependent models were identified for 1-3-N grip forces in the three spatial axes. Also, variability due to human subjects and grip-force variation were modeled as both structured and unstructured uncertainties. For both forms of variability, the maximum variation, 95 %, and 67 % confidence interval limits were examined. All models were in the frequency domain with force as input and position as output. The identified models enable precise controllers targeted to a subset of possible human operator dynamics.

  6. Mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated soils: what makes interfaces an indispensable part of a physically-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikooee, E.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The foundations of the current theories for hydraulics and mechanics of unsaturated soils have been mainly based on the empirically introduced equations. There are various characteristics of unsaturated soils for which lots of different empirical equations have been proposed such as hydraulic conductivity, water retention curve, and effective stress parameter. One of the remarkable challenges which all current models face is hysteresis, i.e., for a certain matric suction, values of saturation, hydraulic conductivity and effective stress parameter in drying state and wetting are different. Conventional models of hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils try to account for the hysteresis phenomenon by means of different empirical equations for each hydraulic path. Hassanizadeh and Gray (1993) claimed that the hysteresis in capillary pressure-saturation curves can be modelled through the inclusion of air-water interfaces as a new independent variable [1]. It has recently been stated that the same conjecture can be made for suction stress [2]. Therefore, it seems to better portray hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils, interfaces are required as an indispensable part of the framework [3, 4]. This presentation aims at introducing the drawbacks of current theories of hydraulics and mechanics of unsaturated soils. For this purpose, the role of interfaces in the mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated soils is explained and different possibilities to account for the contribution of interfaces are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future research directions are set forth. References[1] Hassanizadeh, S.M. & Gray, W.G.: Thermodynamic basis of capillary pressure in porous media. Water Resour.Res. 29(1993), 3389-3405.[2] Nikooee, E., Habibagahi, G., Hassanizadeh, S.M. & Ghahramani, A.: Effective Stress in unsaturated Soils: a thermodynamic approach based on the interfacial energy and hydromechanical coupling. Transport porous Med. 96

  7. Multi-gas interaction modeling on decorated semiconductor interfaces: A novel Fermi distribution-based response isotherm and the inverse hard/soft acid/base concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laminack, William; Gole, James

    2015-12-01

    A unique MEMS/NEMS approach is presented for the modeling of a detection platform for mixed gas interactions. Mixed gas analytes interact with nanostructured decorating metal oxide island sites supported on a microporous silicon substrate. The Inverse Hard/Soft acid/base (IHSAB) concept is used to assess a diversity of conductometric responses for mixed gas interactions as a function of these nanostructured metal oxides. The analyte conductometric responses are well represented using a combination diffusion/absorption-based model for multi-gas interactions where a newly developed response absorption isotherm, based on the Fermi distribution function is applied. A further coupling of this model with the IHSAB concept describes the considerations in modeling of multi-gas mixed analyte-interface, and analyte-analyte interactions. Taking into account the molecular electronic interaction of both the analytes with each other and an extrinsic semiconductor interface we demonstrate how the presence of one gas can enhance or diminish the reversible interaction of a second gas with the extrinsic semiconductor interface. These concepts demonstrate important considerations in the array-based formats for multi-gas sensing and its applications.

  8. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic knowledgebase and web-based interface for rapid model ranking and querying

    EPA Science Inventory

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific pa...

  9. Numerical algorithms based on Galerkin methods for the modeling of reactive interfaces in photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Michael; Gamba, Irene M.; Ren, Kui

    2016-12-01

    This work concerns the numerical solution of a coupled system of self-consistent reaction-drift-diffusion-Poisson equations that describes the macroscopic dynamics of charge transport in photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells with reactive semiconductor and electrolyte interfaces. We present three numerical algorithms, mainly based on a mixed finite element and a local discontinuous Galerkin method for spatial discretization, with carefully chosen numerical fluxes, and implicit-explicit time stepping techniques, for solving the time-dependent nonlinear systems of partial differential equations. We perform computational simulations under various model parameters to demonstrate the performance of the proposed numerical algorithms as well as the impact of these parameters on the solution to the model.

  10. A Diffuse Interface Model for solid-liquid-air dissolution problems based on a porous medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Quintard, M.; Debenest, G.; Laouafa, F.

    2011-12-01

    The underground cavities may be dissolved by the flows of groundwater where the dissolution mainly happens at the liquid-solid interface. In many real cases, the cavities are not occupied only by the water, but also the gas phase, e.g., air, or other gases. In this case, there are solid-liquid-gas three phases. Normally, the air does not participate the dissolution. However, it may influence the dissolution as the position of the solid-liquid interface may gradually lower down with the dissolution process. Simulating the dissolution problems with multi- moving interfaces is a difficult task but rather interesting to study the evolution of the underground cavities. In this paper, we propose a diffuse interface model (DIM) to simulate the three-phase dissolution problem, based on a porous medium theory and a volume averaging theory te{Whitaker1999,Golfier2002,Quintard1994}. The interface is regarded as a continuous layer where the phase indicator (mainly for solid-liquid interface) and phase saturation (mainly for liquid-gas interface) vary rapidly but smoothly. The DIM equations enable us to simulate the moving interface under a fixed mesh system, instead of a deformed or moving mesh. Suppose we have three phases, solid, liquid and gas. The solid phase contains only species A. The gas phase contains only the air. The volume averaging theory is used to upscale the balance equations. The final DIM equations are presented below. The balance equation of solid phase can be written as {partialrho_{s}(1-\\varepsilon_{f})}/{partial t}=-K_{sl} where \\varepsilonf represents the volume fraction of the fluids (liquid+gas) and Ksl refers to the mass exchange between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Ksl cam be expressed as K_{sl}=rho_{l}alpha(omega_{eq}-Omega_{Al}). The balance equations of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho_{l}\\varepsilon_{f}S_{l}}/{partial t}+nabla\\cdot(rho_{l}{V}_{l})= K_{sl}. The balance equation of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho

  11. Interface transferring mechanism and error modification of FRP-OFBG strain sensor based on standard linear viscoelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jilong; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the interface transferring mechanism and error modification of the Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Optical Fiber Bragg Grating (FRP-OFBG) sensing tendons, which including GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer) and CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer), using standard linear viscoelastic model. The optical fiber is made up of glass, quartz or plastic, et al, which creep strain is very small at room temperature. So the tensile creep compliance of optical fiber is independent of time at room temperature. On the other hand, the FRP (GFRP or CFRP) is composed of a kind of polymeric matrix (epoxy resins or the others) with glass, carbon or aramid fibers, which shear creep strain is dependent of time at room temperature. Hence, the standard linear viscoelastic model is employed to describe the shear creep compliance of FRP along the fiber direction. The expression of interface strain transferring mechanism of FRP-OFBG sensors is derived based on the linear viscoelastic theory and the analytic solution of the error rate is given by the inverse Laplace transform. The effects of FRP viscoelasticity on the error rate of FRP-OFBG sensing tendons are included in the above expression. And the transient and steady-state error modified coefficient of FRP-OFBG sensors are obtained using initial value and final value theorems. Finally, a calculated example is given to explain the correct of theoretical prediction.

  12. A learning scheme for reach to grasp movements: on EMG-based interfaces using task specific motion decoding models.

    PubMed

    Liarokapis, Minas V; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Kyriakopoulos, Kostas J; Manolakos, Elias S

    2013-09-01

    A learning scheme based on random forests is used to discriminate between different reach to grasp movements in 3-D space, based on the myoelectric activity of human muscles of the upper-arm and the forearm. Task specificity for motion decoding is introduced in two different levels: Subspace to move toward and object to be grasped. The discrimination between the different reach to grasp strategies is accomplished with machine learning techniques for classification. The classification decision is then used in order to trigger an EMG-based task-specific motion decoding model. Task specific models manage to outperform "general" models providing better estimation accuracy. Thus, the proposed scheme takes advantage of a framework incorporating both a classifier and a regressor that cooperate advantageously in order to split the task space. The proposed learning scheme can be easily used to a series of EMG-based interfaces that must operate in real time, providing data-driven capabilities for multiclass problems, that occur in everyday life complex environments.

  13. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERM Code (GCR Event-Based Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERM code calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERM code also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERM code accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERM code for application to thick target experiments. The GERM code provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their

  14. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERMcode (GCR Event-Based Risk Model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERMcode calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERMcode also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERMcode for application to thick target experiments. The GERMcode provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their

  15. Microprocessor-based interface for oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    Ocean floor imaging system incorporates five identical microprocessor-based interface units each assigned to specific sonar instrument to simplify system. Central control module based on same microprocessor eliminates need for custom tailoring hardware interfaces for each instrument.

  16. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  17. A virtual reality interface for pre-planning of surgical operations based on a customized model of the patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Lenar, Janusz; Sitnik, Robert; Verdonschot, Nico

    2012-03-01

    We present a human-computer interface that enables the operator to plan a surgical procedure on the musculoskeletal (MS) model of the patient's lower limbs, send the modified model to the bio-mechanical analysis module, and export the scenario parameters to the surgical navigation system. The interface provides the operator with tools for: importing customized MS model of the patient, cutting bones and manipulating/removal of bony fragments, repositioning muscle insertion points, muscle removal and placing implants. After planning the operator exports the modified MS model for bio-mechanical analysis of the functional outcome. If the simulation result is satisfactory the exported scenario data may be directly used during the actual surgery. The advantages of the developed interface are the possibility of installing it in various hardware configurations and coherent operation regardless of the devices used. The hardware configurations proposed to be used with the interface are: (a) a standard computer keyboard and mouse, and a 2-D display, (b) a touch screen as a single device for both input and output, or (c) a 3-D display and a haptic device for natural manipulation of 3-D objects. The interface may be utilized in two main fields. Experienced surgeons may use it to simulate their intervention plans and prepare input data for a surgical navigation system while student or novice surgeons can use it for simulating results of their hypothetical procedure. The interface has been developed in the TLEMsafe project (www.tlemsafe.eu) funded by the European Commission FP7 program.

  18. A graphical interface based model for wind turbine drive train dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Manwell, J.F.; McGowan, J.G.; Abdulwahid, U.; Rogers, A.; McNiff, B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of a wind turbine drive train dynamics code that has been under development at the University of Massachusetts, under National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) support. The code is intended to be used to assist in the proper design and selection of drive train components. This work summarizes the development of the equations of motion for the model, and discusses the method of solution. In addition, a number of comparisons with analytical solutions and experimental field data are given. The summary includes conclusions and suggestions for future work on the model. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  19. The Research on Automatic Construction of Domain Model Based on Deep Web Query Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JianPing, Gu

    The integration of services is transparent, meaning that users no longer face the millions of Web services, do not care about the required data stored, but do not need to learn how to obtain these data. In this paper, we analyze the uncertainty of schema matching, and then propose a series of similarity measures. To reduce the cost of execution, we propose the type-based optimization method and schema matching pruning method of numeric data. Based on above analysis, we propose the uncertain schema matching method. The experiments prove the effectiveness and efficiency of our method.

  20. An interface energy density-based theory considering the coherent interface effect in nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yin; Chen, Shaohua; Fang, Daining

    2017-02-01

    To characterize the coherent interface effect conveniently and feasibly in nanomaterials, a continuum theory is proposed that is based on the concept of the interface free energy density, which is a dominant factor affecting the mechanical properties of the coherent interface in materials of all scales. The effect of the residual strain caused by self-relaxation and the lattice misfit of nanomaterials, as well as that due to the interface deformation induced by an external load on the interface free energy density is considered. In contrast to the existing theories, the stress discontinuity at the interface is characterized by the interface free energy density through an interface-induced traction. As a result, the interface elastic constant introduced in previous theories, which is not easy to determine precisely, is avoided in the present theory. Only the surface energy density of the bulk materials forming the interface, the relaxation parameter induced by surface relaxation, and the mismatch parameter for forming a coherent interface between the two surfaces are involved. All the related parameters are far easier to determine than the interface elastic constants. The effective bulk and shear moduli of a nanoparticle-reinforced nanocomposite are predicted using the proposed theory. Closed-form solutions are achieved, demonstrating the feasibility and convenience of the proposed model for predicting the interface effect in nanomaterials.

  1. Compaction-Based Deformable Terrain Model as an Interface for Real-Time Vehicle Dynamics Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-16

    to vehicular loads, and the resulting visco-elastic-plastic stress/strain on the affected soil volume. Pedo transfer functions allow for the... resulting visco-elastic-plastic stress/strain on the affected soil volume. Pedo transfer functions allow for the calculation of the soil mechanics model...in section 2. Example simulations will include timing and profiling results for sequential, CPU parallel and CPU & GPU parallel implementations in

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A CHEMICAL PROCESS MODELING ENVIRONMENT BASED ON CAPE-OPEN INTERFACE STANDARDS AND THE MICROSOFT .NET FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical process simulation has long been used as a design tool in the development of chemical plants, and has long been considered a means to evaluate different design options. With the advent of large scale computer networks and interface models for program components, it is po...

  3. Transport, Interfaces, and Modeling in Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 11 February 2002 - 30 September 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, E. A.

    2008-10-01

    Results for a-Si characteristics/modeling; photocarrier drift mobilities in a-Si;H, ..mu..c-Si:H, CIGS; hole-conducting polymers as p-layer for a-Si and c-Si; IR spectra of p/i and n/i interfaces in a-Si.

  4. A new interface element for connecting independently modeled substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1993-01-01

    A new interface element based on the hybrid variational formulation is presented and demonstrated. The element provides a means of connecting independently modeled substructures whose nodes along the common boundary need not be coincident. The interface element extends previous work to include connecting an arbitrary number of substructures, the use of closed and generally curved interfaces, and the use of multiple, possibly nested, interfaces. Several applications of the element are presented and aspects of the implementation are discussed.

  5. A Cross-Cultural Usability Study on the Internationalization of User Interfaces Based on an Empirical Five Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Joyram

    2009-01-01

    With the internationalization of e-commerce, it is no longer viable to design one user interface for all environments. Web-based applications and services can be accessed from all over the globe. To account for this globalization process, software developers need to understand that simply accounting for language translation of their websites for…

  6. Computational design of patterned interfaces using reduced order models.

    PubMed

    Vattré, A J; Abdolrahim, N; Kolluri, K; Demkowicz, M J

    2014-08-29

    Patterning is a familiar approach for imparting novel functionalities to free surfaces. We extend the patterning paradigm to interfaces between crystalline solids. Many interfaces have non-uniform internal structures comprised of misfit dislocations, which in turn govern interface properties. We develop and validate a computational strategy for designing interfaces with controlled misfit dislocation patterns by tailoring interface crystallography and composition. Our approach relies on a novel method for predicting the internal structure of interfaces: rather than obtaining it from resource-intensive atomistic simulations, we compute it using an efficient reduced order model based on anisotropic elasticity theory. Moreover, our strategy incorporates interface synthesis as a constraint on the design process. As an illustration, we apply our approach to the design of interfaces with rapid, 1-D point defect diffusion. Patterned interfaces may be integrated into the microstructure of composite materials, markedly improving performance.

  7. Computational design of patterned interfaces using reduced order models

    PubMed Central

    Vattré, A. J.; Abdolrahim, N.; Kolluri, K.; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Patterning is a familiar approach for imparting novel functionalities to free surfaces. We extend the patterning paradigm to interfaces between crystalline solids. Many interfaces have non-uniform internal structures comprised of misfit dislocations, which in turn govern interface properties. We develop and validate a computational strategy for designing interfaces with controlled misfit dislocation patterns by tailoring interface crystallography and composition. Our approach relies on a novel method for predicting the internal structure of interfaces: rather than obtaining it from resource-intensive atomistic simulations, we compute it using an efficient reduced order model based on anisotropic elasticity theory. Moreover, our strategy incorporates interface synthesis as a constraint on the design process. As an illustration, we apply our approach to the design of interfaces with rapid, 1-D point defect diffusion. Patterned interfaces may be integrated into the microstructure of composite materials, markedly improving performance. PMID:25169868

  8. Geographic information system/watershed model interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Geographic information systems allow for the interactive analysis of spatial data related to water-resources investigations. A conceptual design for an interface between a geographic information system and a watershed model includes functions for the estimation of model parameter values. Design criteria include ease of use, minimal equipment requirements, a generic data-base management system, and use of a macro language. An application is demonstrated for a 90.1-square-kilometer subbasin of the Patuxent River near Unity, Maryland, that performs automated derivation of watershed parameters for hydrologic modeling.

  9. Model study of protein unfolding by interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakarova, S. D.; Carlsson, A. E.

    2004-02-01

    We study interface-induced protein unfolding on hydrophobic and polar interfaces by means of a two-dimensional lattice model and an exhaustive enumeration ground-state structure search, for a set of model proteins of length 20 residues. We compare the effects of the two types of interfaces, and search for criteria that influence the retention of a protein’s native-state structure upon adsorption. We find that the unfolding proceeds by a large, sudden loss of native contacts. The unfolding at polar interfaces exhibits similar behavior to that at hydrophobic interfaces but with a much weaker interface coupling strength. Further, we find that the resistance of proteins to unfolding in our model is positively correlated with the magnitude of the folding energy in the native-state structure, the thermal stability (or energy gap) for that structure, and the interface energy for native-state adsorption. We find these factors to be of roughly equal importance.

  10. A diagnostic interface for the ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic (ICON) modelling framework based on the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy v2.50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Bastian; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Numerical climate and weather models have advanced to finer scales, accompanied by large amounts of output data. The model systems hit the input and output (I/O) bottleneck of modern high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We aim to apply diagnostic methods online during the model simulation instead of applying them as a post-processing step to written output data, to reduce the amount of I/O. To include diagnostic tools into the model system, we implemented a standardised, easy-to-use interface based on the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) into the ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic (ICON) modelling framework. The integration of the diagnostic interface into the model system is briefly described. Furthermore, we present a prototype implementation of an advanced online diagnostic tool for the aggregation of model data onto a user-defined regular coarse grid. This diagnostic tool will be used to reduce the amount of model output in future simulations. Performance tests of the interface and of two different diagnostic tools show, that the interface itself introduces no overhead in form of additional runtime to the model system. The diagnostic tools, however, have significant impact on the model system's runtime. This overhead strongly depends on the characteristics and implementation of the diagnostic tool. A diagnostic tool with high inter-process communication introduces large overhead, whereas the additional runtime of a diagnostic tool without inter-process communication is low. We briefly describe our efforts to reduce the additional runtime from the diagnostic tools, and present a brief analysis of memory consumption. Future work will focus on optimisation of the memory footprint and the I/O operations of the diagnostic interface.

  11. EDITORIAL: Sensors based on interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassel, Jean; Soukiassian, Patrick G.

    2007-12-01

    Sensors are specific analog devices that convert a physical quantity, like the temperature or external pressure or concentration of carbon monoxide in a confined atmosphere, into an electrical signal. Considered in this way, every sensor is then a part of the artificial interface, which connects the human world to the world of machines. The other side of the interface is represented by actuators. Most often, after processing the data they are used to convert the out-coming electrical power into counteracting physical action. In the last few years, thanks to inexpensive silicon technology, enormous capability for data processing has been developed and the world of machines has become increasingly invasive. The world of sensors has become increasingly complex too. Applications range from classical measurements of the temperature, vibrations, shocks and acceleration to more recent chemical and bio-sensing technologies. Chemical sensors are used to detect the presence of specific, generally toxic, chemical species. To measure their concentration, one uses some specific property, generally a physical one, like the intensity of infrared absorption bands. Bio-sensors are new, more complex, devices that combine a bio-receptor with a physical transducer. The bio-receptor is a molecule (for instance, an enzyme like glucose oxidase) that can recognize a specific target (glucose molecules in the case of glucose oxidase). The enzyme must be fixed on the transducer and, as a consequence of recognition, the transducer must convert the event into a measurable analytical signal. A common feature of many chemical and bio-sensors is that they require a large surface of interaction with the outside world. For that reason and in order to increase efficiency, either nanoparticles or pores or a combination of both, made from various materials including (but not limited to) porous silicon, are often used as the functional transducer interface. The reviews in this Cluster Issue of Journal

  12. Explicit continuous charge-based compact model for long channel heavily doped surrounding-gate MOSFETs incorporating interface traps and quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzah, Afiq; Hamid, Fatimah A.; Ismail, Razali

    2016-12-01

    An explicit solution for long-channel surrounding-gate (SRG) MOSFETs is presented from intrinsic to heavily doped body including the effects of interface traps and fixed oxide charges. The solution is based on the core SRGMOSFETs model of the Unified Charge Control Model (UCCM) for heavily doped conditions. The UCCM model of highly doped SRGMOSFETs is derived to obtain the exact equivalent expression as in the undoped case. Taking advantage of the undoped explicit charge-based expression, the asymptotic limits for below threshold and above threshold have been redefined to include the effect of trap states for heavily doped cases. After solving the asymptotic limits, an explicit mobile charge expression is obtained which includes the trap state effects. The explicit mobile charge model shows very good agreement with respect to numerical simulation over practical terminal voltages, doping concentration, geometry effects, and trap state effects due to the fixed oxide charges and interface traps. Then, the drain current is obtained using the Pao-Sah's dual integral, which is expressed as a function of inversion charge densities at the source/drain ends. The drain current agreed well with the implicit solution and numerical simulation for all regions of operation without employing any empirical parameters. A comparison with previous explicit models has been conducted to verify the competency of the proposed model with the doping concentration of 1× {10}19 {{cm}}-3, as the proposed model has better advantages in terms of its simplicity and accuracy at a higher doping concentration.

  13. A Process Based Approach to Modeling Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions Across the Air-Surface Interface of Manure from Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Aneja, V.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are an important concern due to their contribution to odor and their potential to form PMfine. CAFO manure surface emissions occur from barns floors, during waste storage and treatment, and following land application. There is a need for a process based model, which will provide a method for quantifying emissions in different production, management and environmental conditions. A process based air-surface interface mass transfer model with chemical reactions was developed based on theoretical principles and related published information on H2S emissions. Different approaches were used to calculate the three main components of the model: the dissociation constant, the Henry’s law constant, and the overall mass transport coefficient. The dissociation constant was calculated based on thermodynamic principles and was corrected for the ionic strength of the manure. Similarly, the Henry’s law constant was also calculated based on thermodynamic principles. The overall mass transfer coefficient was developed using a previously published air-surface interface mass transport model, which considered the most important properties affecting mass transport to be the diffusivity of H2S in air, the air viscosity, and the air density. These parameters were modeled using dimensional analysis, which identified the variables that needed to be measured to determine the relevant constant and exponents values. By using the previously published study’s model and their measured constant and exponent values, an appropriate overall mass transfer coefficient was developed. Sensitivity analysis of the process based air-surface interface mass transfer model showed predicted fluxes to be most dependent on manure sulfide concentration and manure pH, and to a smaller extent on wind speed and manure temperature. Model predicted fluxes were compared with measured H2S flux and meteorological and physiochemical

  14. Correlation-based model of artificially induced plasticity in motor cortex by a bidirectional brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Guillaume; Kalaska, John F.; Fairhall, Adrienne L.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    2017-01-01

    Experiments show that spike-triggered stimulation performed with Bidirectional Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BBCI) can artificially strengthen connections between separate neural sites in motor cortex (MC). When spikes from a neuron recorded at one MC site trigger stimuli at a second target site after a fixed delay, the connections between sites eventually strengthen. It was also found that effective spike-stimulus delays are consistent with experimentally derived spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) rules, suggesting that STDP is key to drive these changes. However, the impact of STDP at the level of circuits, and the mechanisms governing its modification with neural implants remain poorly understood. The present work describes a recurrent neural network model with probabilistic spiking mechanisms and plastic synapses capable of capturing both neural and synaptic activity statistics relevant to BBCI conditioning protocols. Our model successfully reproduces key experimental results, both established and new, and offers mechanistic insights into spike-triggered conditioning. Using analytical calculations and numerical simulations, we derive optimal operational regimes for BBCIs, and formulate predictions concerning the efficacy of spike-triggered conditioning in different regimes of cortical activity. PMID:28151957

  15. T:XML: A Tool Supporting User Interface Model Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Jaquero, Víctor; Montero, Francisco; González, Pascual

    Model driven development of user interfaces is based on the transformation of an abstract specification into the final user interface the user will interact with. The design of transformation rules to carry out this transformation process is a key issue in any model-driven user interface development approach. In this paper, we introduce T:XML, an integrated development environment for managing, creating and previewing transformation rules. The tool supports the specification of transformation rules by using a graphical notation that works on the basis of the transformation of the input model into a graph-based representation. T:XML allows the design and execution of transformation rules in an integrated development environment. Furthermore, the designer can also preview how the generated user interface looks like after the transformations have been applied. These previewing capabilities can be used to quickly create prototypes to discuss with the users in user-centered design methods.

  16. Geometric Modeling Application Interface Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    Manual IDEF-Extended ( IDEFIX ) Integrated Information Support System (IISS), ICAM Project 6201, Contract F33615-80-C-5155, December 1985. Interim...Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, M. P. de Carmo, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1976. IDEFIX Readers Reference, D. Appleton Company, December 1985...Modeling. IDEFI -- IDEF Information Modeling. IDEFIX -- IDEF Extended Information Modeling. IDEF2 -- IDEF Dynamics Modeling. IDSS -- Integrated Decision

  17. Ray tracing in discontinuous velocity model with implicit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxing; Yang, Qin; Meng, Xianhai; Li, Jigang

    2016-07-01

    Ray tracing in the velocity model containing complex discontinuities is still facing many challenges. The main difficulty arises from the detection of the spatial relationship between the rays and the interfaces that are usually described in non-linear parametric forms. We propose a novel model representation method that can facilitate the implementation of classical shooting-ray methods. In the representation scheme, each interface is expressed as the zero contour of a signed distance field. A multi-copy strategy is adopted to describe the volumetric properties within blocks. The implicit description of the interface makes it easier to detect the ray-interface intersection. The direct calculation of the intersection point is converted into the problem of judging the signs of a ray segment's endpoints. More importantly, the normal to the interface at the intersection point can be easily acquired according to the signed distance field of the interface. The multiple storage of the velocity property in the proximity of the interface can provide accurate and unambiguous velocity information of the intersection point. Thus, the departing ray path can be determined easily and robustly. In addition, the new representation method can describe velocity models containing very complex geological structures, such as faults, salt domes, intrusions, and pinches, without any simplification. The examples on synthetic and real models validate the robustness and accuracy of the ray tracing based on the proposed model representation scheme.

  18. An Agent-Based Interface to Terrestrial Ecological Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Nemani, Ramakrishna; Pang, Wan-Lin; Votava, Petr; Etzioni, Oren

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a flexible agent-based ecological forecasting system that combines multiple distributed data sources and models to provide near-real-time answers to questions about the state of the Earth system We build on novel techniques in automated constraint-based planning and natural language interfaces to automatically generate data products based on descriptions of the desired data products.

  19. Transistor-based interface circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2007-02-13

    Among the embodiments of the present invention is an apparatus that includes a transistor, a servo device, and a current source. The servo device is operable to provide a common base mode of operation of the transistor by maintaining an approximately constant voltage level at the transistor base. The current source is operable to provide a bias current to the transistor. A first device provides an input signal to an electrical node positioned between the emitter of the transistor and the current source. A second device receives an output signal from the collector of the transistor.

  20. Transistor-based interface circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2004-02-24

    Among the embodiments of the present invention is an apparatus that includes a transistor, a servo device, and a current source. The servo device is operable to provide a common base mode of operation of the transistor by maintaining an approximately constant voltage level at the transistor base. The current source is operable to provide a bias current to the transistor. A first device provides an input signal to an electrical node positioned between the emitter of the transistor and the current source. A second device receives an output signal from the collector of the transistor.

  1. Computer modelling of metal - oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purton, J.; Parker, S. C.; Bullett, D. W.

    1997-07-01

    We have used atomistic simulations to model oxide - metal interfaces. We have, for the first time, allowed the atoms on both sides of the interface to relax. The efficiency of the computational method means that calculations can be performed on complex interfaces containing several thousand atoms and do not require an arbitrary definition of the image plane to model the electrostatics across the dielectric discontinuity. We demonstrate the viability of the approach and the effect of relaxation on a range of MgO - Ag interfaces. Defective and faceted interfaces, as well as the ideal case, have been studied. The latter was chosen for comparison with previous theoretical calculations and experimental results. The wetting angle 0953-8984/9/27/004/img7 and work of adhesion 0953-8984/9/27/004/img8 for MgO{100} - Ag{100} are in reasonable agreement with experiment. As with ab initio electronic structure calculations the silver atoms have been shown to favour the position above the oxygen site.

  2. A Web Interface for Eco System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHenry, K.; Kooper, R.; Serbin, S. P.; LeBauer, D. S.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn) as an open-source scientific workflow system and ecoinformatics toolbox that manages the flow of information in and out of regional-scale terrestrial biosphere models, facilitates heterogeneous data assimilation, tracks data provenance, and enables more effective feedback between models and field research. The over-arching goal of PEcAn is to make otherwise complex analyses transparent, repeatable, and accessible to a diverse array of researchers, allowing both novice and expert users to focus on using the models to examine complex ecosystems rather than having to deal with complex computer system setup and configuration questions in order to run the models. Through the developed web interface we hide much of the data and model details and allow the user to simply select locations, ecosystem models, and desired data sources as inputs to the model. Novice users are guided by the web interface through setting up a model execution and plotting the results. At the same time expert users are given enough freedom to modify specific parameters before the model gets executed. This will become more important as more and more models are added to the PEcAn workflow as well as more and more data that will become available as NEON comes online. On the backend we support the execution of potentially computationally expensive models on different High Performance Computers (HPC) and/or clusters. The system can be configured with a single XML file that gives it the flexibility needed for configuring and running the different models on different systems using a combination of information stored in a database as well as pointers to files on the hard disk. While the web interface usually creates this configuration file, expert users can still directly edit it to fine tune the configuration.. Once a workflow is finished the web interface will allow for the easy creation of plots over result data while also allowing the user to

  3. Empirical Movement Models for Brain Computer Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Matlack, Charles; Chizeck, Howard; Moritz, Chet T

    2016-06-30

    For brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) which provide the user continuous position control, there is little standardization of performance metrics or evaluative tasks. One candidate metric is Fitts's law, which has been used to describe aimed movements across a range of computer interfaces, and has recently been applied to BCI tasks. Reviewing selected studies, we identify two basic problems with Fitts's law: its predictive performance is fragile, and the estimation of 'information transfer rate' from the model is unsupported. Our main contribution is the adaptation and validation of an alternative model to Fitts's law in the BCI context. We show that the Shannon-Welford model outperforms Fitts's law, showing robust predictive power when target distance and width have disproportionate effects on difficulty. Building on a prior study of the Shannon-Welford model, we show that identified model parameters offer a novel approach to quantitatively assess the role of controldisplay gain in speed/accuracy performance tradeoffs during brain control.

  4. User interface for ground-water modeling: Arcview extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsou, M.-S.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation for ground-water modeling often involves handling large input and output data sets. A geographic information system (GIS) provides an integrated platform to manage, analyze, and display disparate data and can greatly facilitate modeling efforts in data compilation, model calibration, and display of model parameters and results. Furthermore, GIS can be used to generate information for decision making through spatial overlay and processing of model results. Arc View is the most widely used Windows-based GIS software that provides a robust user-friendly interface to facilitate data handling and display. An extension is an add-on program to Arc View that provides additional specialized functions. An Arc View interface for the ground-water flow and transport models MODFLOW and MT3D was built as an extension for facilitating modeling. The extension includes preprocessing of spatially distributed (point, line, and polygon) data for model input and postprocessing of model output. An object database is used for linking user dialogs and model input files. The Arc View interface utilizes the capabilities of the 3D Analyst extension. Models can be automatically calibrated through the Arc View interface by external linking to such programs as PEST. The efficient pre- and postprocessing capabilities and calibration link were demonstrated for ground-water modeling in southwest Kansas.

  5. Monitoring and Control Interface Based on Virtual Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Ricardo F.; Adam-Medina, Manuel; García-Beltrán, Carlos D.; Olivares-Peregrino, Víctor H.; Juárez-Romero, David; Guerrero-Ramírez, Gerardo V.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a toolbox based on a monitoring and control interface (MCI) is presented and applied in a heat exchanger. The MCI was programed in order to realize sensor fault detection and isolation and fault tolerance using virtual sensors. The virtual sensors were designed from model-based high-gain observers. To develop the control task, different kinds of control laws were included in the monitoring and control interface. These control laws are PID, MPC and a non-linear model-based control law. The MCI helps to maintain the heat exchanger under operation, even if a temperature outlet sensor fault occurs; in the case of outlet temperature sensor failure, the MCI will display an alarm. The monitoring and control interface is used as a practical tool to support electronic engineering students with heat transfer and control concepts to be applied in a double-pipe heat exchanger pilot plant. The method aims to teach the students through the observation and manipulation of the main variables of the process and by the interaction with the monitoring and control interface (MCI) developed in LabVIEW©. The MCI provides the electronic engineering students with the knowledge of heat exchanger behavior, since the interface is provided with a thermodynamic model that approximates the temperatures and the physical properties of the fluid (density and heat capacity). An advantage of the interface is the easy manipulation of the actuator for an automatic or manual operation. Another advantage of the monitoring and control interface is that all algorithms can be manipulated and modified by the users. PMID:25365462

  6. Monitoring and control interface based on virtual sensors.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Ricardo F; Adam-Medina, Manuel; García-Beltrán, Carlos D; Olivares-Peregrino, Víctor H; Juárez-Romero, David; Guerrero-Ramírez, Gerardo V

    2014-10-31

    In this article, a toolbox based on a monitoring and control interface (MCI) is presented and applied in a heat exchanger. The MCI was programed in order to realize sensor fault detection and isolation and fault tolerance using virtual sensors. The virtual sensors were designed from model-based high-gain observers. To develop the control task, different kinds of control laws were included in the monitoring and control interface. These control laws are PID, MPC and a non-linear model-based control law. The MCI helps to maintain the heat exchanger under operation, even if a temperature outlet sensor fault occurs; in the case of outlet temperature sensor failure, the MCI will display an alarm. The monitoring and control interface is used as a practical tool to support electronic engineering students with heat transfer and control concepts to be applied in a double-pipe heat exchanger pilot plant. The method aims to teach the students through the observation and manipulation of the main variables of the process and by the interaction with the monitoring and control interface (MCI) developed in LabVIEW©. The MCI provides the electronic engineering students with the knowledge of heat exchanger behavior, since the interface is provided with a thermodynamic model that approximates the temperatures and the physical properties of the fluid (density and heat capacity). An advantage of the interface is the easy manipulation of the actuator for an automatic or manual operation. Another advantage of the monitoring and control interface is that all algorithms can be manipulated and modified by the users.

  7. Acorn: A grid computing system for constraint based modeling and visualization of the genome scale metabolic reaction networks via a web interface

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Constraint-based approaches facilitate the prediction of cellular metabolic capabilities, based, in turn on predictions of the repertoire of enzymes encoded in the genome. Recently, genome annotations have been used to reconstruct genome scale metabolic reaction networks for numerous species, including Homo sapiens, which allow simulations that provide valuable insights into topics, including predictions of gene essentiality of pathogens, interpretation of genetic polymorphism in metabolic disease syndromes and suggestions for novel approaches to microbial metabolic engineering. These constraint-based simulations are being integrated with the functional genomics portals, an activity that requires efficient implementation of the constraint-based simulations in the web-based environment. Results Here, we present Acorn, an open source (GNU GPL) grid computing system for constraint-based simulations of genome scale metabolic reaction networks within an interactive web environment. The grid-based architecture allows efficient execution of computationally intensive, iterative protocols such as Flux Variability Analysis, which can be readily scaled up as the numbers of models (and users) increase. The web interface uses AJAX, which facilitates efficient model browsing and other search functions, and intuitive implementation of appropriate simulation conditions. Research groups can install Acorn locally and create user accounts. Users can also import models in the familiar SBML format and link reaction formulas to major functional genomics portals of choice. Selected models and simulation results can be shared between different users and made publically available. Users can construct pathway map layouts and import them into the server using a desktop editor integrated within the system. Pathway maps are then used to visualise numerical results within the web environment. To illustrate these features we have deployed Acorn and created a web server allowing

  8. A Hybrid Tool for User Interface Modeling and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trætteberg, Hallvard

    Although many methods have been proposed, model-based development methods have only to some extent been adopted for UI design. In particular, they are not easy to combine with user-centered design methods. In this paper, we present a hybrid UI modeling and GUI prototyping tool, which is designed to fit better with IS development and UI design traditions. The tool includes a diagram editor for domain and UI models and an execution engine that integrates UI behavior, live UI components and sample data. Thus, both model-based user interface design and prototyping-based iterative design are supported

  9. Ab initio diffuse-interface model for lithiated electrode interface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stournara, Maria E.; Kumar, Ravi; Qi, Yue; Sheldon, Brian W.

    2016-07-01

    The study of chemical segregation at interfaces, and in particular the ability to predict the thickness of segregated layers via analytical expressions or computational modeling, is a fundamentally challenging topic in the design of novel heterostructured materials. This issue is particularly relevant for the phase-field (PF) methodology, which has become a prominent tool for describing phase transitions. These models rely on phenomenological parameters that pertain to the interfacial energy and thickness, quantities that cannot be experimentally measured. Instead of back-calculating these parameters from experimental data, here we combine a set of analytical expressions based on the Cahn-Hilliard approach with ab initio calculations to compute the gradient energy parameter κ and the thickness λ of the segregated Li layer at the LixSi-Cu interface. With this bottom-up approach we calculate the thickness λ of the Li diffuse interface to be on the order of a few nm, in agreement with prior experimental secondary ion mass spectrometry observations. Our analysis indicates that Li segregation is primarily driven by solution thermodynamics, while the strain contribution in this system is relatively small. This combined scheme provides an essential first step in the systematic evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters of the PF methodology, and we believe that it can serve as a framework for the development of quantitative interface models in the field of Li-ion batteries.

  10. Internet-based interface for STRMDEPL08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Howard W.; Asher, A. Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    The core of the computer program STRMDEPL08 that estimates streamflow depletion by a pumping well with one of four analytical solutions was re-written in the Javascript software language and made available through an internet-based interface (web page). In the internet-based interface, the user enters data for one of the four analytical solutions, Glover and Balmer (1954), Hantush (1965), Hunt (1999), and Hunt (2003), and the solution is run for constant pumping for a desired number of simulation days. Results are returned in tabular form to the user. For intermittent pumping, the interface allows the user to request that the header information for an input file for the stand-alone executable STRMDEPL08 be created. The user would add the pumping information to this header information and run the STRMDEPL08 executable that is available for download through the U.S. Geological Survey. Results for the internet-based and stand-alone versions of STRMDEPL08 are shown to match.

  11. A damage mechanics based general purpose interface/contact element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengyong

    Most of the microelectronics packaging structures consist of layered substrates connected with bonding materials, such as solder or epoxy. Predicting the thermomechanical behavior of these multilayered structures is a challenging task in electronic packaging engineering. In a layered structure the most complex part is always the interfaces between the strates. Simulating the thermo-mechanical behavior of such interfaces, is the main theme of this dissertation. The most commonly used solder material, Pb-Sn alloy, has a very low melting temperature 180sp°C, so that the material demonstrates a highly viscous behavior. And, creep usually dominates the failure mechanism. Hence, the theory of viscoplasticity is adapted to describe the constitutive behavior. In a multilayered assembly each layer has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. Under thermal cycling, due to heat dissipated from circuits, interfaces and interconnects experience low cycle fatigue. Presently, the state-of-the art damage mechanics model used for fatigue life predictions is based on Kachanov (1986) continuum damage model. This model uses plastic strain as a damage criterion. Since plastic strain is a stress path dependent value, the criterion does not yield unique damage values for the same state of stress. In this dissertation a new damage evolution equation based on the second law of thermodynamic is proposed. The new criterion is based on the entropy of the system and it yields unique damage values for all stress paths to the final state of stress. In the electronics industry, there is a strong desire to develop fatigue free interconnections. The proposed interface/contact element can also simulate the behavior of the fatigue free Z-direction thin film interconnections as well as traditional layered interconnects. The proposed interface element can simulate behavior of a bonded interface or unbonded sliding interface, also called contact element. The proposed element was verified against

  12. Modeling the Extreme-Pressure Lubricating Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltchev, Matey; Gao, Feng; Lara-Romero, Javier; Tysoe, Wilfred

    2005-04-01

    Extreme-pressure lubricants are currently widely used in various areas of applications. However, despite of their common use, the fundamental aspects of the mechanism in which these lubricants reduce the friction coefficient are not clear yet. Earlier macrotribological experiments using chlorinated hydrocarbons have shown remarkable effectiveness. It has been proven that thin films that resemble those formed under tribological conditions can also be synthesized in ultrahigh vacuum when beams of chlorinated hydrocarbons are directed onto a clean iron surface. Here results obtained using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, atomic force microscopy and microtribological measurements of these films are presented. Substantial information about the fundamental properties and structure of this model lubricating interface is revealed. A mechanism of the formation of the interface under tribological conditions is also suggested.

  13. Modeling material interfaces with hybrid adhesion method

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Nicholas Taylor; Qu, Jianmin; Martinez, Enrique

    2017-01-27

    A molecular dynamics simulation approach is presented to approximate layered material structures using discrete interatomic potentials through classical mechanics and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This method isolates the energetic contributions of the system into two pure material layers and an interfacial region used to simulate the adhesive properties of the diffused interface. The strength relationship of the adhesion contribution is calculated through small-scale separation calculations and applied to the molecular surfaces through an inter-layer bond criterion. By segregating the contributions into three regions and accounting for the interfacial excess energies through the adhesive surface bonds, it is possiblemore » to model each material with an independent potential while maintaining an acceptable level of accuracy in the calculation of mechanical properties. This method is intended for the atomistic study of the delamination mechanics, typically observed in thin-film applications. Therefore, the work presented in this paper focuses on mechanical tensile behaviors, with observations in the elastic modulus and the delamination failure mode. To introduce the hybrid adhesion method, we apply the approach to an ideal bulk copper sample, where an interface is created by disassociating the force potential in the middle of the structure. Various mechanical behaviors are compared to a standard EAM control model to demonstrate the adequacy of this approach in a simple setting. In addition, we demonstrate the robustness of this approach by applying it on (1) a Cu-Cu2O interface with interactions between two atom types, and (2) an Al-Cu interface with two dissimilar FCC lattices. These additional examples are verified against EAM and COMB control models to demonstrate the accurate simulation of failure through delamination, and the formation and propagation of dislocations under loads. Finally, the results conclude that by modeling the energy

  14. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  15. The Development of Quantitative Structure-Binding Affinity Relationship (QSBR) Models Based on Novel Geometrical Chemical Descriptors of the Protein-Ligand Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxing; Golbraikh, Alexander; Tropsha, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Novel geometrical chemical descriptors have been derived based on the computational geometry of protein-ligand interfaces and Pauling atomic electronegativities (EN). Delaunay tessellation has been applied to a diverse set of 517 X-ray characterized protein-ligand complexes yielding a unique collection of interfacial nearest neighbor atomic quadruplets for each complex. Each quadruplet composition was characterized by a single descriptor calculated as the sum of the EN values for the four participating atom types. We termed these simple descriptors generated from atomic EN values and derived with the Delaunay Tessellation the ENTess descriptors and used them in the variable selection k-Nearest Neighbor quantitative structure-binding affinity relationship (QSBR) studies of 264 diverse protein-ligand complexes with known binding constants. 24 complexes with chemically dissimilar ligands were set aside as an independent validation set, and the remaining dataset of 240 complexes was divided into multiple training and test sets. The best models were characterized by the leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 as high as 0.66 for the training set and the correlation coefficient R2 as high as 0.83 for the test set. High predictive power of these models was confirmed independently by applying them to the validation set of 24 complexes yielding R2 as high as 0.85. We conclude that QSBR models built with the ENTess descriptors can be instrumental for predicting the binding affinity of receptor-ligand complexes. PMID:16640331

  16. RSVP Keyboard: An EEG Based Typing Interface

    PubMed Central

    Orhan, Umut; Hild, Kenneth E.; Erdogmus, Deniz; Roark, Brian; Oken, Barry; Fried-Oken, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Humans need communication. The desire to communicate remains one of the primary issues for people with locked-in syndrome (LIS). While many assistive and augmentative communication systems that use various physiological signals are available commercially, the need is not satisfactorily met. Brain interfaces, in particular, those that utilize event related potentials (ERP) in electroencephalography (EEG) to detect the intent of a person noninvasively, are emerging as a promising communication interface to meet this need where existing options are insufficient. Existing brain interfaces for typing use many repetitions of the visual stimuli in order to increase accuracy at the cost of speed. However, speed is also crucial and is an integral portion of peer-to-peer communication; a message that is not delivered timely often looses its importance. Consequently, we utilize rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) in conjunction with language models in order to assist letter selection during the brain-typing process with the final goal of developing a system that achieves high accuracy and speed simultaneously. This paper presents initial results from the RSVP Keyboard system that is under development. These initial results on healthy and locked-in subjects show that single-trial or few-trial accurate letter selection may be possible with the RSVP Keyboard paradigm. PMID:24500542

  17. A general graphical user interface for automatic reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liceaga, Carlos A.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1991-01-01

    Reported here is a general Graphical User Interface (GUI) for automatic reliability modeling of Processor Memory Switch (PMS) structures using a Markov model. This GUI is based on a hierarchy of windows. One window has graphical editing capabilities for specifying the system's communication structure, hierarchy, reconfiguration capabilities, and requirements. Other windows have field texts, popup menus, and buttons for specifying parameters and selecting actions. An example application of the GUI is given.

  18. Individual-Based Modeling of Tuberculosis in a User-Friendly Interface: Understanding the Epidemiological Role of Population Heterogeneity in a City

    PubMed Central

    Prats, Clara; Montañola-Sales, Cristina; Gilabert-Navarro, Joan F.; Valls, Joaquim; Casanovas-Garcia, Josep; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan; López, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    For millennia tuberculosis (TB) has shown a successful strategy to survive, making it one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases. This resilient behavior is based not only on remaining hidden in most of the infected population, but also by showing slow evolution in most sick people. The course of the disease within a population is highly related to its heterogeneity. Thus, classic epidemiological approaches with a top-down perspective have not succeeded in understanding its dynamics. In the past decade a few individual-based models were built, but most of them preserved a top-down view that makes it difficult to study a heterogeneous population. We propose an individual-based model developed with a bottom-up approach to studying the dynamics of pulmonary TB in a certain population, considered constant. Individuals may belong to the following classes: healthy, infected, sick, under treatment, and treated with a probability of relapse. Several variables and parameters account for their age, origin (native or immigrant), immunodeficiency, diabetes, and other risk factors (smoking and alcoholism). The time within each infection state is controlled, and sick individuals may show a cavitated disease or not that conditions infectiousness. It was implemented in NetLogo because it allows non-modelers to perform virtual experiments with a user-friendly interface. The simulation was conducted with data from Ciutat Vella, a district of Barcelona with an incidence of 67 TB cases per 100,000 inhabitants in 2013. Several virtual experiments were performed to relate the disease dynamics with the structure of the infected subpopulation (e.g., the distribution of infected times). Moreover, the short-term effect of health control policies on modifying that structure was studied. Results show that the characteristics of the population are crucial for the local epidemiology of TB. The developed user-friendly tool is ready to test control strategies of disease in any city in the

  19. The effect of interface properties on nickel base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, M.; Grossman, T.; Senemeier, M.; Wright, K.

    1995-01-01

    This program was performed to assess the extent to which mechanical behavior models can predict the properties of sapphire fiber/nickel aluminide matrix composites and help guide their development by defining improved combinations of matrix and interface coating. The program consisted of four tasks: 1) selection of the matrices and interface coating constituents using a modeling-based approach; 2) fabrication of the selected materials; 3) testing and evaluation of the materials; and 4) evaluation of the behavior models to develop recommendations. Ni-50Al and Ni-20AI-30Fe (a/o) matrices were selected which gave brittle and ductile behavior, respectively, and an interface coating of PVD YSZ was selected which provided strong bonding to the sapphire fiber. Significant fiber damage and strength loss was observed in the composites which made straightforward comparison of properties with models difficult. Nevertheless, the models selected generally provided property predictions which agreed well with results when fiber degradation was incorporated. The presence of a strong interface bond was felt to be detrimental in the NiAI MMC system where low toughness and low strength were observed.

  20. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1991-01-01

    Some of the many analytical models in human-computer interface design that are currently being developed are described. The usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design is evaluated. Can the use of analytical models be recommended to interface designers? The answer, based on the empirical research summarized here, is: not at this time. There are too many unanswered questions concerning the validity of models and their ability to meet the practical needs of design organizations.

  1. Attenuation of numerical artefacts in the modelling of fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Fabien; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Denner, Fabian

    2015-11-01

    Numerical artefacts in the modelling of fluid interfaces, such as parasitic currents or spurious capillary waves, present a considerable problem in two-phase flow modelling. Parasitic currents result from an imperfect evaluation of the interface curvature and can severely affect the flow, whereas spatially underresolved (spurious) capillary waves impose strict limits on the time-step and, hence, dictate the required computational resources for surface-tension-dominated flows. By applying an additional shear stress term at the fluid interface, thereby dissipating the surface energy associated with small wavelengths, we have been able to considerably reduce the adverse impact of parasitic currents and mitigate the time-step limit imposed by capillary waves. However, a careful choice of the applied interface viscosity is crucial, since an excess of additional dissipation compromises the accuracy of the solution. We present the derivation of the additional interfacial shear stress term, explain the underlying physical mechanism and discuss the impact on parasitic currents and interface instabilities based on a variety of numerical experiments. We acknowledge financial support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) through Grant No. EP/M021556/1 and from PETROBRAS.

  2. ModelMate - A graphical user interface for model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    ModelMate is a graphical user interface designed to facilitate use of model-analysis programs with models. This initial version of ModelMate supports one model-analysis program, UCODE_2005, and one model software program, MODFLOW-2005. ModelMate can be used to prepare input files for UCODE_2005, run UCODE_2005, and display analysis results. A link to the GW_Chart graphing program facilitates visual interpretation of results. ModelMate includes capabilities for organizing directories used with the parallel-processing capabilities of UCODE_2005 and for maintaining files in those directories to be identical to a set of files in a master directory. ModelMate can be used on its own or in conjunction with ModelMuse, a graphical user interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST.

  3. Multimodal human-machine interface based on a brain-computer interface and an electrooculography interface.

    PubMed

    Iáñez, Eduardo; Ùbeda, Andrés; Azorín, José M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a multimodal interface that combines a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) with an electrooculography (EOG) interface. The non-invasive spontaneous BCI registers the electrical brain activity through surface electrodes. The EOG interface detects the eye movements through electrodes placed on the face around the eyes. Both kind of signals are registered together and processed to obtain the mental task that the user is thinking and the eye movement performed by the user. Both commands (mental task and eye movement) are combined in order to move a dot in a graphic user interface (GUI). Several experimental tests have been made where the users perform a trajectory to get closer to some targets. To perform the trajectory the user moves the dot in a plane with the EOG interface and using the BCI the dot changes its height.

  4. Constructing a starting 3D shear velocity model with sharp interfaces for SEM-based upper mantle tomography in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Larmat, C. S.; Maceira, M.

    2013-12-01

    this work we propose instead to directly tackle the non-linearity of the inverse problem by using stochastic methods to construct a 3D starting model with a good estimate of the depths of the main layering interfaces. We present preliminary results of the construction of such a starting 3D model based on: (1) Regionalizing the study area to define provinces within which lateral variations are smooth; (2) Applying trans-dimensional stochastic inversion (Bodin et al., 2012) to obtain accurate 1D models in each province as well as the corresponding error distribution, constrained by receiver function and surface wave dispersion data as well as the previously constructed 3D model (name), and (3) connecting these models laterally using data-driven smoothing operators to obtain a starting 3D model with errors. References Bodin, T.,et al. 2012, Transdimensional inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B02301, doi:10.1029/2011JB008560. Yuan and Romanowicz, 2013, in revison. Yuan, H., et al. 2011, 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International, 184: 1237-1260. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2010.04901.x Yuan, H. & Romanowicz, B., 2010. Lithospheric layering in the North American Craton, Nature, 466, 1063-1068.

  5. Atomic Models of Strong Solids Interfaces Viewed as Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staffell, I.; Shang, J. L.; Kendall, K.

    2014-02-01

    This paper looks back through the 1960s to the invention of carbon fibres and the theories of Strong Solids. In particular it focuses on the fracture mechanics paradox of strong composites containing weak interfaces. From Griffith theory, it is clear that three parameters must be considered in producing a high strength composite:- minimising defects; maximising the elastic modulus; and raising the fracture energy along the crack path. The interface then introduces two further factors:- elastic modulus mismatch causing crack stopping; and debonding along a brittle interface due to low interface fracture energy. Consequently, an understanding of the fracture energy of a composite interface is needed. Using an interface model based on atomic interaction forces, it is shown that a single layer of contaminant atoms between the matrix and the reinforcement can reduce the interface fracture energy by an order of magnitude, giving a large delamination effect. The paper also looks to a future in which cars will be made largely from composite materials. Radical improvements in automobile design are necessary because the number of cars worldwide is predicted to double. This paper predicts gains in fuel economy by suggesting a new theory of automobile fuel consumption using an adaptation of Coulomb's friction law. It is demonstrated both by experiment and by theoretical argument that the energy dissipated in standard vehicle tests depends only on weight. Consequently, moving from metal to fibre construction can give a factor 2 improved fuel economy performance, roughly the same as moving from a petrol combustion drive to hydrogen fuel cell propulsion. Using both options together can give a factor 4 improvement, as demonstrated by testing a composite car using the ECE15 protocol.

  6. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model - Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts which reflect every detail of the finished product. Ideally, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) they must provide numerical control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) they must enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in space missions. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. The research performed during the fellowship period investigated the transition process from the solid CAD model to the FEA stress analysis model with the final goal of creating an automatic interface between the two. During the period of the fellowship a detailed multi-year program for the development of such an interface was created. The ultimate goal of this program will be the development of a fully parameterized automatic ProE/FEA translator for parts and assemblies, with the incorporation of data base management into the solution, and ultimately including computational fluid dynamics and thermal modeling in the interface.

  7. Multiscale modeling of droplet interface bilayer membrane networks

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Eric C.; Farimani, Amir B.; Aluru, Narayana R.; Philen, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are considered for the development of stimuli-responsive membrane-based materials inspired by cellular mechanics. These DIB networks are often modeled as combinations of electrical circuit analogues, creating complex networks of capacitors and resistors that mimic the biomolecular structures. These empirical models are capable of replicating data from electrophysiology experiments, but these models do not accurately capture the underlying physical phenomena and consequently do not allow for simulations of material functionalities beyond the voltage-clamp or current-clamp conditions. The work presented here provides a more robust description of DIB network behavior through the development of a hierarchical multiscale model, recognizing that the macroscopic network properties are functions of their underlying molecular structure. The result of this research is a modeling methodology based on controlled exchanges across the interfaces of neighboring droplets. This methodology is validated against experimental data, and an extension case is provided to demonstrate possible future applications of droplet interface bilayer networks. PMID:26594262

  8. The electric double layer at a rutile TiO₂ water interface modelled using density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J; Sprik, M

    2014-06-18

    A fully atomistic model of a compact electric double layer at the rutile TiO2(1 1 0)-water interface is constructed by adding protons to bridging oxygens or removing them from H2O molecules adsorbed on terminal metal cation sites. The surface charge is compensated by F(-) or Na(+) counter ions in outer as well as inner sphere coordination. For each of the protonation states the energy of the TiO2 conduction band minimum is determined relative to the standard hydrogen electrode by computing the free energy for the combined insertion of an electron in the solid and a proton in solution away from the double layer using density functional theory based molecular dynamics methods. Interpreted as electrode potentials, this gives an estimate of the capacitance which is compared to the capacitance obtained from the difference in the average electrostatic potentials in the solid and aqueous phase. When aligned at the point of zero charge these two methods lead to almost identical potential-charge profiles. We find that inner sphere complexes have a slightly larger capacitance (0.4 F m(-2)) compared to outer sphere complexes (0.3 F m(-2)).

  9. Are Pretty Interfaces Worth the Time? The Effects of User Interface Types on Web-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheon, Jongpil; Grant, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of three different interface types on Web-based instruction: a text-based interface, a graphical interface and a metaphorical interface. In order to determine differences among three interface groups, we compared learning performance, cognitive load, usability, and appeal with various data…

  10. Wave-based liquid-interface metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, N.; Xia, H.; Punzmann, H.; Fontana, P. W.; Shats, M.

    2017-02-01

    The control of matter motion at liquid-gas interfaces opens an opportunity to create two-dimensional materials with remotely tunable properties. In analogy with optical lattices used in ultra-cold atom physics, such materials can be created by a wave field capable of dynamically guiding matter into periodic spatial structures. Here we show experimentally that such structures can be realized at the macroscopic scale on a liquid surface by using rotating waves. The wave angular momentum is transferred to floating micro-particles, guiding them along closed trajectories. These orbits form stable spatially periodic patterns, the unit cells of a two-dimensional wave-based material. Such dynamic patterns, a mirror image of the concept of metamaterials, are scalable and biocompatible. They can be used in assembly applications, conversion of wave energy into mean two-dimensional flows and for organising motion of active swimmers.

  11. Wave-based liquid-interface metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Fontana, P W; Shats, M

    2017-01-01

    The control of matter motion at liquid–gas interfaces opens an opportunity to create two-dimensional materials with remotely tunable properties. In analogy with optical lattices used in ultra-cold atom physics, such materials can be created by a wave field capable of dynamically guiding matter into periodic spatial structures. Here we show experimentally that such structures can be realized at the macroscopic scale on a liquid surface by using rotating waves. The wave angular momentum is transferred to floating micro-particles, guiding them along closed trajectories. These orbits form stable spatially periodic patterns, the unit cells of a two-dimensional wave-based material. Such dynamic patterns, a mirror image of the concept of metamaterials, are scalable and biocompatible. They can be used in assembly applications, conversion of wave energy into mean two-dimensional flows and for organising motion of active swimmers. PMID:28181490

  12. UIVerify: A Web-Based Tool for Verification and Automatic Generation of User Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiffman, Smadar; Degani, Asaf; Heymann, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this poster, we describe a web-based tool for verification and automatic generation of user interfaces. The verification component of the tool accepts as input a model of a machine and a model of its interface, and checks that the interface is adequate (correct). The generation component of the tool accepts a model of a given machine and the user's task, and then generates a correct and succinct interface. This write-up will demonstrate the usefulness of the tool by verifying the correctness of a user interface to a flight-control system. The poster will include two more examples of using the tool: verification of the interface to an espresso machine, and automatic generation of a succinct interface to a large hypothetical machine.

  13. Workload-Based Automated Interface Mode Selection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    Exposing more control and information gives the operator the ability to understand the state of the system better and take more complex actions, but at the...and require fast response, and may be a better target for these types of interface features. Many computer games already use adaptive interfaces to...introduces an agent into the system interface to assume responsibility for man- aging automation mode selection. The agent uses a novel dynamic scheme for

  14. Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Barry H. Rabin

    2014-07-01

    12. Other advances in QNDE and related topics: Preferred Session Laser-ultrasonics Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces 41st Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation Conference QNDE Conference July 20-25, 2014 Boise Centre 850 West Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702 James A. Smith, Jeffrey M. Lacy, Barry H. Rabin, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID ABSTRACT: The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is assigned with reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU. The new LEU fuel is based on a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to complete the fuel qualification process, the laser shock technique is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being investigated to characterize interface strength in fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on specimen’s surface is intractably complex. The shock wave energy is inferred from the velocity on the backside and the depth of the impression left on the surface from the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses and strengths at the interface, a finite element model is being developed and validated by comparing numerical and experimental results for back face velocities and front face depressions with experimental results. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop a finite element model for laser

  15. Quantitative model studies for interfaces in organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottfried, J. Michael

    2016-11-01

    In organic light-emitting diodes and similar devices, organic semiconductors are typically contacted by metal electrodes. Because the resulting metal/organic interfaces have a large impact on the performance of these devices, their quantitative understanding is indispensable for the further rational development of organic electronics. A study by Kröger et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 113022) of an important single-crystal based model interface provides detailed insight into its geometric and electronic structure and delivers valuable benchmark data for computational studies. In view of the differences between typical surface-science model systems and real devices, a ‘materials gap’ is identified that needs to be addressed by future research to make the knowledge obtained from fundamental studies even more beneficial for real-world applications.

  16. Language Model Applications to Spelling with Brain-Computer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Cortes, Anderson; Manyakov, Nikolay V.; Chumerin, Nikolay; Van Hulle, Marc M.

    2014-01-01

    Within the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) community, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have raised great hopes as they provide alternative communication means for persons with disabilities bypassing the need for speech and other motor activities. Although significant advancements have been realized in the last decade, applications of language models (e.g., word prediction, completion) have only recently started to appear in BCI systems. The main goal of this article is to review the language model applications that supplement non-invasive BCI-based communication systems by discussing their potential and limitations, and to discern future trends. First, a brief overview of the most prominent BCI spelling systems is given, followed by an in-depth discussion of the language models applied to them. These language models are classified according to their functionality in the context of BCI-based spelling: the static/dynamic nature of the user interface, the use of error correction and predictive spelling, and the potential to improve their classification performance by using language models. To conclude, the review offers an overview of the advantages and challenges when implementing language models in BCI-based communication systems when implemented in conjunction with other AAL technologies. PMID:24675760

  17. Polymer based interfaces as bioinspired 'smart skins'.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Danilo; Carpi, Federico; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2005-11-30

    This work reports on already achieved results and ongoing research on the development of complex interfaces between humans and external environment, based on organic synthetic materials and used as smart 'artificial skins'. They are conceived as wearable and flexible systems with multifunctional characteristics. Their features are designed to mimic or augment a broad-spectrum of properties shown by biological skins of humans and/or animals. The discussion is here limited to those properties whose mimicry/augmentation is achievable with currently available technologies based on polymers and oligomers. Such properties include tactile sensing, thermal sensing/regulation, environmental energy harvesting, chromatic mimetism, ultra-violet protection, adhesion and surface mediation of mobility. Accordingly, bioinspired devices and structures, proposed as suitable functional analogous of natural architectures, are analysed. They consist of organic piezoelectric sensors, thermoelectric and pyroelectric sensors and generators, photoelectric generators, thermal and ultra-violet protection systems, electro-, photo- and thermo-chromic devices, as well as structures for improved adhesion and reduced fluid-dynamic friction.

  18. Bacterial Adhesion to Hexadecane (Model NAPL)-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, S.; Zoueki, C. R.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    The rates of biodegradation of NAPLs have been shown to be influenced by the adhesion of hydrocarbon- degrading microorganisms as well as their proximity to the NAPL-water interface. Several studies provide evidence for bacterial adhesion or biofilm formation at alkane- or crude oil-water interfaces, but there is a significant knowledge gap in our understanding of the processes that influence initial adhesion of bacteria on to NAPL-water interfaces. In this study bacterial adhesion to hexadecane, and a series of NAPLs comprised of hexadecane amended with toluene, and/or with asphaltenes and resins, which are the surface active fractions of crude oils, were examined using a Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The microorganisms employed were Mycobacterium kubicae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida, which are hydrocarbon degraders or soil microorganisms. MATH assays as well as electrophoretic mobility measurements of the bacterial cells and the NAPL droplet surfaces in aqueous solutions were conducted at three solution pHs (4, 6 and 7). Asphaltenes and resins were shown to generally decrease microbial adhesion. Results of the MATH assay were not in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of bacteria- hydrocarbon interactions based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) model of free energy of interaction between the cell and NAPL droplets. In this model the free energy of interaction between two colloidal particles is predicted based on electrical double layer, van der Waals and hydrophobic forces. It is likely that the steric repulsion between bacteria and NAPL surfaces, caused by biopolymers on bacterial surfaces and aphaltenes and resins at the NAPL-water interface contributed to the decreased adhesion compared to that predicted by the XDLVO model.

  19. ShowFlow: A practical interface for groundwater modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tauxe, J.D.

    1990-12-01

    ShowFlow was created to provide a user-friendly, intuitive environment for researchers and students who use computer modeling software. What traditionally has been a workplace available only to those familiar with command-line based computer systems is now within reach of almost anyone interested in the subject of modeling. In the case of this edition of ShowFlow, the user can easily experiment with simulations using the steady state gaussian plume groundwater pollutant transport model SSGPLUME, though ShowFlow can be rewritten to provide a similar interface for any computer model. Included in this thesis is all the source code for both the ShowFlow application for Microsoft{reg sign} Windows{trademark} and the SSGPLUME model, a User's Guide, and a Developer's Guide for converting ShowFlow to run other model programs. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  20. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  1. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the excess nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation.

  2. A Rigorous Sharp Interface Limit of a Diffuse Interface Model Related to Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Elisabetta; Scala, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the rigorous sharp interface limit of a diffuse interface model related to the dynamics of tumor growth, when a parameter ɛ, representing the interface thickness between the tumorous and non-tumorous cells, tends to zero. More in particular, we analyze here a gradient-flow-type model arising from a modification of the recently introduced model for tumor growth dynamics in Hawkins-Daruud et al. (Int J Numer Math Biomed Eng 28:3-24, 2011) (cf. also Hilhorst et al. Math Models Methods Appl Sci 25:1011-1043, 2015). Exploiting the techniques related to both gradient flows and gamma convergence, we recover a condition on the interface Γ relating the chemical and double-well potentials, the mean curvature, and the normal velocity.

  3. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    PubMed

    El-Helw, Hadi M; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system.

  4. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System

    PubMed Central

    El-Helw, Hadi M.; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  5. Behavior of asphaltene model compounds at w/o interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Erland L; Sørland, Geir; Sjöblom, Johan

    2010-02-16

    Asphaltenes, present in significant amounts in heavy crude oil, contains subfractions capable of stabilizing water-in-oil emulsions. Still, the composition of these subfractions is not known in detail, and the actual mechanism behind emulsion stability is dependent on perceived interfacial concentrations and compositions. This study aims at utilizing polyaromatic surfactants which contains an acidic moiety as model compounds for the surface-active subfraction of asphaltenes. A modified pulse-field gradient (PFG) NMR method has been used to study droplet sizes and stability of emulsions prepared with asphaltene model compounds. The method has been compared to the standard microscopy droplet counting method. Arithmetic and volumetric mean droplet sizes as a function of surfactant concentration and water content clearly showed that the interfacial area was dependent on the available surfactant at the emulsion interface. Adsorption of the model compounds onto hydrophilic silica has been investigated by UV depletion, and minor differences in the chemical structure of the model compounds caused significant differences in the affinity toward this highly polar surface. The cross-sectional areas obtained have been compared to areas from the surface-to-volume ratio found by NMR and gave similar results for one of the two model compounds. The mean molecular area for this compound suggested a tilted geometry of the aromatic core with respect to the interface, which has also been proposed for real asphaltenic samples. The film behavior was further investigated using a liquid-liquid Langmuir trough supporting the ability to form stable interfacial films. This study supports that acidic, or strong hydrogen-bonding fractions, can promote stable water-in-oil emulsion. The use of model compounds opens up for studying emulsion behavior and demulsifier efficiency based on true interfacial concentrations rather than perceived interfaces.

  6. A conservative interface-interaction model with insoluble surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schranner, Felix S.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we extend the conservative interface-interaction method of Hu et al. (2006) [34], adapted for weakly-compressible flows by Luo et al. (2015) [37], to include the effects of viscous, capillary, and Marangoni stresses consistently as momentum-exchange terms at the sharp interface. The interface-interaction method is coupled with insoluble surfactant transport which employs the underlying sharp-interface representation. Unlike previous methods, we thus achieve discrete global conservation in terms of interface interactions and a consistently sharp interface representation. The interface is reconstructed locally, and a sub-cell correction of the interface curvature improves the evaluation of capillary stresses and surfactant diffusion in particular for marginal mesh resolutions. For a range of numerical test cases we demonstrate accuracy and robustness of the method. In particular, we show that the method is at least as accurate as previous diffuse-interface models while exhibiting throughout the considered test cases improved computational efficiency. We believe that the method is attractive for high-resolution level-set interface-tracking simulations as it straightforwardly incorporates the effects of variable surface tension into the underlying conservative interface-interaction approach.

  7. Metal oxide-graphene field-effect transistor: interface trap density extraction model

    PubMed Central

    Najam, Faraz; Lau, Kah Cheong; Lim, Cheng Siong; Yu, Yun Seop

    2016-01-01

    Summary A simple to implement model is presented to extract interface trap density of graphene field effect transistors. The presence of interface trap states detrimentally affects the device drain current–gate voltage relationship I ds–V gs. At the moment, there is no analytical method available to extract the interface trap distribution of metal-oxide-graphene field effect transistor (MOGFET) devices. The model presented here extracts the interface trap distribution of MOGFET devices making use of available experimental capacitance–gate voltage C tot–V gs data and a basic set of equations used to define the device physics of MOGFET devices. The model was used to extract the interface trap distribution of 2 experimental devices. Device parameters calculated using the extracted interface trap distribution from the model, including surface potential, interface trap charge and interface trap capacitance compared very well with their respective experimental counterparts. The model enables accurate calculation of the surface potential affected by trap charge. Other models ignore the effect of trap charge and only calculate the ideal surface potential. Such ideal surface potential when used in a surface potential based drain current model will result in an inaccurate prediction of the drain current. Accurate calculation of surface potential that can later be used in drain current model is highlighted as a major advantage of the model. PMID:27826511

  8. Metal oxide-graphene field-effect transistor: interface trap density extraction model.

    PubMed

    Najam, Faraz; Lau, Kah Cheong; Lim, Cheng Siong; Yu, Yun Seop; Tan, Michael Loong Peng

    2016-01-01

    A simple to implement model is presented to extract interface trap density of graphene field effect transistors. The presence of interface trap states detrimentally affects the device drain current-gate voltage relationship Ids-Vgs. At the moment, there is no analytical method available to extract the interface trap distribution of metal-oxide-graphene field effect transistor (MOGFET) devices. The model presented here extracts the interface trap distribution of MOGFET devices making use of available experimental capacitance-gate voltage Ctot-Vgs data and a basic set of equations used to define the device physics of MOGFET devices. The model was used to extract the interface trap distribution of 2 experimental devices. Device parameters calculated using the extracted interface trap distribution from the model, including surface potential, interface trap charge and interface trap capacitance compared very well with their respective experimental counterparts. The model enables accurate calculation of the surface potential affected by trap charge. Other models ignore the effect of trap charge and only calculate the ideal surface potential. Such ideal surface potential when used in a surface potential based drain current model will result in an inaccurate prediction of the drain current. Accurate calculation of surface potential that can later be used in drain current model is highlighted as a major advantage of the model.

  9. Multibody dynamics model building using graphical interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macala, Glenn A.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the extremely laborious task of manually deriving equations of motion for the simulation of multibody spacecraft dynamics has largely been eliminated. Instead, the dynamicist now works with commonly available general purpose dynamics simulation programs which generate the equations of motion either explicitly or implicitly via computer codes. The user interface to these programs has predominantly been via input data files, each with its own required format and peculiarities, causing errors and frustrations during program setup. Recent progress in a more natural method of data input for dynamics programs: the graphical interface, is described.

  10. User's Manual for the Object User Interface (OUI): An Environmental Resource Modeling Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    The Object User Interface is a computer application that provides a framework for coupling environmental-resource models and for managing associated temporal and spatial data. The Object User Interface is designed to be easily extensible to incorporate models and data interfaces defined by the user. Additionally, the Object User Interface is highly configurable through the use of a user-modifiable, text-based control file that is written in the eXtensible Markup Language. The Object User Interface user's manual provides (1) installation instructions, (2) an overview of the graphical user interface, (3) a description of the software tools, (4) a project example, and (5) specifications for user configuration and extension.

  11. ORIGAMI -- The Oak Ridge Geometry Analysis and Modeling Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    A revised ``ray-tracing`` package which is a superset of the geometry specifications of the radiation transport codes MORSE, MASH (GIFT Versions 4 and 5), HETC, and TORT has been developed by ORNL. Two additional CAD-based formats are also included as part of the superset: the native format of the BRL-CAD system--MGED, and the solid constructive geometry subset of the IGES specification. As part of this upgrade effort, ORNL has designed an Xwindows-based utility (ORIGAMI) to facilitate the construction, manipulation, and display of the geometric models required by the MASH code. Since the primary design criterion for this effort was that the utility ``see`` the geometric model exactly as the radiation transport code does, ORIGAMI is designed to utilize the same ``ray-tracing`` package as the revised version of MASH. ORIGAMI incorporates the functionality of two previously developed graphical utilities, CGVIEW and ORGBUG, into a single consistent interface.

  12. Microcomputer-Based User Interface for Library Online Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A microcomputer-based user interface was developed and programmed for the library computer systems at the University of Illinois. Designed to provide user-friendly access to the two components of the online catalog on the library's IBM 3081 mainframe computer, the interface program resides on the IBM PC and queries the user in natural written…

  13. Modeling organohalide perovskites for photovoltaic applications: From materials to interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, Filippo

    2015-03-01

    The field of hybrid/organic photovoltaics has been revolutionized in 2012 by the first reports of solid-state solar cells based on organohalide perovskites, now topping at 20% efficiency. First-principles modeling has been widely applied to the dye-sensitized solar cells field, and more recently to perovskite-based solar cells. The computational design and screening of new materials has played a major role in advancing the DSCs field. Suitable modeling strategies may also offer a view of the crucial heterointerfaces ruling the device operational mechanism. I will illustrate how simulation tools can be employed in the emerging field of perovskite solar cells. The performance of the proposed simulation toolbox along with the fundamental modeling strategies are presented using selected examples of relevant materials and interfaces. The main issue with hybrid perovskite modeling is to be able to accurately describe their structural, electronic and optical features. These materials show a degree of short range disorder, due to the presence of mobile organic cations embedded within the inorganic matrix, requiring to average their properties over a molecular dynamics trajectory. Due to the presence of heavy atoms (e.g. Sn and Pb) their electronic structure must take into account spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in an effective way, possibly including GW corrections. The proposed SOC-GW method constitutes the basis for tuning the materials electronic and optical properties, rationalizing experimental trends. Modeling charge generation in perovskite-sensitized TiO2 interfaces is then approached based on a SOC-DFT scheme, describing alignment of energy levels in a qualitatively correct fashion. The role of interfacial chemistry on the device performance is finally discussed. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme [FP7/2007 2013] under Grant Agreement No. 604032 of the MESO project.

  14. Developing Concept-Based User Interfaces for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Stephan, Eric G.; Gracio, Deborah K.; Kuchar, Olga A.; Whitney, Paul D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.

    2006-09-01

    From our interactions with researchers from different scientific fields and disciplines, we have observed that scientists often describe and convey concepts, theories, processes, and results using basic graphs and diagrams. Semantic graphs such as these provide a universal language that all scientists may apply to document their scientific knowledge and to communicate this knowledge to others. Furthermore, studies have shown that the cognitive processing of complex subject matter is improved when the structure of ideas and concepts are made explicit [39] and that semantic graphs may serve as effective “scaffolds” for cognitive processing [29]. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we are deploying semantic graphs within scientific computing systems as central user representations of scientific knowledge. These systems provide concept-based user interfaces that allow scientists to visually define and capture conceptual models of their scientific problems, hypotheses, theories, and processes. Once defined, the visual models then become interaction framework for accessing and applying scientific and computational resources and capabilities. In this paper, through the examination of three visual research systems, we illustrate different ways concept-based user interfaces and semantic graph knowledge representations may make scientific knowledge concrete, usable, shareable, and computable in scientific computing systems.

  15. An IBM PC Based ARINC Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    permission. Copyright is the responsibility of the Director Publishing and Marketing, AGPS. Enquiries should be directed to the Manager, AGPS Press ...types; internal or external. An internal event is generated when the user presses the "p" key at the runtime stage. A message is sent to the interface...the user presses the carriage return key to move on. At this point the user is prompted to specify if all occurences of the selected labels are to be

  16. Knowledge-based control of an adaptive interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    The analysis, development strategy, and preliminary design for an intelligent, adaptive interface is reported. The design philosophy couples knowledge-based system technology with standard human factors approaches to interface development for computer workstations. An expert system has been designed to drive the interface for application software. The intelligent interface will be linked to application packages, one at a time, that are planned for multiple-application workstations aboard Space Station Freedom. Current requirements call for most Space Station activities to be conducted at the workstation consoles. One set of activities will consist of standard data management services (DMS). DMS software includes text processing, spreadsheets, data base management, etc. Text processing was selected for the first intelligent interface prototype because text-processing software can be developed initially as fully functional but limited with a small set of commands. The program's complexity then can be increased incrementally. The intelligent interface includes the operator's behavior and three types of instructions to the underlying application software are included in the rule base. A conventional expert-system inference engine searches the data base for antecedents to rules and sends the consequents of fired rules as commands to the underlying software. Plans for putting the expert system on top of a second application, a database management system, will be carried out following behavioral research on the first application. The intelligent interface design is suitable for use with ground-based workstations now common in government, industrial, and educational organizations.

  17. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 4; Overview and Introduction of Matlab Based Toolkits used to Interface with Optical Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part four of a series on the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The third investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The work here introduces some of the math software tools used to perform the work of the previous three papers of this series. NASA has recently approved these in-house tools for public release as open source, so this presentation also serves as a quick tutorial on their use. The tools are collections of functions written in Matlab, which interface with optical design software (CodeV, OSLO, and Zemax) using either COM or DDE communication protocol. The functions are discussed, and examples are given.

  18. A brain computer interface-based explorer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lijuan; Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing

    2015-04-15

    In recent years, various applications of brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been studied. In this paper, we present a hybrid BCI combining P300 and motor imagery to operate an explorer. Our system is mainly composed of a BCI mouse, a BCI speller and an explorer. Through this system, the user can access his computer and manipulate (open, close, copy, paste, and delete) files such as documents, pictures, music, movies and so on. The system has been tested with five subjects, and the experimental results show that the explorer can be successfully operated according to subjects' intentions.

  19. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts.

  20. Interface Superconductivity in Graphite- and CuCl-Based Heterostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-22

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0062 Interface superconductivity in graphite- and CuCl-based heterostructures Yakov Kopelevich UNIVERSIDADE EEADUAL DE CAMPINAS...TITLE AND SUBTITLE "INTERFACE SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN GRAPHITE AND CuCl-BASED HETEROSTRUCTURES" 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0056 5c...long-standing problem of possible high- temperature superconductivity in CuCl. The obtained experimental evidence indicates that the low resistance

  1. A Robust Camera-Based Interface for Mobile Entertainment

    PubMed Central

    Roig-Maimó, Maria Francesca; Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Varona, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Camera-based interfaces in mobile devices are starting to be used in games and apps, but few works have evaluated them in terms of usability or user perception. Due to the changing nature of mobile contexts, this evaluation requires extensive studies to consider the full spectrum of potential users and contexts. However, previous works usually evaluate these interfaces in controlled environments such as laboratory conditions, therefore, the findings cannot be generalized to real users and real contexts. In this work, we present a robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment. The interface detects and tracks the user’s head by processing the frames provided by the mobile device’s front camera, and its position is then used to interact with the mobile apps. First, we evaluate the interface as a pointing device to study its accuracy, and different factors to configure such as the gain or the device’s orientation, as well as the optimal target size for the interface. Second, we present an in the wild study to evaluate the usage and the user’s perception when playing a game controlled by head motion. Finally, the game is published in an application store to make it available to a large number of potential users and contexts and we register usage data. Results show the feasibility of using this robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment in different contexts and by different people. PMID:26907288

  2. A Robust Camera-Based Interface for Mobile Entertainment.

    PubMed

    Roig-Maimó, Maria Francesca; Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Varona, Javier

    2016-02-19

    Camera-based interfaces in mobile devices are starting to be used in games and apps, but few works have evaluated them in terms of usability or user perception. Due to the changing nature of mobile contexts, this evaluation requires extensive studies to consider the full spectrum of potential users and contexts. However, previous works usually evaluate these interfaces in controlled environments such as laboratory conditions, therefore, the findings cannot be generalized to real users and real contexts. In this work, we present a robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment. The interface detects and tracks the user's head by processing the frames provided by the mobile device's front camera, and its position is then used to interact with the mobile apps. First, we evaluate the interface as a pointing device to study its accuracy, and different factors to configure such as the gain or the device's orientation, as well as the optimal target size for the interface. Second, we present an in the wild study to evaluate the usage and the user's perception when playing a game controlled by head motion. Finally, the game is published in an application store to make it available to a large number of potential users and contexts and we register usage data. Results show the feasibility of using this robust camera-based interface for mobile entertainment in different contexts and by different people.

  3. Electroviscoelasticity of liquid/liquid interfaces: fractional-order model.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Aleksandar M; Lazarevic, Mihailo P

    2005-02-01

    A number of theories that describe the behavior of liquid-liquid interfaces have been developed and applied to various dispersed systems, e.g., Stokes, Reiner-Rivelin, Ericksen, Einstein, Smoluchowski, and Kinch. A new theory of electroviscoelasticity describes the behavior of electrified liquid-liquid interfaces in fine dispersed systems and is based on a new constitutive model of liquids. According to this model liquid-liquid droplet or droplet-film structure (collective of particles) is considered as a macroscopic system with internal structure determined by the way the molecules (ions) are tuned (structured) into the primary components of a cluster configuration. How the tuning/structuring occurs depends on the physical fields involved, both potential (elastic forces) and nonpotential (resistance forces). All these microelements of the primary structure can be considered as electromechanical oscillators assembled into groups, so that excitation by an external physical field may cause oscillations at the resonant/characteristic frequency of the system itself (coupling at the characteristic frequency). Up to now, three possible mathematical formalisms have been discussed related to the theory of electroviscoelasticity. The first is the tension tensor model, where the normal and tangential forces are considered, only in mathematical formalism, regardless of their origin (mechanical and/or electrical). The second is the Van der Pol derivative model, presented by linear and nonlinear differential equations. Finally, the third model presents an effort to generalize the previous Van der Pol equation: the ordinary time derivative and integral are now replaced with the corresponding fractional-order time derivative and integral of order p<1.

  4. Hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: modeling versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Gerya, T.; May, D.

    2015-12-01

    A lot of evidence indicates that fluid flows exist in the subduction interface, including seismic observation, magnetotelluric imaging, heat flow modeling, etc. Fluid percolation should strongly modify rock deformation affected by fluid-induced weakening within the subduction interface. Hence, we study the fluid-rock interaction along the subduction interface using a visco-plastic hydro-mechanical model, in which rock deformation and fluid percolation are self-consistently coupled. Based on a series of 2D numerical experiments, we found two typical hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: (1) coupled and (2) decoupled. In the case of the coupled regime, the tectonic movement of the subduction interface is divided into blocks; newly generated faults are distributed uniformly , say fault band; fluid activity concentrates inside the faults. In the case of the decoupled regime, the upper layer of the subduction interface stops moving while the lower layer continues moving along with the subduction slab; a primary fault is generated at the centre of the subduction interface, or namely decoupled interface. Available observations suggests that both coupled and decoupled regimes can be observed in the nature at different scales. Systematic parameter study suggests that it is mainly the magnitude of the yield strength of subducted rocks depending on their cohesion and friction coefficient, which control the transition between the coupled and decoupled subduction interface regimes.

  5. Simulation of evaporation of a sessile drop using a diffuse interface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefiane, Khellil; Ding, Hang; Sahu, Kirti; Matar, Omar

    2008-11-01

    We consider here the evaporation dynamics of a Newtonian liquid sessile drop using an improved diffuse interface model. The governing equations for the drop and surrounding vapour are both solved, and separated by the order parameter (i.e. volume fraction), based on the previous work of Ding et al. JCP 2007. The diffuse interface model has been shown to be successful in modelling the moving contact line problems (Jacqmin 2000; Ding and Spelt 2007, 2008). Here, a pinned contact line of the drop is assumed. The evaporative mass flux at the liquid-vapour interface is a function of local temperature constitutively and treated as a source term in the interface evolution equation, i.e. Cahn-Hilliard equation. The model is validated by comparing its predictions with data available in the literature. The evaporative dynamics are illustrated in terms of drop snapshots, and a quantitative comparison with the results using a free surface model are made.

  6. Computer-Based Tools for Evaluating Graphical User Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1997-01-01

    The user interface is the component of a software system that connects two very complex system: humans and computers. Each of these two systems impose certain requirements on the final product. The user is the judge of the usability and utility of the system; the computer software and hardware are the tools with which the interface is constructed. Mistakes are sometimes made in designing and developing user interfaces because the designers and developers have limited knowledge about human performance (e.g., problem solving, decision making, planning, and reasoning). Even those trained in user interface design make mistakes because they are unable to address all of the known requirements and constraints on design. Evaluation of the user inter-face is therefore a critical phase of the user interface development process. Evaluation should not be considered the final phase of design; but it should be part of an iterative design cycle with the output of evaluation being feed back into design. The goal of this research was to develop a set of computer-based tools for objectively evaluating graphical user interfaces. The research was organized into three phases. The first phase resulted in the development of an embedded evaluation tool which evaluates the usability of a graphical user interface based on a user's performance. An expert system to assist in the design and evaluation of user interfaces based upon rules and guidelines was developed during the second phase. During the final phase of the research an automatic layout tool to be used in the initial design of graphical inter- faces was developed. The research was coordinated with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Mission Operations Laboratory's efforts in developing onboard payload display specifications for the Space Station.

  7. The Interface Between Theory and Data in Structural Equation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, James B.; Bollen, Kenneth A.

    2006-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) holds the promise of providing natural scientists the capacity to evaluate complex multivariate hypotheses about ecological systems. Building on its predecessors, path analysis and factor analysis, SEM allows for the incorporation of both observed and unobserved (latent) variables into theoretically based probabilistic models. In this paper we discuss the interface between theory and data in SEM and the use of an additional variable type, the composite, for representing general concepts. In simple terms, composite variables specify the influences of collections of other variables and can be helpful in modeling general relationships of the sort commonly of interest to ecologists. While long recognized as a potentially important element of SEM, composite variables have received very limited use, in part because of a lack of theoretical consideration, but also because of difficulties that arise in parameter estimation when using conventional solution procedures. In this paper we present a framework for discussing composites and demonstrate how the use of partially reduced form models can help to overcome some of the parameter estimation and evaluation problems associated with models containing composites. Diagnostic procedures for evaluating the most appropriate and effective use of composites are illustrated with an example from the ecological literature. It is argued that an ability to incorporate composite variables into structural equation models may be particularly valuable in the study of natural systems, where concepts are frequently multifaceted and the influences of suites of variables are often of interest.

  8. Geometrical model for the energy of semicoherent interphase interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ecob, Roger C.; Ralph, Brian

    1980-01-01

    The basis for the considerations given in this paper is the O-lattice description of crystalline interfaces of Bollmann. In the development of his approach presented here, all possible interfacial planes between two crystal phases having a defined orientation relationship are considered. The energies of these interfaces are then computed in terms of the energies of the primary intrinsic dislocations. A number of modeling interactions are incorporated into this approach, and a better agreement with experimental data is thus obtained. PMID:16592796

  9. Learning Machine, Vietnamese Based Human-Computer Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The sixth session of IT@EDU98 consisted of seven papers on the topic of the learning machine--Vietnamese based human-computer interface, and was chaired by Phan Viet Hoang (Informatics College, Singapore). "Knowledge Based Approach for English Vietnamese Machine Translation" (Hoang Kiem, Dinh Dien) presents the knowledge base approach,…

  10. SN_GUI: a graphical user interface for snowpack modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreitzhofer, G.; Fierz, C.; Lehning, M.

    2004-10-01

    SNOWPACK is a physical snow cover model. The model not only serves as a valuable research tool, but also runs operationally on a network of high Alpine automatic weather and snow measurement sites. In order to facilitate the operation of SNOWPACK and the interpretation of the results obtained by this model, a user-friendly graphical user interface for snowpack modeling, named SN_GUI, was created. This Java-based and thus platform-independent tool can be operated in two modes, one designed to fulfill the requirements of avalanche warning services (e.g. by providing information about critical layers within the snowpack that are closely related to the avalanche activity), and the other one offering a variety of additional options satisfying the needs of researchers. The user of SN_GUI is graphically guided through the entire process of creating snow cover simulations. The starting point is the efficient creation of input parameter files for SNOWPACK, followed by the launching of SNOWPACK with a variety of parameter settings. Finally, after the successful termination of the run, a number of interactive display options may be used to visualize the model output. Among these are vertical profiles and time profiles for many parameters. Besides other features, SN_GUI allows the use of various color, time and coordinate scales, and the comparison of measured and observed parameters.

  11. Radiation budget measurement/model interface research

    SciTech Connect

    Vonderhaar, T.H.

    1981-10-01

    The NIMBUS 6 data were analyzed to form an up to date climatology of the Earth radiation budget as a basis for numerical model definition studies. Global maps depicting infrared emitted flux, net flux and albedo from processed NIMBUS 6 data for July, 1977, are presented. Zonal averages of net radiation flux for April, May, and June and zonal mean emitted flux and net flux for the December to January period are also presented. The development of two models is reported. The first is a statistical dynamical model with vertical and horizontal resolution. The second model is a two level global linear balance model. The results of time integration of the model up to 120 days, to simulate the January circulation, are discussed. Average zonal wind, meridonal wind component, vertical velocity, and moisture budget are among the parameters addressed.

  12. Monitoring of intratidal lung mechanics: a Graphical User Interface for a model-based decision support system for PEEP-titration in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Buehler, S; Lozano-Zahonero, S; Schumann, S; Guttmann, J

    2014-12-01

    In mechanical ventilation, a careful setting of the ventilation parameters in accordance with the current individual state of the lung is crucial to minimize ventilator induced lung injury. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has to be set to prevent collapse of the alveoli, however at the same time overdistension should be avoided. Classic approaches of analyzing static respiratory system mechanics fail in particular if lung injury already prevails. A new approach of analyzing dynamic respiratory system mechanics to set PEEP uses the intratidal, volume-dependent compliance which is believed to stay relatively constant during one breath only if neither atelectasis nor overdistension occurs. To test the success of this dynamic approach systematically at bedside or in an animal study, automation of the computing steps is necessary. A decision support system for optimizing PEEP in form of a Graphical User Interface (GUI) was targeted. Respiratory system mechanics were analyzed using the gliding SLICE method. The resulting shapes of the intratidal compliance-volume curve were classified into one of six categories, each associated with a PEEP-suggestion. The GUI should include a graphical representation of the results as well as a quality check to judge the reliability of the suggestion. The implementation of a user-friendly GUI was successfully realized. The agreement between modelled and measured pressure data [expressed as root-mean-square (RMS)] tested during the implementation phase with real respiratory data from two patient studies was below 0.2 mbar for data taken in volume controlled mode and below 0.4 mbar for data taken in pressure controlled mode except for two cases with RMS < 0.6 mbar. Visual inspections showed, that good and medium quality data could be reliably identified. The new GUI allows visualization of intratidal compliance-volume curves on a breath-by-breath basis. The automatic categorisation of curve shape into one of six shape

  13. A Universal Intelligent System-on-Chip Based Sensor Interface

    PubMed Central

    Mattoli, Virgilio; Mondini, Alessio; Mazzolai, Barbara; Ferri, Gabriele; Dario, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The need for real-time/reliable/low-maintenance distributed monitoring systems, e.g., wireless sensor networks, has been becoming more and more evident in many applications in the environmental, agro-alimentary, medical, and industrial fields. The growing interest in technologies related to sensors is an important indicator of these new needs. The design and the realization of complex and/or distributed monitoring systems is often difficult due to the multitude of different electronic interfaces presented by the sensors available on the market. To address these issues the authors propose the concept of a Universal Intelligent Sensor Interface (UISI), a new low-cost system based on a single commercial chip able to convert a generic transducer into an intelligent sensor with multiple standardized interfaces. The device presented offers a flexible analog and/or digital front-end, able to interface different transducer typologies (such as conditioned, unconditioned, resistive, current output, capacitive and digital transducers). The device also provides enhanced processing and storage capabilities, as well as a configurable multi-standard output interface (including plug-and-play interface based on IEEE 1451.3). In this work the general concept of UISI and the design of reconfigurable hardware are presented, together with experimental test results validating the proposed device. PMID:22163624

  14. A distributed data component for the open modeling interface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the volume of collected data continues to increase in the environmental sciences, so does the need for effective means for accessing those data. We have developed an Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI) data component that retrieves input data for model components from environmental information syste...

  15. Streamflow forecasting using the modular modeling system and an object-user interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeton, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), developed a computer program to provide a general framework needed to couple disparate environmental resource models and to manage the necessary data. The Object-User Interface (OUI) is a map-based interface for models and modeling data. It provides a common interface to run hydrologic models and acquire, browse, organize, and select spatial and temporal data. One application is to assist river managers in utilizing streamflow forecasts generated with the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System running in the Modular Modeling System (MMS), a distributed-parameter watershed model, and the National Weather Service Extended Streamflow Prediction (ESP) methodology.

  16. Interface tension and interface entropy in the 2+1 flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Wei-yao; Liu, Yu-xin

    2014-04-01

    We study the QCD phases and their transitions in the 2+1 flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, with a focus on the interface effects such as the interface tension, the interface entropy, and the critical bubble size in the coexistence region of the first-order phase transitions. Our results show that under the thin-wall approximation, the interface contribution to the total entropy density changes its discontinuity scale in the first-order phase transition. However, the entropy density of the dynamical chiral symmetry (DCS) phase is always greater than that of the dynamical chiral symmetry broken (DCSB) phase in both the heating and hadronization processes. To address this entropy puzzle, the thin-wall approximation is evaluated in the present work. We find that the puzzle can be attributed to an overestimate of the critical bubble size at low temperature in the hadronization process. With an improvement on the thin-wall approximation, the entropy puzzle is well solved with the total entropy density of the hadron-DCSB phase exceeding apparently that of the DCS-quark phase at low temperature.

  17. Finite driving rates in interface models of Barkhausen noise.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, S L; Bahiana, M

    2001-12-01

    We consider a single-interface model for the description of Barkhausen noise in soft ferromagnetic materials. Previously, the model was used only in the adiabatic regime of infinitely slow field ramping. We introduce finite driving rates and analyze the scaling of event sizes and durations for different regimes of the driving rate. Coexistence of intermittency, with nontrivial scaling laws, and finite-velocity interface motion is observed for high enough driving rates. Power spectra show a decay approximately omega(-t), with t<2 for finite driving rates, revealing the influence of the internal structure of avalanches.

  18. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Belmonte-Beitia, J; Woolley, T E; Scott, J G; Maini, P K; Gaffney, E A

    2013-10-07

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility.

  19. Molecular Modeling of Water Interfaces: From Molecular Spectroscopy to Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-04-28

    Understanding aqueous interfaces at the molecular level is not only fundamentally important, but also highly relevant for a variety of disciplines. For instance, electrode-water interfaces are relevant for electrochemistry, as are mineral-water interfaces for geochemistry and air-water interfaces for environmental chemistry; water-lipid interfaces constitute the boundaries of the cell membrane, and are thus relevant for biochemistry. One of the major challenges in these fields is to link macroscopic properties such as interfacial reactivity, solubility, and permeability as well as macroscopic thermodynamic and spectroscopic observables to the structure, structural changes, and dynamics of molecules at these interfaces. Simulations, by themselves, or in conjunction with appropriate experiments, can provide such molecular-level insights into aqueous interfaces. In this contribution, we review the current state-of-the-art of three levels of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation: ab initio, force field, and coarse-grained. We discuss the advantages, the potential, and the limitations of each approach for studying aqueous interfaces, by assessing computations of the sum-frequency generation spectra and surface tension. The comparison of experimental and simulation data provides information on the challenges of future MD simulations, such as improving the force field models and the van der Waals corrections in ab initio MD simulations. Once good agreement between experimental observables and simulation can be established, the simulation can be used to provide insights into the processes at a level of detail that is generally inaccessible to experiments. As an example we discuss the mechanism of the evaporation of water. We finish by presenting an outlook outlining four future challenges for molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous interfacial systems.

  20. NASA: Model development for human factors interfacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an intensive literature review in the general topics of human error analysis, stress and job performance, and accident and safety analysis revealed no usable techniques or approaches for analyzing human error in ground or space operations tasks. A task review model is described and proposed to be developed in order to reduce the degree of labor intensiveness in ground and space operations tasks. An extensive number of annotated references are provided.

  1. Kinetic model of membrane extraction with a sorbent interface.

    PubMed

    Yang, M J; Adams, M; Pawliszyn, J

    1996-09-01

    Membrane extraction with a sorbent interface (MESI) is an unique sample preparation alternative for trace organic analysis. The main features of MESI include its solvent-free nature, the rugged and simple design with no moving parts for long-term reliable performance, the fact that it is a single-step process which ensures good precision, its easy automation, and its feasibility for on-site operation. Among the available membrane extraction modules designed for the MESI system, the headspace configuration has continued to show its superior durability and versatility in membrane applications. The headspace membrane extraction configuration effectively eliminates the need for a sampling pump and flow metering and hence prevents the extraction system from plugging and greatly simplifies the extraction process. The module can be used for extraction of VOCs from gaseous, aqueous, or solid samples. A mathematical model has been developed for headspace membrane extraction of an aqueous sample, based on the assumption that the aqueous phase is perfectly stirred. The model is in good agreement with the experimental benzene extraction results obtained with an efficient agitation method such as high-speed magnetic stirring or sonication. The model has also been used to study the effects of various extraction parameters with respect to the sensitivity and response time of the MESI system. Sample agitation facilities analyte mass transport and hence improves both the system sensitivity and the response time. The sensitivity of the extraction method also increases with an increase of the extraction temperature.

  2. SIF-based fracture criterion for interface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xing

    2016-06-01

    The complex stress intensity factor K governing the stress field of an interface crack tip may be split into two parts, i.e., hat{K} and s^{-iɛ}, so that K=hat{K}s^{-iɛ}, s is a characteristic length and ɛ is the oscillatory index. hat{K} has the same dimension as the classical stress intensity factor and characterizes the interface crack tip field. That means a criterion for interface cracks may be formulated directly with hat{K}, as Irwin (ASME J. Appl. Mech. 24:361-364, 1957) did in 1957 for the classical fracture mechanics. Then, for an interface crack, it is demonstrated that the quasi Mode I and Mode II tip fields can be defined and distinguished from the coupled mode tip fields. Built upon SIF-based fracture criteria for quasi Mode I and Mode II, the stress intensity factor (SIF)-based fracture criterion for mixed mode interface cracks is proposed and validated against existing experimental results.

  3. Using ADDIE To Design a Web-Based Training Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Linda

    Modeling the functions of a teacher in a computer interface is not a new practice; most computer applications employ electronic performance support systems (EPSS) such as online help, wizards, coaches, and even some forms of artificial intelligence. This paper presents easy-to-implement strategies for increasing learner autonomy by embedding…

  4. Interface fracture and composite deformation of model laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Matthew R.

    Model laminates were studied to improve the understanding of composite mechanical behavior. NiAl/Mo and NiAl/Cr model laminates, with a series of interfaces, were bonded at 1100°C. Reaction layers were present in all laminates, varying in thickness with bonding conditions. Interface fracture strengths and resistances were determined under primarily mode II loading conditions using a novel technique, the asymmetrically-loaded shear (ALS) test, in which one layer of the laminate was loaded in compression, producing a stable interface crack. The NiAl/Mo interface was also fractured in four-point bending. A small amount of plasticity was found to play a role in crack initiation. During steady-state mode II interface fracture of NiAl/Mo model laminates, large-scale slip was observed near the crack tip in the NiAl adjacent to the interface. After testing, the local slope and curvature of the interface were characterized at intervals along the interface and at slip locations to qualitatively describe local stresses present at and just ahead of the crack tip. The greatest percentage of slip occurred where closing forces on the crack tip were below the maximum value and were decreasing with crack growth. A mechanism for crack propagation is presented describing the role of large-scale slip in crack propagation. The mechanical response of structural laminates in 3-D stress states, as would be present in a polycrystalline aggregate composed of lamellar grains, are lacking. In order to understand the response of laminates composed of hard and soft phases, Pb/Zn laminates were prepared and tested in compression with varying lamellar orientation relative to the loading axis. A model describing the mechanical response in a general state assuming elastic-perfectly plastic isotropic layers was developed. For the 90° laminate, a different approach was applied, using the friction hill concepts used in forging analyses. With increasing ratios of cross-sectional radius to layer

  5. Microfluidic neurotransmiter-based neural interfaces for retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Raymond; Finlayson, Paul; Xu, Yong; Katragadda, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    Natural inter-neuronal communication is mediated primarily via neurotransmitter-gated ion channels. While most of the methods for neural interfacing have been based upon electrical stimulation, neurotransmitter-based approaches for the spatially and temporally controlled delivery of neurotransmitters are relatively new. Methods of neurotransmitter stimulation retinal prosthesis may provide new ways to control neural excitation. Experimental results for retinal ganglion cell stimulation demonstrate the feasibility of a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis.

  6. Designers' models of the human-computer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillan, Douglas J.; Breedin, Sarah D.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding design models of the human-computer interface (HCI) may produce two types of benefits. First, interface development often requires input from two different types of experts: human factors specialists and software developers. Given the differences in their backgrounds and roles, human factors specialists and software developers may have different cognitive models of the HCI. Yet, they have to communicate about the interface as part of the design process. If they have different models, their interactions are likely to involve a certain amount of miscommunication. Second, the design process in general is likely to be guided by designers' cognitive models of the HCI, as well as by their knowledge of the user, tasks, and system. Designers do not start with a blank slate; rather they begin with a general model of the object they are designing. The author's approach to a design model of the HCI was to have three groups make judgments of categorical similarity about the components of an interface: human factors specialists with HCI design experience, software developers with HCI design experience, and a baseline group of computer users with no experience in HCI design. The components of the user interface included both display components such as windows, text, and graphics, and user interaction concepts, such as command language, editing, and help. The judgments of the three groups were analyzed using hierarchical cluster analysis and Pathfinder. These methods indicated, respectively, how the groups categorized the concepts, and network representations of the concepts for each group. The Pathfinder analysis provides greater information about local, pairwise relations among concepts, whereas the cluster analysis shows global, categorical relations to a greater extent.

  7. Critical Interfaces in the Random-Bond Potts Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Jesper L.; Le Doussal, Pierre; Picco, Marco; Santachiara, Raoul; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2009-02-01

    We study geometrical properties of interfaces in the random-temperature q-states Potts model as an example of a conformal field theory weakly perturbed by quenched disorder. Using conformal perturbation theory in q-2 we compute the fractal dimension of Fortuin-Kasteleyn (FK) domain walls. We also compute it numerically both via the Wolff cluster algorithm for q=3 and via transfer-matrix evaluations. We also obtain numerical results for the fractal dimension of spin clusters interfaces for q=3. These are found numerically consistent with the duality κspinκFK=16 as expressed in putative SLE parameters.

  8. Critical interfaces in the random-bond Potts model.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jesper L; Le Doussal, Pierre; Picco, Marco; Santachiara, Raoul; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2009-02-20

    We study geometrical properties of interfaces in the random-temperature q-states Potts model as an example of a conformal field theory weakly perturbed by quenched disorder. Using conformal perturbation theory in q-2 we compute the fractal dimension of Fortuin-Kasteleyn (FK) domain walls. We also compute it numerically both via the Wolff cluster algorithm for q=3 and via transfer-matrix evaluations. We also obtain numerical results for the fractal dimension of spin clusters interfaces for q=3. These are found numerically consistent with the duality kappaspinkappaFK=16 as expressed in putative SLE parameters.

  9. Damage evolution of bi-body model composed of weakly cemented soft rock and coal considering different interface effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zenghui; Lv, Xianzhou; Wang, Weiming; Tan, Yunliang

    2016-01-01

    Considering the structure effect of tunnel stability in western mining of China, three typical kinds of numerical model were respectively built as follows based on the strain softening constitutive model and linear elastic-perfectly plastic model for soft rock and interface: R-M, R-C(s)-M and R-C(w)-M. Calculation results revealed that the stress-strain relation and failure characteristics of the three models vary between each other. The combination model without interface or with a strong interface presented continuous failure, while weak interface exhibited 'cut off' effect. Thus, conceptual models of bi-material model and bi-body model were established. Then numerical experiments of tri-axial compression were carried out for the two models. The relationships between stress evolution, failure zone and deformation rate fluctuations as well as the displacement of interface were detailed analyzed. Results show that two breakaway points of deformation rate actually demonstrate the starting and penetration of the main rupture, respectively. It is distinguishable due to the large fluctuation. The bi-material model shows general continuous failure while bi-body model shows 'V' type shear zone in weak body and failure in strong body near the interface due to the interface effect. With the increasing of confining pressure, the 'cut off' effect of weak interface is not obvious. These conclusions lay the theoretical foundation for further development of constitutive model for soft rock-coal combination body.

  10. Influence of atmospheric stability on model wind turbine wake interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Amelia; Gomez, Virgilio; Novoa, Santiago; Pol, Suhas; Westergaard, Carsten; Castillo, Luciano

    2014-11-01

    Differences in wind turbine wake deficit recovery for various atmospheric stability conditions (stratification) have been attributed to turbulence intensity levels at different conditions. It is shown that buoyancy differences at the wind turbine wake interface should be considered in addition to varying turbulence intensity to describe the net momentum transport across the wake interface. Mixing, induced by tip and hub vortices or wake swirl, induces these buoyancy differences. The above hypothesis was tested using field measurements of the wake interface for a 1.17 m model turbine installed at 6.25 m hub height. Atmospheric conditions were characterized using a 10 m meteorological tower upstream of the turbine, while a vertical rake of sonic anemometers clustered around the hub height on a downstream tower measured the wake. Data was collected over the course of seven months, during varying stability conditions, and with five different turbine configurations - including a single turbine at three different positions, two turbines in a column, and three turbines in a column. Presented are results showing the behavior of the wake (particularly the wake interface), for unstable, stable, and neutral conditions. We observed that the swirl in the wake causes mixing of the inflow, leading to a constant density profile in the far wake that causes density jumps at the wake interfaces for stratified inflow.

  11. Interface-tracking electro-hydrodynamic model for droplet coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Noble, David

    2012-11-01

    Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. micro-fluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface. The electro-hydrodynamic equations solved allow for convection of charge and charge accumulation at the interface, both of which may be important factors for the pinch-off dynamics in this parameter regime.

  12. Modeling of the water network at protein-RNA interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiyu; Sutch, Brian T; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Gallaher, Timothy K; Haworth, Ian S

    2011-06-27

    Water plays an important role in the mediation of biomolecular interactions. Thus, accurate prediction and evaluation of water-mediated interactions is an important element in the computational design of interfaces involving proteins, RNA, and DNA. Here, we use an algorithm (WATGEN) to predict the locations of interfacial water molecules for a data set of 224 protein-RNA interfaces. The accuracy of the prediction is validated against water molecules present in the X-ray structures of 105 of these complexes. The complexity of the water networks is deconvoluted through definition of the characteristics of each water molecule based on its bridging properties between the protein and RNA and on its depth in the interface with respect to the bulk solvent. This approach has the potential for scoring the water network for incorporation into the computational design of protein-RNA complexes.

  13. Computer modelling of nanoscale diffusion phenomena at epitaxial interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailov, M.; Ranguelov, B.

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines an important area in the application of computer modelling to interface phenomena. Being relevant to the fundamental physical problem of competing atomic interactions in systems with reduced dimensionality, these phenomena attract special academic attention. On the other hand, from a technological point of view, detailed knowledge of the fine atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces correlates with a large number of practical problems in materials science. Typical examples are formation of nanoscale surface patterns, two-dimensional superlattices, atomic intermixing at an epitaxial interface, atomic transport phenomena, structure and stability of quantum wires on surfaces. We discuss here a variety of diffusion mechanisms that control surface-confined atomic exchange, formation of alloyed atomic stripes and islands, relaxation of pure and alloyed atomic terraces, diffusion of clusters and their stability in an external field. The computational model refines important details of diffusion of adatoms and clusters accounting for the energy barriers at specific atomic sites: smooth domains, terraces, steps and kinks. The diffusion kinetics, integrity and decomposition of atomic islands in an external field are considered in detail and assigned to specific energy regions depending on the cluster stability in mass transport processes. The presented ensemble of diffusion scenarios opens a way for nanoscale surface design towards regular atomic interface patterns with exotic physical features.

  14. Universality in Sandpiles, Interface Depinning, and Earthquake Models

    SciTech Connect

    Paczuski, M.; Boettcher, S. |

    1996-07-01

    Recent numerical results for a model describing dispersive transport in ricepiles are explained by mapping the model to the depinning transition of an elastic interface that is dragged at one end through a random medium. The average velocity of transport vanishes with system size {ital L} as {l_angle}{ital v}{r_angle}{approximately}{ital L}{sup 2{minus}{ital D}}{approximately}{ital L}{sup {minus}0.23}, and the avalanche size distribution exponent {tau}=2{minus}1/{ital D}{approx_equal}1.55, where {ital D}{approx_equal}2.23 from interface depinning. We conjecture that the purely deterministic Burridge-Knopoff {open_quote}{open_quote}train{close_quote}{close_quote} model for earthquakes is in the same universality class. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Analysis and Management of Large-Scale Activities Based on Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaofan; Ji, Jingwei; Lu, Ligang; Wang, Zhiyi

    Based on the concepts of system safety engineering, life-cycle and interface that comes from American system safety standard MIL-STD-882E, and apply them to the process of risk analysis and management of large-scale activities. Identify the involved personnel, departments, funds and other contents throughout the life cycle of large-scale activities. Recognize and classify the ultimate risk sources of people, objects and environment of large-scale activities from the perspective of interface. Put forward the accident cause analysis model according to the previous large-scale activities' accidents and combine with the analysis of the risk source interface. Analyze the risks of each interface and summary various types of risks the large-scale activities faced. Come up with the risk management consciousness, policies and regulations, risk control and supervision departments improvement ideas.

  16. Broadening the interface bandwidth in simulation based training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    Currently most computer based simulations rely exclusively on computer generated graphics to create the simulation. When training is involved, the method almost exclusively used to display information to the learner is text displayed on the cathode ray tube. MICROEXPERT Systems is concentrating on broadening the communications bandwidth between the computer and user by employing a novel approach to video image storage combined with sound and voice output. An expert system is used to combine and control the presentation of analog video, sound, and voice output with computer based graphics and text. Researchers are currently involved in the development of several graphics based user interfaces for NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy. Here, the focus is on the human factors considerations, software modules, and hardware components being used to develop these interfaces.

  17. Symmetric model of compressible granular mixtures with permeable interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurel, Richard; Le Martelot, Sébastien; Tosello, Robert; Lapébie, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    Compressible granular materials are involved in many applications, some of them being related to energetic porous media. Gas permeation effects are important during their compaction stage, as well as their eventual chemical decomposition. Also, many situations involve porous media separated from pure fluids through two-phase interfaces. It is thus important to develop theoretical and numerical formulations to deal with granular materials in the presence of both two-phase interfaces and gas permeation effects. Similar topic was addressed for fluid mixtures and interfaces with the Discrete Equations Method (DEM) [R. Abgrall and R. Saurel, "Discrete equations for physical and numerical compressible multiphase mixtures," J. Comput. Phys. 186(2), 361-396 (2003)] but it seemed impossible to extend this approach to granular media as intergranular stress [K. K. Kuo, V. Yang, and B. B. Moore, "Intragranular stress, particle-wall friction and speed of sound in granular propellant beds," J. Ballist. 4(1), 697-730 (1980)] and associated configuration energy [J. B. Bdzil, R. Menikoff, S. F. Son, A. K. Kapila, and D. S. Stewart, "Two-phase modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials: A critical examination of modeling issues," Phys. Fluids 11, 378 (1999)] were present with significant effects. An approach to deal with fluid-porous media interfaces was derived in Saurel et al. ["Modelling dynamic and irreversible powder compaction," J. Fluid Mech. 664, 348-396 (2010)] but its validity was restricted to weak velocity disequilibrium only. Thanks to a deeper analysis, the DEM is successfully extended to granular media modelling in the present paper. It results in an enhanced version of the Baer and Nunziato ["A two-phase mixture theory for the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in reactive granular materials," Int. J. Multiphase Flow 12(6), 861-889 (1986)] model as symmetry of the formulation is now preserved. Several computational examples are

  18. Generalized model for solid-on-solid interface growth.

    PubMed

    Richele, M F; Atman, A P F

    2015-05-01

    We present a probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA) model to study solid-on-solid interface growth in which the transition rules depend on the local morphology of the profile obtained from the interface representation of the PCA. We show that the model is able to reproduce a wide range of patterns whose critical roughening exponents are associated to different universality classes, including random deposition, Edwards-Wilkinson, and Kardar-Parisi-Zhang. By means of the growth exponent method, we consider a particular set of the model parameters to build the two-dimensional phase diagram corresponding to a planar cut of the higher dimensional parameter space. A strong indication of phase transition between different universality classes can be observed, evincing different regimes of deposition, from layer-by-layer to Volmer-Weber and Stransk-Krastanov-like modes. We expect that this model can be useful to predict the morphological properties of interfaces obtained at different surface deposition problems, since it allows us to simulate several experimental situations by setting the values of the specific transition probabilities in a very simple and direct way.

  19. Role of melt behavior in modifying oxidation distribution using an interface incorporated model in selective laser melting of aluminum-based material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dongdong; Dai, Donghua

    2016-08-01

    A transient three dimensional model for describing the molten pool dynamics and the response of oxidation film evolution in the selective laser melting of aluminum-based material is proposed. The physical difference in both sides of the scan track, powder-solid transformation and temperature dependent physical properties are taken into account. It shows that the heat energy tends to accumulate in the powder material rather than in the as-fabricated part, leading to the formation of the asymmetrical patterns of the temperature contour and the attendant larger dimensions of the molten pool in the powder phase. As a higher volumetric energy density is applied (≥1300 J/mm3), a severe evaporation is produced with the upward direction of velocity vector in the irradiated powder region while a restricted operating temperature is obtained in the as-fabricated part. The velocity vector continuously changes from upward direction to the downward one as the scan speed increases from 100 mm/s to 300 mm/s, promoting the generation of the debris of the oxidation films and the resultant homogeneous distribution state in the matrix. For the applied hatch spacing of 50 μm, a restricted remelting phenomenon of the as-fabricated part is produced with the upward direction of the convection flow, significantly reducing the turbulence of the thermal-capillary convection on the breaking of the oxidation films, and therefore, the connected oxidation films through the neighboring layers are typically formed. The morphology and distribution of the oxidation are experimentally acquired, which are in a good agreement with the results predicted by simulation.

  20. Penalty-Based Finite Element Interface Technology for Analysis of Homogeneous and Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averill, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    An effective and robust interface element technology able to connect independently modeled finite element subdomains has been developed. This method is based on the use of penalty constraints and allows coupling of finite element models whose nodes do not coincide along their common interface. Additionally, the present formulation leads to a computational approach that is very efficient and completely compatible with existing commercial software. A significant effort has been directed toward identifying those model characteristics (element geometric properties, material properties, and loads) that most strongly affect the required penalty parameter, and subsequently to developing simple 'formulae' for automatically calculating the proper penalty parameter for each interface constraint. This task is especially critical in composite materials and structures, where adjacent sub-regions may be composed of significantly different materials or laminates. This approach has been validated by investigating a variety of two-dimensional problems, including composite laminates.

  1. Water velocity at water-air interface is not zero: Comment on "Three-dimensional quantification of soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and image-based modeling" by Saoirse R. Tracy et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. X.; Fan, X. Y.; Li, Z. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Tracy et al. (2015, doi: 10.1002/2014WR016020) assumed in their recent paper that water velocity at the water-air interface is zero in their pore-scale simulations of water flow in 3-D soil images acquired using X-ray computed tomography. We comment that such a treatment is physically wrong, and explain that it is the water-velocity gradient in the direction normal to the water-air interface, rather than the water velocity, that should be assumed to be zero at the water-air interface if one needs to decouple the water flow and the air flow. We analyze the potential errors caused by incorrectly taking water velocity at the water-air interface zero based on two simple examples, and conclude that it is not physically sound to make such a presumption because its associated errors are unpredictable.

  2. Stability of finite difference models containing two boundaries or interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefethen, L. N.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of finite difference models of hyperbolic initial boundary value problems is connected with the propagation and reflection of parasitic waves. Wave propagation ideas are applied to models containing two boundaires or interfaces, where repeated reflection of trapped wave packets is a potential new source of instability. Various known instability phenomena are accounted for in a unified way. Results show: (1) dissipativity does not ensure stability when three or more formulas are concatenated at a boundary or internal interface; (2) algebraic GKS instabilities can be converted by a second boundary to exponential instabilities only when an infinite numerical reflection coefficient is present; and (3) GKS-stability and P-stability can be established in certain problems by showing that all numerical reflection coefficients have modulus less than 1.

  3. Modeling the Effect of Interface Wear on Fatigue Hysteresis Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on fatigue hysteresis behavior in carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and interface wear, fibers fracture, slip and pull-out, have been considered. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. Upon first loading to fatigue peak stress and subsequent cyclic loading, the fibers failure probabilities and fracture locations were determined by combining the interface wear model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the global load sharing criterion. The effects of matrix properties, i.e., matrix cracking characteristic strength and matrix Weibull modulus, interface properties, i.e., interface shear stress and interface debonded energy, fiber properties, i.e., fiber Weibull modulus and fiber characteristic strength, and cycle number on fibers failure, hysteresis loops and interface slip, have been investigated. The hysteresis loops under fatigue loading from the present analytical method were in good agreement with experimental data.

  4. Wavelet transforms in a critical interface model for Barkhausen noise.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, S L A

    2008-02-01

    We discuss the application of wavelet transforms to a critical interface model which is known to provide a good description of Barkhausen noise in soft ferromagnets. The two-dimensional version of the model (one-dimensional interface) is considered, mainly in the adiabatic limit of very slow driving. On length scales shorter than a crossover length (which grows with the strength of the surface tension), the effective interface roughness exponent zeta is approximately 1.20 , close to the expected value for the universality class of the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson model. We find that the waiting times between avalanches are fully uncorrelated, as the wavelet transform of their autocorrelations scales as white noise. Similarly, detrended size-size correlations give a white-noise wavelet transform. Consideration of finite driving rates, still deep within the intermittent regime, shows the wavelet transform of correlations scaling as 1/f(1.5) for intermediate frequencies. This behavior is ascribed to intra-avalanche correlations.

  5. The JAVA-based DICOM query interface DicoSE.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Michael; Fischer, Georg; Schuster, Ernst

    2005-03-01

    DICOM 3 is a very elaborate standard for the communication between medical image devices. It is published in several parts by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA). To adequately visualize the data structure defined in parts 3, 5 and 6 of the DICOM standard, we implemented the web based Dicom Search Engine (DicoSE). It allows for querying the DICOM standard data dictionary for defined data fields and visualizes the topology of the data which is inherently present in DICOM datasets. For the administration of the underlying data a web based administration interface is provided. The service is entirely based on freely available software.

  6. Particle self-assembly at ionic liquid-based interfaces.

    PubMed

    Frost, Denzil S; Nofen, Elizabeth M; Dai, Lenore L

    2014-04-01

    This review presents an overview of the nature of ionic liquid (IL)-based interfaces and self-assembled particle morphologies of IL-in-water, oil- and water-in-IL, and novel IL-in-IL Pickering emulsions with emphasis on their unique phenomena, by means of experimental and computational studies. In IL-in-water Pickering emulsions, particles formed monolayers at ionic liquid-water interfaces and were close-packed on fully covered emulsion droplets or aggregated on partially covered droplets. Interestingly, other than equilibrating at the ionic liquid-water interfaces, microparticles with certain surface chemistries were extracted into the ionic liquid phase with a high efficiency. These experimental findings were supported by potential of mean force calculations, which showed large energy drops as hydrophobic particles crossed the interface into the IL phase. In the oil- and water-in-IL Pickering emulsions, microparticles with acidic surface chemistries formed monolayer bridges between the internal phase droplets rather than residing at the oil/water-ionic liquid interfaces, a significant deviation from traditional Pickering emulsion morphology. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed aspects of the mechanism behind this bridging phenomenon, including the role of the droplet phase, surface chemistry, and inter-particle film. Novel IL-in-IL Pickering emulsions exhibited an array of self-assembled morphologies including the previously observed particle absorption and bridging phenomena. The appearance of these morphologies depended on the particle surface chemistry as well as the ILs used. The incorporation of particle self-assembly with ionic liquid science allows for new applications at the intersection of these two fields, and have the potential to be numerous due to the tunability of the ionic liquids and particles incorporated, as well as the particle morphology by combining certain groups of particle surface chemistry, IL type (protic or aprotic), and whether oil

  7. Towards the virtual artery: a multiscale model for vascular physiology at the physics-chemistry-biology interface.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Alfons G; Alowayyed, Saad; Lorenz, Eric; Melnikova, Natalia; Mountrakis, Lampros; van Rooij, Britt; Svitenkov, Andrew; Závodszky, Gábor; Zun, Pavel

    2016-11-13

    This discussion paper introduces the concept of the Virtual Artery as a multiscale model for arterial physiology and pathologies at the physics-chemistry-biology (PCB) interface. The cellular level is identified as the mesoscopic level, and we argue that by coupling cell-based models with other relevant models on the macro- and microscale, a versatile model of arterial health and disease can be composed. We review the necessary ingredients, both models of arteries at many different scales, as well as generic methods to compose multiscale models. Next, we discuss how this can be combined into the virtual artery. Finally, we argue that the concept of models at the PCB interface could or perhaps should become a powerful paradigm, not only as in our case for studying physiology, but also for many other systems that have such PCB interfaces.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  8. Towards the virtual artery: a multiscale model for vascular physiology at the physics-chemistry-biology interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, Alfons G.; Alowayyed, Saad; Lorenz, Eric; Melnikova, Natalia; Mountrakis, Lampros; van Rooij, Britt; Svitenkov, Andrew; Závodszky, Gábor; Zun, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    This discussion paper introduces the concept of the Virtual Artery as a multiscale model for arterial physiology and pathologies at the physics-chemistry-biology (PCB) interface. The cellular level is identified as the mesoscopic level, and we argue that by coupling cell-based models with other relevant models on the macro- and microscale, a versatile model of arterial health and disease can be composed. We review the necessary ingredients, both models of arteries at many different scales, as well as generic methods to compose multiscale models. Next, we discuss how this can be combined into the virtual artery. Finally, we argue that the concept of models at the PCB interface could or perhaps should become a powerful paradigm, not only as in our case for studying physiology, but also for many other systems that have such PCB interfaces. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  9. Blocking and Blending: Different Assembly Models of Cyclodextrin and Sodium Caseinate at the Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Neng; Liu, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Lianfu

    2015-08-25

    The stability of cyclodextrin (CD)-based emulsions is attributed to the formation of a solid film of oil-CD complexes at the oil/water interface. However, competitive interactions between CDs and other components at the interface still need to be understood. Here we develop two different routes that allow the incorporation of a model protein (sodium caseinate, SC) into emulsions based on β-CD. One route is the components adsorbed simultaneously from a mixed solution to the oil/water interface (route I), and the other is SC was added to a previously established CD-stabilized interface (route II). The adsorption mechanism of β-CD modified by SC at the oil/water interface is investigated by rheological and optical methods. Strong sensitivity of the rheological behavior to the routes is indicated by both steady-state and small-deformation oscillatory experiments. Possible β-CD/SC interaction models at the interface are proposed. In route I, the protein, due to its higher affinity for the interface, adsorbs strongly at the interface with blocking of the adsorption of β-CD and formation of oil-CD complexes. In route II, the protein penetrates and blends into the preadsorbed layer of oil-CD complexes already formed at the interface. The revelation of interfacial assembly is expected to help better understand CD-based emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  10. Hypertext-based design of a user interface for scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, Irene W.; Biefeld, Eric

    1993-01-01

    Operations Mission Planner (OMP) is an ongoing research project at JPL that utilizes AI techniques to create an intelligent, automated planning and scheduling system. The information space reflects the complexity and diversity of tasks necessary in most real-world scheduling problems. Thus the problem of the user interface is to present as much information as possible at a given moment and allow the user to quickly navigate through the various types of displays. This paper describes a design which applies the hypertext model to solve these user interface problems. The general paradigm is to provide maps and search queries to allow the user to quickly find an interesting conflict or problem, and then allow the user to navigate through the displays in a hypertext fashion.

  11. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Medlin, Douglas; Zimmerman, Jonathan; Hattar, Khalid; Foiles, Stephen

    Incorporating anisotropy into thermodynamic treatments of interfaces dates back to over a century ago. For a given orientation of two abutting grains in a pure metal, depressions in the grain boundary (GB) energy may exist as a function of GB inclination, defined by the plane normal. Therefore, an initially flat GB may facet resulting in a hill-and-valley structure. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model of GB faceting that is capable of capturing anisotropic GB energies and mobilities, and accounting for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the role of each of the interface properties on the faceting behavior. As a demonstration, we consider the Σ 5 < 001 > tilt GB in iron, where faceting along the { 310 } and { 210 } planes was experimentally observed. Linear stability analysis and numerical examples highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. On the whole, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the spatio-temporal evolution of highly anisotropic GBs in polycrystalline metals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey M. Smith, James A. Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-03-31

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  13. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Smith, James A.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-03-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  14. A sharp interface evolutionary model for shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knüpfer, Hans; Kružík, Martin

    2016-11-01

    We show the existence of an energetic solution to a quasistatic evolutionary model of shape memory alloys. Elastic behavior of each material phase/variant is described by polyconvex energy density. Additionally, to every phase boundary, there is an interface-polyconvex energy assigned, introduced by M. \\v{S}ilhav\\'{y}. The model considers internal variables describing the evolving spatial arrangement of the material phases and a deformation mapping with its first-order gradients. It allows for injectivity and orientation-preservation of deformations. Moreover, the resulting material microstructures have finite length scales.

  15. Magnetic interface forward and inversion method based on Padé approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chong; Huang, Da-Nian; Zhang, Kai; Pu, Yi-Tao; Yu, Ping

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic interface forward and inversion method is realized using the Taylor series expansion to linearize the Fourier transform of the exponential function. With a large expansion step and unbounded neighborhood, the Taylor series is not convergent, and therefore, this paper presents the magnetic interface forward and inversion method based on Padé approximation instead of the Taylor series expansion. Compared with the Taylor series, Padé's expansion's convergence is more stable and its approximation more accurate. Model tests show the validity of the magnetic forward modeling and inversion of Padé approximation proposed in the paper, and when this inversion method is applied to the measured data of the Matagami area in Canada, a stable and reasonable distribution of underground interface is obtained.

  16. Design of electronic medical record user interfaces: a matrix-based method for improving usability.

    PubMed

    Kuqi, Kushtrim; Eveleigh, Tim; Holzer, Thomas; Sarkani, Shahryar; Levin, James E; Crowley, Rebecca S

    2013-01-01

    This study examines a new approach of using the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) modeling technique to improve the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) user interfaces. The usability of an EMR medication dosage calculator used for placing orders in an academic hospital setting was investigated. The proposed method captures and analyzes the interactions between user interface elements of the EMR system and groups elements based on information exchange, spatial adjacency, and similarity to improve screen density and time-on-task. Medication dose adjustment task time was recorded for the existing and new designs using a cognitive simulation model that predicts user performance. We estimate that the design improvement could reduce time-on-task by saving an average of 21 hours of hospital physicians' time over the course of a month. The study suggests that the application of DSM can improve the usability of an EMR user interface.

  17. Modelling and simulation of a moving interface problem: freeze drying of black tea extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Ebubekir Sıddık; Yucel, Ozgun; Sadikoglu, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The moving interface separates the material that is subjected to the freeze drying process as dried and frozen. Therefore, the accurate modeling the moving interface reduces the process time and energy consumption by improving the heat and mass transfer predictions during the process. To describe the dynamic behavior of the drying stages of the freeze-drying, a case study of brewed black tea extract in storage trays including moving interface was modeled that the heat and mass transfer equations were solved using orthogonal collocation method based on Jacobian polynomial approximation. Transport parameters and physical properties describing the freeze drying of black tea extract were evaluated by fitting the experimental data using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Experimental results showed good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  18. Graphic user interface-based nuclear medicine reporting system.

    PubMed

    Sanger, J J

    1993-03-01

    A graphically based, computerized report generation program has been developed and deployed at a dozen nuclear medicine facilities. The system is based on the Macintosh graphical user interface (GUI) and has been designed to be easy to learn and use. The system allows the nuclear medicine practitioner to generate reports for any nuclear medicine or nuclear cardiology procedure without transcriptionist support, dramatically decreasing report turnaround time. The system includes a relational database engine that allows cost-effective storage and rapid retrieval of final reports and also supports facsimile transmission of reports directly to referring clinicians' offices.

  19. A Graph Based Interface for Representing Volume Visualization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, James M.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses a graph based user interface for representing the results of the volume visualization process. As images are rendered, they are connected to other images in a graph based on their rendering parameters. The user can take advantage of the information in this graph to understand how certain rendering parameter changes affect a dataset, making the visualization process more efficient. Because the graph contains more information than is contained in an unstructured history of images, the image graph is also helpful for collaborative visualization and animation.

  20. fNIRS-based brain-computer interfaces: a review

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, Noman; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that allows the use of brain activity to control computers or other external devices. It can, by bypassing the peripheral nervous system, provide a means of communication for people suffering from severe motor disabilities or in a persistent vegetative state. In this paper, brain-signal generation tasks, noise removal methods, feature extraction/selection schemes, and classification techniques for fNIRS-based BCI are reviewed. The most common brain areas for fNIRS BCI are the primary motor cortex and the prefrontal cortex. In relation to the motor cortex, motor imagery tasks were preferred to motor execution tasks since possible proprioceptive feedback could be avoided. In relation to the prefrontal cortex, fNIRS showed a significant advantage due to no hair in detecting the cognitive tasks like mental arithmetic, music imagery, emotion induction, etc. In removing physiological noise in fNIRS data, band-pass filtering was mostly used. However, more advanced techniques like adaptive filtering, independent component analysis (ICA), multi optodes arrangement, etc. are being pursued to overcome the problem that a band-pass filter cannot be used when both brain and physiological signals occur within a close band. In extracting features related to the desired brain signal, the mean, variance, peak value, slope, skewness, and kurtosis of the noised-removed hemodynamic response were used. For classification, the linear discriminant analysis method provided simple but good performance among others: support vector machine (SVM), hidden Markov model (HMM), artificial neural network, etc. fNIRS will be more widely used to monitor the occurrence of neuro-plasticity after neuro-rehabilitation and neuro-stimulation. Technical breakthroughs in the future are expected via bundled-type probes, hybrid EEG-fNIRS BCI, and through the detection of initial dips. PMID:25674060

  1. fNIRS-based brain-computer interfaces: a review.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Noman; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that allows the use of brain activity to control computers or other external devices. It can, by bypassing the peripheral nervous system, provide a means of communication for people suffering from severe motor disabilities or in a persistent vegetative state. In this paper, brain-signal generation tasks, noise removal methods, feature extraction/selection schemes, and classification techniques for fNIRS-based BCI are reviewed. The most common brain areas for fNIRS BCI are the primary motor cortex and the prefrontal cortex. In relation to the motor cortex, motor imagery tasks were preferred to motor execution tasks since possible proprioceptive feedback could be avoided. In relation to the prefrontal cortex, fNIRS showed a significant advantage due to no hair in detecting the cognitive tasks like mental arithmetic, music imagery, emotion induction, etc. In removing physiological noise in fNIRS data, band-pass filtering was mostly used. However, more advanced techniques like adaptive filtering, independent component analysis (ICA), multi optodes arrangement, etc. are being pursued to overcome the problem that a band-pass filter cannot be used when both brain and physiological signals occur within a close band. In extracting features related to the desired brain signal, the mean, variance, peak value, slope, skewness, and kurtosis of the noised-removed hemodynamic response were used. For classification, the linear discriminant analysis method provided simple but good performance among others: support vector machine (SVM), hidden Markov model (HMM), artificial neural network, etc. fNIRS will be more widely used to monitor the occurrence of neuro-plasticity after neuro-rehabilitation and neuro-stimulation. Technical breakthroughs in the future are expected via bundled-type probes, hybrid EEG-fNIRS BCI, and through the detection of initial dips.

  2. Modeling Complex Cross-Systems Software Interfaces Using SysML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandutianu, Sanda; Morillo, Ron; Simpson, Kim; Liepack, Otfrid; Bonanne, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The complex flight and ground systems for NASA human space exploration are designed, built, operated and managed as separate programs and projects. However, each system relies on one or more of the other systems in order to accomplish specific mission objectives, creating a complex, tightly coupled architecture. Thus, there is a fundamental need to understand how each system interacts with the other. To determine if a model-based system engineering approach could be utilized to assist with understanding the complex system interactions, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) sponsored a task to develop an approach for performing cross-system behavior modeling. This paper presents the results of applying Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) principles using the System Modeling Language (SysML) to define cross-system behaviors and how they map to crosssystem software interfaces documented in system-level Interface Control Documents (ICDs).

  3. A biological model for controlling interface growth and morphology.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Holm, Elizabeth Ann

    2004-01-01

    Biological systems create proteins that perform tasks more efficiently and precisely than conventional chemicals. For example, many plants and animals produce proteins to control the freezing of water. Biological antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit the solidification process, even below the freezing point. These molecules bond to specific sites at the ice/water interface and are theorized to suppress solidification chemically or geometrically. In this project, we investigated the theoretical and experimental data on AFPs and performed analyses to understand the unique physics of AFPs. The experimental literature was analyzed to determine chemical mechanisms and effects of protein bonding at ice surfaces, specifically thermodynamic freezing point depression, suppression of ice nucleation, decrease in dendrite growth kinetics, solute drag on the moving solid/liquid interface, and stearic pinning of the ice interface. Stearic pinning was found to be the most likely candidate to explain experimental results, including freezing point depression, growth morphologies, and thermal hysteresis. A new stearic pinning model was developed and applied to AFPs, with excellent quantitative results. Understanding biological antifreeze mechanisms could enable important medical and engineering applications, but considerable future work will be necessary.

  4. Near infrared spectroscopy based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganatha, Sitaram; Hoshi, Yoko; Guan, Cuntai

    2005-04-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) provides users with an alternative output channel other than the normal output path of the brain. BCI is being given much attention recently as an alternate mode of communication and control for the disabled, such as patients suffering from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or "locked-in". BCI may also find applications in military, education and entertainment. Most of the existing BCI systems which rely on the brain's electrical activity use scalp EEG signals. The scalp EEG is an inherently noisy and non-linear signal. The signal is detrimentally affected by various artifacts such as the EOG, EMG, ECG and so forth. EEG is cumbersome to use in practice, because of the need for applying conductive gel, and the need for the subject to be immobile. There is an urgent need for a more accessible interface that uses a more direct measure of cognitive function to control an output device. The optical response of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) denoting brain activation can be used as an alternative to electrical signals, with the intention of developing a more practical and user-friendly BCI. In this paper, a new method of brain-computer interface (BCI) based on NIRS is proposed. Preliminary results of our experiments towards developing this system are reported.

  5. A symbolic/subsymbolic interface protocol for cognitive modeling

    PubMed Central

    Simen, Patrick; Polk, Thad

    2009-01-01

    Researchers studying complex cognition have grown increasingly interested in mapping symbolic cognitive architectures onto subsymbolic brain models. Such a mapping seems essential for understanding cognition under all but the most extreme viewpoints (namely, that cognition consists exclusively of digitally implemented rules; or instead, involves no rules whatsoever). Making this mapping reduces to specifying an interface between symbolic and subsymbolic descriptions of brain activity. To that end, we propose parameterization techniques for building cognitive models as programmable, structured, recurrent neural networks. Feedback strength in these models determines whether their components implement classically subsymbolic neural network functions (e.g., pattern recognition), or instead, logical rules and digital memory. These techniques support the implementation of limited production systems. Though inherently sequential and symbolic, these neural production systems can exploit principles of parallel, analog processing from decision-making models in psychology and neuroscience to explain the effects of brain damage on problem solving behavior. PMID:20711520

  6. A strategy based on protein-protein interface motifs may help in identifying drug off-targets.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth; Gursoy, Attila

    2012-08-27

    Networks are increasingly used to study the impact of drugs at the systems level. From the algorithmic standpoint, a drug can "attack" nodes or edges of a protein-protein interaction network. In this work, we propose a new network strategy, "The Interface Attack", based on protein-protein interfaces. Similar interface architectures can occur between unrelated proteins. Consequently, in principle, a drug that binds to one has a certain probability of binding to others. The interface attack strategy simultaneously removes from the network all interactions that consist of similar interface motifs. This strategy is inspired by network pharmacology and allows inferring potential off-targets. We introduce a network model that we call "Protein Interface and Interaction Network (P2IN)", which is the integration of protein-protein interface structures and protein interaction networks. This interface-based network organization clarifies which protein pairs have structurally similar interfaces and which proteins may compete to bind the same surface region. We built the P2IN with the p53 signaling network and performed network robustness analysis. We show that (1) "hitting" frequent interfaces (a set of edges distributed around the network) might be as destructive as eleminating high degree proteins (hub nodes), (2) frequent interfaces are not always topologically critical elements in the network, and (3) interface attack may reveal functional changes in the system better than the attack of single proteins. In the off-target detection case study, we found that drugs blocking the interface between CDK6 and CDKN2D may also affect the interaction between CDK4 and CDKN2D.

  7. Characterization of domain-peptide interaction interface: prediction of SH3 domain-mediated protein-protein interaction network in yeast by generic structure-based models.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingjun; Li, Nan; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-04

    Determination of the binding specificity of SH3 domain, a peptide recognition module (PRM), is important to understand their biological functions and reconstruct the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. In the present study, the SH3-peptide interactions for both class I and II SH3 domains were characterized by the intermolecular residue-residue interaction network. We developed generic MIEC-SVM models to infer SH3 domain-peptide recognition specificity that achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. By investigating the domain-peptide recognition mechanisms at the residue level, we found that the class-I and class-II binding peptides have different binding modes even though they occupy the same binding site of SH3. Furthermore, we predicted the potential binding partners of SH3 domains in the yeast proteome and constructed the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. Comparison with the experimentally determined interactions confirmed the effectiveness of our approach. This study showed that our sophisticated computational approach not only provides a powerful platform to decipher protein recognition code at the molecular level but also allows identification of peptide-mediated protein interactions at a proteomic scale. We believe that such an approach is general to be applicable to other domain-peptide interactions.

  8. Characterization of Domain–Peptide Interaction Interface: Prediction of SH3 Domain-Mediated Protein–Protein Interaction Network in Yeast by Generic Structure-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tingjun; Li, Nan; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Determination of the binding specificity of SH3 domain, a peptide recognition module (PRM), is important to understand their biological functions and reconstruct the SH3-mediated protein–protein interaction network. In the present study, the SH3-peptide interactions for both class I and II SH3 domains were characterized by the intermolecular residue–residue interaction network. We developed generic MIEC-SVM models to infer SH3 domain-peptide recognition specificity that achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. By investigating the domain–peptide recognition mechanisms at the residue level, we found that the class-I and class-II binding peptides have different binding modes even though they occupy the same binding site of SH3. Furthermore, we predicted the potential binding partners of SH3 domains in the yeast proteome and constructed the SH3-mediated protein–protein interaction network. Comparison with the experimentally determined interactions confirmed the effectiveness of our approach. This study showed that our sophisticated computational approach not only provides a powerful platform to decipher protein recognition code at the molecular level but also allows identification of peptide-mediated protein interactions at a proteomic scale. We believe that such an approach is general to be applicable to other domain–peptide interactions. PMID:22468754

  9. Spherical wave reflection in layered media with rough interfaces: Three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Cordioli, Julio; Guillon, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    In the context of sediment characterization, layer interface roughnesses may be responsible for sound-speed profile measurement uncertainties. To study the roughness influence, a three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a layered seafloor with rough interfaces is necessary. Although roughness scattering has an abundant literature, 3D modeling of spherical wave reflection on rough interfaces is generally limited to a single interface (using Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral) or computationally expensive techniques (finite difference or finite element method). In this work, it is demonstrated that the wave reflection over a layered medium with irregular interfaces can be modeled as a sum of integrals over each interface. The main approximations of the method are the tangent-plane approximation, the Born approximation (multiple reflection between interfaces are neglected) and flat-interface approximation for the transmitted waves into the sediment. The integration over layer interfaces results in a method with reasonable computation cost.

  10. A numerical model and spreadsheet interface for pumping test analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G S; Cosgrove, D M; Frederick, D B

    2001-01-01

    Curve-matching techniques have been the standard method of aquifer test analysis for several decades. A variety of techniques provide the capability of evaluating test data from confined, unconfined, leaky aquitard, and other conditions. Each technique, however, is accompanied by a set of assumptions, and evaluation of a combination of conditions can be complicated or impossible due to intractable mathematics or nonuniqueness of the solution. Numerical modeling of pumping tests provides two major advantages: (1) the user can choose which properties to calibrate and what assumptions to make; and (2) in the calibration process the user is gaining insights into the conceptual model of the flow system and uncertainties in the analysis. Routine numerical modeling of pumping tests is now practical due to computer hardware and software advances of the last decade. The RADFLOW model and spreadsheet interface presented in this paper is an easy-to-use numerical model for estimation of aquifer properties from pumping test data. Layered conceptual models and their properties are evaluated in a trial-and-error estimation procedure. The RADFLOW model can treat most combinations of confined, unconfined, leaky aquitard, partial penetration, and borehole storage conditions. RADFLOW is especially useful in stratified aquifer systems with no identifiable lateral boundaries. It has been verified to several analytical solutions and has been applied in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to develop and test conceptual models and provide estimates of aquifer properties. Because the model assumes axially symmetrical flow, it is limited to representing multiple aquifer layers that are laterally continuous.

  11. First principles modeling of the metal-electrolyte interface: A novel approach to the study of the electrochemical interface

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Serra, Maria Victoria

    2016-09-12

    The research objective of this proposal is the computational modeling of the metal-electrolyte interface purely from first principles. The accurate calculation of the electrostatic potential at electrically biased metal-electrolyte interfaces is a current challenge for periodic “ab-initio” simulations. It is also an essential requisite for predicting the correspondence between the macroscopic voltage and the microscopic interfacial charge distribution in electrochemical fuel cells. This interfacial charge distribution is the result of the chemical bonding between solute and metal atoms, and therefore cannot be accurately calculated with the use of semi-empirical classical force fields. The project aims to study in detail the structure and dynamics of aqueous electrolytes at metallic interfaces taking into account the effect of the electrode potential. Another side of the project is to produce an accurate method to simulate the water/metal interface. While both experimental and theoretical surface scientists have made a lot of progress on the understanding and characterization of both atomistic structures and reactions at the solid/vacuum interface, the theoretical description of electrochemical interfaces is still lacking behind. A reason for this is that a complete and accurate first principles description of both the liquid and the metal interfaces is still computationally too expensive and complex, since their characteristics are governed by the explicit atomic and electronic structure built at the interface as a response to environmental conditions. This project will characterize in detail how different theoretical levels of modeling describer the metal/water interface. In particular the role of van der Waals interactions will be carefully analyzed and prescriptions to perform accurate simulations will be produced.

  12. Organic solar cells: a rigorous model of the donor-acceptor interface for various bulk heterojunction morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raba, Adam; Leroy, Yann; Cordan, Anne-Sophie

    2014-02-01

    Theoretical studies of organic solar cells are mostly based on one dimensional models. Despite their accuracy to reproduce most of the experimental trends, they intrinsically cannot correctly integrate the effects of morphology in cells based on a bulk heterojunction structure. Therefore, accounting for these effects requires the development of two dimensional models, in which donor and acceptor domains are explicitly distinct. In this context, we propose an analytical approach, which focuses on the description of the interface between the two domains. Assuming pinned charge transfer states, we rigorously derive the corresponding boundary conditions and explore the differences between this model and other existing models in the literature for various morphologies of the active layer. On one hand, all tested models are equivalent for an ideal interdigitated bulk heterojunction solar cell with a planar donor-acceptor interface, but divergences between the models rise for small sizes of the donor domain. On the other hand, we carried out a comparison on a less ideal case of cell, with a rough interface between the two domains. Simulations with such cells exhibit distinct behaviors for each model. We conclude that the boundary condition for the interface between the materials is of great importance for the study of solar cells with a non-planar interface. The model must account initially for the roughness of the interface.

  13. Numerical simulations of the moving contact line problem using a diffuse-interface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzaal, Muhammad; Sibley, David; Duncan, Andrew; Yatsyshin, Petr; Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Nold, Andreas; Savva, Nikos; Schmuck, Markus; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Moving contact lines are a ubiquitous phenomenon both in nature and in many modern technologies. One prevalent way of numerically tackling the problem is with diffuse-interface (phase-field) models, where the classical sharp-interface model of continuum mechanics is relaxed to one with a finite thickness fluid-fluid interface, capturing physics from mesoscopic lengthscales. The present work is devoted to the study of the contact line between two fluids confined by two parallel plates, i.e. a dynamically moving meniscus. Our approach is based on a coupled Navier-Stokes/Cahn-Hilliard model. This system of partial differential equations allows a tractable numerical solution to be computed, capturing diffusive and advective effects in a prototypical case study in a finite-element framework. Particular attention is paid to the static and dynamic contact angle of the meniscus advancing or receding between the plates. The results obtained from our approach are compared to the classical sharp-interface model to elicit the importance of considering diffusion and associated effects. We acknowledge financial support from European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  14. Facial pressure zones of an oronasal interface for noninvasive ventilation: a computer model analysis* **

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Luana Souto; Talaia, Pedro; Drummond, Marta; Natal-Jorge, Renato

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of an oronasal interface (OI) for noninvasive ventilation, using a three-dimensional (3D) computational model with the ability to simulate and evaluate the main pressure zones (PZs) of the OI on the human face. METHODS: We used a 3D digital model of the human face, based on a pre-established geometric model. The model simulated soft tissues, skull, and nasal cartilage. The geometric model was obtained by 3D laser scanning and post-processed for use in the model created, with the objective of separating the cushion from the frame. A computer simulation was performed to determine the pressure required in order to create the facial PZs. We obtained descriptive graphical images of the PZs and their intensity. RESULTS: For the graphical analyses of each face-OI model pair and their respective evaluations, we ran 21 simulations. The computer model identified several high-impact PZs in the nasal bridge and paranasal regions. The variation in soft tissue depth had a direct impact on the amount of pressure applied (438-724 cmH2O). CONCLUSIONS: The computer simulation results indicate that, in patients submitted to noninvasive ventilation with an OI, the probability of skin lesion is higher in the nasal bridge and paranasal regions. This methodology could increase the applicability of biomechanical research on noninvasive ventilation interfaces, providing the information needed in order to choose the interface that best minimizes the risk of skin lesion. PMID:25610506

  15. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mimi; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, Elisabetta; Schimperna, Giulio; Schonbek, Maria E.

    2017-04-01

    We consider a diffuse interface model for tumor growth recently proposed in Chen et al (2014 Int. J. Numer. Methods Biomed. Eng. 30 726–54). In this new approach sharp interfaces are replaced by narrow transition layers arising due to adhesive forces among the cell species. Hence, a continuum thermodynamically consistent model is introduced. The resulting PDE system couples four different types of equations: a Cahn–Hilliard type equation for the tumor cells (which include proliferating and dead cells), a Darcy law for the tissue velocity field, whose divergence may be different from 0 and depend on the other variables, a transport equation for the proliferating (viable) tumor cells, and a quasi-static reaction diffusion equation for the nutrient concentration. We establish existence of weak solutions for the PDE system coupled with suitable initial and boundary conditions. In particular, the proliferation function at the boundary is supposed to be nonnegative on the set where the velocity \\mathbf{u} satisfies \\mathbf{u}\\centerdot ν >0 , where ν is the outer normal to the boundary of the domain.

  16. Diffuse-Interface Modelling of Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addy, Doug; Pradas, Marc; Schmuck, Marcus; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Multiphase flows are ubiquitous in a wide spectrum of scientific and engineering applications, and their computational modelling often poses many challenges associated with the presence of free boundaries and interfaces. Interfacial flows in porous media encounter additional challenges and complexities due to their inherently multiscale behaviour. Here we investigate the dynamics of interfaces in porous media using an effective convective Cahn-Hilliard (CH) equation recently developed in from a Stokes-CH equation for microscopic heterogeneous domains by means of a homogenization methodology, where the microscopic details are taken into account as effective tensor coefficients which are given by a Poisson equation. The equations are decoupled under appropriate assumptions and solved in series using a classic finite-element formulation with the open-source software FEniCS. We investigate the effects of different microscopic geometries, including periodic and non-periodic, at the bulk fluid flow, and find that our model is able to describe the effective macroscopic behaviour without the need to resolve the microscopic details.

  17. The wave-based substructuring approach for the efficient description of interface dynamics in substructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donders, S.; Pluymers, B.; Ragnarsson, P.; Hadjit, R.; Desmet, W.

    2010-04-01

    In the vehicle design process, design decisions are more and more based on virtual prototypes. Due to competitive and regulatory pressure, vehicle manufacturers are forced to improve product quality, to reduce time-to-market and to launch an increasing number of design variants on the global market. To speed up the design iteration process, substructuring and component mode synthesis (CMS) methods are commonly used, involving the analysis of substructure models and the synthesis of the substructure analysis results. Substructuring and CMS enable efficient decentralized collaboration across departments and allow to benefit from the availability of parallel computing environments. However, traditional CMS methods become prohibitively inefficient when substructures are coupled along large interfaces, i.e. with a large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) at the interface between substructures. The reason is that the analysis of substructures involves the calculation of a number of enrichment vectors, one for each interface degree of freedom (DOF). Since large interfaces are common in vehicles (e.g. the continuous line connections to connect the body with the windshield, roof or floor), this interface bottleneck poses a clear limitation in the vehicle noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) design process. Therefore there is a need to describe the interface dynamics more efficiently. This paper presents a wave-based substructuring (WBS) approach, which allows reducing the interface representation between substructures in an assembly by expressing the interface DOFs in terms of a limited set of basis functions ("waves"). As the number of basis functions can be much lower than the number of interface DOFs, this greatly facilitates the substructure analysis procedure and results in faster design predictions. The waves are calculated once from a full nominal assembly analysis, but these nominal waves can be re-used for the assembly of modified components. The WBS approach thus

  18. A library-based approach to portable, parallel, object-oriented programming: Interface, implementation, and application

    SciTech Connect

    Parkes, S.; Chandy, J.A.; Banerjee, P.

    1994-12-31

    The use of parallel platforms, despite increasing availability, remains largely restricted to well-structured, numeric applications. The authors address the issue of facilitating the use of parallel platforms on unstructured problems through object-oriented design techniques and the actor model of concurrent computation. They present a multi-level approach to expressing parallelism for unstructured applications: a high-level interface based on the actor model of concurrent object-oriented programming and a low-level interface which provides an object-oriented interface to system services across a wide range of parallel architectures. The high- and low-level interfaces are implemented as part of the ProperCAD II C++ class library which supports shared-memory, message-passing, and hybrid architectures. The authors demonstrate their approach through a detailed examination of the parallelization process for an existing unstructured serial application, a state-of-the-art VLSI computer-aided design application. They compare and contrast the library-based actor approach to other methods for expressing parallelism in C++ on a number of applications and kernels.

  19. The electrical behavior of GaAs-insulator interfaces - A discrete energy interface state model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazior, T. E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the electrical behavior of GaAs Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) structures and the high density discrete energy interface states (0.7 and 0.9 eV below the conduction band) was investigated utilizing photo- and thermal emission from the interface states in conjunction with capacitance measurements. It was found that all essential features of the anomalous behavior of GaAs MIS structures, such as the frequency dispersion and the C-V hysteresis, can be explained on the basis of nonequilibrium charging and discharging of the high density discrete energy interface states.

  20. Interfacing MATLAB and Python Optimizers to Black-Box Environmental Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. S.; Leung, K.; Tolson, B.

    2009-12-01

    A common approach for utilizing environmental models in a management or policy-analysis context is to incorporate them into a simulation-optimization framework - where an underlying process-based environmental model is linked with an optimization search algorithm. The optimization search algorithm iteratively adjusts various model inputs (i.e. parameters or design variables) in order to minimize an application-specific objective function computed on the basis of model outputs (i.e. response variables). Numerous optimization algorithms have been applied to the simulation-optimization of environmental systems and this research investigated the use of optimization libraries and toolboxes that are readily available in MATLAB and Python - two popular high-level programming languages. Inspired by model-independent calibration codes (e.g. PEST and UCODE), a small piece of interface software (known as PIGEON) was developed. PIGEON allows users to interface Python and MATLAB optimizers with arbitrary black-box environmental models without writing any additional interface code. An initial set of benchmark tests (involving more than 20 MATLAB and Python optimization algorithms) were performed to validate the interface software - results highlight the need to carefully consider such issues as numerical precision in output files and enforcement (or not) of parameter limits. Additional benchmark testing considered the problem of fitting isotherm expressions to laboratory data - with an emphasis on dual-mode expressions combining non-linear isotherms with a linear partitioning component. With respect to the selected isotherm fitting problems, derivative-free search algorithms significantly outperformed gradient-based algorithms. Attempts to improve gradient-based performance, via parameter tuning and also via several alternative multi-start approaches, were largely unsuccessful.

  1. A computational model for stress reduction at the skin-implant interface of osseointegrated prostheses.

    PubMed

    Yerneni, Srinivasu; Dhaher, Yasin; Kuiken, Todd A

    2012-04-01

    Osseointegrated implants (OI)s for transfemoral prosthetic attachment offer amputees an alternative to the traditional socket attachment. Potential benefits include a natural transfer of loads directly to the skeleton via the percutaneous abutment, relief of pain and discomfort of residual limb soft tissues by eliminating sockets, increased sensory feedback, and improved function. Despite the benefits, the skin-implant interface remains a critical limitation, as it is highly prone to bacterial infection. One approach to improve clinical outcomes is to minimize stress concentrations at the skin-implant interface due to shear loading, reducing soft tissue breakdown and subsequent risk of infection. We hypothesized that broadening the bone base at the distal end of the femur would provide added surface area for skin adhesion and reduce stresses at the skin-implant interface. We tested this hypothesis using finite element models of an OI in a residual limb. Results showed a dramatic decrease in stress reduction, with up to ~90% decrease in stresses at the skin-implant interface as cortical bone thickness increased from 2 to 8 mm. The findings in this study suggests that surgical techniques could stabilize the skin-implant interface, thus enhancing a skin-to-bone seal around the percutaneous device and minimizing infection.

  2. Voltage harmonic elimination with RLC based interface smoothing filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, K.; Ramachandaramurthy, V. K.

    2015-04-01

    A method is proposed for designing a Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR) with RLC interface smoothing filter. The RLC filter connected between the IGBT based Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) is attempted to eliminate voltage harmonics in the busbar voltage and switching harmonics from VSI by producing a PWM controlled harmonic voltage. In this method, the DVR or series active filter produces PWM voltage that cancels the existing harmonic voltage due to any harmonic voltage source. The proposed method is valid for any distorted busbar voltage. The operating VSI handles no active power but only harmonic power. The DVR is able to suppress the lower order switching harmonics generated by the IGBT based VSI. Good dynamic and transient results obtained. The Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) is minimized to zero at the sensitive load end. Digital simulations are carried out using PSCAD/EMTDC to validate the performance of RLC filter. Simulated results are presented.

  3. Brain-computer interface using water-based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosyak, Ivan; Valbuena, Diana; Malechka, Tatsiana; Peuscher, Jan; Gräser, Axel

    2010-12-01

    Current brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that make use of EEG acquisition techniques require unpleasant electrode gel causing skin abrasion during the standard preparation procedure. Electrodes that require tap water instead of electrolytic electrode gel would make both daily setup and clean up much faster, easier and comfortable. This paper presents the results from ten subjects that controlled an SSVEP-based BCI speller system using two EEG sensor modalities: water-based and gel-based surface electrodes. Subjects performed in copy spelling mode using conventional gel-based electrodes and water-based electrodes with a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 29.68 ± 14.088 bit min-1 and of 26.56 ± 9.224 bit min-1, respectively. A paired t-test failed to reveal significant differences in the information transfer rates and accuracies of using gel- or water-based electrodes for EEG acquisition. This promising result confirms the operational readiness of water-based electrodes for BCI applications.

  4. Modeling of tunneling current in ultrathin MOS structure with interface trap charge and fixed oxide charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Huang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Feng-Min

    2013-01-01

    A model based on analysis of the self-consistent Poisson—Schrodinger equation is proposed to investigate the tunneling current of electrons in the inversion layer of a p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure. In this model, the influences of interface trap charge (ITC) at the Si—SiO2 interface and fixed oxide charge (FOC) in the oxide region are taken into account, and one-band effective mass approximation is used. The tunneling probability is obtained by employing the transfer matrix method. Further, the effects of in-plane momentum on the quantization in the electron motion perpendicular to the Si—SiO2 interface of a MOS device are investigated. Theoretical simulation results indicate that both ITC and FOC have great influence on the tunneling current through a MOS structure when their densities are larger than 1012 cm-2, which results from the great change of bound electrons near the Si—SiO2 interface and the oxide region. Therefore, for real ultrathin MOS structures with ITC and FOC, this model can give a more accurate description for the tunneling current in the inversion layer.

  5. Mathematical modeling of dispersion in single interface flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S Sofia M; Marques, Karine L; Lopes, João A; Santos, João L M; Lima, José L F C

    2010-03-24

    This work describes the optimization of the recently proposed fluid management methodology single interface flow analysis (SIFA) using chemometrics modelling. The influence of the most important physical and hydrodynamic flow parameters of SIFA systems on the axial dispersion coefficients estimated with the axially dispersed plug-flow model, was evaluated with chemometrics linear (multivariate linear regression) and non-linear (simple multiplicative and feed-forward neural networks) models. A D-optimal experimental design built with three reaction coil properties (length, configuration and internal diameter), flow-cell volume and flow rate, was adopted to generate the experimental data. Bromocresol green was used as the dye solution and the analytical signals were monitored by spectrophotometric detection at 614 nm. Results demonstrate that, independent of the model type, the statistically relevant parameters were the reactor coil length and internal diameter and the flow rate. The linear and non-linear multiplicative models were able to estimate the axial dispersion coefficient with validation r(2)=0.86. Artificial neural networks estimated the same parameter with an increased accuracy (r(2)=0.93), demonstrating that relations between the physical parameters and the dispersion phenomena are highly non-linear. The analysis of the response surface control charts simulated with the developed models allowed the interpretation of the relationships between the physical parameters and the dispersion processes.

  6. Facilitating access to laboratory guidelines by modeling their contents and designing a computerized user interface.

    PubMed

    Yasini, Mobin; Duclos, Catherine; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Venot, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory tests are not always prescribed appropriately. Guidelines for some important laboratory tests have been developed by expert panels in the Parisian region to maximize the appropriateness of laboratory medicine. However; these recommendations are not frequently consulted by physicians and nurses. We developed a system facilitating consultation of these guidelines, to increase their usability. Elements of information contained in these documents were identified and included in recommendations of different categories. UML modeling was used to represent these categories and their relationships to each other in the guidelines. We used the generated model to implement a computerized interface. The prototype interface, based on web-based technology was found to be rapid and easy to use. By clicking on provided keywords, information about the subject sought is highlighted whilst retaining the entire text of the guideline on-screen.

  7. A model of blind zone for in situ monitoring the solid/liquid interface using ultrasonic wave.

    PubMed

    Peng, Song; Ouyang, Qi; Zhu, Z Z; Zhang, X L

    2015-07-01

    To in situ monitor a solid/liquid interface to control metal qualities, the paper analysis blind models of the ultrasonic propagation in the solidifying molten metal with a solid/liquid interface in the Bridgman type furnace, and a mathematical calculation model of blind zone with different source locations and surface concavities is built. The study points out that the blind zone I is caused by ray bending in the interface edge, and the blind zone II is caused by totally reflection which is related with initial ray angle, critical refraction angle of solid/liquid media. A serial of simulation experiments are operated on the base of the model, and numerical computation results coincide with model calculated results very well. Therefore, receiver should locate beyond these blind zones in the right boundary to obtain time of flight data which is used to reconstruct the solid/liquid interface.

  8. A robust and flexible Geospatial Modeling Interface (GMI) for environmental model deployment and evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper provides an overview of the GMI (Geospatial Modeling Interface) simulation framework for environmental model deployment and assessment. GMI currently provides access to multiple environmental models including AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W), Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis 2 (NLEA...

  9. Modeling and diagnosing interface mix in layered ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Clark, D. S.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing at the fuel-ablator interface of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion can arise from an unfavorable in-flight Atwood number between the cryogenic DT fuel and the ablator. High-Z dopant is typically added to the ablator to control the Atwood number, but recent high-density carbon (HDC) capsules have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) without this added dopant. Highly resolved post-shot modeling of these implosions shows that there was significant mixing of ablator material into the dense DT fuel. This mix lowers the fuel density and results in less overall compression, helping to explain the measured ratio of down scattered-to-primary neutrons. Future experimental designs will seek to improve this issue through adding dopant and changing the x-ray spectra with a different hohlraum wall material. To test these changes, we are designing an experimental platform to look at the growth of this mixing layer. This technique uses side-on radiography to measure the spatial extent of an embedded high-Z tracer layer near the interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Design of video interface conversion system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Heng; Wang, Xiang-jun

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a FPGA based video interface conversion system that enables the inter-conversion between digital and analog video. Cyclone IV series EP4CE22F17C chip from Altera Corporation is used as the main video processing chip, and single-chip is used as the information interaction control unit between FPGA and PC. The system is able to encode/decode messages from the PC. Technologies including video decoding/encoding circuits, bus communication protocol, data stream de-interleaving and de-interlacing, color space conversion and the Camera Link timing generator module of FPGA are introduced. The system converts Composite Video Broadcast Signal (CVBS) from the CCD camera into Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS), which will be collected by the video processing unit with Camera Link interface. The processed video signals will then be inputted to system output board and displayed on the monitor.The current experiment shows that it can achieve high-quality video conversion with minimum board size.

  11. Towards the virtual artery: a multiscale model for vascular physiology at the physics–chemistry–biology interface

    PubMed Central

    Alowayyed, Saad; Lorenz, Eric; Melnikova, Natalia; Mountrakis, Lampros; van Rooij, Britt; Svitenkov, Andrew; Závodszky, Gábor; Zun, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    This discussion paper introduces the concept of the Virtual Artery as a multiscale model for arterial physiology and pathologies at the physics–chemistry–biology (PCB) interface. The cellular level is identified as the mesoscopic level, and we argue that by coupling cell-based models with other relevant models on the macro- and microscale, a versatile model of arterial health and disease can be composed. We review the necessary ingredients, both models of arteries at many different scales, as well as generic methods to compose multiscale models. Next, we discuss how this can be combined into the virtual artery. Finally, we argue that the concept of models at the PCB interface could or perhaps should become a powerful paradigm, not only as in our case for studying physiology, but also for many other systems that have such PCB interfaces. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling at the physics–chemistry–biology interface’. PMID:27698036

  12. A Natural Language Interface Concordant with a Knowledge Base.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-Jin; Park, Seong-Bae; Park, Se-Young

    2016-01-01

    The discordance between expressions interpretable by a natural language interface (NLI) system and those answerable by a knowledge base is a critical problem in the field of NLIs. In order to solve this discordance problem, this paper proposes a method to translate natural language questions into formal queries that can be generated from a graph-based knowledge base. The proposed method considers a subgraph of a knowledge base as a formal query. Thus, all formal queries corresponding to a concept or a predicate in the knowledge base can be generated prior to query time and all possible natural language expressions corresponding to each formal query can also be collected in advance. A natural language expression has a one-to-one mapping with a formal query. Hence, a natural language question is translated into a formal query by matching the question with the most appropriate natural language expression. If the confidence of this matching is not sufficiently high the proposed method rejects the question and does not answer it. Multipredicate queries are processed by regarding them as a set of collected expressions. The experimental results show that the proposed method thoroughly handles answerable questions from the knowledge base and rejects unanswerable ones effectively.

  13. Modeling the Electrical Contact Resistance at Steel-Carbon Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimmo, Ayoola T.; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    In the aluminum smelting industry, electrical contact resistance at the stub-carbon (steel-carbon) interface has been recurrently reported to be of magnitudes that legitimately necessitate concern. Mitigating this via finite element modeling has been the focus of a number of investigations, with the pressure- and temperature-dependent contact resistance relation frequently cited as a factor that limits the accuracy of such models. In this study, pressure- and temperature-dependent relations are derived from the most extensively cited works that have experimentally characterized the electrical contact resistance at these contacts. These relations are applied in a validated thermo-electro-mechanical finite element model used to estimate the voltage drop across a steel-carbon laboratory setup. By comparing the models' estimate of the contact electrical resistance with experimental measurements, we deduce the applicability of the different relations over a range of temperatures. The ultimate goal of this study is to apply mathematical modeling in providing pressure- and temperature-dependent relations that best describe the steel-carbon electrical contact resistance and identify the best fit relation at specific thermodynamic conditions.

  14. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics. PMID:26069968

  15. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography.

    PubMed

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics.

  16. Parallelization of a hydrological model using the message passing interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Yiping; Li, Tiejian; Sun, Liqun; Chen, Ji

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the natural processes, hydrological models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) are becoming larger and more complex with increasing computation time. Additionally, other procedures such as model calibration, which may require thousands of model iterations, can increase running time and thus further reduce rapid modeling and analysis. Using the widely-applied SWAT as an example, this study demonstrates how to parallelize a serial hydrological model in a Windows® environment using a parallel programing technology—Message Passing Interface (MPI). With a case study, we derived the optimal values for the two parameters (the number of processes and the corresponding percentage of work to be distributed to the master process) of the parallel SWAT (P-SWAT) on an ordinary personal computer and a work station. Our study indicates that model execution time can be reduced by 42%–70% (or a speedup of 1.74–3.36) using multiple processes (two to five) with a proper task-distribution scheme (between the master and slave processes). Although the computation time cost becomes lower with an increasing number of processes (from two to five), this enhancement becomes less due to the accompanied increase in demand for message passing procedures between the master and all slave processes. Our case study demonstrates that the P-SWAT with a five-process run may reach the maximum speedup, and the performance can be quite stable (fairly independent of a project size). Overall, the P-SWAT can help reduce the computation time substantially for an individual model run, manual and automatic calibration procedures, and optimization of best management practices. In particular, the parallelization method we used and the scheme for deriving the optimal parameters in this study can be valuable and easily applied to other hydrological or environmental models.

  17. Optimization-based interactive segmentation interface for multiregion problems.

    PubMed

    Baxter, John S H; Rajchl, Martin; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2016-04-01

    Interactive segmentation is becoming of increasing interest to the medical imaging community in that it combines the positive aspects of both manual and automated segmentation. However, general-purpose tools have been lacking in terms of segmenting multiple regions simultaneously with a high degree of coupling between groups of labels. Hierarchical max-flow segmentation has taken advantage of this coupling for individual applications, but until recently, these algorithms were constrained to a particular hierarchy and could not be considered general-purpose. In a generalized form, the hierarchy for any given segmentation problem is specified in run-time, allowing different hierarchies to be quickly explored. We present an interactive segmentation interface, which uses generalized hierarchical max-flow for optimization-based multiregion segmentation guided by user-defined seeds. Applications in cardiac and neonatal brain segmentation are given as example applications of its generality.

  18. Runwien: a text-based interface for the WIEN package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero de la Roza, A.; Luaña, Víctor

    2009-05-01

    A new text-based interface for WIEN2k, the full-potential linearized augmented plane-waves (FPLAPW) program, is presented. This code provides an easy to use, yet powerful way of generating arbitrarily large sets of calculations. Thus, properties over a potential energy surface and WIEN2k parameter exploration can be calculated using a simple input text file. This interface also provides new capabilities to the WIEN2k package, such as the calculation of elastic constants on hexagonal systems or the automatic gathering of relevant information. Additionally, runwien is modular, flexible and intuitive. Program summaryProgram title: runwien Catalogue identifier: AECM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 62 567 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 610 973 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: gawk (with locale POSIX or similar) Computer: All running Unix, Linux Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux Classification: 7.3 External routines: WIEN2k ( http://www.wien2k.at/), GAWK ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gawk/), rename by L. Wall, a Perl script which renames files, modified by R. Barker to check for the existence of target files, gnuplot ( http://www.gnuplot.info/) Subprograms used:Cat Id: ADSY_v1_0/AECB_v1_0, Title: GIBBS/CRITIC, Reference: CPC 158 (2004) 57/CPC 999 (2009) 999 Nature of problem: Creation of a text-based, batch-oriented interface for the WIEN2k package. Solution method: WIEN2k solves the Kohn-Sham equations of a solid using the FPLAPW formalism. Runwien interprets an input file containing the description of the geometry and structure of the solid and drives the execution of the WIEN2k programs. The input is simplified thanks to the default values of the WIEN2k parameters known to runwien. Additional

  19. Formulation of consumables management models: Mission planning processor payload interface definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torian, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Consumables models required for the mission planning and scheduling function are formulated. The relation of the models to prelaunch, onboard, ground support, and postmission functions for the space transportation systems is established. Analytical models consisting of an orbiter planning processor with consumables data base is developed. A method of recognizing potential constraint violations in both the planning and flight operations functions, and a flight data file storage/retrieval of information over an extended period which interfaces with a flight operations processor for monitoring of the actual flights is presented.

  20. Analytical model for Transient Current Technique (TCT) signal prediction and analysis for thin interface characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronuzzi, J.; Mapelli, A.; Sallese, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    A silicon wafer bonding technique has been recently proposed for the fabrication of monolithic silicon radiation detectors. This new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer. Therefore, monolithic silicon detectors could be fabricated in this way which would allow the free choice of electronic chips and high resistive silicon bulk, even from different providers. Moreover, a monolithic detector with a high resistive bulk would also be available. Electrical properties of the bonded interface are then critical for this application. Indeed, mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface to be collected by the read-out electronics. In order to characterize this interface, the concept of Transient Current Technique (TCT) has been explored by means of numerical simulations combined with a physics based analytical model. In this work, the analytical model giving insight into the physics behind the TCT dependence upon interface traps is validated using both TCAD simulations and experimental measurements.

  1. Characterizing and Modeling Brittle Bi-material Interfaces Subjected to Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos N.; Berggreen, Christian

    2014-12-01

    This work is based on the investigation, both experimentally and numerically, of the Mode II fracture process and bond strength of bondlines formed in co-cured composite/metal joints. To this end, GFRP-to-steel double strap joints were tested in tension, so that the bi-material interface was subjected to shear with debonding occurring under Mode II conditions. The study of the debonding process and thus failure of the joints was based both on stress and energy considerations. Analytical formulas were utilized for the derivation of the respective shear strength and fracture toughness measures which characterize the bi-material interface, by considering the joint's failure load, geometry and involved materials. The derived stress and toughness magnitudes were further utilized as the parameters of an extrinsic cohesive law, applied in connection with the modeling the bi-material interface in a finite element simulation environment. It was concluded that interfacial fracture in the considered joints was driven by the fracture toughness and not by strength considerations, and that LEFM is well suited to analyze the failure of the joint. Additionally, the double strap joint geometry was identified and utilized as a characterization test for measuring the Mode II fracture toughness of brittle bi-material interfaces.

  2. A user interface for the Kansas Geological Survey slug test model.

    PubMed

    Esling, Steven P; Keller, John E

    2009-01-01

    The Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) developed a semianalytical solution for slug tests that incorporates the effects of partial penetration, anisotropy, and the presence of variable conductivity well skins. The solution can simulate either confined or unconfined conditions. The original model, written in FORTRAN, has a text-based interface with rigid input requirements and limited output options. We re-created the main routine for the KGS model as a Visual Basic macro that runs in most versions of Microsoft Excel and built a simple-to-use Excel spreadsheet interface that automatically displays the graphical results of the test. A comparison of the output from the original FORTRAN code to that of the new Excel spreadsheet version for three cases produced identical results.

  3. Modeling and dynamic simulation of ultraviolet induced growing interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicstein, J.; Guillonneau, E.; Pata, S.; Kee Chun, L. S.; Palmier, J. F.; Daguet, C.; Courant, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    A solid-on-solid (SOS) model to simulate SiN:H dynamic surface characteristics in ultraviolet chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto indium phosphide is presented. It is recognized that the nucleation process occurs at an UV induced active charged center on the surface of the substrate. Photolysis rates are determined using bond dissociation energies for molecular processes to generate active adsorbed species. The microscopic activation energy in elementary processes depends on the configuration of neighbouring atoms. Monte Carlo-Metropolis method using microscopic activation energy barriers is taken into account in molecular processes by a three-dimensional algorithm. The model includes lattice coordination and atom-atom interactions out to third-nearest neighbours. The molecular events are chosen with a probability of occurrence that depends on the kinetic rates at each atomic site. Stable incorporation of main species is enabled. Three-dimensional simulation of a growing interface indicates validation of a thermally activated rough-smooth transition for submicronic thick layers in the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.

  4. Reduction of nonlinear embedded boundary models for problems with evolving interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balajewicz, Maciej; Farhat, Charbel

    2014-10-01

    Embedded boundary methods alleviate many computational challenges, including those associated with meshing complex geometries and solving problems with evolving domains and interfaces. Developing model reduction methods for computational frameworks based on such methods seems however to be challenging. Indeed, most popular model reduction techniques are projection-based, and rely on basis functions obtained from the compression of simulation snapshots. In a traditional interface-fitted computational framework, the computation of such basis functions is straightforward, primarily because the computational domain does not contain in this case a fictitious region. This is not the case however for an embedded computational framework because the computational domain typically contains in this case both real and ghost regions whose definitions complicate the collection and compression of simulation snapshots. The problem is exacerbated when the interface separating both regions evolves in time. This paper addresses this issue by formulating the snapshot compression problem as a weighted low-rank approximation problem where the binary weighting identifies the evolving component of the individual simulation snapshots. The proposed approach is application independent and therefore comprehensive. It is successfully demonstrated for the model reduction of several two-dimensional, vortex-dominated, fluid-structure interaction problems.

  5. JAIL: a structure-based interface library for macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Günther, Stefan; von Eichborn, Joachim; May, Patrick; Preissner, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The increasing number of solved macromolecules provides a solid number of 3D interfaces, if all types of molecular contacts are being considered. JAIL annotates three different kinds of macromolecular interfaces, those between interacting protein domains, interfaces of different protein chains and interfaces between proteins and nucleic acids. This results in a total number of about 184,000 database entries. All the interfaces can easily be identified by a detailed search form or by a hierarchical tree that describes the protein domain architectures classified by the SCOP database. Visual inspection of the interfaces is possible via an interactive protein viewer. Furthermore, large scale analyses are supported by an implemented sequential and by a structural clustering. Similar interfaces as well as non-redundant interfaces can be easily picked out. Additionally, the sequential conservation of binding sites was also included in the database and is retrievable via Jmol. A comprehensive download section allows the composition of representative data sets with user defined parameters. The huge data set in combination with various search options allow a comprehensive view on all interfaces between macromolecules included in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The download of the data sets supports numerous further investigations in macromolecular recognition. JAIL is publicly available at http://bioinformatics.charite.de/jail.

  6. An SPH model for multiphase flows with complex interfaces and large density differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Zong, Z.; Liu, M. B.; Zou, L.; Li, H. T.; Shu, C.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, an improved SPH model for multiphase flows with complex interfaces and large density differences is developed. The multiphase SPH model is based on the assumption of pressure continuity over the interfaces and avoids directly using the information of neighboring particles' densities or masses in solving governing equations. In order to improve computational accuracy and to obtain smooth pressure fields, a corrected density re-initialization is applied. A coupled dynamic solid boundary treatment (SBT) is implemented both to reduce numerical oscillations and to prevent unphysical particle penetration in the boundary area. The density correction and coupled dynamics SBT algorithms are modified to adapt to the density discontinuity on fluid interfaces in multiphase simulation. A cut-off value of the particle density is set to avoid negative pressure, which can lead to severe numerical difficulties and may even terminate the simulations. Three representative numerical examples, including a Rayleigh-Taylor instability test, a non-Boussinesq problem and a dam breaking simulation, are presented and compared with analytical results or experimental data. It is demonstrated that the present SPH model is capable of modeling complex multiphase flows with large interfacial deformations and density ratios.

  7. Graphical User Interface for Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, R. Caitlyn

    2009-01-01

    The J-2X Engine (built by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne,) in the Upper Stage of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, will only start within a certain range of temperature and pressure for Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen propellants. The purpose of the Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model is to verify that in all reasonable conditions the temperature and pressure of the propellants are within the required J-2X engine start boxes. In order to run the simulation, test variables must be entered at all reasonable values of parameters such as heat leak and mass flow rate. To make this testing process as efficient as possible in order to save the maximum amount of time and money, and to show that the J-2X engine will start when it is required to do so, a graphical user interface (GUI) was created to allow the input of values to be used as parameters in the Simulink Model, without opening or altering the contents of the model. The GUI must allow for test data to come from Microsoft Excel files, allow those values to be edited before testing, place those values into the Simulink Model, and get the output from the Simulink Model. The GUI was built using MATLAB, and will run the Simulink simulation when the Simulate option is activated. After running the simulation, the GUI will construct a new Microsoft Excel file, as well as a MATLAB matrix file, using the output values for each test of the simulation so that they may graphed and compared to other values.

  8. Does screw-bone interface modelling matter in finite element analyses?

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Alisdair R; Pankaj, Pankaj; Simpson, A Hamish R W

    2012-06-01

    The effect of screw-bone interface modelling strategies was evaluated in the setting of a tibial mid-shaft fracture stabilised using locking plates. Three interface models were examined: fully bonded interface; screw with sliding contact with bone; and screw with sliding contact with bone in an undersized pilot hole. For the simulation of the last interface condition we used a novel thermal expansion approach to generate the pre-stress that the bone would be exposed to during screw insertion. The study finds that the global load-deformation response is not influenced by the interface modelling approach employed; the deformation varied by less than 1% between different interaction models. However, interface modelling is found to have a considerable impact on the local stress-strain environment within the bone in the vicinity of the screws. Frictional and tied representations did not have significantly different peak strain values (<5% difference); the frictional interface had higher peak compressive strains while the tied interface had higher tensile strains. The undersized pilot hole simulation produced the largest strains. The peak minimum principal strains for the frictional interface were 26% of those for the undersized pilot hole simulation at a load of 770 N. It is concluded that the commonly used tie constraint can be used effectively when the only interest is the global load-deformation behaviour. Different contact interface models, however, alter the mechanical response around screw holes leading to different predictions for screw loosening, bone damage and stress shielding.

  9. Haptic Interfaces: Getting in Touch with Web-based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussell, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Explains haptic computer interfaces for Web sites that relay touch-sensory feedback to the user. Discusses the importance of touch to cognition and learning; whether haptics can improve performance and learning; haptic interfaces for accessibility for blind and physically impaired users; comparisons of haptic devices; barriers to implementation;…

  10. Challenges in Modeling of the Plasma-Material Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag; Meyer, Fred; Allain, Jean Paul

    2013-09-01

    Plasma-Material Interface mixes materials of the two worlds, creating a new entity, a dynamical surface, which communicates between the two and represent one of the most challenging areas of multidisciplinary science, with many fundamental processes and synergies. How to build an integrated theoretical-experimental approach? Without mutual validation of experiment and theory chances very slim to have believable results? The outreach of the PMI science modeling at the fusion plasma facilities is illustrated by the significant step forward in understanding achieved recently by the quantum-classical modeling of the lithiated carbon surfaces irradiated by deuterium, showing surprisingly large role of oxygen in the deuterium retention and erosion chemistry. The plasma-facing walls of the next-generation fusion reactors will be exposed to high fluxes of neutrons and plasma-particles and will operate at high temperatures for thermodynamic efficiency. To this end we have been studying the evolution dynamics of vacancies and interstitials to the saturated dpa doses of tungsten surfaces bombarded by self-atoms, as well as the plasma-surface interactions of the damaged surfaces (erosion, hydrogen and helium uptake and fuzz formation). PSK and FWM acknowledge support of the ORNL LDRD program.

  11. Driven Interfaces: From Flow to Creep Through Model Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agoritsas, Elisabeth; García-García, Reinaldo; Lecomte, Vivien; Truskinovsky, Lev; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2016-09-01

    The response of spatially extended systems to a force leading their steady state out of equilibrium is strongly affected by the presence of disorder. We focus on the mean velocity induced by a constant force applied on one-dimensional interfaces. In the absence of disorder, the velocity is linear in the force. In the presence of disorder, it is widely admitted, as well as experimentally and numerically verified, that the velocity presents a stretched exponential dependence in the force (the so-called `creep law'), which is out of reach of linear response, or more generically of direct perturbative expansions at small force. In dimension one, there is no exact analytical derivation of such a law, even from a theoretical physical point of view. We propose an effective model with two degrees of freedom, constructed from the full spatially extended model, that captures many aspects of the creep phenomenology. It provides a justification of the creep law form of the velocity-force characteristics, in a quasistatic approximation. It allows, moreover, to capture the non-trivial effects of short-range correlations in the disorder, which govern the low-temperature asymptotics. It enables us to establish a phase diagram where the creep law manifests itself in the vicinity of the origin in the force-system-size-temperature coordinates. Conjointly, we characterise the crossover between the creep regime and a linear-response regime that arises due to finite system size.

  12. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models.

    PubMed

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer.

  13. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models

    PubMed Central

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer. PMID:27445657

  14. Modeling Geometry and Progressive Failure of Material Interfaces in Plain Weave Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Su-Yuen; Cheng, Ron-Bin

    2010-01-01

    A procedure combining a geometrically nonlinear, explicit-dynamics contact analysis, computer aided design techniques, and elasticity-based mesh adjustment is proposed to efficiently generate realistic finite element models for meso-mechanical analysis of progressive failure in textile composites. In the procedure, the geometry of fiber tows is obtained by imposing a fictitious expansion on the tows. Meshes resulting from the procedure are conformal with the computed tow-tow and tow-matrix interfaces but are incongruent at the interfaces. The mesh interfaces are treated as cohesive contact surfaces not only to resolve the incongruence but also to simulate progressive failure. The method is employed to simulate debonding at the material interfaces in a ceramic-matrix plain weave composite with matrix porosity and in a polymeric matrix plain weave composite without matrix porosity, both subject to uniaxial cyclic loading. The numerical results indicate progression of the interfacial damage during every loading and reverse loading event in a constant strain amplitude cyclic process. However, the composites show different patterns of damage advancement.

  15. Modelling the inhomogeneous SiC Schottky interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, P. M.; Pérez-Tomás, A.; Shah, V. A.; Vavasour, O.; Donchev, E.; Pang, J. S.; Myronov, M.; Fisher, C. A.; Jennings, M. R.; Leadley, D. R.; Mawby, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, the I-V-T dataset of a Schottky diode has been accurately modelled, parameterised, and fully fit, incorporating the effects of interface inhomogeneity, patch pinch-off and resistance, and ideality factors that are both heavily temperature and voltage dependent. A Ni/SiC Schottky diode is characterised at 2 K intervals from 20 to 320 K, which, at room temperature, displays low ideality factors (n < 1.01) that suggest that these diodes may be homogeneous. However, at cryogenic temperatures, excessively high (n > 8), voltage dependent ideality factors and evidence of the so-called "thermionic field emission effect" within a T0-plot, suggest significant inhomogeneity. Two models are used, each derived from Tung's original interactive parallel conduction treatment of barrier height inhomogeneity that can reproduce these commonly seen effects in single temperature I-V traces. The first model incorporates patch pinch-off effects and produces accurate and reliable fits above around 150 K, and at current densities lower than 10-5 A cm-2. Outside this region, we show that resistive effects within a given patch are responsible for the excessive ideality factors, and a second simplified model incorporating these resistive effects as well as pinch-off accurately reproduces the entire temperature range. Analysis of these fitting parameters reduces confidence in those fits above 230 K, and questions are raised about the physical interpretation of the fitting parameters. Despite this, both methods used are shown to be useful tools for accurately reproducing I-V-T data over a large temperature range.

  16. A DIFFUSE-INTERFACE APPROACH FOR MODELING TRANSPORT, DIFFUSION AND ADSORPTION/DESORPTION OF MATERIAL QUANTITIES ON A DEFORMABLE INTERFACE*

    PubMed Central

    Teigen, Knut Erik; Li, Xiangrong; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Fan; Voigt, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented to solve two-phase problems involving a material quantity on an interface. The interface can be advected, stretched, and change topology, and material can be adsorbed to or desorbed from it. The method is based on the use of a diffuse interface framework, which allows a simple implementation using standard finite-difference or finite-element techniques. Here, finite-difference methods on a block-structured adaptive grid are used, and the resulting equations are solved using a non-linear multigrid method. Interfacial flow with soluble surfactants is used as an example of the application of the method, and several test cases are presented demonstrating its accuracy and convergence. PMID:21373370

  17. Interfacing comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with advanced aeromechanics and vortex wake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying

    This dissertation describes three aspects of the comprehensive rotorcraft analysis. First, a physics-based methodology for the modeling of hydraulic devices within multibody-based comprehensive models of rotorcraft systems is developed. This newly proposed approach can predict the fully nonlinear behavior of hydraulic devices, and pressure levels in the hydraulic chambers are coupled with the dynamic response of the system. The proposed hydraulic device models are implemented in a multibody code and calibrated by comparing their predictions with test bench measurements for the UH-60 helicopter lead-lag damper. Predicted peak damping forces were found to be in good agreement with measurements, while the model did not predict the entire time history of damper force to the same level of accuracy. The proposed model evaluates relevant hydraulic quantities such as chamber pressures, orifice flow rates, and pressure relief valve displacements. This model could be used to design lead-lag dampers with desirable force and damping characteristics. The second part of this research is in the area of computational aeroelasticity, in which an interface between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD) is established. This interface enables data exchange between CFD and CSD with the goal of achieving accurate airloads predictions. In this work, a loose coupling approach based on the delta-airloads method is developed in a finite-element method based multibody dynamics formulation, DYMORE. To validate this aerodynamic interface, a CFD code, OVERFLOW-2, is loosely coupled with a CSD program, DYMORE, to compute the airloads of different flight conditions for Sikorsky UH-60 aircraft. This loose coupling approach has good convergence characteristics. The predicted airloads are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, although not for all flight conditions. In addition, the tight coupling interface between the CFD program, OVERFLOW

  18. Modeling growth, coalescence, and stability of helium precipitates on patterned interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryev, D. V.; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a phase field simulation to model morphology evolution of helium (He) precipitates on solid-state interfaces. Our approach accounts for differences in precipitate contact angles arising from location-dependent interface energies and is capable of describing precipitate growth, coalescence, and de-wetting from the interface. We demonstrate our approach for interfaces with linear chains of wettable patches and find that different wetting energies and patch spacings give rise to four distinct classes of helium precipitate morphologies. Our method may be adapted to other scenarios involving fluids precipitating on non-uniform solid-state interfaces as well as to precipitation on patterned surfaces.

  19. An alternative accident prediction model for highway-rail interfaces.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ross D; Carson, Jodi L

    2002-01-01

    Safety levels at highway/rail interfaces continue to be of major concern despite an ever-increasing focus on improved design and appurtenance application practices. Despite the encouraging trend towards improved safety, accident frequencies remain high, many of which result in fatalities. More than half of these accidents occur at public crossings, where active warning devices (i.e. gates, lights, bells, etc.) are in place and functioning properly. This phenomenon speaks directly to the need to re-examine both safety evaluation (i.e. accident prediction) methods and design practices at highway-rail crossings. With respect to earlier developed accident prediction methods, the Peabody Dimmick Formula, the New Hampshire Index and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Hazard Index, all lack descriptive capabilities due to their limited number of explanatory variables. Further, each has unique limitations that are detailed in this paper. The US Department of Transportation's (USDOT) Accident Prediction Formula, which is most widely, also has limitations related to the complexity of the three-stage formula and its decline in accident prediction model accuracy over time. This investigation resulted in the development of an alternate highway-rail crossing accident prediction model, using negative binomial regression that shows great promise. The benefit to be gained through the application of this alternate model is (1) a greatly simplified, one-step estimation process; (2) comparable supporting data requirements and (3) interpretation of both the magnitude and direction of the effect of the factors found to significantly influence highway-rail crossing accident frequencies.

  20. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

    2009-12-16

    Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the

  1. A Wireless sEMG-Based Body-Machine Interface for Assistive Technology Devices.

    PubMed

    Fall, Cheikh Latyr; Gagnon-Turcotte, Gabriel; Dube, J F; Gagne, Jean Simon; Delisle, Yanick; Campeau-Lecours, Alexandre; Gosselin, Clement; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-12-21

    Assistive Technology (AT) tools and appliances are being more and more widely used and developed worldwide to improve the autonomy of people living with disabilities and ease the interaction with their environments. This paper describes an intuitive and wireless surface electromyography (sEMG) based body-machine interface for AT tools. Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) at C5-C8 levels affect patients' arms, forearms, hands and fingers control. Thus, using classical AT control interfaces (keypads, joysticks, etc.) is often difficult or impossible. The proposed system reads the AT users' Residual Functional Capacities (RFCs) through their sEMG activity, and converts them into appropriate commands using a threshold-based control algorithm. It has proven to be suitable as a control alternative for assistive devices and has been tested with the JACO arm, an articulated assistive device of which the vocation is to help people living with upper-body disabilities in their daily life activities. The wireless prototype, the architecture of which is based on a 3-channel sEMG measurement system and a 915-MHz wireless transceiver built around a low-power microcontroller, uses low-cost off-the-shelf commercial components. The embedded controller is compared with JACO's regular joystick-based interface, using combinations of forearm, pectoral, masseter and trapeze muscles. The measured index of performance values are 0.88, 0.51 and 0.41 bits/s respectively, for correlation coefficients with the Fitt's model of 0.75, 0.85 and 0.67. These results demonstrate that the proposed controller offers an attractive alternative to conventional interfaces, such as joystick devices, for upper-body disabled people using assistive technologies such as JACO.

  2. Interface controlled plastic flow modelled by strain gradient plasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Thomas; Massart, Thierry J.

    The resistance to plastic flow in metals is often dominated by the presence of interfaces which interfere with dislocation nucleation and motion. Interfaces can be static such as grain and phase boundaries or dynamic such as new boundaries resulting from a phase transformation. The interface can be hard and fully impenetrable to dislocations, or soft and partly or fully transparent. The interactions between dislocations and interfaces constitute the main mechanism controlling the strength and strain hardening capacity of many metallic systems especially in very fine microstructures with a high density of interfaces. A phenomenological strain gradient plasticity theory is used to introduce, within a continuum framework, higher order boundary conditions which empirically represent the effect of interfaces on plastic flow. The strength of the interfaces can evolve during the loading in order to enrich the description of their response. The behaviour of single and dual phase steels, with possible TRIP effect, accounting for the interactions with static and dynamic boundaries, is addressed, with a specific focus on the size dependent strength and ductility balance. The size dependent response of weak precipitate free zones surrounding grain boundaries is treated as an example involving more than one microstructural length scale.

  3. Adaptively deformed mesh based interface method for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wan, Decheng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Mesh deformation methods are a versatile strategy for solving partial differential equations (PDEs) with a vast variety of practical applications. However, these methods break down for elliptic PDEs with discontinuous coefficients, namely, elliptic interface problems. For this class of problems, the additional interface jump conditions are required to maintain the well-posedness of the governing equation. Consequently, in order to achieve high accuracy and high order convergence, additional numerical algorithms are required to enforce the interface jump conditions in solving elliptic interface problems. The present work introduces an interface technique based adaptively deformed mesh strategy for resolving elliptic interface problems. We take the advantages of the high accuracy, flexibility and robustness of the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method to construct an adaptively deformed mesh based interface method for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients. The proposed method generates deformed meshes in the physical domain and solves the transformed governed equations in the computational domain, which maintains regular Cartesian meshes. The mesh deformation is realized by a mesh transformation PDE, which controls the mesh redistribution by a source term. The source term consists of a monitor function, which builds in mesh contraction rules. Both interface geometry based deformed meshes and solution gradient based deformed meshes are constructed to reduce the L∞ and L2 errors in solving elliptic interface problems. The proposed adaptively deformed mesh based interface method is extensively validated by many numerical experiments. Numerical results indicate that the adaptively deformed mesh based interface method outperforms the original MIB method for dealing with elliptic interface problems. PMID:22586356

  4. Recent Findings Based on Airborne Measurements at the Interface of Coastal California Clouds and Clear Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorooshian, A.; Crosbie, E.; Wang, Z.; Chuang, P. Y.; Craven, J. S.; Coggon, M. M.; Brunke, M.; Zeng, X.; Jonsson, H.; Woods, R. K.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent aircraft field experiments with the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter have targeted interfaces between clear and cloudy areas along the California coast. These campaigns, based out of Marina, California in the July-August time frame, include the Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE, 2011), Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE, 2013), and the Biological Ocean Atmospheric Study (BOAS, 2015). Results will be presented related to (i) aqueous processing of natural and anthropogenic emissions, (ii) vertical re-distribution of ocean micronutrients, and (iii) stratocumulus cloud clearings and notable thermodynamic and aerosol contrasts across the clear-cloudy interface. The results have implications for modeling and observational studies of marine boundary layer clouds, especially in relation to aerosol-cloud interactions.

  5. Web Interface for Modeling Fog Oil Dispersion During Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozar, Robert C.

    2002-08-01

    Predicting the dispersion of military camouflage training materials-Smokes and Obscurants (SO)-is a rapidly improving science. The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) developed the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC), a software package that allows the modeling of the dispersion of several potentially detrimental materials. ERDC/CERL characterized the most commonly used SO material, fog oil in HPAC terminology, to predict the SO dispersion characteristics in various training scenarios that might have an effect on Threatened and Endangered Species (TES) at DoD installations. To make the configuration more user friendly, the researchers implemented an initial web-interface version of HPAC with a modifiable fog-oil component that can be applied at any installation in the world. By this method, an installation SO trainer can plan the location and time of fog oil training activities and is able to predict the degree to which various areas will be effected, particularly important in ensuring the appropriate management of TES on a DoD installation.

  6. Triboelectrification based motion sensor for human-machine interfacing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiqing; Chen, Jun; Wen, Xiaonan; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Jin; Su, Yuanjie; Zhu, Guang; Wu, Wenzuo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-05-28

    We present triboelectrification based, flexible, reusable, and skin-friendly dry biopotential electrode arrays as motion sensors for tracking muscle motion and human-machine interfacing (HMI). The independently addressable, self-powered sensor arrays have been utilized to record the electric output signals as a mapping figure to accurately identify the degrees of freedom as well as directions and magnitude of muscle motions. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique was employed to analyse the frequency spectra of the obtained electric signals and thus to determine the motion angular velocities. Moreover, the motion sensor arrays produced a short-circuit current density up to 10.71 mA/m(2), and an open-circuit voltage as high as 42.6 V with a remarkable signal-to-noise ratio up to 1000, which enables the devices as sensors to accurately record and transform the motions of the human joints, such as elbow, knee, heel, and even fingers, and thus renders it a superior and unique invention in the field of HMI.

  7. Pyroelectric energy harvesting using liquid-based switchable thermal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, G; Ju, YS

    2013-01-15

    The pyroelectric effect offers an intriguing solid-state approach for harvesting ambient thermal energy to power distributed networks of sensors and actuators that are remotely located or otherwise difficult to access. There have been, however, few device-level demonstrations due to challenges in converting spatial temperature gradients into temporal temperature oscillations necessary for pyroelectric energy harvesting. We demonstrate the feasibility of a device concept that uses liquid-based thermal interfaces for rapid switching of the thermal conductance between a pyroelectric material and a heat source/sink and can thereby deliver high output power density. Using a thin film of a pyroelectric co-polymer together with a macroscale mechanical actuator, we operate pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting cycles at frequencies close to 1 Hz. Film-level power densities as high as 110 mW/cm(3) were achieved, limited by slow heat diffusion across a glass substrate. When combined with a laterally interdigitated electrode array and a MEMS actuator, the present design offers an attractive option for compact high-power density thermal energy harvesters. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Knowledge-based graphical interfaces for presenting technical information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiner, Steven

    1988-01-01

    Designing effective presentations of technical information is extremely difficult and time-consuming. Moreover, the combination of increasing task complexity and declining job skills makes the need for high-quality technical presentations especially urgent. We believe that this need can ultimately be met through the development of knowledge-based graphical interfaces that can design and present technical information. Since much material is most naturally communicated through pictures, our work has stressed the importance of well-designed graphics, concentrating on generating pictures and laying out displays containing them. We describe APEX, a testbed picture generation system that creates sequences of pictures that depict the performance of simple actions in a world of 3D objects. Our system supports rules for determining automatically the objects to be shown in a picture, the style and level of detail with which they should be rendered, the method by which the action itself should be indicated, and the picture's camera specification. We then describe work on GRIDS, an experimental display layout system that addresses some of the problems in designing displays containing these pictures, determining the position and size of the material to be presented.

  9. Towards a Communication Brain Computer Interface Based on Semantic Relations

    PubMed Central

    Geuze, Jeroen; Farquhar, Jason; Desain, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates a possible Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based on semantic relations. The BCI determines which prime word a subject has in mind by presenting probe words using an intelligent algorithm. Subjects indicate when a presented probe word is related to the prime word by a single finger tap. The detection of the neural signal associated with this movement is used by the BCI to decode the prime word. The movement detector combined both the evoked (ERP) and induced (ERD) responses elicited with the movement. Single trial movement detection had an average accuracy of 67%. The decoding of the prime word had an average accuracy of 38% when using 100 probes and 150 possible targets, and 41% after applying a dynamic stopping criterium, reducing the average number of probes to 47. The article shows that the intelligent algorithm used to present the probe words has a significantly higher performance than a random selection of probes. Simulations demonstrate that the BCI also works with larger vocabulary sizes, and the performance scales logarithmically with vocabulary size. PMID:24516552

  10. DPSM technique for ultrasonic field modelling near fluid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sourav; Kundu, Tribikram; Alnuaimi, Nasser A

    2007-06-01

    Distributed point source method (DPSM) is gradually gaining popularity in the field of non-destructive evaluation (NDE). DPSM is a semi-analytical technique that can be used to calculate the ultrasonic fields produced by transducers of finite dimension placed in homogeneous or non-homogeneous media. This technique has been already used to model ultrasonic fields in homogeneous and multi-layered fluid structures. In this paper the method is extended to model the ultrasonic fields generated in both fluid and solid media near a fluid-solid interface when the transducer is placed in the fluid half-space near the interface. Most results in this paper are generated by the newly developed DPSM technique that requires matrix inversion. This technique is identified as the matrix inversion based DPSM technique. Some of these results are compared with the results produced by the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral based DPSM technique. Theory behind both matrix inversion based and Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral based DPSM techniques is presented in this paper. The matrix inversion based DPSM technique is found to be very efficient for computing the ultrasonic field in non-homogeneous materials. One objective of this study is to model ultrasonic fields in both solids and fluids generated by the leaky Rayleigh wave when finite size transducers are inclined at Rayleigh critical angles. This phenomenon has been correctly modelled by the technique. It should be mentioned here that techniques based on paraxial assumptions fail to model the critical reflection phenomenon. Other advantages of the DPSM technique compared to the currently available techniques for transducer radiation modelling are discussed in the paper under Introduction.

  11. Mathematical modeling of the head-disk interface (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, Robert M.; Jhon, Myung S.

    1993-05-01

    State-of-the-art theoretical and numerical techniques required to simulate the head-disk interface (HDI) of future magnetic storage devices is presented. The severity of operating conditions (i.e., attempts to achieve flying heights as low as 40 nm) pose several challenges. Large transient pressure gradients can be established within air bearing leading to numerical oscillations as well as to increased program execution times. Enhanced gaseous rarefaction effects must also be incorporated into the analysis. In the present study, accurate nonoscillatory air bearing pressure distributions were obtained using a high resolution finite element algorithm to solve the generalized Reynolds equation. Higher order gaseous rarefaction effects are incorporated into generalized Reynolds equations using the total mass flow rate coefficient predicted from the linearized Boltzmann equation. The form of the generalized Reynolds equation that is presented in this paper is an improved version of the continued fraction approximation previously proposed by Crone et al.1 A simple scaling analysis, which is based upon the results of the linearized Boltzmann equation, will also be presented to study the effect of slider miniaturization, as well as to obtain a novel interpretation of accelerated wear and accelerated flyability test results.

  12. Scale separation for multi-scale modeling of free-surface and two-phase flows with the conservative sharp interface method

    SciTech Connect

    Han, L.H. Hu, X.Y. Adams, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a scale separation approach for multi-scale modeling of free-surface and two-phase flows with complex interface evolution. By performing a stimulus-response operation on the level-set function representing the interface, separation of resolvable and non-resolvable interface scales is achieved efficiently. Uniform positive and negative shifts of the level-set function are used to determine non-resolvable interface structures. Non-resolved interface structures are separated from the resolved ones and can be treated by a mixing model or a Lagrangian-particle model in order to preserve mass. Resolved interface structures are treated by the conservative sharp-interface model. Since the proposed scale separation approach does not rely on topological information, unlike in previous work, it can be implemented in a straightforward fashion into a given level set based interface model. A number of two- and three-dimensional numerical tests demonstrate that the proposed method is able to cope with complex interface variations accurately and significantly increases robustness against underresolved interface structures.

  13. Microchannel-based regenerative scaffold for chronic peripheral nerve interfacing in amputees

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Akhil; Tahilramani, Mayank; Bentley, John T.; Gore, Russell K.; Millard, Daniel; Mukhatyar, Vivek J.; Joseph, Anish; Haque, Adel; Stanley, Garrett B.; English, Arthur W.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2015-01-01

    Neurally controlled prosthetics that cosmetically and functionally mimic amputated limbs remain a clinical need because state of the art neural prosthetics only provide a fraction of a natural limb’s functionality. Here, we report on the fabrication and capability of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and epoxy-based SU-8 photoresist microchannel scaffolds to serve as viable constructs for peripheral nerve interfacing though in vitro and in vivo studies in a sciatic nerve amputee model where the nerve lacks distal reinnervation targets. These studies showed microchannels with 100 μm × 100 μm cross-sectional areas support and direct the regeneration/migration of axons, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts through the microchannels with space available for future maturation of the axons. Investigation of the nerve in the distal segment, past the scaffold, showed a high degree of organization, adoption of the microchannel architecture forming ‘microchannel fascicles’, reformation of endoneurial tubes and axon myelination, and a lack of aberrant and unorganized growth that might be characteristic of neuroma formation. Separate chronic terminal in vivo electrophysiology studies utilizing the microchannel scaffolds with permanently integrated microwire electrodes were conducted to evaluate interfacing capabilities. In all devices a variety of spontaneous, sensory evoked and electrically evoked single and multi-unit action potentials were recorded after five months of implantation. Together, these findings suggest that microchannel scaffolds are well suited for chronic implantation and peripheral nerve interfacing to promote organized nerve regeneration that lends itself well to stable interfaces. Thus this study establishes the basis for the advanced fabrication of large-electrode count, wireless microchannel devices that are an important step towards highly functional, bi-directional peripheral nerve interfaces. PMID:25522974

  14. Microchannel-based regenerative scaffold for chronic peripheral nerve interfacing in amputees.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Akhil; Tahilramani, Mayank; Bentley, John T; Gore, Russell K; Millard, Daniel C; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Joseph, Anish; Haque, Adel S; Stanley, Garrett B; English, Arthur W; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2015-02-01

    Neurally controlled prosthetics that cosmetically and functionally mimic amputated limbs remain a clinical need because state of the art neural prosthetics only provide a fraction of a natural limb's functionality. Here, we report on the fabrication and capability of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and epoxy-based SU-8 photoresist microchannel scaffolds to serve as viable constructs for peripheral nerve interfacing through in vitro and in vivo studies in a sciatic nerve amputee model where the nerve lacks distal reinnervation targets. These studies showed microchannels with 100 μm × 100 μm cross-sectional areas support and direct the regeneration/migration of axons, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts through the microchannels with space available for future maturation of the axons. Investigation of the nerve in the distal segment, past the scaffold, showed a high degree of organization, adoption of the microchannel architecture forming 'microchannel fascicles', reformation of endoneurial tubes and axon myelination, and a lack of aberrant and unorganized growth that might be characteristic of neuroma formation. Separate chronic terminal in vivo electrophysiology studies utilizing the microchannel scaffolds with permanently integrated microwire electrodes were conducted to evaluate interfacing capabilities. In all devices a variety of spontaneous, sensory evoked and electrically evoked single and multi-unit action potentials were recorded after five months of implantation. Together, these findings suggest that microchannel scaffolds are well suited for chronic implantation and peripheral nerve interfacing to promote organized nerve regeneration that lends itself well to stable interfaces. Thus this study establishes the basis for the advanced fabrication of large-electrode count, wireless microchannel devices that are an important step towards highly functional, bi-directional peripheral nerve interfaces.

  15. Establishing a fiber-optic-based optical neural interface.

    PubMed

    Adamantidis, Antoine R; Zhang, Feng; de Lecea, Luis; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-08-01

    Selective expression of opsins in genetically defined neurons makes it possible to control a subset of neurons without affecting nearby cells and processes in the intact brain, but light must still be delivered to the target brain structure. Light scattering limits the delivery of light from the surface of the brain. For this reason, we have developed a fiber-optic-based optical neural interface (ONI), which allows optical access to any brain structure in freely moving mammals. The ONI system is constructed by modifying the small animal cannula system from PlasticsOne. The system for bilateral stimulation consists of a bilateral cannula guide that has been stereotactically implanted over the target brain region, a screw cap for securing the optical fiber to the animal's head, a fiber guard modified from the internal cannula adapter, and a bare fiber whose length is customized based on the depth of the target region. For unilateral stimulation, a single-fiber system can be constructed using unilateral cannula parts from PlasticsOne. We describe here the preparation of the bilateral ONI system and its use in optical stimulation of the mouse or rat brain. Delivery of opsin-expressing virus and implantation of the ONI may be conducted in the same surgical session; alternatively, with a transgenic animal no opsin virus is delivered during the surgery. Similar procedures are useful for deep or superficial injections (even for neocortical targets, although in some cases surface light-emitting diodes or cortex-apposed fibers can be used for the most superficial cortical targets).

  16. Introducing a new open source GIS user interface for the SWAT model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is a robust watershed modelling tool. It typically uses the ArcSWAT interface to create its inputs. ArcSWAT is public domain software which works in the licensed ArcGIS environment. The aim of this paper was to develop an open source user interface ...

  17. Modeling the Charge Transport in Graphene Nano Ribbon Interfaces for Nano Scale Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Engles, Derick

    2015-05-01

    In this research work we have modeled, simulated and compared the electronic charge transport for Metal-Semiconductor-Metal interfaces of Graphene Nano Ribbons (GNR) with different geometries using First-Principle calculations and Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) method. We modeled junctions of Armchair GNR strip sandwiched between two Zigzag strips with (Z-A-Z) and Zigzag GNR strip sandwiched between two Armchair strips with (A-Z-A) using semi-empirical Extended Huckle Theory (EHT) within the framework of Non-Equilibrium Green Function (NEGF). I-V characteristics of the interfaces were visualized for various transport parameters. The distinct changes in conductance and I-V curves reported as the Width across layers, Channel length (Central part) was varied at different bias voltages from -1V to 1 V with steps of 0.25 V. From the simulated results we observed that the conductance through A-Z-A graphene junction is in the range of 10-13 Siemens whereas the conductance through Z-A-Z graphene junction is in the range of 10-5 Siemens. These suggested conductance controlled mechanisms for the charge transport in the graphene interfaces with different geometries is important for the design of graphene based nano scale electronic devices like Graphene FETs, Sensors.

  18. Hole-trapping/hydrogen transport (HT) sup 2 model for interface-trap buildup in MOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Schwank, J.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    The electric field dependence of radiation-induced interface-trap formation has been reported to be different for metal-gate capacitors and polysilicon-gate capacitors and transistors. For metal-gate capacitors, interface-trap formation steadily increases with increasing positive field. On the other hand, for polysilicon-gate capacitors and transistors, interface-trap buildup peaks near fields of 1 MV/cm to 2 MV/cm and decreases with an approximate E{sup {minus}1/2} dependence at higher fields. The previously reported field dependence for interface-trap generation for Al-gate capacitors is consistent at all fields with McLean's physical explanation of the two-stage process, which depends on hydrogen ion (H {sup +}) release in the bulk of the oxide as radiation-induced holes transport to either interface via polaron hopping. Above 1 MV/cm, the field dependence of interface-trap buildup for polysilicon-gate devices is inconsistent with this model. Instead, it is similar to the field dependence for hole-trapping in SiO{sub 2}, suggesting that hole trapping may play a key role in interface-trap generation in Si-gate devices. However, recent studies of the time-dependence of interface-trap buildup have known that hole trapping cannot be the rate-limiting step in interface-trap buildup in polysilicon gate devices. Consistent with McLean's physical explanation of the two-stage process, the rate-limiting step in interface-trap formation appears to be H{sup +} transport to the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. We will show that the electric field dependence of radiation-induced oxide- and interface-trap charge buildup for both polysilicon and metal-gate transistors follows an approximate E{sup {minus}1/2} field dependence over a wide range of electric fields when electron-hole recombination effects are included. Based on these results a hole trapping/hydrogen transport (HT){sup 2} model for interface-trap buildup is proposed.

  19. Two graphical user interfaces for managing and analyzing MODFLOW groundwater-model scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Scenario Manager and Scenario Analyzer are graphical user interfaces that facilitate the use of calibrated, MODFLOW-based groundwater models for investigating possible responses to proposed stresses on a groundwater system. Scenario Manager allows a user, starting with a calibrated model, to design and run model scenarios by adding or modifying stresses simulated by the model. Scenario Analyzer facilitates the process of extracting data from model output and preparing such display elements as maps, charts, and tables. Both programs are designed for users who are familiar with the science on which groundwater modeling is based but who may not have a groundwater modeler’s expertise in building and calibrating a groundwater model from start to finish. With Scenario Manager, the user can manipulate model input to simulate withdrawal or injection wells, time-variant specified hydraulic heads, recharge, and such surface-water features as rivers and canals. Input for stresses to be simulated comes from user-provided geographic information system files and time-series data files. A Scenario Manager project can contain multiple scenarios and is self-documenting. Scenario Analyzer can be used to analyze output from any MODFLOW-based model; it is not limited to use with scenarios generated by Scenario Manager. Model-simulated values of hydraulic head, drawdown, solute concentration, and cell-by-cell flow rates can be presented in display elements. Map data can be represented as lines of equal value (contours) or as a gradated color fill. Charts and tables display time-series data obtained from output generated by a transient-state model run or from user-provided text files of time-series data. A display element can be based entirely on output of a single model run, or, to facilitate comparison of results of multiple scenarios, an element can be based on output from multiple model runs. Scenario Analyzer can export display elements and supporting metadata as a Portable

  20. Investigation of the Interfaces between Cu(111)-based Electrodes and Water Using Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin Hyun

    This thesis presents a fundamental study of the interface between Cu(111)-based electrodes and water. Density functional theory is used to investigate the interaction between water and Cu(111) both in the absence and presence of an external electric field. To analyze the water-electrode interaction in depth, a monomeric adsorption of water is studied and compared with other similar types of molecules. The orientation of the adsorbed molecules is found to be influenced by the energy gap between the Fermi level of Cu(111) and the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the molecules. A simple relationship is observed where a stronger dipole moment of the molecule and a lower adsorption energy lead to an interface which responds more sensitively to the external electric field. The dipole moment is a more critical parameter. The behaviour of a water overlayer is then investigated on Cu(111). A differential capacitance of the Cu(111)/water interface remains constant when the molecular movements of water is ignored. The change in the orientations of the water molecules causes the differential capacitance of the interface to be potential dependent. A sharp increase in the differential capacitance is found when the water layer undergoes a structural transition. A new method, namely a "constant field" method is devised to determine the potential of the electrode at a given external electric field. The impact of coating Cu(111) with a layer of graphene is also studied. A quantum capacitance, an intrinsic capacitive property of graphene, is found to influence the differential capacitance of the graphene-coated Cu(111). However, it was found that the electronic interaction between graphene and Cu(111) alters the differential capacitance of the interface at certain electrode potentials. The change in the differential capacitance cannot be predicted by the standard modelling approaches and thus, ab initio modelling of the electrified

  1. Development of a graphical user interface in GIS raster format for the finite difference ground-water model code, MODFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzer, T.; Hansen, D.T.; Greer, W.; Sebhat, M.

    1996-12-31

    A geographic information system (GIS) was used in developing a graphical user interface (GUI) for use with the US Geological Survey`s finite difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW. The GUI permits the construction of a MODFLOW based ground-water flow model from scratch in a GIS environment. The model grid, input data and output are stored as separate raster data sets which may be viewed, edited, and manipulated in a graphic environment. Other GIS data sets can be displayed with the model data sets for reference and evaluation. The GUI sets up a directory structure for storage of the files associated with the ground-water model and the raster data sets created by the interface. The GUI stores model coefficients and model output as raster values. Values stored by these raster data sets are formatted for use with the ground-water flow model code.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of Viscoelastic Behavior and Interface Damage in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Interface Damage in Adhesively Bonded Joints Feifei Cheng, Ö. Özgü Özsoy and J.N. Reddy* Advanced Computational Mechanics Laboratory, Department of...the adhesive and damage analysis of adhesive-adherend interfaces in adhesively bonded joints. First, viscoelastic finite element analysis of a model...nominal stress criterion and mixed-mode energy criterion are used to determine the damage initiation and evolution at the interface, respectively

  3. A Generic Approach for Pen-Based User Interface Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macé, Sébastien; Anquetil, Éric

    Pen-based interaction is an intuitive way to realize hand drawn structured documents, but few applications take advantage of it. Indeed, the interpretation of the user hand drawn strokes in the context of document is a complex problem. In this paper, we propose a new generic approach to develop such systems based on three independent components. The first one is a set of graphical and editing functions adapted to pen interaction. The second one is a rule-based formalism that models structured document composition and the corresponding interpretation process. The last one is a hand drawn stroke analyzer that is able to interpret strokes progressively, directly while the user is drawing. We highlight in particular the human-computer interaction induced from this progressive interpretation process. Thanks to this generic approach, three pen-based system prototypes have already been developed, for musical score editing, for graph editing, and for UML class diagram editing

  4. A COMSOL-GEMS interface for modeling coupled reactive-transport geochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Vahid Jafari; Li, Chang; Verba, Circe; Ideker, Jason H.; Isgor, O. Burkan

    2016-07-01

    An interface was developed between COMSOL MultiphysicsTM finite element analysis software and (geo)chemical modeling platform, GEMS, for the reactive-transport modeling of (geo)chemical processes in variably saturated porous media. The two standalone software packages are managed from the interface that uses a non-iterative operator splitting technique to couple the transport (COMSOL) and reaction (GEMS) processes. The interface allows modeling media with complex chemistry (e.g. cement) using GEMS thermodynamic database formats. Benchmark comparisons show that the developed interface can be used to predict a variety of reactive-transport processes accurately. The full functionality of the interface was demonstrated to model transport processes, governed by extended Nernst-Plank equation, in Class H Portland cement samples in high pressure and temperature autoclaves simulating systems that are used to store captured carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs.

  5. Modeling single molecule junction mechanics as a probe of interface bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2017-03-01

    Using the atomic force microscope based break junction approach, applicable to metal point contacts and single molecule junctions, measurements can be repeated thousands of times resulting in rich data sets characterizing the properties of an ensemble of nanoscale junction structures. This paper focuses on the relationship between the measured force extension characteristics including bond rupture and the properties of the interface bonds in the junction. A set of exemplary model junction structures has been analyzed using density functional theory based calculations to simulate the adiabatic potential surface that governs the junction elongation. The junction structures include representative molecules that bond to the electrodes through amine, methylsulfide, and pyridine links. The force extension characteristics are shown to be most effectively analyzed in a scaled form with maximum sustainable force and the distance between the force zero and force maximum as scale factors. Widely used, two parameter models for chemical bond potential energy versus bond length are found to be nearly identical in scaled form. Furthermore, they fit well to the present calculations of N-Au and S-Au donor-acceptor bonds, provided no other degrees of freedom are allowed to relax. Examination of the reduced problem of a single interface, but including relaxation of atoms proximal to the interface bond, shows that a single-bond potential form renormalized by an effective harmonic potential in series fits well to the calculated results. This allows relatively accurate extraction of the interface bond energy. Analysis of full junction models shows cooperative effects that go beyond the mechanical series inclusion of the second bond in the junction, the spectator bond that does not rupture. Calculations for a series of diaminoalkanes as a function of molecule length indicate that the most important cooperative effect is due to the interactions between the dipoles induced by the donor

  6. Modeling single molecule junction mechanics as a probe of interface bonding

    DOE PAGES

    Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2017-03-07

    Using the atomic force microscope based break junction approach, applicable to metal point contacts and single molecule junctions, measurements can be repeated thousands of times resulting in rich data sets characterizing the properties of an ensemble of nanoscale junction structures. This paper focuses on the relationship between the measured force extension characteristics including bond rupture and the properties of the interface bonds in the junction. We analyzed a set of exemplary model junction structures using density functional theory based calculations to simulate the adiabatic potential surface that governs the junction elongation. The junction structures include representative molecules that bond tomore » the electrodes through amine, methylsulfide, and pyridine links. The force extension characteristics are shown to be most effectively analyzed in a scaled form with maximum sustainable force and the distance between the force zero and force maximum as scale factors. Widely used, two parameter models for chemical bond potential energy versus bond length are found to be nearly identical in scaled form. Furthermore, they fit well to the present calculations of N–Au and S–Au donor-acceptor bonds, provided no other degrees of freedom are allowed to relax. Examination of the reduced problem of a single interface, but including relaxation of atoms proximal to the interface bond, shows that a single-bond potential form renormalized by an effective harmonic potential in series fits well to the calculated results. This, then, allows relatively accurate extraction of the interface bond energy. Analysis of full junction models shows cooperative effects that go beyond the mechanical series inclusion of the second bond in the junction, the spectator bond that does not rupture. Calculations for a series of diaminoalkanes as a function of molecule length indicate that the most important cooperative effect is due to the interactions between the dipoles induced by

  7. Discontinuous model with semi analytical sheath interface for radio frequency plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. provide many products utilizing plasma. In this study, we focus on the Radio Frequency (RF) plasma source by interior antenna. The plasma source is expected to be high density and low metal contamination. However, the sputtering the antenna cover by high energy ion from sheath voltage still have been problematic. We have developed the new model which can calculate sheath voltage wave form in the RF plasma source for realistic calculation time. This model is discontinuous that electronic fluid equation in plasma connect to usual passion equation in antenna cover and chamber with semi analytical sheath interface. We estimate the sputtering distribution based on calculated sheath voltage waveform by this model, sputtering yield and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) model. The estimated sputtering distribution reproduce the tendency of experimental results.

  8. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing Web-user interface

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Iwona E.; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T.; Filippov, Igor V.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a Web-based tool for SAR and QSAR modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms – Random Forest, Support Vector Machine (SVM), Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting etc. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity. PMID:25362883

  9. Modeling the flow in diffuse interface methods of solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhedar, A.; Steinbach, I.; Varnik, F.

    2015-08-01

    Fluid dynamical equations in the presence of a diffuse solid-liquid interface are investigated via a volume averaging approach. The resulting equations exhibit the same structure as the standard Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid with a constant viscosity, the effect of the solid phase fraction appearing in the drag force only. This considerably simplifies the use of the lattice Boltzmann method as a fluid dynamics solver in solidification simulations. Galilean invariance is also satisfied within this approach. Further, we investigate deviations between the diffuse and sharp interface flow profiles via both quasiexact numerical integration and lattice Boltzmann simulations. It emerges from these studies that the freedom in choosing the solid-liquid coupling parameter h provides a flexible way of optimizing the diffuse interface-flow simulations. Once h is adapted for a given spatial resolution, the simulated flow profiles reach an accuracy comparable to quasiexact numerical simulations.

  10. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26884745

  12. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  13. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng–Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young–Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young–Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young–Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical

  14. Integrated droplet analysis system with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry using a hydrophilic tongue-based droplet extraction interface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes a simple, robust, and integrated microchip-based system for droplet analysis with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection. The microchip integrated multiple modules including a droplet generator, a droplet extraction interface, and a monolithic ESI emitter. The novel droplet extraction interface based on hydrophilic tongue structure was developed. The interface could transfer droplets from segmented phase to aqueous phase with high reliability and high controllability by coupling with a back pressure regulator. The flow injection mode was adopted to introduce the transferred droplets to the ESI emitter for minimizing the cross-contamination between droplets and achieving droplet matrix modification. The system performance was evaluated using angiotensin as a model sample, and high sensitivity (<1 μM) and a good reproducibility of 5.2% RSD (n = 7) were obtained. The present device was further applied in the online monitoring of droplet-based microreaction for alkylation of peptide.

  15. Electronic Structure at Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Magnesium based Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Janakiraman; Siegel, Donald

    2015-03-01

    Magnesium is a promising multivalent element for use in next generation electrochemical energy storage systems. However, a wide range of challenges such as low coulombic efficiency, low/varying capacity and cyclability need to be resolved in order to realize Mg based batteries. Many of these issues can be related to interfacial phenomena between the Mg anode and common electrolytes. Ab-initio based computational models of these interfaces can provide insights on the interfacial interactions that can be difficult to probe experimentally. In this work we present ab-initio computations of common electrolyte solvents (THF, DME) in contact with two model electrode surfaces namely -- (i) an ``SEI-free'' electrode based on Mg metal and, (ii) a ``passivated'' electrode consisting of MgO. We perform GW calculations to predict the reorganization of the molecular orbitals (HOMO/LUMO) upon contact with the these surfaces and their alignment with respect to the Fermi energy of the electrodes. These computations are in turn compared with more efficient GGA (PBE) & Hybrid (HSE) functional calculations. The results obtained from these computations enable us to qualitatively describe the stability of these solvent molecules at electrode-electrolyte interfaces

  16. Investigation of piezoelectric impedance-based health monitoring of structure interface debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Li; Chen, Guofeng; Chen, Xiaoming; Qu, Wenzhong

    2016-04-01

    Various damages might occur during the solid rocket motor (SRM) manufacturing/operational phase, and the debonding of propellant/insulator/composite case interfaces is one of damage types which determine the life of a motor. The detection of such interface debonding damage will be beneficial for developing techniques for reliable nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Piezoelectric sensors are widely used for structural health monitoring technique. In particular, electromechanical impedance (EMI) techniques give simple and low-cost solutions for detecting damage in various structures. In this work, piezoelectric EMI structural health monitoring technique is applied to identify the debonding condition of propellant/insulator interface structure using finite element method and experimental investigation. A three-dimensional coupled field finite element model is developed using the software ANSYS and the harmonic analysis is conducted for high-frequency impedance analysis procedure. In the experimental study, the impedance signals were measured from PZT and MFC sensors outside attached to composite case monitoring the different debonding conditions between the propellant and insulator. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) based damage index is conducted to quantify the changes i n impedance for different de bonding conditions and frequency range. Simulation and experimental results confirmed that the EMI technique can be used effectively for detecting the debonding damage in SRM and is expected to be useful for future application of real SRM's SHM.

  17. Integrated surface and groundwater modelling in the Thames Basin, UK using the Open Modelling Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Jonathan; Abesser, Corinna; Hughes, Andrew; Jackson, Chris; Kingdon, Andrew; Mansour, Majdi; Pachocka, Magdalena; Wang, Lei; Williams, Ann

    2013-04-01

    The River Thames catchment is situated in the south-east of England. It covers approximately 16,000 km2 and is the most heavily populated river basin in the UK. It is also one of the driest and has experienced severe drought events in the recent past. With the onset of climate change and human exploitation of our environment, there are now serious concerns over the sustainability of water resources in this basin with 6 million m3 consumed every day for public water supply alone. Groundwater in the Thames basin is extremely important, providing 40% of water for public supply. The principal aquifer is the Chalk, a dual permeability limestone, which has been extensively studied to understand its hydraulic properties. The fractured Jurassic limestone in the upper catchment also forms an important aquifer, supporting baseflow downstream during periods of drought. These aquifers are unconnected other than through the River Thames and its tributaries, which provide two-thirds of London's drinking water. Therefore, to manage these water resources sustainably and to make robust projections into the future, surface and groundwater processes must be considered in combination. This necessitates the simulation of the feedbacks and complex interactions between different parts of the water cycle, and the development of integrated environmental models. The Open Modelling Interface (OpenMI) standard provides a method through which environmental models of varying complexity and structure can be linked, allowing them to run simultaneously and exchange data at each timestep. This architecture has allowed us to represent the surface and subsurface flow processes within the Thames basin at an appropriate level of complexity based on our understanding of particular hydrological processes and features. We have developed a hydrological model in OpenMI which integrates a process-driven, gridded finite difference groundwater model of the Chalk with a more simplistic, semi

  18. Ceria-based model catalysts: fundamental studies on the importance of the metal-ceria interface in CO oxidation, the water-gas shift, CO2 hydrogenation, and methane and alcohol reforming.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Grinter, David C; Liu, Zongyuan; Palomino, Robert M; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2017-04-03

    Model metal/ceria and ceria/metal catalysts have been shown to be excellent systems for studying fundamental phenomena linked to the operation of technical catalysts. In the last fifteen years, many combinations of well-defined systems involving different kinds of metals and ceria have been prepared and characterized using the modern techniques of surface science. So far most of the catalytic studies have been centered on a few reactions: CO oxidation, the hydrogenation of CO2, and the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction and the reforming of methane or alcohols. Using model catalysts it has been possible to examine in detail correlations between the structural, electronic and catalytic properties of ceria-metal interfaces. In situ techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy) have been combined to study the morphological changes under reaction conditions and investigate the evolution of active phases involved in the cleavage of C-O, C-H and C-C bonds. Several studies with model ceria catalysts have shown the importance of strong metal-support interactions. In general, a substantial body of knowledge has been acquired and concepts have been developed for a more rational approach to the design of novel technical catalysts containing ceria.

  19. Penalty-Based Interface Technology for Prediction of Delamination Growth in Laminated Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averill, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    An effective interface element technology has been developed for connecting and simulating crack growth between independently modeled finite element subdomains (e.g., composite plies). This method has been developed using penalty constraints and allows coupling of finite element models whose nodes do not necessarily coincide along their common interface. Additionally, the present formulation leads to a computational approach that is very efficient and completely compatible with existing commercial software. The present interface element has been implemented in the commercial finite element code ABAQUS as a User Element Subroutine (UEL), making it easy to test the approach for a wide range of problems. The interface element technology has been formulated to simulate delamination growth in composite laminates. Thanks to its special features, the interface element approach makes it possible to release portions of the interface surface whose length is smaller than that of the finite elements. In addition, the penalty parameter can vary within the interface element, allowing the damage model to be applied to a desired fraction of the interface between the two meshes. Results for double cantilever beam DCB, end-loaded split (ELS) and fixed-ratio mixed mode (FRMM) specimens are presented. These results are compared to measured data to assess the ability of the present damage model to simulate crack growth.

  20. Swimming of a model ciliate near an air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Ardekani, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the role of the hydrodynamic forces on a swimming microorganism near an air-liquid interface is studied. The lubrication theory is utilized to analyze hydrodynamic effects within the narrow gap between a flat interface and a small swimmer. By using an archetypal low-Reynolds-number swimming model called “squirmer,” we find that the magnitude of the vertical swimming velocity is on the order of O(ɛlnɛ), where ɛ is the ratio of the gap width to the swimmer's body size. The reduced swimming velocity near an interface can explain experimental observations of the aggregation of microorganisms near a liquid interface.

  1. Swimming of a model ciliate near an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Ardekani, A M

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the role of the hydrodynamic forces on a swimming microorganism near an air-liquid interface is studied. The lubrication theory is utilized to analyze hydrodynamic effects within the narrow gap between a flat interface and a small swimmer. By using an archetypal low-Reynolds-number swimming model called "squirmer," we find that the magnitude of the vertical swimming velocity is on the order of O(εlnε), where ε is the ratio of the gap width to the swimmer's body size. The reduced swimming velocity near an interface can explain experimental observations of the aggregation of microorganisms near a liquid interface.

  2. A Contextual Model for Identity Management (IdM) Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The usability of Identity Management (IdM) systems is highly dependent upon design that simplifies the processes of identification, authentication, and authorization. Recent findings reveal two critical problems that degrade IdM usability: (1) unfeasible techniques for managing various digital identifiers, and (2) ambiguous security interfaces.…

  3. Modeling Interfacial Thermal Boundary Conductance of Engineered Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-31

    Interfaces Award Number: FA9550-09-1-0245 Program Manager: Dr. Jason Marshall / Dr. John Luginsland RTB-5, Plasma and Electroenergetic Physics Air Force...thermal boundary resistance at GaN/substrate interface”, Electronics Letters 40, 81–83 (2004). 22A. Sarua, H. Ji, K. P. Hilton, D. J. Wallis , M. J

  4. Characteristic-based and interface-sharpening algorithm for high-order simulations of immiscible compressible multi-material flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiwei; Tian, Baolin; Zhang, Yousheng; Gao, Fujie

    2017-03-01

    The present work focuses on the simulation of immiscible compressible multi-material flows with the Mie-Grüneisen-type equation of state governed by the non-conservative five-equation model [1]. Although low-order single fluid schemes have already been adopted to provide some feasible results, the application of high-order schemes (introducing relatively small numerical dissipation) to these flows may lead to results with severe numerical oscillations. Consequently, attempts to apply any interface-sharpening techniques to stop the progressively more severe smearing interfaces for a longer simulation time may result in an overshoot increase and in some cases convergence to a non-physical solution occurs. This study proposes a characteristic-based interface-sharpening algorithm for performing high-order simulations of such flows by deriving a pressure-equilibrium-consistent intermediate state (augmented with approximations of pressure derivatives) for local characteristic variable reconstruction and constructing a general framework for interface sharpening. First, by imposing a weak form of the jump condition for the non-conservative five-equation model, we analytically derive an intermediate state with pressure derivatives treated as additional parameters of the linearization procedure. Based on this intermediate state, any well-established high-order reconstruction technique can be employed to provide the state at each cell edge. Second, by designing another state with only different reconstructed values of the interface function at each cell edge, the advection term in the equation of the interface function is discretized twice using any common algorithm. The difference between the two discretizations is employed consistently for interface compression, yielding a general framework for interface sharpening. Coupled with the fifth-order improved accurate monotonicity-preserving scheme [2] for local characteristic variable reconstruction and the tangent of hyperbola

  5. Modeling Auditory-Haptic Interface Cues from an Analog Multi-line Telephone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Bittner, Rachael M.

    2012-01-01

    The Western Electric Company produced a multi-line telephone during the 1940s-1970s using a six-button interface design that provided robust tactile, haptic and auditory cues regarding the "state" of the communication system. This multi-line telephone was used as a model for a trade study comparison of two interfaces: a touchscreen interface (iPad)) versus a pressure-sensitive strain gauge button interface (Phidget USB interface controllers). The experiment and its results are detailed in the authors' AES 133rd convention paper " Multimodal Information Management: Evaluation of Auditory and Haptic Cues for NextGen Communication Dispays". This Engineering Brief describes how the interface logic, visual indications, and auditory cues of the original telephone were synthesized using MAX/MSP, including the logic for line selection, line hold, and priority line activation.

  6. Neural bases of syntax-semantics interface processing.

    PubMed

    Malaia, Evguenia; Newman, Sharlene

    2015-06-01

    The binding problem-question of how information between the modules of the linguistic system is integrated during language processing-is as yet unresolved. The remarkable speed of language processing and comprehension (Pulvermüller et al. 2009) suggests that at least coarse semantic information (e.g. noun animacy) and syntactically-relevant information (e.g. verbal template) are integrated rapidly to allow for coarse comprehension. This EEG study investigated syntax-semantics interface processing during word-by-word sentence reading. As alpha-band neural activity serves as an inhibition mechanism for local networks, we used topographical distribution of alpha power to help identify the timecourse of the binding process. We manipulated the syntactic parameter of verbal event structure, and semantic parameter of noun animacy in reduced relative clauses (RRCs, e.g. "The witness/mansion seized/protected by the agent was in danger"), to investigate the neural bases of interaction between syntactic and semantic networks during sentence processing. The word-by-word stimulus presentation method in the present experiment required manipulation of both syntactic structure and semantic features in the working memory. The results demonstrated a gradient distribution of early components (biphasic posterior P1-N2 and anterior N1-P2) over function words "by" and "the", and the verb, corresponding to facilitation or conflict resulting from the syntactic (telicity) and semantic (animacy) cues in the preceding portion of the sentence. This was followed by assimilation of power distribution in the α band at the second noun. The flattened distribution of α power during the mental manipulation with high demand on working memory-thematic role re-assignment-demonstrates a state of α equilibrium with strong functional coupling between posterior and anterior regions. These results demonstrate that the processing of semantic and syntactic features during sentence comprehension proceeds

  7. A Comprehension Based Analysis of Autoflight System Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett (Technical Monitor); Polson, Peter G.

    2003-01-01

    This cooperative agreement supported Dr. Peter Polson's participation in two interrelated research programs. The first was the development of the Situation-Goal-Behavior (SGB) Model that is both a formal description of an avionics system's logic and behavior and a representation of a system that can be understood by avionics designers, pilots, and training developers. The second was the development of a usability inspection method based on an approximate model, RAFIV, of pilot interactions with the Flight Management System (FMS). The main purpose of this report is to integrate the two models and provide a context in order to better characterize the accomplishments of this research program. A major focus of both the previous and this Cooperative Agreement was the development of usability evaluation methods that can be effectively utilized during all phases of the design, development, and certification process of modern avionics systems. The current efforts to validate these methods have involved showing that they generate useful analyses of known operational and training problems with the current generation of avionics systems in modern commercial airliners. This report is organized into seven sections. Following the overview, the second section describes the Goal-Situation-Behavior model and its applications. The next section summarizes the foundations of the RAFIV model and describes the model in some detail. The contents of both these sections are derived from previous reports referenced in footnotes. The fourth section integrates these two models into a complete design evaluation and training development framework. The fifth section contains conclusions and possible future directions for research. References are in Section 6. Section 7 contains the titles and abstracts of the papers paper describing in more detail the results of this research program.

  8. A New Tool for Inundation Modeling: Community Modeling Interface for Tsunamis (ComMIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V. V.; Moore, C. W.; Greenslade, D. J. M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Badal, R.; Synolakis, C. E.; Kânoğlu, U.

    2011-11-01

    Almost 5 years after the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tragedy, the 10 August 2009 Andaman tsunami demonstrated that accurate forecasting is possible using the tsunami community modeling tool Community Model Interface for Tsunamis (ComMIT). ComMIT is designed for ease of use, and allows dissemination of results to the community while addressing concerns associated with proprietary issues of bathymetry and topography. It uses initial conditions from a precomputed propagation database, has an easy-to-interpret graphical interface, and requires only portable hardware. ComMIT was initially developed for Indian Ocean countries with support from the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To date, more than 60 scientists from 17 countries in the Indian Ocean have been trained and are using it in operational inundation mapping.

  9. A phase field dislocation dynamics model for a bicrystal interface system: An investigation into dislocation slip transmission across cube-on-cube interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.; Hunter, A.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Koslowski, M.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we present a phase field dislocation dynamics formulation designed to treat a system comprised of two materials differing in moduli and lattice parameters that meet at a common interface. We apply the model to calculate the critical stress τcrit required to transmit a perfect dislocation across the bimaterial interface with a cube-on-cube orientation relationship. The calculation of τcrit accounts for the effects of: 1) the lattice mismatch (misfit or coherency stresses), 2) the elastic moduli mismatch (Koehler forces or image stresses), and 3) the formation of the residual dislocation in the interface. Our results show that the value of τcrit associated with the transmission of a dislocation from material 1 to material 2 is not the same as that from material 2 to material 1. Dislocation transmission from the material with the lower shear modulus and larger lattice parameter tends to be easier than the reverse and this apparent asymmetry in τcrit generally increases with increases in either lattice or moduli mismatch or both. In efforts to clarify the roles of lattice and moduli mismatch, we construct an analytical model for τcrit based on the formation energy of the residual dislocation. We show that path dependence in this energetic barrier can explain the asymmetry seen in the calculated τcrit values.

  10. A phase field dislocation dynamics model for a bicrystal interface system: An investigation into dislocation slip transmission across cube-on-cube interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Y.; Hunter, A.; Beyerlein, I. J.; ...

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we present a phase field dislocation dynamics formulation designed to treat a system comprised of two materials differing in moduli and lattice parameters that meet at a common interface. We apply the model to calculate the critical stress τcrit required to transmit a perfect dislocation across the bimaterial interface with a cube-on-cube orientation relationship. The calculation of τcrit accounts for the effects of: 1) the lattice mismatch (misfit or coherency stresses), 2) the elastic moduli mismatch (Koehler forces or image stresses), and 3) the formation of the residual dislocation in the interface. Our results show that themore » value of τcrit associated with the transmission of a dislocation from material 1 to material 2 is not the same as that from material 2 to material 1. Dislocation transmission from the material with the lower shear modulus and larger lattice parameter tends to be easier than the reverse and this apparent asymmetry in τcrit generally increases with increases in either lattice or moduli mismatch or both. In efforts to clarify the roles of lattice and moduli mismatch, we construct an analytical model for τcrit based on the formation energy of the residual dislocation. We show that path dependence in this energetic barrier can explain the asymmetry seen in the calculated τcrit values.« less

  11. Sketch-based geologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, M. P.; Jackson, M.; Hampson, G.; Brazil, E. V.; de Carvalho, F.; Coda, C.; Sousa, M. C.; Zhang, Z.; Geiger, S.

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) maps and cross-sections, and 3D conceptual models, are fundamental tools for understanding, communicating and modeling geology. Yet geologists lack dedicated and intuitive tools that allow rapid creation of such figures and models. Standard drawing packages produce only 2D figures that are not suitable for quantitative analysis. Geologic modeling packages can produce 3D models and are widely used in the groundwater and petroleum communities, but are often slow and non-intuitive to use, requiring the creation of a grid early in the modeling workflow and the use of geostatistical methods to populate the grid blocks with geologic information. We present an alternative approach to rapidly create figures and models using sketch-based interface and modelling (SBIM). We leverage methods widely adopted in other industries to prototype complex geometries and designs. The SBIM tool contains built-in geologic rules that constrain how sketched lines and surfaces interact. These rules are based on the logic of superposition and cross-cutting relationships that follow from rock-forming processes, including deposition, deformation, intrusion and modification by diagenesis or metamorphism. The approach allows rapid creation of multiple, geologically realistic, figures and models in 2D and 3D using a simple, intuitive interface. The user can sketch in plan- or cross-section view. Geologic rules are used to extrapolate sketched lines in real time to create 3D surfaces. Quantitative analysis can be carried our directly on the models. Alternatively, they can be output as simple figures or imported directly into other modeling tools. The software runs on a tablet PC and can be used in a variety of settings including the office, classroom and field. The speed and ease of use of SBIM enables multiple interpretations to be developed from limited data, uncertainty to be readily appraised, and figures and models to be rapidly updated to incorporate new data or concepts.

  12. A Study of Learning and Retention with a Web-Based IR Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, S. M. Zabed; McKnight, Cliff; Oppenheim, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on an empirical study on novices' learning and retention with the Web-based interface to the Web of Science. The aim was to evaluate the performance of novice searchers in initially learning to use the search interface and in later use. Their performance in both sessions was measured in terms of time taken to perform tasks,…

  13. From Fulcher to PLEVALEX: Issues in Interface Design, Validity and Reliability in Internet Based Language Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia Laborda, Jesus

    2007-01-01

    Interface design and ergonomics, while already studied in much of educational theory, have not until recently been considered in language testing (Fulcher, 2003). In this paper, we revise the design principles of PLEVALEX, a fully operational prototype Internet based language testing platform. Our focus here is to show PLEVALEX's interfaces and…

  14. Interface Design Concepts in the Development of a Web-Based Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Rebecca; Shuttleworth, Marie; Smith, Phil

    1998-01-01

    Presents six principles for building and evaluating Web-based information retrieval interfaces: help the user develop an understanding of the interface and search process, judge the value of continuing search paths, and refine search queries or search topics; avoid complex navigation; make system actions explicit; and provide verbal labels…

  15. Parallelization of the TRIGRS model for rainfall-induced landslides using the message passing interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvioli, M.; Baum, R.L.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a parallel implementation of TRIGRS, the Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability Model for the timing and distribution of rainfall-induced shallow landslides. We have parallelized the four time-demanding execution modes of TRIGRS, namely both the saturated and unsaturated model with finite and infinite soil depth options, within the Message Passing Interface framework. In addition to new features of the code, we outline details of the parallel implementation and show the performance gain with respect to the serial code. Results are obtained both on commercial hardware and on a high-performance multi-node machine, showing the different limits of applicability of the new code. We also discuss the implications for the application of the model on large-scale areas and as a tool for real-time landslide hazard monitoring.

  16. Cross-Correlation based relocation of deep interface seismicity of the 2010 Chile Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methe, P.; Tilmann, F. J.; Lange, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Chile earthquake of 27 February 2010 nucleated just north of the city of Concépcion, and ruptured to the north and to the south along 350-400 km, with most slip (up to 15 m) accumulating in the northern patch. With a magnitude of 8.8, it is the sixth-strongest earthquake since the beginning of the instrumental record; rapid response teams from Chile, the US, Germany and the UK installed a dense network for monitoring aftershocks along the whole rupture zone. We analysed a subset of this network (in total 139 stations) and detected over 100000 aftershocks following the main earthquake in the period from March to September 2010 alone, using automatic detection and grid-search based phase association algorithms (binder and CMM). Picks are refined by an auto-picking algorithm (MPX) and events are relocated in a minimum-1D model. About 20000 events are designated as very well located with at least 16 high quality automatic picks and a residual rms no larger than 0.2 s. Besides crustal seismicity, the aftershock sequence is dominated by intense plate interface seismicity near and immediately downdip of the most intense coseismic rupture. We also observe a second separate band of deeper aftershocks below the downdip end of the seismogenic zone at a depth of 40-50 km and a distance to the trench of 130-180 km, with a gap of 20-30 km to the main plate interface seismicity. In this presentation we concentrate on the analysis of this deep seismic band. The seismicity in this band is not truly continuous along the rupture zone but it is present along the whole rupture zone and forms clusters elongated along strike. Focal mechanisms derived from first motion polarities show that these events tend to be thrust type events, well aligned with the plate interface. A second deep separate group of plate interface aftershocks is not known from other subduction zone aftershock sequences. To get a better idea about the distribution of these 6000 deep aftershocks (30 to 50 km), a

  17. Human multimedia display interface based on human activity recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yiting; Lee, Eung-Joo

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we will propose a Human Multimedia Display Interface. The interface uses the tracking of human hand movements to control the IP-TV. This paper presents an improved CAMSHIFT algorithm to control an IP-TV system. The CAMSHIFT algorithm (Continuously Adaptive MeanShift) is a method of using color information[1]. It can do tracking with a specific color of the target. In some typical environmental constraints, it can obtain good tracking performance. However, as the question of noise, large area similar to the color interference and so on, only by CAM-SHIFT algorithm it is not competent. Against these issues we propose an improved CAMSHIFT algorithm[2].

  18. Simulation of drag reduction in superhydrophobic microchannels based on parabolic gas-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunxi; Zhang, Shuo; Xue, Quanxi; Ye, Xuemin

    2016-10-01

    Based on the given parabolic gas-liquid interfaces, a two-dimensional fluid flow in superhydrophobic microchannels is numerically simulated with the steady volume of fluid model in the laminar regime. The influence of several crucial parameters on drag reduction effect is discussed. The results indicate that the superhydrophobic microchannel containing rectangular cavities displays significant drag reduction effect. With increasing inlet velocity, the pressure drop reduction decreases slightly. Augments in the pressure drop reduction tend to be large with the increase of the cavity fraction or the decrease of the channel height. The results also reveal that the variation of the normalized slip length with the cavity fraction tends to be more dramatic when the channel height is smaller. As the parabolic height of the gas-liquid interface is enlarged, both the pressure drop reduction and the normalized slip length decrease linearly, while fRe increases linearly. The impact of the cavity depth on the normalized slip length, fRe, and the pressure drop reduction is minimal supposing the depth of the cavity is greater than 40% of its width. The drag reduction effect corresponding to the dovetail cavity model is the best, and the consequence of the rectangular, trapezoidal, and triangular cavity models sequentially worsens.

  19. Discrete Kalman Filter based Sensor Fusion for Robust Accessibility Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghersi, I.; Mariño, M.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    Human-machine interfaces have evolved, benefiting from the growing access to devices with superior, embedded signal-processing capabilities, as well as through new sensors that allow the estimation of movements and gestures, resulting in increasingly intuitive interfaces. In this context, sensor fusion for the estimation of the spatial orientation of body segments allows to achieve more robust solutions, overcoming specific disadvantages derived from the use of isolated sensors, such as the sensitivity of magnetic-field sensors to external influences, when used in uncontrolled environments. In this work, a method for the combination of image-processing data and angular-velocity registers from a 3D MEMS gyroscope, through a Discrete-time Kalman Filter, is proposed and deployed as an alternate user interface for mobile devices, in which an on-screen pointer is controlled with head movements. Results concerning general performance of the method are presented, as well as a comparative analysis, under a dedicated test application, with results from a previous version of this system, in which the relative-orientation information was acquired directly from MEMS sensors (3D magnetometer-accelerometer). These results show an improved response for this new version of the pointer, both in terms of precision and response time, while keeping many of the benefits that were highlighted for its predecessor, giving place to a complementary method for signal acquisition that can be used as an alternative-input device, as well as for accessibility solutions.

  20. Modulation Depth Estimation and Variable Selection in State-Space Models for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid developments in neural interface technology are making it possible to record increasingly large signal sets of neural activity. Various factors such as asymmetrical information distribution and across-channel redundancy may, however, limit the benefit of high-dimensional signal sets, and the increased computational complexity may not yield corresponding improvement in system performance. High-dimensional system models may also lead to overfitting and lack of generalizability. To address these issues, we present a generalized modulation depth measure using the state-space framework that quantifies the tuning of a neural signal channel to relevant behavioral covariates. For a dynamical system, we develop computationally efficient procedures for estimating modulation depth from multivariate data. We show that this measure can be used to rank neural signals and select an optimal channel subset for inclusion in the neural decoding algorithm. We present a scheme for choosing the optimal subset based on model order selection criteria. We apply this method to neuronal ensemble spike-rate decoding in neural interfaces, using our framework to relate motor cortical activity with intended movement kinematics. With offline analysis of intracortical motor imagery data obtained from individuals with tetraplegia using the BrainGate neural interface, we demonstrate that our variable selection scheme is useful for identifying and ranking the most information-rich neural signals. We demonstrate that our approach offers several orders of magnitude lower complexity but virtually identical decoding performance compared to greedy search and other selection schemes. Our statistical analysis shows that the modulation depth of human motor cortical single-unit signals is well characterized by the generalized Pareto distribution. Our variable selection scheme has wide applicability in problems involving multisensor signal modeling and estimation in biomedical engineering systems. PMID

  1. Interface-capturing lattice Boltzmann equation model for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Qin; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an interface-capturing lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) model is proposed for two-phase flows. In the model, a Lax-Wendroff propagation scheme and a properly chosen equilibrium distribution function are employed. The Lax-Wendroff scheme is used to provide an adjustable Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) number, and the equilibrium distribution is presented to remove the dependence of the relaxation time on the CFL number. As a result, the interface can be captured accurately by decreasing the CFL number. A theoretical expression is derived for the chemical potential gradient by solving the LBE directly for a two-phase system with a flat interface. The result shows that the gradient of the chemical potential is proportional to the square of the CFL number, which explains why the proposed model is able to capture the interface naturally with a small CFL number, and why large interface error exists in the standard LBE model. Numerical tests, including a one-dimensional flat interface problem, a two-dimensional circular droplet problem, and a three-dimensional spherical droplet problem, demonstrate that the proposed LBE model performs well and can capture a sharp interface with a suitable CFL number.

  2. Interface-capturing lattice Boltzmann equation model for two-phase flows.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qin; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an interface-capturing lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) model is proposed for two-phase flows. In the model, a Lax-Wendroff propagation scheme and a properly chosen equilibrium distribution function are employed. The Lax-Wendroff scheme is used to provide an adjustable Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) number, and the equilibrium distribution is presented to remove the dependence of the relaxation time on the CFL number. As a result, the interface can be captured accurately by decreasing the CFL number. A theoretical expression is derived for the chemical potential gradient by solving the LBE directly for a two-phase system with a flat interface. The result shows that the gradient of the chemical potential is proportional to the square of the CFL number, which explains why the proposed model is able to capture the interface naturally with a small CFL number, and why large interface error exists in the standard LBE model. Numerical tests, including a one-dimensional flat interface problem, a two-dimensional circular droplet problem, and a three-dimensional spherical droplet problem, demonstrate that the proposed LBE model performs well and can capture a sharp interface with a suitable CFL number.

  3. Interface Modeling for Electro-Osmosis in Subgrade Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    aggregate and different clays ( kaolinite , montmorillonite , limestone and quartz sands) created to simulate below grade structures. A direct current 30...Quartz Sand 100 Sieve Ca Montmorillonite Na Montmorillonite Kaolinite The test setup used a 0.45 water to cement ratio concrete cylinder... Kaolinite cell Figure 4. Measured pH for Concrete and Na Montmorillonite cell 4 Scaling occurred at the interface between the anode

  4. Stochastic modelling of a large subduction interface earthquake in Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois-Holden, C.; Zhao, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Wellington region, home of New Zealand's capital city, is cut by a number of major right-lateral strike slip faults, and is underlain by the currently locked west-dipping subduction interface between the down going Pacific Plate, and the over-riding Australian Plate. A potential cause of significant earthquake loss in the Wellington region is a large magnitude (perhaps 8+) "subduction earthquake" on the Australia-Pacific plate interface, which lies ~23 km beneath Wellington City. "It's Our Fault" is a project involving a comprehensive study of Wellington's earthquake risk. Its objective is to position Wellington city to become more resilient, through an encompassing study of the likelihood of large earthquakes, and the effects and impacts of these earthquakes on humans and the built environment. As part of the "It's Our Fault" project, we are working on estimating ground motions from potential large plate boundary earthquakes. We present the latest results on ground motion simulations in terms of response spectra and acceleration time histories. First we characterise the potential interface rupture area based on previous geodetically-derived estimates interface of slip deficit. Then, we entertain a suitable range of source parameters, including various rupture areas, moment magnitudes, stress drops, slip distributions and rupture propagation directions. Our comprehensive study also includes simulations from historical large world subduction events translated into the New Zealand subduction context, such as the 2003 M8.3 Tokachi-Oki Japan earthquake and the M8.8 2010 Chili earthquake. To model synthetic seismograms and the corresponding response spectra we employed the EXSIM code developed by Atkinson et al. (2009), with a regional attenuation model based on the 3D attenuation model for the lower North-Island which has been developed by Eberhart-Phillips et al. (2005). The resulting rupture scenarios all produce long duration shaking, and peak ground

  5. Toward efficient fiber-based quantum interface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soshenko, Vladimir; Vorobyov, Vadim V.; Bolshedvorsky, Stepan; Lebedev, Nikolay; Akimov, Alexey V.; Sorokin, Vadim; Smolyaninov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    NV center in diamond is attracting a lot of attention in quantum information processing community [1]. Been spin system in clean and well-controlled environment of diamond it shows outstanding performance as quantum memory even at room temperature, spin control with single shot optical readout and possibility to build up quantum registers even on single NV center. Moreover, NV centers could be used as high-resolution sensitive elements of detectors of magnetic or electric field, temperature, tension, force or rotation. For all of these applications collection of the light emitted by NV center is crucial point. There were number of approaches suggested to address this issue, proposing use of surface plasmoms [2], manufacturing structures in diamond [3] etc. One of the key feature of any practically important interface is compatibility with the fiber technology. Several groups attacking this problem using various approaches. One of them is placing of nanodiamonds in the holes of photonic crystal fiber [4], another is utilization of AFM to pick and place nanodiamond on the tapered fiber[5]. We have developed a novel technique of placing a nanodiamond with single NV center on the tapered fiber by controlled transfer of a nanodiamond from one "donor" tapered fiber to the "target" clean tapered fiber. We verify our ability to transfer only single color centers by means of measurement of second order correlation function. With this technique, we were able to double collection efficiency of confocal microscope. The majority of the factors limiting the collection of photons via optical fiber are technical and may be removed allowing order of magnitude improved in collection. We also discuss number of extensions of this technique to all fiber excitation and integration with nanostructures. References: [1] Marcus W. Doherty, Neil B. Manson, Paul Delaney, Fedor Jelezko, Jörg Wrachtrup, Lloyd C.L. Hollenberg , " The nitrogen-vacancy colour centre in diamond," Physics Reports

  6. A phase-field point-particle model for particle-laden interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chuan; Botto, Lorenzo

    2014-11-01

    The irreversible attachment of solid particles to fluid interfaces is exploited in a variety of applications, such as froth flotation and Pickering emulsions. Critical in these applications is to predict particle transport in and near the interface, and the two-way coupling between the particles and the interface. While it is now possible to carry out particle-resolved simulations of these systems, simulating relatively large systems with many particles remains challenging. We present validation studies and preliminary results for a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation method, in which the dynamics of the interface is fully-resolved by a phase-field approach, while the particles are treated in the ``point-particle'' approximation. With this method, which represents a compromise between the competing needs of resolving particle and interface scale phenomena, we are able to simulate the adsorption of a large number of particles in the interface of drops, and particle-interface interactions during the spinodal coarsening of a multiphase system. While this method models the adsorption phenomenon efficiently and with reasonable accuracy, it still requires understanding subtle issues related to the modelling of hydrodynamic and capillary forces for particles in contact with interface.

  7. A coupled damage-plasticity model for the cyclic behavior of shear-loaded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2015-12-01

    The present work proposes a novel thermodynamically consistent model for the behavior of interfaces under shear (i.e. mode-II) cyclic loading conditions. The interface behavior is defined coupling damage and plasticity. The admissible states' domain is formulated restricting the tangential interface stress to non-negative values, which makes the model suitable e.g. for interfaces with thin adherends. Linear softening is assumed so as to reproduce, under monotonic conditions, a bilinear mode-II interface law. Two damage variables govern respectively the loss of strength and of stiffness of the interface. The proposed model needs the evaluation of only four independent parameters, i.e. three defining the monotonic mode-II interface law, and one ruling the fatigue behavior. This limited number of parameters and their clear physical meaning facilitate experimental calibration. Model predictions are compared with experimental results on fiber reinforced polymer sheets externally bonded to concrete involving different load histories, and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  8. Modeling Nitrogen Cycle at the Surface-Subsurface Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, A.; Tonina, D.; Bellin, A.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities, primarily food and energy production, have altered the global nitrogen cycle, increasing reactive dissolved inorganic nitrogen, Nr, chiefly ammonium NH4+ and nitrate NO3-, availability in many streams worldwide. Increased Nr promotes biological activity often with negative consequences such as water body eutrophication and emission of nitrous oxide gas, N2O, an important greenhouse gas as a by-product of denitrification. The hyporheic zone may play an important role in processing Nr and returning it to the atmosphere. Here, we present a process-based three-dimensional semi-analytical model, which couples hyporheic hydraulics with biogeochemical reactions and transport equations. Transport is solved by means of particle tracking with negligible local dispersion and biogeochemical reactions modeled by linearized Monod's kinetics with temperature dependant reaction rate coefficients. Comparison of measured and predicted N2O emissions from 7 natural stream shows a good match. We apply our model to gravel bed rivers with alternate bar morphology to investigate the role of hyporheic hydraulic, depth of alluvium, relative availability of stream concentration of NO3- and NH4+ and water temperature on nitrogen gradients within the sediment. Our model shows complex concentration dynamics, which depend on hyporheic residence time distribution and consequently on streambed morphology, within the hyporheic zone. Nitrogen gas emissions from the hyporheic zone increase with alluvium depth in large low-gradient streams but not in small steep streams. On the other hand, hyporheic water temperature influences nitrification/denitrification processes mainly in small-steep than large low-gradient streams, because of the long residence times, which offset the slow reaction rates induced by low temperatures in the latter stream. The overall conclusion of our analysis is that river morphology has a major impact on biogeochemical processes such as nitrification

  9. Modeling interface roughness scattering in a layered seabed for normal-incident chirp sonar signals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dajun; Hefner, Brian T

    2012-04-01

    Downward looking sonar, such as the chirp sonar, is widely used as a sediment survey tool in shallow water environments. Inversion of geo-acoustic parameters from such sonar data precedes the availability of forward models. An exact numerical model is developed to initiate the simulation of the acoustic field produced by such a sonar in the presence of multiple rough interfaces. The sediment layers are assumed to be fluid layers with non-intercepting rough interfaces.

  10. A prototype interface unit for microprocessor-based loran-C receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novacki, S. M., III

    1981-01-01

    An inexpensive data/command entry and display system is documented. This system is designed to operate in place of a separate ASC2 terminal. The software to interface this unit to the 6502 based navigation receiver is also described.

  11. A DSP based power electronics interface for alternative /renewable energy system.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-28

    This report is an update on the research project involving the implementation of a DSP-based power electronics interface for alternate/renewable energy systems, that was funded by the Department of Energy under the Inventions and Innovations program.

  12. User interface support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Clayton; Wilde, Nick

    1989-01-01

    Space construction will require heavy investment in the development of a wide variety of user interfaces for the computer-based tools that will be involved at every stage of construction operations. Using today's technology, user interface development is very expensive for two reasons: (1) specialized and scarce programming skills are required to implement the necessary graphical representations and complex control regimes for high-quality interfaces; (2) iteration on prototypes is required to meet user and task requirements, since these are difficult to anticipate with current (and foreseeable) design knowledge. We are attacking this problem by building a user interface development tool based on extensions to the spreadsheet model of computation. The tool provides high-level support for graphical user interfaces and permits dynamic modification of interfaces, without requiring conventional programming concepts and skills.

  13. Diffusion-controlled interface kinetics-inclusive system-theoretic propagation models for molecular communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A. K.; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Inspired by biological systems, molecular communication has been proposed as a new communication paradigm that uses biochemical signals to transfer information from one nano device to another over a short distance. The biochemical nature of the information transfer process implies that for molecular communication purposes, the development of molecular channel models should take into consideration diffusion phenomenon as well as the physical/biochemical kinetic possibilities of the process. The physical and biochemical kinetics arise at the interfaces between the diffusion channel and the transmitter/receiver units. These interfaces are herein termed molecular antennas. In this paper, we present the deterministic propagation model of the molecular communication between an immobilized nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver, where the emission and reception kinetics are taken into consideration. Specifically, we derived closed-form system-theoretic models and expressions for configurations that represent different communication systems based on the type of molecular antennas used. The antennas considered are the nanopores at the transmitter and the surface receptor proteins/enzymes at the receiver. The developed models are simulated to show the influence of parameters such as the receiver radius, surface receptor protein/enzyme concentration, and various reaction rate constants. Results show that the effective receiver surface area and the rate constants are important to the system's output performance. Assuming high rate of catalysis, the analysis of the frequency behavior of the developed propagation channels in the form of transfer functions shows significant difference introduce by the inclusion of the molecular antennas into the diffusion-only model. It is also shown that for t > > 0 and with the information molecules' concentration greater than the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constant of the systems, the inclusion of surface receptors proteins and enzymes in the models

  14. Optical simulation of photovoltaic modules with multiple textured interfaces using the matrix-based formalism OPTOS.

    PubMed

    Tucher, Nico; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Gebrewold, Habtamu; Kiefel, Peter; Höhn, Oliver; Hauser, Hubert; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2016-07-11

    The OPTOS formalism is a matrix-based approach to determine the optical properties of textured optical sheets. It is extended within this work to enable the modelling of systems with an arbitrary number of textured, plane-parallel interfaces. A matrix-based system description is derived that accounts for the optical reflection and transmission interaction between all textured interfaces. Using OPTOS, we calculate reflectance and absorptance of complete photovoltaic module stacks, which consist of encapsulated silicon solar cells featuring textures that operate in different optical regimes. As exemplary systems, solar cells with and without module encapsulation are shown to exhibit a considerable absorptance gain if the random pyramid front side texture is combined with a diffractive rear side grating. A variation of the sunlight's angle of incidence reveals that the grating gain is almost not affected for incoming polar angles up to 60°. Considering as well the good agreement with alternative simulation techniques, OPTOS is demonstrated to be a versatile and efficient method for the optical analysis of photovoltaic modules.

  15. A model for electromigration-induced degradation mechanisms in dual-inlaid copper interconnects: Effect of interface bonding strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Valeriy; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2004-12-01

    A physical model and a simulation algorithm are used to predict an electromigration-(EM-) induced void nucleation and growth in dual-inlaid copper interconnect. Incorporation of all important atom migration driving forces into the mass balance equation and its solution together with solution of the coupled electromagnetics, heat transfer, and elasticity problems allows to simulate EM-induced degradation in a variety of dual-inlaid copper interconnect segments characterized by different dominant channels for mass transport. The interface bonding strengths, significantly influencing the interface diffusivity and consequently the mass transport along interfaces, result in completely different degradation and failure pictures for the weak and strengthened copper/capping layer interfaces. Strengthening of the top interface of inlaid copper interconnect metal line is a promising way to prolong the EM lifetime. The results of the numerical simulation have been proven experimentally by the EM degradation studies on the fully embedded dual-inlaid copper interconnect test structures. EM-induced void formation, movement, and growth in a copper interconnect were continuously monitored in an in situ scanning electron microscopy experiment. The correspondence between simulation results and experimental data indicates the applicability of the developed model for optimization of the physical and electrical design rules. Simulation-based optimization of the interconnect architecture, segment geometry, material properties, and some of the process parameters can generate on-chip interconnect systems with a high immunity to EM-induced failures.

  16. General atomistic approach for modeling metal-semiconductor interfaces using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stradi, Daniele; Martinez, Umberto; Blom, Anders; Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    Metal-semiconductor contacts are a pillar of modern semiconductor technology. Historically, their microscopic understanding has been hampered by the inability of traditional analytical and numerical methods to fully capture the complex physics governing their operating principles. Here we introduce an atomistic approach based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function, which includes all the relevant ingredients required to model realistic metal-semiconductor interfaces and allows for a direct comparison between theory and experiments via I -Vbias curve simulations. We apply this method to characterize an Ag/Si interface relevant for photovoltaic applications and study the rectifying-to-Ohmic transition as a function of the semiconductor doping. We also demonstrate that the standard "activation energy" method for the analysis of I -Vbias data might be inaccurate for nonideal interfaces as it neglects electron tunneling, and that finite-size atomistic models have problems in describing these interfaces in the presence of doping due to a poor representation of space-charge effects. Conversely, the present method deals effectively with both issues, thus representing a valid alternative to conventional procedures for the accurate characterization of metal-semiconductor interfaces.

  17. Interface capturing using a compressive advection method and a compositional modelling approach: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhihua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    Progress on a consistent approach for interface-capturing in which each component represents a different phase/fluid is described. The aim is to develop a general multiphase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components. The method is based on the P1DG-P2 finite element pair, in which the velocity has a linear discontinuous variation and the pressure has a quadratic continuous variation. The method is compared against experimental results for a collapsing water column test case and a convergence study is performed. The method is then used to simulate horizontal slug flow. EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  18. High level modelling and design of asynchronous interface logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, A. V.; Koelmans, A. M.; Lavagno, L.

    1993-11-01

    The authors propose a new methodology to design asynchronous circuits that is divided in two stages: abstract synthesis and logic synthesis. The first state is carried out by refining an abstract model, based on logic predicates describing the correct input-output behavior of the circuit, into a labelled Petri net and then into a formalization of timing diagrams (the Signal Transition Graph). This refinement involves hierarchical decomposition of the initial implementation until its size can be handled by automated logic synthesis tools, as well as replacing symbolic events occurring on the input-output ports of the labelled Petri net with up and down transitions occurring on the input-output wires of a circuit implementation.

  19. Predicting the pKa and stability of organic acids and bases at an oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M P; Olsson, M H M; Stipp, S L S

    2014-06-10

    We have used density functional theory and the implicit solvent model, COSMO-RS, to investigate how the acidity constant, pKa, of organic acids and bases adsorbed at the organic compound-aqueous solution interface changes, compared to its value in the aqueous phase. The pKa determine the surface charge density of the molecules that accumulate at the fluid-fluid interface. We have estimated the pKa by comparing the stability of the protonated and unprotonated forms of a series of molecules in the bulk aqueous solution and at an interface where parts of each molecule reside in the hydrophobic phase and the rest remains in the hydrophilic phase. We found that the pKa for acids is shifted by ∼1 pH unit to higher values compared to the bulk water pKa, whereas they are shifted to lower values by a similar amount for bases. Because this pKa shift is similar in magnitude for each of the molecules studied, we propose that the pKa for molecules at a water-organic compound interface can easily be predicted by adding a small shift to the aqueous pKa. This shift is general and correlates with the functional group. We also found that the relative composition of molecules at the fluid-fluid interface is not the same as in the bulk. For example, species such as carboxylic acids are enriched at the interface, where they can dominate surface properties, even when they are a modest component in the bulk fluid. For high surface concentrations of carboxylic acid groups at an interface, such as a self-assembled monolayer, we have demonstrated that the pKa depends on the degree of deprotonation through direct hydrogen bonding between protonated and deprotonated acidic headgroups.

  20. The GIS weasel - An interface for the development of spatial information in modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viger, R.J.; Markstrom, S.M.; Leavesley, G.H.; ,

    2005-01-01

    The GIS Weasel is a map and Graphical User Interface (GUI) driven tool that has been developed as an aid to modelers in the delineation, characterization of geographic features, and their parameterization for use in distributed or lumped parameter physical process models. The interface does not require user expertise in geographic information systems (GIS). The user does need knowledge of how the model will use the output from the GIS Weasel. The GIS Weasel uses Workstation ArcInfo and its the Grid extension. The GIS Weasel will run on all platforms that Workstation ArcInfo runs (i.e. numerous flavors of Unix and Microsoft Windows).The GIS Weasel requires an input ArcInfo grid of some topographical description of the Area of Interest (AOI). This is normally a digital elevation model, but can be the surface of a ground water table or any other data that flow direction can be resolved from. The user may define the AOI as a custom drainage area based on an interactively specified watershed outlet point, or use a previously created map. The user is then able to use any combination of the GIS Weasel's tool set to create one or more maps for depicting different kinds of geographic features. Once the spatial feature maps have been prepared, then the GIS Weasel s many parameterization routines can be used to create descriptions of each element in each of the user s created maps. Over 200 parameterization routines currently exist, generating information about shape, area, and topological association with other features of the same or different maps, as well many types of information based on ancillary data layers such as soil and vegetation properties. These tools easily integrate other similarly formatted data sets.

  1. A Mediator-Based Approach to Resolving Interface Heterogeneity of Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Philipp; Rosenberg, Florian; Michlmayr, Anton; Huber, Andreas; Dustdar, Schahram

    In theory, service-oriented architectures are based on the idea of increasing flexibility in the selection of internal and external business partners using loosely-coupled services. However, in practice this flexibility is limited by the fact that partners need not only to provide the same service, but to do so via virtually the same interface in order to actually be interchangeable easily. Invocation-level mediation may be used to overcome this issue — by using mediation interface differences can be resolved transparently at runtime. In this chapter we discuss the basic ideas of mediation, with a focus on interface-level mediation. We show how interface mediation is integrated into our dynamic Web service invocation framework DAIOS, and present three different mediation strategies, one based on structural message similarity, one based on semantically annotated WSDL, and one which is embedded into the VRESCo SOA runtime, a larger research project with explicit support for service mediation.

  2. Brain-computer interface with language model-EEG fusion for locked-in syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oken, Barry S.; Orhan, Umut; Roark, Brian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Fowler, Andrew; Mooney, Aimee; Peters, Betts; Miller, Meghan; Fried-Oken, Melanie B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Some non-invasive brain computer interface (BCI) systems are currently available for locked-in syndrome (LIS) but none have incorporated a statistical language model during text generation. Objective To begin to address the communication needs of individuals with LIS using a non-invasive BCI that involves Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) of symbols and a unique classifier with EEG and language model fusion. Methods The RSVP Keyboard™ was developed with several unique features. Individual letters are presented at 2.5 per sec. Computer classification of letters as targets or non-targets based on EEG is performed using machine learning that incorporates a language model for letter prediction via Bayesian fusion enabling targets to be presented only 1–4 times. Nine participants with LIS and nine healthy controls were enrolled. After screening, subjects first calibrated the system, and then completed a series of balanced word generation mastery tasks that were designed with five incremental levels of difficulty, that increased by selecting phrases for which the utility of the language model decreased naturally. Results Six participants with LIS and nine controls completed the experiment. All LIS participants successfully mastered spelling at level one and one subject achieved level five. Six of nine control participants achieved level five. Conclusions Individuals who have incomplete LIS may benefit from an EEG-based BCI system, which relies on EEG classification and a statistical language model. Steps to further improve the system are discussed. PMID:24370570

  3. A Hyperbolic Ontology Visualization Tool for Model Application Programming Interface Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, Cody

    2011-01-01

    Spacecraft modeling, a critically important portion in validating planned spacecraft activities, is currently carried out using a time consuming method of mission to mission model implementations and integration. A current project in early development, Integrated Spacecraft Analysis (ISCA), aims to remedy this hindrance by providing reusable architectures and reducing time spent integrating models with planning and sequencing tools. The principle objective of this internship was to develop a user interface for an experimental ontology-based structure visualization of navigation and attitude control system modeling software. To satisfy this, a number of tree and graph visualization tools were researched and a Java based hyperbolic graph viewer was selected for experimental adaptation. Early results show promise in the ability to organize and display large amounts of spacecraft model documentation efficiently and effectively through a web browser. This viewer serves as a conceptual implementation for future development but trials with both ISCA developers and end users should be performed to truly evaluate the effectiveness of continued development of such visualizations.

  4. Nanoscale neuroelectronic interface based on open-ended nanocoax arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, Jeffrey R.; Rizal, Binod; Burns, Michael J.; Yeom, Jee; Heyse, Shannon; Archibald, Michelle; Shepard, Stephen; McMahon, Gregory; Chiles, Thomas C.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2012-02-01

    We describe the development of a nanoscale neuroelectronic array with submicron pixelation for recording and stimulation with high spatial resolution. The device is composed of an array of nanoscale coaxial electrodes, either network- or individually-configured. As a neuroelectronic interface, it will employ noninvasive real-time capacitive coupling to the plasma membrane with potential for extracellular recording of intra- and interneural synaptic activity, with one target being precision measurement of electrical signals associated with induced and spontaneous synapse firing in pre- and post-synaptic somata. Subarrays or even individual pixels can also be actuated for precisely-localized stimulation. We report initial results from measurements using the rat adrenal pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, which terminally differentiates in response to nerve growth factor, as well as SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in response to retinoic acid, characterizing the basic performance of the fabricated device.

  5. ChemPreview: an augmented reality-based molecular interface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Waller, Mark P

    2017-05-01

    Human computer interfaces make computational science more comprehensible and impactful. Complex 3D structures such as proteins or DNA are magnified by digital representations and displayed on two-dimensional monitors. Augmented reality has recently opened another door to access the virtual three-dimensional world. Herein, we present an augmented reality application called ChemPreview with the potential to manipulate bio-molecular structures at an atomistic level. ChemPreview is available at https://github.com/wallerlab/chem-preview/releases, and is built on top of the Meta 1 platform https://www.metavision.com/. ChemPreview can be used to interact with a protein in an intuitive way using natural hand gestures, thereby making it appealing to computational chemists or structural biologists. The ability to manipulate atoms in real world could eventually provide new and more efficient ways of extracting structural knowledge, or designing new molecules in silico.

  6. Novel protocols for P300-based brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Salvaris, Mathew; Cinel, Caterina; Citi, Luca; Poli, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    The oddball protocol is often used in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) to induce P300 ERPs, although, recently, some issues have been shown to detrimentally effect its performance. In this paper, we study a new periodic protocol and explore whether it can compete with the standard oddball protocol within the context of a BCI mouse. We found that the new protocol consistently and significantly outperforms the standard oddball protocol in relation to information transfer rates (33 bits/min for the former and 22 bits/min for the latter, measured at 90% accuracy) as well as P300 amplitudes. Furthermore, we performed a comparison of two periodic protocols with two less conventional oddball-like protocols that reveals the importance of the interactions between task and sequence in determining the success of a protocol.

  7. A comparison of molecular dynamics and diffuse interface model predictions of Lennard-Jones fluid evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbante, Paolo; Frezzotti, Aldo; Gibelli, Livio

    2014-12-09

    The unsteady evaporation of a thin planar liquid film is studied by molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones fluid. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a diffuse interface model in which capillary Korteweg contributions are added to hydrodynamic equations, in order to obtain a unified description of the liquid bulk, liquid-vapor interface and vapor region. Particular care has been taken in constructing a diffuse interface model matching the thermodynamic and transport properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The comparison of diffuse interface model and molecular dynamics results shows that, although good agreement is obtained in equilibrium conditions, remarkable deviations of diffuse interface model predictions from the reference molecular dynamics results are observed in the simulation of liquid film evaporation. It is also observed that molecular dynamics results are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained from a composite model which describes the liquid film by a standard hydrodynamic model and the vapor by the Boltzmann equation. The two mathematical model models are connected by kinetic boundary conditions assuming unit evaporation coefficient.

  8. A Dynamic Model for the Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, A. V.; Mukherjee, S.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Most models that describe the interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid-liquid interface are based on the assumption of steady state. However, as demonstrated by experimental work, the process does not reach steady state until the particle is pushed for a while by the interface. In this work, a dynamic mathematical model was developed. The dynamic model demonstrates that this interaction is essentially non-steady state and that steady state eventually occurs only when solidification is conducted at sub-critical velocities. The model was tested for three systems: aluminum-zirconia particles, succinonitrilepolystyrene particles, and biphenyl-glass particles. The calculated values for critical velocity of the pushing/engulfment transition were in same range with the experimental ones.

  9. Modeling and preliminary testing socket-residual limb interface stiffness of above-elbow prostheses.

    PubMed

    Sensinger, Jonathon W; Weir, Richard F ff

    2008-04-01

    The interface between the socket and residual limb can have a significant effect on the performance of a prosthesis. Specifically, knowledge of the rotational stiffness of the socket-residual limb (S-RL) interface is extremely useful in designing new prostheses and evaluating new control paradigms, as well as in comparing existing and new socket technologies. No previous studies, however, have examined the rotational stiffness of S-RL interfaces. To address this problem, a math model is compared to a more complex finite element analysis, to see if the math model sufficiently captures the main effects of S-RL interface rotational stiffness. Both of these models are then compared to preliminary empirical testing, in which a series of X-rays, called fluoroscopy, is taken to obtain the movement of the bone relative to the socket. Force data are simultaneously recorded, and the combination of force and movement data are used to calculate the empirical rotational stiffness of elbow S-RL interface. The empirical rotational stiffness values are then compared to the models, to see if values of Young's modulus obtained in other studies at localized points may be used to determine the global rotational stiffness of the S-RL interface. Findings include agreement between the models and empirical results and the ability of persons to significantly modulate the rotational stiffness of their S-RL interface a little less than one order of magnitude. The floor and ceiling of this range depend significantly on socket length and co-contraction levels, but not on residual limb diameter or bone diameter. Measured trans-humeral S-RL interface rotational stiffness values ranged from 24-140 Nm/rad for the four subjects tested in this study.

  10. Initial stages of ITO/Si interface formation: In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements upon magnetron sputtering and atomistic modelling using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Løvvik, O. M.; Diplas, S.; Ulyashin, A.; Romanyuk, A.

    2014-02-28

    Initial stages of indium tin oxide (ITO) growth on a polished Si substrate upon magnetron sputtering were studied experimentally using in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The presence of pure indium and tin, as well as Si bonded to oxygen at the ITO/Si interface were observed. The experimental observations were compared with several atomistic models of ITO/Si interfaces. A periodic model of the ITO/Si interface was constructed, giving detailed information about the local environment at the interface. Molecular dynamics based on density functional theory was performed, showing how metal-oxygen bonds are broken on behalf of silicon-oxygen bonds. These theoretical results support and provide an explanation for the present as well as previous ex-situ and in-situ experimental observations pointing to the creation of metallic In and Sn along with the growth of SiO{sub x} at the ITO/Si interface.

  11. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a large number of human-computer interface (HCI) researchers have investigated building analytical models of the user, which are often implemented as computer models. These models simulate the cognitive processes and task knowledge of the user in ways that allow a researcher or designer to estimate various aspects of an interface's usability, such as when user errors are likely to occur. This information can lead to design improvements. Analytical models can supplement design guidelines by providing designers rigorous ways of analyzing the information-processing requirements of specific tasks (i.e., task analysis). These models offer the potential of improving early designs and replacing some of the early phases of usability testing, thus reducing the cost of interface design. This paper describes some of the many analytical models that are currently being developed and evaluates the usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design. This paper will focus on computational, analytical models, such as the GOMS model, rather than less formal, verbal models, because the more exact predictions and task descriptions of computational models may be useful to designers. The paper also discusses some of the practical requirements for using analytical models in complex design organizations such as NASA.

  12. Long-term coupling along the subduction plate interface: insights from exhumed rocks and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.; Guillot, S.; Garcia-Casco, A.

    2012-04-01

    increasing mechanical coupling between the two plates. Based on natural data and numerical modelling we thus propose that rheological contrast chiefly controls mechanical decoupling (and early exhumation). On a steady-state basis the subduction interface is apparently efficiently decoupled. In this context, we hypothesize that the liberation of fluid through pulses (or a somewhat increased amount of fluids) is required to locally modify mechanical coupling and induce the slicing of large pieces of oceanic material along the subduction interface (type 1). By contrast, an extreme hydration of the subduction interface and mantle wedge will result in the formation of serpentinite melanges and extensive material mixing (e.g., cold plumes, mafic pods and localized melting; type 2). This latter situation may be promoted by young/fast/wet subduction, such as subduction initiation and/or subduction of young lithosphere or subduction of a particularly hydrated lithosphere section (e.g., at the ridge and/or prior to entering the trench). By contrast cold, slow subduction (type 1) will result in irregular hydration and localized coupling able to detach large slices.

  13. Interface mechanics in lower-limb external prosthetics: a review of finite element models.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, S G; Sanders, J E

    1996-12-01

    The distribution of mechanical stress at the interface between a residual limb and prosthetic socket is an important design consideration in lower-limb prosthetics. Stresses must be distributed so that the amputee is stable and comfortable, while avoiding trauma to the tissues of the residual limb. Numerical estimation of the stresses at the interface through finite element (FE) modeling can potentially provide researchers and prosthetists with a tool to aid in the design of the prosthetic socket. This review addresses FE modeling of interface stresses in lower-limb external prosthetics. The modeling methodologies adopted by analysts are described. Verification of FE estimates of interface stress against experimental data by different analysts is presented and the likely sources of error discussed. While the performance of the models is encouraging, there are definite limitations to all of them, necessitating further improvements. Parametric analysis of the sensitivity of interface stress to model parameters provides a tool to identify model weaknesses and to suggest possible refinements. Parametric analyses by different analysts are also presented and potential refinements discussed. Finally, directions for future work in prosthetic FE modeling are suggested.

  14. A Graphical User Interface for Parameterizing Biochemical Models of Photosynthesis and Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornfeld, A.; Van der Tol, C.; Berry, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in optical remote sensing of photosynthesis offer great promise for estimating gross primary productivity (GPP) at leaf, canopy and even global scale. These methods -including solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) emission, fluorescence spectra, and hyperspectral features such as the red edge and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) - can be used to greatly enhance the predictive power of global circulation models (GCMs) by providing better constraints on GPP. The way to use measured optical data to parameterize existing models such as SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes) is not trivial, however. We have therefore extended a biochemical model to include fluorescence and other parameters in a coupled treatment. To help parameterize the model, we then use nonlinear curve-fitting routines to determine the parameter set that enables model results to best fit leaf-level gas exchange and optical data measurements. To make the tool more accessible to all practitioners, we have further designed a graphical user interface (GUI) based front-end to allow researchers to analyze data with a minimum of effort while, at the same time, allowing them to change parameters interactively to visualize how variation in model parameters affect predicted outcomes such as photosynthetic rates, electron transport, and chlorophyll fluorescence. Here we discuss the tool and its effectiveness, using recently-gathered leaf-level data.

  15. A multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus interface for electron momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, C.G.; Deng, J.K.; Su, G.L.; Zhou, H.; Ren, X.G.

    2004-09-01

    A versatile multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus (USB) interface was designed and has been used on the electron momentum spectromenter. Digitized data were first buffered in a FIFO memory in an event-by-event mode with a check bit, and then transferred to computer through the USB interface. USB interface combined with a microcontroller unit provides much flexibility for data acquisition and experimental controls. The operation performance of the system is demonstrated in the measurement of electron momentum spectra of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} molecules.

  16. A multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus interface for electron momentum spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C. G.; Deng, J. K.; Su, G. L.; Zhou, H.; Ren, X. G.

    2004-09-01

    A versatile multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus (USB) interface was designed and has been used on the electron momentum spectromenter. Digitized data were first buffered in a FIFO memory in an event-by-event mode with a check bit, and then transferred to computer through the USB interface. USB interface combined with a microcontroller unit provides much flexibility for data acquisition and experimental controls. The operation performance of the system is demonstrated in the measurement of electron momentum spectra of CH2F2 molecules.

  17. A CLIPS-based tool for aircraft pilot-vehicle interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Thomas D.; Rogers, Steven P.

    1991-01-01

    The Pilot-Vehicle Interface of modern aircraft is the cognitive, sensory, and psychomotor link between the pilot, the avionics modules, and all other systems on board the aircraft. To assist pilot-vehicle interface designers, a C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) based tool was developed that allows design information to be stored in a table that can be modified by rules representing design knowledge. Developed for the Apple Macintosh, the tool allows users without any CLIPS programming experience to form simple rules using a point and click interface.

  18. Nanostructure-directed chemical sensing: The IHSAB principle and the dynamics of acid/base-interface interaction.

    PubMed

    Gole, James L; Laminack, William

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructure-decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are studied in order to develop chemical sensing with nanostructured materials. We couple the tenets of acid/base chemistry with the majority charge carriers of an extrinsic semiconductor. Nanostructured islands are deposited in a process that does not require self-assembly in order to direct a dominant electron-transduction process that forms the basis for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of chemical-bond formation. Gaseous analyte interactions on a metal-oxide-decorated n-type porous silicon interface show a dynamic electron transduction to and from the interface depending upon the relative strength of the gas and metal oxides. The dynamic interaction of NO with TiO(2), SnO(2), NiO, Cu(x)O, and Au(x)O (x > 1), in order of decreasing acidity, demonstrates this effect. Interactions with the metal-oxide-decorated interface can be modified by the in situ nitridation of the oxide nanoparticles, enhancing the basicity of the decorated interface. This process changes the interaction of the interface with the analyte. The observed change to the more basic oxinitrides does not represent a simple increase in surface basicity but appears to involve a change in molecular electronic structure, which is well explained by using the recently developed IHSAB model. The optical pumping of a TiO(2) and TiO(2-) (x)N(x) decorated interface demonstrates a significant enhancement in the ability to sense NH(3) and NO(2). Comparisons to traditional metal-oxide sensors are also discussed.

  19. Nanostructure-directed chemical sensing: The IHSAB principle and the dynamics of acid/base-interface interaction

    PubMed Central

    Laminack, William

    2013-01-01

    Summary Nanostructure-decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are studied in order to develop chemical sensing with nanostructured materials. We couple the tenets of acid/base chemistry with the majority charge carriers of an extrinsic semiconductor. Nanostructured islands are deposited in a process that does not require self-assembly in order to direct a dominant electron-transduction process that forms the basis for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of chemical-bond formation. Gaseous analyte interactions on a metal-oxide-decorated n-type porous silicon interface show a dynamic electron transduction to and from the interface depending upon the relative strength of the gas and metal oxides. The dynamic interaction of NO with TiO2, SnO2, NiO, CuxO, and AuxO (x >> 1), in order of decreasing acidity, demonstrates this effect. Interactions with the metal-oxide-decorated interface can be modified by the in situ nitridation of the oxide nanoparticles, enhancing the basicity of the decorated interface. This process changes the interaction of the interface with the analyte. The observed change to the more basic oxinitrides does not represent a simple increase in surface basicity but appears to involve a change in molecular electronic structure, which is well explained by using the recently developed IHSAB model. The optical pumping of a TiO2 and TiO2− xNx decorated interface demonstrates a significant enhancement in the ability to sense NH3 and NO2. Comparisons to traditional metal-oxide sensors are also discussed. PMID:23400337

  20. Framework for non-coherent interface models at finite displacement jumps and finite strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosen, Niels Saabye; Ristinmaa, Matti; Mosler, Jörn

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with a novel constitutive framework suitable for non-coherent interfaces, such as cracks, undergoing large deformations in a geometrically exact setting. For this type of interface, the displacement field shows a jump across the interface. Within the engineering community, so-called cohesive zone models are frequently applied in order to describe non-coherent interfaces. However, for existing models to comply with the restrictions imposed by (a) thermodynamical consistency (e.g., the second law of thermodynamics), (b) balance equations (in particular, balance of angular momentum) and (c) material frame indifference, these models are essentially fiber models, i.e. models where the traction vector is collinear with the displacement jump. This constraints the ability to model shear and, in addition, anisotropic effects are excluded. A novel, extended constitutive framework which is consistent with the above mentioned fundamental physical principles is elaborated in this paper. In addition to the classical tractions associated with a cohesive zone model, the main idea is to consider additional tractions related to membrane-like forces and out-of-plane shear forces acting within the interface. For zero displacement jump, i.e. coherent interfaces, this framework degenerates to existing formulations presented in the literature. For hyperelasticity, the Helmholtz energy of the proposed novel framework depends on the displacement jump as well as on the tangent vectors of the interface with respect to the current configuration - or equivalently - the Helmholtz energy depends on the displacement jump and the surface deformation gradient. It turns out that by defining the Helmholtz energy in terms of the invariants of these variables, all above-mentioned fundamental physical principles are automatically fulfilled. Extensions of the novel framework necessary for material degradation (damage) and plasticity are also covered.

  1. Quantum neural network-based EEG filtering for a brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Vaibhav; Prasad, Girijesh; Coyle, Damien; Behera, Laxmidhar; McGinnity, Thomas Martin

    2014-02-01

    A novel neural information processing architecture inspired by quantum mechanics and incorporating the well-known Schrodinger wave equation is proposed in this paper. The proposed architecture referred to as recurrent quantum neural network (RQNN) can characterize a nonstationary stochastic signal as time-varying wave packets. A robust unsupervised learning algorithm enables the RQNN to effectively capture the statistical behavior of the input signal and facilitates the estimation of signal embedded in noise with unknown characteristics. The results from a number of benchmark tests show that simple signals such as dc, staircase dc, and sinusoidal signals embedded within high noise can be accurately filtered and particle swarm optimization can be employed to select model parameters. The RQNN filtering procedure is applied in a two-class motor imagery-based brain-computer interface where the objective was to filter electroencephalogram (EEG) signals before feature extraction and classification to increase signal separability. A two-step inner-outer fivefold cross-validation approach is utilized to select the algorithm parameters subject-specifically for nine subjects. It is shown that the subject-specific RQNN EEG filtering significantly improves brain-computer interface performance compared to using only the raw EEG or Savitzky-Golay filtered EEG across multiple sessions.

  2. Primary Care Practice-Based Research Networks: Working at the Interface Between Research and Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mold, James W.; Peterson, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to describe the emerging role of primary care practice-based in research, quality improvement (QI), and translation of research into practice (TRIP). METHODS We gathered information from the published literature, discussions with PBRN leaders, case examples, and our own personal experience to describe a role for PBRNs that comfortably bridges the gap between research and QI, discovery and application, academicians and practitioners—a role that may lead to the establishment of true learning communities. We provide specific recommendations for network directors, network clinicians, and other potential stakeholders. RESULTS PBRNs function at the interface between research and QI, an interface called TRIP by some members of the research community. In doing so, PBRNs are helping to clarify the difficulty of applying study findings to everyday care as an inappropriate disconnect between discovery and implementation, research and practice. Participatory models are emerging in which stakeholders agree on their goals; apply their collective knowledge, skills, and resources to accomplish these goals; and use research and QI methods when appropriate. CONCLUSIONS PBRNs appear to be evolving from clinical laboratories into learning communities, proving grounds for generalizable solutions to clinical problems, and engines for improvement of primary care delivery systems. PMID:15928213

  3. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7–36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs. PMID:24828128

  4. ASV3 dial-in interface recommendation for the Repository Based Software Engineering (RBSE) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide insight into the approach and design of the Cooperative User Interface (CUI). The CUI is being developed based on Hypercard technology and will provide the same look and feel as is provided by the NASA Electronic Library System (NELS) X-Window interface. The interaction between the user and ASCII-LIB is presented as well as the set of Hypercard Cards with which the user will work.

  5. Analytic Element Modeling of Steady Interface Flow in Multilayer Aquifers Using AnAqSim.

    PubMed

    Fitts, Charles R; Godwin, Joshua; Feiner, Kathleen; McLane, Charles; Mullendore, Seth

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the analytic element modeling approach implemented in the software AnAqSim for simulating steady groundwater flow with a sharp fresh-salt interface in multilayer (three-dimensional) aquifer systems. Compared with numerical methods for variable-density interface modeling, this approach allows quick model construction and can yield useful guidance about the three-dimensional configuration of an interface even at a large scale. The approach employs subdomains and multiple layers as outlined by Fitts (2010) with the addition of discharge potentials for shallow interface flow (Strack 1989). The following simplifying assumptions are made: steady flow, a sharp interface between fresh- and salt water, static salt water, and no resistance to vertical flow and hydrostatic heads within each fresh water layer. A key component of this approach is a transition to a thin fixed minimum fresh water thickness mode when the fresh water thickness approaches zero. This allows the solution to converge and determine the steady interface position without a long transient simulation. The approach is checked against the widely used numerical codes SEAWAT and SWI/MODFLOW and a hypothetical application of the method to a coastal wellfield is presented.

  6. Model of dynamic self-assembly in ferromagnetic suspensions at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, D. L.; Straube, A. V.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.

    2013-09-01

    Ferromagnetic microparticles suspended at the interface between immiscible liquids and energized by an external alternating magnetic field show a rich variety of self-assembled structures, from linear snakes to radial asters. In order to obtain insight into the fundamental physical mechanisms and the overall balance of forces governing self-assembly, we develop a modeling approach based on analytical solutions of the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. These analytical expressions for the self-consistent hydrodynamic flows are then employed to modify effective interactions between the particles, which in turn are formulated in terms of the time-averaged quantities. Our method allows effective computational verification of the mechanisms of self-assembly and leads to a testable prediction, e.g., on the transitions between various patterns versus viscosity of the solvent.

  7. Control of enterprise interfaces for supply chain enterprise modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Interrante, L.D.; Macfarlane, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    There is a current trend for manufacturing enterprises in a supply chain of a particular industry to join forces in an attempt to promote efficiencies and improve competitive position. Such alliances occur in the context of specific legal and business agreements such that each enterprise retains a majority of its business and manufacturing information as private and shares other information with its trading partners. Shared information may include enterprise demand projections, capacities, finished goods inventories, and aggregate production schedules. Evidence of the trend toward information sharing includes the recent emphases on vendor-managed inventories, quick response, and Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The increased competition brought on by the global marketplace is driving industries to consider the advantages of trading partner agreements. Aggregate-level forecasts, supply-chain production smoothing, and aggregate-level inventory policies can reduce holding costs, record-keeping overhead, and lead time in product development. The goal of this research is to orchestrate information exchange among trading partners to allow for aggregate-level analysis to enhance supply chain efficiency. The notion of Enterprise Interface Control (EIC) is introduced as a means of accomplishing this end.

  8. Neuromuscular interfacing: a novel approach to EMG-driven multiple DOF physiological models.

    PubMed

    Pau, James W L; Xie, Shane S Q; Xu, W L

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that involves first identifying and verifying the available superficial muscles that can be recorded by surface electromyography (EMG) signals, and then developing a musculoskeletal model based on these findings, which have specifically independent DOFs for movement. Such independently controlled multiple DOF EMG-driven models have not been previously developed and a two DOF model for the masticatory system was achieved by implementing independent antagonist muscle combinations for vertical and lateral movements of the jaw. The model has six channels of EMG signals from the bilateral temporalis, masseter and digastric muscles to predict the motion of the mandible. This can be used in a neuromuscular interface to manipulate a jaw exoskeleton for rehabilitation. For a range of different complexities of jaw movements, the presented model is able to consistently identify movements with 0.28 - 0.46 average normalized RMSE. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the approach at determining complex multiple DOF movements and its applicability to any joint system.

  9. Dynamic Impedance Model of the Skin-Electrode Interface for Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Vargas Luna, José Luis; Krenn, Matthias; Cortés Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes. PMID:25942010

  10. Numerical investigations on the osseointegration of uncemented endoprostheses based on bio-active interface theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, André; Nackenhorst, Udo

    2012-09-01

    In order to simulate the osseointegration of bone implants, a bio-active interface theory is necessary. The thin bone-implant interface layer is described by the Drucker-Prager plasticity model. The formulation of bone mineral density depends on the local mechanical environment. For the simulation of the osseointegration of bone implants a bio-active interface theory is suggested. A thin bone-implant interface layer is described by a Drucker-Prager plasticity model. An evolution rule for the bone mineral density is formulated in dependency of the local mechanical environment. The time dependent ingrowth is modeled by a hardening rule which modifies the Drucker-Prager yield-surface cone in the principle stress state in dependency of the local bone mineral density. The osseointegration process is limited by the violation of a so called micromotion threshold. This relative motion in the implant-bone interface is computed by dynamic loads of daily motion activity. For parameter studies on detailed 3D models model reduction techniques are introduced. The applicability is demonstrated on a hip-joint prosthesis which is in clinical usage.

  11. Impact of oxygen exchange reaction at the ohmic interface in Ta2O5-based ReRAM devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonjoo; Menzel, Stephan; Wouters, Dirk J; Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John; Roesgen, Bernd; Waser, Rainer; Rana, Vikas

    2016-10-20

    Interface reactions constitute essential aspects of the switching mechanism in redox-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). For example, the modulation of the electronic barrier height at the Schottky interface is considered to be responsible for the toggling of the resistance states. On the other hand, the role of the ohmic interface in the resistive switching behavior is still ambigious. In this paper, the impact of different ohmic metal-electrode (M) materials, namely W, Ta, Ti, and Hf on the characteristics of Ta2O5 ReRAM is investigated. These materials are chosen with respect to their free energy for metal oxide formation and, associated, their impact on the formation energy of oxygen vacancy defects at the M/Ta2O5 interface. The resistive switching devices with Ti and Hf electrodes that have a negative defect formation energy, show an early RESET failure during the switching cycles. This failure process with Ti and Hf electrode is attributed to the accumulation of oxygen vacancies in the Ta2O5 layer, which leads to permanent breakdown of the metal-oxide to a low resistive state. In contrast, the defect formation energy in the Ta2O5 with respect to Ta and W electrodes is positive and for those highly stable resistive switching behavior is observed. During the quasi-static and transient-pulse characterization, the ReRAM devices with the W electrode consistently show an increased high resistance state (HRS) than with the Ta electrode for all RESET stop voltages. This effect is attributed to the faster oxygen exchange reaction at the W-electrode interface during the RESET process in accordance to lower stability of WO3 than Ta2O5. Based on these findings, an advanced resistive switching model, wherein also the oxygen exchange reaction at the ohmic M-electrode interface plays a vital role in determining of the resistance states, is presented.

  12. Fabrication of nanostructures and nanostructure based interfaces for biosensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Devesh

    Nanoparticles have applications from electronics, composites, drug-delivery, imaging and sensors etc. Fabricating and controlling shape and size of nanoparticles and also controlling the positioning of these particles in 1, 2 or 3-d structures is of most interest. The underlying theme of this study is to develop simple and efficient techniques to fabricate nanoparticles from polymers, and also achieve control in shape, size and functionalization of nanoparticles, while applying them in biosensor applications. First part of the dissertation studies the fabrication of nanostructures using anodized alumina membrane as template. It discusses the fabrication design for injecting polystyrene nanoparticles inside the pores of anodized alumina membranes and heating the membrane to coalesce the particles into tapered nanoparticles. Various parameters like temperature and amount of injected particles can vary the size and shape of fabricated nanoparticles. Later it focuses on the fabrication of metallic nanostructures using the alumina membranes without the aid of the injection system. It utilizes the difference in the functionality of the pore edges of cleaved alumina membrane with respect to the pore walls to first deposit charged polymers using layer-by-layer deposition followed by deposition of nickel. Second part of this study involves immobilization of enzymes for biosensor applications. It describes a biosensor interface developed by immobilization of tyrosinase using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition process. The interface was modified with functional nanoparticles and their influence on the response of biosensor was studied. Tyrosinase sensor was further extended to develop a novel biosensor which was used to study real time inhibition of NEST, a subunit of the medically relevant membrane protein, neuropathy target esterase. The biosensor was developed to give real time monitoring of dose dependent decrease in activity of NEST. Final part of this study emphasizes on

  13. General MACOS Interface for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The General MACOS Interface (GMI) for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems (MACOS) enables the use of MATLAB as a front-end for JPL s critical optical modeling package, MACOS. MACOS is JPL s in-house optical modeling software, which has proven to be a superb tool for advanced systems engineering of optical systems. GMI, coupled with MACOS, allows for seamless interfacing with modeling tools from other disciplines to make possible integration of dynamics, structures, and thermal models with the addition of control systems for deformable optics and other actuated optics. This software package is designed as a tool for analysts to quickly and easily use MACOS without needing to be an expert at programming MACOS. The strength of MACOS is its ability to interface with various modeling/development platforms, allowing evaluation of system performance with thermal, mechanical, and optical modeling parameter variations. GMI provides an improved means for accessing selected key MACOS functionalities. The main objective of GMI is to marry the vast mathematical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB with the powerful optical analysis engine of MACOS, thereby providing a useful tool to anyone who can program in MATLAB. GMI also improves modeling efficiency by eliminating the need to write an interface function for each task/project, reducing error sources, speeding up user/modeling tasks, and making MACOS well suited for fast prototyping.

  14. Enabling Data Fusion via a Common Data Model and Programming Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindholm, D. M.; Wilson, A.

    2011-12-01

    Much progress has been made in scientific data interoperability, especially in the areas of metadata and discovery. However, while a data user may have improved techniques for finding data, there is often a large chasm to span when it comes to acquiring the desired subsets of various datasets and integrating them into a data processing environment. Some tools such as OPeNDAP servers and the Unidata Common Data Model (CDM) have introduced improved abstractions for accessing data via a common interface, but they alone do not go far enough to enable fusion of data from multidisciplinary sources. Although data from various scientific disciplines may represent semantically similar concepts (e.g. time series), the user may face widely varying structural representations of the data (e.g. row versus column oriented), not to mention radically different storage formats. It is not enough to convert data to a common format. The key to fusing scientific data is to represent each dataset with consistent sampling. This can best be done by using a data model that expresses the functional relationship that each dataset represents. The domain of those functions determines how the data can be combined. The Visualization for Algorithm Development (VisAD) Java API has provided a sophisticated data model for representing the functional nature of scientific datasets for well over a decade. Because VisAD is largely designed for its visualization capabilities, the data model can be cumbersome to use for numerical computation, especially for those not comfortable with Java. Although both VisAD and the implementation of the CDM are written in Java, neither defines a pure Java interface that others could implement and program to, further limiting potential for interoperability. In this talk, we will present a solution for data integration based on a simple discipline-agnostic scientific data model and programming interface that enables a dataset to be defined in terms of three variable types

  15. Conceptual model analysis of interaction at a concrete-Boom Clay interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sanheng; Jacques, Diederik; Govaerts, Joan; Wang, Lian

    In many concepts for deep disposal of high-level radioactive waste, cementitious materials are used in the engineered barriers. For example, in Belgium the engineered barrier system is based on a considerable amount of cementitious materials as buffer and backfill in the so-called supercontainer embedded in the hosting geological formation. A potential hosting formation is Boom Clay. Insight in the interaction between the high-pH pore water of the cementitious materials and neutral-pH Boom Clay pore water is required. Two problems are quite common for modeling of such a system. The first one is the computational cost due to the long timescale model assessments envisaged for the deep disposal system. Also a very fine grid (in sub-millimeter), especially at interfaces has to be used in order to accurately predict the evolution of the system. The second one is whether to use equilibrium or kinetic reaction models. The objectives of this paper are twofold. First, we develop an efficient coupled reactive transport code for this diffusion-dominated system by making full use of multi-processors/cores computers. Second, we investigate how sensitive the system is to chemical reaction models especially when pore clogging due to mineral precipitation is considered within the cementitious system. To do this, we selected two portlandite dissolution models, i.e., equilibrium (fastest) and diffusion-controlled model with precipitation of a calcite layer around portlandite particles (diffusion-controlled dissolution). The results show that with shrinking core model portlandite dissolution and calcite precipitation are much slower than with the equilibrium model. Also diffusion-controlled dissolution smooths out dissolution fronts compared to the equilibrium model. However, only a slight difference with respect to the clogging time can be found even though we use a very small diffusion coefficient (10-20 m2/s) in the precipitated calcite layer.

  16. Fullerene film on metal surface: Diffusion of metal atoms and interface model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-jie; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian; Wang, Peng; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Wang, Jia-Ou; Wu, Rui; Qian, Hai-Jie; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2014-05-12

    We try to understand the fact that fullerene film behaves as n-type semiconductor in electronic devices and establish a model describing the energy level alignment at fullerene/metal interfaces. The C{sub 60}/Ag(100) system was taken as a prototype and studied with photoemission measurements. The photoemission spectra revealed that the Ag atoms of the substrate diffused far into C{sub 60} film and donated electrons to the molecules. So the C{sub 60} film became n-type semiconductor with the Ag atoms acting as dopants. The C{sub 60}/Ag(100) interface should be understood as two sub-interfaces on both sides of the molecular layer directly contacting with the substrate. One sub-interface is Fermi level alignment, and the other is vacuum level alignment.

  17. Developing A Web-based User Interface for Semantic Information Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Keller, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    While there are now a number of languages and frameworks that enable computer-based systems to search stored data semantically, the optimal design for effective user interfaces for such systems is still uncle ar. Such interfaces should mask unnecessary query detail from users, yet still allow them to build queries of arbitrary complexity without significant restrictions. We developed a user interface supporting s emantic query generation for Semanticorganizer, a tool used by scient ists and engineers at NASA to construct networks of knowledge and dat a. Through this interface users can select node types, node attribute s and node links to build ad-hoc semantic queries for searching the S emanticOrganizer network.

  18. An Efficient User Interface Design for Nursing Information System Based on Integrated Patient Order Information.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Hui; Kuo, Ming-Chuan; Weng, Shu-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    A user friendly interface can enhance the efficiency of data entry, which is crucial for building a complete database. In this study, two user interfaces (traditional pull-down menu vs. check boxes) are proposed and evaluated based on medical records with fever medication orders by measuring the time for data entry, steps for each data entry record, and the complete rate of each medical record. The result revealed that the time for data entry is reduced from 22.8 sec/record to 3.2 sec/record. The data entry procedures also have reduced from 9 steps in the traditional one to 3 steps in the new one. In addition, the completeness of medical records is increased from 20.2% to 98%. All these results indicate that the new user interface provides a more user friendly and efficient approach for data entry than the traditional interface.

  19. Dosimetry Modeling for Predicting Radiolytic Production at the Spent Fuel - Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William H.; Kline, Amanda J.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2006-04-30

    Modeling of the alpha, beta, and gamma dose from spent fuel as a function of particle size and fuel to water ratio was examined. These doses will be combined with modeling of G values and interactions to determine the concentration of various species formed at the fuel water interface and their affect on dissolution rates.

  20. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  1. Fragment-based docking: development of the CHARMMing Web user interface as a platform for computer-aided drug design.

    PubMed

    Pevzner, Yuri; Frugier, Emilie; Schalk, Vinushka; Caflisch, Amedeo; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-09-22

    Web-based user interfaces to scientific applications are important tools that allow researchers to utilize a broad range of software packages with just an Internet connection and a browser. One such interface, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics), facilitates access to the powerful and widely used molecular software package CHARMM. CHARMMing incorporates tasks such as molecular structure analysis, dynamics, multiscale modeling, and other techniques commonly used by computational life scientists. We have extended CHARMMing's capabilities to include a fragment-based docking protocol that allows users to perform molecular docking and virtual screening calculations either directly via the CHARMMing Web server or on computing resources using the self-contained job scripts generated via the Web interface. The docking protocol was evaluated by performing a series of "re-dockings" with direct comparison to top commercial docking software. Results of this evaluation showed that CHARMMing's docking implementation is comparable to many widely used software packages and validates the use of the new CHARMM generalized force field for docking and virtual screening.

  2. Modeling oblong proteins and water-mediated interfaces with RosettaDock in CAPRI rounds 28-35.

    PubMed

    Marze, Nicholas A; Jeliazkov, Jeliazko R; Roy Burman, Shourya S; Boyken, Scott E; DiMaio, Frank; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-01

    The 28th-35th rounds of the Critical Assessment of PRotein Interactions (CAPRI) served as a practical benchmark for our RosettaDock protein-protein docking protocols, highlighting strengths and weaknesses of the approach. We achieved acceptable or better quality models in three out of 11 targets. For the two α-repeat protein-green fluorescent protein (αrep-GFP) complexes, we used a novel ellipsoidal partial-global docking method (Ellipsoidal Dock) to generate models with 2.2 Å/1.5 Å interface RMSD, capturing 49%/42% of the native contacts, for the 7-/5-repeat αrep complexes. For the DNase-immunity protein complex, we used a new predictor of hydrogen-bonding networks, HBNet with Bridging Waters, to place individual water models at the complex interface; models were generated with 1.8 Å interface RMSD and 12% native water contacts recovered. The targets for which RosettaDock failed to create an acceptable model were typically difficult in general, as six had no acceptable models submitted by any CAPRI predictor. The UCH-L5-RPN13 and UCH-L5-INO80G de-ubiquitinating enzyme-inhibitor complexes comprised inhibitors undergoing significant structural changes upon binding, with the partners being highly interwoven in the docked complexes. Our failure to predict the nucleosome-enzyme complex in Target 95 was largely due to tight constraints we placed on our model based on sparse biochemical data suggesting two specific cross-interface interactions, preventing the correct structure from being sampled. While RosettaDock's three successes show that it is a state-of-the-art docking method, the difficulties with highly flexible and multi-domain complexes highlight the need for better flexible docking and domain-assembly methods. Proteins 2017; 85:479-486. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Atomistic Modeling of Corrosion Events at the Interface between a Metal and Its Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    Atomistic simulation is a powerful tool for probing the structure and properties of materials and the nature of chemical reactions. Corrosion is a complex process that involves chemical reactions occurring at the interface between a material and its environment and is, therefore, highly suited to study by atomistic modeling techniques. In this paper, the complex nature of corrosion processes and mechanisms is briefly reviewed. Various atomistic methods for exploring corrosion mechanisms are then described, and recent applications in the literature surveyed. Several instances of the application of atomistic modeling to corrosion science are then reviewed in detail, including studies ofmore » the metal-water interface, the reaction of water on electrified metallic interfaces, the dissolution of metal atoms from metallic surfaces, and the role of competitive adsorption in controlling the chemical nature and structure of a metallic surface. Some perspectives are then given concerning the future of atomistic modeling in the field of corrosion science.« less

  4. Geometric Modeling Applications Interface Program. Schema Manager User’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    Standard, Product Definition Data Interface (PDDI), Project 5601, Contract F33516-82-5036, July 1984. Information Modeling Manual IDEF-Extended ( IDEFIX ...Englewood Cliffs, N.J. Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, M. P. de Carmo, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1976. IDEFIX Readers Reference, D. Appleton...IDEF Information Modeling. IDEFIX -IDEF Extended Information Modeling. IDEF2 -IDEF Dynamics Modeling. IDSS - Integrated Decision Support System

  5. Diffuse photon remission along unique spiral paths on a cylindrical interface is modeled by photon remission along a straight line on a semi-infinite interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anqi; Piao, Daqing; Yao, Gang; Bunting, Charles F; Jiang, Yuhao

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate that, for a long cylindrical applicator that interfaces concavely or convexly with a scattering-dominant medium, a unique set of spiral-shaped directions exist on the tissue-applicator interface, along which the diffuse photon remission is essentially modeled by the photon remission along a straight line on a semi-infinite interface. This interesting phenomenon, which is validated in steady state in this work by finite-element and Monte Carlo methods, may be particularly useful for simplifying deeper-tissue sensing in endoscopic imaging geometry.

  6. Numerical Modelling of Subduction Plate Interface, Technical Advances for Outstanding Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Ruh, J.; Pranger, C. C.; Zheng, L.; van Dinther, Y.; May, D.; Gerya, T.; Burov, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    The subduction zone interface is the place of the largest earthquakes on earth. Compared to the size of a subduction zone itself, it constitutes a very thin zone (few kilometers) with effective rheological behaviour that varies as a function of pressure, temperature, loading, nature of the material locally embedded within the interface as well as the amount of water, melts and CO2. Capturing the behaviour of this interface and its evolution in time is crucial, yet modelling it is not an easy task. In the last decade, thermo-mechanical models of subduction zone have flourished in the literature. They mostly focused on the long-term dynamics of the subduction; e.g. flat subduction, slab detachment or exhumation. The models were validated models against PTt path of exhumed material as well as topography. The models that could reproduce the data all included a mechanically weak subduction channel made of extremely weak and non cohesive material. While this subduction channel model is very convenient at large scale and might apply to some real subduction zones, it does not capture the many geological field evidences that point out the exhumation of very large slice of almost pristine oceanic crust along localised shear zone. Moreover, modelling of sismological and geodetic data using short term tectonic modelling approach also point out that large localised patches rupture within the subduction interface, which is in accordance with geological data but not with large-scale long-term tectonic models. I will present how high resolution models permit to produce slicing at the subduction interface and give clues on how the plate coupling and effective location of the plate interface vary over a few millions of year time scale. I will then discuss the implication of these new high-resolution long-term models of subduction zone on earthquake generation, report progress in the development of self-consistent thermomechanical codes which can handle large strain, high resolution

  7. The Effects of Metaphorical Interface on Germane Cognitive Load in Web-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheon, Jongpil; Grant, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a metaphorical interface on germane cognitive load in Web-based instruction. Based on cognitive load theory, germane cognitive load is a cognitive investment for schema construction and automation. A new instrument developed in a previous study was used to measure students' mental activities…

  8. GUIDON-WATCH: A Graphic Interface for Viewing a Knowledge-Based System. Technical Report #14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richer, Mark H.; Clancey, William J.

    This paper describes GUIDON-WATCH, a graphic interface that uses multiple windows and a mouse to allow a student to browse a knowledge base and view reasoning processes during diagnostic problem solving. The GUIDON project at Stanford University is investigating how knowledge-based systems can provide the basis for teaching programs, and this…

  9. Model-based neuroimaging for cognitive computing.

    PubMed

    Poznanski, Roman R

    2009-09-01

    The continuity of the mind is suggested to mean the continuous spatiotemporal dynamics arising from the electrochemical signature of the neocortex: (i) globally through volume transmission in the gray matter as fields of neural activity, and (ii) locally through extrasynaptic signaling between fine distal dendrites of cortical neurons. If the continuity of dynamical systems across spatiotemporal scales defines a stream of consciousness then intentional metarepresentations as templates of dynamic continuity allow qualia to be semantically mapped during neuroimaging of specific cognitive tasks. When interfaced with a computer, such model-based neuroimaging requiring new mathematics of the brain will begin to decipher higher cognitive operations not possible with existing brain-machine interfaces.

  10. Knowledge of Native Protein-Protein Interfaces Is Sufficient To Construct Predictive Models for the Selection of Binding Candidates.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2015-10-26

    Selection of putative binding poses is a challenging part of virtual screening for protein-protein interactions. Predictive models to filter out binding candidates with the highest binding affinities comprise scoring functions that assign a score to each binding pose. Existing scoring functions are typically deduced by collecting statistical information about interfaces of native conformations of protein complexes along with interfaces of a large generated set of non-native conformations. However, the obtained scoring functions become biased toward the method used to generate the non-native conformations, i.e., they may not recognize near-native interfaces generated with a different method. The present study demonstrates that knowledge of only native protein-protein interfaces is sufficient to construct well-discriminative predictive models for the selection of binding candidates. Here we introduce a new scoring method that comprises a knowledge-based potential called KSENIA deduced from structural information about the native interfaces of 844 crystallographic protein-protein complexes. We derive KSENIA using convex optimization with a training set composed of native protein complexes and their near-native conformations obtained using deformations along the low-frequency normal modes. As a result, our knowledge-based potential has only marginal bias toward a method used to generate putative binding poses. Furthermore, KSENIA is smooth by construction, which allows it to be used along with rigid-body optimization to refine the binding poses. Using several test benchmarks, we demonstrate that our method discriminates well native and near-native conformations of protein complexes from non-native ones. Our methodology can be easily adapted to the recognition of other types of molecular interactions, such as protein-ligand, protein-RNA, etc. KSENIA will be made publicly available as a part of the SAMSON software platform at https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software .

  11. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Epoxy Matrix Thermal Interface Materials for Thermal Management in Load Bearing Aerospace Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-12

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...TIMs). When two nominally flat surfaces come together at at a typical material interface, the solid-solid contact area is limited to 1-2% of the...interfaces using diffraction limited infrared microscopy. They reported a thermal interface resistance of the CNT-based interface structure to be much

  12. A model for investigating the behaviour of non-spherical particles at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Morris, G; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2011-02-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for modelling non-spherical particles with a fixed contact angle at an interface whilst also providing a method to fix the particles orientation. It is shown how a wide variety of particle shapes (spherical, ellipsoidal, disc) can be created from a simple initial geometry containing only six vertices. The shapes are made from one continuous surface with edges and corners treated as smooth curves not discontinuities. As such, particles approaching cylindrical and orthorhombic shapes can be simulated but the contact angle crossing the edges will be fixed. Non-spherical particles, when attached to an interface can cause large distortions in the surface which affect the forces acting on the particle. The model presented is capable of resolving this distortion of the surface around the particle at the interface as well as allowing for the particle's orientation to be controlled. It is shown that, when considering orthorhombic particles with rounded edges, the flatter the particle the more energetically stable it is to sit flat at the interface. However, as the particle becomes more cube like, the effects of contact angle have a greater effect on the energetically stable orientations. Results for cylindrical particles with rounded edges are also discussed. The model presented allows the user to define the shape, dimensions, contact angle and orientation of the particle at the interface allowing more in-depth investigation of the complex phenomenon of 3D film distortion around an attached particle and the forces that arise due to it.

  13. A Process and Environment Aware Sierra/SolidMechanics Cohesive Zone Modeling Capability for Polymer/Solid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E. D.; Chambers, Robert S.; Hughes, Lindsey Gloe; Kropka, Jamie Michael; Stavig, Mark E.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    The performance and reliability of many mechanical and electrical components depend on the integrity of po lymer - to - solid interfaces . Such interfaces are found in adhesively bonded joints, encapsulated or underfilled electronic modules, protective coatings, and laminates. The work described herein was aimed at improving Sandia's finite element - based capability to predict interfacial crack growth by 1) using a high fidelity nonlinear viscoelastic material model for the adhesive in fracture simulations, and 2) developing and implementing a novel cohesive zone fracture model that generates a mode - mixity dependent toughness as a natural consequence of its formulation (i.e., generates the observed increase in interfacial toughness wi th increasing crack - tip interfacial shear). Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations were used to study fundamental material/interfa cial physics so as to develop a fuller understanding of the connection between molecular structure and failure . Also reported are test results that quantify how joint strength and interfacial toughness vary with temperature.

  14. Operando X-ray Investigation of Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Model Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Sergey; Vonk, Vedran; Khorshidi, Navid; Franz, Dirk; Kubicek, Markus; Kilic, Volkan; Felici, Roberto; Huber, Tobias M; Navickas, Edvinas; Rupp, Ghislain M; Fleig, Jürgen; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-06-14

    We employed operando anomalous surface X-ray diffraction to investigate the buried interface between the cathode and the electrolyte of a model solid oxide fuel cell with atomic resolution. The cell was studied under different oxygen pressures at elevated temperatures and polarizations by external potential control. Making use of anomalous X-ray diffraction effects at the Y and Zr K-edges allowed us to resolve the interfacial structure and chemical composition of a (100)-oriented, 9.5 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal electrolyte below a La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ (LSC) electrode. We observe yttrium segregation toward the YSZ/LSC electrolyte/electrode interface under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, the interface becomes Y depleted. The yttrium segregation is corroborated by an enhanced outward relaxation of the YSZ interfacial metal ion layer. At the same time, an increase in point defect concentration in the electrolyte at the interface was observed, as evidenced by reduced YSZ crystallographic site occupancies for the cations as well as the oxygen ions. Such changes in composition are expected to strongly influence the oxygen ion transport through this interface which plays an important role for the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The structure of the interface is compared to the bare YSZ(100) surface structure near the microelectrode under identical conditions and to the structure of the YSZ(100) surface prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions.

  15. Operando X-ray Investigation of Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Model Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We employed operando anomalous surface X-ray diffraction to investigate the buried interface between the cathode and the electrolyte of a model solid oxide fuel cell with atomic resolution. The cell was studied under different oxygen pressures at elevated temperatures and polarizations by external potential control. Making use of anomalous X-ray diffraction effects at the Y and Zr K-edges allowed us to resolve the interfacial structure and chemical composition of a (100)-oriented, 9.5 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal electrolyte below a La0.6Sr0.4CoO3−δ (LSC) electrode. We observe yttrium segregation toward the YSZ/LSC electrolyte/electrode interface under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, the interface becomes Y depleted. The yttrium segregation is corroborated by an enhanced outward relaxation of the YSZ interfacial metal ion layer. At the same time, an increase in point defect concentration in the electrolyte at the interface was observed, as evidenced by reduced YSZ crystallographic site occupancies for the cations as well as the oxygen ions. Such changes in composition are expected to strongly influence the oxygen ion transport through this interface which plays an important role for the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The structure of the interface is compared to the bare YSZ(100) surface structure near the microelectrode under identical conditions and to the structure of the YSZ(100) surface prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. PMID:27346923

  16. Microenvironment temperature prediction between body and seat interface using autoregressive data-driven model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuofu; Wang, Lin; Luo, Zhongming; Heusch, Andrew I; Cascioli, Vincenzo; McCarthy, Peter W

    2015-11-01

    There is a need to develop a greater understanding of temperature at the skin-seat interface during prolonged seating from the perspectives of both industrial design (comfort/discomfort) and medical care (skin ulcer formation). Here we test the concept of predicting temperature at the seat surface and skin interface during prolonged sitting (such as required from wheelchair users). As caregivers are usually busy, such a method would give them warning ahead of a problem. This paper describes a data-driven model capable of predicting thermal changes and thus having the potential to provide an early warning (15- to 25-min ahead prediction) of an impending temperature that may increase the risk for potential skin damages for those subject to enforced sitting and who have little or no sensory feedback from this area. Initially, the oscillations of the original signal are suppressed using the reconstruction strategy of empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Consequentially, the autoregressive data-driven model can be used to predict future thermal trends based on a shorter period of acquisition, which reduces the possibility of introducing human errors and artefacts associated with longer duration "enforced" sitting by volunteers. In this study, the method had a maximum predictive error of <0.4 °C when used to predict the temperature at the seat and skin interface 15 min ahead, but required 45 min data prior to give this accuracy. Although the 45 min front loading of data appears large (in proportion to the 15 min prediction), a relative strength derives from the fact that the same algorithm could be used on the other 4 sitting datasets created by the same individual, suggesting that the period of 45 min required to train the algorithm is transferable to other data from the same individual. This approach might be developed (along with incorporation of other measures such as movement and humidity) into a system that can give caregivers prior warning to help avoid

  17. Controlling Kondo-like Scattering at the SrTiO3-based Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Han, K.; Palina, N.; Zeng, S. W.; Huang, Z.; Li, C. J.; Zhou, W. X.; Wan, D.-Y.; Zhang, L. C.; Chi, X.; Guo, R.; Chen, J. S.; Venkatesan, T.; Rusydi, A.; Ariando, A

    2016-01-01

    The observation of magnetic interaction at the interface between nonmagnetic oxides has attracted much attention in recent years. In this report, we show that the Kondo-like scattering at the SrTiO3-based conducting interface is enhanced by increasing the lattice mismatch and growth oxygen pressure PO2. For the 26-unit-cell LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface with lattice mismatch being 3.0%, the Kondo-like scattering is observed when PO2 is beyond 1 mTorr. By contrast, when the lattice mismatch is reduced to 1.0% at the (La0.3Sr0.7)(Al0.65Ta0.35)O3/SrTiO3 (LSAT/STO) interface, the metallic state is always preserved up to PO2 of 100 mTorr. The data from Hall measurement and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy reveal that the larger amount of localized Ti3+ ions are formed at the LAO/STO interface compared to LSAT/STO. Those localized Ti3+ ions with unpaired electrons can be spin-polarized to scatter mobile electrons, responsible for the Kondo-like scattering observed at the LAO/STO interface. PMID:27147407

  18. Java-based Graphical User Interface for MAVERIC-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, Suk Jai

    2005-01-01

    A computer program entitled "Marshall Aerospace Vehicle Representation in C II, (MAVERIC-II)" is a vehicle flight simulation program written primarily in the C programming language. It is written by James W. McCarter at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The goal of the MAVERIC-II development effort is to provide a simulation tool that facilitates the rapid development of high-fidelity flight simulations for launch, orbital, and reentry vehicles of any user-defined configuration for all phases of flight. MAVERIC-II has been found invaluable in performing flight simulations for various Space Transportation Systems. The flexibility provided by MAVERIC-II has allowed several different launch vehicles, including the Saturn V, a Space Launch Initiative Two-Stage-to-Orbit concept and a Shuttle-derived launch vehicle, to be simulated during ascent and portions of on-orbit flight in an extremely efficient manner. It was found that MAVERIC-II provided the high fidelity vehicle and flight environment models as well as the program modularity to allow efficient integration, modification and testing of advanced guidance and control algorithms. In addition to serving as an analysis tool for techno logy development, many researchers have found MAVERIC-II to be an efficient, powerful analysis tool that evaluates guidance, navigation, and control designs, vehicle robustness, and requirements. MAVERIC-II is currently designed to execute in a UNIX environment. The input to the program is composed of three segments: 1) the vehicle models such as propulsion, aerodynamics, and guidance, navigation, and control 2) the environment models such as atmosphere and gravity, and 3) a simulation framework which is responsible for executing the vehicle and environment models and propagating the vehicle s states forward in time and handling user input/output. MAVERIC users prepare data files for the above models and run the simulation program. They can see the output on screen and/or store in

  19. The Waveform Server: A Web-based Interactive Seismic Waveform Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, R. L.; Clemesha, A.; Lindquist, K. G.; Reyes, J.; Steidl, J. H.; Vernon, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic waveform data has traditionally been displayed on machines that are either local area networked to, or directly host, a seismic networks waveform database(s). Typical seismic data warehouses allow online users to query and download data collected from regional networks passively, without the scientist directly visually assessing data coverage and/or quality. Using a suite of web-based protocols, we have developed an online seismic waveform interface that directly queries and displays data from a relational database through a web-browser. Using the Python interface to Datascope and the Python-based Twisted network package on the server side, and the jQuery Javascript framework on the client side to send and receive asynchronous waveform queries, we display broadband seismic data using the HTML Canvas element that is globally accessible by anyone using a modern web-browser. The system is used to display data from the USArray experiment, a US continent-wide migratory transportable seismic array. We are currently creating additional interface tools to create a rich-client interface for accessing and displaying seismic data that can be deployed to any system running Boulder Real Time Technology's (BRTT) Antelope Real Time System (ARTS). The software is freely available from the Antelope contributed code Git repository. Screenshot of the web-based waveform server interface

  20. A DSP based power electronics interface for alternate/renewable energy systems. Quarterly report 3.

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-31

    This report is an update on the research project involving the implementation of a DSP based power electronics interface for alternate/renewable energy systems that was funded by the Department of Energy under the Inventions and Innovations program 1998. The objective of this research is to develop a utility interface (dc to ac converter) suitable to interconnect alternate/renewable energy sources to the utility system. The DSP based power electronics interface in comparison with existing methods will excel in terms of efficiency, reliability and cost. Moreover DSP-based control provides the flexibility to upgrade/modify control algorithms to meet specific system requirements. The proposed interface will be capable of maintaining stiffness of the ac voltages at the point of common coupling regardless of variation in the input dc bus voltage. This will be achieved without the addition of any extra components to the basic interface topology but by inherently controlling the inverter switching strategy in accordance to the input voltage variation.

  1. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    group of awake and behaving animals. These unique findings provide preliminary evidence that efferent, volitional motor potentials can be recorded from the microchannel-based peripheral neural interface; a critical requirement for any neural interface intended to facilitate direct neural control of external technologies.

  2. A subject-independent pattern-based Brain-Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Andreas M.; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Rana, Mohit; Pasqualotto, Emanuele; Buyukturkoglu, Korhan; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Kai-Keng; Tejos, Cristián; Zamorano, Francisco; Aboitiz, Francisco; Birbaumer, Niels; Ruiz, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    While earlier Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) studies have mostly focused on modulating specific brain regions or signals, new developments in pattern classification of brain states are enabling real-time decoding and modulation of an entire functional network. The present study proposes a new method for real-time pattern classification and neurofeedback of brain states from electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. It involves the creation of a fused classification model based on the method of Common Spatial Patterns (CSPs) from data of several healthy individuals. The subject-independent model is then used to classify EEG data in real-time and provide feedback to new individuals. In a series of offline experiments involving training and testing of the classifier with individual data from 27 healthy subjects, a mean classification accuracy of 75.30% was achieved, demonstrating that the classification system at hand can reliably decode two types of imagery used in our experiments, i.e., happy emotional imagery and motor imagery. In a subsequent experiment it is shown that the classifier can be used to provide neurofeedback to new subjects, and that these subjects learn to “match” their brain pattern to that of the fused classification model in a few days of neurofeedback training. This finding can have important implications for future studies on neurofeedback and its clinical applications on neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26539089

  3. A subject-independent pattern-based Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Ray, Andreas M; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Rana, Mohit; Pasqualotto, Emanuele; Buyukturkoglu, Korhan; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Kai-Keng; Tejos, Cristián; Zamorano, Francisco; Aboitiz, Francisco; Birbaumer, Niels; Ruiz, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    While earlier Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) studies have mostly focused on modulating specific brain regions or signals, new developments in pattern classification of brain states are enabling real-time decoding and modulation of an entire functional network. The present study proposes a new method for real-time pattern classification and neurofeedback of brain states from electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. It involves the creation of a fused classification model based on the method of Common Spatial Patterns (CSPs) from data of several healthy individuals. The subject-independent model is then used to classify EEG data in real-time and provide feedback to new individuals. In a series of offline experiments involving training and testing of the classifier with individual data from 27 healthy subjects, a mean classification accuracy of 75.30% was achieved, demonstrating that the classification system at hand can reliably decode two types of imagery used in our experiments, i.e., happy emotional imagery and motor imagery. In a subsequent experiment it is shown that the classifier can be used to provide neurofeedback to new subjects, and that these subjects learn to "match" their brain pattern to that of the fused classification model in a few days of neurofeedback training. This finding can have important implications for future studies on neurofeedback and its clinical applications on neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. A Wind Tunnel Model Control Surface Actuator Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    International Follow On Structural Test Program ( IFOSTP ... International Follow On Structural Test Program ( IFOSTP ). PAGE CLASSIFICATION UNCLASSIFIED PRIVACY MARKING THIS PAGE IS TO BE USED TO RECORD INFORMATION... On Structural Test Program ( IFOSTP ). The F/A-18 aircraft was designed and built for the US Navy as a carrier-based aircraft, and as such the

  5. [Development of heart sound signal detection system based on USB interface].

    PubMed

    Ji, An; Guo, Xingming; Guo, Weizhen; Xiao, Shouzhong

    2008-10-01

    This paper introduces a type of heart sound recording, analysis and processing system based on USB interface. The system consists of high performance sensor sampling heart sounds, the preprocessing circuit, the A/D conversion module and the USB based high-speed computer communications interface. The experiments show that it is noninvasive, convenient, inexpensive and rapid in detecting the cardiac contractility of patients with heart disease as well as of healthy subjects. This system has provided a reliable technical platform for evaluating the cardiac contractility reserve.

  6. Sensory System for Implementing a Human—Computer Interface Based on Electrooculography

    PubMed Central

    Barea, Rafael; Boquete, Luciano; Rodriguez-Ascariz, Jose Manuel; Ortega, Sergio; López, Elena

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a sensory system for implementing a human–computer interface based on electrooculography. An acquisition system captures electrooculograms and transmits them via the ZigBee protocol. The data acquired are analysed in real time using a microcontroller-based platform running the Linux operating system. The continuous wavelet transform and neural network are used to process and analyse the signals to obtain highly reliable results in real time. To enhance system usability, the graphical interface is projected onto special eyewear, which is also used to position the signal-capturing electrodes. PMID:22346579

  7. Sensory system for implementing a human-computer interface based on electrooculography.

    PubMed

    Barea, Rafael; Boquete, Luciano; Rodriguez-Ascariz, Jose Manuel; Ortega, Sergio; López, Elena

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a sensory system for implementing a human-computer interface based on electrooculography. An acquisition system captures electrooculograms and transmits them via the ZigBee protocol. The data acquired are analysed in real time using a microcontroller-based platform running the Linux operating system. The continuous wavelet transform and neural network are used to process and analyse the signals to obtain highly reliable results in real time. To enhance system usability, the graphical interface is projected onto special eyewear, which is also used to position the signal-capturing electrodes.

  8. Accident prediction model for railway-highway interfaces.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jutaek; Washington, Simon P; Nam, Doohee

    2006-03-01

    Considerable past research has explored relationships between vehicle accidents and geometric design and operation of road sections, but relatively little research has examined factors that contribute to accidents at railway-highway crossings. Between 1998 and 2002 in Korea, about 95% of railway accidents occurred at highway-rail grade crossings, resulting in 402 accidents, of which about 20% resulted in fatalities. These statistics suggest that efforts to reduce crashes at these locations may significantly reduce crash costs. The objective of this paper is to examine factors associated with railroad crossing crashes. Various statistical models are used to examine the relationships between crossing accidents and features of crossings. The paper also compares accident models developed in the United States and the safety effects of crossing elements obtained using Korea data. Crashes were observed to increase with total traffic volume and average daily train volumes. The proximity of crossings to commercial areas and the distance of the train detector from crossings are associated with larger numbers of accidents, as is the time duration between the activation of warning signals and gates. The unique contributions of the paper are the application of the gamma probability model to deal with underdispersion and the insights obtained regarding railroad crossing related vehicle crashes.

  9. Model studies of Rayleigh instabilities via microdesigned interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2000-10-17

    The energetic and kinetic properties of surfaces play a critical role in defining the microstructural changes that occur during sintering and high-temperature use of ceramics. Characterization of surface diffusion in ceramics is particularly difficult, and significant variations in reported values of surface diffusivities arise even in well-studied systems. Effects of impurities, surface energy anisotropy, and the onset of surface attachment limited kinetics (SALK) are believed to contribute to this variability. An overview of the use of Rayleigh instabilities as a means of characterizing surface diffusivities is presented. The development of models of morphological evolution that account for effects of surface energy anisotropy is reviewed, and the potential interplay between impurities and surface energy anisotropy is addressed. The status of experimental studies of Rayleigh instabilities in sapphire utilizing lithographically introduced pore channels of controlled geometry and crystallography is summarized. Results of model studies indicate that impurities can significantly influence both the spatial and temporal characteristics of Rayleigh instabilities; this is attributed at least in part to impurity effects on the surface energy anisotropy. Related model experiments indicate that the onset of SALK may also contribute significantly to apparent variations in surface diffusion coefficients.

  10. A Home Ignition Assessment Model Applied to Structures in the Wildland-Urban Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Werth, David; Gupta, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    The issue of exterior fire threat to buildings, from either wildfires in the wildland-urban interface or neighboring structure fires, is critically important. To address this, theWildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program was initiated. The WIRHD program developed a tool, theWildFIREWizard, that will allow homeowners to estimate the external fire threat to their homes based on specific features and characteristics of the homes and yards. The software then makes recommendations to reduce the threat. The inputs include the structural and material features of the home and information about any ignition sources or flammable objects in its immediate vicinity, known as the home ignition zone. The tool comprises an ignition assessment model that performs explicit calculations of the radiant and convective heating of the building envelope from the potential ignition sources. This article describes a series of material ignition and flammability tests that were performed to calibrate and/or validate the ignition assessment model. The tests involved exposing test walls with different external siding types to radiant heating and/or direct flame contact.The responses of the test walls were used to determine the conditions leading to melting, ignition, or any other mode of failure of the walls. Temperature data were used to verify the model predictions of temperature rises and ignition times of the test walls.

  11. Thin Interface Asymptotics for an Energy/Entropy Approach to Phase-Field Models with Unequal Conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.; Anderson, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Karma and Rapped recently developed a new sharp interface asymptotic analysis of the phase-field equations that is especially appropriate for modeling dendritic growth at low undercoolings. Their approach relieves a stringent restriction on the interface thickness that applies in the conventional asymptotic analysis, and has the added advantage that interfacial kinetic effects can also be eliminated. However, their analysis focussed on the case of equal thermal conductivities in the solid and liquid phases; when applied to a standard phase-field model with unequal conductivities, anomalous terms arise in the limiting forms of the boundary conditions for the interfacial temperature that are not present in conventional sharp-interface solidification models, as discussed further by Almgren. In this paper we apply their asymptotic methodology to a generalized phase-field model which is derived using a thermodynamically consistent approach that is based on independent entropy and internal energy gradient functionals that include double wells in both the entropy and internal energy densities. The additional degrees of freedom associated with the generalized phased-field equations can be chosen to eliminate the anomalous terms that arise for unequal conductivities.

  12. A novel task-oriented optimal design for P300-based brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Dewen

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The number of items of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) should be adjustable in accordance with the requirements of the specific tasks. To address this issue, we propose a novel task-oriented optimal approach aimed at increasing the performance of general P300 BCIs with different numbers of items. Approach. First, we proposed a stimulus presentation with variable dimensions (VD) paradigm as a generalization of the conventional single-character (SC) and row-column (RC) stimulus paradigms. Furthermore, an embedding design approach was employed for any given number of items. Finally, based on the score-P model of each subject, the VD flash pattern was selected by a linear interpolation approach for a certain task. Main results. The results indicate that the optimal BCI design consistently outperforms the conventional approaches, i.e., the SC and RC paradigms. Specifically, there is significant improvement in the practical information transfer rate for a large number of items. Significance. The results suggest that the proposed optimal approach would provide useful guidance in the practical design of general P300-based BCIs.

  13. Silicon-based wire electrode array for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Weihua; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shanshan; Fang, Xiaolei; Chen, Sanyuan; Gui, Qiang; Tang, Rongyu; Chen, Yuanfang; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongda

    2014-09-01

    Objectives. Metal-wire electrode arrays are widely used to record and stimulate neurons. Commonly, these devices are fabricated from a long insulated metal wire by cutting it into the proper length and using the cross-section as the electrode site. The assembly of a micro-wire electrode array with regular spacing is difficult. With the help of micro-machine technology, a silicon-based wire electrode array (SWEA) is proposed to simplify the assembling process and provide a wire-type electrode with tapered tips. Approach. Silicon wires with regular spacing coated with metal are generated from a silicon wafer through micro-fabrication and are ordered into a 3D array. A silicon wafer is cut into a comb-like structure with hexagonal teeth on both sides by anisotropic etching. To establish an array of silicon-based linear needles through isotropic wet etching, the diameters of these hexagonal teeth are reduced; their sharp edges are smoothed out and their tips are sharpened. The needle array is coated with a layer of parylene after metallization. The tips of the needles are then exposed to form an array of linear neural electrodes. With these linear electrode arrays, an array of area electrodes can be fabricated. Main results. A 6  ×  6 array of wire-type electrodes based on silicon is developed using this method. The time required to manually assemble the 3D array decreases significantly with the introduction of micro-fabricated 2D array. Meanwhile, the tip intervals in the 2D array are accurate and are controlled at no more than 1%. The SWEA is effective both in vitro and in vivo. Significance. Using this method, the SWEA can be batch-prepared in advance along with its parameters, such as spacing, length, and diameter. Thus, neural scientists can assemble proper electrode arrays in a short time.

  14. Diffuse interface models of locally inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aland, Sebastian; Egerer, Sabine; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2014-11-01

    We present a new diffuse interface model for the dynamics of inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid with inertial forces. A new feature of this work is the implementation of the local inextensibility condition in the diffuse interface context. Local inextensibility is enforced by using a local Lagrange multiplier, which provides the necessary tension force at the interface. We introduce a new equation for the local Lagrange multiplier whose solution essentially provides a harmonic extension of the multiplier off the interface while maintaining the local inextensibility constraint near the interface. We also develop a local relaxation scheme that dynamically corrects local stretching/compression errors thereby preventing their accumulation. Asymptotic analysis is presented that shows that our new system converges to a relaxed version of the inextensible sharp interface model. This is also verified numerically. To solve the equations, we use an adaptive finite element method with implicit coupling between the Navier-Stokes and the diffuse interface inextensibility equations. Numerical simulations of a single vesicle in a shear flow at different Reynolds numbers demonstrate that errors in enforcing local inextensibility may accumulate and lead to large differences in the dynamics in the tumbling regime and smaller differences in the inclination angle of vesicles in the tank-treading regime. The local relaxation algorithm is shown to prevent the accumulation of stretching and compression errors very effectively. Simulations of two vesicles in an extensional flow show that local inextensibility plays an important role when vesicles are in close proximity by inhibiting fluid drainage in the near contact region.

  15. Fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - based multielectrode array for neural interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Min; Oh, Da-Rong; Sanchez, Joaquin; Kim, Shang-Hyub; Seo, Jong-Mo

    2013-01-01

    Flexible multielectrode arrays (MEAs) are being developed with various materials, and polyimide has been widely used due to the conveniece of process. Polyimide is developed in the form of photoresist. And this enable precise and reproducible fabrication. PDMS is another good candidate for MEA base material, but it has poor surface energy and etching property. In this paper, we proposed a better fabrication process that could modify PDMS surface for a long time and open the site of electrode and pad efficiently without PDMS etching.

  16. Nonlinear stress deformation behavior of interfaces stabilized by food-based ingredients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, L. M. C.; Humblet-Hua, K. N. P.; van Kempen, S. E. H. J.

    2014-11-01

    Interfaces stabilized by food-based ingredients, such as proteins or glycolipids, often display nonlinear behavior when subjected to oscillatory dilatational deformations, even at the lowest deformation amplitudes which can currently be applied experimentally. Here we show that classical approaches to extract dilatational properties, based on the Young-Laplace equation, may not always be suitable to analyze data. We discuss a number of examples of food-ingredient stabilized interfaces (interfaces stabilized by protein fibrils, protein-polysaccharide complexes and oligosaccharide-fatty aid conjugates) and show how an analysis of the dynamic surface tension signal using Lissajous plots and a protocol which includes deformation amplitude and droplet size variations, can be used to obtain a more detailed and accurate description of their nonlinear dilatational behavior.

  17. Interface modeling to predict well casing damage for big hill strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2012-02-01

    Oil leaks were found in well casings of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interface between the caprock and top of salt. This damage could be caused by interface movement induced by cavern volume closure due to salt creep. A three dimensional finite element model, which allows each cavern to be configured individually, was constructed to investigate shear and vertical displacements across each interface. The model contains interfaces between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interface behavior in a realistic manner. This analysis results indicate that the casings of Caverns 105 and 109 failed by shear stress that exceeded shear strength due to the horizontal movement of the top of salt relative to the caprock, and tensile stress due to the downward movement of the top of salt from the caprock, respectively. The casings of Caverns 101, 110, 111 and 114, located at the far ends of the field, are predicted to be failed by shear stress in the near future. The casings of inmost Caverns 107 and 108 are predicted to be failed by tensile stress in the near future.

  18. Control of Selective Ion Transfer across Liquid–Liquid Interfaces: A Rectifying Heterojunction Based on Immiscible Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The current rectification displayed by solid-state p–n semiconductor diodes relies on the abundance of electrons and holes near the interface between the p–n junction. In analogy to this electronic device, we propose here the construction of a purely ionic liquid-state electric rectifying heterojunction displaying an excess of monovalent cations and anions near the interface between two immiscible solvents with different dielectric properties. This system does not need any physical membrane or material barrier to show preferential ion transfer but relies on the ionic solvation energy between the two immiscible solvents. We construct a simple device, based on an oil/water interface, displaying an asymmetric behavior of the electric current as a function of the polarity of an applied electric field. This device also exhibits a region of negative differential conductivity, analogous to that observed in brain and heart cells via voltage clamp techniques. Computer simulations and mean field theory calculations for a model of this system show that the application of an external electric field is able to control the bulk concentrations of the ionic species in the immiscible liquids in a manner that is asymmetric with respect to the polarity or direction of the applied electric field. These properties make possible to enhance or suppress selective ion transport at liquid−liquid interfaces with the application of an external electric field or electrostatic potential, mimicking the function of biological ion channels, thus creating opportunities for varied applications. PMID:27924315

  19. Calibrating EEG-based motor imagery brain-computer interface from passive movement.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kai Keng; Guan, Cuntai; Wang, Chuanchu; Phua, Kok Soon; Tan, Adrian Hock Guan; Chin, Zheng Yang

    2011-01-01

    EEG data from performing motor imagery are usually collected to calibrate a subject-specific model for classifying the EEG data during the evaluation phase of motor imagery Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). However, there is no direct objective measure to determine if a subject is performing motor imagery correctly for proper calibration. Studies have shown that passive movement, which is directly observable, induces Event-Related Synchronization patterns that are similar to those induced from motor imagery. Hence, this paper investigates the feasibility of calibrating EEG-based motor imagery BCI from passive movement. EEG data of 12 healthy subjects were collected during motor imagery and passive movement of the hand by a haptic knob robot. The calibration models using the Filter Bank Common Spatial Pattern algorithm on the EEG data from motor imagery were compared against using the EEG data from passive movement. The performances were compared based on the 10×10-fold cross-validation accuracies of the calibration data, and off-line session-to-session transfer kappa values to other sessions of motor imagery performed on another day. The results showed that the calibration performed using passive movement yielded higher model accuracy and off-line session-to-session transfer (73.6% and 0.354) than the calibration performed using motor imagery (71.3% and 0.311), and no significant differences were observed between the two groups (p=0.20, 0.23). Hence, this study shows that it is feasible to calibrate EEG-based motor imagery BCI from passive movement.

  20. Evaluating a Web-Based Interface for Internet Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Newman, Dava J.; Sebrechts, Marc M.; Doarn, Charles R.

    1997-01-01

    The objective is to introduce the usability engineering methodology, heuristic evaluation, to the design and development of a web-based telemedicine system. Using a set of usability criteria, or heuristics, one evaluator examined the Spacebridge to Russia web-site for usability problems. Thirty-four usability problems were found in this preliminary study and all were assigned a severity rating. The value of heuristic analysis in the iterative design of a system is shown because the problems can be fixed before deployment of a system and the problems are of a different nature than those found by actual users of the system. It was therefore determined that there is potential value of heuristic evaluation paired with user testing as a strategy for optimal system performance design.

  1. Electrochemical Fabrication of Functional Gelatin-Based Bioelectronic Interface.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xianghong; Liu, Yi; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2016-02-08

    Gelatin remains one of the most important biopolymeric material platforms because of its availability, safety, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and stimuli-responsive properties. Here we report a simple, rapid, and reagentless anodic deposition method to assemble gelatin hydrogels from aqueous salt solutions onto an electrode surface. Results indicate that anodic reactions partially oxidize gelatin to yield a covalently cross-linked network that can perform multiple functions. First, anodically deposited gelatin remains activated, allowing covalent protein grafting and thus enabling biofunctionalization for electrochemical biosensing. Second, the anodically deposited gelatin retains its thermally responsive physical cross-linking properties that enable switching functions. Finally, the physical and chemical cross-linking mechanisms are reversible, which enables self-healing functions. Thus, anodic deposition provides a facile method to assemble gelatin-based multifunctional matrices for diverse applications in bioelectronics.

  2. Dentin bonding performance and interface observation of an MMA-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Junichi; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bonding performance and dentin interface acid resistance using a 4-META/MMA-TBB based restorative material (BF) compared to a conventional 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement (SB), and the effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) addition to the materials. Dentin surfaces were treated with 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 4-META containing self-etching primer (TP), followed by application of BF or SB polymer powders with or without NaF, to evaluate microtensile bond strength (µTBS) in six experimental groups; 10-3/SB, 10-3/BF, TP/SB, TP/BF, TP/SB/NaF and TP/BF/NaF. SEM observation of the resin-dentin interface was performed after acid-base challenge to evaluate interfacial dentin resistance to acid attack. TP/BF showed highest µTBS, while NaF polymers decreased µTBS. TP/BF showed funnel-shaped erosion at the interface, however, NaF polymers improved acid resistance of interface. In conclusion, BF demonstrated high µTBSs and low acid-resistance at the interface. NaF addition enhanced acid resistance but decreased µTBS.

  3. Experimental modelling of material interfaces with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcovilos, Theodore A.; Brooke, Robert W. A.; Gillis, Julie; Ruggiero, Anthony C.; Tiber, Gage D.; Zaccagnini, Christopher A.

    2014-05-01

    We present a design for a new experimental apparatus for studying the physics of junctions using ultracold potassium atoms (K-39 and K-40). Junctions will be modeled using holographically projected 2D optical potentials. These potentials can be engineered to contain arbitrary features such as junctions between dissimilar lattices or the intentional insertion of defects. Long-term investigation goals include edge states, scattering at defects, and quantum depletion at junctions. In this poster we show our overall apparatus design and our progress in building experimental subsystems including the vacuum system, extended cavity diode lasers, digital temperature and current control circuits for the lasers, and the saturated absorption spectroscopy system. Funding provided by the Bayer School of Natural and Environmental.

  4. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D’Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs. PMID:25482337

  5. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs.

  6. A hybrid grid method in an auxiliary coordinate system for irregular fluid-solid interface modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Li, Jinli

    2016-11-01

    Seismic wave propagation in a fluid-solid environment cannot be simulated with a single wave equation, but can be described by use of the acoustic and viscoelastic wave equations for their respective fluid and solid parts. Proper boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface based on the relationship between pressure and stress are crucial when combining the two different wave equations. Traditional finite difference methods (FDM) have had difficulties in dealing with the irregular fluid-solid interface topography. The Cartesian grids discretization leads to artificial reflections and diffractions during the conversion between acoustic wave and elastic waves. We propose a variable coordinate transformation methodology to simulate seismic waves in a fluid-solid environment. An irregular fluid-solid interface can be transformed into a horizontal interface, so that pressure and stress can be well converted. We also introduce a multi-block coordinate transformation (MCT) method which meshes each layer with curvilinear grids to transform the interface topography into a horizontal one, thereby allocating vertical sampling points adaptively. The grid size is determined adaptively based on the shape and the parameters of the target area, which reduces in size in when the layers are thin or exhibit low velocities. A Lebedev-standard staggered grid (LSSG) scheme is applied to the MCT method to reduce both the computational cost associated with the Lebedev grid (LG) scheme and the instability in the auxiliary coordinate system when using a standard staggered grid scheme.

  7. A hybrid grid method in an auxiliary coordinate system for irregular fluid-solid interface modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Li, Jinli

    2017-03-01

    Seismic wave propagation in a fluid-solid environment cannot be simulated with a single wave equation, but can be described by use of the acoustic and viscoelastic wave equations for their respective fluid and solid parts. Proper boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface based on the relationship between pressure and stress are crucial when combining the two different wave equations. Traditional finite difference methods have had difficulties in dealing with the irregular fluid-solid interface topography. The Cartesian grids discretization leads to artificial reflections and diffractions during the conversion between acoustic wave and elastic waves. We propose a variable coordinate transformation methodology to simulate seismic waves in a fluid-solid environment. An irregular fluid-solid interface can be transformed into a horizontal interface, so that pressure and stress can be well converted. We also introduce a multiblock coordinate transformation (MCT) method which meshes each layer with curvilinear grids to transform the interface topography into a horizontal one, thereby allocating vertical sampling points adaptively. The grid size is determined adaptively based on the shape and the parameters of the target area, which reduces in size in when the layers are thin or exhibit low velocities. A Lebedev-standard staggered grid scheme is applied to the MCT method to reduce both the computational cost associated with the Lebedev grid scheme and the instability in the auxiliary coordinate system when using a standard staggered grid scheme.

  8. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  9. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  10. Research on e-commerce transaction networks using multi-agent modelling and open application programming interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Chunhui; Han, Xufang; Wu, Harris

    2010-08-01

    We provide a formal definition of an e-commerce transaction network. Agent-based modelling is used to simulate e-commerce transaction networks. For real-world analysis, we studied the open application programming interfaces (APIs) from eBay and Taobao e-commerce websites and captured real transaction data. Pajek is used to visualise the agent relationships in the transaction network. We derived one-mode networks from the transaction network and analysed them using degree and betweenness centrality. Integrating multi-agent modelling, open APIs and social network analysis, we propose a new way to study large-scale e-commerce systems.

  11. A Model of Subdiffusive Interface Dynamics with a Local Conservation of Minimum Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koduvely, Hari M.; Dhar, Deepak

    1998-01-01

    We define a new model of interface roughening in one dimension which has the property that the minimum of interface height is conserved locally during the evolution. This model corresponds to the limit q → ∞ of the q-color dimer deposition-evaporation model introduced by us earlier [Hari Menon and Dhar, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 28:6517 (1995)]. We present numerical evidence from Monte Carlo simulations and the exact diagonalization of the evolution operator on finite rings that growth of correlations in this model is subdiffusive with dynamical exponent z≍2.5. For periodic boundary conditions, the variation of the gap in the relaxation spectrum with system size appears to involve a logarithmic correction term. Some generalizations of the model are briefly discussed.

  12. Human machine interface by using stereo-based depth extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chao-Kang; Wu, Chi-Hao; Lin, Hsueh-Yi; Chang, Ting-Ting; Lin, Tung-Yang; Huang, Po-Kuan

    2014-03-01

    The ongoing success of three-dimensional (3D) cinema fuels increasing efforts to spread the commercial success of 3D to new markets. The possibilities of a convincing 3D experience at home, such as three-dimensional television (3DTV), has generated a great deal of interest within the research and standardization community. A central issue for 3DTV is the creation and representation of 3D content. Acquiring scene depth information is a fundamental task in computer vision, yet complex and error-prone. Dedicated range sensors, such as the Time­ of-Flight camera (ToF), can simplify the scene depth capture process and overcome shortcomings of traditional solutions, such as active or passive stereo analysis. Admittedly, currently available ToF sensors deliver only a limited spatial resolution. However, sophisticated depth upscaling approaches use texture information to match depth and video resolution. At Electronic Imaging 2012 we proposed an upscaling routine based on error energy minimization, weighted with edge information from an accompanying video source. In this article we develop our algorithm further. By adding temporal consistency constraints to the upscaling process, we reduce disturbing depth jumps and flickering artifacts in the final 3DTV content. Temporal consistency in depth maps enhances the 3D experience, leading to a wider acceptance of 3D media content. More content in better quality can boost the commercial success of 3DTV.

  13. Data processing system and interfacing elements time base analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The processing of time in the Orbiter System Services software and the associated facilities provided to the user community are described. The descriptions are directed toward showing the functional intent of the design rather than the actual implementation. Simplified flow diagrams are included. Based upon detailed analysis of a preliminary review copy of the Approach and Landing Test (ALT) System Software Detailed Design Specification and the Program Listings for Version 17 Prime, the processing of time has the potential for error free operations. The processing of time is not expected to change between ALT and the Operational Flight Test (OFT) other than differences in value of some constants for control and limit checking. Due to the dynamic nature of onboard time processing and its criticality to the successful operation of the orbiter, it is recommended that a comprehensive list of external variables, their locations, initial values, and a 'where used' listing be produced, as a by-product of the link edit process, for all non-HAL coding. In addition, a careful review of the verification test procedures for the System Services time-related software is recommended.

  14. Charge-based forces at the Nafion-water interface.

    PubMed

    Das, Ronnie; Pollack, Gerald H

    2013-02-26

    Interfacial water lying next to hydrophilic surfaces has been shown to be spectroscopically, mechanically, and electrically distinct from bulk water. Interfacial water has also been shown to exclude negatively and positively charged microspheres and has thus become known as the "exclusion zone". Measurements have demonstrated that exclusion zones exhibit a negative electrical potential on the order of -100 mV relative to bulk water, with a corresponding distribution of positive protons in the bulk water region beyond the exclusion zone. This separation of charge is hypothesized to create an electrostatic force between the exclusion zone and the proton-enriched zone beyond. To test this hypothesis, a hydrophilic Nafion ring was attached to the tip of a deflectable ribbonlike force sensor. The sensor was designed to obstruct the flow of protons from one side of the lever to the other, so that any proton-based force would remain unilateral. pH-sensitive dye measurements confirmed that the protons were largely confined to one side. When the lever assembly was exposed to water, the sensor deflected toward the protons. Over a period of 20 min, deflection amounted to approximately 20 μm, corresponding to a force of approximately 22 μN. Hence, electrostatic forces are confirmed. If exclusion zones exist ubiquitously at hydrophilic surfaces, including biological surfaces, then the resulting electrostatic forces may play significant roles in many biological phenomena including adhesion and protein folding.

  15. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  16. Rule based design of conceptual models for formative evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.; Chang, Kai; Hale, Joseph P.; Bester, Terri; Rix, Thomas; Wang, Yaowen

    1994-01-01

    A Human-Computer Interface (HCI) Prototyping Environment with embedded evaluation capability has been investigated. This environment will be valuable in developing and refining HCI standards and evaluating program/project interface development, especially Space Station Freedom on-board displays for payload operations. This environment, which allows for rapid prototyping and evaluation of graphical interfaces, includes the following four components: (1) a HCI development tool; (2) a low fidelity simulator development tool; (3) a dynamic, interactive interface between the HCI and the simulator; and (4) an embedded evaluator that evaluates the adequacy of a HCI based on a user's performance. The embedded evaluation tool collects data while the user is interacting with the system and evaluates the adequacy of an interface based on a user's performance. This paper describes the design of conceptual models for the embedded evaluation system using a rule-based approach.

  17. Rule based design of conceptual models for formative evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.; Chang, Kai; Hale, Joseph P.; Bester, Terri; Rix, Thomas; Wang, Yaowen

    1994-01-01

    A Human-Computer Interface (HCI) Prototyping Environment with embedded evaluation capability has been investigated. This environment will be valuable in developing and refining HCI standards and evaluating program/project interface development, especially Space Station Freedom on-board displays for payload operations. This environment, which allows for rapid prototyping and evaluation of graphical interfaces, includes the following four components: (1) a HCI development tool, (2) a low fidelity simulator development tool, (3) a dynamic, interactive interface between the HCI and the simulator, and (4) an embedded evaluator that evaluates the adequacy of a HCI based on a user's performance. The embedded evaluation tool collects data while the user is interacting with the system and evaluates the adequacy of an interface based on a user's performance. This paper describes the design of conceptual models for the embedded evaluation system using a rule-based approach.

  18. Conceptual Design Model of Instructional Interfaces: Courseware for Inclusive Education System (IID4C) Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosho, Abdulrauf; Mutalib, Ariffin Abdul; Abdul-Salam, Sobihatun Nur

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing study related to a conceptual design model, which is specific to instructional interface design to enhance courseware usage. It was found that most of the existing courseware applications focus on the needs of certain target with most of the courseware offer too little to inclusive learners. In addition, the use of…

  19. The integrity of welded interfaces in ultra high molecular weight polyethylene: Part 1-Model.

    PubMed

    Buckley, C Paul; Wu, Junjie; Haughie, David W

    2006-06-01

    The difficulty of eradicating memory of powder-particle interfaces in UHMWPE for bearing surfaces for hip and knee replacements is well-known, and 'fusion defects' have been implicated frequently in joint failures. During processing the polymer is formed into solid directly from the reactor powder, under pressure and at temperatures above the melting point, and two types of inter-particle defect occur: Type 1 (consolidation-deficient) and Type 2 (diffusion-deficient). To gain quantitative information on the extent of the problem, the formation of macroscopic butt welds in this material was studied, by (1) modelling the process and (2) measuring experimentally the resultant evolution of interface toughness. This paper reports on the model. A quantitative measure of interface structural integrity is defined, and related to the "maximum reptated molecular weight" introduced previously. The model assumes an idealised surface topography. It is used to calculate the evolution of interface integrity during welding, for given values of temperature, pressure, and parameters describing the surfaces, and a given molar mass distribution. Only four material properties are needed for the calculation; all of them available for polyethylene. The model shows that, for UHMWPE typically employed in knee transplants, the rate of eradication of Type 1 defects is highly sensitive to surface topography, process temperature and pressure. Also, even if Type 1 defects are prevented, Type 2 defects heal extremely slowly. They must be an intrinsic feature of UHMWPE for all reasonable forming conditions, and products and forming processes should be designed accordingly.

  20. A Monthly Water-Balance Model Driven By a Graphical User Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a monthly water-balance model driven by a graphical user interface, referred to as the Thornthwaite monthly water-balance program. Computations of monthly water-balance components of the hydrologic cycle are made for a specified location. The program can be used as a research tool, an assessment tool, and a tool for classroom instruction.

  1. AgRISTARS: Yield model development/soil moisture. Interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The interactions and support functions required between the crop Yield Model Development (YMD) Project and Soil Moisture (SM) Project are defined. The requirements for YMD support of SM and vice-versa are outlined. Specific tasks in support of these interfaces are defined for development of support functions.

  2. An Improved Unscented Kalman Filter Based Decoder for Cortical Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Simin; Li, Jie; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) seek to connect brains with machines or computers directly, for application in areas such as prosthesis control. For this application, the accuracy of the decoding of movement intentions is crucial. We aim to improve accuracy by designing a better encoding model of primary motor cortical activity during hand movements and combining this with decoder engineering refinements, resulting in a new unscented Kalman filter based decoder, UKF2, which improves upon our previous unscented Kalman filter decoder, UKF1. The new encoding model includes novel acceleration magnitude, position-velocity interaction, and target-cursor-distance features (the decoder does not require target position as input, it is decoded). We add a novel probabilistic velocity threshold to better determine the user's intent to move. We combine these improvements with several other refinements suggested by others in the field. Data from two Rhesus monkeys indicate that the UKF2 generates offline reconstructions of hand movements (mean CC 0.851) significantly more accurately than the UKF1 (0.833) and the popular position-velocity Kalman filter (0.812). The encoding model of the UKF2 could predict the instantaneous firing rate of neurons (mean CC 0.210), given kinematic variables and past spiking, better than the encoding models of these two decoders (UKF1: 0.138, p-v Kalman: 0.098). In closed-loop experiments where each monkey controlled a computer cursor with each decoder in turn, the UKF2 facilitated faster task completion (mean 1.56 s vs. 2.05 s) and higher Fitts's Law bit rate (mean 0.738 bit/s vs. 0.584 bit/s) than the UKF1. These results suggest that the modeling and decoder engineering refinements of the UKF2 improve decoding performance. We believe they can be used to enhance other decoders as well.

  3. An Improved Unscented Kalman Filter Based Decoder for Cortical Brain-Machine Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simin; Li, Jie; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) seek to connect brains with machines or computers directly, for application in areas such as prosthesis control. For this application, the accuracy of the decoding of movement intentions is crucial. We aim to improve accuracy by designing a better encoding model of primary motor cortical activity during hand movements and combining this with decoder engineering refinements, resulting in a new unscented Kalman filter based decoder, UKF2, which improves upon our previous unscented Kalman filter decoder, UKF1. The new encoding model includes novel acceleration magnitude, position-velocity interaction, and target-cursor-distance features (the decoder does not require target position as input, it is decoded). We add a novel probabilistic velocity threshold to better determine the user's intent to move. We combine these improvements with several other refinements suggested by others in the field. Data from two Rhesus monkeys indicate that the UKF2 generates offline reconstructions of hand movements (mean CC 0.851) significantly more accurately than the UKF1 (0.833) and the popular position-velocity Kalman filter (0.812). The encoding model of the UKF2 could predict the instantaneous firing rate of neurons (mean CC 0.210), given kinematic variables and past spiking, better than the encoding models of these two decoders (UKF1: 0.138, p-v Kalman: 0.098). In closed-loop experiments where each monkey controlled a computer cursor with each decoder in turn, the UKF2 facilitated faster task completion (mean 1.56 s vs. 2.05 s) and higher Fitts's Law bit rate (mean 0.738 bit/s vs. 0.584 bit/s) than the UKF1. These results suggest that the modeling and decoder engineering refinements of the UKF2 improve decoding performance. We believe they can be used to enhance other decoders as well. PMID:28066170

  4. Cryo-EM Data Are Superior to Contact and Interface Information in Integrative Modeling

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Schindler, Christina E.M.; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions carry out a large variety of essential cellular processes. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for the modeling of protein-protein interactions at a wide range of resolutions, and recent developments have caused a revolution in the field. At low resolution, cryo-EM maps can drive integrative modeling of the interaction, assembling existing structures into the map. Other experimental techniques can provide information on the interface or on the contacts between the monomers in the complex. This inevitably raises the question regarding which type of data is best suited to drive integrative modeling approaches. Systematic comparison of the prediction accuracy and specificity of the different integrative modeling paradigms is unavailable to date. Here, we compare EM-driven, interface-driven, and contact-driven integrative modeling paradigms. Models were generated for the protein docking benchmark using the ATTRACT docking engine and evaluated using the CAPRI two-star criterion. At 20 Å resolution, EM-driven modeling achieved a success rate of 100%, outperforming the other paradigms even with perfect interface and contact information. Therefore, even very low resolution cryo-EM data is superior in predicting heterodimeric and heterotrimeric protein assemblies. Our study demonstrates that a force field is not necessary, cryo-EM data alone is sufficient to accurately guide the monomers into place. The resulting rigid models successfully identify regions of conformational change, opening up perspectives for targeted flexible remodeling. PMID:26846888

  5. An anisotropic phase-field model for solid-state dewetting and its sharp-interface limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziwnik, Marion; Münch, Andreas; Wagner, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    We propose a two-dimensional phase field model for solid state dewetting where the surface energy is weakly anisotropic. The evolution is described by the Cahn–Hilliard equation with a bi-quadratic degenerate mobility together with a bulk free energy based on a double-well potential and a free boundary condition at the film-substrate contact line. We derive the corresponding sharp interface limit via matched asymptotic analysis involving multiple inner layers. We show that in contrast to the frequently used quadratic degenerate mobility, the resulting sharp interface model for the bi-quatratic mobility is consistent with the pure surface diffusion model. In addition, we show that natural boundary conditions at the substrate obtained from the first variation of the total free energy including contributions at the substrate imply a contact angle condition in the sharp-interface limit which recovers the Young–Herring equation in the anisotropic and Young’s equation in the isotropic case, as well as a balance of fluxes at the contact line (or contact point).

  6. Investigating the Effects of Multimodal Feedback through Tracking State in Pen-Based Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Minghui; Ren, Xiangshi

    2011-01-01

    A tracking state increases the bandwidth of pen-based interfaces. However, this state is difficult to detect with default visual feedback. This paper reports on two experiments that are designed to evaluate multimodal feedback for pointing tasks (both 1D and 2D) in tracking state. In 1D pointing experiments, results show that there is a…

  7. Evaluating Gaze-Based Interface Tools to Facilitate Point-and-Select Tasks with Small Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. less than 12 x 12 pixels) point-and-select tasks. We conducted two…

  8. A prototype interface unit for microprocessor based Loran-C receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novacki, S. M., III

    1981-01-01

    An inexpensive data/command entry and CRT display system capable of alphanumeric and graphics moe operation and designed to operate in place of a separate ASCII terminal, is documented. The software to interface this unit to the 6502-based Loran C receiver is also described. The system simplifies receiver operations to a level typical of current avionics systems.

  9. Molecular tectonics based nanopatterning of interfaces with 2D metal-organic frameworks (MOFs).

    PubMed

    El Garah, Mohamed; Ciesielski, Artur; Marets, Nicolas; Bulach, Véronique; Hosseini, Mir Wais; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-10-21

    The nanostructuring of the graphite surface with 2D coordination networks, based on a combination of an acentric porphyrin tecton bearing two divergently oriented monodentate pyridyl units and a CoCl2 metallatecton, behaving as a four connecting node, was achieved at the solid-liquid interface and characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  10. Task-Based Navigation of a Taxonomy Interface to a Digital Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Christopher S. G.; Wang, Zhonghong; Chaudhry, Abdus Sattar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This is a study of hierarchical navigation; how users browse a taxonomy-based interface to an organizational repository to locate information resources. The study is part of a project to develop a taxonomy for an library and information science department to organize resources and support user browsing in a digital repository.…

  11. PC-based Multiple Information System Interface (PC/MISI) design plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Hall, Philip P.

    1985-01-01

    The general design plan for the implementation of a common user interface to multiple remote information systems within a microcomputer-based environment is presented. The intent is to provide a framework for the development of detailed specifications which will be used as guidelines for the actual development of the system.

  12. Concentration on performance with P300-based BCI systems: a matter of interface features.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Sauer, Leandro; Valero-Aguayo, Luis; de la Torre-Luque, Alejandro; Ron-Angevin, Ricardo; Varona-Moya, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    People who suffer from severe motor disabilities have difficulties to communicate with others or to interact with their environment using natural, i.e., muscular channels. These limitations can be overcome to some extent by using brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), because such systems allow users to communicate on the basis of their brain activity only. Among the several types of BCIs for spelling purposes, those that rely on the P300 event related potential-P300-based spellers-are chosen preferentially due to their high reliability. However, they demand from the user to sustain his/her attention to the desired character over a relatively long period of time. Therefore, the user's capacity to concentrate can affect his/her performance with a P300-based speller. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis using three different interfaces: one based on the classic P300 speller paradigm, another also based on that speller but including a word predictor, and a third one that was based on the T9 interface developed for mobile phones. User performance was assessed by measuring the time to complete a spelling task and the accuracy of character selection. The d2 test was applied to assess attention and concentration. Sample (N = 14) was divided into two groups basing on of concentration scores. As a result, performance was better with the predictor-enriched interfaces: less time was needed to solve the task and participants made fewer errors (p < .05). There were also significant effects of concentration (p < .05) on performance with the standard P300 speller. In conclusion, the performance of those users with lower concentration level can be improved by providing BCIs with more interactive interfaces. These findings provide substantial evidence in order to highlight the impact of psychological features on BCI performance and should be taken into account for future assistive technology systems.

  13. EEG Classification for Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Using a Tensor Based Multiclass Multimodal Analysis Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongfei; Li, Jie; Lu, Rongrong; Gu, Rong; Cao, Lei; Gong, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems usually utilize one type of changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations for control, such as event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS), steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), and P300 evoked potentials. There is a recent trend to detect more than one of these signals in one system to create a hybrid BCI. However, in this case, EEG data were always divided into groups and analyzed by the separate processing procedures. As a result, the interactive effects were ignored when different types of BCI tasks were executed simultaneously. In this work, we propose an improved tensor based multiclass multimodal scheme especially for hybrid BCI, in which EEG signals are denoted as multiway tensors, a nonredundant rank-one tensor decomposition model is proposed to obtain nonredundant tensor components, a weighted fisher criterion is designed to select multimodal discriminative patterns without ignoring the interactive effects, and support vector machine (SVM) is extended to multiclass classification. Experiment results suggest that the proposed scheme can not only identify the different changes in the dynamics of brain oscillations induced by different types of tasks but also capture the interactive effects of simultaneous tasks properly. Therefore, it has great potential use for hybrid BCI. PMID:26880873

  14. Cavitating flow during water hammer using a generalized interface vaporous cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadafi, Mohamadhosein; Riasi, Alireza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Ahmad

    2012-10-01

    In a transient flow simulation, column separation may occur when the calculated pressure head decreases to the saturated vapor pressure head in a computational grid. Abrupt valve closure or pump failure can result in a fast transient flow with column separation, potentially causing problems such as pipe failure, hydraulic equipment damage, cavitation or corrosion. This paper reports a numerical study of water hammer with column separation in a simple reservoir-pipeline-valve system and pumping station. The governing equations for two-phase transient flow in pipes are solved based on the method of characteristics (MOC) using a generalized interface vaporous cavitating model (GIVCM). The numerical results were compared with the experimental data for validation purposes, and the comparison indicated that the GIVCM describes the experimental results more accurately than the discrete vapor cavity model (DVCM). In particular, the GIVCM correlated better with the experimental data than the DVCM in terms of timing and pressure magnitude. The effects of geometric and hydraulic parameters on flow behavior in a pumping station with column separation were also investigated in this study.

  15. [A data interface based on USB bus technology for full auto patch-clamp system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Youlin; Hu, Yang; Qu, Anlian

    2006-04-01

    A USB bus based data interface technology for full auto Patch-Clamp system is discussed in the article. The main controller is CY2131QC (Cypress) and the logic controller is EPM3256A (Altera). Optocouplers are used to get rid of the noise from the interface. It makes the installation of the Patch-Clamp system easier by using the USB bus, and is suitable for the new generation of the Patch-Clamp system with a high speed of 1M bytes/s.

  16. Carbon nanotube-based multi electrode arrays for neuronal interfacing: progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bareket-Keren, Lilach; Hanein, Yael

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings have been demonstrated over the past several years as a promising material for neuronal interfacing applications. In particular, in the realm of neuronal implants, CNTs have major advantages owing to their unique mechanical and electrical properties. Here we review recent investigations utilizing CNTs in neuro-interfacing applications. Cell adhesion, neuronal engineering and multi electrode recordings with CNTs are described. We also highlight prospective advances in this field, in particular, progress toward flexible, bio-compatible CNT-based technology. PMID:23316141

  17. Design and Evaluation of a User Interface Supporting Multiple Image Query Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostafa, Javed; Dillon, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Describes the ViewFinder interface, designed at Indiana University as a client to a database server; it supports querying based on both visual and verbal clues. Presents results of usability analysis performed on ViewFinder with 18 users. High search success rates were achieved through both types of querying means; verbal clues were used more than…

  18. Interface-tracking using a compressive advection method and a compositional modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2012-11-01

    We describe progress on a consistent approach for interface- tracking in which each component, representing a different phase/fluid, has a sum of unity. Our aim is to develop a general multiphase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components that are assumed to be immiscible in this work although not a requirement of the approach. The method is based on a new mixed finite element pair, the P1DG-P2 element, in which pressure has a quadratic variation and velocity a discontinuous linear variation with the discontinuity between elements. This element allows us to represent key balances such as hydrostatic balance exactly assuming a linear variation in buoyancy. This means that on unstructured meshes we do not have problems representing these key balances that can result in large pressure gradients which, in turn, generate large spurious velocities that can dominate the solution. We apply the method to a series of benchmark problems that demonstrate the approach and show that the method works for at least three different fluids, and that it avoids putting a priority on resolving any of these fields or components. EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  19. Modelface: an Application Programming Interface (API) for Homology Modeling Studies Using Modeller Software

    PubMed Central

    Sakhteman, Amirhossein; Zare, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    An interactive application, Modelface, was presented for Modeller software based on windows platform. The application is able to run all steps of homology modeling including pdb to fasta generation, running clustal, model building and loop refinement. Other modules of modeler including energy calculation, energy minimization and the ability to make single point mutations in the PDB structures are also implemented inside Modelface. The API is a simple batch based application with no memory occupation and is free of charge for academic use. The application is also able to repair missing atom types in the PDB structures making it suitable for many molecular modeling studies such as docking and molecular dynamic simulation. Some successful instances of modeling studies using Modelface are also reported. PMID:28243276

  20. Base Flow Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Neeraj; Brinckman, Kevin; Jansen, Bernard; Seiner, John

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed of obtaining propulsive base flow data in both hot and cold jet environments, at Mach numbers and altitude of relevance to NASA launcher designs. The base flow data was used to perform computational fluid dynamics (CFD) turbulence model assessments of base flow predictive capabilities in order to provide increased confidence in base thermal and pressure load predictions obtained from computational modeling efforts. Predictive CFD analyses were used in the design of the experiments, available propulsive models were used to reduce program costs and increase success, and a wind tunnel facility was used. The data obtained allowed assessment of CFD/turbulence models in a complex flow environment, working within a building-block procedure to validation, where cold, non-reacting test data was first used for validation, followed by more complex reacting base flow validation.

  1. Open boundary conditions for the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmarais, J. L.; Kuerten, J. G. M.

    2014-04-01

    New techniques are developed for solving multi-phase flows in unbounded domains using the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D. They extend two open boundary conditions originally designed for the Navier-Stokes equations. The non-dimensional formulation of the DIM generalizes the approach to any fluid. The equations support a steady state whose analytical approximation close to the critical point depends only on temperature. This feature enables the use of detectors at the boundaries switching between conventional boundary conditions in bulk phases and a multi-phase strategy in interfacial regions. Moreover, the latter takes advantage of the steady state approximation to minimize the interface-boundary interactions. The techniques are applied to fluids experiencing a phase transition and where the interface between the phases travels through one of the boundaries. When the interface crossing the boundary is fully developed, the technique greatly improves results relative to cases where conventional boundary conditions can be used. Limitations appear when the interface crossing the boundary is not a stable equilibrium between the two phases: the terms responsible for creating the true balance between the phases perturb the interior solution. Both boundary conditions present good numerical stability properties: the error remains bounded when the initial conditions or the far field values are perturbed. For the PML, the influence of its main parameters on the global error is investigated to make a compromise between computational costs and maximum error. The approach can be extended to multiple spatial dimensions.

  2. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.

  3. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-07

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells.

  4. Real-time gesture interface based on event-driven processing from stereo silicon retinas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Haeng; Delbruck, Tobi; Pfeiffer, Michael; Park, Paul K J; Shin, Chang-Woo; Ryu, Hyunsurk Eric; Kang, Byung Chang

    2014-12-01

    We propose a real-time hand gesture interface based on combining a stereo pair of biologically inspired event-based dynamic vision sensor (DVS) silicon retinas with neuromorphic event-driven postprocessing. Compared with conventional vision or 3-D sensors, the use of DVSs, which output asynchronous and sparse events in response to motion, eliminates the need to extract movements from sequences of video frames, and allows significantly faster and more energy-efficient processing. In addition, the rate of input events depends on the observed movements, and thus provides an additional cue for solving the gesture spotting problem, i.e., finding the onsets and offsets of gestures. We propose a postprocessing framework based on spiking neural networks that can process the events received from the DVSs in real time, and provides an architecture for future implementation in neuromorphic hardware devices. The motion trajectories of moving hands are detected by spatiotemporally correlating the stereoscopically verged asynchronous events from the DVSs by using leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons. Adaptive thresholds of the LIF neurons achieve the segmentation of trajectories, which are then translated into discrete and finite feature vectors. The feature vectors are classified with hidden Markov models, using a separate Gaussian mixture model for spotting irrelevant transition gestures. The disparity information from stereovision is used to adapt LIF neuron parameters to achieve recognition invariant of the distance of the user to the sensor, and also helps to filter out movements in the background of the user. Exploiting the high dynamic range of DVSs, furthermore, allows gesture recognition over a 60-dB range of scene illuminance. The system achieves recognition rates well over 90% under a variety of variable conditions with static and dynamic backgrounds with naïve users.

  5. Design and development of a miniature column-based interface (MCBI) stress gage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, Denis D.

    1993-04-01

    Tests are routinely conducted to evaluate the survivability, under simulated battlefield conditions, of buried military structures subjected to high-explosive loadings. The survivability assessments require the measurement of dynamic normal stresses induced at soil/structure interfaces. Stresses in excess of 10,000 psi and accelerations greater than 100,000 g's may be applied at interface locations. Normal-incidence interface stress gages currently used in such tests are incapable of accurately measuring stresses above 5,000 psi, and are sensitive to lateral accelerations and structure-transmitted stresses which distort the measurement. This study explores the design, development, and testing of a miniature, column-based, interface (MCBI) stress gage. The MCBI gage is designed to measure normal stresses up to 35,000 psi. Laboratory tests indicate that the gage produces a linear output due to applied pressure and is virtually insensitive to lateral stresses. Explosive tests have shown the MCBI gage compares favorably to commonly-used interface stress gages at stresses up to 3,000 psi and is survivable at stresses up to 25,000 psi.

  6. A hybrid NMR/SAXS-based approach for discriminating oligomeric protein interfaces using Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Paolo; Shi, Lei; Liu, Gaohua; Barbieri, Christopher M.; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Grant, Thomas D.; Luft, Joseph R.; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Snell, Edward H.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David; Lange, Oliver F.; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2016-01-01

    Oligomeric proteins are important targets for structure determination in solution. While in most cases the fold of individual subunits can be determined experimentally, or predicted by homology-based methods, protein-protein interfaces are challenging to determine de novo using conventional NMR structure determination protocols. Here we focus on a member of the bet-V1 superfamily, Aha1 from Colwellia psychrerythraea. This family displays a broad range of crystallographic interfaces none of which can be reconciled with the NMR and SAXS data collected for Aha1. Unlike conventional methods relying on a dense network of experimental restraints, the sparse data are used to limit conformational search during optimization of a physically realistic energy function. This work highlights a new approach for studying minor conformational changes due to structural plasticity within a single dimeric interface in solution. PMID:25388768

  7. Non-invasive EEG-based brain-computer interfaces in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Mikołajewska, Emilia; Mikołajewski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of consciousness (DoCs) are chronic conditions resulting usually from severe neurological deficits. The limitations of the existing diagnosis systems and methodologies cause a need for additional tools for relevant patients with DoCs assessment, including brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Recent progress in BCIs' clinical applications may offer important breakthroughs in the diagnosis and therapy of patients with DoCs. Thus the clinical significance of BCI applications in the diagnosis of patients with DoCs is hard to overestimate. One of them may be brain-computer interfaces. The aim of this study is to evaluate possibility of non-invasive EEG-based brain-computer interfaces in diagnosis of patients with DOCs in post-acute and long-term care institutions.

  8. Interface-induced two-step RESET for filament-based multi-level resistive memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Shen, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhigang; Pan, Liyang; Xu, Jun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a two-step RESET switching behavior of Ag/Al2O3/HfO2/Pt bilayer resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices is investigated. The interface between the two oxide layers is responsible for the special two-step RESET switching. When the conducting filaments have ruptured in the lower layer, the interface can protect the Ag ions of the filaments from breaking in the upper layer due to the trapped charges or defects at the interface. Therefore, a stable middle resistance state (MRS) is realized and the device exhibits a terrace-like I-V curve during the RESET operations. A filament-based switching mechanism combined with the electron hopping theory is proposed to explain the physical nature of the two-step RESET behavior. Furthermore, a good multi-level resistive switching performance with excellent endurance and retention reliability is obtained.

  9. Electrochemical Surface Potential due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Stern, Abraham C.; Levin, Yan; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2012-06-07

    Herein, we present research that suggests that the underlying physics that drive simple empirical models of anions (e.g. point charge, no polarization) to the air-water interface, with water described by SPC/E, or related partial charge models is different than when both ions and water are modeled with quantum mechanical based interactions. Specifically, we will show that the driving force of ions to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and the negative electrochemical surface potential. We will demonstrate that we can fully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory (DCT). Our research suggests that a significant part of the electrochemical surface potential in empirical models appears to be an artifact of the failure of point charge models in the vicinity of a broken symmetry. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle.

  10. Acoustic Response of Underwater Munitions near a Sediment Interface: Measurement Model Comparisons and Classification Schemes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-23

    FINAL REPORT Acoustic Response of Underwater Munitions near a Sediment Interface: Measurement Model Comparisons and Classification Schemes SERDP...6 Figure 2. Effect of fish on acoustic color templates during GULFEX12 …………… 8 Figure 3. Selection of targets deployed during TREX13 and BAYEX14...deployed during TREX13 and BAYEX14 …… 29 Figure 16. Ray diagrams for the acoustic ray model …………………………… 29 Figure 17. Model-model and data-model

  11. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain’s behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user’s motor intention during CLDA—a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to

  12. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Orsborn, Amy L; Carmena, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain's behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user's motor intention during CLDA-a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to parameter

  13. iMatTOUGH: An open-source Matlab-based graphical user interface for pre- and post-processing of TOUGH2 and iTOUGH2 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Anh Phuong; Dafflon, Baptiste; Hubbard, Susan

    2016-04-01

    TOUGH2 and iTOUGH2 are powerful models that simulate the heat and fluid flows in porous and fracture media, and perform parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation analysis. However, setting up the input files is not only tedious, but error prone, and processing output files is time consuming. In this study, we present an open source Matlab-based tool (iMatTOUGH) that supports the generation of all necessary inputs for both TOUGH2 and iTOUGH2 and visualize their outputs. The tool links the inputs of TOUGH2 and iTOUGH2, making sure the two input files are consistent. It supports the generation of rectangular computational mesh, i.e., it automatically generates the elements and connections as well as their properties as required by TOUGH2. The tool also allows the specification of initial and time-dependent boundary conditions for better subsurface heat and water flow simulations. The effectiveness of the tool is illustrated by an example that uses TOUGH2 and iTOUGH2 to estimate soil hydrological and thermal properties from soil temperature data and simulate the heat and water flows at the Rifle site in Colorado.

  14. Modeling the curvature and interface shear stress of GaN-sapphire system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Shi, Junjie; Wu, Jiejun; Liu, Huizhao

    2016-03-01

    The curvature and interface shear stress of GaN-sapphire system are studied by establishing the mechanical equations based on two main assumptions: (a) the thickness of GaN film can be compared to the thickness of sapphire substrate, and (b) the thickness of GaN film is non-uniform. Our results show that the curvature of GaN-sapphire system is a variable within the whole circular system. The interface shear stress changes direction around at the middle of radius for the circular system, and the curvature have an important effect on the interface shear stress due to the consideration of non-uniform thickness for GaN film.

  15. The Design and Implementation of a Visual User Interface for a Structured Model Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Marshall McLuhan and Quentin Fiore The Medium is the Message (1967) We could easily continue that the computer interface is an extension of the user. To...OR) [Ref.2, p.1]. Managers may feel overly dependent on these MS/OR practitioners who more fully understand the underlying concepts of modeling...point. The program presupposes that the user understands struc- tured modeling concepts, but makes no further assumptions regarding the user’s computer

  16. Classification of user interfaces for graph-based online analytical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, James R.

    2016-05-01

    In the domain of business intelligence, user-oriented software for conducting multidimensional analysis via Online- Analytical Processing (OLAP) is now commonplace. In this setting, datasets commonly have well-defined sets of dimensions and measures around which analysis tasks can be conducted. However, many forms of data used in intelligence operations - deriving from social networks, online communications, and text corpora - will consist of graphs with varying forms of potential dimensional structure. Hence, enabling OLAP over such data collections requires explicit definition and extraction of supporting dimensions and measures. Further, as Graph OLAP remains an emerging technique, limited research has been done on its user interface requirements. Namely, on effective pairing of interface designs to different types of graph-derived dimensions and measures. This paper presents a novel technique for pairing of user interface designs to Graph OLAP datasets, rooted in Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) driven comparisons. Attributes of the classification strategy are encoded through an AHP ontology, developed in our alternate work and extended to support pairwise comparison of interfaces. Specifically, according to their ability, as perceived by Subject Matter Experts, to support dimensions and measures corresponding to Graph OLAP dataset attributes. To frame this discussion, a survey is provided both on existing variations of Graph OLAP, as well as existing interface designs previously applied in multidimensional analysis settings. Following this, a review of our AHP ontology is provided, along with a listing of corresponding dataset and interface attributes applicable toward SME recommendation structuring. A walkthrough of AHP-based recommendation encoding via the ontology-based approach is then provided. The paper concludes with a short summary of proposed future directions seen as essential for this research area.

  17. Anisotropic Thermal and Electrical Properties of Thin Thermal Interface Layers of Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Bekyarova, Elena B.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are crucial components of high density electronics and the high thermal conductivity of graphite makes this material an attractive candidate for such applications. We report an investigation of the in-plane and through-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of thin thermal interface layers of graphite nanoplatelet (GNP) based composites. The in-plane electrical conductivity exceeds its through-plane counterpart by three orders of magnitude, whereas the ratio of the thermal conductivities is about 5. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the anisotropy in the transport properties is due to the in-plane alignment of the GNPs which occurs during the formation of the thermal interface layer. Because the alignment in the thermal interface layer suppresses the through-plane component of the thermal conductivity, the anisotropy strongly degrades the performance of GNP-based composites in the geometry required for typical thermal management applications and must be taken into account in the development of GNP-based TIMs.

  18. An elasto-viscoplastic interface model for investigating the constitutive behavior of nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Barthelat, F.; Espinosa, H. D.

    2007-07-01

    In order to better understand the strengthening mechanism observed in nacre, we have developed an interface computational model to simulate the behavior of the organic present at the interface between aragonite tablets. In the model, the single polymer-chain behavior is characterized by the worm-like-chain (WLC) model, which is in turn incorporated into the eight-chain cell model developed by Arruda and Boyce [Arruda, E.M., Boyce, M.C., 1993a. A three-dimensional constitutive model for the large stretches, with application to polymeric glasses. Int. J. Solids Struct. 40, 389-412] to achieve a continuum interface constitutive description. The interface model is formulated within a finite-deformation framework. A fully implicit time-integration algorithm is used for solving the discretized governing equations. Finite element simulations were performed on a representative volume element (RVE) to investigate the tensile response of nacre. The staggered arrangement of tablets and interface waviness obtained experimentally by Barthelat et al. [Barthelat, F., Tang, H., Zavattieri, P.D., Li, C.-M., Espinosa, H.D., 2007. On the mechanics of mother-of-pearl: a key feature in the material hierarchical structure. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 55 (2), 306-337] was included in the RVE simulations. The simulations showed that both the rate-dependence of the tensile response and hysteresis loops during loading, unloading and reloading cycles were captured by the model. Through a parametric study, the effect of the polymer constitutive response during tablet-climbing and its relation to interface hardening was investigated. It is shown that stiffening of the organic material is not required to achieve the experimentally observed strain hardening of nacre during tension. In fact, when ratios of contour length/persistent length experimentally identified are employed in the simulations, the predicted stress-strain behavior exhibits a deformation hardening consistent with the one measured

  19. Using the high-level based program interface to facilitate the large scale scientific computing.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yizi; Shang, Ling; Gao, Chuanchang; Lu, Guiming; Ye, Yuntao; Jia, Dongdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper is to make further research on facilitating the large-scale scientific computing on the grid and the desktop grid platform. The related issues include the programming method, the overhead of the high-level program interface based middleware, and the data anticipate migration. The block based Gauss Jordan algorithm as a real example of large-scale scientific computing is used to evaluate those issues presented above. The results show that the high-level based program interface makes the complex scientific applications on large-scale scientific platform easier, though a little overhead is unavoidable. Also, the data anticipation migration mechanism can improve the efficiency of the platform which needs to process big data based scientific applications.

  20. Using the High-Level Based Program Interface to Facilitate the Large Scale Scientific Computing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yizi; Shang, Ling; Gao, Chuanchang; Lu, Guiming; Ye, Yuntao; Jia, Dongdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper is to make further research on facilitating the large-scale scientific computing on the grid and the desktop grid platform. The related issues include the programming method, the overhead of the high-level program interface based middleware, and the data anticipate migration. The block based Gauss Jordan algorithm as a real example of large-scale scientific computing is used to evaluate those issues presented above. The results show that the high-level based program interface makes the complex scientific applications on large-scale scientific platform easier, though a little overhead is unavoidable. Also, the data anticipation migration mechanism can improve the efficiency of the platform which needs to process big data based scientific applications. PMID:24574931

  1. a Plugin to Interface Openmodeller from Qgis for SPECIES' Potential Distribution Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel; Willmes, Christian; Bareth, Georg; Weniger, Gerd-Christian

    2016-06-01

    This contribution describes the development of a plugin for the geographic information system QGIS to interface the openModeller software package. The aim is to use openModeller to generate species' potential distribution models for various archaeological applications (site catchment analysis, for example). Since the usage of openModeller's command-line interface and configuration files can be a bit inconvenient, an extension of the QGIS user interface to handle these tasks, in combination with the management of the geographic data, was required. The implementation was realized in Python using PyQGIS and PyQT. The plugin, in combination with QGIS, handles the tasks of managing geographical data, data conversion, generation of configuration files required by openModeller and compilation of a project folder. The plugin proved to be very helpful with the task of compiling project datasets and configuration files for multiple instances of species occurrence datasets and the overall handling of openModeller. In addition, the plugin is easily extensible to take potential new requirements into account in the future.

  2. Modeling strategic use of human computer interfaces with novel hidden Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Laura J.; Poore, Joshua C.; Krum, David M.; Schwartz, Jana L.; Coskren, William D.; Jones, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Immersive software tools are virtual environments designed to give their users an augmented view of real-world data and ways of manipulating that data. As virtual environments, every action users make while interacting with these tools can be carefully logged, as can the state of the software and the information it presents to the user, giving these actions context. This data provides a high-resolution lens through which dynamic cognitive and behavioral processes can be viewed. In this report, we describe new methods for the analysis and interpretation of such data, utilizing a novel implementation of the Beta Process Hidden Markov Model (BP-HMM) for analysis of software activity logs. We further report the results of a preliminary study designed to establish the validity of our modeling approach. A group of 20 participants were asked to play a simple computer game, instrumented to log every interaction with the interface. Participants had no previous experience with the game's functionality or rules, so the activity logs collected during their naïve interactions capture patterns of exploratory behavior and skill acquisition as they attempted to learn the rules of the game. Pre- and post-task questionnaires probed for self-reported styles of problem solving, as well as task engagement, difficulty, and workload. We jointly modeled the activity log sequences collected from all participants using the BP-HMM approach, identifying a global library of activity patterns representative of the collective behavior of all the participants. Analyses show systematic relationships between both pre- and post-task questionnaires, self-reported approaches to analytic problem solving, and metrics extracted from the BP-HMM decomposition. Overall, we find that this novel approach to decomposing unstructured behavioral data within software environments provides a sensible means for understanding how users learn to integrate software functionality for strategic task pursuit. PMID

  3. Integration Of Heat Transfer Coefficient In Glass Forming Modeling With Special Interface Element

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, P.; Gregoire, S.; Lochegnies, D.; Cesar de Sa, J.

    2007-05-17

    Numerical modeling of the glass forming processes requires the accurate knowledge of the heat exchange between the glass and the forming tools. A laboratory testing is developed to determine the evolution of the heat transfer coefficient in different glass/mould contact conditions (contact pressure, temperature, lubrication...). In this paper, trials are performed to determine heat transfer coefficient evolutions in experimental conditions close to the industrial blow-and-blow process conditions. In parallel of this work, a special interface element is implemented in a commercial Finite Element code in order to deal with heat transfer between glass and mould for non-meshing meshes and evolutive contact. This special interface element, implemented by using user subroutines, permits to introduce the previous heat transfer coefficient evolutions in the numerical modelings at the glass/mould interface in function of the local temperatures, contact pressures, contact time and kind of lubrication. The blow-and-blow forming simulation of a perfume bottle is finally performed to assess the special interface element performance.

  4. Integration Of Heat Transfer Coefficient In Glass Forming Modeling With Special Interface Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, P.; César de Sá, J.; Grégoire, S.; Lochegnies, D.

    2007-05-01

    Numerical modeling of the glass forming processes requires the accurate knowledge of the heat exchange between the glass and the forming tools. A laboratory testing is developed to determine the evolution of the heat transfer coefficient in different glass/mould contact conditions (contact pressure, temperature, lubrication…). In this paper, trials are performed to determine heat transfer coefficient evolutions in experimental conditions close to the industrial blow-and-blow process conditions. In parallel of this work, a special interface element is implemented in a commercial Finite Element code in order to deal with heat transfer between glass and mould for non-meshing meshes and evolutive contact. This special interface element, implemented by using user subroutines, permits to introduce the previous heat transfer coefficient evolutions in the numerical modelings at the glass/mould interface in function of the local temperatures, contact pressures, contact time and kind of lubrication. The blow-and-blow forming simulation of a perfume bottle is finally performed to assess the special interface element performance.

  5. Integration of a model-independent interface for RBE predictions in a treatment planning system for active particle beam scanning.

    PubMed

    Steinsträter, O; Scholz, U; Friedrich, T; Krämer, M; Grün, R; Durante, M; Scholz, M

    2015-09-07

    Especially for heavier ions such as carbon ions, treatment planning systems (TPSs) for ion radiotherapy depend on models predicting the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the particles involved. Such models are subject to intensive research and the choice of the optimal RBE model is a matter of debate. On the other hand TPSs are often strongly coupled to particular RBE models and transition even to extended models of the same family can be difficult. We present here a model-independent interface which allows the unbiased use of any RBE model capable of providing dose-effect curves (even sampled curves) for a TPS. The full decoupling between the RBE model and TPS is based on the beam-mixing model proposed by Lam which is, in contrast to the often-used Zaider-Rossi model, independent of the explicit form of the underlying dose-effect curves. This approach not only supports the refinement of RBE models without adaptations of the TPS--which we demonstrate by means of the local effect model (LEM)--but also allows the comparison of very different model approaches on a common basis. We exemplify this by a comparison between the LEM and a model from the literature for proton RBE prediction.

  6. ANALOG I/O MODULE TEST SYSTEM BASED ON EPICS CA PROTOCOL AND ACTIVEX CA INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,YHOFF,L.

    2003-10-13

    Analog input (ADC) and output (DAC) modules play a substantial role in device level control of accelerator and large experiment physics control system. In order to get the best performance some features of analog modules including linearity, accuracy, crosstalk, thermal drift and so on have to be evaluated during the preliminary design phase. Gain and offset error calibration and thermal drift compensation (if needed) may have to be done in the implementation phase as well. A natural technique for performing these tasks is to interface the analog VO modules and GPIB interface programmable test instruments with a computer, which can complete measurements or calibration automatically. A difficulty is that drivers of analog modules and test instruments usually work on totally different platforms (vxworks VS Windows). Developing new test routines and drivers for testing instruments under VxWorks (or any other RTOS) platform is not a good solution because such systems have relatively poor user interface and developing such software requires substantial effort. EPICS CA protocol and ActiveX CA interface provide another choice, a PC and LabVIEW based test system. Analog 110 module can be interfaced from LabVIEW test routines via ActiveX CA interface. Test instruments can be controlled via LabVIEW drivers, most of which are provided by instrument vendors or by National Instruments. Labview also provides extensive data analysis and process functions. Using these functions, users can generate powerful test routines very easily. Several applications built for Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) system are described in this paper.

  7. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Boninger, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning. PMID:26113812

  8. Novel Anticancer Agents Based on Targeting the Trimer Interface of the PRL Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-08-15

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) oncoproteins are phosphatases overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. Elevated levels of PRL associate with metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. In principle, PRL phosphatases offer appealing therapeutic targets, but they remain underexplored due to the lack of specific chemical probes. In this study, we address this issue by exploiting a unique property of PRL phosphatases, namely, that they may function as homotrimers. Starting from a sequential structure-based virtual screening and medicinal chemistry strategy, we identified Cmpd-43 and several analogs that disrupt PRL1 trimerization. Biochemical and structural analyses demonstrate that Cmpd-43 and its close analogs directly bind the PRL1 trimer interface and obstruct PRL1 trimerization. Cmpd-43 also specifically blocks the PRL1-induced cell proliferation and migration through attenuation of both ERK1/2 and Akt activity. Importantly, Cmpd-43 exerted potent anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine xenograft model of melanoma. Our results validate a trimerization-dependent signaling mechanism for PRL and offer proof of concept for trimerization inhibitors as candidate therapeutics to treat PRL-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4805-15. ©2016 AACR.

  9. A transcutaneous power transfer interface based on a multicoil inductive link.

    PubMed

    Mirbozorgi, S A; Gosselin, B; Sawan, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a transcutaneous power transfer link based on a multicoil structure. Multicoil inductive links using 4-coil or 3-coil topologies have shown significant improvement over conventional 2-coil structures for transferring power transcutaneously across larger distances and with higher efficiency. However, such performance comes at the cost of additional inductors and capacitor in the system, which is not convenient in implantable applications. This paper presents a transcutaneous power transfer interface that takes advantage on a 3-coils inductive topology to achieve wide separation distances and high power transfer efficiency without increasing the size of the implanted device compared to a conventional 2-coil structure. In the proposed link, a middle coil is placed outside the body to act as a repeater between an external transmitting coil and an implanted receiving coil. The proposed structure allows optimizing the link parameters after implantation by changing the characteristics of the repeater coil. Simulation with a multilayer model of the biological tissues and measured results are presented for the proposed link.

  10. A Benchmark Dataset for SSVEP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Chen, Xiaogang; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2016-11-10

    This paper presents a benchmark steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) dataset acquired with a 40-target brain-computer interface (BCI) speller. The dataset consists of 64-channel Electroencephalogram (EEG) data from 35 healthy subjects (8 experienced and 27 naïve) while they performed a cue-guided target selecting task. The virtual keyboard of the speller was composed of 40 visual flickers, which were coded using a joint frequency and phase modulation (JFPM) approach. The stimulation frequencies ranged from 8Hz to 15.8Hz with an interval of 0.2Hz. The phase difference between two adjacent frequencies was 0.5π. For each subject, the data included six blocks of 40 trials corresponding to all 40 flickers indicated by a visual cue in a random order. The stimulation duration in each trial was five seconds. The dataset can be used as a benchmark dataset to compare the methods for stimulus coding and target identification in SSVEP-based BCIs. Through offline simulation, the dataset can be used to design new system diagrams and evaluate their BCI performance without collecting any new data. The dataset also provides high-quality data for computational modeling of SSVEPs. The dataset is freely available from http://bci.med.tsinghua.edu.cn/download.html.

  11. Adaptive Stacked Generalization for Multiclass Motor Imagery-Based Brain Computer Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis F; Corralejo, Rebeca; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Álvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Practical motor imagery-based brain computer interface (MI-BCI) applications are limited by the difficult to decode brain signals in a reliable way. In this paper, we propose a processing framework to address non-stationarity, as well as handle spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics associated with execution of motor tasks. Stacked generalization is used to exploit the power of classifier ensembles for combining information coming from multiple sources and reducing the existing uncertainty in EEG signals. The outputs of several regularized linear discriminant analysis (RLDA) models are combined to account for temporal, spatial, and spectral information. The resultant algorithm is called stacked RLDA (SRLDA). Additionally, an adaptive processing stage is introduced before classification to reduce the harmful effect of intersession non-stationarity. The benefits of the proposed method are evaluated on the BCI Competition IV dataset 2a. We demonstrate its effectiveness in binary and multiclass settings with four different motor imagery tasks: left-hand, right-hand, both feet, and tongue movements. The results show that adaptive SRLDA outperforms the winner of the competition and other approaches tested on this multiclass dataset.

  12. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Collinger, Jennifer L; Boninger, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning.

  13. Micromechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction, morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element models of a cement-bone interface specimen were created from micro-computed tomography data of a physical specimen that was sectioned from an in vitro cemented total hip arthroplasty. In five models the friction coefficient was varied (μ= 0.0; 0.3; 0.7; 1.0 and 3.0), while in one model an ideally bonded interface was assumed. In two models cement interface gaps and an optimal cement penetration were simulated. Finally, the effect of bone cement stiffness variations was simulated (2.0 and 2.5 GPa, relative to the default 3.0 GPa). All models were loaded for a cycle of fully reversible tension-compression. From the simulated stress-displacement curves the interface deformation, stiffness and hysteresis were calculated. The results indicate that in the current model the mechanical properties of the cement-bone interface were caused by frictional phenomena at the shape-closed interlock rather than by adhesive properties of the cement. Our findings furthermore show that in our model maximizing cement penetration improved the micromechanical response of the cement-bone interface stiffness, while interface gaps had a detrimental effect. Relative to the frictional and morphological variations, variations in the cement stiffness had only a modest effect on the micromechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface. The current study provides information that may help to better understand the load transfer mechanisms taking place at the cement-bone interface. PMID:18848699

  14. Surface speciation models of calcite and dolomite/aqueous solution interfaces and their spectroscopic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, O.S.; Mielczarski, J.A.; Barres, O.; Schott, J.

    2000-03-21

    The composition and density of surface hydroxyl and carbonate groups on calcite and dolomite after contact at 25 C with solutions of different pH (3 to 12) and carbonate concentration (10{sup {minus}4} {le}{Sigma}CO{sub 2}{le} 0.1 M) were monitored by means of diffuse reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Both for calcite and dolomite, broad high-intensity absorbance bands at about 3,400 and 1,600 cm{sup {minus}1} were observed at pH below 6 and carbonate concentration below 10{sub {minus}3} M. These bands are assigned to hydroxyl groups present at the mineral surfaces. At higher pH and {Sigma}CO{sub 2}, the intensity of these bands significantly decreases. On the contrary the intensity of the broad double band at about 1,400 cm{sup {minus}1} due to carbonate species (surface and bulk) for both minerals was found to increase significantly with increasing solution pH and carbonate concentration, being the lowest at pH {le} 5 and {Sigma}CO{sub 2} {le} 10{sup {minus}3} M. These observations correlate well with the surface speciation for calcite or dolomite/aqueous solution interface predicted based on surface complexation models (SCM).

  15. A theoretical model and phase field simulation on the evolution of interface roughness in the oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Fang, Dai-Ning; Liu, Bin

    2012-01-01

    An oxidation kinetics model is developed to account for the effects of the oxidation interface curvature and the oxidation-induced volume change or Pilling-Bedworth ratio. For the oxidation of Fe-Cr-Al-Y alloy fiber, the predictions agree well with experimental results. By considering the influence of the oxidation interface curvature on oxidation rates, the evolution of fluctuant oxidation interface is predicted. We also developed the phase field method (PFM) to simulate the evolution of the interface roughness. Both the theoretical model and the PFM results show that the interface will become smooth during high temperature oxidation. Stress distribution and evolution are calculated by PFM, which indicates that the stress level decreases as the interface morphology evolves.

  16. Simulations of light scattering spectra of a nanoshell on plane interface based on the discrete sources method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Elena; Eremin, Yuri; Wriedt, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    The resonance properties of nanoshells are of great interest in nanosensing applications such as surface enhanced Raman scattering or biological sensing. In this paper the discrete sources method has been applied to analyze the spectrum of evanescent light scattering from a nanoshell particle deposited near a plane surface. Based on the rigorous theoretical model, which allows to take into account all features of the scattering problem as: medium with frequency dispersion, presence of the interface, the objective aperture and its location and core-shell asphericity, the scattering spectrum of nanoshells was calculated. The dependence of the local nanoshell spectral density behavior on its properties is discussed.

  17. Including nonequilibrium interface kinetics in a continuum model for melting nanoscaled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Julian M.; McCue, Scott W.; Moroney, Timothy J.

    2014-11-01

    The melting temperature of a nanoscaled particle is known to decrease as the curvature of the solid-melt interface increases. This relationship is most often modelled by a Gibbs-Thomson law, with the decrease in melting temperature proposed to be a product of the curvature of the solid-melt interface and the surface tension. Such a law must break down for sufficiently small particles, since the curvature becomes singular in the limit that the particle radius vanishes. Furthermore, the use of this law as a boundary condition for a Stefan-type continuum model is problematic because it leads to a physically unrealistic form of mathematical blow-up at a finite particle radius. By numerical simulation, we show that the inclusion of nonequilibrium interface kinetics in the Gibbs-Thomson law regularises the continuum model, so that the mathematical blow up is suppressed. As a result, the solution continues until complete melting, and the corresponding melting temperature remains finite for all time. The results of the adjusted model are consistent with experimental findings of abrupt melting of nanoscaled particles. This small-particle regime appears to be closely related to the problem of melting a superheated particle.

  18. Including nonequilibrium interface kinetics in a continuum model for melting nanoscaled particles.

    PubMed

    Back, Julian M; McCue, Scott W; Moroney, Timothy J

    2014-11-17

    The melting temperature of a nanoscaled particle is known to decrease as the curvature of the solid-melt interface increases. This relationship is most often modelled by a Gibbs-Thomson law, with the decrease in melting temperature proposed to be a product of the curvature of the solid-melt interface and the surface tension. Such a law must break down for sufficiently small particles, since the curvature becomes singular in the limit that the particle radius vanishes. Furthermore, the use of this law as a boundary condition for a Stefan-type continuum model is problematic because it leads to a physically unrealistic form of mathematical blow-up at a finite particle radius. By numerical simulation, we show that the inclusion of nonequilibrium interface kinetics in the Gibbs-Thomson law regularises the continuum model, so that the mathematical blow up is suppressed. As a result, the solution continues until complete melting, and the corresponding melting temperature remains finite for all time. The results of the adjusted model are consistent with experimental findings of abrupt melting of nanoscaled particles. This small-particle regime appears to be closely related to the problem of melting a superheated particle.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Intergranular Fracture in Aluminum: Constitutive Relation For Interface Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E. H.

    2008-01-01

    Intergranular fracture is a dominant mode of failure in ultrafine grained materials. In the present study, the atomistic mechanisms of grain-boundary debonding during intergranular fracture in aluminum are modeled using a coupled molecular dynamics finite element simulation. Using a statistical mechanics approach, a cohesive-zone law in the form of a traction-displacement constitutive relationship, characterizing the load transfer across the plane of a growing edge crack, is extracted from atomistic simulations and then recast in a form suitable for inclusion within a continuum finite element model. The cohesive-zone law derived by the presented technique is free of finite size effects and is statistically representative for describing the interfacial debonding of a grain boundary (GB) interface examined at atomic length scales. By incorporating the cohesive-zone law in cohesive-zone finite elements, the debonding of a GB interface can be simulated in a coupled continuum-atomistic model, in which a crack starts in the continuum environment, smoothly penetrates the continuum-atomistic interface, and continues its propagation in the atomistic environment. This study is a step towards relating atomistically derived decohesion laws to macroscopic predictions of fracture and constructing multiscale models for nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained materials.

  20. A modelling approach demonstrating micromechanical changes in the tibial cemented interface due to in vivo service.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Priyanka; Miller, Mark A; Verdonschot, Nico; Mann, Kenneth A; Janssen, Dennis

    2017-02-27

    Post-operative changes in trabecular bone morphology at the cement-bone interface can vary depending on time in service. This study aims to investigate how micromotion and bone strains change at the tibial bone-cement interface before and after cementation. This work discusses whether the morphology of the post-mortem interface can be explained by studying changes in these mechanical quantities. Three post-mortem cement-bone interface specimens showing varying levels of bone resorption (minimal, extensive and intermediate) were selected for this study Using image segmentation techniques, masks of the post-mortem bone were dilated to fill up the mould spaces in the cement to obtain the immediately post-operative situation. Finite element (FE) models of the post-mortem and post-operative situation were created from these segmentation masks. Subsequent removal of the cement layer resulted in the pre-operative situation. FE micromotion and bone strains were analyzed for the interdigitated trabecular bone. For all specimens micromotion increased from the post-operative to the post-mortem models (distally, in specimen 1: 0.1 to 0.5µm; specimen 2: 0.2 to 0.8µm; specimen 3: 0.27 to 1.62µm). Similarly bone strains were shown to increase from post-operative to post-mortem (distally, in specimen 1: -185 to -389µε; specimen 2: -170 to -824µε; specimen 3: -216 to -1024µε). Post-mortem interdigitated bone was found to be strain shielded in comparison with supporting bone indicating that failure of bone would occur distal to the interface. These results indicate that stress shielding of interdigitated trabeculae is a plausible explanation for resorption patterns observed in post-mortem specimens.

  1. The DaveMLTranslator: An Interface for DAVE-ML Aerodynamic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Melissa A.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    It can take weeks or months to incorporate a new aerodynamic model into a vehicle simulation and validate the performance of the model. The Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML) has been proposed as a means to reduce the time required to accomplish this task by defining a standard format for typical components of a flight dynamic model. The purpose of this paper is to describe an object-oriented C++ implementation of a class that interfaces a vehicle subsystem model specified in DAVE-ML and a vehicle simulation. Using the DaveMLTranslator class, aerodynamic or other subsystem models can be automatically imported and verified at run-time, significantly reducing the elapsed time between receipt of a DAVE-ML model and its integration into a simulation environment. The translator performs variable initializations, data table lookups, and mathematical calculations for the aerodynamic build-up, and executes any embedded static check-cases for verification. The implementation is efficient, enabling real-time execution. Simple interface code for the model inputs and outputs is the only requirement to integrate the DaveMLTranslator as a vehicle aerodynamic model. The translator makes use of existing table-lookup utilities from the Langley Standard Real-Time Simulation in C++ (LaSRS++). The design and operation of the translator class is described and comparisons with existing, conventional, C++ aerodynamic models of the same vehicle are given.

  2. Study on interface and frame structure of SWAT and MODFLOW models coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jinggang; Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Huicheng

    2010-05-01

    , substrate and groundwater withdrawal over short periods of time, each hydrologic response unit (HRU) needs the information that reflects spatial distribution, such as runoff curve number, characteristic parameters of soil water content, crop type, suppression factor of moisture under different irrigations, groundwater level and permeability, to veritably reflect states of interaction between surface water and groundwater. MODFLOW is a modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model developed by USGS for numerical simulation of groundwater flow in porous media. The model is physically based, and capable of reflecting spatial characteristics and movement of groundwater. The limitation of MODFLOW is its running dependence on the input of some specified conditions for tributary flow, recharge, evaporation and water uses. The model lacks a means of specifying these conditions in terms of hydrologic processes at the watershed's surface and in the soil profile. MODFLOW is designed to treat specified conditions as parameters to be determined by calibration. The accuracy of groundwater simulations is higher only when the value of these calibrated parameters corresponds to reality. However, it is very difficult. Therefore, when SWAT is used for watershed hydrological simulations, it is very necessary to couple SWAT with MODFLOW to form SWAT-MODFLOW model that keeps the advantages of the two models and realizes the appropriate quantitative analysis of watershed hydrological processes. The concrete process is that the recharge values of HRU from SWAT are assigned to MODFLOW, the groundwater flow values of cell between river and aquifer from MODFLOW are returned to SWAT, and then the temporal and spatial characteristics of watershed can be revealed reasonably. Because the smallest computational units of SWAT and MODFLOW are hydrologic response units (HRUs) and cells respectively, the conversion between HRU and CELL, that is the interface of SWAT and MODFLOW models

  3. Computer modelling of the surface tension of the gas-liquid and liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2016-03-07

    This review presents the state of the art in molecular simulations of interfacial systems and of the calculation of the surface tension from the underlying intermolecular potential. We provide a short account of different methodological factors (size-effects, truncation procedures, long-range corrections and potential models) that can affect the results of the simulations. Accurate calculations are presented for the calculation of the surface tension as a function of the temperature, pressure and composition by considering the planar gas-liquid interface of a range of molecular fluids. In particular, we consider the challenging problems of reproducing the interfacial tension of salt solutions as a function of the salt molality; the simulations of spherical interfaces including the calculation of the sign and size of the Tolman length for a spherical droplet; the use of coarse-grained models in the calculation of the interfacial tension of liquid-liquid surfaces and the mesoscopic simulations of oil-water-surfactant interfacial systems.

  4. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paumel, K.; Moysan, J.; Chatain, D.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F.

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  5. The need to consider temporal variability when modelling exchange at the sediment-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.

    2011-01-01

    Most conceptual or numerical models of flows and processes at the sediment-water interface assume steady-state conditions and do not consider temporal variability. The steady-state assumption is required because temporal variability, if quantified at all, is usually determined on a seasonal or inter-annual scale. In order to design models that can incorporate finer-scale temporal resolution we first need to measure variability at a finer scale. Automated seepage meters that can measure flow across the sediment-water interface with temporal resolution of seconds to minutes were used in a variety of settings to characterize seepage response to rainfall, wind, and evapotranspiration. Results indicate that instantaneous seepage fluxes can be much larger than values commonly reported in the literature, although seepage does not always respond to hydrological processes. Additional study is needed to understand the reasons for the wide range and types of responses to these hydrologic and atmospheric events.

  6. Influence of thermal fluctuations on the geometry of interfaces of the quenched Ising model.

    PubMed

    Corberi, Federico; Lippiello, Eugenio; Zannetti, Marco

    2008-07-01

    We study the role of the quench temperature Tf in the phase-ordering kinetics of the Ising model with single spin flip in d=2,3 . Equilibrium interfaces are flat at Tf=0 , whereas at Tf>0 they are curved and rough (above the roughening temperature in d=3 ). We show, by means of scaling arguments and numerical simulations, that this geometrical difference is important for the phase-ordering kinetics as well. In particular, while the growth exponent z=2 of the size of domains L(t) approximately t 1/z is unaffected by Tf, other exponents related to the interface geometry take different values at Tf=0 or Tf>0 . For Tf>0 a crossover phenomenon is observed from an early stage where interfaces are still flat and the system behaves as at Tf=0 , to the asymptotic regime with curved interfaces characteristic of Tf>0 . Furthermore, it is shown that the roughening length, although subdominant with respect to L(t) , produces appreciable correction to scaling up to very long times in d=2 .

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