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Sample records for interface cell exposure

  1. Exposure of Mammalian Cells to Air-Pollutant Mixtures at the Air-Liquid Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been widely accepted that exposure of mammalian cells to air-pollutant mixtures at the air-liquid interface is a more realistic approach than exposing cell under submerged conditions. The VITROCELL systems, are commercially available systems for air-liquid interface expo...

  2. Isolation of mouse respiratory epithelial cells and exposure to experimental cigarette smoke at air liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hilaire C; Choi, Augustine M K; Ryter, Stefan W

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary epithelial cells can be isolated from the respiratory tract of mice and cultured at air-liquid interface (ALI) as a model of differentiated respiratory epithelium. A protocol is described for isolating and exposing these cells to mainstream cigarette smoke (CS), in order to study epithelial cell responses to CS exposure. The protocol consists of three parts: the isolation of airway epithelial cells from mouse trachea, the culturing of these cells at air-liquid interface (ALI) as fully differentiated epithelial cells, and the delivery of calibrated mainstream CS to these cells in culture. The ALI culture system allows the culture of respiratory epithelia under conditions that more closely resemble their physiological setting than ordinary liquid culture systems. The study of molecular and lung cellular responses to CS exposure is a critical component of understanding the impact of environmental air pollution on human health. Research findings in this area may ultimately contribute towards understanding the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other tobacco-related diseases, which represent major global health problems. PMID:21372793

  3. Exposure of silver-nanoparticles and silver-ions to lung cells in vitro at the air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to its antibacterial properties, silver (Ag) has been used in more consumer products than any other nanomaterial so far. Despite the promising advantages posed by using Ag-nanoparticles (NPs), their interaction with mammalian systems is currently not fully understood. An exposure route via inhalation is of primary concern for humans in an occupational setting. Aim of this study was therefore to investigate the potential adverse effects of aerosolised Ag-NPs using a human epithelial airway barrier model composed of A549, monocyte derived macrophage and dendritic cells cultured in vitro at the air-liquid interface. Cell cultures were exposed to 20 nm citrate-coated Ag-NPs with a deposition of 30 and 278 ng/cm2 respectively and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. To elucidate whether any effects of Ag-NPs are due to ionic effects, Ag-Nitrate (AgNO3) solutions were aerosolised at the same molecular mass concentrations. Results Agglomerates of Ag-NPs were detected at 24 h post exposure in vesicular structures inside cells but the cellular integrity was not impaired upon Ag-NP exposures. Minimal cytotoxicity, by measuring the release of lactate dehydrogenase, could only be detected following a higher concentrated AgNO3-solution. A release of pro-inflammatory markers TNF-α and IL-8 was neither observed upon Ag-NP and AgNO3 exposures as well as was not affected when cells were pre-stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Also, an induction of mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-8, could only be observed for the highest AgNO3 concentration alone or even significantly increased when pre-stimulated with LPS after 4 h. However, this effect disappeared after 24 h. Furthermore, oxidative stress markers (HMOX-1, SOD-1) were expressed after 4 h in a concentration dependent manner following AgNO3 exposures only. Conclusions With an experimental setup reflecting physiological exposure conditions in the human lung more realistic, the present study indicates that Ag

  4. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iro...

  5. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iron homeostas...

  6. Comet assay and air-liquid interface exposure system: a new combination to evaluate genotoxic effects of cigarette whole smoke in human lung cell lines.

    PubMed

    Weber, Susanne; Hebestreit, Marco; Wilms, Torsten; Conroy, Lynda L; Rodrigo, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    Over the past three decades, the genotoxic effects of cigarette smoke have generally been evaluated in non-human cell models after exposure to particulate phase, gas phase, or cigarette smoke condensate, rather than the whole smoke aerosol itself. In vitro setups using human cell lines and whole smoke exposure to mimic actual aerosol exposure should more accurately reflect human cigarette smoke exposure. We investigated the VITROCELL® 24 air-liquid interface exposure system in combination with the comet assay to assess DNA damage in two different human lung epithelial cell lines exposed to whole smoke. Results showed a repeatable and reproducible dose-response relationship between DNA damage and increased whole smoke dose in both cell lines. Thus, the combination of the comet assay with the VITROCELL® 24 represents a valuable new in vitro test system to screen and assess DNA damage in human lung cells exposed to whole smoke.

  7. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Cell Exposure Systems for in Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared various in vitro exposure systems for their ability to expose cells to particles and gases. The systems tested use different mechanisms to deliver multi-pollutants to the cells: diffusion, sedimentation, thermophoresis (THP) and electrostatic precipitation (ESP). Vari...

  8. Responses of differentiated primary human lung epithelial cells to exposure to diesel exhaust at an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Seagrave, JeanClare; Dunaway, Sandy; McDonald, Jacob D; Mauderly, Joe L; Hayden, Patrick; Stidley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    In vitro responses of potential target cell types to air pollutants under physiological conditions may be useful in understanding the health effects of air pollution exposure. The study evaluated responses of human primary airway epithelial cells to diesel exhaust (DE). Cultures of cells from 3 donors, differentiated by culture on membranes with the apical surfaces exposed to the atmosphere, were exposed to filtered air or DE. Some exposure-related effects were similar among donors, whereas others were affected by the donor, consistent with human population heterogeneity. This model may be useful for mechanistic and comparative toxicology studies. PMID:17364910

  9. The CULTEX RFS: A Comprehensive Technical Approach for the In Vitro Exposure of Airway Epithelial Cells to the Particulate Matter at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Hochrainer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The EU Regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) demands the implementation of alternative methods for analyzing the hazardous effects of chemicals including particulate formulations. In the field of inhalation toxicology, a variety of in vitro models have been developed for such studies. To simulate the in vivo situation, an adequate exposure device is necessary for the direct exposure of cultivated lung cells at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The CULTEX RFS fulfills these requirements and has been optimized for the exposure of cells to atomized suspensions, gases, and volatile compounds as well as micro- and nanosized particles. This study provides information on the construction and functional aspects of the exposure device. By using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, the technical design was optimized to realize a stable, reproducible, and homogeneous deposition of particles. The efficiency of the exposure procedure is demonstrated by exposing A549 cells dose dependently to lactose monohydrate, copper(II) sulfate, copper(II) oxide, and micro- and nanoparticles. All copper compounds induced cytotoxic effects, most pronounced for soluble copper(II) sulfate. Micro- and nanosized copper(II) oxide also showed a dose-dependent decrease in the cell viability, whereby the nanosized particles decreased the metabolic activity of the cells more severely. PMID:23509768

  10. Cellular Dose of Partly Soluble Cu Particle Aerosols at the Air–Liquid Interface Using an In Vitro Lung Cell Exposure System

    PubMed Central

    Cronholm, Pontus; Karlsson, Hanna L.; Midander, Klara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Möller, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background There is currently a need to develop and test in vitro systems for predicting the toxicity of nanoparticles. One challenge is to determine the actual cellular dose of nanoparticles after exposure. Methods In this study, human epithelial lung cells (A549) were exposed to airborne Cu particles at the air–liquid interface (ALI). The cellular dose was determined for two different particle sizes at different deposition conditions, including constant and pulsed Cu aerosol flow. Results Airborne polydisperse particles with a geometric mean diameter (GMD) of 180 nm [geometric standard deviation (GSD) 1.5, concentration 105 particles/mL] deposited at the ALI yielded a cellular dose of 0.4–2.6 μg/cm2 at pulsed flow and 1.6–7.6 μg/cm2 at constant flow. Smaller polydisperse particles in the nanoregime (GMD 80 nm, GSD 1.5, concentration 107 particles/mL) resulted in a lower cellular dose of 0.01–0.05 μg/cm2 at pulsed flow, whereas no deposition was observed at constant flow. Exposure experiments with and without cells showed that the Cu particles were partly dissolved upon deposition on cells and in contact with medium. Conclusions Different cellular doses were obtained for the different Cu particle sizes (generated with different methods). Furthermore, the cellular doses were affected by the flow conditions in the cell exposure system and the solubility of Cu. The cellular doses of Cu presented here are the amount of Cu that remained on the cells after completion of an experiment. As Cu particles were partly dissolved, Cu (a nonnegligible contribution) was, in addition, present and analyzed in the nourishing medium present beneath the cells. This study presents cellular doses induced by Cu particles and demonstrates difficulties with deposition of nanoparticles at the ALI and of partially soluble particles. PMID:22889118

  11. Silica nanoparticles are less toxic to human lung cells when deposited at the air–liquid interface compared to conventional submerged exposure

    PubMed Central

    Saathoff, Harald; Leisner, Thomas; Al-Rawi, Marco; Simon, Michael; Seemann, Gunnar; Dössel, Olaf; Mülhopt, Sonja; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Fritsch-Decker, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Investigations on adverse biological effects of nanoparticles (NPs) in the lung by in vitro studies are usually performed under submerged conditions where NPs are suspended in cell culture media. However, the behaviour of nanoparticles such as agglomeration and sedimentation in such complex suspensions is difficult to control and hence the deposited cellular dose often remains unknown. Moreover, the cellular responses to NPs under submerged culture conditions might differ from those observed at physiological settings at the air–liquid interface. Results: In order to avoid problems because of an altered behaviour of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and to mimic a more realistic situation relevant for inhalation, human A549 lung epithelial cells were exposed to aerosols at the air–liquid interphase (ALI) by using the ALI deposition apparatus (ALIDA). The application of an electrostatic field allowed for particle deposition efficiencies that were higher by a factor of more than 20 compared to the unmodified VITROCELL deposition system. We studied two different amorphous silica nanoparticles (particles produced by flame synthesis and particles produced in suspension by the Stöber method). Aerosols with well-defined particle sizes and concentrations were generated by using a commercial electrospray generator or an atomizer. Only the electrospray method allowed for the generation of an aerosol containing monodisperse NPs. However, the deposited mass and surface dose of the particles was too low to induce cellular responses. Therefore, we generated the aerosol with an atomizer which supplied agglomerates and thus allowed a particle deposition with a three orders of magnitude higher mass and of surface doses on lung cells that induced significant biological effects. The deposited dose was estimated and independently validated by measurements using either transmission electron microscopy or, in case of labelled NPs, by fluorescence analyses

  12. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Exposure Devices for In Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to atmospheric pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of attached cells submerged in liquid medium. However, there is still limited understanding of the ideal ALI device design features that permit reproducible a...

  13. Phenotypic modification of human airway epithelial cells in air-liquid interface culture induced by exposure to the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK).

    PubMed

    Carson, Johnny L; Brighton, Luisa E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-04-01

    The nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a potent tobacco-specific carcinogen. We used an air-liquid interface epithelial cell culture system to model changes associated with NNK exposure relative to pathologies documented in human tobacco-related illnesses. Although in vitro systems exhibit certain limitations, they often offer accentuation of subtle pathologies. While the distribution of cell types in control cultures typically favors the ciliated cell phenotype, NNK-exposed cultures transitioned to non-ciliated cell phenotypes as well as reflecting features consistent with squamous metaplasia. We conclude that NNK impacts normal growth and differentiation of human airway epithelium in a short interval of time in vitro.

  14. Film bonded fuel cell interface configuration

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. A multi-layer arrangement for the interface provides bridging electrical contact with a hot-pressed resin filling the void space.

  15. Longitudinal Hierarchy Co3O4 Mesocrystals with High-dense Exposure Facets and Anisotropic Interfaces for Direct-Ethanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Diab; El-Safty, Sherif A; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Elmarakbi, Ahmed; Shenashen, Mohamed A; Sakai, Masaru

    2016-04-14

    Novel electrodes are needed for direct ethanol fuel cells with improved quality. Hierarchical engineering can produce catalysts composed of mesocrystals with many exposed active planes and multi-diffused voids. Here we report a simple, one-pot, hydrothermal method for fabricating Co3O4/carbon/substrate electrodes that provides control over the catalyst mesocrystal morphology (i.e., corn tubercle pellets or banana clusters oriented along nanotube domains, or layered lamina or multiple cantilevered sheets). These morphologies afforded catalysts with a high density of exposed active facets, a diverse range of mesopores in the cage interior, a window architecture, and vertical alignment to the substrate, which improved efficiency in an ethanol electrooxidation reaction compared with a conventional platinum/carbon electrode. On the atomic scale, the longitudinally aligned architecture of the Co3O4 mesocrystals resulted in exposed low- and high-index single and interface surfaces that had improved electron transport and diffusion compared with currently used electrodes.

  16. Longitudinal Hierarchy Co3O4 Mesocrystals with High-dense Exposure Facets and Anisotropic Interfaces for Direct-Ethanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassen, Diab; El-Safty, Sherif A.; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Elmarakbi, Ahmed; Shenashen, Mohamed. A.; Sakai, Masaru

    2016-04-01

    Novel electrodes are needed for direct ethanol fuel cells with improved quality. Hierarchical engineering can produce catalysts composed of mesocrystals with many exposed active planes and multi-diffused voids. Here we report a simple, one-pot, hydrothermal method for fabricating Co3O4/carbon/substrate electrodes that provides control over the catalyst mesocrystal morphology (i.e., corn tubercle pellets or banana clusters oriented along nanotube domains, or layered lamina or multiple cantilevered sheets). These morphologies afforded catalysts with a high density of exposed active facets, a diverse range of mesopores in the cage interior, a window architecture, and vertical alignment to the substrate, which improved efficiency in an ethanol electrooxidation reaction compared with a conventional platinum/carbon electrode. On the atomic scale, the longitudinally aligned architecture of the Co3O4 mesocrystals resulted in exposed low- and high-index single and interface surfaces that had improved electron transport and diffusion compared with currently used electrodes.

  17. Longitudinal Hierarchy Co3O4 Mesocrystals with High-dense Exposure Facets and Anisotropic Interfaces for Direct-Ethanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Diab; El-Safty, Sherif A; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Elmarakbi, Ahmed; Shenashen, Mohamed A; Sakai, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Novel electrodes are needed for direct ethanol fuel cells with improved quality. Hierarchical engineering can produce catalysts composed of mesocrystals with many exposed active planes and multi-diffused voids. Here we report a simple, one-pot, hydrothermal method for fabricating Co3O4/carbon/substrate electrodes that provides control over the catalyst mesocrystal morphology (i.e., corn tubercle pellets or banana clusters oriented along nanotube domains, or layered lamina or multiple cantilevered sheets). These morphologies afforded catalysts with a high density of exposed active facets, a diverse range of mesopores in the cage interior, a window architecture, and vertical alignment to the substrate, which improved efficiency in an ethanol electrooxidation reaction compared with a conventional platinum/carbon electrode. On the atomic scale, the longitudinally aligned architecture of the Co3O4 mesocrystals resulted in exposed low- and high-index single and interface surfaces that had improved electron transport and diffusion compared with currently used electrodes. PMID:27075551

  18. Longitudinal Hierarchy Co3O4 Mesocrystals with High-dense Exposure Facets and Anisotropic Interfaces for Direct-Ethanol Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hassen, Diab; El-Safty, Sherif A.; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Elmarakbi, Ahmed; Shenashen, Mohamed. A.; Sakai, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Novel electrodes are needed for direct ethanol fuel cells with improved quality. Hierarchical engineering can produce catalysts composed of mesocrystals with many exposed active planes and multi-diffused voids. Here we report a simple, one-pot, hydrothermal method for fabricating Co3O4/carbon/substrate electrodes that provides control over the catalyst mesocrystal morphology (i.e., corn tubercle pellets or banana clusters oriented along nanotube domains, or layered lamina or multiple cantilevered sheets). These morphologies afforded catalysts with a high density of exposed active facets, a diverse range of mesopores in the cage interior, a window architecture, and vertical alignment to the substrate, which improved efficiency in an ethanol electrooxidation reaction compared with a conventional platinum/carbon electrode. On the atomic scale, the longitudinally aligned architecture of the Co3O4 mesocrystals resulted in exposed low- and high-index single and interface surfaces that had improved electron transport and diffusion compared with currently used electrodes. PMID:27075551

  19. Ciliatoxicity in human primary bronchiolar epithelial cells after repeated exposure at the air-liquid interface with native mainstream smoke of K3R4F cigarettes with and without charcoal filter.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Scheffler, Stefanie; Ito, Shigeaki; Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Emura, Makito

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance is the primary physical mechanism to protect the human airways against harmful effects of inhaled particles. Environmental factors play a significant role in the impairment of this defense mechanism, whereas cigarette smoke is discussed to be one of the clinically most important causes. Impaired mucociliary clearance in smokers has been connected to changes in ciliated cells such as decreased numbers, altered structure and beat frequency. Clinical studies have shown that cilia length is reduced in healthy smokers and that long-term exposure to cigarette smoke leads to reduced numbers of ciliated cells in mice. We present an in vitro model of primary normal human bronchiolar epithelial (NHBE) cells with in vivo like morphology to study the influence of cigarette mainstream smoke on ciliated cells. We exposed mucociliary differentiated cultures repeatedly to non-toxic concentrations of mainstream cigarette smoke (4 cigarettes, 5 days/week, 8 repetitions in total) at the air-liquid interface. Charcoal filter tipped cigarettes were compared to those being equipped with standard cellulose acetate filters. Histopathological analyses of the exposed cultures showed a reduction of cilia bearing cells, shortening of existing cilia and finally disappearance of all cilia in cigarette smoke exposed cells. In cultures exposed to charcoal filtered cigarette smoke, little changes in cilia length were seen after four exposure repetitions, but those effects were reversed after a two day recovery period. Those differences indicate that volatile organic compounds, being removed by the charcoal filter tip, affect primary bronchiolar epithelial cells concerning their cilia formation and function comparable with the in vivo situation. In conclusion, our in vitro model presents a valuable tool to study air-borne ciliatoxic compounds.

  20. Film bonded fuel cell interface configuration

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to improved elements for use in fuel cell stacks, and more particularly, to a stack having a corrosion-resistant, electrally conductive, fluid-impervious interface member therein.

  1. Optimization of an air–liquid interface exposure system for assessing toxicity of airborne nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Latvala, Siiri; Hedberg, Jonas; Möller, Lennart; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Karlsson, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of refined toxicological methods is currently needed for characterizing the risks of airborne nanoparticles (NPs) to human health. To mimic pulmonary exposure, we have developed an air–liquid interface (ALI) exposure system for direct deposition of airborne NPs on to lung cell cultures. Compared to traditional submerged systems, this allows more realistic exposure conditions for characterizing toxicological effects induced by airborne NPs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the deposition of silver NPs (AgNPs) is affected by different conditions of the ALI system. Additionally, the viability and metabolic activity of A549 cells was studied following AgNP exposure. Particle deposition increased markedly with increasing aerosol flow rate and electrostatic field strength. The highest amount of deposited particles (2.2 μg cm–2) at cell‐free conditions following 2 h exposure was observed for the highest flow rate (390 ml min–1) and the strongest electrostatic field (±2 kV). This was estimated corresponding to deposition efficiency of 94%. Cell viability was not affected after 2 h exposure to clean air in the ALI system. Cells exposed to AgNPs (0.45 and 0.74 μg cm–2) showed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced metabolic activities (64 and 46%, respectively). Our study shows that the ALI exposure system can be used for generating conditions that were more realistic for in vitro exposures, which enables improved mechanistic and toxicological studies of NPs in contact with human lung cells.Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26935862

  2. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  3. Cell instructive microporous scaffolds through interface engineering

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Ngamkham, Kamolchanok; Engler, Adam J.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The design of novel biomaterials for regenerative medicine requires incorporation of well-defined physical and chemical properties that mimic the native extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we report the synthesis and characterisation of porous foams prepared by high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templating using amphiphilic copolymers that act as surfactants during the HIPE process. We combine different copolymers exploiting oil-water interface confined phase separation to engineer the surface topology of foam pores with nanoscopic domains of cell inert and active chemistries mimicking native matrix. We further demonstrate how proteins and hMSCs adhere in a domain specific manner. PMID:23163574

  4. Process for making film-bonded fuel cell interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1990-07-03

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. A multi-layer arrangement for the interface provides bridging electrical contact with a hot-pressed resin filling the void space.

  5. Plastic solar cell interface and morphological characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guralnick, Brett W.

    Plastic solar cell research has become an intense field of study considering these devices may be lightweight, flexible and reduce the cost of photovoltaic devices. The active layer of plastic solar cells are a combination of two organic components which blend to form an internal morphology. Due to the poor electrical transport properties of the organic components it is important to understand how the morphology forms in order to engineer these materials for increased efficiency. The focus of this thesis is a detailed study of the interfaces between the plastic solar cell layers and the morphology of the active layer. The system studied in detail is a blend of P3HT and PCBM that acts as the primary absorber, which is the electron donor, and the electron acceptor, respectively. The key morphological findings are, while thermal annealing increases the crystallinity parallel to the substrate, the morphology is largely unchanged following annealing. The deposition and mixing conditions of the bulk heterojunction from solution control the starting morphology. The spin coating speed, concentration, solvent type, and solution mixing time are all critical variables in the formation of the bulk heterojunction. In addition, including the terminals or inorganic layers in the analysis is critical because the inorganic surface properties influence the morphology. Charge transfer in the device occurs at the material interfaces, and a highly resistive transparent conducting oxide layer limits device performance. It was discovered that the electron blocking layer between the transparent conducting oxide and the bulk heterojunction is compromised following annealing. The electron acceptor material can diffuse into this layer, a location which does not benefit device performance. Additionally, the back contact deposition is important since the organic material can be damaged by the thermal evaporation of Aluminum, typically used for plastic solar cells. Depositing a thin thermal and

  6. Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1986-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

  7. In situ Plasma Exposure for Improved Interfaces in Atomic Layer Deposited Dielectrics on GaSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppalt, Laura; Cleveland, Erin; Champlain, James; Boos, Brad; Prokes, Sharka; Bennett, Brian

    2015-09-01

    Among compound semiconductors, GaSb possesses one of the highest hole mobilities, making it a promising candidate for p-channel devices for III-V-based MOS technologies. However, the requirement of a low-defect interface between the GaSb device layer and gate dielectric represents a formidable hurdle to full MOS implementation. Native oxidation of the GaSb surface typically results in a highly defective interface, trapping charge and preventing free Fermi level movement. Wet chemical approaches to removing the native oxide often lead to mixed, irreproducible results and fail to prevent rapid reoxidation upon atmospheric exposure. As an alternative to wet chemical treatments, we have investigated the use of in-situ H2/Ar plasma for improving the interface between GaSb and atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectrics. We have found that by exposing the native-oxide-covered GaSb to mild H2/Ar plasma immediately prior to ALD of high-k dielectrics, one can decrease the density of interface states by two orders of magnitude, unpinning the Fermi level and enabling carrier modulation. The effectiveness of the treatment can be tuned by varying the RF plasma power, the plasma exposure time, or the substrate temperature during exposure, with higher powers, longer exposures, and higher temperatures (up to 300C) resulting in improved electrical interfaces.

  8. Genome exposure and regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Webb, P; Johnson, R

    1998-09-01

    A method of measurement of exposed DNA (i.e. hypersensitive to DNase I hydrolysis) as opposed to sequestered (hydrolysis resistant) DNA in isolated nuclei of mammalian cells is described. While cell cultures exhibit some differences in behavior from day to day, the general pattern of exposed and sequestered DNA is satisfactorily reproducible and agrees with results previously obtained by other methods. The general pattern of DNA hydrolysis exhibited by all cells tested consists of a curve which at first rises sharply with increasing DNase I, and then becomes almost horizontal, indicating that roughly about half of the nuclear DNA is highly sequestered. In 4 cases where transformed cells (Raszip6, CHO, HL60 and PC12) were compared, each with its more normal homolog (3T3, and the reverse transformed versions of CHO, HL60 and PC12, achieved by dibutyryl cyclic AMP [DBcAMP], retinoic acid, and nerve growth factor [NGF] respectively), the transformed form displayed less genome exposure than the nontransformed form at every DNase I dose tested. When Ca++ was excluded from the hydrolysis medium in both the Raszip6-3T3 and the CHO-DBcAMP systems, the normal cell forms lost their increased exposure reverting to that of the transformed forms. Therefore Ca++ appears necessary for maintenance of the DNA in the more highly exposed state characteristic of the nontransformed phenotype. LiCl increases the DNA exposure of all transformed cells tested. Dextran sulfate and heparin each can increase the DNA exposure of several different cancers. Colcemid prevents the increase of exposure of CHO by DBcAMP but it must be administered before or simultaneously with the latter compound. Measurements on mouse biopsies reveal large differences in exposure in different normal tissues. Thus, the exposure from adult liver cells was greater than that of adult brain, but both fetal liver and fetal brain had significantly greater exposure than their adult counterparts. Exposure in normal human

  9. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  10. NANOPATTERNED INTERFACES FOR CONTROLLING CELL BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, KEVIN; DeQUACH, JESSICA A.; CHRISTMAN, KAREN L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that microscale changes to surface chemistry and topography affect cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and gene expression. More recently, studies have begun to examine cell behavior interactions with structures on the nanoscale since in vivo, cells recognize and adhere to cell adhesion receptors that are spatially organized on this scale. These studies have been enabled through various fabrication methods, many of which were initially developed for the semiconductor industry. This review explores cell responses to a variety of controlled topographical and biochemical cues using an assortment of nanoscale fabrication methods in order to elucidate which pattern dimensions are beneficial for controlling cell adhesion and differentiation. PMID:25383101

  11. Atomic structure of interface states in silicon heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    George, B M; Behrends, J; Schnegg, A; Schulze, T F; Fehr, M; Korte, L; Rech, B; Lips, K; Rohrmüller, M; Rauls, E; Schmidt, W G; Gerstmann, U

    2013-03-29

    Combining orientation dependent electrically detected magnetic resonance and g tensor calculations based on density functional theory we assign microscopic structures to paramagnetic states involved in spin-dependent recombination at the interface of hydrogenated amorphous silicon crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. We find that (i) the interface exhibits microscopic roughness, (ii) the electronic structure of the interface defects is mainly determined by c-Si, (iii) we identify the microscopic origin of the conduction band tail state in the a-Si:H layer, and (iv) present a detailed recombination mechanism.

  12. Enhanced Invasion of Metastatic Cancer Cells via Extracellular Matrix Interface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangrui; Liang, Long; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Liyu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell invasion is a major component of metastasis and is responsible for extensive cell diffusion into and major destruction of tissues. Cells exhibit complex invasion modes, including a variety of collective behaviors. This phenomenon results in the structural heterogeneity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in tissues. Here, we systematically investigated the environmental heterogeneity facilitating tumor cell invasion via a combination of in vitro cell migration experiments and computer simulations. Specifically, we constructed an ECM microenvironment in a microfabricated biochip and successfully created a three-dimensional (3D) funnel-like matrigel interface inside. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the interface was at the interior defects of the nano-scale molecular anisotropic orientation and the localized structural density variations in the matrigel. Our results, particularly the correlation of the collective migration pattern with the geometric features of the funnel-like interface, indicate that this heterogeneous in vitro ECM structure strongly guides and promotes aggressive cell invasion in the rigid matrigel space. A cellular automaton model was proposed based on our experimental observations, and the associated quantitative analysis indicated that cell invasion was initiated and controlled by several mechanisms, including microenvironment heterogeneity, long-range cell-cell homotype and gradient-driven directional cellular migration. Our work shows the feasibility of constructing a complex and heterogeneous in vitro 3D ECM microenvironment that mimics the in vivo environment. Moreover, our results indicate that ECM heterogeneity is essential in controlling collective cell invasive behaviors and therefore determining metastasis efficiency. PMID:25706718

  13. Interface Directed Self Assembly of Cell-Laden Microgels

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian, Behnam; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Nichol, Jason W.; Khabiry, Masoud; Hancock, Matthew J.; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Cell-laden hydrogels show great promise for creating engineered tissues. However, a major shortcoming with these systems has been the inability to fabricate structures with controlled microscale features on a biologically relevant length scale. Here we demonstrate a rapid method for creating centimeter-scale, cell-laden hydrogels through the assembly of shape-controlled microgels. This was achieved by using an approach that uses the liquid-air interface of a hydrophobic solution to drive the assembly of microgels. Cell-laden microgels of specific shapes were randomly placed on the surface of a high density, hydrophobic solution and induced to aggregate and were subsequently crosslinked into macroscale tissue-like structures. The resultant assemblies were cell-laden hydrogel sheets consisting of tightly-packed ordered microgel units. In addition, a hierarchical approach created complex multi-gel building blocks which were then assembled into tissues with precise spatial control over the cell distribution. These data demonstrate that forces at an air-liquid interface can be used to self-assemble spatially controllable, co-cultured tissue-like structures. PMID:20358531

  14. Updating the Tools Used to Estimate Space Radiation Exposures for Operations: Codes, Models and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapp, E.; Shelfer, T.; Semones, E.; Johnson, A.; Weyland, M.; Golightly, M.; Smith, G.; Dardano, C.

    In order to estimate the exposure to a crew in space, there are three essential steps to be performed: first, the ambient radiation environment at the vehicle must be characterized; second, the mass distribution properties of the vehicle, including the crewmembers themselves must be developed, and third a model of the interactions of space radiations with matter must be employed in order to characterize the radiation field at the dose point of interest. The Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at the NASA, Johnson Space Center carries the primary responsibility for the operational radiation protection support function associated with manned space flight. In order to provide support during the various planning, execution, and analysis/recording phase activities associated with a given mission, tools have been developed to allow rapid, repeatable calculations of exposure on orbit. The majority of these tools implicitly contain numerical approximations, or other limitations included as a result of either hardware limitations (i.e. processor clock speed, RAM, etc.) present at the time of inception and initial development, or of limitations in scope inherent in the programming language(s) and version(s) of the time. Over the last ten years, prevalent desktop/daily use hardware has increased in speed by approximately three orders of magnitude, and there has been a concurrent improvement in the capacity, scope, and interoperability of programming languages. These improvements in available technology make possible updates to the tools used in exposure evaluation. Obviously, one expects an increase in speed purely as a result of executing existing algorithms on faster hardware. Beyond this, however, removal of some system constraints allows for a re-design of the tool suite in such a way as to provide for greater flexibility, an expanded scope of calculation, the addition of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs), improved calculation stability and precision, and an additional

  15. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  16. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  17. Tunable high aspect ratio polymer nanostructures for cell interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Cooil, Simon P.; Wells, Justin W.; Sikorski, Pawel

    2015-04-01

    Nanoscale topographies and chemical patterns can be used as synthetic cell interfaces with a range of applications including the study and control of cellular processes. Herein, we describe the fabrication of high aspect ratio nanostructures using electron beam lithography in the epoxy-based polymer SU-8. We show how nanostructure geometry, position and fluorescence properties can be tuned, allowing flexible device design. Further, thiol-epoxide reactions were developed to give effective and specific modification of SU-8 surface chemistry. SU-8 nanostructures were made directly on glass cover slips, enabling the use of high resolution optical techniques such as live-cell confocal, total internal reflection and 3D structured illumination microscopy to investigate cell interactions with the nanostructures. Details of cell adherence and spreading, plasma membrane conformation and actin organization in response to high aspect ratio nanopillars and nanolines were investigated. The versatile structural and chemical properties combined with the high resolution cell imaging capabilities of this system are an important step towards the better understanding and control of cell interactions with nanomaterials.Nanoscale topographies and chemical patterns can be used as synthetic cell interfaces with a range of applications including the study and control of cellular processes. Herein, we describe the fabrication of high aspect ratio nanostructures using electron beam lithography in the epoxy-based polymer SU-8. We show how nanostructure geometry, position and fluorescence properties can be tuned, allowing flexible device design. Further, thiol-epoxide reactions were developed to give effective and specific modification of SU-8 surface chemistry. SU-8 nanostructures were made directly on glass cover slips, enabling the use of high resolution optical techniques such as live-cell confocal, total internal reflection and 3D structured illumination microscopy to investigate cell

  18. A dynamic system for single and repeated exposure of airway epithelial cells to gaseous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Pierre Edouard; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Zheng, Wuyin; Casset, Anne; Pons, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    In vitro models are promising approaches to investigate the adverse effects and the mode of action of air pollutants on the respiratory tract. We designed a dynamic system that allows the single or repeated exposure of cultured cells to two major indoor air gaseous pollutants, formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), alone or as a mixture. In this system, the Calu-3 human bronchial epithelial cell line was exposed at the air-liquid interface (ALI) or submerged by culture medium to synthetic air or to target concentrations of HCHO and/or NO2 once or on 4 consecutive days before assessment of cell viability and necrosis, IL-6 and IL-8 release and trans-epithelial electrical resistance. Our data showed that whereas the ALI method can be used for single short-term exposures only, the submerged method provides the possibility to expose Calu-3 cells in a repeated manner. As well, we found that repeated exposures of the cells to HCHO and NO2 at concentrations that can be found indoors triggered a significant decrease in cell metabolism and an increase in IL-8 release that were not evoked by a single exposure. Thus, our work highlights the fact that the development of systems and methods that allow repeated exposures of cultured cells to gaseous compounds in mixtures is of major interest to evaluate the impact of air pollution on the respiratory tract.

  19. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Healy, Kevin E

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells' focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces. PMID:26213899

  20. Interface engineering for efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shivanna, Ravichandran; Narayan, K. S. E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in; Rajaram, Sridhar E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate the role of zinc oxide (ZnO) morphology and addition of an acceptor interlayer to achieve high efficiency fullerene-free bulk heterojunction inverted organic solar cells. Nanopatterning of the ZnO buffer layer enhances the effective light absorption in the active layer, and the insertion of a twisted perylene acceptor layer planarizes and decreases the electron extraction barrier. Along with an increase in current homogeneity, the reduced work function difference and selective transport of electrons prevent the accumulation of charges and decrease the electron-hole recombination at the interface. These factors enable an overall increase of efficiency to 4.6%, which is significant for a fullerene-free solution-processed organic solar cell.

  1. High performance organic solar cells with interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mi Hyae

    Polymer solar cells are considered a promising candidate for renewable energy with low-cost and high volume production capability. The main focus of this dissertation is to investigate the several approaches for improving the efficiency of polymer solar cells. These approaches include understanding of the physics, operation mechanisms, materials and device engineering and optimization of fabrication processes. A typical polymer solar cell has a sandwiched structure with anode, active material, and cathode. To improve device performances, it is often to introduce interfacial layers between the anode and cathode interfaces. These interfacial layers can be conductive polymers, metal oxides, and other nano-structure materials. In this thesis, we focus on a novel metaloxide derivative. Synthesizing metal oxides through the sol--gel process provides a convenient way of forming nanostructured wide band gap semiconductors. In this dissertation, a doped metal oxide functional interfacial layer is introduced for achieving high performance organic electronic devices. The role of dopants is found to modify the electronic property of the metal oxide. Polymer solar cells and polymer light emitting devices with this functional layer exhibited excellent characteristics. The improved device performance is attributed to an improved polymer/metal contact, more efficient electron extraction, and better hole blocking properties. Another aspect of polymer solar cells is the potential to double the efficiency by using the tandem structure. Hence, the research on the understanding of tandem structure has become one of the frontiers in the field of organic/polymer photovoltaics. This dissertation discusses the role of the inter-connection layer in the tandem cell. We focus on the understanding and improvement of the interfaces within the interconnection layer, and its role for charge collection and recombination. Based on this understanding, high efficiency tandem cell with a power

  2. A model of human nasal epithelial cells adapted for direct and repeated exposure to airborne pollutants.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Achard, Sophie; Loret, Thomas; Desauziers, Valérie; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie

    2014-08-17

    Airway epithelium lining the nasal cavity plays a pivotal role in respiratory tract defense and protection mechanisms. Air pollution induces alterations linked to airway diseases such as asthma. Only very few in vitro studies to date have succeeded in reproducing physiological conditions relevant to cellular type and chronic atmospheric pollution exposure. We therefore, set up an in vitro model of human Airway Epithelial Cells of Nasal origin (hAECN) close to real human cell functionality, specifically adapted to study the biological effects of exposure to indoor gaseous pollution at the environmental level. hAECN were exposed under air-liquid interface, one, two, or three-times at 24 h intervals for 1 h, to air or formaldehyde (200 μg/m(3)), an indoor air gaseous pollutant. All experiments were ended at day 4, when both cellular viability and cytokine production were assessed. Optimal adherence and confluence of cells were obtained 96 h after cell seeding onto collagen IV-precoated insert. Direct and repeated exposure to formaldehyde did not produce any cellular damage or IL-6 production change, although weak lower IL-8 production was observed only after the third exposure. Our model is significantly better than previous ones due to cell type and the repeated exposure protocol.

  3. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  4. Multisensory Interface for 5D Stem Cell Image Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Koerner, Michael; Wait, Eric; Winter, Mark; Bjornsson, Chris; Kokovay, Erzsebet; Wang, Yue; Goderie, Susan K; Temple, Sally; Cohen, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Biological imaging of live cell and tissue using 3D microscopy is able to capture time-lapse image sequences showing multiple molecular markers labeling different biological structures simultaneously. In order to analyze this complex multi-dimensional image sequence data, there is a need for automated quantitative algorithms, and for methods to visualize and interact with both the data and the analytical results. Traditional computational human input devices such as the keyboard and mouse are no longer adequate for complex tasks such as manipulating and navigating 3+ dimensional volumes. In this paper, we have developed a new interaction system for interfacing with big data sets using the human visual system together with touch, force and audio feedback. This system includes real-time dynamic 3D visualization, haptic interaction via exoskeletal glove, and tonal auditory components that seamlessly create an immersive environment for efficient qualitative analysis. PMID:25570174

  5. Interface and Composition Analysis on Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Matteocci, Fabio; Busby, Yan; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques; Divitini, Giorgio; Cacovich, Stefania; Ducati, Caterina; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    Organometal halide (hybrid) perovskite solar cells have been fabricated following four different deposition procedures and investigated in order to find correlations between the solar cell characteristics/performance and their structure and composition as determined by combining depth-resolved imaging with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The interface quality is found to be strongly affected by the perovskite deposition procedure, and in particular from the environment where the conversion of the starting precursors into the final perovskite is performed (air, nitrogen, or vacuum). The conversion efficiency of the precursors into the hybrid perovskite layer is compared between the different solar cells by looking at the ToF-SIMS intensities of the characteristic molecular fragments from the perovskite and the precursor materials. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the STEM confirms the macroscopic ToF-SIMS findings and allows elemental mapping with nanometer resolution. Clear evidence for iodine diffusion has been observed and related to the fabrication procedure.

  6. Interface and Composition Analysis on Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Matteocci, Fabio; Busby, Yan; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques; Divitini, Giorgio; Cacovich, Stefania; Ducati, Caterina; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    Organometal halide (hybrid) perovskite solar cells have been fabricated following four different deposition procedures and investigated in order to find correlations between the solar cell characteristics/performance and their structure and composition as determined by combining depth-resolved imaging with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The interface quality is found to be strongly affected by the perovskite deposition procedure, and in particular from the environment where the conversion of the starting precursors into the final perovskite is performed (air, nitrogen, or vacuum). The conversion efficiency of the precursors into the hybrid perovskite layer is compared between the different solar cells by looking at the ToF-SIMS intensities of the characteristic molecular fragments from the perovskite and the precursor materials. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the STEM confirms the macroscopic ToF-SIMS findings and allows elemental mapping with nanometer resolution. Clear evidence for iodine diffusion has been observed and related to the fabrication procedure. PMID:26523427

  7. A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable Brain–Machine Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.; Kedzierski, Jakub T.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing steady-state power and up to peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, employing semiconductor fabrication techniques, and is therefore well suited for manufacture together with integrated circuits on a single silicon wafer. Thus, it can help enable implantable microelectronic systems with long-lifetime power sources that harvest energy from their surrounds. The fuel reactions are mediated by robust, solid state catalysts. Glucose is oxidized at the nanostructured surface of an activated platinum anode. Oxygen is reduced to water at the surface of a self-assembled network of single-walled carbon nanotubes, embedded in a Nafion film that forms the cathode and is exposed to the biological environment. The catalytic electrodes are separated by a Nafion membrane. The availability of fuel cell reactants, oxygen and glucose, only as a mixture in the physiologic environment, has traditionally posed a design challenge: Net current production requires oxidation and reduction to occur separately and selectively at the anode and cathode, respectively, to prevent electrochemical short circuits. Our fuel cell is configured in a half-open geometry that shields the anode while exposing the cathode, resulting in an oxygen gradient that strongly favors oxygen reduction at the cathode. Glucose reaches the shielded anode by diffusing through the nanotube mesh, which does not catalyze glucose oxidation, and the Nafion layers, which are permeable to small neutral and cationic species. We demonstrate computationally that the natural recirculation of cerebrospinal fluid around the human brain theoretically permits glucose energy harvesting at a rate on the order of at least 1 mW with no adverse physiologic effects. Low-power brain–machine interfaces can thus potentially benefit from having their implanted units powered or recharged by glucose fuel cells. PMID

  8. Culturing of Human Nasal Epithelial Cells at the Air Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.; Carson, Johnny L.; Fischer, William A.; Jaspers, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    In vitro models using human primary epithelial cells are essential in understanding key functions of the respiratory epithelium in the context of microbial infections or inhaled agents. Direct comparisons of cells obtained from diseased populations allow us to characterize different phenotypes and dissect the underlying mechanisms mediating changes in epithelial cell function. Culturing epithelial cells from the human tracheobronchial region has been well documented, but is limited by the availability of human lung tissue or invasiveness associated with obtaining the bronchial brushes biopsies. Nasal epithelial cells are obtained through much less invasive superficial nasal scrape biopsies and subjects can be biopsied multiple times with no significant side effects. Additionally, the nose is the entry point to the respiratory system and therefore one of the first sites to be exposed to any kind of air-borne stressor, such as microbial agents, pollutants, or allergens. Briefly, nasal epithelial cells obtained from human volunteers are expanded on coated tissue culture plates, and then transferred onto cell culture inserts. Upon reaching confluency, cells continue to be cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI), for several weeks, which creates more physiologically relevant conditions. The ALI culture condition uses defined media leading to a differentiated epithelium that exhibits morphological and functional characteristics similar to the human nasal epithelium, with both ciliated and mucus producing cells. Tissue culture inserts with differentiated nasal epithelial cells can be manipulated in a variety of ways depending on the research questions (treatment with pharmacological agents, transduction with lentiviral vectors, exposure to gases, or infection with microbial agents) and analyzed for numerous different endpoints ranging from cellular and molecular pathways, functional changes, morphology, etc. In vitro models of differentiated human nasal epithelial

  9. Culturing of human nasal epithelial cells at the air liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E; Carson, Johnny L; Fischer, William A; Jaspers, Ilona

    2013-10-08

    In vitro models using human primary epithelial cells are essential in understanding key functions of the respiratory epithelium in the context of microbial infections or inhaled agents. Direct comparisons of cells obtained from diseased populations allow us to characterize different phenotypes and dissect the underlying mechanisms mediating changes in epithelial cell function. Culturing epithelial cells from the human tracheobronchial region has been well documented, but is limited by the availability of human lung tissue or invasiveness associated with obtaining the bronchial brushes biopsies. Nasal epithelial cells are obtained through much less invasive superficial nasal scrape biopsies and subjects can be biopsied multiple times with no significant side effects. Additionally, the nose is the entry point to the respiratory system and therefore one of the first sites to be exposed to any kind of air-borne stressor, such as microbial agents, pollutants, or allergens. Briefly, nasal epithelial cells obtained from human volunteers are expanded on coated tissue culture plates, and then transferred onto cell culture inserts. Upon reaching confluency, cells continue to be cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI), for several weeks, which creates more physiologically relevant conditions. The ALI culture condition uses defined media leading to a differentiated epithelium that exhibits morphological and functional characteristics similar to the human nasal epithelium, with both ciliated and mucus producing cells. Tissue culture inserts with differentiated nasal epithelial cells can be manipulated in a variety of ways depending on the research questions (treatment with pharmacological agents, transduction with lentiviral vectors, exposure to gases, or infection with microbial agents) and analyzed for numerous different endpoints ranging from cellular and molecular pathways, functional changes, morphology, etc. In vitro models of differentiated human nasal epithelial

  10. Hairy cell leukaemia and occupational exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, J; Conso, F; Limasset, J C; Mandereau, L; Roche, P; Flandrin, G; Hémon, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The role of occupational exposures in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) was investigated through a multicentre, hospital based, case-control study. This paper analyses the role of exposure to benzene in HCL. METHODS: A population of 226 male cases of HCL and 425 matched controls were included in the study. Benzene exposure was evaluated by expert review of the detailed data on occupational exposures generated by case-control interviews. RESULTS: No association was found between HCL and employment in a job exposed to benzene (odds ratio (OR) 0.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.6-1.3)). The sample included 125 subjects, 34 cases (15%), and 91 controls (21%) who had been exposed to benzene, as individually assessed by the experts, for at least one hour a month during one of their jobs. Benzene exposure was not associated with a risk of HCL (OR 0.8 (0.5-1.2)). No trend towards an increase in OR was detected for increasing exposures, the percentage of work time involving exposure to > 1 ppm, or the duration of exposure. No findings suggested a particular risk period, when the OR associated with the time since first or last exposure, or since the end of exposure, were examined. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, with the low exposures prevalent in the sample, the study did not show any association between benzene exposure and HCL. PMID:8983464

  11. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs. PMID:25173649

  12. Transient changes in neuronal cell membrane permeability after blast exposure.

    PubMed

    Arun, Peethambaran; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Wang, Ying; Long, Joseph B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2012-04-18

    The biochemical mechanisms of explosive blast-induced traumatic brain injury and the subsequent long-term neurobehavioral abnormalities are still not completely understood. We studied the biochemical mechanism of blast traumatic brain injury using our recently reported in-vitro model system with a shock tube. Primary blast exposure of in-vitro models leads to neurobiological changes in an overpressure dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Lactate dehydrogenase was released significantly into the extracellular medium without cell death after blast exposure, indicating compromised cell membrane integrity. We further explored the integrity of cell membrane after blast exposure by fluorescent dye uptake/release techniques in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Our data indicate that blast exposure leads to an overpressure-dependent transient increase in the release of preloaded calcein AM into the culture medium with proportional intracellular decrease. Uptake of an extracellular nucleic acid-binding dye TO-PRO-3 iodide was also increased significantly after blast exposure, indicating that the increased molecular transport is bidirectional and nuclear membrane integrity is also affected by blast exposure. These results suggest that blast exposure perturbs the integrity of the neuronal cell membrane, leading to increased bidirectional transport of molecules--a potential mechanism that can lead to traumatic brain injury.

  13. Nanosilver and Nano Zero-Valent Iron Exposure Affects Nutrient Exchange Across the Sediment-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Buchkowski, Robert W; Williams, Clayton J; Kelly, Joel; Veinot, Jonathan G C; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A

    2016-01-01

    To examine how nanoparticles influence biogeochemical cycles in streams, we studied the acute impact of nanosilver (nAg) and nanoparticulate zero-valent iron (nZVI) exposure on nutrient and oxygen exchange across the sediment-water interface of two streams (agricultural canal and wetland) that differed in their water quality and sediment characteristics. At the agricultural site, nAg increased oxygen consumption and decreased N2 flux rates from that observed in control incubations. nZVI caused sediment-water systems from both streams to go hypoxic within 1.5 h of exposure. N2 flux rates were at least an order of magnitude higher in nZVI treatments as compared to control. Water column nitrate and nitrite concentrations were not impacted by nZVI exposure but total dissolved phosphorus concentrations were higher in cores treated with nZVI. nAg and nZVI exposure to surface water ecosystems can disrupt ecological function across the sediment-water interface. PMID:26611367

  14. Exposure to tobacco-derived materials induces overproduction of secreted proteinases in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Small-Howard, Andrea; Turner, Helen . E-mail: hturner@queens.org

    2005-04-15

    Mast cells reside at interfaces with the environment, including the mucosa of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This localization exposes mast cells to inhaled, or ingested, environmental challenges. In the airways of smokers, resident immune cells will be in contact with the condensed components of cigarette smoke. Mast cells are of particular interest due to their ability to promote airway remodeling and mucus hypersecretion. Clinical data show increased levels of mast cell-secreted tryptase and increased numbers of degranulated mast cells in the lavage and bronchial tissue of smokers. Since mast cell-secreted proteinases (MCPTs), including tryptases, contribute to pathological airway remodeling, we investigated the relationship between mast cell proteinases and smoke exposure. We exposed a mast cell line to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). We show that CSC exposure increases MCPT levels in mast cells using an assay for tryptase-type MCPT activity. We hypothesized that this increase in MCPT activity reflects a CSC-induced increase in the cytosolic pool of proteinase molecules, via stimulation of MCPT transcription. Transcript array data suggested that mRNA changes in response to CSC were limited in number and peaked after 3 h of CSC exposure. However, we noted marked transcriptional regulation of several MCPT genes. CSC-induced changes in the mRNA levels for MCPTs were confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke up-regulates MCPT levels in mast cells at both the protein and the mRNA level. We suggest that the pathological airway remodeling that has been described in clinical studies of smoke inhalation may be attributable to MCPT overproduction in vivo.

  15. Time course of bronchial cell inflammation following exposure to diesel particulate matter using a modified EAVES.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Brie; McKenna, Dave; Marchese, Anthony; Volckens, John

    2014-08-01

    Electrostatic deposition of particles onto the surface of well-differentiated airway cells is a rapid and efficient means to screen for toxicity associated with exposure to fine and ultrafine particulate air pollution. This work describes the development and application of an electrostatic aerosol in vitro exposure system (EAVES) with increased throughput and ease-of-use. The modified EAVES accommodates standard tissue culture plates and uses an alternating electric field to deposit a net neutral charge of aerosol onto air-interface cell cultures. Using this higher-throughput design, we were able to examine the time-course (1, 3, 6, 9, and 24 h post-exposure) of transcript production and cytotoxicity in well-differentiated human bronchial cells exposed to diesel particulate matter at levels of 'real-world' significance. Statistically significant responses were observed at exposure levels (∼0.4 μg/cm(2)) much lower than typically reported in vitro using traditional submerged/resuspended techniques. Levels of HO-1, IL-8, CYP1A1, COX-2, and HSP-70 transcripts increased immediately following diesel particulate exposure and persisted for several hours; cytotoxicity was increased at 24h. The modified EAVES provides a platform for higher throughput, more efficient and representative testing of aerosol toxicity in vitro.

  16. Aerosolized ZnO nanoparticles induce toxicity in alveolar type II epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yumei; Williams, Nolann G.; Tolic, Ana; Chrisler, William B.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Maddux, Bettye L.; Pounds, Joel G.; Laskin, Alexander; Orr, Galya

    2012-01-20

    The majority of in vitro studies characterizing the impact of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cells that line the respiratory tract were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in suspension. This approach introduces processes that are unlikely to occur during inhaled NP exposures in vivo, such as the shedding of toxic doses of dissolved ions. ZnO NPs are used extensively and pose significant sources for human exposure. Exposures to airborne ZnO NPs can induce adverse effects, but the relevance of the dissolved Zn2+ to the observed effects in vivo is still unclear. Our goal was to mimic in vivo exposures to airborne NPs and decipher the contribution of the intact NP from the contribution of the dissolved ions to airborne ZnO NP toxicity. We established the exposure of alveolar type II epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI), and compared the impact of aerosolized ZnO NPs and NPs in suspension at the same cellular doses, measured as the number of particles per cell. By evaluating membrane integrity and cell viability 6 and 24 hours post exposure we found that aerosolized NPs induced toxicity at the ALI at doses that were in the same order of magnitude as doses required to induce toxicity in submersed cultures. In addition, distinct patterns of oxidative stress were observed in the two exposure systems. These observations unravel the ability of airborne ZnO NPs to induce toxicity without the contribution of dissolved Zn2+ and suggest distinct mechanisms at the ALI and in submersed cultures.

  17. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-04-23

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans.

  18. Modeling of the cell-electrode interface noise for microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Yuan, Jie; Chan, Mansun

    2012-12-01

    Microelectrodes are widely used in the physiological recording of cell field potentials. As microelectrode signals are generally in the μV range, characteristics of the cell-electrode interface are important to the recording accuracy. Although the impedance of the microelectrode-solution interface has been well studied and modeled in the past, no effective model has been experimentally verified to estimate the noise of the cell-electrode interface. Also in existing interface models, spectral information is largely disregarded. In this work, we developed a model for estimating the noise of the cell-electrode interface from interface impedances. This model improves over existing noise models by including the cell membrane capacitor and frequency dependent impedances. With low-noise experiment setups, this model is verified by microelectrode array (MEA) experiments with mouse muscle myoblast cells. Experiments show that the noise estimated from this model has <;10% error, which is much less than estimations from existing models. With this model, noise of the cell-electrode interface can be estimated by simply measuring interface impedances. This model also provides insights for micro- electrode design to achieve good recording signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Interface Engineering of High Efficiency Organic-Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixia; Liu, Yaoping; Chen, Wei; Wang, Yan; Liang, Huili; Mei, Zengxia; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Du, Xiaolong

    2016-01-13

    Insufficient interface conformity is a challenge faced in hybrid organic-silicon heterojunction solar cells because of using conventional pyramid antireflection texturing provoking the porosity of interface. In this study, we tested alternative textures, in particular rounded pyramids and inverted pyramids to compare the performance. It was remarkably improved delivering 7.61%, 8.91% and 10.04% efficiency employing conventional, rounded, and inverted pyramids, respectively. The result was interpreted in terms of gradually improving conformity of the Ag/organic/silicon interface, together with the gradually decreasing serial resistance. Altogether, the present data may guide further efforts arising the interface engineering for mastering high efficient heterojunction solar cells. PMID:26701061

  20. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively1–6, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography7 to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells toward higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces. PMID:26213899

  1. [Results of mammalian cell culture exposure on artificial earth satellites].

    PubMed

    Sushkov, F V; Portugalov, V V; Rudneva, S V; Bobkova, N N; Iordanishvili, E K

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an exposure of cells of the Syrian hamster strain VNK-21 to space flight effects. In contrast to the cell culture kept in a thermostat at 29 degrees C, the cell culture that was maintained in thermally uncontrolled conditions developed noticeable structural and physiological changes induced by suboptimal temperatures. It was concluded that a 6-day exposure to weightlessness exerted no adverse effect on mammalian cells in vitro and produced no stable structural or physiological changes. Some changes that were detected in the cell culture--faster ageing, stable tendency to an increase of the number of cells with enlarged nuclei, an increase of the mitotic index at an early stage of cultivation--need further investigation.

  2. Fundamental processes of exciton scattering at organic solar-cell interfaces: One-dimensional model calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Yoshimitsu; Iizuka, Hideyuki; Sato, Kosuke; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental processes of exciton scattering at organic solar-cell interfaces were studied using a one-dimensional tight-binding model and by performing a time-evolution simulation of electron–hole pair wave packets. We found the fundamental features of exciton scattering: the scattering promotes not only the dissociation of excitons and the generation of interface-bound (charge-transferred) excitons but also the transmission and reflection of excitons depending on the electron and hole interface offsets. In particular, the dissociation increases in a certain region of an interface offset, while the transmission shows resonances with higher-energy bound-exciton and interface bound-exciton states. We also studied the effects of carrier-transfer and potential modulations at the interface and the scattering of charged excitons, and we found trap dissociations where one of the carriers is trapped around the interface after the dissociation.

  3. An application programming interface for CellNetAnalyzer.

    PubMed

    Klamt, Steffen; von Kamp, Axel

    2011-08-01

    CellNetAnalyzer (CNA) is a MATLAB toolbox providing computational methods for studying structure and function of metabolic and cellular signaling networks. In order to allow non-experts to use these methods easily, CNA provides GUI-based interactive network maps as a means of parameter input and result visualization. However, with the availability of high-throughput data, there is a need to make CNA's functionality also accessible in batch mode for automatic data processing. Furthermore, as some algorithms of CNA are of general relevance for network analysis it would be desirable if they could be called as sub-routines by other applications. For this purpose, we developed an API (application programming interface) for CNA allowing users (i) to access the content of network models in CNA, (ii) to use CNA's network analysis capabilities independent of the GUI, and (iii) to interact with the GUI to facilitate the development of graphical plugins. Here we describe the organization of network projects in CNA and the application of the new API functions to these projects. This includes the creation of network projects from scratch, loading and saving of projects and scenarios, and the application of the actual analysis methods. Furthermore, API functions for the import/export of metabolic models in SBML format and for accessing the GUI are described. Lastly, two example applications demonstrate the use and versatile applicability of CNA's API. CNA is freely available for academic use and can be downloaded from http://www.mpi-magdeburg.mpg.de/projects/cna/cna.html.

  4. Cell wide responses to low oxygen exposure in Desulfovibriovulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Redding, A.; Joachimiak, M.; Arkin, A.; Borglin, S.; Dehal, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Geller, J.; Hazen, T.; He, Q.; Joyner, D.; Martin, V.; Wall, J.; Yang, Z.; Zhou, J.; Keasling, J.

    2007-03-11

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low oxygen exposure (0.1% O{sub 2}) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O{sub 2} caused a decrease in growth rate without affecting viability. A concerted up regulation in the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure. Several of these candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the up regulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during this low O{sub 2} exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were down regulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell wide response to low and high O{sub 2} levels of in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O{sub 2} levels in its environment.

  5. Microstructure Evolution and Interface Stability of Thermal Barrier Coatings with Vertical Type Cracks in Cyclic Thermal Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe; Myoung, Sang-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sung; Kim, Min-Sik; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Jang, Jung-Chel; Paik, Ungyu

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the effects of intrinsic feature of microstructure in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with and without vertical cracks on the microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated in cyclic thermal exposure. The hardness values of TBCs with vertical cracks were higher than those without vertical cracks, showing a good agreement with microstructure. The TBC prepared without vertical cracks using the 204-NS was delaminated after 250 cycles in the cyclic thermal exposure test. The TBCs with and without vertical cracks prepared with 204 C-NS and the TBC with vertical cracks prepared with 204 NS showed a sound condition without any cracking at the interface or spalling of top coat. After the thermal exposure of 381 cycles, the hardness values were increased in the survived TBC specimens, and the thicknesses of TGO layer for the TBCs with 204 C-NS and 204 NS were measured as in the ranges of 5-9 and 3-7 μm, respectively. In the thermal shock test, the advantage of vertical cracks for thermal durability of TBC could be well investigated, showing relatively longer sustained cycles in the TBCs with vertical cracks. The TBCs with vertical cracks are more efficient in improving thermal durability than those without vertical cracks in cyclic thermal exposure.

  6. Interface defects in a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defresne, A.; Plantevin, O.; Sobkowicz, I. P.; Bourçois, J.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to incorporate a low concentration of defects at different near-surface or interface locations in a silicon heterojunction solar cell is reported here using argon ion implantation. Optical properties of the irradiated layers are addressed using spectroscopic ellipsometry while non-radiative recombinations through defects are addressed using photoconductance and photoluminescence measurements. Low energy ion irradiation at 1 keV under fluences up to 7 × 1013 cm-2 induces no cell degradation while higher ion energies associated to larger penetration depths close to the amorphous/crystalline interface show increased degradation with ion fluence. This behavior allows to estimate some interface defect concentration threshold for cell degradation.

  7. Chronic Alcohol Exposure Renders Epithelial Cells Vulnerable to Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Stephen; Pithadia, Ravi; Rehman, Tooba; Zhang, Lijuan; Plichta, Jennifer; Radek, Katherine A.; Forsyth, Christopher; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shafikhani, Sasha H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite two centuries of reports linking alcohol consumption with enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections and in particular gut-derived bacteria, there have been no studies or model systems to assess the impact of long-term alcohol exposure on the ability of the epithelial barrier to withstand bacterial infection. It is well established that acute alcohol exposure leads to reduction in tight and adherens junctions, which in turn leads to increases in epithelial cellular permeability to bacterial products, leading to endotoxemia and a variety of deleterious effects in both rodents and human. We hypothesized that reduced fortification at junctional structures should also reduce the epithelial barrier’s capacity to maintain its integrity in the face of bacterial challenge thus rendering epithelial cells more vulnerable to infection. In this study, we established a cell-culture based model system for long-term alcohol exposure to assess the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on the ability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells to withstand infection when facing pathogenic bacteria under the intact or wounded conditions. We report that daily treatment with 0.2% ethanol for two months rendered Caco-2 cells far more susceptible to wound damage and cytotoxicity caused by most but not all bacterial pathogens tested in our studies. Consistent with acute alcohol exposure, long-term ethanol exposure also adversely impacted tight junction structures, but in contrast, it did not affect the adherens junction. Finally, alcohol-treated cells partially regained their ability to withstand infection when ethanol treatment was ceased for two weeks, indicating that alcohol’s deleterious effects on cells may be reversible. PMID:23358457

  8. Chronic alcohol exposure renders epithelial cells vulnerable to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stephen; Pithadia, Ravi; Rehman, Tooba; Zhang, Lijuan; Plichta, Jennifer; Radek, Katherine A; Forsyth, Christopher; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shafikhani, Sasha H

    2013-01-01

    Despite two centuries of reports linking alcohol consumption with enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections and in particular gut-derived bacteria, there have been no studies or model systems to assess the impact of long-term alcohol exposure on the ability of the epithelial barrier to withstand bacterial infection. It is well established that acute alcohol exposure leads to reduction in tight and adherens junctions, which in turn leads to increases in epithelial cellular permeability to bacterial products, leading to endotoxemia and a variety of deleterious effects in both rodents and human. We hypothesized that reduced fortification at junctional structures should also reduce the epithelial barrier's capacity to maintain its integrity in the face of bacterial challenge thus rendering epithelial cells more vulnerable to infection. In this study, we established a cell-culture based model system for long-term alcohol exposure to assess the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on the ability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells to withstand infection when facing pathogenic bacteria under the intact or wounded conditions. We report that daily treatment with 0.2% ethanol for two months rendered Caco-2 cells far more susceptible to wound damage and cytotoxicity caused by most but not all bacterial pathogens tested in our studies. Consistent with acute alcohol exposure, long-term ethanol exposure also adversely impacted tight junction structures, but in contrast, it did not affect the adherens junction. Finally, alcohol-treated cells partially regained their ability to withstand infection when ethanol treatment was ceased for two weeks, indicating that alcohol's deleterious effects on cells may be reversible. PMID:23358457

  9. Effects of space flight exposure on cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Yuehui; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Tong, Yongqing; Zhou, Guohua; Xie, Pingli; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2008-12-01

    It is well recognized that harsh outer space environment, consisting of microgravity and radiation, poses significant health risks for human cells. To investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on cancer cells we examined the biological changes in Caski cells carried by the "Shen Zhou IV" spaceship. After exposure for 7 days in spaceflight, 1440 survival subclonal cell lines were established and 4 cell lines were screened. 44F10 and 17E3 were selected because of their increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while 48A9 and 31F2 had slower cytological events. Experiments with cell proliferation assay, flow cytometry, soft agar assay, tumorigenesis assay and DNA microarray analysis have shown that selected cell lines presented multiple biological changes in cell morphology, cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression. These results suggest that space environment exposure can make significant biological impact on cancer cells and provide an entry point to find the immunological target of tumorigenesis.

  10. Uniform dose atmospheric pressure microplasma exposure of individual bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, David; Mahony, Charles; Spence, Sarah; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Kelsey, Colin; Hamilton, Neil; Diver, Declan; Bennet, Euan; Potts, Hugh; Mariotti, Davide; McDowell, David; Maguire, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Plasma - bacteria interactions have been studied for some time with a view to using plasma exposure for wound healing, sterilization and decontamination. While high efficacy has been demonstrated, important fundamental mechanisms are not understood and may be critical for ultimate acceptance. The dose variation across the exposed population and the impact of non-lethal exposure on subsequent bacterial growth are important issues. We demonstrate that individual bacterial cells can remain viable after exposure to a uniform plasma dose. Each bacteria cell (E coli) is delivered to the atmospheric pressure plasma in an aerosolised droplet (d ~ 10 micron). The estimated plasma density is 1E13 - 1E14 cm-3, gas temperature <400 K, and exposure times vary between 0.04 and 0.1ms. Droplet evaporation in flight is ~2 micron and plasma - cell interactions are mediated by the surrounding liquid (Ringers solution) where plasma-induced droplet surface chemistry and charging is known to occur. We report the cell viability and recovery dynamics of individual exposed cells as well as impact on DNA and membrane components with reference to measured plasma parameters. This research was funded by EPSRC (Grants: EP/K006088/1 & EP/K006142/1).

  11. Dosimetry considerations in far field microwave exposure of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.; Eagan, P.; Harris, C.R.; Erwin, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    A circulating water bath exposure system has been designed for in vitro radiofrequency radiation (RFR) exposure studies in the 915 to 2450 MHz range. A Styrofoam float, in which 10 T-25 plastic tissue culture flasks are embedded, is rotated at approximately 20 rpm in a Plexiglas water bath at a distance beneath a rectangular horn. The continuous circular rotation of the flasks is designed to average out the heterogeneity present in stationary flask exposures. The rotation also serves to prevent the establishment of chemical gradients in the medium within the flasks. Several factors have been demonstrated to affect the specific absorption rate (SAR) measured in the medium in the exposed flasks. These factors include: 1) the position of the exposure flasks relative to the long axis of the antenna horn; 2) whether the flasks are exposed while stationary or in rotation; 3) the volume of the medium contained in the flask; and 4) the depth in the medium in the flask at which temperatures for SAR calculation are measured. The presence of cells in the exposure flask (as attached monolayer or cell suspension) did not result in an SAR different from that measured in the same volume of medium without cells present.

  12. Skin and dermal appendages stem cells exposure to tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Kolanko, Emanuel; Czekaj, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to persist throughout human life possessing enormous capacity for proliferation and differentiation. These cells and their microenvironment are potential targets for environmental pollutions, for example tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke consists of thousands of substances which can disturb stem cell homeostasis by evoking, in particular, oxidative stress and hypoxia. It causes also deep, irreversible changes in the affected tissues. It is strongly linked with carcinogenesis. Skin is one of the most exposed tissues to tobacco smoke. Self-renewal dermal tissues, such as epidermis and its appendages, are composed of various stem cell populations. The tissue of the skin that is richest in SC is the hair follicle. In wound healing are involved: epidermal KSC population and stem populations from hair follicle, such as CD34+ and Lrig6+ cells. Some skin cancers, i.e., squamous cell carcinoma, originate from skin stem cells and are considered to be most associated with long-term smoking. Dermal stem cells can be affected by tobacco smoke components in two ways: internal, where xenobiotics are delivered with blood stream, and external, where the tissues are directly exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, as well as to third-hand smoke. Assessment of the dose- and time-response of the skin and dermal appendages to tobacco smoke exposure can allow to estimate the adverse health effects risk. Usually, to assess tobacco smoke exposure time, hairs and toenails are used. This is because they have a unique ability to store xenobiotics for longer periods of time in respect to their temporal appearance in the blood. Current scientific and medical problem is searching for more adequate biomarkers for TS exposure assessment. The unresolved question is, if stem cells isolated from the skin and its appendages might be good biomarkers for tobacco smoke exposure. We should take into consideration stem cell biology (proliferation vs. differentiation), expression of

  13. Exposure to perfluorinated compounds: in vitro study on thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Coperchini, Francesca; Pignatti, Patrizia; Lacerenza, Serena; Negri, Sara; Sideri, Riccardo; Testoni, Claudia; de Martinis, Luca; Cottica, Danilo; Magri, Flavia; Imbriani, Marcello; Rotondi, Mario; Chiovato, Luca

    2015-02-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are widely used perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). Previous studies detected PFOA and PFOS in human tissues including the thyroid gland. There are no studies on the in vitro effects of PFOA and PFOS on thyroid cells. Our study was aimed at evaluating the effect of the in vitro exposure to PFOA and PFOS on thyroid cell proliferation and viability. These objectives were investigated using Fisher rat thyroid line-5 (FRTL-5) cells. FRTL-5 cells cultured in the presence of PFOA and PFOS at concentrations up to 10(4) nM do not display changes in their viability and proliferation rate, while at a concentration of 10(5) nM of either PFCs, a significant inhibition of cell proliferation, mainly due to increased cell death, was found. PFOA and PFOS were detected in FRTL-5 cell pellets after 72 h of incubation with PFCs but not in control cultures. When FRTL-5 were incubated with PFCs then washed in PBS and re-cultured for 72 h without PFCs in the medium, no detectable concentrations of PFOA and PFOS were measured in the cell pellet. This indicates that PFOA and PFOS enter thyroid cells by a gradient-based passive diffusion mechanism. Future studies are required to evaluate the potential toxic effect resulting from prolonged in vivo exposure to even lower concentrations of PFCs. PMID:25182428

  14. Photo-Injected Hot-Electron Damage at the Silicon/silicon Dioxide Interface in Point-Contact Solar Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenbaum, Peter E.

    1990-01-01

    Point-contact solar cells currently hold the record for the most efficient silicon solar cell, reaching 28.5% under concentrated sunlight. These cells have both p and n contacts on the back, eliminating the losses due to grid shadowing found in a conventional cell. However, this means that the electron-hole pairs created near the front of the cell during illumination must diffuse all the way to the back of the cell without recombining. Therefore, point-contact solar cells have been processed to have the minimum number of recombination centers possible. Unfortunately, a decrease in the efficiency of these highly efficient cells can be measured after exposure to concentrated sunlight for just a few hours. The degradation was found to be due to an increase in the surface recombination velocity at the front surface of the cell. Experimental evidence suggests that what is occurring is an effect called "hot electron photoinjection", where electrons can absorb enough energy from an ultraviolet photon that they can overcome the 3.1 eV barrier between the silicon conduction band and the oxide conduction band, and be injected from the silicon into the oxide. This injection has been reported to create interface states, although the mechanism is not well understood. By utilizing literature results about hot electron injection, we were able to slow the degradation rate considerably by altering oxidation conditions to reduce water and mechanical stress at the interface. The stability of the cells also can be increased greatly by putting a light phosphorus diffusion at the interface. This creates an electric field near the surface that will keep holes away from the interface; since both electrons and holes are needed for recombination, the carrier recombination at the surface will be reduced, even though the surface recombination velocity itself can be very high. We have also been able to utilize the hot -electron resistance of ultrathin oxides by putting them on the front of

  15. Epigenetic Regulation: The Interface Between Prenatal and Early-Life Exposure and Asthma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    de Planell-Saguer, Mariangels; Lovinsky-Desir, Stephanie; Miller, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease with genetic and environmental influences and emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic regulation is also a major contributor. Here, we focus on the developing paradigm that epigenetic dysregulation in asthma and allergy may start as early as in utero following several environmental exposures. We summarize the pathways important to the allergic immune response that are epigenetically regulated, the key environmental exposures associated with epigenetic changes in asthma genes, and newly identified epigenetic bio-markers that have been linked to clinical asthma. We conclude with a brief discussion about the potential to apply newly developing technologies in epigenetics to the diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergy. The inherent plasticity of epigenetic regulation following environmental exposures offers opportunities for prevention using environmental remediation, measuring novel biomarkers for early identification of those at risk, and applying advances in pharmaco-epigenetics to tailor medical therapies that maximize efficacy of treatment. ‘Precision Medicine’ in asthma and allergy is arriving. As the field advances this may involve an individually tailored approach to the prevention, early detection, and treatment of disease based on the knowledge of an individual’s epigenetic profile. PMID:24323745

  16. Steering the efficiency of carbon nanotube-silicon photovoltaic cells by acid vapor exposure: a real-time spectroscopic tracking.

    PubMed

    Pintossi, C; Pagliara, S; Drera, G; De Nicola, F; Castrucci, P; De Crescenzi, M; Crivellari, M; Boscardin, M; Sangaletti, L

    2015-05-13

    Hybrid carbon nanotube-silicon (CNT-Si) junctions have been investigated by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (AR-XPS) with the aim to clarify the effects of a nonstoichiometric silicon oxide buried interface on the overall cell efficiency. A complex silicon oxide interface has been clearly identified and its origin and role in the heterojunction have been probed by exposing the cells to hydrofluoric (HF) and nitric (HNO3) acid. Real-time monitoring of the cell efficiencies during the steps following acid exposure (up to 1 week after etching) revealed a correlation between the thickness and chemical state of the oxide layer and the cell efficiencies. By matching the AR-XPS and Raman spectroscopy with the electrical response data it has been possible to discriminate the effects on the cell efficiency of the buried SiO(x) interface from those related to CNT acid doping. The overall cell behavior recorded for different thicknesses of the SiO(x) interface indicates that the buried oxide layer is likely acting as a passivating/inversion layer in a metal-insulator-semiconductor junction.

  17. Alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed at the air-liquid interface to diesel exhaust: First study in TNO's powertrain test center.

    PubMed

    Kooter, Ingeborg M; Alblas, Marcel J; Jedynska, Aleksandra D; Steenhof, Maaike; Houtzager, Marc M G; van Ras, Martijn

    2013-12-01

    Air-liquid interface (ALI) exposures enable in vitro testing of mixtures of gases and particles such as diesel exhaust (DE). The main objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of exposing human lung epithelial cells at the ALI to complete DE generated by a heavy-duty truck in the state-of-the-art TNO powertrain test center. A549 cells were exposed at the air-liquid interface to DE generated by a heavy-duty Euro III truck for 1.5h. The truck was tested at a speed of ∼70kmh(-1) to simulate free-flowing traffic on a motorway. Twenty-four hours after exposure, cells were analyzed for markers of oxidative stress (GSH and HO-1), cytotoxicity (LDH and Alamar Blue assay) and inflammation (IL-8). DE exposure resulted in an increased oxidative stress response (significantly increased HO-1 levels and significantly reduced GSH/GSSH ratio), and a decreased cell viability (significantly decreased Alamar Blue levels and slightly increased LDH levels). However, the pro-inflammatory response seemed to decrease (decrease in IL-8). The results presented here demonstrate that we are able to successfully expose A549 cells at ALI to complete DE generated by a heavy-duty truck in TNO's powertrain test center and show oxidative stress and cytotoxicity responses due to DE exposure.

  18. Alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed at the air-liquid interface to diesel exhaust: First study in TNO's powertrain test center.

    PubMed

    Kooter, Ingeborg M; Alblas, Marcel J; Jedynska, Aleksandra D; Steenhof, Maaike; Houtzager, Marc M G; van Ras, Martijn

    2013-12-01

    Air-liquid interface (ALI) exposures enable in vitro testing of mixtures of gases and particles such as diesel exhaust (DE). The main objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of exposing human lung epithelial cells at the ALI to complete DE generated by a heavy-duty truck in the state-of-the-art TNO powertrain test center. A549 cells were exposed at the air-liquid interface to DE generated by a heavy-duty Euro III truck for 1.5h. The truck was tested at a speed of ∼70kmh(-1) to simulate free-flowing traffic on a motorway. Twenty-four hours after exposure, cells were analyzed for markers of oxidative stress (GSH and HO-1), cytotoxicity (LDH and Alamar Blue assay) and inflammation (IL-8). DE exposure resulted in an increased oxidative stress response (significantly increased HO-1 levels and significantly reduced GSH/GSSH ratio), and a decreased cell viability (significantly decreased Alamar Blue levels and slightly increased LDH levels). However, the pro-inflammatory response seemed to decrease (decrease in IL-8). The results presented here demonstrate that we are able to successfully expose A549 cells at ALI to complete DE generated by a heavy-duty truck in TNO's powertrain test center and show oxidative stress and cytotoxicity responses due to DE exposure. PMID:24161370

  19. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  20. Hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia: a form of cutaneous T-cell dyscrasia distinct from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia M; Hagen, Joshua W; Crowson, Arthur N; Liu, Yen Chen; Mihm, Martin; Drucker, Natalie M; Yassin, Aminah H

    2014-07-01

    Hypopigmentation in cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disease should not always be equated with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF). A form of hypopigmented pre-lymphomatous T-cell dyscrasia falling under the designation of the so-called hypopigmented interface variant of T-cell dyscrasia has recently been proposed. The aim of the present study was to establish hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia as its own entity apart from other T-cell dyscrasias and MF using a patient case series. Twenty four cases of hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia were identified in the dermatopathology database of Weill Medical College of Cornell University. There were 17 females and seven males (mean age, 36 years). In children and adolescents, the patients were most commonly of African American extraction. Truncal photo-protected areas manifesting as large solitary patches or multiple smaller macules were characteristic; disease progression to MF occurred in only one patient. The lesions responded to topical steroids and light therapy. The pathology was defined by a cell poor interface associated with degeneration of keratinocytes and melanocytes, and by lymphocytes whose nuclei showed low-grade cerebriform atypia, and which expressed a significant reduction in CD7 and CD62L expression. In 50% of the cases, the implicated cell type was of the CD8 subset. Clonality was not identified. Hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia is a distinct entity separate from and rarely progressive to MF. PMID:24806661

  1. Metabolic shift in lung alveolar cell mitochondria following acrolein exposure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit R; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein, an α,β unsaturated electrophile, is an environmental pollutant released in ambient air from diesel exhausts and cooking oils. This study examines the role of acrolein in altering mitochondrial function and metabolism in lung-specific cells. RLE-6TN, H441, and primary alveolar type II (pAT2) cells were exposed to acrolein for 4 h, and its effect on mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates was studied by XF Extracellular Flux analysis. Low-dose acrolein exposure decreased mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner because of alteration in the metabolism of glucose in all the three cell types. Acrolein inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, leading to decreased substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN, H441, and pAT2 cells; the reduced GAPDH activity was compensated in pAT2 cells by an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the regulatory control of the pentose phosphate pathway. The decrease in pyruvate from glucose metabolism resulted in utilization of alternative sources to support mitochondrial energy production: palmitate-BSA complex increased mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN and pAT2 cells. The presence of palmitate in alveolar cells for surfactant biosynthesis may prove to be the alternative fuel source for mitochondrial respiration. Accordingly, a decrease in phosphatidylcholine levels and an increase in phospholipase A2 activity were found in the alveolar cells after acrolein exposure. These findings have implications for understanding the decrease in surfactant levels frequently observed in pathophysiological situations with altered lung function following exposure to environmental toxicants.

  2. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2013-08-15

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect.

  3. The atomistic origin of interface confinement and enhanced conversion efficiency in Si nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Quan, Jun; Ouyang, Gang

    2016-03-14

    The photoelectric properties of Si nanowires (SiNWs) under interface confinement are investigated based on the atomic-bond-relaxation consideration and the detailed balance principle. An analytical model is developed to elucidate the interface confinement and power conversion efficiency (PCE). It is found that the band curvature and surface barrier height decrease with decreasing size. The interface recombination rate and PCE can be determined by the size, shell thickness and local interface conditions. Our theoretical results show evident improvement in the PCE of SiNWs under interface confinement compared to that of a bare nanowire, highlighting the feasibility of the epitaxial layer as a booster for highly efficient SiNW solar cells.

  4. The atomistic origin of interface confinement and enhanced conversion efficiency in Si nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Quan, Jun; Ouyang, Gang

    2016-03-14

    The photoelectric properties of Si nanowires (SiNWs) under interface confinement are investigated based on the atomic-bond-relaxation consideration and the detailed balance principle. An analytical model is developed to elucidate the interface confinement and power conversion efficiency (PCE). It is found that the band curvature and surface barrier height decrease with decreasing size. The interface recombination rate and PCE can be determined by the size, shell thickness and local interface conditions. Our theoretical results show evident improvement in the PCE of SiNWs under interface confinement compared to that of a bare nanowire, highlighting the feasibility of the epitaxial layer as a booster for highly efficient SiNW solar cells. PMID:26883245

  5. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  6. Carrier collection losses in interface passivated amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumüller, A.; Bereznev, S.; Ewert, M.; Volobujeva, O.; Sergeev, O.; Falta, J.; Vehse, M.; Agert, C.

    2016-07-01

    In silicon thin-film solar cells the interface between the i- and p-layer is the most critical. In the case of back diffusion of photogenerated minority carriers to the i/p-interface, recombination occurs mainly on the defect states at the interface. To suppress this effect and to reduce recombination losses, hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) is usually applied. As an alternative to using state of the art HPT we apply an argon plasma treatment (APT) before the p-layer deposition in n-i-p solar cells. To study the effect of APT, several investigations were applied to compare the results with HPT and no plasma treatment at the interface. Carrier collection losses in resulting solar cells were examined with spectral response measurements with and without bias voltage. To investigate single layers, surface photovoltage and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were conducted. The results with APT at the i/p-interface show a beneficial contribution to the carrier collection compared with HPT and no plasma treatment. Therefore, it can be concluded that APT reduces the recombination centers at the interface. Further, we demonstrate that carrier collection losses of thin-film solar cells are significantly lower with APT.

  7. Multifunctional Interface Modification of Energy Relay Dye in Quasi-solid Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Cui, Yixiu; Liu, Xiaojiang; Wang, Liduo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) has been used in interface modification of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) with combined effects of retarding charge recombination and Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET). DCJTB interface modification significantly improved photovoltaic performance of DSCs. I–V curves shows the conversion efficiency increases from 4.27% to 5.64% with DCJTB coating. The application of DCJTB with combined effects is beneficial to explore more novel multi-functional interface modification materials to improve the performance of DSCs. PMID:24993900

  8. Numerical study of metal oxide hetero-junction solar cells with defects and interface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Le; Shao, Guosheng; Luo, J. K.

    2013-05-01

    Further to our previous work on ideal metal oxide (MO) hetero-junction solar cells, a systematic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of defects and interface states on the cells. Two structures of the window/absorber (WA) and window/absorber/voltage-enhancer (WAV) were modelled with defect concentration, defect energy level, interface state (ISt) density and ISt energy level as parameters. The simulation showed that the defects in the window layer and the voltage-enhancer layer have very limited effects on the performance of the cells, but those in the absorption layer have profound effects on the cell performance. The interface states at the W/A interface have a limited effect on the performance even for a density up to 1013 cm-2, while those at the A/V interface cause the solar cell to deteriorate severely even at a low density of lower than 1 × 1011 cm-2. It also showed that the back surface field (BSF) induced by band gap off-set in the WAV structure loses its function when defects with a modest concentration exist in the absorption layer and does not improve the open voltage at all.

  9. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  10. Cellular response to the deposition of diesel exhaust particle aerosols onto human lung cells grown at the air-liquid interface by inertial impaction.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Daniel J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2011-12-01

    The pathogenesis of disease resulting from exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) is often studied using cultured lung cells. Frequently, researchers expose cells to DEP by spiking a suspension of particles in liquid onto the apical surface. This is not representative of in vivo exposure, where aerosols are deposited onto cell surfaces at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Inertial impaction provides an opportunity to deliver high doses of particles with aerodynamic diameters>∼1 μm to the surface of cells in seconds in a reproducible and predictable manner. A custom device was constructed to deposit DEP aerosols onto the surface of Calu-3 and A549 cells grown at the ALI. The pro-inflammatory and toxic cellular response to exposure to the deposited DEP aerosols was measured and compared to the response of cells exposed to DEP as suspensions. Calu-3 cells showed evidence of an oxidative stress response for both exposure types, while there was strong evidence to suggest that the method of aerosol delivery was harmful to the A549 cells.

  11. Operando X-ray Investigation of Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Model Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We employed operando anomalous surface X-ray diffraction to investigate the buried interface between the cathode and the electrolyte of a model solid oxide fuel cell with atomic resolution. The cell was studied under different oxygen pressures at elevated temperatures and polarizations by external potential control. Making use of anomalous X-ray diffraction effects at the Y and Zr K-edges allowed us to resolve the interfacial structure and chemical composition of a (100)-oriented, 9.5 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal electrolyte below a La0.6Sr0.4CoO3−δ (LSC) electrode. We observe yttrium segregation toward the YSZ/LSC electrolyte/electrode interface under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, the interface becomes Y depleted. The yttrium segregation is corroborated by an enhanced outward relaxation of the YSZ interfacial metal ion layer. At the same time, an increase in point defect concentration in the electrolyte at the interface was observed, as evidenced by reduced YSZ crystallographic site occupancies for the cations as well as the oxygen ions. Such changes in composition are expected to strongly influence the oxygen ion transport through this interface which plays an important role for the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The structure of the interface is compared to the bare YSZ(100) surface structure near the microelectrode under identical conditions and to the structure of the YSZ(100) surface prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. PMID:27346923

  12. Cell membrane conformation at vertical nanowire array interface revealed by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthing, Trine; Bonde, Sara; Rostgaard, Katrine R.; Hannibal Madsen, Morten; Sørensen, Claus B.; Nygård, Jesper; Martinez, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    The perspectives offered by vertical arrays of nanowires for biosensing applications in living cells depend on the access of individual nanowires to the cell interior. Recent results on electrical access and molecular delivery suggest that direct access is not always obtained. Here, we present a generic approach to directly visualize the membrane conformation of living cells interfaced with nanowire arrays, with single nanowire resolution. The method combines confocal z-stack imaging with an optimized cell membrane labelling strategy which was applied to HEK293 cells interfaced with 2-11 μm long and 3-7 μm spaced nanowires with various surface coatings (bare, aminosilane-coated or polyethyleneimine-coated indium arsenide). We demonstrate that, for all commonly used nanowire lengths, spacings and surface coatings, nanowires generally remain enclosed in a membrane compartment, and are thereby not in direct contact with the cell interior.

  13. Nanowire Nanoelectronics: Building Interfaces with Tissue and Cells at the Natural Scale of Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Karni, Itzhaq Tzahi

    The interface between nanoscale electronic devices and biological systems enables interactions at length-scales natural to biology, and thus should maximize communication between these two diverse yet complementary systems. Moreover, nanostructures and nanostructured substrates show enhanced coupling to artificial membranes, cells, and tissue. Such nano-bio interfaces offer better sensitivity and spatial resolution as compared to conventional planar structures. In this work, I will report the electrical properties of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) interfaced with embryonic chicken hearts and cultured cardiomyocytes. I developed a scheme that allows us to manipulate the nanoelectronic to tissue/cell interfaces while monitoring their electrical activity. In addition, by utilizing the bottom-up approach, we extend our work to the sub-cellular regime, and interface cells with the smallest reported device ever and thus exceed the spatial and temporal resolution limits of other electrical recording techniques. The exceptional synthetic control and flexible assembly of nanowires provides powerful tools for fundamental studies and applications in life science, and opens up the potential of merging active transistors with cells such that the distinction between nonliving and living systems is blurred.

  14. Different cell responses induced by exposure to maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo, Yurena; Nardecchia, Stefania; Morales, María Puerto; Serrano, M. Concepción

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have permitted the development of a wide repertoire of inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with extensive promise for biomedical applications. Despite this remarkable potential, many questions still arise concerning the biocompatible nature of NPs when in contact with biological systems. Herein, we have investigated how controlled changes in the physicochemical properties of iron oxide NPs at their surface (i.e., surface charge and hydrodynamic size) affect, first, their interaction with cell media components and, subsequently, cell responses to NP exposure. For that purpose, we have prepared iron oxide NPs with three different coatings (i.e., dimercaptosuccinic acid - DMSA, (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane - APS and dextran) and explored the response of two different cell types, murine L929 fibroblasts and human Saos-2 osteoblasts, to their exposure. Interestingly, different cell responses were found depending on the NP concentration, surface charge and cell type. In this sense, neutral NPs, as those coated with dextran, induced negligible cell damage, as their cellular internalization was significantly reduced. In contrast, surface-charged NPs (i.e., those coated with DMSA and APS) caused significant cellular changes in viability, morphology and cell cycle under certain culture conditions, as a result of a more active cellular internalization. These results also revealed a particular cellular ability to detect and remember the original physicochemical properties of the NPs, despite the formation of a protein corona when incubated in culture media. Overall, conclusions from these studies are of crucial interest for future biomedical applications of iron oxide NPs.Recent advances in nanotechnology have permitted the development of a wide repertoire of inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with extensive promise for biomedical applications. Despite this remarkable potential, many questions still arise concerning the biocompatible

  15. Impact of laser-structured biomaterial interfaces on guided cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Fadeeva, Elena; Deiwick, Andrea; Chichkov, Boris; Schlie-Wolter, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a perfect integration of biomaterials into the body, tissue formation in contact with the interface has to be controlled. In this connection, a selective cell control is required: fibrotic encapsulation has to be inhibited, while tissue guidance has to be stimulated. As conventional biomaterials do not fulfil this specification, functionalization of the biointerface is under development to mimic the natural environment of the cells. One approach focuses on the fabrication of defined surface topographies. Thereby, ultrashort pulse laser ablation is very beneficial, owing to a large variety of fabricated structures, reduced heat-affected zones, high precision and reproducibility. We demonstrate that nanostructures in platinum and microstructures in silicon selectively control cell behaviour: inhibiting fibroblasts, while stimulating neuronal attachment and differentiation. However, the control of fibroblasts strongly correlates with the created size dimensions of the surface structures. These findings suggest favourable biomaterial interfaces for electronic devices. The mechanisms which are responsible for selective cell control are poorly understood. To give an insight, cell behaviour in dependence of biomaterial interfaces is discussed—including basic research on the role of the extracellular matrix. This knowledge is essential to understand such specific cell responses and to optimize biomaterial interfaces for future biomedical applications. PMID:24501676

  16. Engineering Cell-Material Interfaces for Long-term Expansion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Wen; Hwang, Yongsung; Brafman, Dave; Hagan, Thomas; Phung, Catherine; Varghese, Shyni

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective and scalable synthetic matrices that support long-term expansion of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have many applications, ranging from drug screening platforms to regenerative medicine. Here, we report the development of a hydrogel-based matrix containing synthetic heparin-mimicking moieties that supports the long-term expansion of hPSCs (≥20 passages) in a chemically defined medium. HPSCs expanded on this synthetic matrix maintained their characteristic morphology, colony forming ability, karyotypic stability, and differentiation potential. We also used the synthetic matrix as a platform to investigate the effects of various physicochemical properties of the extracellular environment on the adhesion, growth, and self-renewal of hPSCs. The observed cellular responses can be explained in terms of matrix interface-mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, and other cell secreted factors, which create an instructive microenvironment to support self-renewal of hPSCs. These synthetic matrices, which comprise of “off-the-shelf” components and are easy to synthesize, provide an ideal tool to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that control stem cell fate. PMID:23131532

  17. Engineering the Interface Between Inorganic Materials and Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, David

    2014-05-31

    To further optimize cell function in hybrid “living materials”, it would be advantageous to render mammalian cells responsive to novel “orthogonal” cues, i.e. signals they would not ordinarily respond to but that can be engineered to feed into defined intracellular signaling pathways. We recently developed an optogenetic method, based on A. thaliana Cry2, for rapid and reversible protein oligomerization in response to blue light. We also demonstrated the ability to use this method to channel the light input into several defined signaling pathways, work that will enhance communication between inorganic devices and living systems.

  18. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure Exposure on Hepatic Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Recker, Stephanie; Bukovec, Melani; Sparks, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) have the potential to regenerate healthy tissue in the setting of chronic liver disease. The goal of this study was to characterize the mechanosensitivity of HPCs to sustained hydrostatic pressure (20 mmHg) similar to that observed in liver cirrhosis. Bipotential Murine Oval Liver (BMOL) cells, an HPC-like cell line, were cultured in a hydrostatic pressure controlled chamber at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 4 days (to 90% confluency) or 12 days (superconfluency). Controls were run for each time point in a standard incubator without pressure. Nuclei were stained with DAPI and cells were viewed under a Zeiss 710 laser scanning confocal microscope with 40x objective. Nuclei were measured with Image J software (170 to 398 distinct cell nucleus area measurements per group). Two-way ANOVA was used to examine the influence of pressure and confluency on nuclear size. Cells exposed to pressure (mean nuclear area 126.7µm2, S.D. 56.9) had significantly larger nuclei than control cells (mean nuclear area 102.3µm2, S.D. 84.1), p<.001. The pressure*confluency interaction was also significant (p<.05). Results suggest that HPCs are sensitive to low-level hydrostatic pressure associated with chronic liver disease. Further experiments include analyzing cellular proliferation, morphology, and differentiation effects associated with pressure exposure.

  19. Optimization of Organic Solar Cells: Materials, Devices and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanjia

    Due to the increasing demand for sustainable clean energy, photovoltaic cells have received intensified attention in the past decade in both academia and industry. Among the types of cells, organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells offer promise as alternatives to conventional inorganic-type solar cells owning to several unique advantages such as low material and fabrication cost. To maximize power conversion efficiencies (PCEs), extensive research efforts focus on frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energy engineering of photoactive materials. Towards this objective, a series of novel donor polymers incorporating a new building block, bithiophene imide (BTI) group are developed, with narrow bandgap and low-lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies to increase short circuit current density, Jsc, and open circuit voltage, Voc.. Compared to other PV technologies, OPVs often suffer from large internal recombination loss and relatively low fill factors (FFs) <70%. Through a combination of materials design and device architecture optimization strategies to improve both microscopic and macroscopic thin film morphology, OPVs with PCEs up to 8.7% and unprecedented FF approaching 80% are obtained. Such high FF are close to those typically achieved in amorphous Si solar cells. Systematic variations of polymer chemical structures lead to understanding of structure-property relationships between polymer geometry and the resulting blend film morphology characteristics which are crucial for achieving high local mobilities and long carrier lifetimes. Instead of using fullerene as the acceptors, an alternative type of OPV is developed employing a high electron mobility polymer, P(NDI2OD-T2), as the acceptor. To improve the all-polymer blend film morphology, the influence of basic solvent properties such as solvent boiling point and solubility on polymer phase separation and charge transport properties is investigated, yielding to a high PCE of 2.7% for all-polymer solar cells

  20. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can

  1. Organic Thin-Film Solar Cells Based on Donor-Acceptor Interpenetrating Nano-Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Akihiko; Hori, Tetsuro; Moritou, Hiroki; Fukuoka, Naoki; Sakamoto, Junki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2010-12-23

    Photovoltaic cells with interpenetrating interfaces between a conducting polymer layer and a fullerene layer fabricated by a solvent corrosion method have been investigated. Using a weakly dissoluble combination of a solvent and an underlayer film, we fabricated a ''semi-layered'' structure that was maintaining a bilayer structure and furthermore interpenetrating at the interface of the conducting polymer and the fullerene layers. In these cells, high external quantum efficiencies (EQE) were obtained. The photovoltaic properties have been interpreted by the effective absorption of incident photons around the interface of conducting polymer and fullerene, the interpenetrating fullerene / conducting polymer interface involving the efficient photo-induced charge transfer, and the short distance between the electron-generation region and electrode resulting in the enhancement of the electron collection to the electrode. In these cells, both of the efficient exciton dissociations at the interpenetrating interface and the efficient carrier transports by each continuous pathway for electrons between fullerene molecules and for holes between conducting polymers occur.

  2. An interface reconstruction method based on an analytical formula for 3D arbitrary convex cells

    DOE PAGES

    Diot, Steven; François, Marianne M.

    2015-10-22

    In this study, we are interested in an interface reconstruction method for 3D arbitrary convex cells that could be used in multi-material flow simulations for instance. We assume that the interface is represented by a plane whose normal vector is known and we focus on the volume-matching step that consists in finding the plane constant so that it splits the cell according to a given volume fraction. We follow the same approach as in the recent authors' publication for 2D arbitrary convex cells in planar and axisymmetrical geometries, namely we derive an analytical formula for the volume of the specificmore » prismatoids obtained when decomposing the cell using the planes that are parallel to the interface and passing through all the cell nodes. This formula is used to bracket the interface plane constant such that the volume-matching problem is rewritten in a single prismatoid in which the same formula is used to find the final solution. Finally, the proposed method is tested against an important number of reproducible configurations and shown to be at least five times faster.« less

  3. An interface reconstruction method based on an analytical formula for 3D arbitrary convex cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Steven; François, Marianne M.

    2015-10-22

    In this study, we are interested in an interface reconstruction method for 3D arbitrary convex cells that could be used in multi-material flow simulations for instance. We assume that the interface is represented by a plane whose normal vector is known and we focus on the volume-matching step that consists in finding the plane constant so that it splits the cell according to a given volume fraction. We follow the same approach as in the recent authors' publication for 2D arbitrary convex cells in planar and axisymmetrical geometries, namely we derive an analytical formula for the volume of the specific prismatoids obtained when decomposing the cell using the planes that are parallel to the interface and passing through all the cell nodes. This formula is used to bracket the interface plane constant such that the volume-matching problem is rewritten in a single prismatoid in which the same formula is used to find the final solution. Finally, the proposed method is tested against an important number of reproducible configurations and shown to be at least five times faster.

  4. Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Due to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Ho; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Kennedy, Ian M.; Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Although inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) is known to cause systemic disease (i.e., metal fume fever), little is known about mechanisms underlying injury to alveolar epithelium. Objectives: Investigate ZnO NP–induced injury to alveolar epithelium by exposing primary cultured rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECMs) to ZnO NPs. Methods: RAECMs were exposed apically to ZnO NPs or, in some experiments, to culture fluid containing ZnCl2 or free Zn released from ZnO NPs. Transepithelial electrical resistance (RT) and equivalent short-circuit current (IEQ) were assessed as functions of concentration and time. Morphologic changes, lactate dehydrogenase release, cell membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial activity were measured. Measurements and Main Results: Apical exposure to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs decreased RT and IEQ of RAECMs by 100% over 24 hours, whereas exposure to 11 μg/ml ZnO NPs had little effect. Changes in RT and IEQ caused by 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs were irreversible. ZnO NP effects on RT yielded half-maximal concentrations of approximately 20 μg/ml. Apical exposure for 24 hours to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs induced decreases in mitochondrial activity and increases in lactate dehydrogenase release, permeability to fluorescein sulfonic acid, increased intracellular ROS, and translocation of ZnO NPs from apical to basolateral fluid (most likely across injured cells and/or damaged paracellular pathways). Conclusions: ZnO NPs cause severe injury to RAECMs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, mediated, at least in part, by free Zn released from ZnO NPs, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased intracellular ROS. PMID:20639441

  5. Doxycycline inhibits bone resorption by human interface membrane cells from aseptically loose hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Ong, S M; Taylor, G J S

    2003-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may have a role in the process of aseptic loosening. Doxycycline has been shown to inhibit MMPs. Our aim was to investigate the potential pharmacological effect of doxycycline on aseptic loosening. We used radiolabelled mouse calvariae cultured with human interface membrane cells from aseptically loosened hips. Bone resorption was confirmed in this model. The effect of doxycycline was assessed by culturing dead radiolabelled bone discs with cells from the interface membrane with doxycycline. The control group consisted of the same culture system without doxycycline. Supernatant 45calcium and the total 45calcium remaining in the bone discs at the completion of the culture were used to measure osteolysis. We found that doxycycline can inhibit osteolysis at the interface membrane of aseptically loosened hips. This may have therapeutic implications for the treatment of patients with aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. PMID:12729128

  6. Strategies to engineer tendon/ligament-to-bone interface: Biomaterials, cells and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Font Tellado, Sonia; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Van Griensven, Martijn

    2015-11-01

    Integration between tendon/ligament and bone occurs through a specialized tissue interface called enthesis. The complex and heterogeneous structure of the enthesis is essential to ensure smooth mechanical stress transfer between bone and soft tissues. Following injury, the interface is not regenerated, resulting in high rupture recurrence rates. Tissue engineering is a promising strategy for the regeneration of a functional enthesis. However, the complex structural and cellular composition of the native interface makes enthesis tissue engineering particularly challenging. Thus, it is likely that a combination of biomaterials and cells stimulated with appropriate biochemical and mechanical cues will be needed. The objective of this review is to describe the current state-of-the-art, challenges and future directions in the field of enthesis tissue engineering focusing on four key parameters: (1) scaffold and biomaterials, (2) cells, (3) growth factors and (4) mechanical stimuli.

  7. Mathematical model for cell competition: Predator-prey interactions at the interface between two groups of cells in monolayer tissue.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Seiya; Takamatsu, Atsuko; Ohsawa, Shizue; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of 'cell competition' has been implicated in the normal development and maintenance of organs, such as in the regulation of organ size and suppression of neoplastic development. In cell competition, one group of cells competes with another group through an interaction at their interface. Which cell group "wins" is governed by a certain relative fitness within the cells. However, this idea of cellular fitness has not been clearly defined. We construct two types of mathematical models to describe this phenomenon of cell competition by considering the interaction at the interface as a predator-prey type interaction in a monolayer tissue such as epithelium. Both of these models can reproduce several typical experimental observations involving systems of mutant cells (losers) and normal cells (winners). By analyzing one of the model and defining an index for the degree of fitness in groups of cells, we show that the fate of each group mainly depends on the relative carrying capacities of certain resources and the strength of the predator-prey interaction at the interface. This contradicts the classical hypothesis in which the relative proliferation rate determines the winner.

  8. Origin of photogenerated carrier recombination at the metal-active layer interface in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dubey, Ashish; Reza, Khan Mamun; Adhikari, Nirmal; Qiao, Qiquan; Bommisetty, Venkat

    2015-11-01

    The role of the metal-active layer interface in photogenerated recombination has been investigated using nanoscale current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) in as-deposited, pre-annealed and post-annealed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Aluminum (Al) confined post-annealed BHJ solar cells exhibited a significantly improved device efficiency compared to pre-annealed BHJ solar cells having similar photocarrier harvesting ability in the active layer. The nanoscale topography and CS-AFM results indicate a uniform PCBM rich phase at the metal-active layer interface in the post-annealed cells, but PCBM segregation in the pre-annealed cells. These two different annealing processes showed different carrier dynamics revealed using IMPS under various light intensities. The IMPS results suggest reduced photo generated carrier recombination in uniform PCBM rich post-annealed BHJ solar cells. This study reveals the importance of the metal-bend interface in BHJ solar cells in order to obtain efficient charge carrier extraction for high efficiency. PMID:26431263

  9. ADOLESCENT BINGE ALCOHOL EXPOSURE ALTERS HIPPOCAMPAL PROGENITOR CELL PROLIFERATION IN RATS: EFFECTS ON CELL CYCLE KINETICS

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Justin A.; Hayes, Dayna M.; Morris, Stephanie A.; Nixon, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Binge alcohol exposure in adolescent rats potently inhibits adult hippocampal neurogenesis by altering neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation and survival; however, it is not clear whether alcohol results in an increase or decrease in net proliferation. Thus, the effects of alcohol on hippocampal NPC cell cycle phase distribution and kinetics were assessed in an adolescent rat model of an alcohol use disorder. Cell cycle distribution was measured using a combination of markers (Ki-67, bromo-deoxy-uridine incorporation, and phospho-histone H3) to determine the proportion of NPCs within G1, S, and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Cell cycle kinetics were calculated using a cumulative bromo-deoxy-uridine injection protocol to determine the effect of alcohol on cell cycle length and S-phase duration. Binge alcohol exposure reduced the proportion of NPCs in S-phase, but had no effect on G1 or G2/M phases, indicating that alcohol specifically targets S-phase of the cell cycle. Cell cycle kinetics studies revealed that alcohol reduced NPC cell cycle duration by 36% and shortened S-phase by 62%, suggesting that binge alcohol exposure accelerates progression through the cell cycle. This effect would be expected to increase NPC proliferation, which was supported by a slight, but significant increase in the number of Sox-2+ NPCs residing in the hippocampal subgranular zone following binge alcohol exposure. These studies suggest the mechanism of alcohol inhibition of neurogenesis but also reveal the earliest evidence of the compensatory neurogenesis reaction that has been observed a week after binge alcohol exposure. PMID:21484803

  10. Toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in lung epithelial cells exposed at the air-liquid interface compared with in vivo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuefang; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of spark-generated copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) was evaluated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) using an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system. Dose-response results were compared to in vivo inhalation and instillation studies of CuONP. Cells were exposed to particle-free clean air (controls) or spark-generated CuONPs. The number median diameter, geometric standard deviation and total number concentration of CuONPs were 9.2 nm, 1.48 and 2.27×107 particles/cm3, respectively. Outcome measures included cell viability, cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and proinflammatory chemokine production. Exposure to clean air (2 or 4 hr) did not induce toxicity in HBEC or A549 cells. Compared with controls, CuONP exposures significantly reduced cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. A549 cells were significantly more susceptible to CuONP effects than HBEC. Antioxidant treatment reduced CuONP-induced cytotoxicity. When dose was expressed per area of exposed epithelium there was good agreement of toxicity measures with murine in vivo studies. This demonstrates that in vitro ALI studies can provide meaningful data on nanotoxicity of metal oxides. PMID:25575782

  11. Biomedical interfaces: titanium surface technology for implants and cell carriers.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Martin; Trentin, Diana; Textor, Marcus; Tosatti, Samuele G P

    2006-12-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become key materials for biomedical applications, mainly owing to their compatibility with human tissues and their mechanical strength. Effects of surface topography on cell and tissue response have been investigated extensively in the past, while (bio)chemical surface modification and its combination with designed topographies have remained largely unexplored. The following report describes some of the strategies used or intended to modify titanium surfaces, based on biological principles, with a focus on ultrathin biomimetic adlayers. One of the visions behind such approaches is to achieve improved healing and integration responses after implantation for patients, especially for those suffering from deficiencies, for example, diabetes or osteoporosis, two diseases that have increased drastically in our society during the last century.

  12. The dissociation of excitons at indium tin oxide-copper phthalocyanine interface in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. Y.; Song, Q. L.; Wang, M. L.; Ding, X. M.; Hou, X. Y.; Zhou, Z. G.; Li, F. Y.

    2008-11-01

    Exciton dissociation process at indium tin oxide (ITO)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) interface of ITO/CuPc(370 nm)/Al is studied by transient photovoltage method. A negative-to-positive change in the polarity of photovoltage upon pulsed laser irradiation is observed in CuPc thin film. The polarity change is regarded as a summation of the effect of exciton dissociation at ITO/CuPc interface (fast process) and that of free carrier separation by built-in field (slow process). Further experiments confirm the existence of exciton dissociation at ITO/CuPc interface, and the direction of which is electron injected into ITO, with holes left in CuPc film. This is opposite to that of the interfacial dissociation at donor/acceptor (D/A) interface in single heterojunction cells (ITO/D/A/buffer/Al). 3-nm-thick LiF insulating layer is inserted between ITO and CuPc to inhibit the exciton dissociation at ITO/CuPc interface. Thereby, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency of the single layer cell have been increased by several times.

  13. The complex interface chemistry of thin-film silicon/zinc oxide solar cell structures.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, D; Wimmer, M; Wilks, R G; Félix, R; Kronast, F; Ruske, F; Bär, M

    2014-12-21

    The interface between solid-phase crystallized phosphorous-doped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si(n(+))) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) was investigated using spatially resolved photoelectron emission microscopy. We find the accumulation of aluminum in the proximity of the interface. Based on a detailed photoemission line analysis, we also suggest the formation of an interface species. Silicon suboxide and/or dehydrated hemimorphite have been identified as likely candidates. For each scenario a detailed chemical reaction pathway is suggested. The chemical instability of the poly-Si(n(+))/ZnO:Al interface is explained by the fact that SiO2 is more stable than ZnO and/or that H2 is released from the initially deposited a-Si:H during the crystallization process. As a result, Zn (a deep acceptor in silicon) is "liberated" close to the silicon/zinc oxide interface presenting the inherent risk of forming deep defects in the silicon absorber. These could act as recombination centers and thus limit the performance of silicon/zinc oxide based solar cells. Based on this insight some recommendations with respect to solar cell design, material selection, and process parameters are given for further knowledge-based thin-film silicon device optimization. PMID:25363298

  14. Note: Sample cells to investigate solid/liquid interfaces with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rennie, Adrian R. Hellsing, Maja S.; Lindholm, Eric; Olsson, Anders

    2015-01-15

    The design of sample cells to study solid/liquid interfaces by neutron reflection is presented. Use of standardized components and a modular design has allowed a wide range of experiments that include grazing incidence scattering and conventional small-angle scattering. Features that reduce background scattering are emphasized. Various flow arrangements to fill and replenish the liquid in the cell as well as continuous stirring are described.

  15. Ozone exposure of human tracheal epithelial cells inactivates cyclooxygenase and increases 15-HETE production.

    PubMed

    Alpert, S E; Walenga, R W

    1995-12-01

    We assessed the immediate and prolonged effects of ozone on arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by primary cultured human tracheal epithelial (TE) cells. TE monolayers were exposed at a gas-fluid interface to air or 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 ppm ozone (15 min air, then 45 min air/ozone), and serially collected effluents were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and/or high-performance liquid chromatography. Release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and AA, but not 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) or its metabolites, was detected from cultures prelabeled with [14C]AA. PGE2 production, measured by immunoassay, was nearly constant during air exposure. In contrast, PGE2 increased two- to threefold during the first 15-min exposure to all concentrations of ozone, but then progressively declined to 78 +/- 17, 57 +/- 12 (P < or = 0.05), and 45 +/- 15% (P < or = 0.05) of air controls after exposure to 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 ppm ozone. Ozone did not induce a new spectrum of AA metabolites; only PGE2, lesser amounts of PGF2 alpha, and 15-HETE were present in media and cell extracts of air- or ozone-exposed cultures provided with 30 microM exogenous AA. However, cyclooxygenase (CO) activity (PGE2 produced from 30 microM AA) decreased to 82 +/- 9, 53 +/- 8 (P < or = 0.05), and 28 +/- 6% (P < or = 0.05) vs. controls after 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 ppm ozone, whereas 15-HETE production was unimpaired. When cells exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone were maintained for up to 6 h in 5% CO2-air, spontaneous PGE2 production remained decreased and recovery of CO activity was extremely slow. TLC analysis of lipid extracts from [14C]AA-labeled cells revealed a nearly twofold increase in free intracellular 15-HETE, and hydrolysis of phospholipids demonstrated increased esterified 15-HETE. Exposure of human TE cells to ozone leads to a transient increase followed by prolonged decrease in PGE2 production and increased intracellular retention of 15-HETE. Loss of the bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory properties

  16. A Hybrid Immersed Boundary-Immersed Interface Method for Cell Tracking in Microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossan, Mohammad; Dutta, Prashanta; Dillon, Robert

    2011-11-01

    The manipulation of cells in microfluidic devices has become routine for biomedical applications such as cell sorting and trapping. To date most of the designs used for cell manipulation are based on experimental trial and error. A fast and accurate numerical algorithm can provide important insight into the design of these devices. In this study, a hybrid immersed boundary-immersed interface method is developed to study the complex behavior of cells in liquid. The immersed boundary method provides an accurate prediction of particle motion in a fluid while the immersed interface method gives second-order accurate solutions for the ion concentrations and electrostatic potential in the presence of moving cells. Both methods employ a fixed computational grid without the need for remeshing at each time step. Cells of different size, shape and charge are allowed to move under both hydrodynamic and electrokinetic forces. Moreover different channel geometries are considered to obtain the best trapping and separation performance. The present immersed boundary-immersed interface model is particularly suitable for bioMEMS devices as this method can accurately predict viscous and electrostatic forces as well as particle velocity, location, and particle membrane deflection.

  17. Solution of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations in the cell-substrate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, M.; Wrobel, G.; Ingebrandt, S.; Sommerhage, F.; Offenhäusser, A.

    2007-09-01

    Electrogenic cells are able to generate electrical signals which can be measured by various invasive electrophysiological methods such as patch-clamp or sharp microelectrode recordings. Growing cells on the surfaces of e.g. metal microelectrodes or field-effect transistors allows the recording of an extracellular component of these signals. For an understanding of such extracellular signals it is mandatory to get detailed topographical as well as electrical information about the cell-sensor interface. In a first approximation, this interface can be described by a flat disk between cell membrane and sensor surface. For a correct description of the signals, the electrodiffusion of ions in this interface is modeled by using the stationary Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. We solve the equations analytically, and derive expressions for the potential, the ionic charge densities, and the seal resistance. The results provide a method for determining the distance h between sensor surface and cell membrane. For human embryonic kidney cells, we receive h ≈ 70 nm. Comparison with literature shows good agreement.

  18. Osteochondral interface generation by rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts coculture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Ravi, Sujata; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2012-09-01

    Physiological osteochondral interface regeneration is a significant challenge. This study aims to investigate the effect of the coculture of chondrogenic rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) with rabbit osteoblasts in a specially designed two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) co-interface culture to develop the intermediate osteochondral region in vitro. The 2D-3D coculture system was set up by first independently culturing chondrogenic rBMSCs on a scaffold and osteoblasts in cell culture plates, and subsequently placed in contact and cocultured. As control, samples not cocultured with osteoblasts were used. The regulatory effects exerted by osteoblasts on chondrogenic rBMSCs were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To study the effect of coculture on cells located in different parts of the scaffold, samples were separated into two parts and significantly different gene expression patterns were found between them. In comparison with the control group, a significant moderate downregulation of chondrogenic marker genes, such as Collagen II and Aggrecan was observed. However, the Sox-9 and Collagen I expression increased. More importantly, chondrogenic rBMSCs in the coculture system were shown to form the osteochondral interface layer by expressing calcified cartilage zone specific extracellular matrix marker Collagen X and the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker MMP-13, which were not observed in the control group. Specifically, only the chondrogenic rBMSC layer in contact with the osteoblasts expressed Collagen X and MMP-13, indicating the positive influence of the coculture upon interface formation. Biochemical analyses, histology results, and immunohistochemical staining further supported this observation. In conclusion, this study revealed that specific regulatory stimulations from osteoblasts in the 2D-3D interface coculture system could induce the formation of ostochondral interface for the purpose of osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID

  19. Molecular scale characterization of the titania-dye-solvent interface in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Philip; Andersson, Gunther; Snedden, Alan; Kloo, Lars; Atkin, Rob

    2010-06-15

    Charge separation at the dye/titania interface in dye sensitized solar cells is strongly influenced by the thickness and homogeneity of the sensitizing dye layer, as this controls the potential drop across the interface, and the probability of an excited electron being transferred from the dye to the titania. In this study we use atomic force microscopy and the depth profiling method neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (NICISS) to investigate the thickness and homogeneity of N719 dye adsorbed to titania before and after rinsing with pure acetonitrile. Both experimental methods show that the dye layers are closed but inhomogeneous. Inhomogeneity is more pronounced for unrinsed samples. PMID:20297833

  20. Effects of flame made zinc oxide particles in human lung cells - a comparison of aerosol and suspension exposures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Predominantly, studies of nanoparticle (NPs) toxicology in vitro are based upon the exposure of submerged cell cultures to particle suspensions. Such an approach however, does not reflect particle inhalation. As a more realistic simulation of such a scenario, efforts were made towards direct delivery of aerosols to air-liquid-interface cultivated cell cultures by the use of aerosol exposure systems. This study aims to provide a direct comparison of the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs when delivered as either an aerosol, or in suspension to a triple cell co-culture model of the epithelial airway barrier. To ensure dose–equivalence, ZnO-deposition was determined in each exposure scenario by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Biological endpoints being investigated after 4 or 24h incubation include cytotoxicity, total reduced glutathione, induction of antioxidative genes such as heme-oxygenase 1 (HO–1) as well as the release of the (pro)-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Results Off-gases released as by-product of flame ZnO synthesis caused a significant decrease of total reduced GSH and induced further the release of the cytokine TNFα, demonstrating the influence of the gas phase on aerosol toxicology. No direct effects could be attributed to ZnO particles. By performing suspension exposure to avoid the factor “flame-gases”, particle specific effects become apparent. Other parameters such as LDH and HO–1 were not influenced by gaseous compounds: Following aerosol exposure, LDH levels appeared elevated at both timepoints and the HO–1 transcript correlated positively with deposited ZnO-dose. Under submerged conditions, the HO–1 induction scheme deviated for 4 and 24h and increased extracellular LDH was found following 24h exposure. Conclusion In the current study, aerosol and suspension-exposure has been compared by exposing cell cultures to equivalent amounts of ZnO. Both exposure strategies differ fundamentally in their dose–response pattern

  1. Polarization Energies at Organic-Organic Interfaces: Impact on the Charge Separation Barrier at Donor-Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryno, Sean M; Fu, Yao-Tsung; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-22

    We probe the energetic landscape at a model pentacene/fullerene (C60) interface to investigate the interactions between positive and negative charges, which are critical to the processes of charge separation and recombination in organic solar cells. Using a polarizable force field, we find that polarization energy, i.e., the stabilization a charge feels due to its environment, is larger at the interface than in the bulk for both a positive and a negative charge. The combination of the charge being more stabilized at the interface and the Coulomb attraction between the charges results in a barrier to charge separation at the pentacene/C60 interface that can be in excess of 0.7 eV for static configurations of the donor and acceptor locations. However, the impact of molecular motions, i.e., the dynamics, at the interface at room temperature results in a distribution of polarization energies and in charge separation barriers that can be significantly reduced. The dynamic nature of the interface is thus critical, with the polarization energy distributions indicating that sites along the interface shift in time between favorable and unfavorable configurations for charge separation.

  2. Photoelectrical Stimulation of Neuronal Cells by an Organic Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interface.

    PubMed

    Abdullaeva, Oliya S; Schulz, Matthias; Balzer, Frank; Parisi, Jürgen; Lützen, Arne; Dedek, Karin; Schiek, Manuela

    2016-08-23

    As a step toward the realization of neuroprosthetics for vision restoration, we follow an electrophysiological patch-clamp approach to study the fundamental photoelectrical stimulation mechanism of neuronal model cells by an organic semiconductor-electrolyte interface. Our photoactive layer consisting of an anilino-squaraine donor blended with a fullerene acceptor is supporting the growth of the neuronal model cell line (N2A cells) without an adhesion layer on it and is not impairing cell viability. The transient photocurrent signal upon illumination from the semiconductor-electrolyte layer is able to trigger a passive response of the neuronal cells under physiological conditions via a capacitive coupling mechanism. We study the dynamics of the capacitive transmembrane currents by patch-clamp recordings and compare them to the dynamics of the photocurrent signal and its spectral responsivity. Furthermore, we characterize the morphology of the semiconductor-electrolyte interface by atomic force microscopy and study the stability of the interface in dark and under illuminated conditions.

  3. Photoelectrical Stimulation of Neuronal Cells by an Organic Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interface.

    PubMed

    Abdullaeva, Oliya S; Schulz, Matthias; Balzer, Frank; Parisi, Jürgen; Lützen, Arne; Dedek, Karin; Schiek, Manuela

    2016-08-23

    As a step toward the realization of neuroprosthetics for vision restoration, we follow an electrophysiological patch-clamp approach to study the fundamental photoelectrical stimulation mechanism of neuronal model cells by an organic semiconductor-electrolyte interface. Our photoactive layer consisting of an anilino-squaraine donor blended with a fullerene acceptor is supporting the growth of the neuronal model cell line (N2A cells) without an adhesion layer on it and is not impairing cell viability. The transient photocurrent signal upon illumination from the semiconductor-electrolyte layer is able to trigger a passive response of the neuronal cells under physiological conditions via a capacitive coupling mechanism. We study the dynamics of the capacitive transmembrane currents by patch-clamp recordings and compare them to the dynamics of the photocurrent signal and its spectral responsivity. Furthermore, we characterize the morphology of the semiconductor-electrolyte interface by atomic force microscopy and study the stability of the interface in dark and under illuminated conditions. PMID:27480642

  4. Nano-Bio Electrochemical Interfacing-Linking Cell Biology and Micro-Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shacham-Diamand, Y.; Popovtzer, R.; Rishpon, Y.

    Integration of biological substance within electronic devices is an innovative and challenging area combining recent progress in molecular biology and micro technology. First, we introduce the concept of integrating living cells with Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Following a brief overview on "whole cell based biosensors" we describe the design, fabrication, and process of a biocompatible electrochemical "Lab-on-a-Chip" system. Demonstrating the application of electrochemical interfacing based whole cell bio chips, we present two different configurations: a. integration of prokaryotic cells (bacteria) for water toxicity detection, and b. integration of eukaryotic cells (human colon cancer cells) for rapid evaluation of the effectiveness of drug treatments. Both applications, with either microbes or mammalian cells integrated onto MEMS based biochips with liquid volume in the range of 100 nL-1 μL, function well and yield a detectable signal much higher than noise level after few minutes.

  5. Oral Gingival Cell Cigarette Smoke Exposure Induces Muscle Cell Metabolic Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Baeder, Andrea C.; Napa, Kiran; Richardson, Sarah T.; Taylor, Oliver J.; Andersen, Samantha G.; Wilcox, Shalene H.; Winden, Duane R.; Reynolds, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure compromises health through damaging multiple physiological systems, including disrupting metabolic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of oral gingiva in mediating the deleterious metabolic effects of cigarette smoke exposure on skeletal muscle metabolic function. Using an in vitro conditioned medium cell model, skeletal muscle cells were incubated with medium from gingival cells treated with normal medium or medium containing suspended cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Following incubation of muscle cells with gingival cell conditioned medium, muscle cell mitochondrial respiration and insulin signaling and action were determined as an indication of overall muscle metabolic health. Skeletal muscle cells incubated with conditioned medium of CSE-treated gingival cells had a profound reduction in mitochondrial respiration and respiratory control. Furthermore, skeletal muscle cells had a greatly reduced response in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Altogether, these results provide a novel perspective on the mechanism whereby cigarette smoke affects systemic metabolic function. In conclusion, we found that oral gingival cells treated with CSE create an altered milieu that is sufficient to both disrupted skeletal muscle cell mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27034671

  6. Favorable electronic structure for organic solar cells induced by strong interaction at interface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shenghao Hao, Xia; Fu, Wei; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Sakurai, Takeaki; Masuda, Shigeru

    2013-11-14

    To clarify the role of buffer layer in organic solar cells (OSCs), the electronic properties of bathocuproine (BCP)/Mg interface were systematically investigated by using ultraviolet photoemissions spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, angle-resolved X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The results show there are gap states at the interface, which are caused by the interaction between BCP and Mg. The formation of Mg-N bond was found at the interface. The NEXAFS measurements show that BCP molecules for 1-2 monolayers are lying-down on the substrate, whereas orient randomly for thick BCP layer. It was supposed that the gap states and the highly-ordered orientation of thin BCP layer are the reasons for improving the performance of OSC with BCP buffer layer and low work function metal cathode.

  7. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship

  8. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell’s ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. PMID:23811327

  9. Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect in Human Lymphoblastoid TK6 Cells Following [13C2]-Acetaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The dose-response relationship for biomarkers of exposure (N2-ethylidene-dG adducts) and effect (cell survival and micronucleus formation) was determined across 4.5 orders of magnitude (50nM–2mM) using [13C2]-acetaldehyde exposures to human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells for 12h. There was a clear increase in exogenous N 2-ethylidene-dG formation at exposure concentrations ≥ 1µM, whereas the endogenous adducts remained nearly constant across all exposure concentrations, with an average of 3.0 adducts/107 dG. Exogenous adducts were lower than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≤ 10µM and were greater than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≥ 250µM. When the endogenous and exogenous adducts were summed together, statistically significant increases in total adduct formation over the endogenous background occurred at 50µM. Cell survival and micronucleus formation were monitored across the exposure range and statistically significant decreases in cell survival and increases in micronucleus formation occurred at ≥ 1000µM. This research supports the hypothesis that endogenously produced reactive species, including acetaldehyde, are always present and constitute the majority of the observed biological effects following very low exposures to exogenous acetaldehyde. These data can replace default assumptions of linear extrapolation to very low doses of exogenous acetaldehyde for risk prediction. PMID:23425604

  10. Cell-directed-assembly: Directing the formation of nano/bio interfaces and architectures with living cells

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Helen K.; Carnes, Eric C.; Ashley, Carlee E.; Lopez, DeAnna M.; Douthit, Cynthia; Karlin, Shelly; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Background The desire to immobilize, encapsulate, or entrap viable cells for use in a variety of applications has been explored for decades. Traditionally, the approach is to immobilize cells to utilize a specific functionality of the cell in the system. Scope of Review This review describes our recent discovery that living cells can organize extended nanostructures and nano-objects to create a highly biocompatible nano//bio interface [1]. Major Conclusions We find that short chain phospholipids direct the formation of thin film silica mesophases during evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) [2], and that the introduction of cells alter the self-assembly pathway. Cells organize an ordered lipid-membrane that forms a coherent interface with the silica mesophase that is unique in that it withstands drying - yet it maintains accessibility to molecules introduced into the 3D silica host. Cell viability is preserved in the absence of buffer, making these constructs useful as standalone cell-based sensors. In response to hyperosmotic stress, the cells release water, creating a pH gradient which is maintained within the nanostructured host and serves to localize lipids, proteins, plasmids, lipidized nanocrystals, and other components at the cellular surface. This active organization of the bio/nano interface can be accomplished during ink-jet printing or selective wetting - processes allowing patterning of cellular arrays - and even spatially-defined genetic modification. General Significance Recent advances in the understanding of nanotechnology and cell biology encourage the pursuit of more complex endeavors where the dynamic interactions of the cell and host material act symbiotically to obtain new, useful functions. PMID:20933574

  11. Assessment of planctomycetes cell viability after pollutants exposure.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carlos; Catita, José A M; Lage, Olga Maria

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the growth of six different planctomycetes, a particular ubiquitous bacterial phylum, was assessed after exposure to pollutants. In addition and for comparative purposes, Pseudomonas putida, Escherichia coli and Vibrio anguillarum were tested. Each microorganism was exposed to several concentrations of 21 different pollutants. After exposure, bacteria were cultivated using the drop plate method. In general, the strains exhibited a great variation of sensitivity to pollutants in the order: V. anguillarum > planctomycetes > P. putida > E. coli. E. coli showed resistance to all pollutants tested, with the exception of phenol and sodium azide. Copper, Ridomil® (fungicide), hydrazine and phenol were the most toxic pollutants. Planctomycetes were resistant to extremely high concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium but they were the only bacteria sensitive to Previcur N® (fungicide). Sodium azide affected the growth on plates of E. coli, P. putida and V. anguillarum, but not of planctomycetes. However, this compound affected planctomycetes cell respiration but with less impact than in the aforementioned bacteria. Our results provide evidence for a diverse response of bacteria towards pollutants, which may influence the structuring of microbial communities in ecosystems under stress, and provide new insights on the ecophysiology of planctomycetes.

  12. Interplay between fullerene surface coverage and contact selectivity of cathode interfaces in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Antonio; Dörling, Bernhard; Ripolles-Sanchis, Teresa; Aghamohammadi, Mahdieh; Barrena, Esther; Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà

    2013-05-28

    Interfaces play a determining role in establishing the degree of carrier selectivity at outer contacts in organic solar cells. Considering that the bulk heterojunction consists of a blend of electron donor and acceptor materials, the specific relative surface coverage at the electrode interfaces has an impact on the carrier selectivity. This work unravels how fullerene surface coverage at cathode contacts lies behind the carrier selectivity of the electrodes. A variety of techniques such as variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and capacitance-voltage measurements have been used to determine the degree of fullerene surface coverage in a set of PCPDTBT-based solar cells processed with different additives. A full screening from highly fullerene-rich to polymer-rich phases attaching the cathode interface has enabled the overall correlation between surface morphology (relative coverage) and device performance (operating parameters). The general validity of the measurements is further discussed in three additional donor/acceptor systems: PCPDTBT, P3HT, PCDTBT, and PTB7 blended with fullerene derivatives. It is demonstrated that a fullerene-rich interface at the cathode is a prerequisite to enhance contact selectivity and consequently power conversion efficiency.

  13. Tuning back contact property via artificial interface dipoles in Si/organic hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Sheng, Jiang; Wu, Sudong; Zhu, Juye; Chen, Shaojie; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun

    2016-07-01

    Back contact property plays a key role in the charge collection efficiency of c-Si/poly(3,4-ethylthiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) hybrid solar cells (Si-HSCs), as an alternative for the high-efficiency and low-cost photovoltaic devices. In this letter, we utilize the water soluble poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) to modify the Al/Si interface to be an Ohmic contact via interface dipole tuning, decreasing the work function of the Al film. This Ohmic contact improves the electron collection efficiency of the rear electrode, increasing the short circuit current density (Jsc). Furthermore, the interface dipoles make the band bending downward to increase the total barrier height of built-in electric field of the solar cell, enhancing the open circuit voltage (Voc). The PEO solar cell exhibits an excellent performance, 12.29% power conversion efficiency, a 25.28% increase from the reference solar cell without a PEO interlayer. The simple and water soluble method as a promising alternative is used to develop the interfacial contact quality of the rear electrode for the high photovoltaic performance of Si-HSCs.

  14. Human foetal osteoblastic cell response to polymer-demixed nanotopographic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung Yul; Hansen, Joshua C; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Runt, James; Donahue, Henry J

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale cell–substratum interactions are of significant interest in various biomedical applications. We investigated human foetal osteoblastic cell response to randomly distributed nanoisland topography with varying heights (11, 38 and 85 nm) produced by a polystyrene (PS)/polybromostyrene polymer-demixing technique. Cells displayed island-conforming lamellipodia spreading, and filopodia projections appeared to play a role in sensing the nanotopography. Cells cultured on 11 nm high islands displayed significantly enhanced cell spreading and larger cell dimensions than cells on larger nanoislands or flat PS control, on which cells often displayed a stellate shape. Development of signal transmitting structures such as focal adhesive vinculin protein and cytoskeletal actin stress fibres was more pronounced, as was their colocalization, in cells cultured on smaller nanoisland surfaces. Cell adhesion and proliferation were greater with decreasing island height. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, an early stage marker of bone cell differentiation, also exhibited nanotopography dependence, i.e. higher AP activity on 11 nm islands compared with that on larger islands or flat PS. Therefore, randomly distributed island topography with varying nanoscale heights not only affect adhesion-related cell behaviour but also bone cell phenotype. Our results suggest that modulation of nanoscale topography may be exploited to control cell function at cell–biomaterial interfaces. PMID:16849169

  15. Modulation of bronchial epithelial cell barrier function by in vitro ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Takahashi, Nobuyoshi; Croxton, T.L.; Spannhake, E.W.

    1994-12-01

    The epithelial cells lining the small, peripheral airways function as important targets for the action of inspired ozone. Loss of epithelial barrier integrity in these regions is a common element in ozone-induced airway inflammation. To investigate the direct effect of ozone on epithelial barrier function, canine bronchial epithelial (CBE) cells grown with an air interface were exposed for 3hr to 0.2, 0.5, or 0.8 ppm ozone or to air. Mannitol flux, used as an index of paracellular permeability, increased above air controls by 461%, 774%, and 1172% at the three ozone concentrations, respectively. Transcellular electrical resistance exhibited a dose-related decrease. The immediate effect of 0.8 ppm ozone on permeability was significantly inhibited by preincubation for 48 hr in the presence of 1 ng/ml vitamin E (33%) or 1 {mu}M vitamin A (34%). Responses to 0.5 ppm or 0.8 ppm were inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with 0.1 {mu}M of the actin polymerizing agent phalloidin (34% and 25% inhibition, respectively). The increases in permeability induced by 0.2 and 0.5 ppm ozone were attenuated by 54% and 22%, respectively, at 18 hr after exposure, whereas that to 0.8 ppm was further enhanced by 42% at this time. The effects of ozone are modulated by the availability of antioxidants to the cells and appear to be associated with cytoskeletal dysfunction in CBE cells. The data are consistent with a loss of barrier function linked to a direct oxidative effect of ozone on individual CBE cells and indicate that the reversible or progressive nature of this effect is dose dependent. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Response to Heavy Particle Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill

    2012-07-01

    A battery of non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) are being used to examine the molecular changes that lead to lung carcinogenesis after exposure to heavy particles found in the free space environment. The goal is to ultimately identify biomarkers of radioresponse that can be used for prediction of carcinogenic risk for fatal lung cancer. Our initial studies have focused on the cell line HBEC3 KT and the isogenic variant HBEC3 KTR53, which overexpresses the RASv12 mutant and where p53 has been knocked down by shRNA, and is considered to be a more oncogenically progressed variant. We have previously described the response of HBEC3 KT at the cellular and molecular level, however, the focus here is on the rate of cellular transformation after HZE radiation exposure and the molecular changes in transformed cells. When comparing the two cell lines we find that there is a maximum rate of cellular transformation at 0.25 Gy when cells are exposed to 1 GeV Fe particles, and, for the HBEC3 KTR53 there are multiple pathways upregulated that promote anchorage independent growth including the mTOR pathway, the TGF-1 pathway, RhoA signaling and the ERK/MAPK pathway as early as 2 weeks after radiation. This does not occur in the HBEC3 KT cell line. Transformed HBEC3 KT cells do not show any morphologic or phenotypic changes when grown as cell cultures. HBEC3 KTR53 cells on the other hand show substantial changes in morphology from a cobblestone epithelial appearance to a mesenchymal appearance with a lack of contact inhibition. This epithelial to mesenchymal change in morphology is accompanied by the expression of vimentin and a reduction in the expression of E-cadherin, which are hallmarks of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, for HBEC3 KT transformed cells there are no mutations in the p53 gene, 2 of 15 clones were found to be heterozygous for the RASV12 mutation, and 3 of 15 clones expressed high levels of BigH3, a TGFB

  17. Alterations in Cell Signaling Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells after Environmental Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, K; McCutcheon-Maloney, S M; Bennett, L M

    2003-02-01

    Recent human epidemiological studies suggest that up to 75% of human cancers can be attributed to environmental exposures. Understanding the biologic impact of being exposed to a lifetime of complex environmental mixtures that may not be fully characterized is currently a major challenge. Functional endpoints may be used to assess the gross health consequences of complex mixture exposures from groundwater contamination, superfund sites, biologic releases, or nutritional sources. Such endpoints include the stimulation of cell growth or the induction of a response in an animal model. An environmental exposure that upsets normal cell growth regulation may have important ramifications for cancer development. Stimulating cell growth may alter an individual's cancer risk by changing the expression of genes and proteins that have a role in growth regulatory pathways within cells. Modulating the regulation of these genes and their products may contribute to the initiation, promotion or progression of disease in response to environmental exposure. We are investigating diet-related compounds that induce cell proliferation in breast cancer cell lines. These compounds, PhIP, Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign}, may be part of an everyday diet. PhIP is a naturally occurring mutagen that is formed in well-cooked muscle meats. PhIP consistently causes dose-dependent breast tumor formation in rats and consumption of well-done meat has been linked to increased risk of breast cancer in women. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} herbal tonics are complementary and alternative medicines used by women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer as an alternative therapy for disease treatment and prevention. The long-term goal of this work is to identify those cellular pathways that are altered by a chemical or biologic environmental exposure and understand how those changes correlate with and or predict changes in human health risk. This project addressed this goal by

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  19. Robotics, Stem Cells and Brain Computer Interfaces in Rehabilitation and Recovery from Stroke; Updates and Advances

    PubMed Central

    Boninger, Michael L; Wechsler, Lawrence R.; Stein, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the current state and latest advances in robotics, stem cells, and brain computer interfaces in rehabilitation and recovery for stroke. Design The authors of this summary recently reviewed this work as part of a national presentation. The paper represents the information included in each area. Results Each area has seen great advances and challenges as products move to market and experiments are ongoing. Conclusion Robotics, stem cells, and brain computer interfaces all have tremendous potential to reduce disability and lead to better outcomes for patients with stroke. Continued research and investment will be needed as the field moves forward. With this investment, the potential for recovery of function is likely substantial PMID:25313662

  20. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  1. Radiation exposure as a possible etiologic factor in hairy cell leukemia (leukemic reticuloendotheliosis)

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.J.; Keating, M.J.

    1980-10-01

    The frequency of prior occupational, accidental, or therapeutic radiation exposure was significantly higher for hairy cell leukemia patients than for a control group of solid tumor patients. Hairy cell leukemia patients were also more frequently involved in occupations at high risk of radiation exposure such as chemist, engineer, physicist, and health care facility worker. The observation that the incidence of thyroid disorders among hairy cell leukemia patients was also unusually high was interpreted as further indirect evidence of excessive radiation exposure. It appears that radiation exposure may be an important contributing factor in the development of some cases of hairy cell leukemia.

  2. In-vitro Cell Exposure Studies for the Assessment of Nanoparticle Toxicity in the Lung - A Dialogue between Aerosol Science and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hanns-Rudolf, Paur; Cassee, Flemming R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Fissan, Heinz; Diabate, Silvia; Aufderheide, M.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Hanninen, Otto; Kasper, G.; Riediker, Michael; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Schmid, Otmar

    2011-10-01

    The rapid introduction of engineered nanostructured materials into numerous industrial and consumer products will result in enhanced exposure to engineered nanoparticles. Workplace exposure has been identified as the most likely source of uncontrolled inhalation of engineered aerosolized nanoparticles, but release of engineered nanoparticles may occur at any stage of the lifecycle of consumer products. The dynamic development of new nanomaterials with possibly unknown toxicological effects poses a challenge for the assessment of nanoparticle induced toxicity and safety. In this consensus document from a workshop on in-vitro cell systems for nanotoxicity testing an overview is given of the main issues concerning inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, lung physiology, nanoparticle-related biological mechanisms, in-vitro cell exposure systems for nanoparticles and social aspects of nanotechnology. The workshop participants recognized the large potential of in-vitro cell exposure systems for reliable, high-throughput screening of nanotoxicity. For the investigation of pulmonary nanotoxicity, a strong preference was expressed for air-liquid interface (ALI) cell exposure systems (rather than submerged cell exposure systems) as they closely resemble in-vivo conditions in the lungs and they allow for unaltered and dosimetrically accurate delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles to the cells. The members of the workshop believe that further advances in in-vitro cell exposure studies would be greatly facilitated by a more active role of the aerosol scientists. The technical know-how for developing and running ALI in-vitro exposure systems is available in the aerosol community and at the same time biologists/toxicologists are required for proper assessment of the biological impact of nanoparticles.

  3. Surface chemistry gradients on silicone elastomers for high-throughput modulation of cell-adhesive interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Greeshma; Gallant, Nathan D

    2015-06-01

    Combinatorial and high-throughput approaches to screening cell responses to material properties accelerate the speed of discovery and facilitate the identification of cell instructive cues or trends that may be missed by discrete sampling. However, these technologies have not yet been widely applied to materials with tissue-like stiffness. The fabrication of monotonically varying surface chemistry gradients on polydimethylsiloxane, an elastic biomaterial, and the influence of these engineered surfaces on protein adsorption and adherent cell morphology were explored in this study. Crosslinked networks of polydimethylsiloxane were functionalized with a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer and then modified by spatiotemporally regulated ultraviolet ozonolysis to obtain gradients of oxygenated species ranging from ∼10° to ∼100° in water contact angle. Automated microscopy and image analysis of fibroblast cell morphology revealed a strong correlation between cell spreading and hydrophobicity. However, structural and functional analysis of the fibronectin interface indicated a proportional increase in cell spreading with adsorption, but a biphasic relationship with fibronectin conformation, underscoring the complexity of the adhesive interface. This work demonstrates the development of an elastomer surface modification platform that can be extended to future combinatorial studies of biological responses to chemical and mechanical material properties. PMID:25294744

  4. MERS-CoV at the Animal–Human Interface: Inputs on Exposure Pathways from an Expert-Opinion Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Anna L.; Goutard, Flavie Luce; Miguel, Eve; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Chevalier, Veronique; Faye, Bernard; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Roger, Francois Louis

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 4 years after the first report of the emergence of Middle-East respiratory syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and nearly 1800 human cases later, the ecology of MERS-CoV, its epidemiology, and more than risk factors of MERS-CoV transmission between camels are poorly understood. Knowledge about the pathways and mechanisms of transmission from animals to humans is limited; as of yet, transmission risks have not been quantified. Moreover the divergent sanitary situations and exposures to animals among populations in the Arabian Peninsula, where human primary cases appear to dominate, vs. other regions in the Middle East and Africa, with no reported human clinical cases and where the virus has been detected only in dromedaries, represents huge scientific and health challenges. Here, we have used expert-opinion elicitation in order to obtain ideas on relative importance of MERS-CoV risk factors and estimates of transmission risks from various types of contact between humans and dromedaries. Fourteen experts with diverse and extensive experience in MERS-CoV relevant fields were enrolled and completed an online questionnaire that examined pathways based on several scenarios, e.g., camels–camels, camels–human, bats/other species to camels/humans, and the role of diverse biological substances (milk, urine, etc.) and potential fomites. Experts believed that dromedary camels play the largest role in MERS-CoV infection of other dromedaries; however, they also indicated a significant influence of the season (i.e. calving or weaning periods) on transmission risk. All experts thought that MERS-CoV-infected dromedaries and asymptomatic humans play the most important role in infection of humans, with bats and other species presenting a possible, but yet undefined, risk. Direct and indirect contact of humans with dromedary camels were identified as the most risky types of contact, when compared to consumption of various camel products, with estimated “most likely

  5. Solar cell radiation response near the interface of different atomic number materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, E. A.; Cappelli, J. R.; Lowe, L. F.; Wall, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The response of cobalt 60 irradiated N/P silicon solar cells was measured as a function of the atomic number of the medium adjacent to the cell and the direction of the gamma ray beam. The interpositioning of various thicknesses of aluminum between the adjacent material and the cell had the effect of moving the cell to various locations in an approximate monatomic numbered medium. Using this technique the solar cell response was determined at various distances from the interface for gold and beryllium. The results were compared with predictions based upon ionization chamber measurements of dose perturbations in aluminum and found to agree within five percent. Ionization chamber data was then used to estimate the influence of various base contact materials.

  6. Atom-probe tomographic study of interfaces of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, S. Asahi, R.; Itoh, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Ohishi, K.; Isheim, D.; Seidman, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    The heterophase interfaces between the CdS buffer layer and the Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) absorption layers are one of the main factors affecting photovoltaic performance of CZTS cells. We have studied the compositional distributions at heterophase interfaces in CZTS cells using three-dimensional atom-probe tomography. The results demonstrate: (a) diffusion of Cd into the CZTS layer; (b) segregation of Zn at the CdS/CZTS interface; and (c) a change of oxygen and hydrogen concentrations in the CdS layer depending on the heat treatment. Annealing at 573 K after deposition of CdS improves the photovoltaic properties of CZTS cells probably because of the formation of a heterophase epitaxial junction at the CdS/CZTS interface. Conversely, segregation of Zn at the CdS/CZTS interface after annealing at a higher temperature deteriorates the photovoltaic properties.

  7. The effect of interfaces on charge transport and recombination in polymeric solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbacka, Ronald; Sanden, Simon; Xu, Qian; Sandberg, Oskar; Nyman, Mathias; Smatt, Jan-Henrik; Juska, Gytis

    2013-03-01

    Charge-carrier transport and recombination in hybrid TiO2/P3HT:PCBM bulk-heterojunction solar cells (BHSCs) have been measured using photo-CELIV. We have fabricated hybrid devices in the form of indium tin oxide/titanium dioxide/P3HT:PCBM/Cu) to clarify the impact of the TiO2/P3HT:PCBM interface on the charge transport using the charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage (CELIV) technique. We found that a large equilibrium charge reservoir is accumulated at negative offsets at the TiO2/P3HT:PCBM interface leading to space charge limited extraction current (SCLC) transients. We show analytically the SCLC transient response and compare the experimental data to calculated SCLC in a linearly increasing voltage. The theoretical calculations indicate that the large charge reservoir at negative offset voltages is due to thermally generated charges combined with poor hole extraction at the ITO/TiO2 contact, due to the hole blocking character of TiO2. In this presentation we will discuss how interfaces, both metal-organic but also organic-organic interfaces affect charge carrier transport and recombination measurements. Laboratory of Physical Chemistry

  8. Novel impedance cell for low conductive liquids: Determination of bulk and interface contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchi, Marta; Callegaro, Luca; Durbiano, Francesca; D'Elia, Vincenzo; Strigazzi, Alfredo

    2007-11-01

    A plane capacitor cell with variable gap has been designed in order to detect the complex permittivity of low conductive liquids (up to 500μS/cm) and the impedance of the sample-electrode interface. The novelty of the cell consists of the simultaneous presence of the field uniformity ensured by a guard ring, an adjustable gap between 300μm and 6.75mm (the electrode axial motion avoiding any rotation), and the immersion of the capacitor in the sample reservoir. The size of the capacitor electrodes and the gap values have been tested via the capacitance detection of the in-air cell at 1kHz. The sample measurements have been performed by scanning the frequency range between 15Hz and 2MHz at four different capacitor gap values. In the paper a method to directly extract the bulk complex permittivity and the interface impedance versus frequency is presented. It is based on the assumption that the interface contribution is independent of the electrode gap, as confirmed (within the measurement accuracy) from measurements on all samples investigated. As samples of interest, we have chosen two certified electrolytic conductivity standards, KCl aqueous solutions having conductivity traceable to SI units; and two polymer latex aqueous dispersions of microspheres. Regarding KCl solutions, the conductivity measurements are compatible with the reference values within the specified uncertainty; the measured permittivities are consistent with the literature. For all samples, we have recovered the expected result that the interface impedance mainly affects the low frequency range (f<10kHz).

  9. T cell chemo-vaccination effects after repeated mucosal SHIV exposures and oral pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Ellen N; Adams, Debra R; Youngpairoj, Ae S; Luo, Wei; Zheng, Qi; Cong, Mian-er; Aung, Wutyi; Mitchell, James; Otten, Ron; Hendry, R Michael; Heneine, Walid; McNicholl, Janet; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2011-04-26

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with anti-viral drugs is currently in clinical trials for the prevention of HIV infection. Induction of adaptive immune responses to virus exposures during anti-viral drug administration, i.e., a "chemo-vaccination" effect, could contribute to PrEP efficacy. To study possible chemo-vaccination, we monitored humoral and cellular immune responses in nine rhesus macaques undergoing up to 14 weekly, low-dose SHIV(SF162P3) rectal exposures. Six macaques concurrently received PrEP with intermittent, oral Truvada; three were no-PrEP controls. PrEP protected 4 macaques from infection. Two of the four showed evidence of chemo-vaccination, because they developed anti-SHIV CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells; SHIV-specific antibodies were not detected. Control macaques showed no anti-SHIV immune responses before infection. Chemo-vaccination-induced T cell responses were robust (up to 3,940 SFU/10(6) PBMCs), predominantly central memory cells, short-lived (≤22 weeks), and appeared intermittently and with changing specificities. The two chemo-vaccinated macaques were virus-challenged again after 28 weeks of rest, after T cell responses had waned. One macaque was not protected from infection. The other macaque concurrently received additional PrEP. It remained uninfected and T cell responses were boosted during the additional virus exposures. In summary, we document and characterize PrEP-induced T cell chemo-vaccination. Although not protective after subsiding in one macaque, chemo-vaccination-induced T cells warrant more comprehensive analysis during peak responses for their ability to prevent or to control infections after additional exposures. Our findings highlight the importance of monitoring these responses in clinical PrEP trials and suggest that a combination of vaccines and PrEP potentially might enhance efficacy.

  10. Modelling the effects of microgravity on the permeability of air interface respiratory epithelial cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Marlise A.; Bosquillon, Cynthia; Russomano, Thais; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Falcão, Felipe; Marriott, Christopher; Forbes, Ben

    2010-09-01

    Although it has been suggested that microgravity might affect drug absorption in vivo, drug permeability across epithelial barriers has not yet been investigated in vitro during modelled microgravity. Therefore, a cell culture/diffusion chamber was designed specifically to accommodate epithelial cell layers in a 3D-clinostat and allow epithelial permeability to be measured under microgravity conditions in vitro with minimum alteration to established cell culture techniques. Human respiratory epithelial Calu-3 cell layers were used to model the airway epithelium. Cells grown at an air interface in the diffusion chamber from day 1 or day 5 after seeding on 24-well polyester Transwell cell culture inserts developed a similar transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) to cells cultured in conventional cell culture plates. Confluent Calu-3 layers exposed to modelled microgravity in the 3D-clinostat for up to 48 h maintained their high TER. The permeability of the paracellular marker 14C-mannitol was unaffected after a 24 h rotation of the cell layers in the 3D-clinostat, but was increased 2-fold after 48 h of modelled microgravity. It was demonstrated that the culture/diffusion chamber developed is suitable for culturing epithelial cell layers and, when subjected to rotation in the 3D-clinostat, will be a valuable in vitro system in which to study the influence of microgravity on epithelial permeability and drug transport.

  11. Occupational exposures, animal exposure and smoking as risk factors for hairy cell leukaemia evaluated in a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, M.; Hardell, L.; Magnuson, A.; Hagberg, H.; Rask-Andersen, A.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate occupational exposures as risk factors for hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), a population-based case-control study on 121 male HCL patients and 484 controls matched for age and sex was conducted. Elevated odds ratio (OR) was found for exposure to farm animals in general: OR 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.2. The ORs were elevated for exposure to cattle, horse, hog, poultry and sheep. Exposure to herbicides (OR 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9), insecticides (OR 2.0, CI 1.1-3.5), fungicides (OR 3.8, CI 1.4-9.9) and impregnating agents (OR 2.4, CI 1.3-4.6) also showed increased risk. Certain findings suggested that recall bias may have affected the results for farm animals, herbicides and insecticides. Exposure to organic solvents yielded elevated risk (OR 1.5, CI 0.99-2.3), as did exposure to exhaust fumes (OR 2.1, CI 1.3-3.3). In an additional multivariate model, the ORs remained elevated for all these exposures with the exception of insecticides. We found a reduced risk for smokers with OR 0.6 (CI 0.4-1.1) because of an effect among non-farmers. PMID:9667691

  12. Mobility-lifetime product and interface property in amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, H.; Kida, H.; Nonomura, S.; Fukumoto, K.; Hamakawa, Y.

    1983-06-01

    A technique for evaluating the mobility-lifetime product of electrons and holes for amorphous Si solar cells is reported and used to assay the variation of the products with impurity doping, temperature, and prolonged light exposure. The product was examined as a significant indicator of solar cell performance and durability. The a-Si:H cells examined were prepared by an rf technique, and the spectral response of the photocurrent was examined in monochromatic light. The maximum products were observed when small amounts of boron atoms were used as the dopant. The hole lifetime dominated the photoconductivity in undoped and phosphorus doped cells, while the electron lifetime was dominant in boron doped cells. The mobility-lifetime product controlled the effective surface recombination factor. The method was concluded useful for optimizing the material, structure, and manufacturing processes for producing higher performance, reproducible, and stable a-Si:H pin solar cells.

  13. Impact of a small cell on the RF-EMF exposure in a train.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Sam; Plets, David; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2015-02-27

    The deployment of a miniature mobile-phone base station or small cell in a train car significantly improves the coverage and the capacity of a mobile network service on the train. However, the impact of the small cell on the passengers' exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is unknown. In this study, we assessed experimentally the RF-EMF exposure of a mobile-phone user who is either connected to the outdoor macrocell network or to an in-train small cell, while traveling on the train, by means of the absorbed-dose concept, which combines the base station downlink exposure with the mobile-phone uplink exposure. For Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology at 1800 MHz, we found that by connecting to a small cell, the brain exposure of the user could realistically be reduced by a factor 35 and the whole-body exposure by a factor 11.

  14. Impact of a small cell on the RF-EMF exposure in a train.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Sam; Plets, David; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2015-03-01

    The deployment of a miniature mobile-phone base station or small cell in a train car significantly improves the coverage and the capacity of a mobile network service on the train. However, the impact of the small cell on the passengers' exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is unknown. In this study, we assessed experimentally the RF-EMF exposure of a mobile-phone user who is either connected to the outdoor macrocell network or to an in-train small cell, while traveling on the train, by means of the absorbed-dose concept, which combines the base station downlink exposure with the mobile-phone uplink exposure. For Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology at 1800 MHz, we found that by connecting to a small cell, the brain exposure of the user could realistically be reduced by a factor 35 and the whole-body exposure by a factor 11. PMID:25734793

  15. Impact of a Small Cell on the RF-EMF Exposure in a Train

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Sam; Plets, David; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2015-01-01

    The deployment of a miniature mobile-phone base station or small cell in a train car significantly improves the coverage and the capacity of a mobile network service on the train. However, the impact of the small cell on the passengers’ exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is unknown. In this study, we assessed experimentally the RF-EMF exposure of a mobile-phone user who is either connected to the outdoor macrocell network or to an in-train small cell, while traveling on the train, by means of the absorbed-dose concept, which combines the base station downlink exposure with the mobile-phone uplink exposure. For Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology at 1800 MHz, we found that by connecting to a small cell, the brain exposure of the user could realistically be reduced by a factor 35 and the whole-body exposure by a factor 11. PMID:25734793

  16. Stem cell progeny contribute to the schistosome host-parasite interface

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J; Wendt, George R; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomes infect more than 200 million of the world's poorest people. These parasites live in the vasculature, producing eggs that spur a variety of chronic, potentially life-threatening, pathologies exacerbated by the long lifespan of schistosomes, that can thrive in the host for decades. How schistosomes maintain their longevity in this immunologically hostile environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that somatic stem cells in Schistosoma mansoni are biased towards generating a population of cells expressing factors associated exclusively with the schistosome host-parasite interface, a structure called the tegument. We show cells expressing these tegumental factors are short-lived and rapidly turned over. We suggest that stem cell-driven renewal of this tegumental lineage represents an important strategy for parasite survival in the context of the host vasculature. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12473.001 PMID:27003592

  17. The Degradation Interface of Magnesium Based Alloys in Direct Contact with Human Primary Osteoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Laipple, Daniel; Luthringer, Bérengère; Feyerabend, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been identified as a new generation material of orthopaedic implants. In vitro setups mimicking physiological conditions are promising for material / degradation analysis prior to in vivo studies however the direct influence of cell on the degradation mechanism has never been investigated. For the first time, the direct, active, influence of human primary osteoblasts on magnesium-based materials (pure magnesium, Mg-2Ag and Mg-10Gd alloys) is studied for up to 14 days. Several parameters such as composition of the degradation interface (directly beneath the cells) are analysed with a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray and focused ion beam. Furthermore, influence of the materials on cell metabolism is examined via different parameters like active mineralisation process. The results are highlighting the influences of the selected alloying element on the initial cells metabolic activity. PMID:27327435

  18. Nano interfaced biosensor for detection of choline in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Vignesh; Madhurantakam, Sasya; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Balaguru Rayappan, John Bosco; Maheswari Krishnan, Uma

    2016-01-15

    Choline, a type of Vitamin B, is an important nutrient in the human body and is involved in key metabolic pathways. Abnormal levels of choline leads to diseased conditions. The levels of choline and its associated compounds are found to be elevated in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. The choline level ranges from 0.4 to 4.9mmol/kg in TNBC. Thus the detection of choline levels in cells can aid in diagnosing breast cancer. The present work aims to develop a nano-interfaced electrochemical biosensor for the rapid detection of choline in cancer cells. For electrochemical detection, glassy carbon electrode coated with a zinc oxide nano-interface was used as the working electrode. Zinc oxide synthesized by hydrothermal method was characterized using SEM and XRD. The choline oxidase (ChOx) enzyme was immobilized on the nano-interface by drop-casting. Choline oxidase (ChOx) converts choline to betaine and H2O2 in the presence of oxygen. The H2O2 produced was determined amperometrically. The amount of H2O2 produced is directly proportional to concentration of choline present. The sensitivity, selectivity, stability and concentration studies were carried out and quantification of choline in TNBC was also carried out. The results demonstrate that this biosensor has the potential to be developed as a clinical tool for breast cancer detection. PMID:26476202

  19. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-05-17

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm(2). Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification.

  20. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification.

  1. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification. PMID:27185635

  2. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm(2). Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification. PMID:27185635

  3. Ionizing Radiation Exposure and Basal Cell Carcinoma Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changzhao; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    This commentary summarizes studies showing risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) development in relationship to environmental, occupational and therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). BCC, the most common type of human cancer, is driven by the aberrant activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a tumor suppressor gene of Hh signaling pathway, and Smoothened play a key role in the development of radiation-induced BCCs in animal models. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that humans exposed to radiation as observed among the long-term, large scale cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, bone marrow transplant recipients, patients with tinea capitis and radiologic workers enhances risk of BCCs. Overall, this risk is higher in Caucasians than other races. People who were exposed early in life develop more BCCs. The enhanced IR correlation with BCC and not other common cutaneous malignancies is intriguing. The mechanism underlying these observations remains undefined. Understanding interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways and those which drive BCC development may be important in unraveling the mechanism associated with this enhanced risk. Recent studies showed that Vismodegib, a Smoothened inhibitor, is effective in treating radiation-induced BCCs in humans, suggesting that common strategies are required for the intervention of BCCs development irrespective of their etiology.

  4. Ionizing Radiation Exposure and Basal Cell Carcinoma Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changzhao; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    This commentary summarizes studies showing risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) development in relationship to environmental, occupational and therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). BCC, the most common type of human cancer, is driven by the aberrant activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a tumor suppressor gene of Hh signaling pathway, and Smoothened play a key role in the development of radiation-induced BCCs in animal models. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that humans exposed to radiation as observed among the long-term, large scale cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, bone marrow transplant recipients, patients with tinea capitis and radiologic workers enhances risk of BCCs. Overall, this risk is higher in Caucasians than other races. People who were exposed early in life develop more BCCs. The enhanced IR correlation with BCC and not other common cutaneous malignancies is intriguing. The mechanism underlying these observations remains undefined. Understanding interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways and those which drive BCC development may be important in unraveling the mechanism associated with this enhanced risk. Recent studies showed that Vismodegib, a Smoothened inhibitor, is effective in treating radiation-induced BCCs in humans, suggesting that common strategies are required for the intervention of BCCs development irrespective of their etiology. PMID:26930381

  5. Investigation into the diffusion and oxidation behavior of the interface between a plasma-sprayed anode and a porous steel support for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Liu, Meilin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Porous metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have attracted much attention because their potential to dramatically reduce the cost while enhancing the robustness and manufacturability. In particular, 430 ferritic steel (430L) is one of the popular choice for SOFC support because of its superior performance and low cost. In this study, we investigate the oxidation and diffusion behavior of the interface between a Ni-based anode and porous 430L support exposed to a humidified (3% H2O) hydrogen atmosphere at 700 °C. The Ni-GDC (Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ) cermet anodes are deposited on the porous 430L support by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The effect of exposure time on the microstructure and phase structure of the anode and the supports is studied and the element diffusion across the support/anode interface is characterized. Results indicate that the main oxidation product of the 430L support is Cr2O3, and that Cr and Fe will diffuse to the anode and the diffusion thickness increases with the exposure time. The diffusion thickness of Cr and Fe reach about 5 and 2 μm, respectively, after 1000 h exposure. However, the element diffusion and oxidation has little influence on the area-specific resistance, indicating that the porous 430L steel and plasma sprayed Ni-GDC anode are promising for durable SOFCs.

  6. Determinants of cell–material crosstalk at the interface: towards engineering of cell instructive materials

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of novel biomaterials able to control cell activities and direct their fate is warranted for engineering functional biological tissues, advanced cell culture systems, single-cell diagnosis as well as for cell sorting and differentiation. It is well established that crosstalk at the cell–material interface occurs and this has a profound influence on cell behaviour. However, the complete deciphering of the cell–material communication code is still far away. A variety of material surface properties have been reported to affect the strength and the nature of the cell–material interactions, including biological cues, topography and mechanical properties. Novel experimental evidence bears out the hypothesis that these three different signals participate in the same material–cytoskeleton crosstalk pathway via adhesion plaque formation dynamics. In this review, we present the relevant findings on material-induced cell response along with the description of cell behaviour when exposed to arrays of signals—biochemical, topographical and mechanical. Finally, with the aid of literature data, we attempt to draw unifying elements of the material–cytoskeleton–cell fate chain. PMID:22753785

  7. Shear Force at the Cell-Matrix Interface: Enhanced Analysis for Microfabricated Post Array Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Christopher A.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Ruiz, Sami Alom; Tan, John L.; Romer, Lewis H.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2006-01-01

    The interplay of mechanical forces between the extracellular environment and the cytoskeleton drives development, repair, and senescence in many tissues. Quantitative definition of these forces is a vital step in understanding cellular mechanosensing. Microfabricated post array detectors (mPADs) provide direct measurements of cell-generated forces during cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. A new approach to mPAD post labeling, volumetric imaging, and an analysis of post bending mechanics determined that cells apply shear forces and not point moments at the matrix interface. In addition, these forces could be accurately resolved from post deflections by using images of post tops and bases. Image analysis tools were then developed to increase the precision and throughput of post centroid location. These studies resulted in an improved method of force measurement with broad applicability and concise execution using a fully automated force analysis system. The new method measures cell-generated forces with less than 5%error and less than 90 seconds of computational time. Using this approach, we demonstrated direct and distinct relationships between cellular traction force and spread cell surface area for fibroblasts, endothelial cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells. PMID:16708468

  8. The role of buffer/kesterite interface recombination and minority carrier lifetime on kesterite thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courel, Maykel; Andrade-Arvizu, J. A.; Vigil-Galán, O.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents for the first time a theoretical study of the impact of kesterite/buffer interface recombination and kesterite minority carrier lifetime on both CZTS and CZTSe solar cells. It demonstrates that only an 11% efficiency can be reached in CZTS solar cells by improving absorber crystalline quality, pointing out the need for an improved CdS/CZTS interface. It further demonstrates that a CZTS solar cell efficiency enhancement of up to 18%, with an open-circuit voltage value of up to 918 mV, can be achieved depending on CZTS minority carrier lifetime and CdS/CZTS interface recombination speed values. Moreover, this paper shows that by improving CZTSe crystalline quality, a record efficiency value of 17% could be achieved without focusing on improving CdS/CZTSe interface quality. Consequently, CZTSe is presented as a better candidate for solar cell applications. Conditions under which CdS/kesterite interface recombination and trap-assisted tunneling recombination become dominant are provided. In particular, we find that CdS/CZTS interface recombination is the dominant transport mechanism for CZTS minority carrier lifetime values higher than 5 ns, while for CZTSe minority carrier lifetime values lower than 0.1 μs, CdS/CZTSe interface losses are negligible.

  9. Measles Virus Transmission from Dendritic Cells to T Cells: Formation of Synapse-Like Interfaces Concentrating Viral and Cellular Components

    PubMed Central

    Koethe, Susanne; Avota, Elita

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of measles virus (MV) to T cells by its early CD150+ target cells is considered to be crucial for viral dissemination within the hematopoietic compartment. Using cocultures involving monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, we now show that T cells acquire MV most efficiently from cis-infected DCs rather than DCs having trapped MV (trans-infection). Transmission involves interactions of the viral glycoprotein H with its receptor CD150 and is therefore more efficient to preactivated T cells. In addition to rare association with actin-rich filopodial structures, the formation of contact interfaces consistent with that of virological synapses (VS) was observed where viral proteins accumulated and CD150 was redistributed in an actin-dependent manner. In addition to these molecules, activated LFA-1, DC-SIGN, CD81, and phosphorylated ezrin-radixin-moesin proteins, which also mark the HIV VS, redistributed toward the MV VS. Most interestingly, moesin and substance P receptor, both implicated earlier in assisting MV entry or cell-to-cell transmission, also partitioned to the transmission structure. Altogether, the MV VS shares important similarities to the HIV VS in concentrating cellular components potentially regulating actin dynamics, conjugate stability, and membrane fusion as required for efficient entry of MV into target T cells. PMID:22761368

  10. From Morphology to Interfaces to Tandem Geometries: Enhancing the Performance of Perovskite/Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas

    We have taken a new approach to develop mesoporous lead iodide scaffolds, using the nucleation and growth of lead iodide crystallites in a wet film. A simple time-dependent growth control enabled the manipulation of the mesoporous lead iodide layer quality in a continuous manner. The morphology of lead iodide is shown to influence the subsequent crystallization of methyamoniumleadiodide film by using angle-dependent grazing incidence x-ray scattering. The morphology of lead iodide film can be fine-tuned, and thus the methyamoniumleadiodide film quality can be effectively controlled, leading to an optimization of the perovskite active layer. Using this strategy, perovskite solar cells with inverted PHJ structure showed a PCE of 15.7 per cent with little hysteresis. Interface engineering is critical for achieving efficient solar cells, yet a comprehensive understanding of the interface between metal electrode and electron transport layer (ETL) is lacking. A significant power conversion efficiency (PCE) improvement of fullerene/perovskite planar heterojunction solar cells was achieved by inserting a fulleropyrrolidine interlayer between the silver electrode and electron transport layer. The interlayer was found to enhance recombination resistance, increases electron extraction rate and prolongs free carrier lifetime. We also uncovered a facile solution-based fabrication of high performance tandem perovskite/polymer solar cells where the front sub-cell consists of perovskite and the back sub-cell is a polymer-based layer. A record maximum PCE of 15.96 per cent was achieved, demonstrating the synergy between the perovskite and semiconducting polymers. This design balances the absorption of the perovskite and the polymer, eliminates the adverse impact of thermal annealing during perovskite fabrication, and affords devices with no hysteresis. This work was performed in collaboration with Y. Liu, Z. Page, D. Venkataraman and T. Emrick (UMASS), F. Liu (LBNL) and Q. Hu and R

  11. Interface characterization of nanometer scale CdS buffer layer in chalcopyrite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Hung; Cheng, Tzu-Huan

    2016-06-01

    The buffer layer of a chalcopyrite solar cell plays an important role in optical responses of open circuit voltage (V oc) and short circuit current (J sc). A CdS buffer layer is applicable on the nanometer scale owing to its high carrier concentration and n-type semiconductor behavior in chalcopyrite solar cells. The thin buffer layer also contributes to the passivation of the absorber surface to reduce defect recombination loss. Non-destructive metrological parameters such as photoluminescence (PL) intensity, external quantum efficiency (EQE), and depth-resolved photovoltage are used to characterize the interface quality of CdS/chalcopyrite. The defects and dangling bonds at the absorber surface will cause interface recombination and reduce the cell performance in build-in voltage distribution. Post annealing can improve Cd ion diffusion from the buffer layer to the absorber surface and reduce the density of defects and dangling bonds. After thermal annealing, the EQE, PL intensity, and minority carrier lifetime are improved.

  12. 75 FR 14391 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Cell Leukemia and Other Chronic B Cell Leukemias, Parkinson's Disease and Ischemic Heart Disease... between exposure to herbicides and the subsequent development of hairy cell leukemia and other chronic B- cell leukemias, Parkinson's disease, and ischemic heart disease. The intended effect of this...

  13. NLRP6 inflammasome orchestrates the colonic host-microbial interface by regulating goblet cell mucus secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarska, Marta; Thaiss, Christoph A.; Nowarski, Roni; Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Brown, Eric M.; Frankel, Gad; Levy, Maayan; Katz, Meirav N.; Philbrick, William M.; Elinav, Eran; Finlay, B. Brett; Flavell, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mucus production by goblet cells of the large intestine serves as a crucial anti microbial protective mechanism at the interface between the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells of the mammalian intestinal ecosystem. However, the regulatory pathways involved in goblet cell-induced mucus secretion remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the NLRP6 inflammasome, a recently described regulator of colonic microbiota composition and bio-geographical distribution, is a critical orchestrator of goblet cell mucin granule exocytosis. NLRP6 deficiency leads to defective autophagy in goblet cells and abrogated mucin secretion into the large intestinal lumen. Consequently, NLRP6 inflammasome-deficient mice are unable to clear enteric pathogens from the mucosal surface, rendering them highly susceptible to persistent infection. This study identifies the first innate immune regulatory pathway governing goblet cell mucus secretion, linking non-hematopoietic inflammasome signaling to autophagy and highlighting the goblet cell as a critical innate immune player in the control of intestinal host-microbial mutualism. PMID:24581500

  14. Mutations at the Subunit Interface of Yeast Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Reveal a Versatile Regulatory Domain

    PubMed Central

    Halmai, Miklos; Frittmann, Orsolya; Szabo, Zoltan; Daraba, Andreea; Gali, Vamsi K.; Balint, Eva; Unk, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays a key role in many cellular processes and due to that it interacts with a plethora of proteins. The main interacting surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PCNA have been mapped to the interdomain connecting loop and to the carboxy-terminal domain. Here we report that the subunit interface of yeast PCNA also has regulatory roles in the function of several DNA damage response pathways. Using site-directed mutagenesis we engineered mutations at both sides of the interface and investigated the effect of these alleles on DNA damage response. Genetic experiments with strains bearing the mutant alleles revealed that mutagenic translesion synthesis, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination are all regulated through residues at the subunit interface. Moreover, genetic characterization of one of our mutants identifies a new sub-branch of nucleotide excision repair. Based on these results we conclude that residues at the subunit boundary of PCNA are not only important for the formation of the trimer structure of PCNA, but they constitute a regulatory protein domain that mediates different DNA damage response pathways, as well. PMID:27537501

  15. Interface control in organic heterojunction photovoltaic cells by phase separation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heier, Jakob; Castro, Fernando A.; Nüesch, Frank; Hany, Roland

    2007-09-01

    Significant progress is being made in the photovoltaic energy conversion using organic semiconducting materials. One of the focuses of attention is the nanoscale morphology of the donor-acceptor mixture, to ensure efficient charge generation and loss-free charge transport at the same time. Using small molecule and polymer blend systems, recent efforts highlight the problems to ensure an optimized relationship between molecular structure, morphology and device properties. Here, we present two examples using a host/guest mixture approach for the controlled, sequential design of bilayer organic solar cell architectures that consist of a large interface area with connecting paths to the respective electrodes at the same time. In the first example, we employed polymer demixing during spin coating to produce a rough interface: surface directed spinodal decomposition leads to a 2-dimensional spinodal pattern with submicrometer features at the polymer-polymer interface. The second system consists of a solution of a blend of small molecules, where phase separation into a bilayer during spin coating is followed by dewetting. For both cases, the guest can be removed using a selective solvent after the phase separation process, and the rough host surface can be covered with a second active, semiconducting component. We explain the potential merits of the resulting interdigitated bilayer films, and explore to which extent polymer-polymer and surface interactions can be employed to create surface features in the nanometer range.

  16. CPV Cell Characterization Following One-Year Exposure in Golden, Colorado: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2014-08-01

    A CPV module containing 30 III-V multijunction cells was operated on?sun for one year in Golden, Colorado. Each cell was characterized prior to and following exposure. A module power degradation of 10% was observed and found to be a result as an overall decrease in cell short circuit current and the presence of at least one shunted cell. A positive correlation between initial shunt current and an increase in shunt current following exposure was also found. Cell exfoliation was also observed and found to be coincident with the presence of water and/or charring of the cell package due to an off-sun event.

  17. Probing the PEDOT:PSS/cell interface with conductive colloidal probe AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Zhang, H.; Kranz, C.; Wallace, G. G.; Higgins, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical information e.g., oxygen reduction can be obtained simultaneously. Conductive colloid AFM-SECM probes modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) are used for single cell force measurements in mouse fibroblasts and single cell interactions are investigated as a function of the applied potential.Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical

  18. Biochemical Characterization of the Cell-Biomaterial Interface by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Tong, W. Y.; Liang, Y. M.; Tam, V.; Yip, H. K.; Kao, Y. T.; Cheung, K. M. C.; Yeung, K. W. K.; Lam, Y. W.

    2010-01-01

    Surface topography and texture of cell culture substrata can affect the differentiation and growth of adherent cells. The biochemical basis of the transduction of the physical and mechanical signals to cellular responses is not well understood. The lack of a systematic characterization of cell-biomaterial interaction is the major bottleneck. This study demonstrated the use of a novel subcellular fractionation method combined with quantitative MS-based proteomics to enable the robust and high-throughput analysis of proteins at the adherence interface of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. This method revealed the enrichment of extracellular matrix proteins and membrane and stress fibers proteins at the adherence surface, whereas it shows depletion of extracellular matrix belonging to the cytoplasmic, nucleus, and lateral and apical membranes. The asymmetric distribution of proteins between apical and adherence sides was also profiled. Apart from classical proteins with clear involvement in cell-material interactions, proteins previously not known to be involved in cell attachment were also discovered. PMID:20562470

  19. In vitro systems for exposure of lung cells to NO2 and O3.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, R E

    1984-01-01

    In vitro studies of the effects of NO2 and O3 require development of methods for separation and culture of those lung cells that experience in vivo exposure, and also the design and construction of systems for controlled exposure of the cells to known concentrations of the gases. Separation of lung cell types has been accomplished by enzymatic dispersal of lung tissue and centrifugation of the mixed cells on media of various densities in order to separate the cells on the basis of buoyant density or sedimentation rate. The application of centrifugal elutriation has enabled separation of type II alveolar cells and Clara cells with a high degree of purity. Alveolar macrophages and endothelial cells have also been obtained in good yield. Exposure of cultured cells to test atmospheres requires precise control of pollutant levels, close contact of cells and gas without an intervening layer of medium, capability for prolonged exposure, and maintenance of sterile conditions, so that recovered cells can be cultured further or studied for other biological activity. Systems which meet these criteria include roller bottle cultures, petri dish cultures on rocker platforms, cell cultures on cellulose filters fed by perfusion of medium from the side opposite the cells, and cells grown in dishes with gas-permeable film bottoms. Systems that rely on solution of the gases in the overlaying medium do not resemble exposure conditions in vivo, and may not be suitable for studying effects of the poorly soluble oxidant gases. The cell exposure systems have not been used extensively for studies of the effects of pollutants on freshly isolated specific lung cell types. Such studies should be encouraged.

  20. In vitro atrazine-exposure inhibits human natural killer cell lytic granule release

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B. . E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2007-06-01

    The herbicide atrazine is a known immunotoxicant and an inhibitor of human natural killer (NK) cell lytic function. The precise changes in NK cell lytic function following atrazine exposure have not been fully elucidated. The current study identifies the point at which atrazine exerts its affect on the stepwise process of human NK cell-mediated lyses of the K562 target cell line. Using intracellular staining of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, it was determined that a 24-h in vitro exposure to atrazine did not decrease the level of NK cell lytic proteins granzyme A, granzyme B or perforin. Thus, it was hypothesized that atrazine exposure was inhibiting the ability of the NK cells to bind to the target cell and subsequently inhibit the release of lytic protein from the NK cell. To test this hypothesis, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were employed to analyze NK cell-target cell co-cultures following atrazine exposure. These assays demonstrated no significant decrease in the level of target cell binding. However, the levels of NK intracellular lytic protein retained and the amount of lytic protein released were assessed following a 4-h incubation with K562 target cells. The relative level of intracellular lytic protein was 25-50% higher, and the amount of lytic protein released was 55-65% less in atrazine-treated cells than vehicle-treated cells following incubation with the target cells. These results indicate that ATR exposure inhibits the ability of NK cells to lyse target cells by blocking lytic granule release without affecting the ability of the NK cell to form stable conjugates with target cells.

  1. A futuristic approach towards interface layer modifications for improved efficiency in inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, J. P. E-mail: tiwarijp@mail.nplindia.org; Ali, Farman; Sharma, Abhishek; Chand, Suresh; Pillai, Sriraj; Parakh, Sonal

    2014-01-27

    Inverted polymer Solar Cells of the classical poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C{sub 61}butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 61}BM) blend on indium tin oxide substrates were fabricated, which shows improved device performance, by using a facile solution–processed ZnO-polyelectrolytes [poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC), Poly (acrylic acid sodium salt) (PAS), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS), and Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)] nanocomposite as a cathode interface layer compared to devices using pristine ZnO as cathode buffer layer in ambient conditions. The devices with different combinations of polyelectrolyte with ZnO show different improvements in the device efficiency. The combinations of ZnO with PVP and PDADMAC show highest amount of improvements in the efficiency by a factor of ∼17–19. The improvement of the efficiency may be due to various phenomena, such as the passivation of ZnO surface as well as bulk traps, work function modification, improved energy level alignment, improved electronic coupling of the inorganic/organic interface, improved light harvesting, and decrease of surface as well as bulk charge recombination in the device. The introduction of polyelectrolyte into ZnO inhibits the aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles yielding the large area ZnO nanoclusters; and hence, forming the uniform film of ZnO resulting in the modifications of morphology as well as electronic structure of ZnO-polyelectrolyte nano-composite favouring better electronic coupling between cathode and active layer and hence enhancing the current and, consequently, the efficiency. This simple low temperature ZnO-polyelectrolyte nanocomposite based protocol proposed for cathode interface layer modification may be very much useful for roll to roll industrial manufacturing of organic solar cells.

  2. A futuristic approach towards interface layer modifications for improved efficiency in inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, J. P.; Pillai, Sriraj; Parakh, Sonal; Ali, Farman; Sharma, Abhishek; Chand, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Inverted polymer Solar Cells of the classical poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) blend on indium tin oxide substrates were fabricated, which shows improved device performance, by using a facile solution-processed ZnO-polyelectrolytes [poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC), Poly (acrylic acid sodium salt) (PAS), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS), and Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)] nanocomposite as a cathode interface layer compared to devices using pristine ZnO as cathode buffer layer in ambient conditions. The devices with different combinations of polyelectrolyte with ZnO show different improvements in the device efficiency. The combinations of ZnO with PVP and PDADMAC show highest amount of improvements in the efficiency by a factor of ˜17-19. The improvement of the efficiency may be due to various phenomena, such as the passivation of ZnO surface as well as bulk traps, work function modification, improved energy level alignment, improved electronic coupling of the inorganic/organic interface, improved light harvesting, and decrease of surface as well as bulk charge recombination in the device. The introduction of polyelectrolyte into ZnO inhibits the aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles yielding the large area ZnO nanoclusters; and hence, forming the uniform film of ZnO resulting in the modifications of morphology as well as electronic structure of ZnO-polyelectrolyte nano-composite favouring better electronic coupling between cathode and active layer and hence enhancing the current and, consequently, the efficiency. This simple low temperature ZnO-polyelectrolyte nanocomposite based protocol proposed for cathode interface layer modification may be very much useful for roll to roll industrial manufacturing of organic solar cells.

  3. Occupational and Environmental Exposures Associated with Testicular Germ Cell Tumours: Systematic Review of Prenatal and Life-Long Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Béranger, Rémi; Le Cornet, Charlotte; Schüz, Joachim; Fervers, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    Background Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) are the most common cancers in men aged between 15 and 44 years and the incidence has increased steeply over the past 30 years. The rapid increase in the incidence, the spatial variation and the evolution of incidence in migrants suggest that environmental risk factors play a role in TGCT aetiology. The purpose of our review is to summarise the current state of knowledge on occupational and environmental factors thought to be associated with TGCT. Methods A systematic literature search of PubMed. All selected articles were quality appraised by two independent researchers using the ‘Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale’. Results After exclusion of duplicate reports, 72 relevant articles were selected; 65 assessed exposure in adulthood, 7 assessed parental exposures and 2 assessed both. Associations with occupation was reported for agricultural workers, construction workers, firemen, policemen, military personnel, as well as workers in paper, plastic or metal industries. Electromagnetic fields, PCBs and pesticides were also suggested. However, results were inconsistent and studies showing positive associations tended to had lower quality ranking using the assessment scale (p=0.02). Discussion Current evidence does not allow concluding on existence of any clear association between TGCT and adulthood occupational or environmental exposure. The limitations of the studies may partly explain the inconsistencies observed. The lack of association with adulthood exposure is in line with current hypotheses supporting the prenatal origin of TGCT. Future research should focus on prenatal or early life exposure, as well as combined effect of prenatal and later life exposure. National and international collaborative studies should allow for more adequately powered epidemiological studies. More sophisticated methods for assessing exposure as well as evaluating gene–environment interactions will be necessary to establish

  4. Investigation of engineered bacterial adhesins for opportunity to interface cells with abiotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Dong, Hong; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Small, Meagan C.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    The convenience of cellular genetic engineering has afforded the power to build `smart' synthetic biological tools with novel applications. Here, we have explored opportunities to hybridize engineered cells with inorganic materials toward the development of 'living' device-compatible systems. Cellular structural biology is engineerable based on the ability to rewrite genetic code to generate recombinant, foreign, or even unnatural proteins. With this capability on the biological end, it should be possible to achieve superior abio-compatibility with the inorganic materials that compose current microfabricated technology. This work investigated the hair-like appendages of Escherichia coli known as Type 1 fimbriae that enable natural adhesion to glycosylated substrates. Sequence alterations within the fimbrial gene cluster were found to be well-tolerated, evidenced by tagging the fimbriae with peptide-based probes. As a further development, fimbriae tips could be reconfigured to, in turn, alter cell binding. In particular, the fimbriae were fused with a genetically optimized peptide-for-inorganics to enable metal binding. This work established methodologies to systematically survey cell adhesion properties across a suite of fimbriae-modified cell types as well as to direct patterned cell adhesion. Cell types were further customized for added complexity including turning on secondary gene expression and binding to gold surfaces. The former demonstrates potential for programmable gene switches and the latter for interfacing biology with inorganic materials. In general, the incorporation of 'programmed' cells into devices can be used to provide the feature of dynamic and automated cell response. The outcomes of this study are foundational toward the critical feature of deliberate positioning of cells as configurable biocomponentry. Overall, cellular integration into bioMEMs will yield advanced sensing and actuation.

  5. The JigCell model builder: a spreadsheet interface for creating biochemical reaction network models.

    PubMed

    Vass, Marc T; Shaffer, Clifford A; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Watson, Layne T; Tyson, John J

    2006-01-01

    Converting a biochemical reaction network to a set of kinetic rate equations is tedious and error prone. We describe known interface paradigms for inputing models of intracellular regulatory networks: graphical layout (diagrams), wizards, scripting languages, and direct entry of chemical equations. We present the JigCell Model Builder, which allows users to define models as a set of reaction equations using a spreadsheet (an example of direct entry of equations) and outputs model definitions in the Systems Biology Markup Language, Level 2. We present the results of two usability studies. The spreadsheet paradigm demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing the number of errors made by modelers when compared to hand conversion of a wiring diagram to differential equations. A comparison of representatives of the four interface paradigms for a simple model of the cell cycle was conducted which measured time, mouse clicks, and keystrokes to enter the model, and the number of screens needed to view the contents of the model. All four paradigms had similar data entry times. The spreadsheet and scripting language approaches require significantly fewer screens to view the models than do the wizard or graphical layout approaches.

  6. A Janus-paper PDMS platform for air-liquid interface cell culture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Rahim; Ochoa, Manuel; Donaldson, Amy; Parupudi, Tejasvi; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ghaemmaghami, Amir; Ziaie, Babak

    2015-05-01

    A commercially available Janus paper with one hydrophobic (polyethylene-coated) face and a hygroscopic/hydrophilic one is irreversibly bonded to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate incorporating microfluidic channels via corona discharge surface treatment. The bond strength between the polymer-coated side and PDMS is characterized as a function of corona treatment time and annealing temperature/time. A maximum strength of 392 kPa is obtained with a 2 min corona treatment followed by 60 min of annealing at 120 °C. The water contact angle of the corona-treated polymer side decreases with increased discharge duration from 98° to 22°. The hygroscopic/hydrophilic side is seeded with human lung fibroblast cells encapsulated in a methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel to show the potential of this technology for nutrient and chemical delivery in an air-liquid interface cell culture.

  7. KCN Chemical Etch for Interface Engineering in Cu2ZnSnSe4 Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Buffière, Marie; Brammertz, Guy; Sahayaraj, Sylvester; Batuk, Maria; Khelifi, Samira; Mangin, Denis; El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Arzel, Ludovic; Hadermann, Joke; Meuris, Marc; Poortmans, Jef

    2015-07-15

    The removal of secondary phases from the surface of the kesterite crystals is one of the major challenges to improve the performances of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells. In this contribution, the KCN/KOH chemical etching approach, originally developed for the removal of CuxSe phases in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films, is applied to CZTSe absorbers exhibiting various chemical compositions. Two distinct electrical behaviors were observed on CZTSe/CdS solar cells after treatment: (i) the improvement of the fill factor (FF) after 30 s of etching for the CZTSe absorbers showing initially a distortion of the electrical characteristic; (ii) the progressive degradation of the FF after long treatment time for all Cu-poor CZTSe solar cell samples. The first effect can be attributed to the action of KCN on the absorber, that is found to clean the absorber free surface from most of the secondary phases surrounding the kesterite grains (e.g., Se0, CuxSe, SnSex, SnO2, Cu2SnSe3 phases, excepting the ZnSe-based phases). The second observation was identified as a consequence of the preferential etching of Se, Sn, and Zn from the CZTSe surface by the KOH solution, combined with the modification of the alkali content of the absorber. The formation of a Cu-rich shell at the absorber/buffer layer interface, leading to the increase of the recombination rate at the interface, and the increase in the doping of the absorber layer after etching are found to be at the origin of the deterioration of the FF of the solar cells. PMID:26039042

  8. KCN Chemical Etch for Interface Engineering in Cu2ZnSnSe4 Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Buffière, Marie; Brammertz, Guy; Sahayaraj, Sylvester; Batuk, Maria; Khelifi, Samira; Mangin, Denis; El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Arzel, Ludovic; Hadermann, Joke; Meuris, Marc; Poortmans, Jef

    2015-07-15

    The removal of secondary phases from the surface of the kesterite crystals is one of the major challenges to improve the performances of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells. In this contribution, the KCN/KOH chemical etching approach, originally developed for the removal of CuxSe phases in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films, is applied to CZTSe absorbers exhibiting various chemical compositions. Two distinct electrical behaviors were observed on CZTSe/CdS solar cells after treatment: (i) the improvement of the fill factor (FF) after 30 s of etching for the CZTSe absorbers showing initially a distortion of the electrical characteristic; (ii) the progressive degradation of the FF after long treatment time for all Cu-poor CZTSe solar cell samples. The first effect can be attributed to the action of KCN on the absorber, that is found to clean the absorber free surface from most of the secondary phases surrounding the kesterite grains (e.g., Se0, CuxSe, SnSex, SnO2, Cu2SnSe3 phases, excepting the ZnSe-based phases). The second observation was identified as a consequence of the preferential etching of Se, Sn, and Zn from the CZTSe surface by the KOH solution, combined with the modification of the alkali content of the absorber. The formation of a Cu-rich shell at the absorber/buffer layer interface, leading to the increase of the recombination rate at the interface, and the increase in the doping of the absorber layer after etching are found to be at the origin of the deterioration of the FF of the solar cells.

  9. BTEX in vitro exposure tool using human lung cells: trips and gains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Faye F; Peng, Cheng; Ng, Jack C

    2015-06-01

    Cytotoxicity of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to human lung cells was explored using three different exposure methods: Method 1 - in normal 96-well plates using DMSO as a carrier vehicle, we exposed (a) human lung carcinoma A549 cells, (b) A549 cells over-expressed with cytochrome P450 2E1 cells, and (c) normal lung fibroblast LL-24 cells to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene individually and in a mixture which models car exhaust gases for between 1-88 h. We found that the order of the BTEX potency is benzeneCYP2E1 over-expressed A549 cells. A significant difference was found between inter-assay responses for all 24h exposures (P<0.005) suggesting a poor assay repeatability. No sign of potency increase was found from 6 to 72 h exposures. Method 2 - Using sealed vials to expose A549 cells to benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene, we observed a twenty-fold increase in their cytotoxicity, but also with no time-course effect. Method 3 - Using air exposed hanging-drop cell culture, we were able to see both an increase of demonstration of toxicity and a time-course effect from 1 to 12h exposure. We conclude that exposing cells in sealed and unsealed media using DMSO as a carrier vehicle was not suitable for BTEX exposure studies. Hanging-drop air exposure has more potential. It should be noted that if there are any changes in their exposure matrixes, its exposure mass distribution in cells could differ.

  10. Regulation of TB vaccine-induced airway luminal T cells by respiratory exposure to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuerong; Xiu, Fangming; Horvath, Carly N; Damjanovic, Daniela; Thanthrige-Don, Niroshan; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Xing, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) vaccine-induced airway luminal T cells (ALT) have recently been shown to be critical to host defense against pulmonary TB. However, the mechanisms that maintain memory ALT remain poorly understood. In particular, whether respiratory mucosal exposure to environmental agents such as endotoxin may regulate the size of vaccine-induced ALT population is still unclear. Using a murine model of respiratory genetic TB vaccination and respiratory LPS exposure, we have addressed this issue in the current study. We have found that single or repeated LPS exposure increases the number of antigen-specific ALT which are capable of robust secondary responses to pulmonary mycobacterial challenge. To investigate the potential mechanisms by which LPS exposure modulates the ALT population, we have examined the role of ALT proliferation and peripheral T cell recruitment. We have found that LPS exposure-increased ALT is not dependent on increased ALT proliferation as respiratory LPS exposure does not significantly increase the rate of proliferation of ALT. But rather, we find it to be dependent upon the recruitment of peripheral T cells into the airway lumen as blockade of peripheral T cell supplies markedly reduces the initially increased ALT. Thus, our data suggest that environmental exposure to airborne agents such as endotoxin has a profound modulatory effect on TB vaccine-elicited T cells within the respiratory tract. Our study provides a new, M.tb antigen-independent mechanism by which the respiratory mucosal anti-TB memory T cells may be maintained.

  11. Microgravity Inhibits Resting T Cell Immunity in an Exposure Time-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Haiying; Wang, Chongzhen; Feng, Meifu; Zhao, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Decline immune function is well documented after spaceflights. Microgravity is one of the key factors directly suppressing the function of immune system. Though T cell immune response was inhibited by microgravity, it is not clearly whether activation would be inhibited after a pre-exposure of microgravity on T lymphocytes at the resting state. Methods: We herein investigated the response ability of resting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells experiencing pre-exposure of modeled microgravity (MMg) for 0, 8, 16 and 24 hrs to concanavalin A (ConA) stimulation. The phenotypes and subsets of immune cells were determined by flow cytometry. Results: Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an MMg pre-exposure exhibited decreased expressions of activation-markers including CD25, CD69 and CD71, inflammatory cytokine secretion and cell proliferation in response to ConA compared with T cells with 1g controls in an MMg exposure time- dependent manner. Moreover, short term MMg treatment caused more severe decreased proliferation in CD4+ T cells than in CD8+ T cells. Conclusions: MMg can directly impact on resting T cell subsets. CD4+ T cells were more sensitive to the microgravity inhibition than CD8+ T cells in respect of cell proliferation. These results offered new insights for the MMg-caused T cell functional defects. PMID:24396290

  12. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  13. Biofunctionalization of conductive hydrogel coatings to support olfactory ensheathing cells at implantable electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hassarati, Rachelle T; Marcal, Helder; John, L; Foster, R; Green, Rylie A

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical discrepancies between conventional platinum (Pt) electrodes and neural tissue often result in scar tissue encapsulation of implanted neural recording and stimulating devices. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a supportive glial cell in the olfactory nervous system which can transition through glial scar tissue while supporting the outgrowth of neural processes. It has been proposed that this function can be used to reconnect implanted electrodes with the target neural pathways. Conductive hydrogel (CH) electrode coatings have been proposed as a substrate for supporting OEC survival and proliferation at the device interface. To determine an ideal CH to support OECs, this study explored eight CH variants, with differing biochemical composition, in comparison to a conventional Pt electrodes. All CH variants were based on a biosynthetic hydrogel, consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) and heparin, through which the conductive polymer (CP) poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) was electropolymerized. The biochemical composition was varied through incorporation of gelatin and sericin, which were expected to provide cell adherence functionality, supporting attachment, and cell spreading. Combinations of these biomolecules varied from 1 to 3 wt %. The physical, electrical, and biological impact of these molecules on electrode performance was assessed. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrated that the addition of these biological molecules had little significant effect on the coating's ability to safely transfer charge. Cell attachment studies, however, determined that the incorporation of 1 wt % gelatin in the hydrogel was sufficient to significantly increase the attachment of OECs compared to the nonfunctionalized CH.

  14. Summary of solar cell data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, David C.; Rose, M. Frank

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of many separate experiments, some of which contained solar cells. These solar cells were distributed at various positions on the LDEF and, therefore, were exposed to the space environment with an orientational dependence. This report will address the space environmental effects on solar cells and solar cell assemblies (SCA's), including electrical interconnects and associated insulation blankets where flown in conjunction with solar cells.

  15. Tubulin and actin interplay at the T cell and antigen-presenting cell interface.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off.

  16. Tubulin and Actin Interplay at the T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off. PMID:22566814

  17. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  18. Immune Cell Targets of Infection at the Tick-Skin Interface during Powassan Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hermance, Meghan E.; Santos, Rodrigo I.; Kelly, Brent C.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a tick-borne flavivirus that can result in a severe neuroinvasive disease with 50% of survivors displaying long-term neurological sequelae. Human POWV cases have been documented in Canada, the United States, and Russia. Although the number of reported POWV human cases has increased in the past fifteen years, POWV remains one of the less studied human pathogenic flaviviruses. Ixodes ticks are the vectors for POWV, and the virus is transmitted to a host’s skin very early during the tick feeding process. Central to the successful transmission of a tick-borne pathogen are complex interactions between the host immune response and early tick-mediated immunomodulation, all of which initially occur at the skin interface. In our prior work, we examined the cutaneous immune gene expression during the early stages of POWV-infected Ixodes scapularis feeding. The present study serves to further investigate the skin interface by identifying early cell targets of infection at the POWV-infected tick feeding site. An in vivo infection model consisting of POWV-infected ticks feeding on mice for short durations was used in this study. Skin biopsies from the tick feeding sites were harvested at various early time points, enabling us to examine the skin histopathology and detect POWV viral antigen in immune cells present at the tick feeding site. The histopathology from the present study demonstrates that neutrophil and mononuclear cell infiltrates are recruited earlier to the feeding site of a POWV-infected tick versus an uninfected tick. This is the first report demonstrating that macrophages and fibroblasts contain POWV antigens, which suggests that they are early cellular targets of infection at the tick feeding site. These data provide key insights towards defining the complex interactions between the host immune response and early tick-mediated immunomodulation. PMID:27203436

  19. Experimental impact of aspirin exposure on rat intestinal bacteria, epithelial cells and cell line.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Raj K; Kannan, A; Pant, A B

    2010-10-01

    Aspirin, a commonly used therapeutic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is known to cause gastric mucosal damage. Intestinal bacteria having a regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis play significant role in NSAID-induced intestinal injury. Bacteria and specific cell lines are considered to be suitable for toxicity screening and testing of chemicals. Therefore, to evaluate and compare in vitro toxicity, cultures of rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), isolated bacteria and IEC-6 cell line were assessed for viability, morphometric analysis, membrane transport enzymes and structural constituents for membrane damage, dehydrogenase activity test for respiratory and energy producing processes and esterase activity test for intra- and extra-cellular degradation, following the post exposure to aspirin (0-50 µg mL(- 1)). Similar pattern of dose-dependent changes in these parameters were observed in three types of cells. Similar in situ effects on IEC validated the in vitro findings. These findings indicate that higher aspirin concentrations may alter cellular functions of IEC and gut bacteria. Furthermore, results suggest that gut bacteria and IEC-6 cell line can be used for the initial screening of gastrointestinal cellular toxicity caused by NSAIDs. PMID:20167629

  20. Cell-Wide Responses to Low-Oxygen Exposure in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa; Joachimiak, Marcin; Arkin, Adam; Borglin, sharon; Dehal, Paramvir; Chakraborty, Romy; Geller, Jil; Hazen, Terry; HE, Qiang; Joyner, Dominique C.; Martin, Vincent; Wall, Judy; Yang, Zamin Koo; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling, Jay

    2007-08-01

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low-oxygen exposure (0.1% O2) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O2 caused a decrease in the growth rate without affecting viability. Concerted upregulation of the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O2 exposure. Several of the candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the upregulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during the low-O2 exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O2 exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O2 exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were downregulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell-wide responses to low and high O2 levels in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O2 levels in its environment.

  1. Cell-Wide Responses to Low-Oxygen Exposure in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa M.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Arkin, Adam P.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Chakraborty, Romy; Geller, Jil T.; Hazen, Terry C.; He, Qiang; Joyner, Dominique C.; Martin, Vincent J. J.; Wall, Judy D.; Yang, Zamin Koo; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low-oxygen exposure (0.1% O2) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O2 caused a decrease in the growth rate without affecting viability. Concerted upregulation of the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O2 exposure. Several of the candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the upregulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during the low-O2 exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O2 exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O2 exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were downregulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell-wide responses to low and high O2 levels in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O2 levels in its environment. PMID:17545284

  2. Band alignment measurements at heterojunction interfaces in layered thin film solar cells & thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang

    2011-12-01

    Public awareness of the increasing energy crisis and the related serious environmental concerns has led to a significantly growing demand for alternative clean and renewable energy resources. Thin film are widely applied in multiple renewable energy devices owing to the reduced amount of raw materials and increase flexibility of choosing from low-cost candidates, which translates directly into reduced capital cost. This is a key driving force to make renewable technology competitive in the energy market. This thesis is focused on the measurement of energy level alignments at interfaces of thin film structures for renewable energy applications. There are two primary foci: II -VI semiconductor ZnSe/ZnTe thin film solar cells and Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 thin film structures for thermoelectric applications. In both cases, the electronic structure and energy band alignment at interfaces usually controls the carrier transport behavior and determines the quality of the device. High-resolution photoemission spectroscopy (lab-based XPS & synchrotron-based UPS) was used to investigate the chemical and electronic properties of epitaxial Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films, in order to validate the anticipated band alignment at interfaces in Bi 2Te3/Sb2Te3 superlattices as one favoring electron-transmission. A simple, thorough two-step treatment of a chemical etching in dilute hydrochloric acid solution and a subsequent annealing at ˜150°C under ultra-high vacuum environment is established to remove the surface oxides completely. It is an essential step to ensure the measurements on electronic states are acquired on stoichimetric, oxide-free clean surface of Bi 2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. The direct measurement of valence band offsets (VBO) at a real Sb 2Te3/Bi2Te3 interface is designed based on the Kraut model; a special stacking film structure is prepared intentionally: sufficiently thin Sb2Te3 film on top of Bi2Te 3 that photoelectrons from both of them are collected simultaneously. From a

  3. Mechanical characterization of oxide coating-interconnect interfaces for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, Sajedur R.; Walter, Mark E.; Kidner, Neil J.; Seabaugh, Matthew M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of interfaces between oxide coatings and metallic interconnects that are used in planar solid oxide fuel cells. With the reduction of operating temperatures to 800 °C, it is possible to replace ceramic interconnects with less expensive stainless steels. However, when incorporating chromia-forming metallic interconnects, steps must be taken to inhibit chromium poisoning. One approach to prevent chromium poisoning, is to deposit dense, protective coatings, such as manganese cobalt spinel oxide (MCO). The brittle nature of MCO makes it susceptible to damage under mechanical and thermal stresses during operation. A four point bend experiment is designed to assess the strength and adhesion of reduced and oxidized coatings deposited on SS441 or Crofer interconnects. Resulting tensile cracking patterns on the convex side of bend specimen are used to quantify the interfacial shear strength with a shear lag model. Using energy based fracture mechanics, interfacial fracture energy is calculated from the strain at the onset of coating spallation. Scanning electron microscopy images of the cracked coating surfaces are processed to analyze the failure mechanisms, crack spacing and spalled areas. At 3% strain, the weakest interface is found in the Crofer system with the oxidized coating.

  4. Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (pigmented villonodular synovitis-)-like changes in periprosthetic interface membranes.

    PubMed

    Söder, Stephan; Sesselmann, Stefan; Aigner, Thomas; Oehler, Stephan; Agaimy, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (TSGCT; synonym, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS)) is a rare low-grade mesenchymal neoplasm of either intra-articular or extra-articular origin. The etiopathogenesis of TSGCT is still uncertain, but recent studies showed a translocation involving colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) gene in a subset of cases. Histological features mimicking TSGCT can sometimes be encountered in periprosthetic interface membranes. To investigate the frequency and morphologic spectrum of this phenomenon, we conducted a systematic analysis of 477 periprosthetic interface membranes and performed immunohistochemical analysis on a subset of lesions compared to genuine TSGCT. In 26 of 477 periprosthetic membrane samples (5 %), at least some TSGCT-like features were found and 18 cases (4 %) strongly resembled it. Wear particles were detected in 100 % of the TSGCT-like lesions but only in 63.3 % of the whole cohort of periprosthetic membranes (p value <0.001). Immunohistochemistry comparing true TSGCT and TSGCT-like membranes showed similar inflammatory infiltrates with slightly elevated CD3+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and a slightly higher proliferation index in TSGCT samples. In conclusion, TSGCT-like changes in periprosthetic membranes likely represent exuberant fibrohistiocytic inflammatory response induced by wear particles and should be distinguished from genuine (neoplastic) TSGCT. Although TSGCT and TSGCT-like periprosthetic membranes represent different entities, their comparable morphology might reflect analogous morphogenesis.

  5. Interface Engineering through Atomic Layer Deposition towards Highly Improved Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hao; Tian, Wei; Guo, Jun; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    A composite photoanode comprising ultralong ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles was prepared and its performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) was optimized and compared to the photoanode consisting of conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. The ultralong ZnO nanobelts were synthesized in high yield by a facile solution approach at 90 oC followed by annealing at 500 oC. The effect of the ratio of ZnO nanobelts to TiO2 nanoparticles on the light scattering, specific surface area, and interface recombination were investigated. An optimum amount of ZnO nanobelts enhanced the photon-conversion efficiency by 61.4% compared to that of the conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. To further reduce the recombination rate and increase the carrier lifetime, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technique was utilized to coat a continuous TiO2 film surrounding the ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles, functioning as a barrier-free access of all electrons to conductive electrodes. This ALD treatment improved the interface contact within the whole photoanode system, finally leading to significant enhancement (137%) in the conversion efficiency of DSSCs. PMID:26238737

  6. Cell phone radiation exposure on brain and associated biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Meena, Ramovatar; Verma, H N; Kumar, Shivendra

    2013-03-01

    Wireless technologies are ubiquitous today and the mobile phones are one of the prodigious output of this technology. Although the familiarization and dependency of mobile phones is growing at an alarming pace, the biological effects due to the exposure of radiations have become a subject of intense debate. The present evidence on mobile phone radiation exposure is based on scientific research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at radiofrequency (RF)/ electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. The conflict in conclusions is mainly because of difficulty in controlling the affecting parameters. Biological effects are dependent not only on the distance and size of the object (with respect to the object) but also on the environmental parameters. Health endpoints reported to be associated with RF include childhood leukemia, brain tumors, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, infertility and some cardiovascular effects. Most of the reports conclude a reasonable suspicion of mobile phone risk that exists based on clear evidence of bio-effects which with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. The present study summarizes the public issue based on mobile phone radiation exposure and their biological effects. This review concludes that the regular and long term use of microwave devices (mobile phone, microwave oven) at domestic level can have negative impact upon biological system especially on brain. It also suggests that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role by enhancing the effect of microwave radiations which may cause neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Cell phone radiation exposure on brain and associated biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Meena, Ramovatar; Verma, H N; Kumar, Shivendra

    2013-03-01

    Wireless technologies are ubiquitous today and the mobile phones are one of the prodigious output of this technology. Although the familiarization and dependency of mobile phones is growing at an alarming pace, the biological effects due to the exposure of radiations have become a subject of intense debate. The present evidence on mobile phone radiation exposure is based on scientific research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at radiofrequency (RF)/ electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. The conflict in conclusions is mainly because of difficulty in controlling the affecting parameters. Biological effects are dependent not only on the distance and size of the object (with respect to the object) but also on the environmental parameters. Health endpoints reported to be associated with RF include childhood leukemia, brain tumors, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, infertility and some cardiovascular effects. Most of the reports conclude a reasonable suspicion of mobile phone risk that exists based on clear evidence of bio-effects which with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. The present study summarizes the public issue based on mobile phone radiation exposure and their biological effects. This review concludes that the regular and long term use of microwave devices (mobile phone, microwave oven) at domestic level can have negative impact upon biological system especially on brain. It also suggests that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role by enhancing the effect of microwave radiations which may cause neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23678539

  8. Exposure to inhaled isobutyl nitrite reduces T cell-dependent responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, L.S.F.; Barnett, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Isobutyl nitrite is a drug of abuse popular among male homosexuals and among adolescents. In order to approximate the nitrite exposures of inhalant abusers, mice were treated with 900 ppm isobutyl nitrite in an inhalation chamber for 45 min per day for 14 days. At 72 hr after the last exposure, mice were assayed for immune competence. Under these conditions, mice gained only half the weight of mice exposed to air. The spleens of nitrite exposed mice weighed 15% less and had 24% fewer cells per spleen than controls. Adjusted for equal cell numbers, T cell mitogenic and allogeneic proliferative responses were significantly reduce by 33% and 47%, respectively. Unstimulated spleen cells had elevated levels of IL-2 transcription following exposure to isobutyl nitrite suggesting that nitrite inhalation caused a nonspecific induction of T cells. In contrast, B cell proliferative responses to LPS were unaltered. Exposure to the nitrite reduced the frequency of T-dependent antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC) by 63% and the total number of reduced by 60% after as few as five daily exposures to isobutyl nitrite. Therefore, the data suggest that habitual inhalation of isobutyl nitrite impairs immune competence and that toxicity appears to be directed toward T cell functions.

  9. Estimation of defect activation energy around pn interfaces of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells using impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakura, Hidenori; Itagaki, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Mutsumi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the defect activation energy around the pn interface of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS)-based solar cells using a simple electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. By applying AC and DC voltages to the solar cells, we observed an “inductive” element around the pn interface, which is ignored in conventional deep-level transient spectroscopy or admittance spectroscopy. A defect model is evaluated by proposing an equivalent circuit that includes a positive/negative constant phase element (CPE) to represent the area around the CdS/CIGS interface. By fitting the impedance data, the CPE index and CPE constant show a relationship with the defect activation energy or defect concentration. This result is significant because it may help reveal the defect properties of CIGS solar cells or any other semiconductor devices.

  10. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D’Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs. PMID:25482337

  11. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs.

  12. ALDOSTERONISM AND PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELL ACTIVATION: A NEUROENDOCRINE-IMMUNE INTERFACE

    PubMed Central

    Ahokas, Robert A.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Sun, Yao; Wodi, Linus A.; Herring, Paula A.; Lu, Li; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Postlethwaite, Arnold E.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Aldosteronism eventuates in a proinflammatory/fibrogenic vascular phenotype of the heart and systemic organs. It remains uncertain whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are activated prior to tissue invasion by monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes as is the case for responsible pathogenic mechanisms. Uninephrectomized rats, treated for 4 wks with dietary 1%NaCl and aldosterone (0.75 μg/h, ALDOST) ± spironolactone (Spi, 100 mg/kg/daily gavage), were compared to unoperated/-untreated and uninephrectomized/salt-treated controls. Before intramural coronary vascular lesions appeared at wk 4 ALDOST, we found: 1) a reduction of PBMC cytosolic free [Mg2+]i, together with intracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ loading while plasma and cardiac tissue Mg2+ were no different from controls; 2) increased H2O2 production by monocytes and lymphocytes together with upregulated PBMC gene expression of oxidative stress-inducible tyrosine phosphatase and Mn2+-superoxide dismutase, and the presence of 3-nitrotyrosine in CD4+ and ED-1-positive inflammatory cells that had invaded intramural coronary arteries; 3) B cell activation, including transcription of immunoglobulins, ICAM-1, CC and CXC chemokines and their receptors; 4) expansion of B lymphocyte subset and MHC Class II-expressing lymphocytes; and 5) autoreactivity with gene expression for antibodies to acetylcholine receptors and a downregulation of RT-6.2, which is in keeping with cell activation and associated with autoimmunity. Spi co-treatment attenuated the rise in intracellular Ca2+, the appearance of oxi/nitrosative stress in PBMC and invading inflammatory cells, and alterations in PBMC transcriptome. Thus, aldosteronism is associated with an activation of circulating immune cells induced by iterations in PBMC divalent cations and transduced by oxi/nitrosative stress. ALDO receptor antagonism modulates this neuroendocrine-immune interface. PMID:14576195

  13. Effects of formaldehyde exposure on human NK cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Mei, Qibing; Huyan, Ting; Xie, Li; Che, Su; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Mingjie; Huang, Qingsheng

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in human immunologic surveillance. Formaldehyde (FA), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been classified as a carcinogen to humans. Although it is known that immune cells are sensitive to FA, so far little is known about how it's affecting the activity of human NK cells. To probe it, the primary human NK cells were treated with different concentrations of FA (3200, 1600, 800, 400, 200, 100, 50, and 0 μM) in vitro. The morphology, viability, apoptosis, cytotoxicity (killing tumor cell activity) and cytokine and cytolytic proteins secretion of NK cells were evaluated respectively. Our results reveal that FA could induce NK cells death obviously in a concentration-dependent manner. With the decreased concentrations of FA from 3200 μM to 800 μM, accordingly, the viability of NK cells increased from 65. 2 ± 12.1% to 78.48 ± 10.3% (p<0.05), and the cytotoxicity of NK cells recovered from 29.2 ± 8.5% to 63.9 ± 5.9% (p<0.05). The secretion of perforin was affected significantly by FA, whereas the secretion of IFN-γ and granzyme-B altered slightly. It is concluded that human NK cell is sensitive to FA, 800 μM may be a critical concentration of FA inhibiting the activity of human NK cell.

  14. High efficiency solution processed sintered CdTe nanocrystal solar cells: the role of interfaces.

    PubMed

    Panthani, Matthew G; Kurley, J Matthew; Crisp, Ryan W; Dietz, Travis C; Ezzyat, Taha; Luther, Joseph M; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2014-02-12

    Solution processing of photovoltaic semiconducting layers offers the potential for drastic cost reduction through improved materials utilization and high device throughput. One compelling solution-based processing strategy utilizes semiconductor layers produced by sintering nanocrystals into large-grain semiconductors at relatively low temperatures. Using n-ZnO/p-CdTe as a model system, we fabricate sintered CdTe nanocrystal solar cells processed at 350 °C with power conversion efficiencies (PCE) as high as 12.3%. JSC of over 25 mA cm(-2) are achieved, which are comparable or higher than those achieved using traditional, close-space sublimated CdTe. We find that the VOC can be substantially increased by applying forward bias for short periods of time. Capacitance measurements as well as intensity- and temperature-dependent analysis indicate that the increased VOC is likely due to relaxation of an energetic barrier at the ITO/CdTe interface.

  15. Parallel macromolecular delivery and biochemical/electrochemical interface to cells employing nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli V; Griffin, Guy D; Guillorn, Michael A; Merkulov, Vladimir L; Simpson, Michael L

    2015-03-31

    Systems and methods are described for parallel macromolecular delivery and biochemical/electrochemical interface to whole cells employing carbon nanostructures including nanofibers and nanotubes. A method includes providing a first material on at least a first portion of a first surface of a first tip of a first elongated carbon nanostructure; providing a second material on at least a second portion of a second surface of a second tip of a second elongated carbon nanostructure, the second elongated carbon nanostructure coupled to, and substantially parallel to, the first elongated carbon nanostructure; and penetrating a boundary of a biological sample with at least one member selected from the group consisting of the first tip and the second tip.

  16. Interface electric properties of Si/organic hybrid solar cells using impedance spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhu, Juye; Ding, Li; Gao, Pingqi; Pan, Xiaoyin; Sheng, Jiang; Ye, Jichun

    2016-05-01

    The internal resistance and capacitance of Si/organic hybrid solar cells (Si-HSC) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) are investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Three types of Nyquist plots in Si-HSC are observed firstly at different bias voltages, while suitable equivalent circuit models are established to evaluate the details of interface carrier transfer and recombination. In particular, the carrier transport property of the PEDOT:PSS film responds at a high frequency (6 × 104-1 × 106 Hz) in three-arc spectra. Therefore, EIS could help us deeply understand the electronic properties of Si-HSC for developing high performance devices.

  17. Infiltration and Selective Interactions at the Interface in Polymer-Oxide Hybrid Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferragut, R.; Aghion, S.; Moia, F.; Binda, M.; Canesi, E. V.; Lanzani, G.; Petrozza, A.

    2013-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to characterize polymer-based hybrid solar cells formed by poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) finely infiltrated in a porous TiO2 skeleton. A step-change improvement in the device performance is enabled by engineering the hybrid interface by the insertion of a proper molecular interlayer namely 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MP). In order to obtain depth-resolved data, positrons were implanted in the sample using a variable-energy positron beam. The characteristics of the partially filled nanoporous structures were evaluated in terms of the depth profile of the positronium yield and the S-parameter. A quantitative evaluation of the pore filling in the deep region is given from the analysis of Coincidence Doppler Broadening taken at fixed implantation energy. We note a remarkable difference in terms of the positronium yield when the 4-MP interlayer is introduced, which means a better covering of P3HT on the porous surface.

  18. Control of Nanostructures and Interfaces of Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Quantum-Dots-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2015-05-21

    Nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors (MOS), such as TiO2 and ZnO, have been regarded as an attractive material for the quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSCs), owing to their large specific surface area for loading a large amount of quantum dots (QDs) and strong scattering effect for capturing a sufficient fraction of photons. However, the large surface area of such nanostructures also provides easy pathways for charge recombination, and surface defects and connections between adjacent nanoparticles may retard effective charge injection and charge transport, leading to a loss of power conversion efficiency. Introduction of the surface modification for MOS or QDs has been thought an effective approach to improve the performance of QDSC. In this paper, the recent advances in the control of nanostructures and interfaces in QDSCs and prospects for the further development with higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) have been discussed. PMID:26263261

  19. Fluorinated pickering emulsions impede interfacial transport and form rigid interface for the growth of anchorage-dependent cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ming; Rosenfeld, Liat; Kim, Minkyu; Xu, Manqi; Lin, Edith; Derda, Ratmir; Tang, Sindy K Y

    2014-12-10

    This study describes the design and synthesis of amphiphilic silica nanoparticles for the stabilization of aqueous drops in fluorinated oils for applications in droplet microfluidics. The success of droplet microfluidics has thus far relied on one type of surfactant for the stabilization of drops. However, surfactants are known to have two key limitations: (1) interdrop molecular transport leads to cross-contamination of droplet contents, and (2) the incompatibility with the growth of adherent mammalian cells as the liquid-liquid interface is too soft for cell adhesion. The use of nanoparticles as emulsifiers overcomes these two limitations. Particles are effective in mitigating undesirable interdrop molecular transport as they are irreversibly adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface. They do not form micelles as surfactants do, and thus, a major pathway for interdrop transport is eliminated. In addition, particles at the droplet interface provide a rigid solid-like interface to which cells could adhere and spread, and are thus compatible with the proliferation of adherent mammalian cells such as fibroblasts and breast cancer cells. The particles described in this work can enable new applications for high-fidelity assays and for the culture of anchorage-dependent cells in droplet microfluidics, and they have the potential to become a competitive alternative to current surfactant systems for the stabilization of drops critical for the success of the technology.

  20. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Lestard, Nathalia R; Capella, Marcia A M

    2016-01-01

    Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells. PMID:27478480

  1. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lestard, Nathalia R.

    2016-01-01

    Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells. PMID:27478480

  2. Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of an Alveolar Epithelial Cell Line to Airborne Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface: A Comparison with Conventional, Submerged Cell-Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Karg, Erwin; Brendel, Ellen; Hinze-Heyn, Helga; Maier, Konrad L.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Stoeger, Tobias; Schmid, Otmar

    2013-01-01

    The biological effects of inhalable nanoparticles have been widely studied in vitro with pulmonary cells cultured under submerged and air-liquid interface (ALI) conditions. Submerged exposures are experimentally simpler, but ALI exposures are physiologically more realistic and hence potentially biologically more meaningful. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of human alveolar epithelial-like cells (A549) to airborne agglomerates of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles at the ALI, compared it to the response under submerged culture conditions, and provided a quantitative comparison with the literature data on different types of particles and cells. For ZnO nanoparticle doses of 0.7 and 2.5 μg ZnO/cm2 (or 0.09 and 0.33 cm2 ZnO/cm2), cell viability was not mitigated and no significant effects on the transcript levels of oxidative stress markers (HMOX1, SOD-2 and GCS) were observed. However, the transcript levels of proinflammatory markers (IL-8, IL-6, and GM-CSF) were induced to higher levels under ALI conditions. This is consistent with the literature data and it suggests that in vitro toxicity screening of nanoparticles with ALI cell culture systems may produce less false negative results than screening with submerged cell cultures. However, the database is currently too scarce to draw a definite conclusion on this issue. PMID:23484138

  3. Lead Exposure Induces Telomere Instability in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pottier, Géraldine; Viau, Muriel; Ricoul, Michelle; Shim, Grace; Bellamy, Marion; Cuceu, Corina; Hempel, William M.; Sabatier, Laure

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is an important environmental contaminant due to its widespread use over many centuries. While it affects primarily every organ system of the body, the most pernicious effects of Pb are on the central nervous system leading to cognitive and behavioral modification. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms responsible for Pb toxicity remain poorly understood. Recent work has suggested that Pb exposure may have consequences on chromosomal integrity as it was shown that Pb exposure leads to the generation of γH2Ax foci, a well-established biomarker for DNA double stranded break (DSB formation). As the chromosomal localization of γH2Ax foci plays an important role in determining the molecular mechanism responsible for their formation, we examined the localization of Pb-induced foci with respect to telomeres. Indeed, short or dysfunctional telomeres (uncapped or damaged telomeres) may be recognized as DSB by the DNA repair machinery, leading to “telomere-Induced Foci” (TIFs). In the current study, we show that while Pb exposure did not increase intra-chromosomal foci, it significantly induced TIFs, leading in some cases, to chromosomal abnormalities including telomere loss. The evidence suggests that these chromosomal abnormalities are likely due to perturbation of telomere replication, in particular on the lagging DNA strand. We propose a mechanism by which Pb exposure leads to the loss of telomere maintenance. As numerous studies have demonstrated a role for telomere maintenance in brain development and tissue homeostasis, our results suggest a possible mechanism for lead-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:23840724

  4. NeuroArray: a universal interface for patterning and interrogating neural circuitry with single cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices. PMID:24759264

  5. NeuroArray: A Universal Interface for Patterning and Interrogating Neural Circuitry with Single Cell Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-04-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices.

  6. Functions of BCL-XL at the Interface between Cell Death and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Judith; Kepp, Oliver; Senovilla, Laura; Lissa, Delphine; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The BCL-2 homolog BCL-XL, one of the two protein products of BCL2L1, has originally been characterized for its prominent prosurvival functions. Similar to BCL-2, BCL-XL binds to its multidomain proapoptotic counterparts BAX and BAK, hence preventing the formation of lethal pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane, as well as to multiple BH3-only proteins, thus interrupting apical proapoptotic signals. In addition, BCL-XL has been suggested to exert cytoprotective functions by sequestering a cytosolic pool of the pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53 and by binding to the voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), thereby inhibiting the so-called mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Thus, BCL-XL appears to play a prominent role in the regulation of multiple distinct types of cell death, including apoptosis and regulated necrosis. More recently, great attention has been given to the cell death-unrelated functions of BCL-2-like proteins. In particular, BCL-XL has been shown to modulate a number of pathophysiological processes, including—but not limited to—mitochondrial ATP synthesis, protein acetylation, autophagy and mitosis. In this short review article, we will discuss the functions of BCL-XL at the interface between cell death and metabolism. PMID:23533418

  7. A cell-phone-based brain-computer interface for communication in daily life.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Te; Wang, Yijun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Moving a brain-computer interface (BCI) system from a laboratory demonstration to real-life applications still poses severe challenges to the BCI community. This study aims to integrate a mobile and wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) system and a signal-processing platform based on a cell phone into a truly wearable and wireless online BCI. Its practicality and implications in a routine BCI are demonstrated through the realization and testing of a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI. This study implemented and tested online signal processing methods in both time and frequency domains for detecting SSVEPs. The results of this study showed that the performance of the proposed cell-phone-based platform was comparable, in terms of the information transfer rate, with other BCI systems using bulky commercial EEG systems and personal computers. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a truly portable, cost-effective and miniature cell-phone-based platform for online BCIs. PMID:21436517

  8. A cell-phone-based brain-computer interface for communication in daily life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Te; Wang, Yijun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Moving a brain-computer interface (BCI) system from a laboratory demonstration to real-life applications still poses severe challenges to the BCI community. This study aims to integrate a mobile and wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) system and a signal-processing platform based on a cell phone into a truly wearable and wireless online BCI. Its practicality and implications in a routine BCI are demonstrated through the realization and testing of a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI. This study implemented and tested online signal processing methods in both time and frequency domains for detecting SSVEPs. The results of this study showed that the performance of the proposed cell-phone-based platform was comparable, in terms of the information transfer rate, with other BCI systems using bulky commercial EEG systems and personal computers. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a truly portable, cost-effective and miniature cell-phone-based platform for online BCIs.

  9. Functional Interfaces in Polymer-Based Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: Establishment of a Cluster for Interdisciplinary Research and Training

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Alan J; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen

    2009-01-05

    Remarkable scientific progress has been demonstrated toward the creation of a low cost (“printable”) solar cell technology by the interdisciplinary group at UC Santa Barbara. Multi-layer architectures were implemented with clean interfaces were demonstrated; the various interfaces are sharp; there is no evidence of inter-layer mixing. This is indeed remarkable since each of these layers was processed from solution. The use of “Processing Additives” such as the alkanedithiols was demonstrated to increase the power conversion efficiency of BHJ solar cells by a factor of two. Equally important, the mechanism by which these Processing Additives function has been identified.

  10. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  11. Exposure to Carbon Nanotube Material: Assessment of Nanotube Cytotoxicity Using Human Keratinocyte Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Castranova, Vincent; Kisin, Elena R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Murray, Ashley R.; Gandelsman, Vadim Z.; Maynard, Andrew; Baron, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are new members of carbon allotropes similar to fullerenes and graphite. Because of their unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, carbon nanotubes are important for novel applications in the electronics, aerospace, and computer industries. Exposure to graphite and carbon materials has been associated with increased incidence of skin diseases, such as carbon fiber dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, and naevi. We investigated adverse effects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) using a cell culture of immortalized human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). After 18 h of exposure of HaCaT to SWCNT, oxidative stress and cellular toxicity were indicated by formation of free radicals, accumulation of peroxidative products, antioxidant depletion, and loss of cell viability. Exposure to SWCNT also resulted in ultrastructural and morphological changes in cultured skin cells. These data indicate that dermal exposure to unrefined SWCNT may lead to dermal toxicity due to accelerated oxidative stress in the skin of exposed workers.

  12. Cocaine exposure reorganizes cell type- and input-specific connectivity in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    MacAskill, Andrew F; Cassel, John M; Carter, Adam G

    2014-09-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine alters the structural and functional properties of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). These changes suggest a rewiring of the NAc circuit, with an enhancement of excitatory synaptic connections onto MSNs. However, it is unknown how drug exposure alters the balance of long-range afferents onto different cell types in the NAc. Here we used whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, optogenetics and pharmacogenetics to show how repeated cocaine exposure alters connectivity in the mouse NAc medial shell. Cocaine selectively enhanced amygdala innervation of MSNs expressing D1 dopamine receptors (D1-MSNs) relative to D2-MSNs. We also found that amygdala activity was required for cocaine-induced changes to behavior and connectivity. Finally, we established how heightened amygdala innervation can explain the structural and functional changes evoked by cocaine. Our findings reveal how exposure to drugs of abuse fundamentally reorganizes cell type- and input-specific connectivity in the NAc.

  13. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  14. Interfacing biomembrane mimetic polymer surfaces with living cells Surface modification for reliable bioartificial liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Takami, Utae; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2008-11-01

    The surface design used for reducing nonspecific biofouling is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. We present here a newly synthesized a carbohydrate-immobilized phosphorylcholine polymer for surface modification of medical devices to control the interface with living cells. A random copolymer composed of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), n-butyl methacrylate (BMA), and 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate (LAMA) was synthesized by conventional radical polymerization. The monomer feeding ratio in the copolymer was adjusted to 24/75/1 (MPC/BMA/LAMA). The copolymer (PMBL1.0) could be coated by solvent evaporation from an ethanol solution. Cells of the human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) having asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) were seeded on PMBL1.0 or poly(BMA) (PBMA)-coated PET plates. On PBMA, many adherent cells were observed and were well spread with monolayer adhesion. HepG2 adhesion was observed on PMBL1.0 because the cell has ASGPRs. Furthermore, some of the cells adhering to PMBL1.0 had a spheroid formation and similarly shaped spheroids were scattered on the surface. According to confocal laser microscopic observation after 96 h cultivation, it was found that albumin production preferentially occurred in the center of the spheroid. The albumin production of the cells that adhered to PBMA was sparse. The amount of albumin production per unit cell that adhered to PMBL1.0 was determined by ELISA and was significantly higher than that which adhered to PBMA. Long-term cultivation of HepG2 was also performed using hollow fiber mini-modules coated with PMBL1.0. The concentration of albumin produced from HepG2 increased continuously for one month. In the mini-module, the function of HepG2 was effectively preserved for that period. On the hollow fiber membrane, spheroid formation of HepG2 cells was also observed. In conclusion, PMBL1.0 can provide a suitable surface for the cultivation of

  15. Cell investigations simultaneously with exposure to 2.45 GHz microwaves.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diana; Cinca, Sabin; Margaritescu, Irina; Neagu, Monica; Iacob, Nicusor; Ighigeanu, Daniel; Matei, Constantin; Craciun, Gabriela; Manaila, Elena; Chirita, Doru Aurel; Moisescu, Mihaela

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents two microwave (MW) exposure systems (MWESs) that permit observations and measurements on cell cultures during their exposure to MW of 2.45 GHz: MWES-1 and MWES-2. MWES-1 is designed for the measurement of the cell membrane fluorescence anisotropies (MFA) simultaneously with MW exposure. MWES-2 is designed for the cells culture exploration under an inverted microscope before, during and after MW exposure. MWES-1 consists mainly of a 2.45 GHz microwave generator (MWG-2.45 GHz-SAIREM) of 0-25 W, equipped with forward power and reflected power displaying, and an adjustable coaxial antenna immersed directly into the cuvette with the cells-suspension of a Spex type spectrofluorometer. The MW effect on membrane fluidity of B16F10 malignant melanoma (B16F10-MM) cells in suspension were investigated with MWES-1, by MFA measurements. We observed a MW induced transition temperature (ITT) rising strongly during the MW exposure as compared with ITT obtained by classical heating (CH). The MWES-2 consists of the MWG-2.45 GHz-SAIREM generator and a rectangular waveguide applicator with traveling wave placed between the condenser and the objective of a Zeiss Axiovert 200 microscope, equipped with a fluorescence device and image acquisition. The MW effects on shape and apoptosis of the B16F10-MM cells were investigate with MWES-2. The B16F10-MM cells exhibited visible shape changes during MW exposure up to 37 degrees C. The MW exposure induced cells apoptosis/necrosis in several seconds after that MW are applied, beginning with SAR = 1.5 W/sample, compared to CH controls exposed at the same temperature dynamics.

  16. Cell investigations simultaneously with exposure to 2.45 GHz microwaves.

    PubMed

    Martin, Diana; Cinca, Sabin; Margaritescu, Irina; Neagu, Monica; Iacob, Nicusor; Ighigeanu, Daniel; Matei, Constantin; Craciun, Gabriela; Manaila, Elena; Chirita, Doru Aurel; Moisescu, Mihaela

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents two microwave (MW) exposure systems (MWESs) that permit observations and measurements on cell cultures during their exposure to MW of 2.45 GHz: MWES-1 and MWES-2. MWES-1 is designed for the measurement of the cell membrane fluorescence anisotropies (MFA) simultaneously with MW exposure. MWES-2 is designed for the cells culture exploration under an inverted microscope before, during and after MW exposure. MWES-1 consists mainly of a 2.45 GHz microwave generator (MWG-2.45 GHz-SAIREM) of 0-25 W, equipped with forward power and reflected power displaying, and an adjustable coaxial antenna immersed directly into the cuvette with the cells-suspension of a Spex type spectrofluorometer. The MW effect on membrane fluidity of B16F10 malignant melanoma (B16F10-MM) cells in suspension were investigated with MWES-1, by MFA measurements. We observed a MW induced transition temperature (ITT) rising strongly during the MW exposure as compared with ITT obtained by classical heating (CH). The MWES-2 consists of the MWG-2.45 GHz-SAIREM generator and a rectangular waveguide applicator with traveling wave placed between the condenser and the objective of a Zeiss Axiovert 200 microscope, equipped with a fluorescence device and image acquisition. The MW effects on shape and apoptosis of the B16F10-MM cells were investigate with MWES-2. The B16F10-MM cells exhibited visible shape changes during MW exposure up to 37 degrees C. The MW exposure induced cells apoptosis/necrosis in several seconds after that MW are applied, beginning with SAR = 1.5 W/sample, compared to CH controls exposed at the same temperature dynamics. PMID:21384706

  17. Dynamic Reorganization and Enzymatic Remodeling of Type IV Collagen at Cell-Biomaterial Interface.

    PubMed

    Coelho, N M; Llopis-Hernández, V; Salmerón-Sánchez, M; Altankov, G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular basement membrane remodeling involves assembly and degradation of its main constituents, type IV collagen (Col IV) and laminin, which is critical during development, angiogenesis, and tissue repair. Remodeling can also occur at cell-biomaterials interface altering significantly the biocompatibility of implants. Here we describe the fate of adsorbed Col IV in contact with endothelial cells adhering on positively charged NH2 or hydrophobic CH3 substrata, both based on self-assembly monolayers (SAMs) and studied alone or mixed in different proportions. AFM studies revealed distinct pattern of adsorbed Col IV, varying from single molecular deposition on pure NH2 to network-like assembly on mixed SAMs, turning to big globular aggregates on bare CH3. Human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) interact better with Col IV adsorbed as single molecules on NH2 surface and readily rearrange it in fibril-like pattern that coincide with secreted fibronectin fibrils. The cells show flattened morphology and well-developed focal adhesion complexes that are rich on phosphorylated FAK while expressing markedly low pericellular proteolytic activity. Conversely, on hydrophobic CH3 substrata HUVECs showed abrogated spreading and FAK phosphorylation, combined with less reorganization of the aggregated Col IV and significantly increased proteolytic activity. The later involves both MMP-2 and MMP-9, as measured by zymography and FITC-Col IV release. The mixed SAMs support intermediate remodeling activity. Taken together these results show that chemical functionalization combined with Col IV preadsorption provides a tool for guiding the endothelial cells behavior and pericellular proteolytic activity, events that strongly affect the fate of cardiovascular implants. PMID:27567485

  18. Cellular effects of metolachlor exposure on human liver (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Sean; Musah, Sadiatu; Dhanwada, Kavita R

    2013-01-01

    Metolachlor is one of the most commonly used herbicides in the United States. Protein synthesis is inhibited when roots and shoots of susceptible plants absorb this synthetic herbicide. While quite effective in killing weeds, several studies have shown that exposure to metolachlor results in decreased cell proliferation, growth and reproductive ability of non-target organisms. However, the mode of metolachlor action in non-target organisms has not yet been elucidated. The current study assessed effects of metolachlor exposure on immortalized human liver (HepG2) cells. Results from cell proliferation assays showed that a 72-h exposure to 50 parts per billion (ppb) metolachlor significantly inhibited growth of these cells compared to untreated controls while a decrease in the cell division rate required exposure to 500 ppb metolachlor for 48 h. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle distribution revealed that 500 ppb metolachlor treatment resulted in fewer HepG2 cells in G2/M phase after 72 h. Real-time PCR analysis showed a significant decrease in the abundance of the cyclin A transcripts after 12h in cells exposed to 300 ppb metolachlor. These results suggest metolachlor may affect progression through the S phase of the cell cycle and entrance into the G2 phase. PMID:23084262

  19. Effects of microwave exposure and Gemcitabine treatment on apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells.

    PubMed

    Canseven, Ayşe G; Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Kayhan, Handan; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 1.8 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)-modulated microwave (MW) radiation on apoptotic level and cell viability of Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells with or without Gemcitabine, which exhibits cell phase specificity, primarily killing cells undergoing DNA synthesis (S-phase). Raji cells were exposed to 1.8 GHz GSM-modulated MW radiation at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.350 W/kg in a CO2 incubator. The duration of the exposure was 24 h. The amount of apoptotic cells was analyzed using Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI) staining with flow cytometer. The apoptotic activity of MW exposed Raji cells was increased significantly. In addition, cell viability of exposed samples was significantly decreased. Combined exposure of MW and Gemcitabine increased the amount of apoptotic cells than MW radiation alone. Moreover, viability of MW + Gemcitabine exposed cells was lower than that of cells exposed only to MW. These results demonstrated that MW radiation exposure and Gemcitabine treatment have a synergistic effect on apoptotic activity of Raji cells.

  20. Endotoxemia-induced cytokine-mediated responses of hippocampal astrocytes transmitted by cells of the brain–immune interface

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae; Inaba, Muneo; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Unno, Keiko; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Shimada, Atsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation shifts the brain microenvironment towards a proinflammatory state. However, how peripheral inflammation mediates changes in the brain remains to be clarified. We aimed to identify hippocampal cells and cytokines that respond to endotoxemia. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline, and examined 1, 4, and 24 h after injection. Tissue cytokine concentrations in the spleens and hippocampi were determined by multiplex assays. Another group of mice were studied immunohistologically. Fourteen cytokines showed an increased concentration in the spleen, and 10 showed an increase in the hippocampus after LPS injection. Cytokines increased at 4 h (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, and interleukin-6) were expressed by leptomeningeal stromal cells, choroid plexus stromal cells, choroid plexus epithelial cells, and hippocampal vascular endothelial cells, all of which were located at the brain–immune interface. Receptors for these cytokines were expressed by astrocytic endfeet. Cytokines increased at 24 h (CCL11, CXCL10, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor) were expressed by astrocytes. Cells of the brain–immune interface therefore respond to endotoxemia with cytokine signals earlier than hippocampal parenchymal cells. In the parenchyma, astrocytes play a key role in responding to signals by using endfeet located in close apposition to the interface cells via cytokine receptors. PMID:27149601

  1. Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence Decays (TRPL) in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

  2. Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL) Decays in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

  3. Long-term exposure of bacterial cells to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouia, Fathi; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Ott, Mark C.; Willson, Richard C.; Pierson, Duane L.; Fox, George E.

    2012-10-01

    Previous space flight experience has demonstrated that microorganisms are just as ubiquitous in space habitats as they are on Earth. Numerous incidences of biofilm formation within space habitats have been reported; some of which were identified only after damage to spacecraft structures and irritation to astronaut's skin occurred. As we increase the duration of spaceflight missions, it becomes legitimate to question the long-term effects of microgravity on bacteria. To begin this assessment, Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 was grown for one thousand generations (1000G) under low shear modeled microgravity. Subsequently, growth kinetics and the presence of biofilm were assessed in the 1000G strain as compared to a strain (1G) briefly exposed to LSMMG. Overall, the analysis revealed that (i) there was no obvious difference in growth kinetics between the 1G and 1000G strains, and (ii) although biofilm formation was not seen in the 1G strain it did in fact occur as exposure time increased. The results suggest that long-term exposure to the space environment likely favors biofilm formation in many organisms.

  4. Primary in vitro culture of porcine tracheal epithelial cells in an air-liquid interface as a model to study airway epithelium and Aspergillus fumigatus interactions.

    PubMed

    Khoufache, Khaled; Cabaret, Odile; Farrugia, Cécile; Rivollet, Danièle; Alliot, Annie; Allaire, Eric; Cordonnier, Catherine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Botterel, Françoise

    2010-12-01

    Since the airway epithelium is the first tissue encountered by airborne fungal spores, specific models are needed to study this interaction. We developed such a model using primary porcine tracheal epithelial cells (PTEC) as a possible alternative to the use of primary human cells. PTEC were obtained from pigs and were cultivated in an air-liquid interface. Fluorescent brightener was employed to quantify the internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. Potential differences (Vt) and transepithelial resistances (Rt) after challenge with the mycotoxin, verruculogen, were studied. Primers for porcine inflammatory mediator genes IL-8, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF were designed for a quantitative real-time PCR procedure to study cellular responses to challenges with A. fumigatus conidia. TEM showed the differentiation of ciliated cells and the PTEC ability to internalize conidia. The internalization rate was 21.9 ± 1.4% after 8 h of incubation. Verruculogen (10(-6) M) significantly increased Vt without having an effect on the Rt. Exposure of PTEC to live A. fumigatus conidia for 24 h induced a 10- to 40-fold increase in the mRNA levels of inflammatory mediator genes. PTEC behave similarly to human cells and are therefore a suitable alternative to human cells for studying interaction between airway epithelium and A. fumigatus. PMID:20608777

  5. High-throughput PBPK and Microdosimetry: Cell-level Exposures in a Virtual Tissue Context (WC9)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicokinetic (TK) models can determine whether chemical exposures produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations. Tissue microdosimetry TK models relate whole-body chemical exposures to cell-scale concentrations. As a proof of concept, we approximated the micro-anatomic arc...

  6. Diverse Profiles of Ricin-Cell Interactions in the Lung Following Intranasal Exposure to Ricin

    PubMed Central

    Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Alcalay, Ron; Gal, Yoav; Seliger, Nehama; Sabo, Tamar; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-01-01

    Ricin, a plant-derived exotoxin, inhibits protein synthesis by ribosomal inactivation. Due to its wide availability and ease of preparation, ricin is considered a biothreat, foremost by respiratory exposure. We examined the in vivo interactions between ricin and cells of the lungs in mice intranasally exposed to the toxin and revealed multi-phasic cell-type-dependent binding profiles. While macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) displayed biphasic binding to ricin, monophasic binding patterns were observed for other cell types; epithelial cells displayed early binding, while B cells and endothelial cells bound toxin late after intoxication. Neutrophils, which were massively recruited to the intoxicated lung, were refractive to toxin binding. Although epithelial cells bound ricin as early as MΦs and DCs, their rates of elimination differed considerably; a reduction in epithelial cell counts occurred late after intoxication and was restricted to alveolar type II cells only. The differential binding and cell-elimination patterns observed may stem from dissimilar accessibility of the toxin to different cells in the lung and may also reflect unequal interactions of the toxin with different cell-surface receptors. The multifaceted interactions observed in this study between ricin and the various cells of the target organ should be considered in the future development of efficient post-exposure countermeasures against ricin intoxication. PMID:26593946

  7. Diverse profiles of ricin-cell interactions in the lung following intranasal exposure to ricin.

    PubMed

    Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Alcalay, Ron; Gal, Yoav; Seliger, Nehama; Sabo, Tamar; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-11-01

    Ricin, a plant-derived exotoxin, inhibits protein synthesis by ribosomal inactivation. Due to its wide availability and ease of preparation, ricin is considered a biothreat, foremost by respiratory exposure. We examined the in vivo interactions between ricin and cells of the lungs in mice intranasally exposed to the toxin and revealed multi-phasic cell-type-dependent binding profiles. While macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) displayed biphasic binding to ricin, monophasic binding patterns were observed for other cell types; epithelial cells displayed early binding, while B cells and endothelial cells bound toxin late after intoxication. Neutrophils, which were massively recruited to the intoxicated lung, were refractive to toxin binding. Although epithelial cells bound ricin as early as MΦs and DCs, their rates of elimination differed considerably; a reduction in epithelial cell counts occurred late after intoxication and was restricted to alveolar type II cells only. The differential binding and cell-elimination patterns observed may stem from dissimilar accessibility of the toxin to different cells in the lung and may also reflect unequal interactions of the toxin with different cell-surface receptors. The multifaceted interactions observed in this study between ricin and the various cells of the target organ should be considered in the future development of efficient post-exposure countermeasures against ricin intoxication. PMID:26593946

  8. The effect of high intensity microwave exposure on enucleation of murine erythroid cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sciandra, J J; Repasky, E; Subjeck, J R; Johnson, R J

    1982-03-01

    We have examined the effects of microwave vs sham exposure on the enucleation phase of murine erythroid cells in vitro. While enucleation occurs rapidly in vivo, it occurs somewhat slower in vitro and can be quantitated in terms of rate. Exposure to 915 MHz electromagnetic radiation is found to significantly reduce the rate of enucleation (P less than 0.001). Exposure is carried out in a TE10 mode energized water-filled temperature-controlled waveguide. It is hypothesized that the effects of the exposure are on cytoplasmic or plasma membrane-associated structures since the nucleus at this stage of maturation is completely condensed and inactive. This assay is of direct interest in itself as well as providing a tool for the investigation of biological response to microwave exposure.

  9. Interface engineering of hybrid perovskite solar cells with poly(3-thiophene acetic acid) under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Shit, Arnab; Nandi, Arun K

    2016-04-21

    The properties of methyl ammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite solar cells with poly(3-thiophene acetic acid) (P3TAA) as a hole transporting material (HTM) and a dense layer of ZnO nanoparticle film as an electron transporting material (ETM) are described using the conventional ZnO (n)/perovskite (i)/P3TAA (p) (n-i-p) architecture. The FT-IR spectra of a MAPbI3/P3TAA mixture indicate a shift of the N-H stretching and the abolition of the N-H bending peak indicating the interaction between the components. UV-Vis spectra of the mixture exhibit a large red shift of the π-π* transition peak of the conjugated chain arising from the interaction causing an increase of the conjugation length. The cross-sectional SEM image of the device shows the sequence of the individual layers of ZnO, MAPbI3, P3TAA and Ag, respectively. The current density (J)-voltage (V) curves obtained upon illumination with a light of 100 mW cm(-2) indicate the average PCE to be 7.38 ± 0.59% under ambient conditions. The IPCE values of these cells reach about 63% across a broad range of wavelength (300-800 nm). The HOMO and the LUMO of P3TAA are measured using cyclic voltammetry and the optical band gap and the relative energy level of the components explain the operation of photocurrent in the cell. For comparison purposes a device using poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) as the HTM is fabricated under similar conditions and it exhibits a lower PCE (5.85 ± 0.51%) than that of the P3TAA based device. The longevity of the P3TAA based cell is also found to be better than that of the P3HT based cell for storing in air. The UV-Vis and impedance spectral results clearly explain the above results, signifying the influence of the interface on the performance of hybrid solar cells. PMID:27020145

  10. Imidacloprid Exposure Suppresses Neural Crest Cells Generation during Early Chick Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Wang, Guang; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Meng; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; He, Xiao-Song; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-06-15

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is widely used in the control pests found on crops and fleas on pets. However, it is still unclear whether imidacloprid exposure could affect early embryo development-despite some studies having been conducted on the gametes. In this study, we demonstrated that imidacloprid exposure could lead to abnormal craniofacial osteogenesis in the developing chick embryo. Cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) are the progenitor cells of the chick cranial skull. We found that the imidacloprid exposure retards the development of gastrulating chick embryos. HNK-1, PAX7, and Ap-2α immunohistological stainings indicated that cranial NCCs generation was inhibited after imidacloprid exposure. Double immunofluorescent staining (Ap-2α and PHIS3 or PAX7 and c-Caspase3) revealed that imidacloprid exposure inhibited both NCC proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, it inhibited NCCs production by repressing Msx1 and BMP4 expression in the developing neural tube and by altering expression of EMT-related adhesion molecules (Cad6B, E-Cadherin, and N-cadherin) in the developing neural crests. We also determined that imidacloprid exposure suppressed cranial NCCs migration and their ability to differentiate. In sum, we have provided experimental evidence that imidacloprid exposure during embryogenesis disrupts NCCs development, which in turn causes defective cranial bone development.

  11. Features in optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of organic solar cells due to organic/organic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Yasser A. M.; Soga, Tetsuo; Jimbo, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    We surprisingly found that, organic/organic interface had a direct and pronounced impact on optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of organic solar cell at a favorable wavelength region of the visible solar spectrum. The organic/organic interface was formed as a result of connection between coumarin 6 (C6): [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend films and indium-tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) electrode. Optical absorption measurement was carried out for ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM films, while external quantum efficiency measurement was carried out for ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM/Al solar cells, with varying C6:PCBM blend concentration. We found that, the C6:PCBM blend in the ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM films had an additional feature in the absorption spectra at the wavelength range of 520-800 nm, at which the C6 dye, PCBM, PEDOT:PSS, and ITO were transparent. An additional feature, also, appeared in photocurrent spectra of the C6:PCBM films in the ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM/Al solar cells at the same wavelength range. The new features in the optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of the investigated solar cells originated, in all probability, due to optically induced sup-band transitions in the C6:PCBM blend films at the interface with ITO/PEDOT:PSS electrode. Thus, the C6:PCBM blend films produced a charge carrier generation interface due to connection with ITO/PEDOT:PSS electrode. As a result of this charge carrier generation interface, the power conversion efficiency of the corresponding solar cell is improved. Taking into consideration these new findings, the high-band-gap organic materials will take more importance as sensitizers in organic optoelectronic applications.

  12. Rational material, interface, and device engineering for high-performance polymer and perovskite solar cells (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Alex K.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of polymer and hybrid solar cells is also strongly dependent on their efficiency in harvesting light, exciton dissociation, charge transport, and charge collection at the metal/organic/metal oxide or the metal/perovskite/metal oxide interfaces. Our laboratory employs a molecular engineering approach to develop processible low band-gap polymers with high charge carrier mobility that can enhance power conversion efficiency of the single junction solar cells to values as high as ~11%. We have also developed several innovative strategies to modify the interface of bulk-heterojunction devices and create new device architectures to fully explore their potential for solar applications. In this talk, the integrated approach of combining material design, interface, and device engineering to significantly improve the performance of polymer and hybrid perovskite photovoltaic cells will be discussed. Specific emphasis will be placed on the development of low band-gap polymers with reduced reorganizational energy and proper energy levels, formation of optimized morphology of active layer, and minimized interfacial energy barriers using functional conductive surfactants. At the end, several new device architectures and optical engineering strategies to make tandem cells and semitransparent solar cells will be discussed to explore the full promise of polymer and perovskite hybrid solar cells.

  13. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup Cip1} is likely dispensable when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces senescence in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21{sup Cip1}/PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  14. Controlling mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into contractile smooth muscle cells on a TiO2 micro/nano interface: Towards benign pericytes environment for endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingan; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Feng; Yang, Ping; He, Zikun; Zhao, Ansha; Huang, Nan

    2016-09-01

    Building healthy and oriented smooth muscle cells (SMCs) environment is an effective method for improving the surface endothelialization of the cardiovascular implants. However, a long-term and stable source of SMCs for implantation without immune rejection and inflammation has not been solved, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation may be a good choice. In this work, two types of TiO2 micro/nano interfaces were fabricated on titanium surface by photolithography and anodic oxidation. These TiO2 micro/nano interfaces were used to regulate the differentiation of the MSCs. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) detection showed that the TiO2 micro/nano interfaces possessed the anatase crystal structure, suggesting good cytocompatibility. The CCK-8 results indicated the TiO2 micro/nano interfaces improved MSC proliferation, further immunofluorescence staining and calculation of the cell morphology index proved the micro/nano surfaces also elongated MSCs and regulated MSCs oriented growth. The specific staining of α-SMA, CNN-1, vWF, CD44 and CD133 markers revealed that the micro/nano surfaces induced MSCs differentiation to contractile SMCs, and the endothelial cells (ECs) culture experiment indicated that the MSCs induced by micro/nano interfaces contributed to the ECs attachment and proliferation. This method will be further studied and applied for the surface modification of the cardiovascular implants.

  15. Controlling mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into contractile smooth muscle cells on a TiO2 micro/nano interface: Towards benign pericytes environment for endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingan; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Feng; Yang, Ping; He, Zikun; Zhao, Ansha; Huang, Nan

    2016-09-01

    Building healthy and oriented smooth muscle cells (SMCs) environment is an effective method for improving the surface endothelialization of the cardiovascular implants. However, a long-term and stable source of SMCs for implantation without immune rejection and inflammation has not been solved, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation may be a good choice. In this work, two types of TiO2 micro/nano interfaces were fabricated on titanium surface by photolithography and anodic oxidation. These TiO2 micro/nano interfaces were used to regulate the differentiation of the MSCs. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) detection showed that the TiO2 micro/nano interfaces possessed the anatase crystal structure, suggesting good cytocompatibility. The CCK-8 results indicated the TiO2 micro/nano interfaces improved MSC proliferation, further immunofluorescence staining and calculation of the cell morphology index proved the micro/nano surfaces also elongated MSCs and regulated MSCs oriented growth. The specific staining of α-SMA, CNN-1, vWF, CD44 and CD133 markers revealed that the micro/nano surfaces induced MSCs differentiation to contractile SMCs, and the endothelial cells (ECs) culture experiment indicated that the MSCs induced by micro/nano interfaces contributed to the ECs attachment and proliferation. This method will be further studied and applied for the surface modification of the cardiovascular implants. PMID:27232304

  16. Alterations in cancer cell mechanical properties after fluid shear stress exposure: a micropipette aspiration study

    PubMed Central

    Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; Krog, Benjamin L; Nauseef, Jones T; Henry, Michael D; Vigmostad, Sarah C

    2015-01-01

    Over 90% of cancer deaths result not from primary tumor development, but from metastatic tumors that arise after cancer cells circulate to distal sites via the circulatory system. While it is known that metastasis is an inefficient process, the effect of hemodynamic parameters such as fluid shear stress (FSS) on the viability and efficacy of metastasis is not well understood. Recent work has shown that select cancer cells may be able to survive and possibly even adapt to FSS in vitro. The current research seeks to characterize the effect of FSS on the mechanical properties of suspended cancer cells in vitro. Nontransformed prostate epithelial cells (PrEC LH) and transformed prostate cancer cells (PC-3) were used in this study. The Young’s modulus was determined using micropipette aspiration. We examined cells in suspension but not exposed to FSS (unsheared) and immediately after exposure to high (6,400 dyn/cm2) and low (510 dyn/cm2) FSS. The PrEC LH cells were ~140% stiffer than the PC-3 cells not exposed to FSS. Post-FSS exposure, there was an increase of ~77% in Young’s modulus after exposure to high FSS and a ~47% increase in Young’s modulus after exposure to low FSS for the PC-3 cells. There was no significant change in the Young’s modulus of PrEC LH cells post-FSS exposure. Our findings indicate that cancer cells adapt to FSS, with an increased Young’s modulus being one of the adaptive responses, and that this adaptation is specific only to PC-3 cells and is not seen in PrEC LH cells. Moreover, this adaptation appears to be graded in response to the magnitude of FSS experienced by the cancer cells. This is the first study investigating the effect of FSS on the mechanical properties of cancer cells in suspension, and may provide significant insights into the mechanism by which some select cancer cells may survive in the circulation, ultimately leading to metastasis at distal sites. Our findings suggest that biomechanical analysis of cancer cells could

  17. The Effects of Gamma and Proton Radiation Exposure on Hematopoietic Cell Counts in the Ferret Model.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Wan, X Steven; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S; Wroe, Andrew J; Gridley, Daila S; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to total-body radiation induces hematological changes, which can detriment one's immune response to wounds and infection. Here, the decreases in blood cell counts after acute radiation doses of γ-ray or proton radiation exposure, at the doses and dose-rates expected during a solar particle event (SPE), are reported in the ferret model system. Following the exposure to γ-ray or proton radiation, the ferret peripheral total white blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte counts decreased whereas neutrophil count increased within 3 hours. At 48 hours after irradiation, the WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts decreased in a dose-dependent manner but were not significantly affected by the radiation type (γ-rays verses protons) or dose rate (0.5 Gy/minute verses 0.5 Gy/hour). The loss of these blood cells could accompany and contribute to the physiological symptoms of the acute radiation syndrome (ARS).

  18. Summary of solar cell data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, David C.; Rose, M. Frank

    1994-01-01

    The contractor has obtained and reviewed data relating solar cells assemblies (SCA's) flown as part of the following LDEF experiments: the Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment (S0014); the Solar Array Materials Passive LDEF Experiment (A0171); the Advanced Solar Cell and Coverglass Analysis Experiment (M0003-4); the LDEF Heat Pipe Experiment (S1001); the Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings Y Solar Cells Experiment (S1002); and the Space Plasma-High Voltage Drainage Experiment (A0054). Where possible, electrical data have been tabulated and correlated with various environmental effects, including meteoroid and debris impacts, radiation exposure, atomic oxygen exposure, contamination, UV radiation exposure, and thermal cycling. The type, configuration, and location of all SCA's are documented here. By gathering all data and results together, a comparison of the survivability of the various types and configurations can be made.

  19. Cocaine Exposure Reorganizes Cell-Type and Input-Specific Connectivity in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    MacAskill, Andrew F.; Cassel, John M.; Carter, Adam G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine alters the structural and functional properties of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc). These changes suggest a rewiring of the NAc circuit, with an enhancement of excitatory synaptic connections onto MSNs. However, it is unknown how drug exposure alters the balance of long-range afferents onto different cell types in the NAc. Here we use whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, optogenetics and pharmacogenetics to show how repeated cocaine alters connectivity in the mouse NAc medial shell. We first determine that cocaine selectively enhances amygdala innervation of D1-MSNs relative to D2-MSNs. We then show that amygdala activity is required for cocaine-induced changes to behavior and connectivity. Finally, we establish how heightened amygdala innervation can explain the structural and functional changes induced by cocaine. Our findings reveal how exposure to drugs of abuse fundamentally reorganizes cell-type and input-specific connectivity in the NAc. PMID:25108911

  20. Human Airway Epithelial Cell Responses to Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Exposure: Nanorope-Residual Body Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, Barbara J.; Warren, John B.; Kisslinger, Kim; Crosson, Kenya; Maye, Mathew M.

    2012-11-01

    This investigation examines the 'first contact responses' of in vitro human epithelial airway cells exposed to unrefined single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) [containing metal catalyst, carbon black, amorphous carbon, graphitic shells, and SWCNTs], and refined acid/peroxide cleaned and cut SWCNTs at low and high dose exposures (0.16 ug/L and 1.60 ug/L) for 2, 3 and 3.5 hours. FTIR, X-ray compositional analysis, morphological TEM analysis and UV-Vis were used to physicochemically characterize the SWCNTs in this study. Following SWCNT exposure to human lung NCI-H292 epithelial monolayers, the airway cells were prepared for light microscopy vital staining, or fixed in glutaraldehyde for SEM/TEM imaging to determine SWCNT binding, uptake, intracellular processing and organellar/SWCNT fate within the exposure period. At 2 hr exposures to both unrefined Carbolex, and refined SWCNTs (at both high and low doses), there were no increases in lung cell necrosis compared to controls. However high dose, 3 hr exposures to unrefined Carbolex material produced severe cell damage (apical and basal plasma membrane holes, decreased mitochondria, numerous intracellular vesicles containing nanomaterial and membrane fragments) and increased cell necrosis. The refined SWCNTs exposed for 3 hr at low dose produced no increase in cell death, although high dose exposure produced significant cell death. By TEM, Acid/peroxide cleaned SWCNT 3 hr exposures at high and low doses, revealed SWCNTs attachment to cell surface mucin, and SWCNT uptake into the cells during membrane recycling. Membranes and SWCNTs were seen within cytoplasmic lamellar body-type vesicles, where vesicular contents were bio-degraded, eventually forming long SWCNT-nanoropes, which were subsequently released into the cytoplasm as clusters of attached nanoropes, as the vesicle membranes fragmented. These Nanorope-Residual Bodies did not cause damage to the surrounding organelles or cytoplasm, and seemed very stabile in the

  1. Necrotic cell death caused by exposure to graphitic carbon-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hee; Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Kim, Eunjoo

    2015-09-01

    We synthesized graphitic carbon-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe@C NPs) and evaluated their physicochemical properties and mechanism of cytotoxicity in vitro. The structure of these nanocomposites consisted of an iron core encapsulated by a graphitic-carbon shell. The diameter of these Fe@C NPs was 81 ± 14 nm, and the thickness of the carbon layer encapsulating the core was 7.0 ± 0.5 nm. Inhibition of cell proliferation was induced by exposure to Fe@C NPs at doses above 50 μg mL(-1) . The exposed cells did not show increased activation of apoptosis biomarkers such as PARP, caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-9, and apoptosis-specific responses such as DNA laddering and annexin V binding to the cell membranes. In addition, the expression levels of autophagy-specific biomarkers such as ATG5 and LC3 after exposure were not enhanced, either. Instead, we observed increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in the culture media and red-fluorescent cell cytosol stained with ethidium homodimer I after the exposure. These results indicated enhanced cell membrane permeability after exposure to Fe@C NPs, probably caused by necrosis. The analysis of the regulatory molecules of cell cycling and proliferation, ERK, p53, and AKT, implied that cell cycle arrest was initiated and the cells were sensitized to necrosis. This necrotic cell death was also observed in carbon shells from Fe@C NPs obtained by removing the metal core. In conclusion, the graphitic carbon-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by one-pot synthesis induced necrotic cell death to human HEK293 cells, which was caused by graphitic carbon surface encapsulating the metal core.

  2. Reactive oxygen species in chick hair cells after gentamicin exposure in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Hockenbery, D M; Rubel, E W

    1997-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been invoked as a causative agent of cell death in many different developmental and pathological states. The presence of free radicals and their importance of hair cell death due to aminoglycosides is suggested by a number of studies that have demonstrated a protective effect of antioxidants. By using dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) a fluorescent compound that is a reporter of reactive oxygen species, we have shown that free radicals are rapidly produced by avian hair cells in vitro after exposure to gentamicin. In addition, free radical scavengers, catalase and glutathione, were tested with DCFH fluorescent imaging for their ability to quench the production of reactive oxygen species in hair cells after drug exposure. Both free radical scavengers were very effective in suppressing drug-induced production of free radicals. Next, we investigated the ability of these antioxidants to preserve the structural integrity of hair cells after exposure to gentamicin. We were not able to detect any attenuation of the hair cell loss using antioxidants in conjunction with gentamicin. This result must be qualified by the fact that the antioxidants used were not effective over long-term gentamicin exposure. Therefore, methodological constraints prevented adequately testing possible protective effects of the free radical scavengers in this model system. PMID:9119753

  3. Exposure of human cells to electromagnetic fields. Final report, 1 January 1988-31 December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1990-02-27

    This study addressed the following basic question: How does extremely low-level non-ionizing radiation affect human cells, and if there are cellular responses that can be directly related to signal parameters such as frequency, amplitude and time of exposure. The focus of these studies was to identify transcriptional changes in human cultured cells, HL60, which result from exposure of these cells to defined extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (elf EMFS). Our experiments show a pronounced measurable response observed as transcript increase, with associated changes in protein synthesis. The major findings relative to transcriptional changes are fourfold: (1) transcript changes in human cells correlate with previous findings of transcriptional and translational changes in Drosophila salivary gland cells; (2) the frequency of the signal in the amplitude (with resulting changes in E- and B-fields) in log increments from 0.5 to 500 uV at 60 Hz gives both amplitude and time-dependent windows, and (4) genes not usually expressed in HL-60 are unaffected by exposure to elf EMFs. Changes in the overall protein synthetic pattern have also been observed following exposure of HL60 cells to 60 Hz signals.

  4. New exposure system to evaluate the toxicity of (scooter) exhaust emissions in lung cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Müller, Loretta; Comte, Pierre; Czerwinski, Jan; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas C R; Gehr, Peter; Burtscher, Heinz; Morin, Jean-Paul; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2010-04-01

    A constantly growing number of scooters produce an increasing amount of potentially harmful emissions. Due to their engine technology, two-stroke scooters emit huge amounts of adverse substances, which can induce adverse pulmonary and cardiovascular health effects. The aim of this study was to develop a system to expose a characterized triple cell coculture model of the human epithelial airway barrier, to freshly produced and characterized total scooter exhaust emissions. In exposure chambers, cell cultures were exposed for 1 and 2 h to 1:100 diluted exhaust emissions and in the reference chamber to filtered ambient air, both controlled at 5% CO(2), 85% relative humidity, and 37 degrees C. The postexposure time was 0-24 h. Cytotoxicity, used to validate the exposure system, was significantly increased in exposed cell cultures after 8 h postexposure time. (Pro-) inflammatory chemo- and cytokine concentrations in the medium of exposed cells were significantly higher at the 12 h postexposure time point. It was shown that the described exposure system (with 2 h exposure duration, 8 and 24 h postexposure time, dilution of 1:100, flow of 2 L/min as optimal exposure conditions) can be used to evaluate the toxic potential of total exhaust emissions.

  5. Effects of combined radiofrequency radiation exposure on levels of reactive oxygen species in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung; Hong, Mi-Na; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined RF radiation (837 MHz CDMA plus 1950 MHz WCDMA) signal on levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neuronal cells. Exposure of the combined RF signal was conducted at specific absorption rate values of 2 W/kg of CDMA plus 2 W/kg of WCDMA for 2 h. Co-exposure to combined RF radiation with either H2O2 or menadione was also performed. The experimental exposure groups were incubator control, sham-exposed, combined RF radiation-exposed with or without either H2O2 or menadione groups. The intracellular ROS level was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Intracellular ROS levels were not consistently affected by combined RF radiation exposure alone in a time-dependent manner in U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y cells. In neuronal cells exposed to combined RF radiation with either H2O2 or menadione, intracellular ROS levels showed no statically significant alteration compared with exposure to menadione or H2O2 alone. These findings indicate that neither combined RF radiation alone nor combined RF radiation with menadione or H2O2 influences the intracellular ROS level in neuronal cells such as U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y. PMID:24105709

  6. Chronic exposure to IFNα drives medullar lymphopoiesis towards T-cell differentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Marianna; Gil-Fariña, Irene; Vanrell, Lucia; Sánchez-Bayona, Rodrigo; Alignani, Diego; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; Berraondo, Pedro; Prieto, Jesús; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-08-01

    Interferon-α is a potent antiviral agent and a vigorous adjuvant in the induction of T-cell responses but its use is limited by hematologic toxicity. Interferon-α alters hematopoietic stem cell dormancy and impairs myelocytic and erythrocytic/megakaryocytic differentiation from hematopoietic progenitors. However, the effect of chronic interferon-α exposure on hematopoietic precursors has still not been well characterized. Here, we transduced the liver of mice with an adenoassociated vector encoding interferon-α to achieve sustained high serum levels of the cytokine. The bone marrow of these animals showed diminished long-term and short-term hematopoietic stem cells, reduction of multipotent progenitor cells, and marked decrease of B cells, but significant increase in the proportion of CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells. Upon adoptive transfer to RAG(-/-) mice, bone marrow cells from interferon-α-treated animals generated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells while CD19(+), CD11b(+) and NK1.1(+) lineages failed to develop. These effects are associated with the transcriptional downregulation of transcription factors involved in B-cell differentiation and modulation of key factors for T-cell development. Thus, sustained interferon-α exposure causes hematopoietic stem cells exhaustion and drives common lymphoid progenitors towards T-cell generation. PMID:25715405

  7. Chronic exposure to IFNα drives medullar lymphopoiesis towards T-cell differentiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Di Scala, Marianna; Gil-Fariña, Irene; Vanrell, Lucia; Sánchez-Bayona, Rodrigo; Alignani, Diego; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; Berraondo, Pedro; Prieto, Jesús; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-α is a potent antiviral agent and a vigorous adjuvant in the induction of T-cell responses but its use is limited by hematologic toxicity. Interferon-α alters hematopoietic stem cell dormancy and impairs myelocytic and erythrocytic/megakaryocytic differentiation from hematopoietic progenitors. However, the effect of chronic interferon-α exposure on hematopoietic precursors has still not been well characterized. Here, we transduced the liver of mice with an adenoassociated vector encoding interferon-α to achieve sustained high serum levels of the cytokine. The bone marrow of these animals showed diminished long-term and short-term hematopoietic stem cells, reduction of multipotent progenitor cells, and marked decrease of B cells, but significant increase in the proportion of CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ T cells. Upon adoptive transfer to RAG−/− mice, bone marrow cells from interferon-α-treated animals generated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells while CD19+, CD11b+ and NK1.1+ lineages failed to develop. These effects are associated with the transcriptional downregulation of transcription factors involved in B-cell differentiation and modulation of key factors for T-cell development. Thus, sustained interferon-α exposure causes hematopoietic stem cells exhaustion and drives common lymphoid progenitors towards T-cell generation. PMID:25715405

  8. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2015-07-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm-2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  9. Loss of T cell precursors after spaceflight and exposure to vector-averaged gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Chris C.; Banks, Krista E.; Gruener, Raphael; DeLuca, Dominick

    2003-01-01

    Using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC), we examined the effects of spaceflight and vector-averaged gravity on T cell development. Under both conditions, the development of T cells was significantly attenuated. Exposure to spaceflight for 16 days resulted in a loss of precursors for CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ T cells in a rat/mouse xenogeneic co-culture. A significant decrease in the same precursor cells, as well as a decrease in CD4-CD8- T cell precursors, was also observed in a murine C57BL/6 FTOC after rotation in a clinostat to produce a vector-averaged microgravity-like environment. The block in T cell development appeared to occur between the pre-T cell and CD4+CD8+ T cell stage. These data indicate that gravity plays a decisive role in the development of T cells.

  10. Prenatal alcohol exposure inducing the apoptosis of mossy cells in hippocampus of SMS2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai; Wu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoqing; Deng, Jiexin; Ma, Zhanyou; Fan, Wenjuan; He, Weiya; Deng, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis through the ceramide pathway, sphingomyelin synthase 2 knockout (SMS2-/-) mice were used to make the prenatal alcohol exposure model, and the role of ceramide regulation on alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis was studied in the offspring. Initially the levels of serum sphingomyelin (SM) were detected with enzymatic method in P0 pups after alcohol exposure in parents. Then the apoptosis of mossy cells in the offspring hippocampus was investigated after prenatal alcohol exposure with immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay. Finally the expression of activated Caspase 8 and activated Caspase 3 in the offspring hippocampus was detected with Western blot analysis. Our results showed that SM levels were down-regulated in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05) after prenatal alcohol exposure in wild-type (WT) and SMS2-/- pups. However, SM levels of serum in SMS2-/- pups were significantly lower than that in WT pups (p<0.01). Furthermore, we found that mossy cells were very sensitive to alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis. In both WT pups and SMS2-/- pups, the number of apoptotic mossy cells in the hippocampus increased after prenatal alcohol exposure in a dose dependent manner (p<0.05) and decreased with the growing age. Compared with WT pups, the number of apoptotic mossy cells in the hippocampus of SMS2-/- pups increased (p<0.05). Western blotting showed that the expression of activated Caspase 8 and activated Caspase 3 of hippocampal tissue in WT pups and SMS2-/- pups increases after prenatal alcohol exposure, consistent with results from TUNEL assay and immunocytochemistry. Our study suggests that mossy cells may be the easily attacked cells for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), and ceramide is involved in the alcohol-induced neural apoptosis. The mechanism probably lies in the accumulated ceramide in SMS2 mice, and the increase of activated Caspase 8 and Caspase 3 promotes alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis.

  11. Influence of Waveform on Cell Viability during Ultrasound Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliev, Timur; Feril, Loreto B.; McLean, Donald A.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Campbell, Paul A.

    2011-09-01

    We examined the role of ultrasound standing waves, and their travelling wave counterparts, on cell viability in an in-vitro insonation apparatus. Furthermore, the effect of distinct waveforms (sine and top-hat) was also explored, together with the role of microbubble presence. Measurements of cell viability in standing wave scenarios demonstrated a relatively higher rate of lysis (63.13±10.89% remaining viable) compared with the travelling wave data, where 96.22±4.0% remained viable. Significant differences were also seen as a function of waveform, where insonations employing top-hat wave shapes resulted in an average end stage viability of 30.31±5.71% compared with 61.94±14.28% in the sinusoidal counterparts.

  12. An integrated genomic and proteomic approach to identify signatures of endosulfan exposure in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Deepa; Tarale, Prashant; Naoghare, Pravin K; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Arrigo, Patrizio; Saravanadevi, Sivanesan

    2015-11-01

    Present study reports the identification of genomic and proteomic signatures of endosulfan exposure in hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2). HepG2 cells were exposed to sublethal concentration (15μM) of endosulfan for 24h. DNA microarray and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses revealed that endosulfan induced significant alterations in the expression level of genes and proteins involved in multiple cellular pathways (apoptosis, transcription, immune/inflammatory response, carbohydrate metabolism, etc.). Furthermore, downregulation of PHLDA gene, upregulation of ACIN1 protein and caspase-3 activation in exposed cells indicated that endosulfan can trigger apoptotic cascade in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In total 135 transcripts and 19 proteins were differentially expressed. This study presents an integrated approach to identify the alteration of biological/cellular pathways in HepG2 cells upon endosulfan exposure.

  13. Analysis of cell-cycle regulation following exposure of lung-derived cells to γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trani, D.; Lucchetti, C.; Cassone, M.; D'Agostino, L.; Caputi, M.; Giordano, A.

    Acute exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation results in a delay of cell-cycle progression and/or augmentation of apoptosis. Following ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, cell-cycle arrest in the G1- or G2-phase of the cell-cycle prevents or delays DNA replication or mitosis, providing time for the DNA repair machinery to exert its function. Deregulation or failing of cell-cycle checkpoints and/or DNA repair mechanisms may lead normal cells bearing chromosome mutations to acquire neoplastic autonomy, which in turn can trigger the onset of cancer. Existing studies have focused on the impact of p53 status on the radiation response of lung cancer (LC) cell lines in terms of both cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis, while no comparative studies have been performed on the radiation response of lung derived normal and cancerous epithelial cells. To investigate the radiation response in normal and cancerous phenotypes, along with the role and impact of p53 status, and possible correlations with pRb/p105 or other proteins involved in carcinogenesis and cell-cycle regulation, we selected two lung-derived epithelial cell lines, one normal (NL20, p53 wild-type) and one non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), H358 (known to be p53-deficient). We compared the levels of γ-induced cell proliferation ability, cell-cycle arrest, apoptotic index, and expression levels of cell-cycle regulating and regulated proteins. The different cell sensitivity, apoptotic response and protein expression profiles resulting from our study for NL20 and H358 cells suggest that still unknown mechanisms involving p53, pRb/p105 and their target molecules might play a pivotal role in determining cell sensitivity and resistance upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  14. Engineering the cell-semiconductor interface: a materials modification approach using II-VI and III-V semiconductor materials.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lauren E; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-02-18

    Developing functional biomedical devices based on semiconductor materials requires an understanding of interactions taking place at the material-biosystem interface. Cell behavior is dependent on the local physicochemical environment. While standard routes of material preparation involve chemical functionalization of the active surface, this review emphasizes both biocompatibility of unmodified surfaces as well as use of topographic features in manipulating cell-material interactions. Initially, the review discusses experiments involving unmodified II-VI and III-V semiconductors - a starting point for assessing cytotoxicity and biocompatibility - followed by specific surface modification, including the generation of submicron roughness or the potential effect of quantum dot structures. Finally, the discussion turns to more recent work in coupling topography and specific chemistry, enhancing the tunability of the cell-semiconductor interface. With this broadened materials approach, researchers' ability to tune the interactions between semiconductors and biological environments continues to improve, reaching new heights in device function.

  15. Cytoprotective effect of glutaraldehyde erythropoietin on HEK293 kidney cells after silver nanoparticle exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sooklert, Kanidta; Chattong, Supreecha; Manotham, Krissanapong; Boonwong, Chawikan; Klaharn, I-yanut; Jindatip, Depicha; Sereemaspun, Amornpun

    2016-01-01

    The toxic effects from exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which are broadly present in many consumer products, have long raised concerns. Many studies have focused on the mechanisms of nanosilver, which cause toxicity in human cells, but little is known about prevention of this type of injury. This study investigated the in vitro effects of glutaraldehyde erythropoietin (GEPO), a cytoprotective compound derived from erythropoietin, in terms of cell protection against AgNP-induced injury. HEK293 cells were pretreated with or without GEPO before administration of AgNPs. The protective effects of GEPO in this cell line were assessed by the percentage of viable cells, alterations of cell morphology, and the proliferative capability of the cells. In addition, we assessed the role of GEPO in lowering cellular oxidative stress and regulating expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2. The results showed rescue effects on the percentage of viable and proliferative cells among GEPO pretreated cells. Pretreatment with GEPO maintained the normal cell shape and ultrastructural morphology. Moreover, GEPO reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species in cells and activated expression of Bcl2, which are the major mechanisms in protection against cellular toxicity induced by AgNPs. In conclusion, our study showed that the cytotoxic effects from exposure to AgNPs can be prevented by GEPO. PMID:26929619

  16. Cytoprotective effect of glutaraldehyde erythropoietin on HEK293 kidney cells after silver nanoparticle exposure.

    PubMed

    Sooklert, Kanidta; Chattong, Supreecha; Manotham, Krissanapong; Boonwong, Chawikan; Klaharn, I-yanut; Jindatip, Depicha; Sereemaspun, Amornpun

    2016-01-01

    The toxic effects from exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which are broadly present in many consumer products, have long raised concerns. Many studies have focused on the mechanisms of nanosilver, which cause toxicity in human cells, but little is known about prevention of this type of injury. This study investigated the in vitro effects of glutaraldehyde erythropoietin (GEPO), a cytoprotective compound derived from erythropoietin, in terms of cell protection against AgNP-induced injury. HEK293 cells were pretreated with or without GEPO before administration of AgNPs. The protective effects of GEPO in this cell line were assessed by the percentage of viable cells, alterations of cell morphology, and the proliferative capability of the cells. In addition, we assessed the role of GEPO in lowering cellular oxidative stress and regulating expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2. The results showed rescue effects on the percentage of viable and proliferative cells among GEPO pretreated cells. Pretreatment with GEPO maintained the normal cell shape and ultrastructural morphology. Moreover, GEPO reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species in cells and activated expression of Bcl2, which are the major mechanisms in protection against cellular toxicity induced by AgNPs. In conclusion, our study showed that the cytotoxic effects from exposure to AgNPs can be prevented by GEPO. PMID:26929619

  17. Chronic Exposure to Combined Carcinogens Enhances Breast Cell Carcinogenesis with Mesenchymal and Stem-Like Cell Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in North America and Europe. More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to small quantities of multiple carcinogens. To understand how multiple carcinogens act together to induce cellular carcinogenesis, we studied the activity of environmental carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) using our breast cell carcinogenesis model. Our study revealed, for the first time, that combined NNK and B[a]P enhanced breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by PhIP in both non-cancerous and cancerous breast cells. Co-exposure was more potent than sequential exposure to combined NNK and B[a]P followed by PhIP in inducing carcinogenesis. Initiation of carcinogenesis was measured by transient endpoints induced in a single exposure, while progression of carcinogenesis was measured by acquisition of constitutive endpoints in cumulative exposures. Transient endpoints included DNA damage, Ras-Erk-Nox pathway activation, reactive oxygen species elevation, and increased cellular proliferation. Constitutive endpoints included various cancer-associated properties and signaling modulators, as well as enrichment of cancer stem-like cell population and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program. Using transient and constitutive endpoints as targets, we detected that a combination of the green tea catechins ECG and EGCG, at non-cytotoxic levels, was more effective than individual agents in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by combined NNK, B[a]P, and PhIP. Thus, use of combined ECG and EGCG should be seriously considered for early intervention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens. PMID:25372613

  18. Directed blood donor program decreases donor exposure for children with sickle cell disease requiring chronic transfusion.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D O; Covert, B; Lindsey, T; Edwards, V; McLaughlin, L; Theus, J; Wray, R J; Jupka, K; Baker, D; Robbins, M; DeBaun, M R

    2012-01-01

    In children with sickle cell disease (SCD), primary and secondary prevention of strokes require indefinite regular blood transfusion therapy. The risks associated with repeated transfusions include alloimmunization and increased donor exposure. The Charles Drew Program is a directed blood donor program designed to lower donor exposure, decreasing the associated complications of transfusion; however, no evidence exists demonstrating the magnitude of the benefit to the recipient. Further, the use of extended red blood cell (RBC) antigen matching for C, E, and K has been well documented in a clinical trial setting but not extensively evaluated in a standard care setting. The goal of this study is to assess the effectiveness in reducing alloimmunization when matching for C, E, and K and the magnitude of the decrease in donor exposure in a directed blood donor program. The rate of alloimmunization and reduction of donor exposure were determined during the course of 1 year in a cohort of children with SCD who received regular directed donor blood transfusions. A total of 24 recipients were in the program, 16 females and 8 males, 4 to 20 years of age. During 2008, alloimmunization was 0 percent and donor exposure was reduced by 20 percent, compared with usual care. Extended RBC antigen matching has the same benefit as in a clinical trial setting for patients with SCD receiving blood transfusion therapy. Despite significant effort, we only achieved a modest decrease in donor exposure and cannot determine the immediate benefit of a directed blood donor program.

  19. Purkinje cell and cerebellar effects following developmental exposure to PCBs and/or MeHg.

    PubMed

    Roegge, Cindy S; Morris, John R; Villareal, Sherilyn; Wang, Victor C; Powers, Brian E; Klintsova, Anna Y; Greenough, William T; Pessah, Isaac N; Schantz, Susan L

    2006-01-01

    We recently reported that rats exposed to PCBs and MeHg during development were impaired on the rotating rod, a test of balance and coordination that is often indicative of cerebellar damage. In addition, developmental PCB exposure is known to dramatically reduce circulating thyroid hormone concentrations, which may have a negative impact on cerebellar development. Therefore, we investigated the effects of combined PCB and MeHg exposure on Purkinje cells and the cerebellum. The serum and brains from littermates of the animals tested on the rotating rod were collected at weaning, and we also collected brains from the adult animals at the end of motor testing. Four groups were studied: 1) vehicle controls, 2) PCBs only (Aroclor 1254, 6 mg/kg/d, oral), 3) MeHg only (0.5 ppm, in dams' drinking water), and 4) PCB+MeHg (at the same doses as in individual toxicant exposures). Female Long-Evans rats were exposed beginning 4 weeks prior to breeding with an unexposed male and continuing until postnatal day (PND) 16. There was a significant reduction in serum T4 and T3 concentrations in the PCB and PCB+MeHg pups on PND21. Golgi-impregnated Purkinje cells were examined in PND21 brains, but there were no significant exposure-related effects on primary dendrite length, branching area, or structural abnormalities. However, all three male exposure groups had a marginally significant increase in Purkinje cell height, which may suggest a subtle thyromimetic effect in the cerebellum. Cresyl-violet stained sections from the adult brains showed no exposure-related effects within paramedian lobule in Purkinje cell number, total lobule volume or layer volumes (molecular, granule cell and white matter layers). Evidence is provided for the dysregulation of expression of cerebellar ryanodine receptor (RyR) isoforms in PCB-exposed brains, and this could contribute to the rotating rod deficit by changing critical aspects of intracellular calcium signaling within the cerebellum.

  20. Ab-IL2 fusion proteins mediate NK cell immune synapse formation by polarizing CD25 to the target cell-effector cell interface.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Jennifer A A; Gadbaw, Brian; Buhtoiarov, Ilia N; Horibata, Sachi; Kapur, Arvinder K; Patel, Dhara; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M; Patankar, Manish S; Connor, Joseph

    2011-12-01

    The huKS-IL2 immunocytokine (IC) consists of IL2 fused to a mAb against EpCAM, while the hu14.18-IL2 IC recognizes the GD2 disialoganglioside. They are under evaluation for treatment of EpCAM(+) (ovarian) and GD2(+) (neuroblastoma and melanoma) malignancies because of their proven ability to enhance tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and by antitumor cytotoxic T cells. Here, we demonstrate that huKS-IL2 and hu14.18-IL2 bind to tumor cells via their antibody components and increase adhesion and activating immune synapse (AIS) formation with NK cells by engaging the immune cells' IL-2 receptors (IL2R). The NK leukemia cell line, NKL (which expresses high affinity IL2Rs), shows fivefold increase in binding to tumor targets when treated with IC compared to matching controls. This increase in binding is effectively inhibited by blocking antibodies against CD25, the α-chain of the IL2R. NK cells isolated from the peritoneal environment of ovarian cancer patients, known to be impaired in mediating ADCC, bind to huKS-IL2 via CD25. The increased binding between tumor and effector cells via ICs is due to the formation of AIS that are characterized by the simultaneous polarization of LFA-1, CD2 and F-actin at the cellular interface. AIS formation of peritoneal NK and NKL cells is inhibited by anti-CD25 blocking antibody and is 50-200% higher with IC versus the parent antibody. These findings demonstrate that the IL-2 component of the IC allows IL2Rs to function not only as receptors for this cytokine but also as facilitators of peritoneal NK cell binding to IC-coated tumor cells.

  1. Direct exposure of chromosomes to nonactivated ovum cytoplasm is effective for bovine somatic cell nucleus reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Tani, T; Kato, Y; Tsunoda, Y

    2001-01-01

    We examined the in vitro developmental potential of nonactivated and activated enucleated ova receiving cumulus cells at various stages of the cell cycle. Eleven to 29% of activated ova receiving donor cells stopped developing at the 8-cell stage but 21% to 50% of nonactivated ova receiving donor cells at either the G(0), G(1), G(2), or M phase, or cycling cells developed into blastocysts. One normal calf was born after transferring five blastocysts that had developed from ova receiving donor cells at the M phase. The present study demonstrated that direct exposure of donor chromosomes to nonactivated ovum cytoplasm is effective for somatic cell nucleus reprogramming, and activated ovum cytoplasm does not reprogram the nucleus.

  2. Zeta potential change of Neuro-2a tumor cells after exposure to alumina nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, Sergey O.; Fomenko, Alla N.; Korovin, Matvey S.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, researches have paid much attention to the physical, chemical, biophysical and biochemical properties of a cell surface. It is known that most of the cells' surfaces are charged. This charge depends on the biochemical structure of the cell membranes. Therefore, measurement of a cell surface charge is a significant criterion that gives information about the cell surface. Evaluation of the cells zeta-potential is important to understand the interaction mechanisms of various drugs, antibiotics, as well as the interaction of nanoparticles with the cell surface. In this study, we use the dynamic light scattering method to detect the zeta-potential change of Neuro-2a tumor cells. It has been observed that zeta-potential shifted to negative values after exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles and inducing apoptosis.

  3. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Person, Rachel J; Ngalame, Ntube N Olive; Makia, Ngome L; Bell, Matthew W; Waalkes, Michael P; Tokar, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer.

  4. Variation of carrier concentration and interface trap density in 8MeV electron irradiated c-Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Sathyanarayana Rao, Asha; Krishnan, Sheeja; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Suresh, E. P.

    2014-04-24

    The capacitance and conductance measurements were carried out for c-Si solar cells, irradiated with 8 MeV electrons with doses ranging from 5kGy – 100kGy in order to investigate the anomalous degradation of the cells in the radiation harsh environments. Capacitance – Voltage measurements indicate that there is a slight reduction in the carrier concentration upon electron irradiation due to the creation of radiation induced defects. The conductance measurement results reveal that the interface state densities and the trap time constant increases with electron dose due to displacement damages in c-Si solar cells.

  5. Chronic exposure to particulate chromate induces spindle assembly checkpoint bypass in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Xie, Hong; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2006-11-01

    One of the hallmarks of lung cancer is chromosome instability (CIN), particularly a tetraploid phenotype, which is normally prevented by the spindle assembly checkpoint. Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is an established human lung carcinogen, and Cr(VI) induces tumors at lung bifurcation sites where Cr(VI) particles impact and persist. However, the effects of Cr(VI) on the spindle assembly checkpoint are unknown and little is known about prolonged exposure to particulate Cr(VI). Accordingly, we investigated particulate Cr(VI)-induced bypass of the spindle assembly checkpoint after several days of exposure in WHTBF-6 cells. We found that lead chromate indeed induces spindle assembly checkpoint bypass in human lung cells, as 72, 96, and 120 h treatments with 0.5 or 1 microg/cm2 lead chromate induced significant increases in the percentage of cells with aberrant mitotic figures. For example, treatment with 1 microg/cm2 lead chromate for 96 h induced 11, 12.3, and 14% of cells with premature anaphase, centromere spreading and premature centromere division, respectively. In addition, we found a disruption of mitosis with more cells accumulating in anaphase; cells treated for 96 h increased from 18% in controls to 31% in cells treated with lead chromate. To confirm involvement of the spindle assembly checkpoint, Mad2 expression was used as a marker. Mad2 expression was decreased in cells exposed to chronic treatments of lead chromate, consistent with disruption of the checkpoint. We also found concentration- and time-dependent increases in tetraploid cells, which continued to grow and form colonies. When cells were treated with chronic lead alone there was no increase in aberrant mitotic cells or polyploidy; however, chronic exposure to a soluble Cr(VI) showed an increase in aberrant mitotic cells and polyploidy. These data suggest that lead chromate does induce CIN and may be one mechanism in the development of Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. PMID:17112237

  6. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Brian R.; Ross, Brennan; Chou, Joan Wang; Khankan, Rana; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bui, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors—reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon—gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology. PMID:27364165

  7. Chronic endotoxin exposure produces airflow obstruction and lung dendritic cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peggy S; Fresco, Jennifer M; Pinilla, Miguel A; Macias, Alvaro A; Brown, Ronald D; Englert, Joshua A; Hofmann, Oliver; Lederer, James A; Hide, Winston; Christiani, David C; Cernadas, Manuela; Baron, Rebecca M

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of persistent airflow obstruction that result from chronic occupational endotoxin exposure. We sought to analyze the inflammatory response underlying persistent airflow obstruction as a result of chronic occupational endotoxin exposure. We developed a murine model of daily inhaled endotoxin for periods of 5 days to 8 weeks. We analyzed physiologic lung dysfunction, lung histology, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and total lung homogenate inflammatory cell and cytokine profiles, and pulmonary gene expression profiles. We observed an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness as a result of chronic endotoxin exposure. After 8 weeks, the mice exhibited an increase in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung neutrophils that correlated with an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. Detailed analyses of inflammatory cell subsets revealed an expansion of dendritic cells (DCs), and in particular, proinflammatory DCs, with a reduced percentage of macrophages. Gene expression profiling revealed the up-regulation of a panel of genes that was consistent with DC recruitment, and lung histology revealed an accumulation of DCs in inflammatory aggregates around the airways in 8-week-exposed animals. Repeated, low-dose LPS inhalation, which mirrors occupational exposure, resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness, associated with a failure to resolve the proinflammatory response, an inverted macrophage to DC ratio, and a significant rise in the inflammatory DC population. These findings point to a novel underlying mechanism of airflow obstruction as a result of occupational LPS exposure, and suggest molecular and cellular targets for therapeutic development.

  8. Study of gaseous benzene effects upon A549 lung epithelial cells using a novel exposure system.

    PubMed

    Mascelloni, Massimiliano; Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Hodges, Nikolas J; Harrison, Roy M

    2015-08-19

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are ubiquitous pollutants known to be present in both indoor and outdoor air arising from various sources. Indoor exposure has increasingly become a major cause of concern due to the effects that such pollutants can have on health. Benzene, along with toluene, is one of the main components of the VOC mixture and is a known carcinogen due to its genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of an in vitro model to study the short-term effects of exposure of lung cells to airborne benzene. We studied the effects of exposure on DNA and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A549 cells, exposed to various concentrations of benzene (0.03; 0.1; 0.3 ppm) in gaseous form using a custom designed cell exposure chamber. Results showed a concentration-dependent increase of DNA breaks and an increase of ROS production, confirming the feasibility of the experimental procedure and validating the model for further in vitro studies of exposure to other VOCs.

  9. Gene expression changes in human cells after exposure to mobile phone microwaves.

    PubMed

    Remondini, Daniel; Nylund, Reetta; Reivinen, Jukka; Poulletier de Gannes, Florence; Veyret, Bernard; Lagroye, Isabelle; Haro, Emmanuelle; Trillo, M Angeles; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio; Schlatterer, Kathrin; Gminski, Richard; Fitzner, Rudolf; Tauber, Rudolf; Schuderer, Jurgen; Kuster, Niels; Leszczynski, Dariusz; Bersani, Ferdinando; Maercker, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Possible biological effects of mobile phone microwaves were investigated in vitro. In this study, which was part of the 5FP EU project REFLEX (Risk Evaluation of Potential Environmental Hazards From Low-Energy Electromagnetic Field Exposure Using Sensitive in vitro Methods), six human cell types, immortalized cell lines and primary cells, were exposed to 900 and 1800 MHz. RNA was isolated from exposed and sham-exposed cells and labeled for transcriptome analysis on whole-genome cDNA arrays. The results were evaluated statistically using bioinformatics techniques and examined for biological relevance with the help of different databases. NB69 neuroblastoma cells, T lymphocytes, and CHME5 microglial cells did not show significant changes in gene expression. In EA.hy926 endothelial cells, U937 lymphoblastoma cells, and HL-60 leukemia cells we found between 12 and 34 up- or down-regulated genes. Analysis of the affected gene families does not point towards a stress response. However, following microwave exposure, some but not all human cells might react with an increase in expression of genes encoding ribosomal proteins and therefore up-regulating the cellular metabolism. PMID:16878293

  10. Recurrent exposure to nicotine differentiates human bronchial epithelial cells via epidermal growth factor receptor activation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eva; Irigoyen, Marta; Anso, Elena; Martinez-Irujo, Juan Jose; Rouzaut, Ana

    2008-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major preventable cause of lung cancer in developed countries. Nicotine (3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-pyridine) is one of the major alkaloids present in tobacco. Besides its addictive properties, its effects have been described in panoply of cell types. In fact, recent studies have shown that nicotine behaves as a tumor promoter in transformed epithelial cells. This research focuses on the effects of acute repetitive nicotine exposure on normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE cells). Here we show that treatment of NHBE cells with recurrent doses of nicotine up to 500 {mu}M triggered cell differentiation towards a neuronal-like phenotype: cells emitted filopodia and expressed neuronal markers such as neuronal cell adhesion molecule, neurofilament-M and the transcription factors neuronal N and Pax-3. We also demonstrate that nicotine treatment induced NF-kB translocation to the nucleus, phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and accumulation of heparin binding-EGF in the extracellular medium. Moreover, addition of AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, or cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that precludes ligand binding to the same receptor, prevented cell differentiation by nicotine. Lastly, we show that differentiated cells increased their adhesion to the extracellular matrix and their protease activity. Given that several lung pathologies are strongly related to tobacco consumption, these results may help to better understand the damaging consequences of nicotine exposure.

  11. Limited ethanol exposure selectively alters the proliferation of precursor cells in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Miller, M W

    1996-02-01

    The present in vivo study tests the hypothesis that limited (4-day) exposure to ethanol differentially affects the proliferation of cortical precursors in the two cortical germinal zones [the ventricular zone (VZ) and the subventricular zone (SZ)] and their descendants in the mature brain. The offspring of pregnant rats fed a liquid diet containing 6.7% (v/v) ethanol when prosencephalic stem cells [gestation day (G) 6-69], VZ cells (G12-G15), and SZ cells were proliferating (G18- G21) throughout much of gestation (G6-G21). In addition, the offspring of rats pair-fed a liquid control diet or fed chow were examined. The pregnant dams were administered with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on either G15 or G21. The ratio of the number of cells that incorporated BrdU to the total number (the labeling index) was determined 1-hr postinjection (i.e., on G15 or G21) or on postnatal day 60, Ethanol treatment between G6 and G21 reduced the ratio of cells labeled by an injection of BrdU on G15 in the fetus and in the adult, and increased the ratio of cells labeled on G21. Regardless of when the injection was placed, ethanol treatment between G6 and G9 had no effect upon the ratio of BrdU-labeled cells in the fetus or mature cortex. Exposure from G12 to G15 decreased the number of VZ cells in the fetus and the number of immunolabeled cells in the adult cortex labeled by an injection on G15. This exposure had no effect on the incorporation by SZ cells. In contrast, ethanol exposure from G18 to G21 increased the labeling indices for fetal SZ cells and for cells in the adult, but it had no effect on the ratio of labeled VZ cells. Although ethanol had no apparent effect on the proliferation of stem cells, it did alter the proliferation of cells in the VZ and SZ. These effects are time-dependent and underlie the ethanol-induced changes in the number of cells in the adult.

  12. Design principle for efficient charge separation at the donor-acceptor interface for high performance organic solar cell device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wanyi; Gupta, Gautam; Crone, Brian; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mohite, Aditya; MPA-11 Material synthesis and integrated device Team; MPA-chemistry Team

    2014-03-01

    The performance of donor (D) /acceptor (A) structure based organic electronic devices, such as solar cell, light emitting devices etc., relays on the charge transfer process at the interface dramatically. In organic solar cell, the photo-induced electron-hole pair is tightly bonded and will form a charge transfer (CT) state at the D/A interface after dissociation. There is a large chance for them to recombine through CT state and thus is a major loss that limit the overall performance. Here, we report three different strategies that allow us to completely suppress the exciplex (or charge transfer state) recombination between any D/A system. We observe that the photocurrent increases by 300% and the power conversion efficiency increases by 4-5 times simply by inserting a spacer layer in the form of an a) insulator b) Oliogomer or using a c) heavy atom at the donor-acceptor interface in a P3HT/C60 bilayer device. By using those different functional mono layers, we successfully suppressed the exciplex recombination in evidence of increased photocurrent and open circuit voltage. Moreover, these strategies are applicable universally to any donor-acceptor interface. And we demonstrated such strategies in a bulk-heterojunction device which improved the power conversion efficiency from 3.5% up to 4.6%.

  13. In vitro effects induced by diesel exhaust at an air-liquid interface in a human lung alveolar carcinoma cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Tomoko; Hosaka, Mitsugu; Nakae, Dai

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the effects induced in vitro in human adenocarcinoma-derived alveolar basal epithelial A549 cells by diesel particulate matter (DPM) administered into the culture medium or by diesel exhaust administered at an air-liquid interface. When A549 cells were exposed to DPM in the culture medium, cell proliferation was inhibited at doses of 10-100 μg/mL; generation of interleukin (IL)-8 and the antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), were inhibited at a dose of 100 μg/mL, and hydroxyl radicals were produced, but could be inhibited by catalase or superoxide dismutase. In contrast, when A549 cells were exposed to diesel exhaust, cell proliferation was inhibited in the absence, but not in the presence, of a diesel particulate filter (DPF); in the absence of a DPF IL-8 was produced in the same amount as in the control cells but was suppressed in the presence of a DPF; HO-1 mRNA was transiently over-expressed in the presence of a DPF, and it was also increased slightly produced in the absence of a DPF but statistically not significant in the presence of a DPF, and it was also increased slightly produced in the absence of a DPF but statistically not significant; HO-1 was transiently produced independent of the absence or the presence of a DPF; and hydroxyl radicals were weakly produced, even in the presence of a DPF but could be inhibited by catalase or superoxide dismutase. It is thus suggested that oxidative stress may be induced by exposure to DPM or diesel exhaust and thereby exerts cytotoxic effect. The introduction of a DPF is effective to protect cells from the toxicity of diesel exhaust presumably by suppression of an oxidative stress.

  14. In vitro effects induced by diesel exhaust at an air-liquid interface in a human lung alveolar carcinoma cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Tomoko; Hosaka, Mitsugu; Nakae, Dai

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the effects induced in vitro in human adenocarcinoma-derived alveolar basal epithelial A549 cells by diesel particulate matter (DPM) administered into the culture medium or by diesel exhaust administered at an air-liquid interface. When A549 cells were exposed to DPM in the culture medium, cell proliferation was inhibited at doses of 10-100 μg/mL; generation of interleukin (IL)-8 and the antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), were inhibited at a dose of 100 μg/mL, and hydroxyl radicals were produced, but could be inhibited by catalase or superoxide dismutase. In contrast, when A549 cells were exposed to diesel exhaust, cell proliferation was inhibited in the absence, but not in the presence, of a diesel particulate filter (DPF); in the absence of a DPF IL-8 was produced in the same amount as in the control cells but was suppressed in the presence of a DPF; HO-1 mRNA was transiently over-expressed in the presence of a DPF, and it was also increased slightly produced in the absence of a DPF but statistically not significant in the presence of a DPF, and it was also increased slightly produced in the absence of a DPF but statistically not significant; HO-1 was transiently produced independent of the absence or the presence of a DPF; and hydroxyl radicals were weakly produced, even in the presence of a DPF but could be inhibited by catalase or superoxide dismutase. It is thus suggested that oxidative stress may be induced by exposure to DPM or diesel exhaust and thereby exerts cytotoxic effect. The introduction of a DPF is effective to protect cells from the toxicity of diesel exhaust presumably by suppression of an oxidative stress. PMID:25983017

  15. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  16. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  17. Energy level alignment in TiO2/metal sulfide/polymer interfaces for solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Rebecka; Cappel, Ute B; O'Mahony, Flannan T F; Siegbahn, Hans; Johansson, Erik M J; Haque, Saif A; Rensmo, Håkan

    2014-08-28

    Semiconductor sensitized solar cell interfaces have been studied with photoelectron spectroscopy to understand the interfacial electronic structures. In particular, the experimental energy level alignment has been determined for complete TiO2/metal sulfide/polymer interfaces. For the metal sulfides CdS, Sb2S3 and Bi2S3 deposited from single source metal xanthate precursors, it was shown that both driving forces for electron injection into TiO2 and hole transfer to the polymer decrease for narrower bandgaps. The energy level alignment results were used in the discussion of the function of solar cells with the same metal sulfides as light absorbers. For example Sb2S3 showed the most favourable energy level alignment with 0.3 eV driving force for electron injection and 0.4 eV driving force for hole transfer and also the most efficient solar cells due to high photocurrent generation. The energy level alignment of the TiO2/Bi2S3 interface on the other hand showed no driving force for electron injection to TiO2, and the performance of the corresponding solar cell was very low.

  18. Engineered polymer-media interfaces for the long-term self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Elizabeth F; Gupta, Rohini; Dashti, Derek C; Healy, Kevin E

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a synthetic polymer interface for the long-term self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in defined media. We successfully cultured hESCs on hydrogel interfaces of aminopropylmethacrylamide (APMAAm) for over 20 passages in chemically-defined mTeSR™1 media and demonstrated pluripotency of multiple hESC lines with immunostaining and quantitative RT-PCR studies. Results for hESC proliferation and pluripotency markers were both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to cells cultured on Matrigel™-coated substrates. Mechanistically, it was resolved that bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the mTeSR™1 media was critical for cell adhesion on APMAAm hydrogel interfaces. This study uniquely identified a robust long-term culture surface for the self-renewal of hESCs without the use of biologic coatings (e.g., peptides, proteins, or Matrigel™) in completely chemically-defined media that employed practical culturing techniques amenable to clinical-scale cell expansion.

  19. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J.; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38±0.06 compared to 1.91±0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  20. Degradation mechanism of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells induced by exposure to air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinaga, Jiro; Kamikawa, Yukiko; Koida, Takashi; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru

    2016-07-01

    The degradation mechanism of unencapsulated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells upon exposure to air has been investigated. Exposure to air at room temperature slightly reduces the conversion efficiency of CIGS solar cells. However, this conversion efficiency decreases significantly under damp heat testing at 85 °C and a relative humidity of 85% for 15 h. The shunt resistance and conversion efficiency are completely recovered after removing the side edges of the CIGS solar cells by mechanical scribing. This result suggests that low-resistive layers are formed on the sidewalls of the solar cells during damp heat testing. In addition, alkaline solution etching has been confirmed to be an effective way of removing the low-resistive layers. The low-resistive layers on the sidewalls are identified to be molybdenum oxides and sodium molybdate by Auger electron spectroscopy. After etching the oxides on the sidewalls, the saturation current density and ideality factor are confirmed to be improved.

  1. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation impairs neurite outgrowth of embryonic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhai; Ma, Qinlong; Liu, Chuan; Deng, Ping; Zhu, Gang; Zhang, Lei; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Duan, Weixia; Pei, Liping; Li, Min; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-05-29

    A radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) of 1800 MHz is widely used in mobile communications. However, the effects of RF-EMFs on cell biology are unclear. Embryonic neural stem cells (eNSCs) play a critical role in brain development. Thus, detecting the effects of RF-EMF on eNSCs is important for exploring the effects of RF-EMF on brain development. Here, we exposed eNSCs to 1800 MHz RF-EMF at specific absorption rate (SAR) values of 1, 2, and 4 W/kg for 1, 2, and 3 days. We found that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure did not influence eNSC apoptosis, proliferation, cell cycle or the mRNA expressions of related genes. RF-EMF exposure also did not alter the ratio of eNSC differentiated neurons and astrocytes. However, neurite outgrowth of eNSC differentiated neurons was inhibited after 4 W/kg RF-EMF exposure for 3 days. Additionally, the mRNA and protein expression of the proneural genes Ngn1 and NeuroD, which are crucial for neurite outgrowth, were decreased after RF-EMF exposure. The expression of their inhibitor Hes1 was upregulated by RF-EMF exposure. These results together suggested that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure impairs neurite outgrowth of eNSCs. More attention should be given to the potential adverse effects of RF-EMF exposure on brain development.

  2. Acute and chronic cadmium exposure promotes E-cadherin degradation in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Esmeralda; Louie, Maggie C; Sevigny, Mary B

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium is an environmental carcinogen that usually enters the body at minute concentrations through diet or cigarette smoke and bioaccumulates in soft tissues. In past studies, cadmium has been shown to contribute to the development of more aggressive cancer phenotypes including increased cell migration and invasion. This study aims to determine if cadmium exposure-both acute and chronic-contributes to breast cancer progression by interfering with the normal functional relationship between E-cadherin and β-catenin. An MCF7 breast cancer cell line (MCF7-Cd) chronically exposed to 10(-7)  M CdCl2 was previously developed and used as a model system to study chronic exposures, whereas parental MCF7 cells exposed to 10(-6)  M CdCl2 for short periods of time were used to study acute exposures. Cadmium exposure of MCF7 cells led to the degradation of the E-cadherin protein via the ubiquitination pathway. This resulted in fewer E-cadherin/β-catenin complexes and the relocation of active β-catenin to the nucleus, where it interacted with transcription factor TCF-4 to modulate gene expression. Interestingly, only cells chronically exposed to cadmium showed a significant decrease in the localization of β-catenin to the plasma membrane and an increased distance between cells. Our data suggest that cadmium exposure promotes breast cancer progression by (1) down-regulating E-cadherin, thus decreasing the number of E-cadherin/β-catenin adhesion complexes, and (2) enhancing the nuclear translocation of β-catenin to increase expression of cancer-promoting proteins (i.e., c-Jun and cyclin D1).

  3. Preliminary results of accelerated exposure testing of solar cell system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostou, E.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Plastic samples and solar cell sub modules were exposed to an accelerated outdoor environment in Arizona and an accelerated simulated environment in a cyclic ultraviolet exposure tester which included humidity exposure. These tests were for preliminary screening of materials suitable for use in the manufacture of solar cell modules which are to have a 20-year lifetime. The samples were exposed for various times up to six months, equivalent to a real time exposure of four years. Suitable materials were found to be FEP-A, FEP-C, PFA, acrylic, silicone compounds and adhesives and possibly parylene. The method of packaging the sub modules was also found to be important to their performance.

  4. Alterations in cell migration and cell viability of wounded human skin fibroblasts following visible red light exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    The present study intended to examine the effect of visible red light on structural and cellular parameters on wounded skin fibroblast cells. To achieve the stated objective, uniform scratch was created on confluent monolayered human skin fibroblast cells, and were exposed to single dose of He-Ne laser (15 mm spot, 6.6808 mWcm-2) at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 Jcm-2 in the presence and absence of 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Beam profile measurements of the expanded laser beam were conducted to ensure the beam uniformity. The influence of laser dose on the change in temperature was recorded using sensitive temperature probe. Additionally, following laser exposure cell migration and cell survival were documented at different time intervals on wounded human skin fibroblast cells grown in vitro. Beam profile measurements indicated more or less uniform power distribution over the whole beam area. Temperature monitoring of sham irradiated control and laser treatment groups displayed negligible temperature change indicating the absence of thermal effect at the tested laser doses. In the absence of 10% FBS, single exposure of different laser doses failed to produce any significant effects on cell migration or cell survival. However, in the presence of serum single exposure of 5 J/cm2 on wounded skin fibroblasts significantly enhanced the cell migration (P<0.05) compared to the other tested doses (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 J/cm2) and sham irradiated controls. In conclusion, the LLLT acts by improving cell migration and cell proliferation to produce measurable changes in wounded fibroblast cells.

  5. Induction of chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells after heavy ion exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, S.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G.

    The induction of chromosome aberrations by heavy charged particles was studied in V79 Chinese hamster cells over a wide range of energies (3-100 MeV/u) and LET (20-16000 keV/μm). For comparison, X-ray experiments were performed. Our data indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the response of cells to particle and x-ray irradiation. For the same level of cell survival the amount of damaged cells which can be observed is smaller in heavy ion (11.4 MeV/u Ar) irradiated samples. The highest yield of damaged cells is found 8 to 12 hours after particle irradiation and 4 hours after x-irradiation. Differences in the amount of damaged cells are attributed to cell cycle perturbations which interfere with the expression of damage. After heavy ion exposure the amount of cells reaching mitosis (mitotic index) decreases drastically and not all damaged cells reach mitosis within 48 hours after exposure. A portion of cells die in interphase. Cell cycle delays induced by x-ray irradiation are less pronounced and all cells reach the first post-irradiation mitosis within 24 hours after irradiation. Additionally, the damage produced by charged particles seems to be more severe. The disintegration of chromosomes was only observed after high LET radiation: an indication of the high and local energy deposition in the particle track. Only cross sections for the induction of chromosome aberrations in mitotic cells were reported in this paper because of the problems arising from the drastic cell cycle perturbations. In this case, cells were irradiated in mitosis and assayed immediately.

  6. Metabolomic Response of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Germ-like Cells after Exposure to Steroid Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential risks of human exposure to endocrine active compounds (EACs), the mechanisms of toxicity must first be identified and characterized. Currently, there are no robust in vitro models for identifying the mechanisms of toxicity in germ cells resulting from EAC ...

  7. CULTURE CONDITIONS AFFECT HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO DIESEL PARTICLE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant that may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter inhalation. In vitro studies have shown that DEP exposure induces pro-inflammatory proteins in human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) with varying...

  8. Wood dust exposure induces cell transformation through EGFR-mediated OGG1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Staffolani, Sara; Manzella, Nicola; Strafella, Elisabetta; Nocchi, Linda; Bracci, Massimo; Ciarapica, Veronica; Amati, Monica; Rubini, Corrado; Re, Massimo; Pugnaloni, Armanda; Pasquini, Ernesto; Tarchini, Paolo; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-07-01

    A high risk of neoplastic transformation of nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa is related to the occupational exposure to wood dust. However, the role of occupational exposures in the aetiology of the airway cancers remains largely unknown. Here, an in vitro model was performed to investigate the carcinogenic effect of wood dusts. Human bronchial epithelial cells were incubated with hard and soft wood dusts and the DNA damage and response to DNA damage evaluated. Wood dust exposure induced accumulation of oxidised DNA bases, which was associated with a delay in DNA repair activity. By exposing cells to wood dust at a prolonged time, wood dust-initiated cells were obtained. Initiated-cells were able to form colonies in soft agar, and to induce blood vessel formation. These cells showed extensive autophagy, reduced DNA repair, which was associated with reduced OGG1 expression and oxidised DNA base accumulation. These events were found related to the activation of EGFR/AKT/mTOR pathway, through phosphorylation and subsequent inactivation of tuberin. The persistence in the tissue of wood dusts, their repetitious binding with EGFR may continually trigger the activation switch, leading to chronic down-regulation of genes involved in DNA repair, leading to cell transformation and proliferation.

  9. Cell line specific modulation of connexin43 expression after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Banaz-Yaşar, Ferya; Tischka, Rabea; Iliakis, George; Winterhager, Elke; Gellhaus, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication plays a significant role in mediating radiation-induced bystander effects. However, the level of Cx43 itself is influenced by ionizing radiation, which could modify the bystander effect. Here we have investigated several cell lines for the modulation of Cx43 expression 24 h after irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays. The mouse endothelial cell line bEnd3 revealed a significantly elevated level of Cx43 already 15 min after exposure to X-rays, whereas human hybrid endothelial cells (EA.hy926) exhibited a transient downregulation of Cx43 mRNA. No obvious changes in the communication properties of the different cell lines could be observed after irradiation. The communication-deficient malignant human trophoblast cell line Jeg3 stably transfected with Cx43 did not reveal any induction of endogenous nor alteration in the exogenous Cx43 transcript level upon exposure to 5 Gy. Taken together, our data show a cell line specific modulation of Cx43 expression after exposure to X-rays.

  10. Cell line specific modulation of connexin43 expression after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Banaz-Yaşar, Ferya; Tischka, Rabea; Iliakis, George; Winterhager, Elke; Gellhaus, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication plays a significant role in mediating radiation-induced bystander effects. However, the level of Cx43 itself is influenced by ionizing radiation, which could modify the bystander effect. Here we have investigated several cell lines for the modulation of Cx43 expression 24 h after irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays. The mouse endothelial cell line bEnd3 revealed a significantly elevated level of Cx43 already 15 min after exposure to X-rays, whereas human hybrid endothelial cells (EA.hy926) exhibited a transient downregulation of Cx43 mRNA. No obvious changes in the communication properties of the different cell lines could be observed after irradiation. The communication-deficient malignant human trophoblast cell line Jeg3 stably transfected with Cx43 did not reveal any induction of endogenous nor alteration in the exogenous Cx43 transcript level upon exposure to 5 Gy. Taken together, our data show a cell line specific modulation of Cx43 expression after exposure to X-rays. PMID:16531320

  11. Lateral Chain Length in Polyalkyl Acrylates Determines the Mobility of Fibronectin at the Cell/Material Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells, by interacting with surfaces indirectly through a layer of extracellular matrix proteins, can respond to a variety of physical properties, such as topography or stiffness. Polymer surface mobility is another physical property that is less well understood but has been indicated to hold the potential to modulate cell behavior. Polymer mobility is related to the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the system, the point at which a polymer transitions from an amorphous solid to a more liquid-like state. This work shows that changes in polymer mobility translate to interfacial mobility of extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed on the material surface. This study has utilized a family of polyalkyl acrylates with similar chemistry but different degrees of mobility, obtained through increasing length of the side chain. These materials are used, in conjunction with fluorescent fibronectin, to determine the mobility of this interfacial layer of protein that constitutes the initial cell–material interface. Furthermore, the extent of fibronectin domain availability (III9, III10, - the integrin binding site), cell-mediated reorganization, and cell differentiation was also determined. A nonmonotonic dependence of fibronectin mobility on polymer surface mobility was observed, with a similar trend noted in cell-mediated reorganization of the protein layer by L929 fibroblasts. The availability of the integrin-binding site was higher on the more mobile surfaces, where a similar organization of the protein into networks at the material interface was observed. Finally, differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was seen to be highly sensitive to surface mobility upon inhibition of cell contractility. Altogether, these findings show that polymer mobility is a subtle influence that translates to the cell/material interface through the protein layer to alter the biological activity of the surface. PMID:26715432

  12. Out-of-Field Cell Survival Following Exposure to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the in-field and out-of-field cell survival of cells irradiated with either primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU145) and primary fibroblast (AGO1552) cells following exposure to different field configurations delivered using a 6-MV photon beam produced with a Varian linear accelerator. Results: Nonuniform dose distributions were delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC) in which half of the cell population was shielded. Clonogenic survival in the shielded region was significantly lower than that predicted from the linear quadratic model. In both cell lines, the out-of-field responses appeared to saturate at 40%-50% survival at a scattered dose of 0.70 Gy in DU-145 cells and 0.24 Gy in AGO1522 cells. There was an approximately eightfold difference in the initial slopes of the out-of-field response compared with the {alpha}-component of the uniform field response. In contrast, cells in the exposed part of the field showed increased survival. These observations were abrogated by direct physical inhibition of cellular communication and by the addition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine known to inhibit intercellular bystander effects. Additional studies showed the proportion of cells irradiated and dose delivered to the shielded and exposed regions of the field to impact on response. Conclusions: These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields with cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations playing an important role. Validation of these observations in additional cell models may facilitate the refinement of existing radiobiological models and the observations considered important determinants of cell survival.

  13. Evolution of the electrochemical interface in high-temperature fuel cells and electrolysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, John T. S.; Neagu, Dragos; Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Graves, Christopher; Mogensen, Mogens B.

    2016-01-01

    The critical region determining the performance and lifetime of solid oxide electrochemical systems is normally at the electrode side of the electrode/electrolyte interface. Typically this electrochemically active region only extends a few micrometres and for best performance involves intricate structures and nanocomposites. Much of the most exciting recent research involves understanding processes occurring at this interface and in developing new means of controlling the structure at this interface on the nanoscale. Here we consider in detail the diverse range of materials architectures that may be involved, describe the evolution of these interface structures and finally explore the new chemistries that allow control and manipulation of these architectures to optimize both performance and durability.

  14. Designing a binding interface for control of cancer cell adhesion via 3D topography and metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian; Che, Pao-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yun; Aich, Udayanath; Yarema, Kevin J

    2011-08-01

    This study combines metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE), a technology where the glycocalyx of living cells is endowed with chemical features not normally found in sugars, with custom-designed three-dimensional biomaterial substrates to enhance the adhesion of cancer cells and control their morphology and gene expression. Specifically, Ac(5)ManNTGc, a thiol-bearing analog of N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) was used to introduce thiolated sialic acids into the glycocalyx of human Jurkat T-lymphoma derived cells. In parallel 2D films and 3D electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds were prepared from polyethersulfone (PES) and (as controls) left unmodified or aminated. Alternately, the materials were malemided or gold-coated to provide bio-orthogonal binding partners for the thiol groups newly expressed on the cell surface. Cell attachment was modulated by both the topography of the substrate surface and by the chemical compatibility of the binding interface between the cell and the substrate; a substantial increase in binding for normally non-adhesive Jurkat line for 3D scaffold compared to 2D surfaces with an added degree of adhesion resulting from chemoselective binding to malemidede-derivatived or gold-coated surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells attached to the 3D scaffolds via MOE-mediated adhesion was dramatically altered and the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion changed in a time-dependent manner. This study showed that cell adhesion could be enhanced, gene expression modulated, and cell fate controlled by introducing the 3D topograhical cues into the growth substrate and by creating a glycoengineered binding interface where the chemistry of both the cell surface and biomaterials scaffold was controlled to facilitate a new mode of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion. PMID:21549424

  15. Expression of Cell Competition Markers at the Interface between p53 Signature and Normal Epithelium in the Human Fallopian Tube

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Masahiko; Maeda, Daichi; Kudo-Asabe, Yukitsugu; Sato, Naoki; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Terada, Yukihiro; Goto, Akiteru

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence regarding cell competition between normal and mutant mammalian cells, which suggest that it may play a defensive role in the early phase of carcinogenesis. In vitro study in the past has shown that overexpression of vimentin in normal epithelial cells at the contact surface with transformed cells is essential for the cell competition involved in epithelial defense against cancer. In this study, we attempted to examine cell competition in human tissue in vivo by investigating surgically resected human fallopian tubes that contain p53 signatures and serous tubal intraepithelial lesions (STILs), a linear expansion of p53-immunopositive/TP53 mutant tubal epithelial cells that are considered as precursors of pelvic high grade serous carcinoma. Immunofluorescence double staining for p53 and the cell competition marker vimentin was performed in 21 sections of human fallopian tube tissue containing 17 p53 signatures and 4 STILs. The intensities of vimentin expression at the interface between p53-positive cells at the end of the p53 signature/STIL and adjacent p53-negative normal tubal epithelial cells were compared with the background tubal epithelium. As a result, the average vimentin intensity at the interfaces relative to the background intensity was 1.076 (95% CI, 0.9412 – 1.211 for p53 signature and 0.9790 (95% CI, 0.7206 – 1.237) for STIL. Thus, it can be concluded that overexpression of the cell competition marker vimentin are not observed in human tissue with TP53 alterations. PMID:27258067

  16. Power frequency magnetic field exposure and gap junctional communication in Clone 9 cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, G D; Khalaf, W; Hayden, K E; Miller, E J; Dowray, V R; Creekmore, A L; Carruthers, C W; Williams, M W; Gailey, P C

    2000-06-01

    Exposure to a power-frequency magnetic field has been reported to produce a statistically significant inhibition of gap junctional communication (GJC) in Clone 9 cells that have been pre-stressed by treatment with low concentrations of chloral hydrate (CH) [C.F. Blackman, J.P. Blanchard, S.G. Benane, D.E. House, J.A. Elder, Double blind test of magnetic field effects on neurite outgrowth, Bioelectromagnetics, 19 (1998) 204-209]. This observation might provide mechanistic insight into the possible role of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in the carcinogenic process, since cancer cells frequently show decreased or absent GJC, and tumor promoting chemicals have been observed to inhibit GJC. Magnetic field exposure conditions were 45 Hz, 23.8 microT rms + parallel DC 36.6 microT, for 30 min of exposure. The responses of Clone 9 cells to the GJC-inhibiting effects of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate and the chemical CH were evaluated and compared to reported results [S.G. Benane, C.F. Blackman, D.E. House, Effects of perchloroethylene and its metabolites on intercellular communication in Clone 9 rat liver cells, J. Toxicol. Environ. Health, 48 (1996) 427-437]. Before magnetic field exposure, cells were exposed for 24 h to either 3 (nine experiments) or 5 mM (11 experiments) CH to produce GJC of 67% or 50%, respectively, relative to unexposed controls. GJC was assessed microscopically using the scrape-loading technique and a blinded protocol. No statistically significant effect was observed due to magnetic field exposure with either CH concentration.

  17. Prenatal cocaine exposure alters progenitor cell markers in the subventricular zone of the adult rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhyanesh Arvind; Booze, Rosemarie M.; Mactutus, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term consequences of early developmental exposure to drugs of abuse may have deleterious effects on the proliferative plasticity of the brain. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to cocaine, using the IV route of administration and doses that mimic the peak arterial levels of cocaine use in humans, on the proliferative cell types of the subventricular zones (SVZ) in the adult (180 days-old) rat brain. Employing immunocytochemistry, the expression of GFAP+ (type B cells) and nestin+(GFAP−) (Type C and A cells) staining was quantified in the subcallosal area of the SVZ. GFAP+ expression was significantly different between the prenatal cocaine treated group and the vehicle (saline) control group. The prenatal cocaine treated group possessed significantly lower GFAP+ expression relative to the vehicle control group, suggesting that prenatal cocaine exposure significantly reduced the expression of type B neural stem cells of the SVZ. In addition, there was a significant sex difference in nestin+ expression with females showing approximately 8–13% higher nestin+ expression compared to the males. More importantly, a significant prenatal treatment condition (prenatal cocaine, control) by sex interaction in nestin+ expression was confirmed, indicating different effects of cocaine based on sex of the animal. Specifically, prenatal cocaine exposure eliminated the basal difference between the sexes. Collectively, the present findings suggest that prenatal exposure to cocaine, when delivered via a protocol designed to capture prominent features of recreational usage, can selectively alter the major proliferative cell types in the subcallosal area of the SVZ in an adult rat brain, and does so differently for males and females. PMID:22119286

  18. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Permenter, Matthew G; Dennis, William E; Sutto, Thomas E; Jackson, David A; Lewis, John A; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  19. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Permenter, Matthew G.; Dennis, William E.; Sutto, Thomas E.; Jackson, David A.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies. PMID:24386269

  20. Photosensitized rose Bengal-induced phototoxicity on human melanoma cell line under natural sunlight exposure.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Ajeet K; Mujtaba, Syed Faiz; Dwivedi, Ashish; Amar, Saroj K; Goyal, Shruti; Verma, Ankit; Kushwaha, Hari N; Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2016-03-01

    Rose Bengal (RB) is an anionic water-soluble xanthene dye, which used for many years to assess eye cornea and conjunctiva damage. RB showed strong absorption maxima (λmax) under visible light followed by UV-B and UV-A. RB under sunlight exposure showed a time-dependent photodegradation. Our results show that photosensitized RB generates (1)O2 via Type-II photodynamic pathway and induced DNA damage under sunlight/UV-R exposure. 2'dGuO degradation, micronuclei formation, and single- and double-strand breakage were the outcome of photogenotoxicity caused by RB. Quenching studies with NaN3 advocate the involvement of (1)O2 in RB photogenotoxicity. RB induced linoleic acid photoperoxidation, which was parallel to (1)O2-mediated DNA damage. Oxidative stress in A375 cell line (human melanoma cell line) was detected through DCF-DA assay. Photosensitized RB decreased maximum cellular viability under sunlight followed by UV-B and UV-A exposures. Apoptosis was detected as a pattern of cell death through the increased of caspase-3 activity, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and PS translocation through inner to outer plasma membrane. Increased cytosolic levels of Bax also advocate the apoptotic cell death. We propose a p53-mediated apoptosis via increased expression of Bax gene and protein. Thus, the exact mechanism behind RB phototoxicity was the involvement of (1)O2, which induced oxidative stress-mediated DNA and membrane damage, finally apoptotic cell death under natural sunlight exposure. The study suggests that after the use of RB, sunlight exposure may avoid to prevent from its harmful effects.

  1. Nanoscale Interfaces in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells: Physical Insights and Materials Engineering Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Kyle Wayne

    With growing global energy demand there will be an increased need for sources of renewable energy such as solar cells. To make these photovoltaic technologies more competitive with conventional energy sources such as coal and natural gas requires further reduction in manufacturing costs that can be realized by solution processing and roll-to-roll printing. Colloidal quantum dots are a bandgap tunable, solution processible, semiconductor material which may offer a path forward to efficient, inexpensive photovoltaics. Despite impressive progress in performance with these materials, there remain limitations in photocarrier collection that must be overcome. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of charge recombination and transport in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, and the application of this knowledge to the development of new and better materials. Core-shell, PbS-CdS, quantum dots were investigated in an attempt to achieve better surface passivation and reduce electronic defects which can limit performance. Optimization of this material led to improved open circuit voltage, exceeding 0.6 V for the first time, and record published performance of 6% efficiency. Using temperature-dependent and transient photovoltage measurements we explored the significance of interface recombination on the operation of these devices. Careful engineering of the electrode using atomic layer deposition of ZnO helped lead to better TiO2 substrate materials and allowed us to realize a nearly two-fold reduction in recombination rate and an enhancement upwards of 50 mV in open circuit voltage. Carrier extraction efficiency was studied in these devices using intensity dependent current-voltage data of an operational solar cell. By developing an analytical model to describe recombination loss within the active layer of the device we were able to accurately determine transport lengths ranging up to 90 nm. Transient absorption and photoconductivity techniques were used to study

  2. Primary Paediatric Bronchial Airway Epithelial Cell in Vitro Responses to Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Neil; Davidson, Matthew; Scaife, Alison; Miller, David; Spiteri, Daniella; Engelhardt, Tom; Semple, Sean; Devereux, Graham; Walsh, Garry; Turner, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The bronchial airway epithelial cell (BAEC) is the site for initial encounters between inhaled environmental factors and the lower respiratory system. Our hypothesis was that release of pro inflammatory interleukins (IL)-6 and IL-8 from primary BAEC cultured from children will be increased after in vitro exposure to common environmental factors. Primary BAEC were obtained from children undergoing clinically indicated routine general anaesthetic procedures. Cells were exposed to three different concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or house dust mite allergen (HDM) or particulates extracted from side stream cigarette smoke (SSCS). BAEC were obtained from 24 children (mean age 7.0 years) and exposed to stimuli. Compared with the negative control, there was an increase in IL-6 and IL-8 release after exposure to HDM (p ≤ 0.001 for both comparisons). There was reduced IL-6 after higher compared to lower SSCS exposure (p = 0.023). There was no change in BAEC release of IL-6 or IL-8 after LPS exposure. BAEC from children are able to recognise and respond in vitro with enhanced pro inflammatory mediator secretion to some inhaled exposures. PMID:27023576

  3. Toxicological Effects of Caco-2 Cells Following Short-Term and Long-Term Exposure to Ag Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ni; Song, Zheng-Mei; Tang, Huan; Xi, Wen-Song; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2016-01-01

    Extensive utilization increases the exposure of humans to Ag nanoparticles (NPs) via the oral pathway. To comprehensively address the action of Ag NPs to the gastrointestinal systems in real situations, i.e., the long-term low-dose exposure, we evaluated and compared the toxicity of three Ag NPs (20–30 nm with different surface coatings) to the human intestine cell Caco-2 after 1-day and 21-day exposures, using various biological assays. In both the short- and long-term exposures, the variety of surface coating predominated the toxicity of Ag NPs in a descending order of citrate-coated Ag NP (Ag-CIT), bare Ag NP (Ag-B), and poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-coated Ag NP (Ag-PVP). The short-term exposure induced cell growth inhibition and death. The cell viability loss appeared after cells were exposed to 0.7 μg/mL Ag-CIT, 0.9 μg/mL Ag-B or >1.0 μg/mL Ag-PVP for 24 h. The short-term and higher-dose exposure also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial damage, cell membrane leakage, apoptosis, and inflammation (IL-8 level). The long-term exposure only inhibited the cell proliferation. After 21-day exposure to 0.4 μg/mL Ag-CIT, the cell viability dropped to less than 50%, while cells exposed to 0.5 μg/mL Ag-PVP remained normal as the control. Generally, 0.3 μg/mL is the non-toxic dose for the long-term exposure of Caco-2 cells to Ag NPs in this study. However, cells presented inflammation after exposure to Ag NPs with the non-toxic dose in the long-term exposure. PMID:27338357

  4. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    DOE PAGES

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specificmore » fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.« less

  5. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes

  6. Safety Evaluation of Dry Powder Formulations by Direct Dispersion onto Air-Liquid Interface Cultured Cell Layer.

    PubMed

    Asai, Ayumu; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Yamauchi, Tomoyo; Sugiura, Yuka; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Most safety evaluations of dry powder inhalers (DPIs) using cultured cells have been performed with dry powder formulations dissolved in a medium. However, this method is not considered to be suitable to evaluate the safety of inhaled dry powder formulations correctly since it cannot reflect the actual phenomenon on the respiratory epithelial surface. In this study, we established a novel in-vitro safety evaluation system suitable for DPIs by combining an air-liquid interface cultured cell layer and a device for dispersing dry powders, and evaluated the safety of candidate excipients of dry powders for inhalation. The safety of excipients (sugars, amino acids, cyclodextrins, and positive controls) in solutions was compared using submerged cell culture systems with a conventional 96-well plate and Transwell(®). The sensitivity of the cells grown in Transwell(®) was lower than that of those grown in the 96-well plate. Dry powders were prepared by spray-drying and we evaluated their safety with a novel in-vitro safety evaluation system using an air-liquid interface cultured cell layer. Dry powders decreased the cell viability with doses more than solutions. On the other hand, dissolving the dry powders attenuated their cytotoxicity. This suggested that the novel in-vitro safety evaluation system would be suitable to evaluate the safety of DPIs with high sensitivity.

  7. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  8. Modulation of bronchial epithelial cell barrier function by in vitro jet propulsion fuel 8 exposure.

    PubMed

    Robledo, R F; Barber, D S; Witten, M L

    1999-09-01

    The loss of epithelial barrier integrity in bronchial and bronchiolar airways may be an initiating factor in the observed onset of toxicant-induced lung injuries. Acute 1-h inhalation exposures to aerosolized jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) have been shown to induce cellular and morphological indications of pulmonary toxicity that was associated with increased respiratory permeability to 99mTc-DTPA. To address the hypothesis that JP-8 jet fuel-induced lung injury is initiated through a disruption in the airway epithelial barrier function, paracellular mannitol flux of BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells was measured. Incubation of confluent cell cultures with non-cytotoxic concentrations of JP-8 or n-tetradecane (C14), a primary constituent of JP-8, for a 1-h exposure period resulted in dose-dependent increases of paracellular flux. Following exposures of 0.17, 0.33, 0.50, or 0.67 mg/ml, mannitol flux increased above vehicle controls by 10, 14, 29, and 52%, respectively, during a 2-h incubation period immediately after each JP-8 exposure. C14 caused greater mannitol flux increases of 37, 42, 63, and 78%, respectively, following identical exposure conditions. The effect on transepithelial mannitol flux reached a maximum at 12 h and spontaneously reversed to control values over a 48-h recovery period, for both JP-8 and C14 exposure. These data indicate that non-cytotoxic exposures to JP-8 or C14 exert a noxious effect on bronchial epithelial barrier function that may preclude pathological lung injury.

  9. Human embryonic stem cell responses to ionizing radiation exposures: current state of knowledge and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Mykyta V; Neumann, Ronald D

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells, which are derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, have become an object of intense study over the last decade. They possess two unique properties that distinguish them from many other cell types: (i) the ability to self-renew indefinitely in culture under permissive conditions, and (ii) the pluripotency, defined as the capability of giving rise to all cell types of embryonic lineage under the guidance of the appropriate developmental cues. The focus of many recent efforts has been on the elucidating the signaling pathways and molecular networks operating in human embryonic stem cells. These cells hold great promise in cell-based regenerative therapies, disease modeling, drug screening and testing, assessing genotoxic and mutagenic risks associated with exposures to a variety of environmental factors, and so forth. Ionizing radiation is ubiquitous in nature, and it is widely used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in medicine. In this paper, our goal is to summarize the recent progress in understanding how human embryonic stem cells respond to ionizing radiation exposures, using novel methodologies based on "omics" approaches, and to provide a critical discussion of what remains unknown; thus proposing a roadmap for the future research in this area. PMID:22966236

  10. Effect of long-term exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to morphine: a whole cell proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Neasta, Jérémie; Uttenweiler-Joseph, Sandrine; Chaoui, Karima; Monsarrat, Bernard; Meunier, Jean-Claude; Moulédous, Lionel

    2006-01-01

    Background Opiate addiction reflects plastic changes that endurably alter synaptic transmission within relevant neuronal circuits. The biochemical mechanisms of these adaptations remain largely unknown and proteomics-based approaches could lead to a broad characterization of the molecular events underlying adaptations to chronic drug exposure. Results Thus, we have started proteomic analyses of the effects of chronic morphine exposure in a recombinant human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y clone that stably overexpresses the μ-opioid receptor. Cells were treated with morphine for 6, 24 and 72 hours, the proteins were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis and stained with Coomassie blue, and the protein map was compared with that obtained from untreated cells. Spots showing a statistically significant variation were selected for identification using mass spectrometric analyses. Conclusion A total of 45 proteins were identified, including proteins involved in cellular metabolism, cytoskeleton organization, vesicular trafficking, transcriptional and translational regulation, and cell signaling. PMID:17184524

  11. Induction of apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure of resistive barrier cold plasma.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Anderson, Heather; Gonzales, Xavier F

    2014-03-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ambient temperature ionized gas, is gaining extensive interest as a promising addition to anti-tumor therapy primarily due to the ability to generate and control delivery of electrons, ions, excited molecules, UV photons, and reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to a specific site. The heterogeneous composition of CAP offers the opportunity to mediate several signaling pathways that regulate tumor cells. Consequently, the array of CAP generated products has limited the identification of the mechanisms of action on tumor cells. The aim of this work is to assess the cell death response of human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure to CAP generated RNS by utilizing a novel resistive barrier discharge system that primarily produces RNS. The effect of variable treatments of CAP generated RNS was tested in THP-1 cell (human monocytic leukemia cell line), a model for hematological malignancy. The number of viable cells was evaluated with erythrosine-B staining, while apoptosis and necrosis was assessed by endonuclease cleavage observed by agarose gel electrophoresis and detection of cells with the exclusionary dye propidium iodide and fluorescently labeled annexin-V by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Our observations indicate that treatment dosage levels of 45 s of exposure to CAP emitted RNS-induced apoptotic cell death and for higher dosage conditions of ≥50 s of exposure to CAP induced necrosis. Overall the results suggest that CAP emitted RNS play a significant role in the anti-tumor potential of CAP.

  12. Comparing plasma and X-ray exposure and identifying vulnerable cell parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Bill

    2012-10-01

    Here two issues in plasma medicine that are being addressed in a collaboration between the Centre of Plasma Physics and the School of Pharmacy at Queen's University Belfast and the Plasma Institute at York University UK will be discussed. Recent measurements of the interaction of plasmas created directly in DMEM cell medium and MDAMB-231, a human breast cancer cell line, showed evidence of reduced cell viability and of DNA damage. The same set of experiments were undertaken but with X-ray exposure. A correlation of the dependence on plasma exposure time and X-ray dose was observed which might point the way to dose definition in plasma medicine. We have also been working to identify the cell parts most vulnerable to plasma exposure. In this study a 10 kHz atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet, operating in He/0.5%O2 and characterized to determine the behavior of many of the plasma species, was incident onto the surface of media containing either bacterial strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, or isolated bacterial plasmid DNA. The results of measurements to look for changes in plasmid structural conformation, rates of single and double strand breaks, the catalytic activity of certain bacterial enzymes, the peroxidation of lipid content of the bacterial cells, the leakage of ATP and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images will be discussed.

  13. Arsenic exposure causes epigenetic dysregulation of IL-8 expression leading to proneoplastic changes in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Radha Dutt; Tiwari, Ratnakar; Khan, Hafizurrahman; Kumar, Anoop; Srivastava, Vikas

    2015-08-19

    Prolonged arsenic exposure has been shown to cause several detrimental effects in adults. However its effects following prenatal exposure are not well defined at the epigenetic level, particularly in terms of changes which may predispose an individual to adult malignancies. In this work, we have studied the effect of arsenic exposure on renal system using human embryonic kidney cells and prenatally exposed animals and identified Interleukin-8(IL-8) and its homologue (CINC-1) as mediators of arsenic induced renal toxicity. We further show that embryonic kidney cells are more responsive to arsenic leading to higher induction of IL-8 as compared to adult cells due to DNA methylation and histone acetylation (H3 acetylation) changes in the IL-8 promoter. Through bisulfite analysis of the IL-8 promoter, we have also identified an arsenic modulated CpG site at -168 bases upstream of transcription start site. This CpG is associated with C/EBP and CREB binding sites in the IL-8 promoter and its demethylation by arsenic coupled with increased H3 histone acetylation and CBP/P300 recruitment could lead to induction of IL-8. Our study shows how epigenetic modulation of IL-8 by arsenic could contribute to increased cell migratory and proliferative capabilities, cell cycle dysregulation and renal toxicity.

  14. Arsenic exposure causes epigenetic dysregulation of IL-8 expression leading to proneoplastic changes in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Radha Dutt; Tiwari, Ratnakar; Khan, Hafizurrahman; Kumar, Anoop; Srivastava, Vikas

    2015-08-19

    Prolonged arsenic exposure has been shown to cause several detrimental effects in adults. However its effects following prenatal exposure are not well defined at the epigenetic level, particularly in terms of changes which may predispose an individual to adult malignancies. In this work, we have studied the effect of arsenic exposure on renal system using human embryonic kidney cells and prenatally exposed animals and identified Interleukin-8(IL-8) and its homologue (CINC-1) as mediators of arsenic induced renal toxicity. We further show that embryonic kidney cells are more responsive to arsenic leading to higher induction of IL-8 as compared to adult cells due to DNA methylation and histone acetylation (H3 acetylation) changes in the IL-8 promoter. Through bisulfite analysis of the IL-8 promoter, we have also identified an arsenic modulated CpG site at -168 bases upstream of transcription start site. This CpG is associated with C/EBP and CREB binding sites in the IL-8 promoter and its demethylation by arsenic coupled with increased H3 histone acetylation and CBP/P300 recruitment could lead to induction of IL-8. Our study shows how epigenetic modulation of IL-8 by arsenic could contribute to increased cell migratory and proliferative capabilities, cell cycle dysregulation and renal toxicity. PMID:26008221

  15. Effects of cement alkalinity, exposure conditions and steel-concrete interface on the time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold for reinforcing steel in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jingak

    Effects of (1) cement alkalinity (low, normal and high), (2) exposure conditions (RH and temperature), (3) rebar surface condition (as-received versus cleaned) and (4) density and distribution of air voids at the steel-concrete interface on the chloride threshold and time-to-corrosion for reinforcing steel in concrete have been studied. Also, experiments were performed to evaluate effects of RH and temperature on the diffusion of chloride in concrete and develop a method for ex-situ pH measurement of concrete pore water. Once specimens were fabricated and exposed to a corrosive chloride solution, various experimental techniques were employed to determine time-to-corrosion, chloride threshold, diffusion coefficient and void density along the rebar trace as well as pore water pH. Based upon the resultant data, several findings related to the above parameters have been obtained as summarized below. First, time for the corrosion initiation was longest for G109 concrete specimens with high alkalinity cement (HA). Also, chloride threshold increased with increasing time-to-corrosion and cement alkalinity. Consequently, the HA specimens exhibited the highest chloride threshold compared to low and normal alkalinity ones. Second, high temperature and temperature variations reduced time-to-corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete since chloride diffusion was accelerated at higher temperature and possibly by temperature variations. The lowest chloride threshold values were found for outdoor exposed specimens suggesting that variation of RH or temperature (or both) facilitated rapid chloride diffusion. Third, an elevated time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold values were found for the wire brushed steel specimens compared to as-received ones. The higher ratio of [OH-]/[Fe n+] on the wire brushed steel surface compared to that of as-received case can be the possible cause because the higher ratio of this parameter enables the formation of a more protective passive film on

  16. Chronic Exposure to Particulate Chromate Induces Premature Centrosome Separation and Centriole Disengagement in Human Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Martino, Julieta; Holmes, Amie L; Xie, Hong; Wise, Sandra S; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-10-01

    Particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a well-established human lung carcinogen. Lung tumors are characterized by structural and numerical chromosome instability. Centrosome amplification is a phenotype commonly found in solid tumors, including lung tumors, which strongly correlates with chromosome instability. Human lung cells exposed to Cr(VI) exhibit centrosome amplification but the underlying phenotypes and mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we further characterize the phenotypes of Cr(VI)-induced centrosome abnormalities. We show that Cr(VI)-induced centrosome amplification correlates with numerical chromosome instability. We also show chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) induces centrosomes with supernumerary centrioles and acentriolar centrosomes in human lung cells. Moreover, chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) affects the timing of important centriolar events. Specifically, chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) causes premature centriole disengagement in S and G2 phase cells. It also induces premature centrosome separation in interphase. Altogether, our data suggest that chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) targets the protein linkers that hold centrioles together. These centriolar linkers are important for key events of the centrosome cycle and their premature disruption might underlie Cr(VI)-induced centrosome amplification. PMID:26293554

  17. Ambient particulate matter exposure and cardiovascular diseases: a focus on progenitor and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuqi; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Zhenguo

    2016-05-01

    Air pollution is a major challenge to public health. Ambient fine particulate matter (PM) is the key component for air pollution, and associated with significant mortality. The majority of the mortality following PM exposure is related to cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms for the adverse effects of PM exposure on cardiovascular system remain largely unknown and under active investigation. Endothelial dysfunction or injury is considered one of the major factors that contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a critical role in maintaining the structural and functional integrity of vasculature. Particulate matter exposure significantly suppressed the number and function of EPCs in animals and humans. However, the mechanisms for the detrimental effects of PM on EPCs remain to be fully defined. One of the important mechanisms might be related to increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. Bone marrow (BM) is a major source of EPCs. Thus, the number and function of EPCs could be intimately associated with the population and functional status of stem cells (SCs) in the BM. Bone marrow stem cells and other SCs have the potential for cardiovascular regeneration and repair. The present review is focused on summarizing the detrimental effects of PM exposure on EPCs and SCs, and potential mechanisms including ROS formation as well as clinical implications.

  18. Chronic Exposure to Particulate Chromate Induces Premature Centrosome Separation and Centriole Disengagement in Human Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Martino, Julieta; Holmes, Amie L; Xie, Hong; Wise, Sandra S; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-10-01

    Particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a well-established human lung carcinogen. Lung tumors are characterized by structural and numerical chromosome instability. Centrosome amplification is a phenotype commonly found in solid tumors, including lung tumors, which strongly correlates with chromosome instability. Human lung cells exposed to Cr(VI) exhibit centrosome amplification but the underlying phenotypes and mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we further characterize the phenotypes of Cr(VI)-induced centrosome abnormalities. We show that Cr(VI)-induced centrosome amplification correlates with numerical chromosome instability. We also show chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) induces centrosomes with supernumerary centrioles and acentriolar centrosomes in human lung cells. Moreover, chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) affects the timing of important centriolar events. Specifically, chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) causes premature centriole disengagement in S and G2 phase cells. It also induces premature centrosome separation in interphase. Altogether, our data suggest that chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) targets the protein linkers that hold centrioles together. These centriolar linkers are important for key events of the centrosome cycle and their premature disruption might underlie Cr(VI)-induced centrosome amplification.

  19. Dose-dependent in vivo cell-cycle changes following radon progeny exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.F.; Carpenter, T.R.; Hickman, A.W.; Jaramillo, R.J.; Gurule, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    Exposures to low concentrations of alpha-emitting radon progeny are reported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to be the second leading cause of lung cancer. Current risk estimates for lung cancer from the inhalation of radon progeny are based on data from underground uranium miners. To produce such risk estimates, calculations are based on several assumptions concerning exposure-response relationships rather than dose-response relationships. A better understanding of the mechanisms of interactions between alpha particles, the cells of the respiratory tract, and the progression toward cancer may validate the mathematical models used to derive risk estimates.

  20. Functionality of NGF-protected PC12 cells following exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Edel T.; Loughlin, John P.; Herbert, Kate Reed; Dockery, Peter; Samali, Afshin; Doyle, Karen M.; Gorman, Adrienne M. . E-mail: adrienne.gorman@nuigalway.ie

    2006-12-29

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is often used in models of Parkinson's disease since it can selectively target and kill dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra. In this study, pre-treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibited apoptosis and necrosis by 6-OHDA, including caspase activity and lactate dehydrogenase release. Notably, cells exposed to 6-OHDA in the presence of NGF were subsequently capable of proliferation (when replated without NGF), or neurite outgrowth (with continued presence of NGF). Following 7 days growth in the presence of NGF, expression of {beta}III tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase and increased intracellular catecholamines was detectable in PC12 cells, features characteristic of functional dopaminergic neurons. NGF-pre-treated PC12 cells retained expression of {beta}III-tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase, but not catecholamine content following 6-OHDA exposure. These data indicate that NGF-protected cells maintained some aspects of functionality and were subsequently capable of proliferation or differentiation.

  1. Atrazine exposure causes mitochondrial toxicity in liver and muscle cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sagarkar, Sneha; Gandhi, Deepa; Devi, S. Saravana; Sakharkar, Amul; Kapley, Atya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic exposure to atrazine and other pesticides is reported to cause metabolic disorders, yet information on effects of atrazine on expression of genes relevant to mitochondrial function is largely missing. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the expression of a battery of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in human liver (HepG2) and rat muscle (L6) cell lines due to short-term atrazine exposure. Materials and Methods: We have determined the EC50 values of atrazine for cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity (mitotoxicity) in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in HepG2 and L6 cells. Further, the mRNA expression of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: The EC50 value of atrazine for mitotoxicity in HepG2 and L6 cells was found to be about 0.162 and 0.089 mM, respectively. Mitochondrial toxicity was indicated by reduction in ATP content following atrazine exposure. Atrazine exposure resulted in down-regulation of many OXPHOS subunits expression and affected biogenesis factors’ expression. Most prominently, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) expressions were up-regulated in HepG2 cells, whereas SIRT3 expression was alleviated in L6 cells, without significant changes in SOD levels. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and SIRT1 expression were significantly down-regulated in both cell lines. Conclusion: Results suggest that TFAM and SIRT1 could be involved in atrazine-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and further studies can be taken up to understand the mechanism of mitochondrial toxicity. Further study can also be taken up to explore the possibility of target genes as biomarkers of pesticide toxicity. PMID:27114639

  2. Roles of Energy/Charge Cascades and Intermixed Layers at Donor/Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kyohei; Suzuki, Kaori; Chen, Yujiao; Tajima, Keisuke

    2016-07-01

    The secret to the success of mixed bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) in yielding highly efficient organic solar cells (OSCs) could reside in the molecular structures at their donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of energy and charge cascade structures at the interfaces by using well-defined planar heterojunctions (PHJs) as a model system. The results showed that (1) the charge cascade structure enhanced VOC because it shuts down the recombination pathway through charge transfer (CT) state with a low energy, (2) the charge cascade layer having a wider energy gap than the bulk material decreased JSC because the diffusion of the excitons from the bulk to D/A interface was blocked; the energy of the cascade layers must be appropriately arranged for both the charges and the excitons, and (3) molecular intermixing in the cascade layer opened the recombination path through the low-energy CT state and decreased VOC. Based on these findings, we propose improved structures for D/A interfaces in BHJs.

  3. Indium-Based Interface Chemical Engineering by Electrochemistry and Atomic Layer Deposition for Copper Indium Diselenide Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemoles, Jean-François; Canava, Bruno; Yousfi, El Bekkaye; Cowache, Pierre; Galtayries, Anouk; Asikainen, Timo; Powalla, Michael; Hariskos, Dimitri; Schock, Hans-Werner; Lincot, Daniel

    2001-10-01

    The key to achieve better Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells is through the improvement of the CIGS/ZnO interface. In this work, we illustrate various approaches, wet and dry, to engineer that interface with processes that avoid the use of Cd containing compounds. Wet chemical treatments have been performed so as to test the possibility to improve that interface by surface doping of CIGS@. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Kelvin probe studies show that such doping is not achieved in the conditions leading to best devices. Rather, the most desirable feature of the surface treatments appears to be surface passivation. We show that this can be achieved via CIGS surface reaction with In(III) ions, leading to 12.5% efficient devices. A well passivated interface can also be achieved directly, using an all dry process, by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) of In2S3 buffer layer, yielding to 13.5% efficient devices. The ALD growth of the buffer layers have been studied in situ with the help of a quartz crystal microgravimetry.

  4. Roles of Energy/Charge Cascades and Intermixed Layers at Donor/Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kyohei; Suzuki, Kaori; Chen, Yujiao; Tajima, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    The secret to the success of mixed bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) in yielding highly efficient organic solar cells (OSCs) could reside in the molecular structures at their donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of energy and charge cascade structures at the interfaces by using well-defined planar heterojunctions (PHJs) as a model system. The results showed that (1) the charge cascade structure enhanced VOC because it shuts down the recombination pathway through charge transfer (CT) state with a low energy, (2) the charge cascade layer having a wider energy gap than the bulk material decreased JSC because the diffusion of the excitons from the bulk to D/A interface was blocked; the energy of the cascade layers must be appropriately arranged for both the charges and the excitons, and (3) molecular intermixing in the cascade layer opened the recombination path through the low-energy CT state and decreased VOC. Based on these findings, we propose improved structures for D/A interfaces in BHJs. PMID:27404948

  5. Roles of Energy/Charge Cascades and Intermixed Layers at Donor/Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kyohei; Suzuki, Kaori; Chen, Yujiao; Tajima, Keisuke

    2016-07-12

    The secret to the success of mixed bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) in yielding highly efficient organic solar cells (OSCs) could reside in the molecular structures at their donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of energy and charge cascade structures at the interfaces by using well-defined planar heterojunctions (PHJs) as a model system. The results showed that (1) the charge cascade structure enhanced VOC because it shuts down the recombination pathway through charge transfer (CT) state with a low energy, (2) the charge cascade layer having a wider energy gap than the bulk material decreased JSC because the diffusion of the excitons from the bulk to D/A interface was blocked; the energy of the cascade layers must be appropriately arranged for both the charges and the excitons, and (3) molecular intermixing in the cascade layer opened the recombination path through the low-energy CT state and decreased VOC. Based on these findings, we propose improved structures for D/A interfaces in BHJs.

  6. Roles of Energy/Charge Cascades and Intermixed Layers at Donor/Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kyohei; Suzuki, Kaori; Chen, Yujiao; Tajima, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    The secret to the success of mixed bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) in yielding highly efficient organic solar cells (OSCs) could reside in the molecular structures at their donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of energy and charge cascade structures at the interfaces by using well-defined planar heterojunctions (PHJs) as a model system. The results showed that (1) the charge cascade structure enhanced VOC because it shuts down the recombination pathway through charge transfer (CT) state with a low energy, (2) the charge cascade layer having a wider energy gap than the bulk material decreased JSC because the diffusion of the excitons from the bulk to D/A interface was blocked; the energy of the cascade layers must be appropriately arranged for both the charges and the excitons, and (3) molecular intermixing in the cascade layer opened the recombination path through the low-energy CT state and decreased VOC. Based on these findings, we propose improved structures for D/A interfaces in BHJs. PMID:27404948

  7. Protein kinase C activation induces phosphatidylserine exposure on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Kitty; Rettig, Michael P; Low, Philip S; Kuypers, Frans A

    2002-10-15

    We have shown previously that red blood cells (RBCs) can be induced to influx Ca(2+) when treated with lipid mediators, such as lysophosphatidic acid and prostaglandin E(2), that are released during clot formation. Since calcium loading of RBCs can lead to both protein kinase C (PKC) activation and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, we decided to investigate the possible linkage between PKC activation and membrane PS scrambling using phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a commonly used activator of PKC. Treatment of RBCs with PMA in a calcium-containing buffer caused immediate PS exposure in an RBC subpopulation. The size of the subpopulation did not change upon further incubation, indicating that not all RBCs are equally susceptible to this treatment. Using a fluorescent indicator, we found a subpopulation of RBCs with elevated intracellular calcium levels. In the absence of extracellular calcium, no PS exposure was found. However, we did find cells with high levels of calcium that did not expose PS, and a variable percentage of PS-exposing cells that did not show elevated calcium concentrations. Inhibition of PKC with either calphostin C, a blocker of the PMA binding site, or chelerythrine chloride, an inhibitor of the active site, diminished the level of formation of PS-exposing cells. However, the inhibitors had different effects on calcium internalization, indicating that a high calcium concentration alone was not responsible for inducing PS exposure in the absence of PKC activity. Moreover, PKC inhibition could prevent PS exposure induced by calcium and ionophore treatment of RBCs. We conclude that PKC is implicated in the mechanism of membrane phospholipid scrambling.

  8. Dual Analysis of the Murine Cytomegalovirus and Host Cell Transcriptomes Reveal New Aspects of the Virus-Host Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Juranic Lisnic, Vanda; Babic Cac, Marina; Lisnic, Berislav; Trsan, Tihana; Mefferd, Adam; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitrangada; Cook, Charles H.; Jonjic, Stipan; Trgovcich, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Major gaps in our knowledge of pathogen genes and how these gene products interact with host gene products to cause disease represent a major obstacle to progress in vaccine and antiviral drug development for the herpesviruses. To begin to bridge these gaps, we conducted a dual analysis of Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and host cell transcriptomes during lytic infection. We analyzed the MCMV transcriptome during lytic infection using both classical cDNA cloning and sequencing of viral transcripts and next generation sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq). We also investigated the host transcriptome using RNA-Seq combined with differential gene expression analysis, biological pathway analysis, and gene ontology analysis. We identify numerous novel spliced and unspliced transcripts of MCMV. Unexpectedly, the most abundantly transcribed viral genes are of unknown function. We found that the most abundant viral transcript, recently identified as a noncoding RNA regulating cellular microRNAs, also codes for a novel protein. To our knowledge, this is the first viral transcript that functions both as a noncoding RNA and an mRNA. We also report that lytic infection elicits a profound cellular response in fibroblasts. Highly upregulated and induced host genes included those involved in inflammation and immunity, but also many unexpected transcription factors and host genes related to development and differentiation. Many top downregulated and repressed genes are associated with functions whose roles in infection are obscure, including host long intergenic noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs or small nucleolar RNAs. Correspondingly, many differentially expressed genes cluster in biological pathways that may shed new light on cytomegalovirus pathogenesis. Together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular warfare at the virus-host interface and suggest new areas of research to advance the understanding and treatment of cytomegalovirus-associated diseases. PMID:24086132

  9. Benzopyrene exposure disrupts DNA methylation and growth dynamics in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Rodenhiser, David I. . E-mail: drodenhi@uwo.ca

    2006-11-01

    Exposures to environmental carcinogens and unhealthy lifestyle choices increase the incidence of breast cancer. One such compound, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), leads to covalent DNA modifications and the deregulation of gene expression. To date, these mechanisms of BaP-induced carcinogenesis are poorly understood, particularly in the case of breast cancer. We tested the effects of BaP exposure on cellular growth dynamics and DNA methylation in four breast cancer cell lines since disruptions in DNA methylation lead to deregulated gene expression and the loss of genomic integrity. We observed robust time- and concentration-dependent loss of proliferation, S phase and G2M accumulation and apoptosis in p53 positive MCF-7 and T47-D cells. We observed minimal responses in p53 negative HCC-1086 and MDA MB 231 cells. Furthermore, BaP increased p53 levels in both p53 positive cell lines, as well as p21 levels in MCF-7 cells, an effect that was prevented by the p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-{alpha}. No changes in global levels of DNA methylation levels induced by BaP were detected by the methyl acceptor assay (MAA) in any cell line, however, methylation profiling by AIMS (amplification of intermethylated sites) analysis showed dynamic, sequence-specific hypo- and hypermethylation events in all cell lines. We also identified BaP-induced hypomethylation events at a number of genomic repeats. Our data confirm the p53-specific disruption of the cell cycle as well as the disruption of DNA methylation as a consequence of BaP treatment, thus reinforcing the link between environmental exposures, DNA methylation and breast cancer.

  10. Differential Susceptibility of Human Pleural and Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells to Asbestos Exposure.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Julie; Thompson, Joyce; MacPherson, Maximilian; Shukla, Arti

    2015-08-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer of mesothelial cells of pleural and peritoneal cavities. In 85% of cases both pleural and peritoneal MM is caused by asbestos exposure. Although both are asbestos-induced cancers, the incidence of pleural MM is significantly higher (85%) than peritoneal MM (15%). It has been proposed that carcinogenesis is a result of asbestos-induced inflammation but it is not clear what contributes to the differences observed between incidences of these two cancers. We hypothesize that the observed differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM are the result of differences in the direct response of these cell types to asbestos rather than to differences mediated by the in vivo microenvironment. To test this hypothesis we characterized cellular responses to asbestos in a controlled environment. We found significantly greater changes in genome-wide expression in response to asbestos exposure in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. In particular, a greater response in many common genes (IL-8, ATF3, CXCL2, CXCL3, IL-6, GOS2) was seen in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. Unique genes expressed in pleural mesothelial cells were mainly pro-inflammatory (G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1α, GREM1) and have previously been shown to be involved in development of MM. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM upon exposure to asbestos are the result of differences in mesothelial cell physiology that lead to differences in the inflammatory response, which leads to cancer.

  11. [Increase in the number of cancer stem cells after exposure to low-LET radiation].

    PubMed

    Zamulaeva, I A; Matchuk, O N; Selivanova, E I; Andreev, V G; Lipunov, N M; Makarenko, S A; Zhavoronkov, L P; Saenko, A S

    2014-01-01

    Radioresistance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is regarded as one of the possible causes of cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. Since the regularities and mechanisms of radiation effects on this population of cells have not been sufficiently studied, the aim of this work is to elucidate the changes in the CSC number after γ-irradiation in stable cultures of tumor cells in vitro and tumor tissue in vivo (in the course of radiation therapy of patients with cancers of the upper respiratory tract). CSCs were identified in the cell lines B16, MCF-7, HeLa by the ability to exclude the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 (SP method) 48-72 h after irradiation at the doses of 1-20 Gy and in biopsy material by immunophenotype CD44+CD24(-/low) before and 24 h after irradiation at the total dose of 10 Gy. The essential differences in the response of CSCs and other cancer cells were found after exposure to low-LET radiation. The absolute number of CSCs increased after a single exposure at the doses ranging from 1 to 5-10 Gy in different cell cultures, but a further dose increase maintained the current number of CSCs or decreased it. At the same time, the number of non CSCs significantly decreased with increasing doses of radiation exposure, as expected. Fractionated irradiation in vivo at a total dose of 10 Gy increased the relative amount of CSCs in most patients. The registered changes are an integral indicator of cell death, cell division delay immediately after irradiation, proliferation at a later time, possible dedifferentiation of non CSCs, etc. The exact contribution of each of them to the radiation-induced increase of the CSCs number is of considerable interest and requires further research.

  12. Differential susceptibility of human pleural and peritoneal mesothelial cells to asbestos exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dragon, Julie; Thompson, Joyce; MacPherson, Maximilian; Shukla, Arti

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer of mesothelial cells of pleural and peritoneal cavities. In 85% of cases both pleural and peritoneal MM is caused by asbestos exposure. Although both are asbestos-induced cancers, the incidence of pleural MM is significantly higher (85%) than peritoneal MM (15%). It has been proposed that carcinogenesis is a result of asbestos-induced inflammation but it is not clear what contributes to the differences observed between incidences of these two cancers. We hypothesize that the observed differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM are the result of differences in the direct response of these cell types to asbestos rather than to differences mediated by the in vivo microenvironment. To test this hypothesis we characterized cellular responses to asbestos in a controlled environment. We found significantly greater changes in genome-wide expression in response to asbestos exposure in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. In particular, a greater response in many common genes (IL-8, ATF3, CXCL2, CXCL3, IL-6, GOS2) was seen in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. Unique genes expressed in pleural mesothelial cells were mainly pro-inflammatory (G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1α, GREM1) and have previously been shown to be involved in development of MM. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM upon exposure to asbestos are the result of differences in mesothelial cell physiology that lead to differences in the inflammatory response, which leads to cancer. PMID:25757056

  13. Prenatal and lactation nicotine exposure affects Sertoli cell and gonadotropin levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Paccola, C C; Miraglia, S M

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is largely consumed in the world as a component of cigarettes. It can cross the placenta and reach the milk of smoking mothers. This drug induces apoptosis, affects sex hormone secretion, and leads to male infertility. To investigate the exposure to nicotine during the whole intrauterine and lactation phases in Sertoli cells, pregnant rats received nicotine (2 mg/kg per day) through osmotic minipumps. Male offsprings (30, 60, and 90 days old) had blood collected for hormonal analysis (FSH and LH) and their testes submitted for histophatological study, analysis of the frequency of the stages of seminiferous epithelium cycle, immunolabeling of apoptotic epithelial cells (TUNEL and Fas/FasL), analysis of the function and structure of Sertoli cells (respectively using transferrin and vimentin immunolabeling), and analysis of Sertoli-germ cell junctional molecule (β-catenin immunolabeling). The exposure to nicotine increased the FSH and LH plasmatic levels in adult rats. Although nicotine had not changed the number of apoptotic cells, neither in Fas nor FasL expression, it provoked an intense sloughing of epithelial cells and also altered the frequency of some stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. Transferrin and β-catenin expressions were not changed, but vimentin was significantly reduced in the early stages of the seminiferous cycle of the nicotine-exposed adult rats. Thus, we concluded that nicotine exposure during all gestational and lactation periods affects the structure of Sertoli cells by events causing intense germ cell sloughing observed in the tubular lumen and can compromise the fertility of the offspring.

  14. Fractionated radiation exposure amplifies the radioresistant nature of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, N.; Meunier, A.; Mooney, B.; Nortey, G.; Hernandez, C.; Hurley, S.; Lynam-Lennon, N.; Barsoom, S. H.; Bowman, K. J.; Marples, B.; Jones, G. D. D.; Marignol, L.

    2016-01-01

    The risk of recurrence following radiation therapy remains high for a significant number of prostate cancer patients. The development of in vitro isogenic models of radioresistance through exposure to fractionated radiation is an increasingly used approach to investigate the mechanisms of radioresistance in cancer cells and help guide improvements in radiotherapy standards. We treated 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells with fractionated 2 Gy radiation to a cumulative total dose of 60 Gy. This process selected for 22Rv1-cells with increased clonogenic survival following subsequent radiation exposure but increased sensitivity to Docetaxel. This RR-22Rv1 cell line was enriched in S-phase cells, less susceptible to DNA damage, radiation-induced apoptosis and acquired enhanced migration potential, when compared to wild type and aged matched control 22Rv1 cells. The selection of radioresistant cancer cells during fractionated radiation therapy may have implications in the development and administration of future targeted therapy in conjunction with radiation therapy. PMID:27703211

  15. Exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles increases Staphylococcusaureusinfection of HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Walker, Stephen. G.; Wang, Hong Zhan; Gondon, Chris; Brink, Peter; Guterman, Shoshana; Zawacki, Emma; Applebaum, Eliana; Rafailovich, Miriam; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel; Mironava, Tatsiana

    TiO2 is one of the most common nanoparticles in industry from food additives to energy generation. Even though TiO2 is also used as an anti-bacterial agent in combination with UV, we found that, in the absence of UV, exposure of HeLa cells to TiO2 nanoparticles largely increased their risk of bacterial invasion. HeLa cells cultured with low dosage rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (0.1 mg/ml) for 24 hrs prior to exposure to bacteria had 350% and 250% respectively more bacteria infected per cell. The increase was attributed to increased LDH leakage, and changes in the mechanical response of the cell membrane. On the other hand, macrophages exposed to TiO2 particles ingested 40% fewer bacteria, further increasing the risk of infection. In combination, these two factors raise serious concerns regarding the impact of exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles on the ability of organisms to resist bacterial infection.

  16. Alterations induced by chronic lead exposure on the cells of circadian pacemaker of developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Rojas, Patricia; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Pérez, Oscar Gutiérrez; Montes, Sergio; Ríos, Camilo

    2011-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure alters the temporal organization of several physiological and behavioural processes in which the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus plays a fundamental role. In this study, we evaluated the effects of chronic early Pb exposure (CePbe) on the morphology, cellular density and relative optical density (OD) in the cells of the SCN of male rats. Female Wistar rats were exposed during gestation and lactation to a Pb solution containing 320 ppm of Pb acetate through drinking water. After weaning, the pups were maintained with the same drinking water until sacrificed at 90 days of age. Pb levels in the blood, hypothalamus, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were significantly increased in the experimental group. Chronic early Pb exposure induced a significant increase in the minor and major axes and somatic area of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and vasopressin (VP)-immunoreactive neurons. The density of VIP-, VP- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells showed a significant decrease in the experimental group. OD analysis showed a significant increase in VIP neurons of the experimental group. The results showed that CePbe induced alterations in the cells of the SCN, as evidenced by modifications in soma morphology, cellular density and OD in circadian pacemaker cells. These findings provide a morphological and cellular basis for deficits in circadian rhythms documented in Pb-exposed animals. PMID:21324006

  17. Performance Degradation of Encapsulated Monocrystalline-Si Solar Cells upon Accelerated Weathering Exposures: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S. H.; Pern, F. J.; Watson, G. L.; Tomek, D.; Raaff, J.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Performed accelerated exposures to study performance reliability/materials degradation of encapsulated c-Si cells using weathering protocols in 2 weatherometers. We have performed accelerated exposures to study performance reliability and materials degradation of a total of forty-one 3-cm x 3-cm monocrystalline-Si (c-Si) solar cells that were variously encapsulated using accelerated weathering protocols in two weatherometers (WOMs), with and without front specimen water sprays. Laminated cells (EVA/c-Si/EVA, ethylene vinyl acetate) with one of five superstrate/substrate variations and other features including with and without: (i) load resistance, (ii) Al foil light masks, and (iii) epoxy edge-sealing were studied. Three additional samples, omitting EVA, were exposed under a full-spectrum solar simulator, or heated in an oven, for comparison. After exposures, cell performance decreased irregularly, but to a relatively greater extent for samples exposed in WOM where light, heat, and humidity cycles were present (solar simulator or oven lacked such cycles). EVA laminates in the samples masked with aluminum (Al) foils were observed to retain moisture in WOM with water spray. Moisture effects caused substantial efficiency losses probably related in part to increasing series resistance.

  18. Genotoxicity of inorganic arsenic exposure: Micronuclei frequencies in exfoliated human oral mucosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsebatt, M.E.; Guzman, P.; Salazar, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    Micronuclei (MN) can be formed by acentric chromosome fragments or whole lagging chromosomes. When used in vivo, this assay can potentially detect the clastogenic effect of an exposure. MN are easier to score than chromosome aberrations although both biomarkers of effect are useful tools in risk estimation. We investigated the frequency of MN in exfoliated cells from the oral mucosa in 25-30 volunteers lifetime exposed to approximately 400 {mu}g/L of arsenic in their drinking water. A group of individuals with similar composition with respect to sex, age, and socioeconomic status, but with As levels in the drinking water between 29-32 {mu}g/L, was used as controls. Exposure was assessed by questionnaires and by determining the levels of arsenic in urine and water samples. Oral mucosa cells were collected scraping the mucosa with a premoistened wooden spatula and smeared on microscope slides. Feulgen stained samples were scored blind on slides. The frequency of MN in oral mucosa cells was 0.05% in controls and 0.25% in exposed individuals. Exposed males showed higher frequencies of MN than exposed females. Smoking habits did not account for the observed differences. These results demonstrate that buccal mucosa cells are a target tissue in inorganic arsenic exposure via drinking water. Several studies have also reported elevated frequencies of MN in oral mucosa cells from individuals exposed to substances or factors associated with increased cancer risk, which makes this non-invasive technique appropriate and sensitive to monitor human exposure to carcinogens such as inorganic arsenic.

  19. Self-assembly of microscopic chiplets at a liquid–liquid–solid interface forming a flexible segmented monocrystalline solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Knuesel, Robert J.; Jacobs, Heiko O.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for self-assembling and electrically connecting small (20–60 micrometer) semiconductor chiplets at predetermined locations on flexible substrates with high speed (62500 chips/45 s), accuracy (0.9 micrometer, 0.14°), and yield (> 98%). The process takes place at the triple interface between silicone oil, water, and a penetrating solder-patterned substrate. The assembly is driven by a stepwise reduction of interfacial free energy where chips are first collected and preoriented at an oil-water interface before they assemble on a solder-patterned substrate that is pulled through the interface. Patterned transfer occurs in a progressing linear front as the liquid layers recede. The process eliminates the dependency on gravity and sedimentation of prior methods, thereby extending the minimal chip size to the sub-100 micrometer scale. It provides a new route for the field of printable electronics to enable the integration of microscopic high performance inorganic semiconductors on foreign substrates with the freedom to choose target location, pitch, and integration density. As an example we demonstrate a fault-tolerant segmented flexible monocrystalline silicon solar cell, reducing the amount of Si that is used when compared to conventional rigid cells. PMID:20080682

  20. Self-assembly of microscopic chiplets at a liquid-liquid-solid interface forming a flexible segmented monocrystalline solar cell.

    PubMed

    Knuesel, Robert J; Jacobs, Heiko O

    2010-01-19

    This paper introduces a method for self-assembling and electrically connecting small (20-60 micrometer) semiconductor chiplets at predetermined locations on flexible substrates with high speed (62500 chips/45 s), accuracy (0.9 micrometer, 0.14 degrees), and yield (> 98%). The process takes place at the triple interface between silicone oil, water, and a penetrating solder-patterned substrate. The assembly is driven by a stepwise reduction of interfacial free energy where chips are first collected and preoriented at an oil-water interface before they assemble on a solder-patterned substrate that is pulled through the interface. Patterned transfer occurs in a progressing linear front as the liquid layers recede. The process eliminates the dependency on gravity and sedimentation of prior methods, thereby extending the minimal chip size to the sub-100 micrometer scale. It provides a new route for the field of printable electronics to enable the integration of microscopic high performance inorganic semiconductors on foreign substrates with the freedom to choose target location, pitch, and integration density. As an example we demonstrate a fault-tolerant segmented flexible monocrystalline silicon solar cell, reducing the amount of Si that is used when compared to conventional rigid cells. PMID:20080682

  1. A macroscopic model of proton transport through the membrane-ionomer interface of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Milan; Edwards, Brian J; Paddison, Stephen J

    2013-02-14

    The membrane-ionomer interface is the critical interlink of the electrodes and catalyst to the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM); together forming the membrane electrode assembly in current state-of-the-art PEM fuel cells. In this paper, proton conduction through the interface is investigated to understand its effect on the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The water containing domains at this interface were modeled as cylindrical pores/channels with the anionic groups (i.e., -SO(3)(-)) assumed to be fixed on the pore wall. The interactions of each species with all other species and an applied external field were examined. Molecular-based interaction potential energies were computed in a small test element of the pore and were scaled up in terms of macroscopic variables. Evolution equations of the density and momentum of the species (water molecules and hydronium ions) were derived within a framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The resulting evolution equations for the species were solved analytically using an order-of-magnitude analysis to obtain an expression for the proton conductivity. Results show that the conductivity increases with increasing water content and pore radius, and strongly depends on the separation distance between the sulfonate groups and their distribution on the pore wall. It was also determined that the conductivity of two similar pores of different radii in series is limited by the pore with the smaller radius.

  2. Lithium cell tests at Langley Research Center. [for the long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bene, J.

    1977-01-01

    The long duration exposure facility mission places temperature requirements of from -30 F to +150 F on the batteries to be used. A hermetically sealed lithium sulfur dioxide cell was tested to predict what the temperature of the battery would be over a given spectrum of temperatures of operation. Near the end of cell discharge, as the voltage started collapsing, a very high heat output rise due to chemical reaction took place. However, if the cells were thermally insulated, they vented, ignited, and burned if an attempt was made to discharge them all the way. The cells do not go into reversal. It was determined that the root of the problem was probably the chemical reaction between the lithium and the acetonitrite solvent. A redesigned cell is discussed as well as some alternates.

  3. Ageing and the Regulation of Cell Activities during Exposure to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Caleb E.; Foster, Jeffrey R.; Mirsky, Alfred E.

    1969-01-01

    The inability to maintain body temperature and a selective pattern of changes in the regulation of cell activities were revealed by briefly exposing ageing C57B1/6J male mice to cold (10°C). The induction of liver tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) during exposure to cold (a gene-dependent process) was markedly delayed in senescent mice (26 months old) as compared with younger mice (3–16 months old); after the delay, the rate of increase of TAT was similar to that prevailing in younger mice. Direct challenge of the liver with injections of corticosterone or insulin elicited the induction of TAT on an identical time course in young and senescent mice. These experiments provide an example of an age change in a gene-dependent cell process (the delayed induction of TAT in senescent mice during exposure to cold) which is not due to a change in the potential of the genome for responding when exogenous stimulae are supplied (injection of hormones). In contrast to the age-related change in liver cell activities, no significant changes were found in the secretion of corticosterone during exposure to cold. Although the seat of these selective age-related changes in the regulation of cell activities remains unclear, it is argued that generalized damage to the genome of cells throughout the body is not involved. The results of this and other studies showing the selective effect of age on cell activities are considered in terms of the concept that many cellular age changes represent the response of cells to primary age-related changes in humoral factors in the internal environment of the body. PMID:4391050

  4. Transient serum exposure regimes to support dual differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    France, L A; Scotchford, C A; Grant, D M; Rashidi, H; Popov, A A; Sottile, V

    2014-08-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can generate both osteoblasts and chondrocytes, represent an ideal resource for orthopaedic repair using tissue-engineering approaches. One major difficulty for the development of osteochondral constructs using undifferentiated MSCs is that serum is typically used in culture protocols to promote differentiation of the osteogenic component, whereas existing chondrogenic differentiation protocols rely on the use of serum-free conditions. In order to define conditions which could be compatible with both chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation in a single bioreactor, we have analysed the efficiency of new biphasic differentiation regimes based on transient serum exposure followed by serum-free treatment. MSC differentiation was assessed either in serum-free medium or with a range of transient exposure to serum, and compared to continuous serum-containing treatment. Although osteogenic differentation was not supported in the complete absence of serum, marker expression and extensive mineralization analyses established that 5 days of transient exposure triggered a level of differentiation comparable to that observed when serum was present throughout. This initial phase of serum exposure was further shown to support the successful chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, comparable to controls maintained in serum-free conditions throughout. This study indicates that a culture based on temporal serum exposure followed by serum-free treatment is compatible with both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. These results will allow the development of novel strategies for osteochondral tissue engineering approaches using MSCs for regenerative medicine. PMID:23161724

  5. Risk of renal cell carcinoma following exposure to metalworking fluids among autoworkers

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Deepika; Liu, Sa; Hammond, S. Katharine; LaValley, Michael P.; Weiner, Daniel E.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Applebaum, Katie M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Metalworking fluids (MWF), used to cool and lubricate metal in occupational settings, are linked to several cancers but data on kidney cancer are limited. We examine how MWF influence the rate of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a large prospective study. Methods A cohort of Michigan autoworkers consisting of 33,421 individuals was followed 1985 through 2009. The cohort was linked to the Michigan Cancer Registry to identify new cases of RCC. We analyzed RCC in relation to cumulative exposure to each specific type of MWF (straight, soluble and synthetic) and all three types pooled into a single MWF variable, with a 15-year lag. Cox Proportional Hazards Regression with splines were used to estimate Hazard Ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), controlling for age, gender, race, calendar year, year hired, time since hire, plant, and other MWF types. Results There were 135 incident cases. A linear increase in the log-HR was observed for RCC with increasing cumulative exposure to each MWF type and total MWF exposure. At the mean of total MWF exposure (18.80 mg/m3-yr), the estimated HR was 1.11 (95% CI 1.04, 1.19). Conclusions Our results provide evidence for a dose-dependent association between MWF exposure and RCC. The influence of components of both oil- and water-based MWF needs further examination. PMID:27484955

  6. Glycoconjugates Effects: do Gender and Ethnicity Influence Exposure of Pathogen by Peripheral Mononuclear Cells ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiani, Mohamed; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group demonstrate different pathological effects. B. cereus is a spore-forming, gram positive bacterium responsible for most foodborne illnesses. It was shown that susceptibility to infection and response to vaccines or treatments can be attributed to specific immunogenetic factors including gender and ethnicity. Glycoconjugate polymers (GCs) are potentially important in pharmaceutical and biomedical research. Our group has shown that GCs activate murine macrophages and promote killing of Bacillus cereus spores during phagocytosis. We hypothesized that the GCs effects are independent from gender and race. The goal of the present study was two-folds: A) determine whether GCs influence on human PMNC exposure of B. cereus spores and B) analyze whether gender and ethnicity influence of the effect of GCs. GCs were studied during exposure and post-exposure conditions. Phagocytosis was performed during exposure of PMNC to Bacillus spores. Post-exposure analysis involved cytotoxicity, cell viability and activation, and colonies forming unit. GC1 and GC3 enhance Bacillus spore killing. GC1 proved more effective than GC3 in spore killing while activating PMNC. Results demonstrate GCs effect were independent from ethnicity or gender. Findings of this research demonstrated that GC can be used as ligands to stimulate PMNC and kill B. cereus spores.

  7. Sulfur gradient-driven Se diffusion at the CdS/CuIn(S,Se){sub 2} solar cell interface

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Morkel, M.; Baer, M.; Pookpanratana, S.; Heske, C.; Niesen, T. P.; Karg, F.; Ramanathan, K.; Contreras, M. A.; Noufi, R.; Umbach, E.

    2010-05-03

    The diffusion behavior of Se at the CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin film solar cell interface was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy. Buffer/absorber structures with S/Se ratios between zero and three at the initial Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} surface were analyzed. Samples from a high-efficiency laboratory process (NREL) as well as from an industrial large-area process (AVANCIS) were investigated. We find selenium diffusion into the CdS buffer layer, the magnitude of which strongly depends on the S content at the absorber surface. The associated modification of the heterojunction partners has significant impact on the electronic structure at the interface.

  8. Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelids and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, G.; Diffey, B.; Larko, O.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To compare the distribution of eyelid basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with the relative ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure to different sites on the eyelids.
METHODS—The location of BCC on the eyelids was allocated to one of seven regions. The UVR exposure was recorded with a polymer film attached to the eyelids at seven sites in a manikin and in human subjects.
RESULTS—Localisation of the 329 tumours was mainly on the lower eyelids (225 tumours), and the medial canthal regions (87 tumours). There was no association between UVR doses at the seven sites of the eyelids and the location of BCCs. The UVR exposure was similar on the upper and lower eyelids, while the number of tumours on the lower eyelids outnumbered the upper lids by a factor of 13 (17 upper, 225 lower)
CONCLUSION—UVR exposure only partially explains the aetiology of periorbital BCC.

 Keywords: polysulphone film; basal cell carcinoma; ultraviolet radiation; eyelid PMID:9930273

  9. Timing of Galectin-1 Exposure Differentially Modulates Nipah Virus Entry and Syncytium Formation in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Omai B.; Yun, Tatyana; Pernet, Olivier; Aguilar, Hector C.; Park, Arnold; Bowden, Thomas A.; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nipah virus (NiV) is a deadly emerging enveloped paramyxovirus that primarily targets human endothelial cells. Endothelial cells express the innate immune effector galectin-1 that we have previously shown can bind to specific N-glycans on the NiV envelope fusion glycoprotein (F). NiV-F mediates fusion of infected endothelial cells into syncytia, resulting in endothelial disruption and hemorrhage. Galectin-1 is an endogenous carbohydrate-binding protein that binds to specific glycans on NiV-F to reduce endothelial cell fusion, an effect that may reduce pathophysiologic sequelae of NiV infection. However, galectins play multiple roles in regulating host-pathogen interactions; for example, galectins can promote attachment of HIV to T cells and macrophages and attachment of HSV-1 to keratinocytes but can also inhibit influenza entry into airway epithelial cells. Using live Nipah virus, in the present study, we demonstrate that galectin-1 can enhance NiV attachment to and infection of primary human endothelial cells by bridging glycans on the viral envelope to host cell glycoproteins. In order to exhibit an enhancing effect, galectin-1 must be present during the initial phase of virus attachment; in contrast, addition of galectin-1 postinfection results in reduced production of progeny virus and syncytium formation. Thus, galectin-1 can have dual and opposing effects on NiV infection of human endothelial cells. While various roles for galectin family members in microbial-host interactions have been described, we report opposing effects of the same galectin family member on a specific virus, with the timing of exposure during the viral life cycle determining the outcome. IMPORTANCE Nipah virus is an emerging pathogen that targets endothelial cells lining blood vessels; the high mortality rate (up to 70%) in Nipah virus infections results from destruction of these cells and resulting catastrophic hemorrhage. Host factors that promote or prevent Nipah virus

  10. The evaluation of p,p'-DDT exposure on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoting; Chen, Meilan; Song, Li; Li, Hanqing; Li, Zhuoyu

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have found a positive association between the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma and DDT exposure. These studies mainly focus on the effect of DDT exposure on cell proliferation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) promotion. However, the influence of DDT on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma remains to be unclear. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of p,p'-DDT on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. The data showed that p,p'-DDT, exposing HepG2 cells for 6 days, decreased cell-cell adhesion and elevated cell-matrix adhesion. Strikingly, p,p'-DDT increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and this was accompanied by the activation of JAK/STAT3 pathway. Moreover, ROS inhibitor supplement reversed these effects significantly. However, the addition of ER inhibitor, ICI, had no effect on the p,p'-DDT-induced effects. p,p'-DDT altered the mRNA levels of related adhesion molecules, including inhibition of E-cadherin and promotion of N-cadherin along with CD29. Interestingly, the p,p'-DDT-altered adhesion molecules could be reversed with JAK inhibitor or STAT3 inhibitor. Likewise, p,p'-DDT stimulated the JAK/STAT3 pathway in nude mice, as well as altered the mRNA levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and CD29. Taken together, these results indicate that p,p'-DDT profoundly promotes the adhesion process by decreasing cell-cell adhesion and inducing cell-matrix adhesion via the ROS-mediated JAK/STAT3 pathway. All these events account for the carcinogenic potential of p,p'-DDT in liver.

  11. INCREASES IN CYTOSOLIC CALCIUM ION LEVELS IN HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS IN RESPONSE TO BUTYLTIN EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Rhonda; Ghazi, Sabah O.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether exposures to butyltins (BTs), tributylin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) were able to alter cytosolic calcium levels in human natural killer (NK) cells. Additionally, the effects of cytosolic calcium ion increases on the activation state of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in NK cells were also investigated. NK cells are an intital immune defense against the development of tumors or viral infections. TBT and DBT are widespread environmental contaminants, due to their various industrial applications. Both TBT and DBT have been shown to decrease the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells (lytic function). TBT has also been shown to activate MAPKs in NK cells. The results of this study indicated that TBT increased cytosolic calcium levels by as much as 100% after a 60 min exposure to 500 nM TBT while DBT increased cytosolic calcium levels to a much smaller extent (and required higher concentrations). The results also indicated that increases in cytosolic calcium could activate MAPKs but only for a short period of time (5 min), while previous studies showed that activation of MAPKs by TBT last for at least 6 hours. Thus, it appears that TBT stimulated increases in cytosolic calcium may contribute to, but are not fully responsible for, TBT-induced activation of MAPKs. PMID:19365649

  12. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals cell type-specific transcriptional signatures at the maternal–foetal interface during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew C.; Mould, Arne W.; Bikoff, Elizabeth K.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Growth and survival of the mammalian embryo within the uterine environment depends on the placenta, a highly complex vascularized organ comprised of both maternal and foetal tissues. Recent experiments demonstrate that the zinc finger transcriptional repressor Prdm1/Blimp1 is essential for specification of spiral artery trophoblast giant cells (SpA-TGCs) that invade and remodel maternal blood vessels. To learn more about functional contributions made by Blimp1+ cell lineages here we perform the first single-cell RNA-seq analysis of the placenta. Cell types of both foetal and maternal origin are profiled. Comparisons with microarray datasets from mutant placenta and in vitro differentiated trophoblast stem cells allow us to identify Blimp1-dependent transcripts enriched in SpA-TGCs. Our experiments provide new insights into the functionally distinct cell types present at the maternal–foetal interface and advance our knowledge of dynamic gene expression patterns controlling placental morphogenesis and vascular mimicry. PMID:27108815

  13. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Effect of space relevant radiation exposure on differentiation and mineralization of murine osteoprogenitor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Patrick; Hu, Yueyuan; Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Guenther

    Extended exposure to altered gravity conditions like during long-term space flight results in significant bone loss. Exposure to ionizing radiation for cancer therapy causes bone damage and may increase the risk of fractures. Similarly, besides altered gravity conditions, astronauts on exploratory missions beyond low-Earth orbit will be exposed to high-energy heavy ions in addition to proton and photon radiation, although for prolonged periods and at lower doses and dose rates compared with therapy. Space conditions may place astronauts at a greater risk for mission-critical fractures. Until now, little is known about the effects of space radiation on the skeletal system especially on osteoprogenitor cells. Accelerator facilities are used to simulate parts of the radiation environment in space. Heavy ion accelerators therefore could be used to assess radiation risks for astronauts who will be exposed to higher radiation doses e.g. on a Mars mission. The aim of the present study was to determine the biological effects of spaceflight-relevant radiation exposure on the cellular level using murine osteoprogenitor cell lines compared to nonirradiated controls. To gain a deeper understanding of bone cell differenti-ation and mineralization after exposure to heavy ions, we examined gene expression modulation of bone specific transcription factors, osteoblast specific marker genes as well as genes function as coupling factors that link bone resorption to bone formation. We investigated the transcrip-tional modulation of type I collagen (Col I), osteocalcin (Ocn), Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the bone specific transcription factor Runx2 (Cbfa1). To gain deeper insight into potential cellular mechanisms involved in cellular response after ex-posure to heavy ions, we investigated gene expression modulations after exposure to energetic carbon ions (35 MeV/u, 73.2 keV/µm), iron ions (1000 MeV/u, 150 keV/µm) and lead ions (29 MeV/u, 9600

  15. Can prolonged exposure to low VPD disturb the ABA signalling in stomatal guard cells?

    PubMed Central

    Aliniaeifard, Sasan; van Meeteren, Uulke

    2013-01-01

    The response of stomata to many environmental factors is well documented. Multiple signalling pathways for abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure have been proposed over the last decades. However, it seems that exposure of a leaf for a long time (several days) to some environmental conditions generates a sort of memory in the guard cells that results in the loss of suitable responses of the stomata to closing stimuli, such as desiccation and ABA. In this review paper we discuss changes in the normal pattern of signal transduction that could account for disruption of guard cell signalling after long-term exposure to some environmental conditions, with special emphasis on long-term low vapour pressure deficit (VPD). PMID:23956410

  16. Cytotoxicity of NO2 gas to cultured human and murine cells in an inverted monolayer exposure system.

    PubMed

    Tu, B; Wallin, A; Moldéus, P; Cotgreave, I A

    1995-01-19

    We report the development of an optimised exposure system for the exposure of inverted cell cultures to NO2, which presents several advantages over conventional, right-side-up exposure systems. Firstly, the cells may be directly exposed to NO2 in the gas phase for up to 1 h, without the interposition of an aqueous layer. Secondly, the chamber system allows simple and precise control of the gas concentration during the exposure. Finally, the system allows the simultaneous exposure of large numbers of cells under sterile conditions, facilitating further culture of the cells after the exposure period. We report the application of this system to a comparative study of the toxicity of NO2 in three different cell types involved in the circuit of the inflammatory response, the IC-21 murine macrophage line, the A-549 human pulmonary type II-like epithelial cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. As little as 2 ppm NO2 for 20 min reduced colony-forming efficiency of HUVE cells and A-549 cells and A-549 cells to 35% and 78% of their air controls, respectively. Exposure to 5 ppm NO2 for 1 h increased lactate dehydrogenase release of HUVE cells, IC-21 macrophages and A-549 cells from 7.9% to 21.6%, 5.7% to 10.9% and 2.0% to 3.4%, respectively, whilst 10 ppm NO2 for 1 h lowered cellular glutathione in HUVE cells, IC-21 cells and A-549 cells from 35.2 nmol/mg to 23.3 nmol/mg, from 45.0 nmol/mg to 31.0 nmol/mg and from 86.4 nmol/mg to 69.2 nmol/mg, respectively. Of the cell types tested it was shown that HUVE cells and IC-21 cells were equally sensitive to the toxicity of NO2, whilst A-549 cells displayed considerable resistance, perhaps due to the considerably higher levels of glutathione in this cell line. Further, a comparison of the sensitivity of HUVE cells to NO2, using several modes of exposure (inverted and right-side-up (either rocked or static)) and the assay of lactate dehydrogenase and [3H]deoxyglucose release, revealed that the present inverted exposure

  17. Stress proteins and glial cell functions during chronic aluminium exposures: protective role of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Sood, Pooja Khanna; Nahar, Uma; Nehru, Bimla

    2012-03-01

    Involved in the ongoing debate is the speculation that aluminium is somehow toxic for neurons. Glial cells cope up to protect neurons from this toxic insult by maintaining the glutathione homeostasis. Of late newer and newer roles of glial cells have been depicted. The present work looks into the other regulatory mechanisms that show the glial cells response to pro-oxidant effects of aluminium exposure. In the present investigation we have evaluated the inflammatory responses of the glial cells as well as HSP70-induction during aluminium exposure. Further, the protective role of curcumin is also evaluated. Aluminium was administered by oral gavage at a dose level of 100 mg/kg b.wt/day for a period of 8 weeks. Curcumin was administered i.p. at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.wt./day on alternate days. Enhanced gene and protein expression of HSP70 in the glial fractions of the aluminium exposed animals as compared to the corresponding neuronal population. Aluminium exposure resulted in a significant increase in the NF-κB and TNF-α expression suggesting inflammatory responses. In the conjunctive treatment group of aluminium and curcumin exposure marked reduction in the gene and protein expression of NF-κB and TNF-α was observed. This was further reflected in histopathological studies showing no evidence of inflammation in conjunctive group as compared to aluminium treatment. From the present study, it can be concluded that curcumin has a potential anti-inflammatory action and can be exploited in other toxicological conditions also.

  18. Exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to whole cigarette smoke: assessment of cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jeremy; Kluss, Bruno; Richter, Audrey; Massey, Eian

    2005-06-01

    Cigarette smoke is composed of approximately 5% particulate phase and 95% vapour phase by weight. However, routine in vitro toxicological testing of smoke normally only measures the activity of the particulate phase. This study describes a new system for exposing cells at an air-liquid interface to serial dilutions of gaseous smoke. Confluent monolayers of NCI-H292 human lung epithelial cells on semipermeable membranes were placed in a purpose-designed Perspex chamber at an air-liquid interface. The cells were exposed to dilute whole mainstream cigarette smoke for 30 minutes, followed by a 20-hour recovery period. Firstly, high and low delivery cigarettes were compared, and cytotoxicity was determined by using the neutral red uptake assay. Clear differential cytotoxic responses were observed with the two cigarette types, which correlated positively with the concentrations of components in smoke, and particularly compounds in the vapour phase, such as aldehydes. Secondly, low doses of smoke were found to up-regulate mRNA levels of the secreted mucin, MUC5AC, and to stimulate the production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and matrix-metalloprotease-1, but had no effect on growth-related oncogene alpha. This system will facilitate further investigations into the toxicological mechanisms of cigarette smoke components, and may be useful for studying other gaseous mixtures or aerosols.

  19. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology at the interface of cell biology, materials science and medicine Nanotechnology at the interface of cell biology, materials science and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas; Miles, Mervyn

    2008-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) and related scanning probe microscopes have become resourceful tools to study cells, supramolecular assemblies and single biomolecules, because they allow investigations of such structures in native environments. Quantitative information has been gathered about the surface structure of membrane proteins to lateral and vertical resolutions of 0.5 nm and 0.1 nm, respectively, about the forces that keep protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid assemblies together as well as single proteins in their native conformation, and about the nanomechanical properties of cells in health and disease. Such progress has been achieved mainly because of constant development of AFM instrumentation and sample preparation methods. This special issue of Nanotechnology presents papers from leading laboratories in the field of nanobiology, covering a wide range of topics in the form of original and novel scientific contributions. It addresses achievements in instrumentation, sample preparation, automation and in biological applications. These papers document the creativity and persistence of researchers pursuing the goal to unravel the structure and dynamics of cells, supramolecuar structures and single biomolecules at work. Improved cantilever sensors, novel optical probes, and quantitative data on supports for electrochemical experiments open new avenues for characterizing biological nanomachines down to the single molecule. Comparative measurements of healthy and metastatic cells promise new methods for early detection of tumors, and possible assessments of drug efficacy. High-speed AFMs document possibilities to monitor crystal growth and to observe large structures at video rate. A wealth of information on amyloid-type fibers as well as on membrane proteins has been gathered by single molecule force spectroscopy—a technology now being automated for large-scale data collection. With the progress of basic research and a strong industry supporting

  20. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12-13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6-11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  1. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell D.; Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12–13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6–11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  2. Interaction of dental pulp stem cells with Biodentine and MTA after exposure to different environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrafioti, Anastasia; Taraslia, Vasiliki; Chrepa, Vanessa; Lymperi, Stefania; Panopoulos, Panos; Anastasiadou, Ema; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxic effects of Biodentine and MTA on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and to assess cell viability and adherence after material exposure to an acidic environment. Material and Methods: DPSCs were cultured either alone or in contact with either: Biodentine; MTA set for 1 hour; or MTA set for 24 hours. After 4 and 7 days, cell viability was measured using the MTT assay. Biodentine and MTA were also prepared and packed into standardized bovine dentin disks and divided into three groups according to the storage media (n=6/group): freshly mixed materials without storage medium (Group A); materials stored in saline (Group B); materials stored in citric acid buffered at pH 5.4 (Group C). After 24 hours, DPSCs were introduced in the wells and cell adherence, viability, and cellular morphology were observed via confocal microscopy after three days of culture. Cell viability was analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance test with Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). Results: Biodentine expressed significantly higher cell viability compared with all other groups after 4 days, with no differences after 7 days. Notably, cell viability was significantly greater in 24-hour set MTA compared with 1-hour set MTA and control groups after 7 days. Material exposure to an acidic environment showed an increase in cell adherence and viability in both groups. Conclusions: Biodentine induced a significantly accelerated cell proliferation compared with MTA. Setting of these materials in the presence of citric acid enhanced DPSC viability and adherence.

  3. Radiation Exposure Decreases the Quantity and Quality of Cardiac Stem Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lan; Urata, Yoshishige; Yan, Chen; Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Tou, Fang-Fang; Xie, Yucai; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure may increase cardiovascular disease risks; however, the precise molecular/cellular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that radiation impairs cardiac stem cells (CSCs), thereby contributing to future cardiovascular disease risks. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 3 Gy γ-rays, and heart tissues were collected 24 hours later for further experiments. Although c-kit-positive cells were rarely found, radiation exposure significantly induced apoptosis and DNA damage in the cells of the heart. The ex vivo expansion of CSCs from freshly harvested atrial tissues showed a significantly lower production of CSCs in irradiated mice compared with healthy mice. The proliferative activity of CSCs evaluated by Ki-67 expression was not significantly different between the groups. However, compared to the healthy control, CSCs expanded from irradiated mice showed significantly lower telomerase activity, more 53BP1 foci in the nuclei, lower expression of c-kit and higher expression of CD90. Furthermore, CSCs expanded from irradiated mice had significantly poorer potency in the production of insulin-like growth factor-1. Our data suggest that radiation exposure significantly decreases the quantity and quality of CSCs, which may serve as sensitive bio-parameters for predicting future cardiovascular disease risks. PMID:27195709

  4. Exposure to Brefeldin A promotes initiation of meiosis in murine female germ cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-Jun; Chen, Bo; Feng, Xin-Lei; Ma, Hua-Gang; Sun, Li-Lan; Feng, Yan-Min; Liang, Gui-Jin; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Li, Lan; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, ontogenesis starts from a fusion of spermatozoon and oocyte, which are produced by reductive nuclear division of a diploid germ cell in a specialised but complex biological process known as meiosis. However, little is known about the mechanism of meiotic initiation in germ cells, although many factors may be responsible for meiosis both in male and female gonads. In this study, 11.5 days post coitum (dpc) female fetal mouse genital ridges were cultured in vitro with exposure to Brefeldin A (BFA) for 6h, and the changes in meiosis were detected. Synaptonemal-complex analysis implied that BFA played a positive role in meiosis initiation and this hypothesis was confirmed by quantitative PCR of meiosis-specific genes: stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8) and deleted in a zoospermia-like (DAZL). At the same time, mRNA expression of retinoic acid synthetase (Raldh2) and retinoic acid (RA) receptors increased in female gonads with in vitro exposure to BFA. Transplanting genital ridges treated with BFA into the kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice demonstrated that the development capacity of female germ cells was normal, while formation of primordial follicles was seen to be a result of accelerated meiosis after exposure to BFA. In conclusion, the study indicated that BFA stimulated meiosis initiation partly by RA signalling and then promoted the development of follicles.

  5. Exposure to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid alters glucose metabolism in immature rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Alves, M G; Neuhaus-Oliveira, A; Moreira, P I; Socorro, S; Oliveira, P F

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 2,4-D, an herbicide used worldwide also known as endocrine disruptor, in Sertoli cell (SC) metabolism. Immature rat SCs were maintained 50h under basal conditions or exposed to 2,4-D (100nM, 10μM and 1mM). SCs exposed to 10μM and 1mM of 2,4-D presented lower intracellular glucose and lactate content. Exposure to 10μM of 2,4-D induced a significant decrease in glucose transporter-3 mRNA levels and phosphofructokinase-1 mRNA levels decreased in cells exposed to 100nM and 10μM of 2,4-D. Exposure to 100nM and 10μM also induced a decrease in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) mRNA levels while the LDH protein levels were only decreased in cells exposed to 1mM of 2,4-D. Exposure to 2,4-D altered glucose uptake and metabolization in SCs, as well as lactate metabolism and export that may result in impaired spermatogenesis.

  6. Engineering interface and surface of noble metal nanoparticle nanotubes toward enhanced catalytic activity for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chun-Hua; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-07-16

    In order for fuel cells to have commercial viability as alternative fuel sources, researchers need to develop highly active and robust fuel cell electrocatalysts. In recent years, the focus has been on the design and synthesis of novel catalytic materials with controlled interface and surface structures. Another goal is to uncover potential catalytic activity and selectivity, as well as understand their fundamental catalytic mechanisms. Scientists have achieved great progress in the experimental and theoretical investigation due to the urgent demand for broad commercialization of fuel cells in automotive applications. However, there are still three main problems: cost, performance, and stability. To meet these targets, the catalyst needs to have multisynergic functions. In addition, the composition and structure changes of the catalysts during the reactions still need to be explored. Activity in catalytic nanomaterials is generally controlled by the size, shape, composition, and interface and surface engineering. As such, one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes are of special interest. However, these structures tend to lose the nanoparticle morphology and inhibit the use of catalysts in both fuel cell anodes and cathodes. In 2003, Rubinstein and co-workers proposed the idea of nanoparticle nanotubes (NNs), which combine the geometry of nanotubes and the morphology of nanoparticles. This concept gives both the high surface-to-volume ratio and the size effect, which are both appealing in electrocatalyst design. In this Account, we describe our developments in the construction of highly active NNs with unique surface and heterogeneous interface structures. We try to clarify enhanced activity and stability in catalytic systems by taking into account the activity impact factors. We briefly introduce material structural effects on the electrocatalytic reactivity including metal oxide/metal and metal/metal interfaces, dealloyed pure Pt, and mixed Pt

  7. Engineering interface and surface of noble metal nanoparticle nanotubes toward enhanced catalytic activity for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chun-Hua; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-07-16

    In order for fuel cells to have commercial viability as alternative fuel sources, researchers need to develop highly active and robust fuel cell electrocatalysts. In recent years, the focus has been on the design and synthesis of novel catalytic materials with controlled interface and surface structures. Another goal is to uncover potential catalytic activity and selectivity, as well as understand their fundamental catalytic mechanisms. Scientists have achieved great progress in the experimental and theoretical investigation due to the urgent demand for broad commercialization of fuel cells in automotive applications. However, there are still three main problems: cost, performance, and stability. To meet these targets, the catalyst needs to have multisynergic functions. In addition, the composition and structure changes of the catalysts during the reactions still need to be explored. Activity in catalytic nanomaterials is generally controlled by the size, shape, composition, and interface and surface engineering. As such, one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes are of special interest. However, these structures tend to lose the nanoparticle morphology and inhibit the use of catalysts in both fuel cell anodes and cathodes. In 2003, Rubinstein and co-workers proposed the idea of nanoparticle nanotubes (NNs), which combine the geometry of nanotubes and the morphology of nanoparticles. This concept gives both the high surface-to-volume ratio and the size effect, which are both appealing in electrocatalyst design. In this Account, we describe our developments in the construction of highly active NNs with unique surface and heterogeneous interface structures. We try to clarify enhanced activity and stability in catalytic systems by taking into account the activity impact factors. We briefly introduce material structural effects on the electrocatalytic reactivity including metal oxide/metal and metal/metal interfaces, dealloyed pure Pt, and mixed Pt

  8. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure.

    PubMed

    Camarca, Alessandra; Gianfrani, Carmen; Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Valentino, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  9. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  10. Damage and Recovery of Hair Cells in Fish Canal (But Not Superficial) Neuromasts after Gentamicin Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Jiakun; Yan, Hong Young; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrating the presence of two types of sensory hair cells in the ear of a telcost fish (Astronotus ocellatus, the oscar) indicates that hair cell heterogeneity may exist not only in amniotic vertebrates but also in anamniotes. Here we report that a similar heterogeneity between hair cell types may also occur in the other mechanosensory organ of the oscar, the lateral line. We exposed oscars to the aminoglycoside (ototoxic) antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and found damaged sensory hair cells in one class of the lateral line receptors, the canal neuromasts, but not in the other class, the superficial neuromasts. This effect was not due to the canal environment. Moreover, new ciliary bundles on hair cells of the canal neuromasts were found after, and during, gentamicin exposure. The pattern of hair cell destruction and recovery in canal neuromasts is similar to that of type 1-like hair cells found in the striolar region of the utricle and lagena of the oscar after gentamicin treatment. These results suggest that the hair cells in the canal and superficial neuromasts may be similar to type 1-like and type 2 hair cells, respectively, in the fish ear.

  11. [Effects of BaP exposure on ultrastructures of hepatic cells of Boleophthalmus pectinirostris].

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Zheng, Weiyun; Ouyang, Gaoliang; Hong, Wanshu

    2003-10-01

    The changes of ultrastructures of hepatic cells of Boleophthalmus pectinirostris were investigated after the fish were exposed under benzo(a) pyrene in different concentrations under experimental condition. The results showed that the organelles in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostris were damaged to different extents after the fish was exposed under lower concentration of BaP (0.5 mg.L-1) for up to 7 d, in which, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were the chief organelles affected by BaP exposure. While the fish was exposed under higher concentration of BaP (5 mg.L-1) for 2 h, almost all of the organelles including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostr were affected by BaP exposure. The structures of liver cells were seriously damaged. It was demonstrated that BaP could produce multiorganalle lesions in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostris, and the severity extent of such lesions was dependent on the concentration level of BaP.

  12. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for phosphatidylserine exposure on apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Jean-Philippe; Hehl, Michaela; Millward, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    A simple, "mix-and-measure" microplate assay for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of apoptotic cells is described. The assay exploits the fact that annexin V, a protein with high affinity and specificity for PtdSer, forms trimers and higher order oligomers on binding to membranes containing PtdSer. The transition from soluble monomer to cell-bound oligomer is detected using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer from europium chelate-labeled annexin V to Cy5-labeled annexin V. PtdSer detection is achieved by a single addition of a reagent mix containing labeled annexins and calcium ions directly to cell cultures in a 96-well plate, followed by a brief incubation before fluorescence measurement. The assay can be used to quantify PtdSer exposure on both suspension cells and adherent cells in situ. This method is simpler and faster than existing annexin V binding assays based on flow cytometry or microscopy, and it yields precise data with Z' values of 0.6-0.7. PMID:18835236

  13. Perinatal exposure to bisphenol a increases adult mammary gland progesterone response and cell number.

    PubMed

    Ayyanan, Ayyakkannu; Laribi, Ouahiba; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Schrick, Christina; Gutierrez, Maria; Tanos, Tamara; Lefebvre, Gregory; Rougemont, Jacques; Yalcin-Ozuysal, Ozden; Brisken, Cathrin

    2011-11-01

    Bisphenol A [BPA, 2,2,-bis (hydroxyphenyl) propane] is one of the highest-volume chemicals produced worldwide. It is detected in body fluids of more than 90% of the human population. Originally synthesized as an estrogenic compound, it is currently utilized to manufacture food and beverage containers resulting in uptake with food and drinks. There is concern that exposure to low doses of BPA, defined as less than or equal to 5 mg/kg body weight /d, may have developmental effects on various hormone-responsive organs including the mammary gland. Here, we asked whether perinatal exposure to a range of low doses of BPA is sufficient to alter mammary gland hormone response later on in life, with a possible impact on breast cancer risk. To mimic human exposure, we added BPA to the drinking water of C57/Bl6 breeding pairs. Analysis of the mammary glands of their daughters at puberty showed that estrogen-dependent transcriptional events were perturbed and the number of terminal end buds, estrogen-induced proliferative structures, was altered in a dose-dependent fashion. Importantly, adult females showed an increase in mammary epithelial cell numbers comparable to that seen in females exposed to diethylbestrol, a compound exposure to which was previously linked to increased breast cancer risk. Molecularly, the mRNAs encoding Wnt-4 and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand, two key mediators of hormone function implicated in control of mammary stem cell proliferation and carcinogenesis, showed increased induction by progesterone in the mammary tissue of exposed mice. Thus, perinatal exposure to environmentally relevant doses of BPA alters long-term hormone response that may increase the propensity to develop breast cancer.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Immune Cells Activation and Cytotoxicity upon Exposure Pathogen and Glycoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheb, Entsar; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) including macrophages are key players in the immune responses against pathogens. Any infection could be attenuated if PMNC would be activated and capable to kill pathogen on exposure. It was shown that glycoconjugates (GCs) play an important role in adhesion to, activation, and recognition of pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is a regulatory molecule released by immune cells against pathogens that include bacteria, protozoa, helminthes, and fungi. NO is a highly reactive and diffusible molecule that controls replication or intracellular killing of pathogens during infection and immune responses against infections caused by pathogens. Avirulent Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores were used as a model in our study. The purpose of this study was two-fold: A) to analyze PMNC activation through NO production and B) to determine the cytotoxicity effect based on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) upon exposure to pathogen exerted by GCs. The latter were used "prior to," "during," and "following" PMNC exposure to pathogen in order to modulate immune responses to spores during phagocytosis. Post-phagocytosis study involved the assessment of NO and LDH release by macrophages upon exposure to spores. Results have shown that untreated PMNC released low levels of NO. However, in the presence of GCs, PMNC were activated and produced high levels of NO under all experimental conditions. In addition, the results showed that GC1, GC3 are capable of increasing PMNC activity as evidenced by higher NO levels under the "prior," "during" and "following" to pathogen exposure conditions. On the other hand, GCs were capable of controlling cytotoxicity and decreased LDH levels during phagocytosis of spores. Our findings suggest that GCs stimulate NO production by activating PMNC and decrease cytotoxicity caused by pathogens on PMNC.

  15. Exposure to Phthalates Affects Calcium Handling and Intercellular Connectivity of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Posnack, Nikki Gillum; Idrees, Rabia; Ding, Hao; Jaimes III, Rafael; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Karabekian, Zaruhi; Laflamme, Michael A.; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2015-01-01

    Background The pervasive nature of plastics has raised concerns about the impact of continuous exposure to plastic additives on human health. Of particular concern is the use of phthalates in the production of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) products. Di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP) is a commonly used phthalate ester plasticizer that imparts flexibility and elasticity to PVC products. Recent epidemiological studies have reported correlations between urinary phthalate concentrations and cardiovascular disease, including an increased risk of high blood pressure and coronary risk. Yet, there is little direct evidence linking phthalate exposure to adverse effects in human cells, including cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results The effect of DEHP on calcium handling was examined using monolayers of gCAMP3 human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, which contain an endogenous calcium sensor. Cardiomyocytes were exposed to DEHP (5 – 50 μg/mL), and calcium transients were recorded using a Zeiss confocal imaging system. DEHP exposure (24 – 72 hr) had a negative chronotropic and inotropic effect on cardiomyocytes, increased the minimum threshold voltage required for external pacing, and modified connexin-43 expression. Application of Wy-14,643 (100 μM), an agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, did not replicate DEHP’s effects on calcium transient morphology or spontaneous beating rate. Conclusions Phthalates can affect the normal physiology of human cardiomyocytes, including DEHP elicited perturbations in cardiac calcium handling and intercellular connectivity. Our findings call for additional studies to clarify the extent by which phthalate exposure can alter cardiac function, particularly in vulnerable patient populations who are at risk for high phthalate exposure. PMID:25799571

  16. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z; Farias, Iria Luiza G; Rigo, Melânia L; Glanzner, Werner G; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D; Cadoná, Francine C; Cruz, Ivana B; Farias, Júlia G; Duarte, Marta M M F; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C; Rocha, João Batista T; Leal, Daniela B R

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended.

  17. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z.; Farias, Iria Luiza G.; Rigo, Melânia L.; Glanzner, Werner G.; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D.; Cadoná, Francine C.; Cruz, Ivana B.; Farias, Júlia G.; Duarte, Marta M. M. F.; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C.; Rocha, João Batista T.; Leal, Daniela B. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended. PMID:25505920

  18. Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Susceptibility to HSV-2 in Vaginal Cells Grown in Air-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung; Dizzell, Sara E; Leung, Vivian; Nazli, Aisha; Zahoor, Muhammad A; Fichorova, Raina N; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    The lower female reproductive tract (FRT) is comprised of the cervix and vagina, surfaces that are continuously exposed to a variety of commensal and pathogenic organisms. Sexually transmitted viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), have to traverse the mucosal epithelial lining of the FRT to establish infection. The majority of current culture systems that model the host-pathogen interactions in the mucosal epithelium have limitations in simulating physiological conditions as they employ a liquid-liquid interface (LLI), in which both apical and basolateral surfaces are submerged in growth medium. We designed the current study to simulate in vivo conditions by growing an immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line (Vk2/E6E7) in culture with an air-liquid interface (ALI) and examined the effects of female sex hormones on their growth, differentiation, and susceptibility to HSV-2 under these conditions, in comparison to LLI cultures. ALI conditions induced Vk2/E6E7 cells to grow into multi-layered cultures compared to the monolayers present in LLI conditions. Vk2 cells in ALI showed higher production of cytokeratin in the presence of estradiol (E2), compared to cells grown in progesterone (P4). Cells grown under ALI conditions were exposed to HSV-2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the highest infection and replication was observed in the presence of P4. Altogether, this study suggests that ALI cultures more closely simulate the in vivo conditions of the FRT compared to the conventional LLI cultures. Furthermore, under these conditions P4 was found to confer higher susceptibility to HSV-2 infection in vaginal cells. The vaginal ALI culture system offers a better alternative to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27589787

  19. Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Susceptibility to HSV-2 in Vaginal Cells Grown in Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung; Dizzell, Sara E.; Leung, Vivian; Nazli, Aisha; Zahoor, Muhammad A.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    The lower female reproductive tract (FRT) is comprised of the cervix and vagina, surfaces that are continuously exposed to a variety of commensal and pathogenic organisms. Sexually transmitted viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), have to traverse the mucosal epithelial lining of the FRT to establish infection. The majority of current culture systems that model the host-pathogen interactions in the mucosal epithelium have limitations in simulating physiological conditions as they employ a liquid-liquid interface (LLI), in which both apical and basolateral surfaces are submerged in growth medium. We designed the current study to simulate in vivo conditions by growing an immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line (Vk2/E6E7) in culture with an air-liquid interface (ALI) and examined the effects of female sex hormones on their growth, differentiation, and susceptibility to HSV-2 under these conditions, in comparison to LLI cultures. ALI conditions induced Vk2/E6E7 cells to grow into multi-layered cultures compared to the monolayers present in LLI conditions. Vk2 cells in ALI showed higher production of cytokeratin in the presence of estradiol (E2), compared to cells grown in progesterone (P4). Cells grown under ALI conditions were exposed to HSV-2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the highest infection and replication was observed in the presence of P4. Altogether, this study suggests that ALI cultures more closely simulate the in vivo conditions of the FRT compared to the conventional LLI cultures. Furthermore, under these conditions P4 was found to confer higher susceptibility to HSV-2 infection in vaginal cells. The vaginal ALI culture system offers a better alternative to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27589787

  20. Interface investigation of the alcohol-/water-soluble conjugated polymer PFN as cathode interfacial layer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shu; Wang, Rui; Ying Mao, Hong; He, Zhicai; Wu, Hongbin; Chen, Wei; Cao, Yong

    2013-09-01

    In this work, in situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were used to investigate the working mechanism of an alcohol-/water-soluble conjugated polymer poly [(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode interfacial layer in organic solar cells from the view of interfacial energy level alignment. Fullerene (C60) was chosen as the model acceptor material in contact with PFN as well as two other cathode interfacial layers ZnO and TiO2 in the configuration of an inverted solar cell structure. Significant charge transfer between PFN modified ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode and C60 is observed due to the low work function of PFN. This results in the Fermi level of the substrate pinned very close to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of C60 as well as an additional electric field at the cathode/acceptor interface. Both of them facilitate the electron extraction from the acceptor C60 to the ITO cathode, as confirmed by the electrical measurements of the electron-only devices with PFN modification. The better electron extraction originated from the Fermi level pinning and the additional interface electric field are believed to contribute to the efficiency enhancement of the inverted organic solar cells employing PFN as cathode interfacial layer.

  1. Transport and Metabolism at Blood–Brain Interfaces and in Neural Cells: Relevance to Bilirubin-Induced Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gazzin, Silvia; Strazielle, Nathalie; Tiribelli, Claudio; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Bilirubin, the end-product of heme catabolism, circulates in non-pathological plasma mostly as a protein-bound species. When bilirubin concentration builds up, the free fraction of the molecule increases. Unbound bilirubin then diffuses across blood–brain interfaces (BBIs) into the brain, where it accumulates and exerts neurotoxic effects. In this classical view of bilirubin neurotoxicity, BBIs act merely as structural barriers impeding the penetration of the pigment-bound carrier protein, and neural cells are considered as passive targets of its toxicity. Yet, the role of BBIs in the occurrence of bilirubin encephalopathy appears more complex than being simple barriers to the diffusion of bilirubin, and neural cells such as astrocytes and neurons can play an active role in controlling the balance between the neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of bilirubin. This article reviews the emerging in vivo and in vitro data showing that transport and metabolic detoxification mechanisms at the blood–brain and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barriers may modulate bilirubin flux across both cellular interfaces, and that these protective functions can be affected in chronic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Then the in vivo and in vitro arguments in favor of the physiological antioxidant function of intracerebral bilirubin are presented, as well as the potential role of transporters such as ABCC1 and metabolizing enzymes such as cytochromes P-450 in setting the cerebral cell- and structure-specific toxicity of bilirubin following hyperbilirubinemia. The relevance of these data to the pathophysiology of bilirubin-induced neurological diseases is discussed. PMID:22629246

  2. Progress and prospects in neurorehabilitation: clinical applications of stem cells and brain-computer interface for spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Mariana; Peressutti, Caroline; Machado, Sergio; Teixeira, Silmar; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disease that affects millions of people worldwide, causing a temporary or permanent impairment of neuromotor functions. Mostly associated to traumatic lesions, but also to other forms of disease, the appropriate treatment is still unsure. In this review, several ongoing studies are presented that aim to provide methods of prevention that ensure quality of life, and rehabilitation trends to patients who suffer from this injury. Stem cell research, highlighted in this review, seeks to reduce damage caused to the tissue, as also provide spinal cord regeneration through the application of several types of stem cells. On the other hand, research using brain-computer interface (BCI) technology proposes the development of interfaces based on the interaction of neural networks with artificial tools to restore motor control and full mobility of the injured area. PubMed, MEDLINE and SciELO data basis analyses were performed to identify studies published from 2000 to date, which describe the link between SCI with stem cells and BCI technology.

  3. Erythrocyte Shrinkage and Cell Membrane Scrambling after Exposure to the Ionophore Nonactin.

    PubMed

    Peter, Thomas; Bissinger, Rosi; Lang, Florian

    2016-02-01

    The ionophore antibiotic nonactin permeabilizes cell membranes to NH4+ and K(+) . Treatment of erythrocytes with nonactin is expected to trigger cellular K(+) loss with subsequent cell shrinkage, which in turn is known to trigger suicidal death of a wide variety of cells including erythrocytes. This study explored whether nonactin exposure induces eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and translocation of cell membrane phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Signalling of eryptosis includes increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) activity [(Ca(2+) )i ] and stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter (FSC) and (Ca(2+) )i from Fluo3-fluorescence. A 48-hr treatment of human erythrocytes with nonactin significantly decreased FSC (≥10 ng/ml) and significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥10 ng/ml), effects paralleled by increase in (Ca(2+) )i (≥50 ng/ml) and virtually abrogated by increase in extracellular K(+) concentration to 120 mM at the expense of Na(+) . The up-regulation of annexin-V-binding after nonactin treatment was significantly blunted but not abolished by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and by addition of either PKC inhibitor staurosporine (0.4 μM) or p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 (2 μM). In conclusion, exposure of erythrocytes to the K(+) ionophore nonactin induces erythrocyte shrinkage and subsequent erythrocyte membrane scrambling, effects involving cellular K(+) loss, Ca(2+) entry and activation of staurosporine as well as SB203580-sensitive kinases.

  4. Inherited effects of low-dose exposure to methylmercury in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bose, Raj; Onishchenko, Natalia; Edoff, Karin; Janson Lang, Ann Marie; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental contaminant with recognized neurotoxic effects, particularly to the developing nervous system. In the present study, we show that nanomolar concentrations of MeHg can induce long-lasting effects in neural stem cells (NSCs). We investigated short-term direct and long-term inherited effects of exposure to MeHg (2.5 or 5.0 nM) using primary cultures of rat embryonic cortical NSCs. We found that MeHg had no adverse effect on cell viability but reduced NSC proliferation and altered the expression of cell cycle regulators (p16 and p21) and senescence-associated markers. In addition, we demonstrated a decrease in global DNA methylation in the exposed cells, indicating that epigenetic changes may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the MeHg-induced effects. These changes were observed in cells directly exposed to MeHg (parent cells) and in their daughter cells cultured under MeHg-free conditions. In agreement with our in vitro data, a trend was found for decreased cell proliferation in the subgranular zone in the hippocampi of adult mice exposed to low doses of MeHg during the perinatal period. Interestingly, this impaired proliferation had a measurable impact on the total number of neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Importantly, this effect could be reversed by chronic antidepressant treatment. Our study provides novel evidence for programming effects induced by MeHg in NSCs and supports the idea that developmental exposure to low levels of MeHg may result in long-term consequences predisposing to neurodevelopmental disorders and/or neurodegeneration.

  5. Neural stem cell apoptosis after low-methylmercury exposures in postnatal hippocampus produce persistent cell loss and adolescent memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Katie; Obiorah, Maryann; Robinson, Kelsey; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Buckley, Brian; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2013-12-01

    The developing brain is particularly sensitive to exposures to environmental contaminants. In contrast to the adult, the developing brain contains large numbers of dividing neuronal precursors, suggesting that they may be vulnerable targets. The postnatal day 7 (P7) rat hippocampus has populations of both mature neurons in the CA1-3 region as well as neural stem cells (NSC) in the dentate gyrus (DG) hilus, which actively produce new neurons that migrate to the granule cell layer (GCL). Using this well-characterized NSC population, we examined the impact of low levels of methylmercury (MeHg) on proliferation, neurogenesis, and subsequent adolescent learning and memory behavior. Assessing a range of exposures, we found that a single subcutaneous injection of 0.6 µg/g MeHg in P7 rats induced caspase activation in proliferating NSC of the hilus and GCL. This acute NSC death had lasting impact on the DG at P21, reducing cell numbers in the hilus by 22% and the GCL by 27%, as well as reductions in neural precursor proliferation by 25%. In contrast, non-proliferative CA1-3 pyramidal neuron cell number was unchanged. Furthermore, animals exposed to P7 MeHg exhibited an adolescent spatial memory deficit as assessed by Morris water maze. These results suggest that environmentally relevant levels of MeHg exposure may decrease NSC populations and, despite ongoing neurogenesis, the brain may not restore the hippocampal cell deficits, which may contribute to hippocampal-dependent memory deficits during adolescence.

  6. Mammalian skin cell biology: at the interface between laboratory and clinic.

    PubMed

    Watt, Fiona M

    2014-11-21

    Mammalian skin research represents the convergence of three complementary disciplines: cell biology, mouse genetics, and dermatology. The skin provides a paradigm for current research in cell adhesion, inflammation, and tissue stem cells. Here, I discuss recent insights into the cell biology of skin. Single-cell analysis has revealed that human epidermal stem cells are heterogeneous and differentiate in response to multiple extrinsic signals. Live-cell imaging, optogenetics, and cell ablation experiments show skin cells to be remarkably dynamic. High-throughput, genome-wide approaches have yielded unprecedented insights into the circuitry that controls epidermal stem cell fate. Last, integrative biological analysis of human skin disorders has revealed unexpected functions for elements of the skin that were previously considered purely structural.

  7. Gestational lead exposure selectively decreases retinal dopamine amacrine cells and dopamine content in adult mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Donald A.; Hamilton, W. Ryan; Johnson, Jerry E.; Xiao, Weimin; Chaney, Shawntay; Mukherjee, Shradha; Miller, Diane B.; O'Callaghan, James P.

    2011-11-15

    Gestational lead exposure (GLE) produces supernormal scotopic electroretinograms (ERG) in children, monkeys and rats, and a novel retinal phenotype characterized by an increased number of rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells in adult mice and rats. Since the loss of dopaminergic amacrine cells (DA ACs) in GLE monkeys and rats contributes to supernormal ERGs, the retinal DA system was analyzed in mice following GLE. C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to low (27 ppm), moderate (55 ppm) or high (109 ppm) lead throughout gestation and until postnatal day 10 (PN10). Blood [Pb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose GLE was {<=} 1, {<=} 10, {approx} 25 and {approx} 40 {mu}g/dL, respectively, on PN10 and by PN30 all were {<=} 1 {mu}g/dL. At PN60, confocal-stereology studies used vertical sections and wholemounts to characterize tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and the number of DA and other ACs. GLE dose-dependently and selectively decreased the number of TH-immunoreactive (IR) DA ACs and their synaptic plexus without affecting GABAergic, glycinergic or cholinergic ACs. Immunoblots and confocal revealed dose-dependent decreases in retinal TH protein expression and content, although monoamine oxidase-A protein and gene expression were unchanged. High-pressure liquid chromatography showed that GLE dose-dependently decreased retinal DA content, its metabolites and DA utilization/release. The mechanism of DA selective vulnerability is unknown. However, a GLE-induced loss/dysfunction of DA ACs during development could increase the number of rods and bipolar cells since DA helps regulate neuronal proliferation, whereas during adulthood it could produce ERG supernormality as well as altered circadian rhythms, dark/light adaptation and spatial contrast sensitivity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak [BPb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose newborn mice with gestational lead exposure: {<=} 1, {<=} 10, 25 and 40 {mu}g/dL Black

  8. Regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in endothelial cells with exposure to metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Mo, Yiqun; Wan, Rong; Chien, Sufan; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Qunwei

    2010-05-19

    Recent studies demonstrated that exposure to nanoparticles could enhance the adhesion of endothelial cells and modify the membrane structure of vascular endothelium. The endothelium plays an important role in the regulation of fibrinolysis, and imbalance of the fibrinolysis system potential contributes to the development of thrombosis. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the most potent endogenous inhibitor of fibrinolysis and is involved in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the alteration of PAI-1 expression in mouse pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MPMVEC) exposed to the metal nanoparticles that are known to be reactive, and the potential underlying mechanisms. We compared the alteration of PAI-1 expression in MPMVEC exposed to non-toxic doses of nano-size copper (II) oxide (Nano-CuO) and nano-size titanium dioxide (Nano-TiO(2)). Our results showed that Nano-CuO caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in PAI-1 expression. Moreover, exposure of MPMVEC to Nano-CuO caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation that was abolished by pre-treatment of cells with ROS scavengers or inhibitors, DPI, NAC and catalase. Exposure of MPMVEC to Nano-CuO also caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in p38 phosphorylation by Western blot. These effects were significantly attenuated when MPMVEC were pre-treated with DPI, NAC and catalase. To further investigate the role of p38 phosphorylation in Nano-CuO-induced PAI-1 overexpression, the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, was used to pre-treat cells prior to Nano-CuO exposure. We found that Nano-CuO-induced overexpression of PAI-1 was attenuated by p38 inhibitor pre-treatment. However, Nano-TiO(2) did not show the same results. Our results suggest that Nano-CuO caused up-regulation of PAI-1 in endothelial cells is mediated by p38 phosphorylation due to oxidative stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the potential health

  9. Study of the CdS/CdTe interface and its relevance to solar cell properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Ramesh Gurupad

    CdTe based devices have shown significant progress over the last decade. CdS/CdTe devices fabricated by close-spaced sublimation have resulted in 15.8% efficiency. To understand the effect of CdS/CdTe interface properties on device properties, a detailed investigation of the dependence of properties of CdS, CdTe and CdS/CdTe interface on various processing parameters is reported. Analysis of CdS/CdTe devices fabricated under identical conditions, was carried out to determine any correlation between the interface properties and device characteristics. Possible mechanisms to explain the correlation are presented. The CdS layers were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) on glass/SnOsb2 substrates. The CdTe layers were grown by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) on glass/SnOsb2/CdS substrates. Post-deposition CdClsb2 heat-treatment was carried out using different concentrations of CdClsb2/methanol solution. CBD CdS gives conformal coverage on rough SnOsb2 layers at a thickness as low as 30 nm. Under optimal conditions, CdS films with refractive index close to bulk index are obtained indicating that the layers are void-free. The grain-size of CBD CdS films is independent of film thickness and is established during the early part of growth. AFM analysis of CSS CdTe shows that the films are faceted for the entire temperature range (475sp°C-625sp°C) investigated, the grain-size increases with substrate temperature, and the films are free of voids. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that CdTe films grown at substrate temperatures ≥525sp°C have <111> preferred orientation and the orientation is not affected by the CdClsb2 heat-treatment, indicating that the films deposited at these temperatures are more compact. TEM analysis of CdS/CdTe structures suggests that the majority of structural defects in the CdTe layers are generated at the interface and are caused by lattice mismatch and growth conditions. Cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence analysis shows that Cd

  10. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A; Liu, Meilin

    2011-06-21

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C(3)H(8), CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H(2)O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity.

  11. Enhanced surface losses of organic solar cells induced by efficient polaron pair dissociation at the metal/organic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Li, De-Li; Yao, Yao; Hou, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Chang-Qin

    2012-08-01

    As a growing importance is placed on developing more efficient organic solar cells, understanding the behavior of free charge carriers at the metal/organic (M/O) interface is critical. One of the current challenges is understanding surface losses, essentially the loss of free charge carriers at the electrode/organic interface. In this paper, we use device model simulations to study such phenomena and we pay particular attention to the role of polaron pair (PP) M/O interfacial dissociation. The origin of surface losses is through the extraction of free charge carriers from the wrong electrodes, or direct surface recombination of PPs. Through simulation, we find that a high injection barrier leads to a large surface loss. In addition, surface loss increases with both the interfacial dissociation rate and PP diffusivity. Efficient interfacial dissociation can significantly enhance surface losses if the PP diffusivity is relatively large. Furthermore, current voltage characteristics reveal that surface losses undermine the device operating parameters and efficiency. Interlayers inserted at the M/O interface could block wrong electrode carriers, suppress the interfacial dissociation and reduce surface losses.

  12. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A.; Liu, Meilin

    2011-01-01

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C3H8, CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H2O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity. PMID:21694705

  13. Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucos Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Vaska, P.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Alexoff, D.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.

    2011-03-01

    The dramatic increase in use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible negative effects of radiofrequency signals delivered to the brain. However, whether acute cell phone exposure affects the human brain is unclear. To evaluate if acute cell phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity. Randomized crossover study conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2009, at a single US laboratory among 47 healthy participants recruited from the community. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and positron emission tomography with ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose injection was used to measure brain glucose metabolism twice, once with the right cell phone activated (sound muted) for 50 minutes ('on' condition) and once with both cell phones deactivated ('off' condition). Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare metabolism between on and off conditions using paired t tests, and Pearson linear correlations were used to verify the association of metabolism and estimated amplitude of radiofrequency-modulated electromagnetic waves emitted by the cell phone. Clusters with at least 1000 voxels (volume >8 cm{sup 3}) and P < .05 (corrected for multiple comparisons) were considered significant. Brain glucose metabolism computed as absolute metabolism ({micro}mol/100 g per minute) and as normalized metabolism (region/whole brain). Whole-brain metabolism did not differ between on and off conditions. In contrast, metabolism in the region closest to the antenna (orbitofrontal cortex and temporal pole) was significantly higher for on than off conditions (35.7 vs 33.3 {micro}mol/100 g per minute; mean difference, 2.4 [95% confidence interval, 0.67-4.2]; P = .004). The increases were significantly correlated with the estimated electromagnetic field amplitudes both for absolute metabolism (R = 0.95, P < .001) and normalized metabolism (R = 0.89; P < .001). In healthy participants and compared with no exposure, 50-minute

  14. TiO₂/P3HT Hybrid Solar Cell with Efficient Interface Modification by Organic and Inorganic Materials: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duofa; Tao, Haizheng; Zhao, Xiujian; Zhang, Tianjin; Han, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    TiO₂/P3HT hybrid solar cells were fabricated by infiltrating P3HT into the pores of TiO₂ nanowire arrays. CdS quantum dot and pyridine were employed to modify the interface of TiO₂/P3HT before P3HT was coated. The results show that the interface treatment significantly enhanced the photovoltaic performance of the cell. However characterization of time-resolved photoluminescence, open-circuit voltage decay and transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that the underlying mechanism was different for the organic and inorganic interface modifications. Pyridine plays an important role in assisting the charge separation at the TiO₂/P3HT interface, and suppressing electron back recombination. The reason for CdS modifying the cell in this way is mainly due to the suppression of electron back recombination, and the additional photovoltaic effect generated by CdS itself. PMID:27398525

  15. Tailoring the interface using thiophene small molecules in TiO2/P3HT hybrid solar cells.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Flavio S; Clifford, John N; Palomares, Emilio; Nogueira, Ana F

    2012-09-14

    In this paper we focus on the effect of carboxylated thiophene small molecules as interface modifiers in TiO(2)/P3HT hybrid solar cells. Our results show that small differences in the chemical structure of these molecules, for example, the presence of the -CH(2)- group in the 2-thiopheneacetic acid (TAA), can greatly increase the TiO(2) surface wettability, improving the TiO(2)/polymer contact. This effect is important to enhance exciton splitting and charge separation. PMID:22842849

  16. Contrary interfacial exciton dissociation at metal/organic interface in regular and reverse configuration organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bo; Wu, Zhenghui; Tam, Hoi Lam; Zhu, Furong

    2014-09-08

    An opposite interfacial exciton dissociation behavior at the metal (Al)/organic cathode interface in regular and inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) was analyzed using transient photocurrent measurements. It is found that Al/organic contact in regular OSCs, made with the blend layer of poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-2,6-diyl] -[3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]-thiophenediyl

  17. Contrary interfacial exciton dissociation at metal/organic interface in regular and reverse configuration organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Wu, Zhenghui; Tam, Hoi Lam; Zhu, Furong

    2014-09-01

    An opposite interfacial exciton dissociation behavior at the metal (Al)/organic cathode interface in regular and inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) was analyzed using transient photocurrent measurements. It is found that Al/organic contact in regular OSCs, made with the blend layer of poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl]-[3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]-thiophenediyl

  18. In vitro atrazine exposure affects the phenotypic and functional maturation of dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Lesya M.; Lee, Sang-Ryul; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2007-09-15

    Recent data suggest that some of the immunotoxic effects of the herbicide atrazine, a very widely used pesticide, may be due to perturbations in dendritic cell (DC) function. As consequences of atrazine exposure on the phenotypic and functional maturation of DC have not been studied, our objective was, using the murine DC line, JAWSII, to determine whether atrazine will interfere with DC maturation. First, we characterized the maturation of JAWSII cells in vitro by inducing them to mature in the presence of growth factors and selected maturational stimuli in vitro. Next, we exposed the DC cell line to a concentration range of atrazine and examined its effects on phenotypic and functional maturation of DC. Atrazine exposure interfered with the phenotypic and functional maturation of DC at non-cytotoxic concentrations. Among the phenotypic changes caused by atrazine exposure was a dose-dependent removal of surface MHC-I with a significant decrease being observed at 1 {mu}M concentration. In addition, atrazine exposure decreased the expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 and it downregulated the expression of the CD11b and CD11c accessory molecules and the myeloid developmental marker CD14. When, for comparative purposes, we exposed primary thymic DC to atrazine, MHC-I and CD11c expression was also decreased. Phenotypic changes in JAWSII DC maturation were associated with functional inhibition of maturation as, albeit at higher concentrations, receptor-mediated antigen uptake was increased by atrazine. Thus, our data suggest that atrazine directly targets DC maturation and that toxicants such as atrazine that efficiently remove MHC-I molecules from the DC surface are likely to contribute to immune evasion.

  19. Storable droplet interface lipid bilayers for cell-free ion channel studies.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Ho; Choi, Sangbaek; Kim, Young-Rok; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2012-01-01

    An artificially created lipid bilayer is an important platform in studying ion channels and engineered biosensor applications. However, a lipid bilayer created using conventional techniques is fragile and short-lived, and the measurement of ion channels requires expertise and laborious procedures, precluding practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a storable droplet lipid bilayer precursor frozen with ion channels, resulting in a droplet interface bilayer upon thawing. A small vial with an aqueous droplet in organic solution was flash frozen in -80 °C methanol immediately after an aqueous droplet was introduced into the organic solution and gravity draws the droplet down to the interface upon thawing. A lipid bilayer created along the interface using this method had giga-ohm resistance and typical specific capacitance values. The noise level of this system is favorably comparable to the conventional system. The subsequent incorporation of ion channels, alpha-hemolysin and gramicidin A, showed typical conductance values consistent with those in previous literatures. This novel system to create a lipid bilayer as a whole can be automated from its manufacture to use and indefinitely stored when frozen. As a result, ion channel measurements can be carried out in any place, increasing the accessibility of ion channel studies as well as a number of applications, such as biosensors, ion channel drug screening, and biophysical studies. PMID:21909672

  20. Fucoidan Extracted from Hijiki Protects Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells Against Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure-Induced Disruption.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Sook; Eom, Sang-Yong; Kim, In-Soo; Ali, Syed F; Kleinman, Michael T; Kim, Yong-Dae; Kim, Heon

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of fucoidan against the decreased function of primary cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMECs) after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). BBMECs were extracted from bovine brains and cultured until confluent. To evaluate the function of BBMECs, we performed a permeability test using cell-by-cell equipment and by Western blot analysis for zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1), which is a tight junction protein of BMECs, and evaluated oxidative stress in BBMECs using the DCFH-DA assay and the CUPRAC-BCS assay. The increased oxidative stress in BBMECs following DEP exposure was suppressed by fucoidan. In addition, permeability of BBMECs induced by DEP exposure was decreased by fucoidan treatment. Our results showed that fucoidan protects against BBMEC disruption induced by DEP exposure. This study provides evidence that fucoidan might protect the central nervous system (CNS) against DEP exposure.

  1. Diesel exposure suppresses natural killer cell function and resolution of eosinophil inflammation: a randomized controlled trial of exposure in allergic rhinitics.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Erica A; Noah, Terry L; Zhou, Haibo; Chehrazi, Claire; Robinette, Carole; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Müller, Loretta; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-05-06

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) is known to exacerbate allergic inflammation, including virus-induced eosinophil activation in laboratory animals. We have previously shown that in human volunteers with allergic rhinitis a short-term exposure to DE prior to infection with the live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) increases markers of allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa. Specifically, levels of eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) were significantly enhanced in individuals exposed to DE prior to inoculation with LAIV and this effect was maintained for at least seven days. However, this previous study was limited in its scope of nasal immune endpoints and did not explore potential mechanisms mediating the prolonged exacerbation of allergic inflammation caused by exposure to DE prior to inoculation with LAIV. In this follow-up study, the methods were modified to expand experimental endpoints and explore the potential role of NK cells. The data presented here suggest DE prolongs viral-induced eosinophil activation, which was accompanied by decreased markers of NK cell recruitment and activation. Separate in vitro studies showed that exposure to DE particles decreases the ability of NK cells to kill eosinophils. Taken together, these follow-up studies suggest that DE-induced exacerbation of allergic inflammation in the context of viral infections may be mediated by decreased activity of NK cells and their ability to clear eosinophils.

  2. Chromosomal mosaicism in mouse two-cell embryos after paternal exposure to acrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Lowe, Xiu; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2008-10-14

    Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos is a common cause ofspontaneous abortions, however, our knowledge of its etiology is limited. We used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) painting to investigate whether paternally-transmitted chromosomal aberrations result in mosaicism in mouse 2-cell embryos. Paternal exposure to acrylamide, an important industrial chemical also found in tobacco smoke and generated during the cooking process of starchy foods, produced significant increases in chromosomally defective 2-cell embryos, however, the effects were transient primarily affecting the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. Comparisons with our previous study of zygotes demonstrated similar frequencies of chromosomally abnormal zygotes and 2-cell embryos suggesting that there was no apparent selection against numerical or structural chromosomal aberrations. However, the majority of affected 2-cell embryos were mosaics showing different chromosomal abnormalities in the two blastomeric metaphases. Analyses of chromosomal aberrations in zygotes and 2-cell embryos showed a tendency for loss of acentric fragments during the first mitotic division ofembryogenesis, while both dicentrics and translocations apparently underwent propersegregation. These results suggest that embryonic development can proceed up to the end of the second cell cycle of development in the presence of abnormal paternal chromosomes and that even dicentrics can persist through cell division. The high incidence of chromosomally mosaic 2-cell embryos suggests that the first mitotic division of embryogenesis is prone to missegregation errors and that paternally-transmitted chromosomal abnromalities increase the risk of missegregation leading to embryonic mosaicism.

  3. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previously with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation.

  4. Negative impact of DEP exposure on human airway epithelial cell adhesion, stiffness, and repair.

    PubMed

    Doornaert, Blandine; Leblond, Valerie; Galiacy, Stephane; Gras, Gabriel; Planus, Emmanuelle; Laurent, Valerie; Isabey, Daniel; Lafuma, Chantal

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) may be associated with increased respiratory mortality and morbidity. Several recent studies have also shown that DEPs increase the production of inflammatory cytokines by human bronchial epithelium (HBE) cells in vitro. The present study investigates the effects of DEPs on the interaction of l-HBE cells (16HBE14o-) with the cell and matrix microenvironment based on evaluation of integrin-type cell/matrix ligand expression, cytoskeleton (CSK) stiffness, and matrix remodeling via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression. The results showed that DEP exposure induced: 1) a net dose-dependent decrease in CSK stiffness through actin fibers, 2) a concomitant specific reduction of both alpha(3)- and beta(1)-integrin subunits extensively expressed on the HBE cell surface, 3) a decrease in the level of CD44, which is a major HBE cell-cell and HBE cell-matrix adhesion molecule; and 4) an isolated decrease in MMP-1 expression without any change in tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 or TIMP-2 tissue inhibitors. Restrictive modulation of cell-matrix interaction, cell-cell connection, CSK stiffness, and fibrillary collagen remodeling results in a decreased wound closure capacity and an increased deadhesion capacity. In conclusion, on the basis of these results, we can propose that, in addition to their ability to increase the production of inflammatory cytokines, DEPs could also alter the links between actin CSK and the extracellular matrix, suggesting that they might facilitate HBE cell detachment in vivo. PMID:12471014

  5. Aristolochic acid exposure in Romania and implications for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turesky, Robert J; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Brennan, Paul; Mates, Dana; Jinga, Viorel; Harnden, Patricia; Banks, Rosamonde E; Blanche, Helene; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Chopard, Priscilia; Letourneau, Louis; Lathrop, G Mark; Scelo, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aristolochic acid (AA) is a nephrotoxicant associated with AA nephropathy (AAN) and upper urothelial tract cancer (UUTC). Whole-genome sequences of 14 Romanian cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) recently exhibited mutational signatures consistent with AA exposure, although RCC had not been previously linked with AAN and AA exposure was previously reported only in localised rural areas. Methods: We performed mass spectrometric measurements of the aristolactam (AL) DNA adduct 7-(deoxyadenosin-N6-yl) aristolactam I (dA-AL-I) in nontumour renal tissues of the 14 Romanian RCC cases and 15 cases from 3 other countries. Results: We detected dA-AL-I in the 14 Romanian cases at levels ranging from 0.7 to 27 adducts per 108 DNA bases, in line with levels reported in Asian and Balkan populations exposed through herbal remedies or food contamination. The 15 cases from other countries were negative. Interpretation: Although the source of exposure is uncertain and likely different in AAN regions than elsewhere, our results demonstrate that AA exposure in Romania exists outside localised AAN regions and provide further evidence implicating AA in RCC. PMID:26657656

  6. Retardation of C2C12 myoblast cell proliferation by exposure to low-temperature atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Naoya; Fujita, Ryo; Kawano, Fuminori; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ohira, Takashi; Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Nakata, Ken; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2014-09-01

    As the first step in evaluating the possibility of low-temperature atmospheric plasma for clinical applications in the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), we determined the effects of plasma exposure on C2C12 myoblasts. The low-temperature atmospheric plasma was generated through an electrical discharge in argon gas. One minute of plasma exposure every 24 h inhibited the cell proliferation, whereas myoblast differentiation was not affected. Plasma exposure increased the phosphorylation of ERK and JNK at 30 min after the exposure, but the phosphorylation of both was decreased to less than control levels at 1 and 4 h after the exposure. Plasma exposure increased the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase at 8 h after the exposure. In conclusion, plasma exposure retarded the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts by G2/M arrest. Therefore, plasma exposure can be a possible treatment for the anti-proliferative effects of malignant tumors, such as RMS, without affecting differentiated skeletal muscle cells.

  7. The protective effect of autophagy on mouse spermatocyte derived cells exposure to 1800MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaijun; Zhang, Guowei; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yong; Dong, Jianyun; Dong, Xiaomei; Liu, Jinyi; Cao, Jia; Ao, Lin; Zhang, Shaoxiang

    2014-08-01

    The increasing exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phone use has raised public concern regarding the biological effects of RF exposure on the male reproductive system. Autophagy contributes to maintaining intracellular homeostasis under environmental stress. To clarify whether RF exposure could induce autophagy in the spermatocyte, mouse spermatocyte-derived cells (GC-2) were exposed to 1800MHz Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) signals in GSM-Talk mode at specific absorption rate (SAR) values of 1w/kg, 2w/kg or 4w/kg for 24h, respectively. The results indicated that the expression of LC3-II increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner with RF exposure, and showed a significant change at the SAR value of 4w/kg. The autophagosome formation and the occurrence of autophagy were further confirmed by GFP-LC3 transient transfection assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Furthermore, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II was enhanced by co-treatment with Chloroquine (CQ), indicating autophagic flux could be enhanced by RF exposure. Intracellular ROS levels significantly increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after cells were exposed to RF. Pretreatment with anti-oxidative NAC obviously decreased the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and attenuated the degradation of p62 induced by RF exposure. Meanwhile, phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly increased after RF exposure at the SAR value of 2w/kg and 4w/kg. Moreover, we observed that RF exposure did not increase the percentage of apoptotic cells, but inhibition of autophagy could increase the percentage of apoptotic cells. These findings suggested that autophagy flux could be enhanced by 1800MHz GSM exposure (4w/kg), which is mediated by ROS generation. Autophagy may play an important role in preventing cells from apoptotic cell death under RF exposure stress.

  8. Short and prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells: metabolic and osmotic effects.

    PubMed

    Moruzzi, Noah; Del Sole, Marianna; Fato, Romana; Gerdes, Jantje M; Berggren, Per-Olof; Bergamini, Christian; Brismar, Kerstin

    2014-08-01

    High blood glucose levels are the main feature of diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism linking high glucose concentration to diabetic complications is still not fully elucidated, particularly with regard to human physiology. Excess of glucose is likely to trigger a metabolic response depending on the cell features, activating deleterious pathways involved in the complications of diabetes. In this study, we aim to elucidate how acute and prolonged hyperglycaemia alters the biology and metabolism in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. We found that hyperglycaemia triggers a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis that is maintained over prolonged time. Moreover, osmotic pressure is a major factor in the early metabolic response, decreasing both mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cellular proliferation. After prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia we observed decreased mitochondrial steady-state and uncoupled respiration, together with a reduced ATP/ADP ratio. At the same time, we could not detect major changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and reactive oxygen species. We suggest that the physiological and metabolic alterations observed in healthy human primary fibroblasts and endothelial cells are an adaptive response to hyperglycaemia. The severity of metabolic and bioenergetics impairment associated with diabetic complications may occur after longer glucose exposure or due to interactions with cell types more sensitive to hyperglycaemia.

  9. Chronic arsenic trioxide exposure leads to enhanced aggressiveness via Met oncogene addiction in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Pirker, Christine; Englinger, Bernhard; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Spitzwieser, Melanie; Mohr, Thomas; Körner, Wilfried; Weinmüllner, Regina; Tav, Koray; Grillari, Johannes; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2016-01-01

    As an environmental poison, arsenic is responsible for many cancer deaths. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide (ATO) presents also a powerful therapy used to treat refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and is intensively investigated for treatment of other cancer types. Noteworthy, cancer therapy is frequently hampered by drug resistance, which is also often associated with enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we analyzed ATO-selected cancer cells (A2780ATO) for the mechanisms underlying their enhanced tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. These cells were characterized by enhanced proliferation and spheroid growth as well as increased tumorigenicity of xenografts in SCID mice. Noteworthy, subsequent studies revealed that overexpression of Met receptor was the underlying oncogenic driver of these effects, as A2780ATO cells were characterized by collateral sensitivity against Met inhibitors. This finding was also confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and whole genome gene expression arrays, which revealed that Met overexpression by chronic ATO exposure was based on the transcriptional regulation via activation of AP-1. Finally, it was shown that treatment with the Met inhibitor crizotinib was also effective against A2780ATO cell xenografts in vivo, indicating that targeting of Met presents a promising strategy for the treatment of Met-overexpressing tumors after either arsenic exposure or failure to ATO treatment. PMID:27036042

  10. Gene expression in mammalian cells after exposure to 95 MeV/amu argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, Andrea; Hellweg, Christine E.; Meier, Matthias M.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    High LET radiations, such as heavy ions or neutrons, have an increased biological effectiveness compared to X-rays for gene mutation, genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Estimating the biological risks from space radiation encountered by cosmonauts will continue to influence long term duration in space, such as the planned mission to Mars. The human radiation responsive genes CDKN1A (p21/WAF), GADD45α (GADD45), GADD45β (MyD118), RRM2b (p53R2) and BRCA2 (FancD1), involved in cell cycle control or damage repair, were screened for gene expression changes in MCF-7 cells by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assay, using cDNA obtained from total RNA isolated at various time points after irradiation with accelerated doses of 36-argon ions and X-rays. Examination of the expression profiles 2 and 12 h after exposure reveals a pattern consistent with a population of cells in the early response to DNA damage and invoking cell stress responses. Interesting new data showing different expression patterns according to the gene and the type of ionizing radiation used could be obtained. Results show, that the signaling and repair activities induced after heavy ion or X-ray exposure are not the same and gene expression patterns may become useful indicators for distinguishing different types of radiation in relation to their biological effects.

  11. Protein-inorganic hybrid nanoflowers as ultrasensitive electrochemical cytosensing interfaces for evaluation of cell surface sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongmei; Yang, Da-Peng; Ye, Daixin; Zhang, Xianxia; Fang, Xueen; Zhang, Song; Liu, Baohong; Kong, Jilie

    2015-06-15

    The identification of biocompatible nanomaterials with high conductivities as sensing interfaces is important in developing novel electrochemical cytosensors. We prepared a novel protein-inorganic nanomaterial-bovine serum albumin (BSA) incorporated Ag nanoflowers with three-dimensional porous architectures, using a simple biomimetic method. The BSA-incorporated Ag nanoflowers were modified on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface and conjugated with a targeting lectin molecule, i.e., Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), for sensing DLD-1 human colon cancer cells. The BSA-incorporated Ag nanoflowers were a suitable platform, and showed improved cell-immobilization capacity, and good biocompatibility, with retention of activity of the immobilized cells. These properties are attributed to the large surface area of the porous structure and the natural BSA layer acting as a biocompatible support. The attachment of DLD-1 cells to the GCE increased the electron-transfer resistance, with a good correlation with the logarithm of the concentration from 1.35×10(2) to 1.35×10(7) cells mL(-1), with a low detection limit of 40 cells mL(-1). Based on the affinity between SNA and sialic acid (SA), the UV-vis absorption spectrum of the one-step reaction between SA and acidic ninhydrin indicated that the average number of SA molecules on a single living DLD-1 cell surface was approximately 2.16×10(12). This proposed cytosensing strategy had good reproducibility, acceptable precision, and high specificity for SA-over-expressed cells, indicating that it has potential applications for the early monitoring of tumor cells and convenient evaluation of SA on living cells. PMID:25599845

  12. Comparative toxicities of bismuth oxybromide and titanium dioxide exposure on human skin keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoya; Wang, Yawen; Peng, Shiqi; Yue, Bin; Fan, Caimei; Chen, Weiyi; Li, Xiaona

    2015-09-01

    Nano-sized bismuth oxybromide (BiOBr) particles are being considered for applications within the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about their potential impact on human health. In this study, we comparatively investigated the cytotoxicity of BiOBr and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) using human skin keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) as a research model. Results indicate that lamellar-shaped BiOBr (length: 200 nm, width: 150 nm, and an average thickness: around 15 nm) has less toxic effects on cell viability and intracellular organelles than TiO2 (P25) NPs. BiOBr mainly induced late cell apoptosis, while for TiO2, both early apoptosis and late apoptosis were involved. Cell cycle arrest was found in cells on both NPs exposure, and more prominent in TiO2-treated cells. More cellular uptake was achieved after TiO2 exposure, particularly at 10 μg mL(-1), presence of TiO2 resulted in more than 2-fold increase in cellular granularity compared with BiOBr. Furthermore, TiO2 had a high potential to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, where a 2.7-fold increase in TiO2 group and 2.0-fold increase in BiOBr group at the same concentration of 25 μg mL(-1). Higher cellular uptake and ROS stimulation should contribute to the more hazards of TiO2 than BiOBr NPs. This knowledge is a crucial component in the environmental and human hazard assessment of BiOBr and TiO2 NPs.

  13. Activation of endothelial cells after exposure to ambient ultrafine particles: The role of NADPH oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Yiqun; Wan Rong; Chien Sufan; Tollerud, David J.; Zhang Qunwei

    2009-04-15

    Several studies have shown that ultrafine particles (UFPs) may pass from the lungs to the circulation because of their very small diameter, and induce lung oxidative stress with a resultant increase in lung epithelial permeability. The direct effects of UFPs on vascular endothelium remain unknown. We hypothesized that exposure to UFPs leads to endothelial cell O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} generation via NADPH oxidase and results in activation of endothelial cells. Our results showed that UFPs, at a non-toxic dose, induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mouse pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MPMVEC) that was inhibited by pre-treatment with the ROS scavengers or inhibitors, but not with the mitochondrial inhibitor, rotenone. UFP-induced ROS generation in MPMVEC was abolished by p67{sup phox} siRNA transfection and UFPs did not cause ROS generation in MPMVEC isolated from gp91{sup phox} knock-out mice. UFP-induced ROS generation in endothelial cells was also determined in vivo by using a perfused lung model with imaging. Moreover, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining results showed that MPMVEC treated with UFPs resulted in the translocation of cytosolic proteins of NADPH oxidase, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox} and rac 1, to the plasma membrane. These results demonstrate that NADPH oxidase in the pulmonary endothelium is involved in ROS generation following exposure to UFPs. To investigate the activation of endothelial cells by UFP-induced oxidative stress, we determined the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in MPMVEC. Our results showed that exposure of MPMVEC to UFPs caused increased phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs that was blocked by pre-treatment with DPI or p67{sup phox} siRNA. Exposure of MPMVEC obtained from gp91{sup phox} knock-out mice to UFPs did not cause increased phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs. These findings confirm that UFPs can cause endothelial cells to generate ROS directly

  14. Acute pergolide exposure stiffens engineered valve interstitial cell tissues and reduces contractility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Capulli, Andrew K; MacQueen, Luke A; O'Connor, Blakely B; Dauth, Stephanie; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    Medications based on ergoline-derived dopamine and serotonin agonists are associated with off-target toxicities that include valvular heart disease (VHD). Reports of drug-induced VHD resulted in the withdrawal of appetite suppressants containing fenfluramine and phentermine from the US market in 1997 and pergolide, a Parkinson's disease medication, in 2007. Recent evidence suggests that serotonin receptor activity affected by these medications modulates cardiac valve interstitial cell activation and subsequent valvular remodeling, which can lead to cardiac valve fibrosis and dysfunction similar to that seen in carcinoid heart disease. Failure to identify these risks prior to market and continued use of similar drugs reaffirm the need to improve preclinical evaluation of drug-induced VHD. Here, we present two complimentary assays to measure stiffness and contractile stresses generated by engineered valvular tissues in vitro. As a case study, we measured the effects of acute (24 h) pergolide exposure to engineered porcine aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) tissues. Pergolide exposure led to increased tissue stiffness, but it decreased both basal and active contractile tone stresses generated by AVIC tissues. Pergolide exposure also disrupted AVIC tissue organization (i.e., tissue anisotropy), suggesting that the mechanical properties and contractile functionality of these tissues are governed by their ability to maintain their structure. We expect further use of these assays to identify off-target drug effects that alter the phenotypic balance of AVICs, disrupt their ability to maintain mechanical homeostasis, and lead to VHD. PMID:27174867

  15. Effect of asbestos exposure on differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in mixed lymphocyte reaction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Maeda, Megumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2013-07-01

    Asbestos fibers are associated with tumorigenicity, and are thought to cause mesothelioma. However, their effect on immune response remains unclear. We examined the effect of asbestos exposure on differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) upon exposure to chrysotile B (CB) or crocidolite (CR) asbestos at 5 μg/ml for 7 days. Exposure to CB during MLR suppressed increases in the percentage and number of CD8⁺ T cells in response to allogenic cells. The cytotoxicity for allogenic targets decreased in PBMCs exposed to CB, but not CR, when compared with PBMCs without any exposure during MLR. Exposure to CB during MLR resulted in suppression of increases in granzyme B⁺ cells and IFN-γ⁺ cells. CB exposure also resulted in suppression of increases in CD45RO⁺ effector/memory cells and CD25⁺-activated cells in CD8⁺ lymphocytes, and a decrease in CD45RA⁺ cells. CB exposure suppressed the proliferation of CD8⁺ lymphocytes without an increase in annexin V⁺ apoptotic cells in CD8⁺ lymphocytes. Moreover, the production of IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, but not IL-2, decreased in the presence of CB. These results suggest that exposure to asbestos potentially suppresses the differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte, accompanied by decreases in IFN-γ and TNF-α.

  16. Bluetooth wireless monitoring, diagnosis and calibration interface for control system of fuel cell bus in Olympic demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jianfeng; Lin, Xinfan; Xu, Liangfei; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao

    With the worldwide deterioration of the natural environment and the fossil fuel crisis, the possible commercialization of fuel cell vehicles has become a hot topic. In July 2008, Beijing started a clean public transportation plan for the 29th Olympic games. Three fuel cell city buses and 497 other low-emission vehicles are now serving the Olympic core area and Beijing urban areas. The fuel cell buses will operate along a fixed bus line for 1 year as a public demonstration of green energy vehicles. Due to the specialized nature of fuel cell engines and electrified power-train systems, measurement, monitoring and calibration devices are indispensable. Based on the latest Bluetooth wireless technology, a novel Bluetooth universal data interface was developed for the control system of the fuel cell city bus. On this platform, a series of wireless portable control auxiliary systems have been implemented, including wireless calibration, a monitoring system and an in-system programming platform, all of which are ensuring normal operation of the fuel cell buses used in the demonstration.

  17. Exposure of periodontal ligament progenitor cells to lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli changes osteoblast differentiation pattern

    PubMed Central

    ALBIERO, Mayra Laino; AMORIM, Bruna Rabelo; MARTINS, Luciane; CASATI, Márcio Zaffalon; SALLUM, Enilson Antonio; NOCITI, Francisco Humberto; SILVÉRIO, Karina Gonzales

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal ligament mesenchymal stem cells (PDLMSCs) are an important alternative source of adult stem cells and may be applied for periodontal tissue regeneration, neuroregenerative medicine, and heart valve tissue engineering. However, little is known about the impact of bacterial toxins on the biological properties of PDLSMSCs, including self-renewal, differentiation, and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Objective : This study investigated whether proliferation, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and osteogenic differentiation of CD105-enriched PDL progenitor cell populations (PDL-CD105+ cells) would be affected by exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli (EcLPS). Material and Methods : Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was assessed in PDL-CD105+ cells by the immunostaining technique and confirmed using Western blotting assay. Afterwards, these cells were exposed to EcLPS, and the following assays were carried out: (i) cell viability using MTS; (ii) expression of the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) genes; (iii) osteoblast differentiation assessed by mineralization in vitro, and by mRNA levels of run-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) determined by quantitative PCR. Results : PDL-CD105+ cells were identified as positive for TLR4. EcLPS did not affect cell viability, but induced a significant increase of transcripts for IL-6 and IL-8. Under osteogenic condition, PDL-CD105+ cells exposed to EcLPS presented an increase of mineralized matrix deposition and higher RUNX2 and ALP mRNA levels when compared to the control group. Conclusions : These results provide evidence that CD105-enriched PDL progenitor cells are able to adapt to continuous Escherichia coli endotoxin challenge, leading to an upregulation of osteogenic activities. PMID:26018305

  18. Effect of nickel and chromium exposure on buccal cells of electroplaters.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Saba; Ara, Anjum; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad

    2012-02-01

    The electroplating industry commonly involves the use of nickel and chromium. An assessment of the genotoxic effects of these metals can be carried out by micronucleus (MN) test in buccal cells. Other nuclear anomalies (NA) observed in buccal cells viz., karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis are also the indicators of genotoxicity. The current study aims at determining the extent of genotoxic damage in relation to the duration of exposure to nickel and hexavalent chromium via micronuclei induction and other nuclear anomalies. The present investigation included 150 subjects of which 50 individuals with no history of nickel/chromium exposure (Group I) were taken as control, 50 electroplaters exposed to nickel and hexavalent chromium for duration of less than 10 years (Group II) and 50 electroplaters exposed for ≥10 years (Group III) were included. Slides of buccal cells were prepared and the frequency of MN (‰) and NA (‰) were calculated. ANOVA was applied to test significance. Results were considered significant at p < 0.05 and p < 0.001. Group III showed the highest MN frequency (1.08 ± 0.54‰, p < 0.05), karyorrhexis (20.75 ± 6.29, p < 0.05), karyolysis (3.50 ± 1.91, p < 0.001), binucleate (4.75 ± 2.75, p < 0.05) and enucleated cells (5.75 ± 1.70, p < 0.05). Significant increase in frequencies between Group II and III was found as duration of exposure increased. Plasma nickel and chromium levels were also determined which showed a positive correlation with frequency MN and other nuclear abnormalities (p < 0.01).

  19. Cannabidiol Exposure During Neuronal Differentiation Sensitizes Cells Against Redox-Active Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Schönhofen, Patrícia; de Medeiros, Liana M; Bristot, Ivi Juliana; Lopes, Fernanda M; De Bastiani, Marco A; Kapczinski, Flávio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Castro, Mauro Antônio A; Parsons, Richard B; Klamt, Fábio

    2015-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the most abundant Cannabis sativa-derived compounds, has been implicated with neuroprotective effect in several human pathologies. Until now, no undesired side effects have been associated with CBD. In this study, we evaluated CBD's neuroprotective effect in terminal differentiation (mature) and during neuronal differentiation (neuronal developmental toxicity model) of the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. A dose-response curve was performed to establish a sublethal dose of CBD with antioxidant activity (2.5 μM). In terminally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, incubation with 2.5 μM CBD was unable to protect cells against the neurotoxic effect of glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal, 6-hydroxydopamine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Moreover, no difference in antioxidant potential and neurite density was observed. When SH-SY5Y cells undergoing neuronal differentiation were exposed to CBD, no differences in antioxidant potential and neurite density were observed. However, CBD potentiated the neurotoxicity induced by all redox-active drugs tested. Our data indicate that 2.5 μM of CBD, the higher dose tolerated by differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, does not provide neuroprotection for terminally differentiated cells and shows, for the first time, that exposure of CBD during neuronal differentiation could sensitize immature cells to future challenges with neurotoxins.

  20. Bisphenol A Exposure Leads to Specific MicroRNA Alterations in Placental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Avissar-Whiting, Michele; Veiga, Keila; Uhl, Kristen; Maccani, Matthew; Gagne, Luc; Moen, Erika; Marsit, Carmen J.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA) has been observed to alter developmental pathways and cell processes, at least in part, through epigenetic mechanisms. This study sought to investigate the effect of BPA on microRNAs (miRNAs) in human placental cells. miRNA microarray was performed following BPA treatment in three immortalized cytotrophoblast cell lines and the results validated using quantitative real-time PCR. For functional analysis, overexpression constructs were stably transfected into cells that were then assayed for changes in proliferation and response to toxicants. Microarray analysis revealed several miRNAs to be significantly altered in response to BPA treatment in two cell lines. Real-time PCR results confirmed that miR-146a was particularly strongly induced and its overexpression in cells led to slower proliferation as well as higher sensitivity to the DNA damaging agent, bleomycin. Overall, these results suggest that BPA can alter miRNA expression in placental cells, a potentially novel mode of BPA toxicity. PMID:20417706

  1. Elevated Human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene expression in blood cells associated with chronic and arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Arsenic exposure is associated with human cancer. Telomerase containing the catalytic subunit, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of chromosomes, delay senescence and promoting cell proliferation leading to tumorigenesis. OBJECTIVE:...

  2. Developmental exposure to terbutaline alters cell signaling in mature rat brain regions and augments the effects of subsequent neonatal exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J.; Aldridge, Justin E.; Slotkin, Theodore A. . E-mail: t.slotkin@duke.edu

    2005-03-01

    Exposure to apparently unrelated neurotoxicants can nevertheless converge on common neurodevelopmental events. We examined the long-term effects of developmental exposure of rats to terbutaline, a {beta}-adrenoceptor agonist used to arrest preterm labor, and the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) separately and together. Treatments mimicked the appropriate neurodevelopmental stages for human exposures: terbutaline on postnatal days (PN) 2-5 and CPF on PN11-14, with assessments conducted on PN45. Although neither treatment affected growth or viability, each elicited alterations in CNS cell signaling mediated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), a transduction pathway shared by numerous neuronal and hormonal signals. Terbutaline altered signaling in the brainstem and cerebellum, with gender differences particularly notable in the cerebellum (enhanced AC in males, suppressed in females). By itself, CPF exposure elicited deficits in AC signaling in the midbrain, brainstem, and striatum. However, sequential exposure to terbutaline followed by CPF produced larger alterations and involved a wider spectrum of brain regions than were obtained with either agent alone. In the cerebral cortex, adverse effects of the combined treatment intensified between PN45 and PN60, suggesting that exposures alter the long-term program for development of synaptic communication, leading to alterations in AC signaling that emerge even after adolescence. These findings indicate that terbutaline, like CPF, is a developmental neurotoxicant, and reinforce the idea that its use in preterm labor may create a subpopulation that is sensitized to long-term CNS effects of organophosphorus insecticides.

  3. An in vitro system for exposure of lung cells to gases: effects of ozone on rat macrophages.

    PubMed

    Valentine, R

    1985-01-01

    A test system was developed for the in vitro exposure of lung cells to gases. The exposure system was used to evaluate ozone (O3) injury to pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats by bronchopulmonary lavage. Ozone exposures were conducted within temperature-controlled stainless-steel and Plexiglas chambers that contained glass petri dishes affixed to a revolving, inclined platform. Cell exposures were accomplished by rotation of the platform at 1 rpm to alternately expose PAM monolayers to culture media and O3. The system provided stable, O3-containing atmospheres and permitted simultaneous in vitro exposures at three O3 concentrations. In vitro exposure of PAM monolayers for 2 h at chamber concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 6.1 ppm O3 was associated with a significant, concentration-related reduction of latex-bead phagocytosis in rotated PAM cultures. In contrast, PAM that were similarly exposed in nonrotated dishes placed horizontally and covered with a stationary layer of media (1.5 mm depth) were not affected. Other parameters of cell function, including PAM viability and adherence, were unchanged compared to unexposed or horizontal, nonrotated controls. The inability to observe adverse effects among the nonrotated cultures is consistent with the impaired diffusion of O3 through the comparatively thick media overlay in stationary cultures. The in vitro system provides a realistic simulation of lung cell exposure to O3 and represents a useful model to study the toxicity of gases on cultured cells.

  4. Analysis of white blood cell counts in mice after gamma- or proton-radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Maks, Casey J; Wan, X Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H; Romero-Weaver, Ana L; Sanzari, Jenine K; Wilson, Jolaine M; Rightnar, Steve; Wroe, Andrew J; Koss, Peter; Gridley, Daila S; Slater, James M; Kennedy, Ann R

    2011-08-01

    In the coming decades human space exploration is expected to move beyond low-Earth orbit. This transition involves increasing mission time and therefore an increased risk of radiation exposure from solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Acute radiation effects after exposure to SPE radiation are of prime importance due to potential mission-threatening consequences. The major objective of this study was to characterize the dose-response relationship for proton and γ radiation delivered at doses up to 2 Gy at high (0.5 Gy/min) and low (0.5 Gy/h) dose rates using white blood cell (WBC) counts as a biological end point. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent decrease in WBC counts in mice exposed to high- and low-dose-rate proton and γ radiation, suggesting that astronauts exposed to SPE-like radiation may experience a significant decrease in circulating leukocytes. PMID:21476859

  5. Analysis of white blood cell counts in mice after gamma- or proton-radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Maks, Casey J; Wan, X Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H; Romero-Weaver, Ana L; Sanzari, Jenine K; Wilson, Jolaine M; Rightnar, Steve; Wroe, Andrew J; Koss, Peter; Gridley, Daila S; Slater, James M; Kennedy, Ann R

    2011-08-01

    In the coming decades human space exploration is expected to move beyond low-Earth orbit. This transition involves increasing mission time and therefore an increased risk of radiation exposure from solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Acute radiation effects after exposure to SPE radiation are of prime importance due to potential mission-threatening consequences. The major objective of this study was to characterize the dose-response relationship for proton and γ radiation delivered at doses up to 2 Gy at high (0.5 Gy/min) and low (0.5 Gy/h) dose rates using white blood cell (WBC) counts as a biological end point. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent decrease in WBC counts in mice exposed to high- and low-dose-rate proton and γ radiation, suggesting that astronauts exposed to SPE-like radiation may experience a significant decrease in circulating leukocytes.

  6. Degeneration and regeneration of the olfactory epithelium following inhalation exposure to methyl bromide: pathology, cell kinetics, and olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Hurtt, M E; Thomas, D A; Working, P K; Monticello, T M; Morgan, K T

    1988-06-30

    The effects of acute inhalation exposure to methyl bromide (MeBr) on the olfactory epithelium of male F-344 rats was investigated by morphologic examination of animals killed at varying timepoints during and following exposure to 200 ppm MeBr 6 hr/day for 5 days. Cell replication rate and histopathology were used to assess the kinetics of repair. In addition, olfactory function, using the buried food pellet test, was assessed and the result compared with morphological recovery. Extensive destruction of the olfactory epithelium was evident in animals killed directly after a single 6-hr exposure to MeBr. Histologic features of these lesions indicate that the primary, or most severe, effect of MeBr exposure was on the sustentacular cells and mature sensory cells; basal cells were generally unaffected. By Day 3, despite continued exposure, there was replacement of the olfactory epithelium by a squamous cell layer that increased in thickness and basophilic cytoplasmic staining over the next 2 days of exposure. One week postexposure, the epithelial region was covered by a layer of polyhedral, basophilic cells, and from 2 to 10 weeks postexposure, the epithelium exhibited progressive reorganization to reform the original olfactory epithelium pattern. By Week 10, 75-80% of the olfactory epithelium appeared morphologically normal. Cell replication showed a single peak of olfactory epithelial cell proliferation at Day 3 of exposure, with a labeling index of 14.5% compared to 0.7% in controls. Cell replication rates returned gradually to control levels by Week 10 postexposure. Behavioral tests of olfactory function in animals after a single 6-hr exposure to 200 ppm MeBr demonstrated a loss of the sense of smell, with recovery of this function by Day 6. Exposure to 90 ppm caused no observable effect on olfactory function or morphology. These findings demonstrate that the olfactory mucosa is highly sensitive to the toxic effects of MeBr and that olfactory epithelial cell

  7. Merkel cell carcinoma and multiple Bowen's disease: incidental association or possible relationship to inorganic arsenic exposure?

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Y; Murakami, S; Ohtsuka, H; Miyauchi, S; Shinmori, H; Hashimoto, K

    1997-05-01

    An 81-year-old Japanese male was referred to our clinic in 1991 with multiple Bowen's disease. The associated hyperpigmentation of the trunk and extremities and palmoplantar keratotic nodules indicated that he had suffered from chronic arsenic poisoning. Interestingly, he was a native of Namikata in Ehime, Japan, where many residents have suffered from multiple Bowen's disease with internal malignancy. Arsenic exposure was strongly suspected. Two years later, Merkel cell carcinoma developed on the dorsum of his right hand, where Bowen's disease lesions were absent. Metastasis of this Merkel cell carcinoma led to his eventual death one year later. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Merkel cell carcinoma associated with multiple Bowen's disease. Chronic arsenic poisoning may be responsible for the association of these two rare skin neoplasms.

  8. [Histoenzymologic features of adrenal medulla ganglionic cells 60 days after exposure to detergents].

    PubMed

    Devecerski, V; Marjanov, M; Milićević, S

    1993-01-01

    We investigated histochemical reactions in adrenal medulla sympathic ganglionic cells in the animals who after a 30-day stay in a detergent manufactory department survived 60 days in laboratory conditions. The obtained data show a strong isocytrate dehydrogenase activity in the experimental animals; the reaction to the lactate dehydrogenase activity reflects a decrease of the ganglionic cell volume and a slight decrease of the reaction intensity. The activity of isoenzyme F is mildly increased; similarly was found for isoenzyme S. There was a significant decrease of the succinate dehydrogenase activity--all this was detected in the animals exposed to detergents. Sympathic ganglionic cells within the adrenal medulla are rather sensitive t