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Sample records for interface cell exposure

  1. Air-Liquid Interface Cell Exposures to Nanoparticle Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, Nastassja A; Liu, Nathan J; Asimakopoulou, Akrivi; Papaioannou, Eleni; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios; Riediker, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The field of nanomedicine is steadily growing and several nanomedicines are currently approved for clinical use with even more in the pipeline. Yet, while the use of nanotechnology to improve targeted drug delivery to the lungs has received some attention, the use of nanoparticles for inhalation drug delivery has not yet resulted in successful translation to market as compared to intravenous drug delivery. The reasons behind the lack of inhaled nanomedicines approved for clinical use or under preclinical development are unclear, but challenges related to safety are likely to contribute. Although inhalation toxicology studies often begin using animal models, there has been an increase in the development and use of in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure systems for toxicity testing of engineered nanoparticle aerosols, which will be useful for rapid testing of candidate substances and formulations. This chapter describes an ALI cell exposure assay for measuring toxicological effects, specifically cell viability and oxidative stress, resulting from exposure to aerosols containing nanoparticles.

  2. Exposure of Mammalian Cells to Air-Pollutant Mixtures at the Air-Liquid Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been widely accepted that exposure of mammalian cells to air-pollutant mixtures at the air-liquid interface is a more realistic approach than exposing cell under submerged conditions. The VITROCELL systems, are commercially available systems for air-liquid interface expo...

  3. Exposure of Mammalian Cells to Air-Pollutant Mixtures at the Air-Liquid Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been widely accepted that exposure of mammalian cells to air-pollutant mixtures at the air-liquid interface is a more realistic approach than exposing cell under submerged conditions. The VITROCELL systems, are commercially available systems for air-liquid interface expo...

  4. Growth of human bronchial epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface alters the response to particle exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: We tested the hypothesis that relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface would have an altered response to particle exposure. RNA for IL-8, IL-6, heme oxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 increased following exposure of submer...

  5. Growth of human bronchial epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface alters the response to particle exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: We tested the hypothesis that relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface would have an altered response to particle exposure. RNA for IL-8, IL-6, heme oxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 increased following exposure of submer...

  6. A dose-controlled system for air-liquid interface cell exposure and application to zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and their toxicological effects on human health, as well as on the ecosystem, have become a concern. Since initial contact with nanoparticles occurs at the epithelium in the lungs (or skin, or eyes), in vitro cell studies with nanoparticles require dose-controlled systems for delivery of nanoparticles to epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Results A novel air-liquid interface cell exposure system (ALICE) for nanoparticles in liquids is presented and validated. The ALICE generates a dense cloud of droplets with a vibrating membrane nebulizer and utilizes combined cloud settling and single particle sedimentation for fast (~10 min; entire exposure), repeatable (<12%), low-stress and efficient delivery of nanoparticles, or dissolved substances, to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Validation with various types of nanoparticles (Au, ZnO and carbon black nanoparticles) and solutes (such as NaCl) showed that the ALICE provided spatially uniform deposition (<1.6% variability) and had no adverse effect on the viability of a widely used alveolar human epithelial-like cell line (A549). The cell deposited dose can be controlled with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) over a dynamic range of at least 0.02-200 μg/cm2. The cell-specific deposition efficiency is currently limited to 0.072 (7.2% for two commercially available 6-er transwell plates), but a deposition efficiency of up to 0.57 (57%) is possible for better cell coverage of the exposure chamber. Dose-response measurements with ZnO nanoparticles (0.3-8.5 μg/cm2) showed significant differences in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-8) and oxidative stress (HO-1) markers when comparing submerged and air-liquid interface exposures. Both exposure methods showed no cellular response below 1 μg/cm2 ZnO, which indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are not toxic at occupationally allowed exposure levels. Conclusion The ALICE

  7. A dose-controlled system for air-liquid interface cell exposure and application to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Anke Gabriele; Karg, Erwin; Lentner, Bernd; Dittrich, Vlad; Brandenberger, Christina; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Schulz, Holger; Ferron, George A; Schmid, Otmar

    2009-12-16

    Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and their toxicological effects on human health, as well as on the ecosystem, have become a concern. Since initial contact with nanoparticles occurs at the epithelium in the lungs (or skin, or eyes), in vitro cell studies with nanoparticles require dose-controlled systems for delivery of nanoparticles to epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. A novel air-liquid interface cell exposure system (ALICE) for nanoparticles in liquids is presented and validated. The ALICE generates a dense cloud of droplets with a vibrating membrane nebulizer and utilizes combined cloud settling and single particle sedimentation for fast (~10 min; entire exposure), repeatable (<12%), low-stress and efficient delivery of nanoparticles, or dissolved substances, to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Validation with various types of nanoparticles (Au, ZnO and carbon black nanoparticles) and solutes (such as NaCl) showed that the ALICE provided spatially uniform deposition (<1.6% variability) and had no adverse effect on the viability of a widely used alveolar human epithelial-like cell line (A549). The cell deposited dose can be controlled with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) over a dynamic range of at least 0.02-200 mug/cm(2). The cell-specific deposition efficiency is currently limited to 0.072 (7.2% for two commercially available 6-er transwell plates), but a deposition efficiency of up to 0.57 (57%) is possible for better cell coverage of the exposure chamber. Dose-response measurements with ZnO nanoparticles (0.3-8.5 mug/cm(2)) showed significant differences in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-8) and oxidative stress (HO-1) markers when comparing submerged and air-liquid interface exposures. Both exposure methods showed no cellular response below 1 mug/cm(2 )ZnO, which indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are not toxic at occupationally allowed exposure levels. The ALICE is a useful tool for

  8. Exposure of silver-nanoparticles and silver-ions to lung cells in vitro at the air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to its antibacterial properties, silver (Ag) has been used in more consumer products than any other nanomaterial so far. Despite the promising advantages posed by using Ag-nanoparticles (NPs), their interaction with mammalian systems is currently not fully understood. An exposure route via inhalation is of primary concern for humans in an occupational setting. Aim of this study was therefore to investigate the potential adverse effects of aerosolised Ag-NPs using a human epithelial airway barrier model composed of A549, monocyte derived macrophage and dendritic cells cultured in vitro at the air-liquid interface. Cell cultures were exposed to 20 nm citrate-coated Ag-NPs with a deposition of 30 and 278 ng/cm2 respectively and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. To elucidate whether any effects of Ag-NPs are due to ionic effects, Ag-Nitrate (AgNO3) solutions were aerosolised at the same molecular mass concentrations. Results Agglomerates of Ag-NPs were detected at 24 h post exposure in vesicular structures inside cells but the cellular integrity was not impaired upon Ag-NP exposures. Minimal cytotoxicity, by measuring the release of lactate dehydrogenase, could only be detected following a higher concentrated AgNO3-solution. A release of pro-inflammatory markers TNF-α and IL-8 was neither observed upon Ag-NP and AgNO3 exposures as well as was not affected when cells were pre-stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Also, an induction of mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-8, could only be observed for the highest AgNO3 concentration alone or even significantly increased when pre-stimulated with LPS after 4 h. However, this effect disappeared after 24 h. Furthermore, oxidative stress markers (HMOX-1, SOD-1) were expressed after 4 h in a concentration dependent manner following AgNO3 exposures only. Conclusions With an experimental setup reflecting physiological exposure conditions in the human lung more realistic, the present study indicates that Ag

  9. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iro...

  10. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iro...

  11. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iron homeostas...

  12. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iron homeostas...

  13. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Cell Exposure Systems for in Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared various in vitro exposure systems for their ability to expose cells to particles and gases. The systems tested use different mechanisms to deliver multi-pollutants to the cells: diffusion, sedimentation, thermophoresis (THP) and electrostatic precipitation (ESP). Vari...

  14. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Cell Exposure Systems for in Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared various in vitro exposure systems for their ability to expose cells to particles and gases. The systems tested use different mechanisms to deliver multi-pollutants to the cells: diffusion, sedimentation, thermophoresis (THP) and electrostatic precipitation (ESP). Vari...

  15. Detection of the cytotoxicity of water-insoluble fraction of cigarette smoke by direct exposure to cultured cells at an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nara, Hidenori; Fukano, Yasuo; Nishino, Tomoki; Aufderheide, Michaela

    2013-07-01

    For the biological evaluation of cigarette smoke in vitro, the particulate phase (PP) and the gas vapor phase (GVP) of mainstream smoke have usually been collected individually and exposed to biological material such as cultured cells. Using this traditional method, the GVP is collected by bubbling in an aqueous solution such as phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). In such a way the water-insoluble GVP fraction is excluded from the GVP, meaning that the toxic potential of the water-insoluble GVP fraction has hardly been investigated so far. In our experiments we used a direct exposure method to expose cells at the air-liquid interface (ALI) to the water-insoluble GVP fraction for demonstrating its toxicological/biological activity. In order to isolate the water-insoluble GVP fraction from mainstream smoke, the GVP was passed through 6 impingers connected in series with PBS. After direct exposure of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) with the water-insoluble GVP fraction in the CULTEX(®) system its cytotoxicity was assayed by using the neutral red uptake assay. The water-insoluble GVP fraction was proven to be less cytotoxic than the water-soluble GVP fraction, but showed a significant effect in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study showed that the direct exposure of cultivated cells at the air-liquid interface offers the possibility to analyze the biological and toxicological activities of all fractions of cigarette smoke including the water-insoluble GVP fraction.

  16. Interfaces in perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiangjian; Xu, Xin; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo

    2015-06-03

    The interfacial atomic and electronic structures, charge transfer processes, and interface engineering in perovskite solar cells are discussed in this review. An effective heterojunction is found to exist at the window/perovskite absorber interface, contributing to the relatively fast extraction of free electrons. Moreover, the high photovoltage in this cell can be attributed to slow interfacial charge recombination due to the outstanding material and interfacial electronic properties. However, some fundamental questions including the interfacial atomic and electronic structures and the interface stability need to be further clarified. Designing and engineering the interfaces are also important for the next-stage development of this cell.

  17. Evaluation of air-liquid interface exposure systems for in vitro assessment of airborne pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to airborne pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of submerged cells. The published literature, however, describes irreproducible and/or unrealistic experimental conditions using ALI systems. We have compared fi...

  18. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Exposure Devices for In Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to atmospheric pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of attached cells submerged in liquid medium. However, there is still limited understanding of the ideal ALI device design features that permit reproducible a...

  19. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Exposure Devices for In Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to atmospheric pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of attached cells submerged in liquid medium. However, there is still limited understanding of the ideal ALI device design features that permit reproducible a...

  20. Evaluation of air-liquid interface exposure systems for in vitro assessment of airborne pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to airborne pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of submerged cells. The published literature, however, describes irreproducible and/or unrealistic experimental conditions using ALI systems. We have compared fi...

  1. Repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure alters cell differentiation and augments secretion of inflammatory mediators in air-liquid interface three-dimensional co-culture model of human bronchial tissue.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Ito, Shigeaki

    2017-02-01

    In vitro models of human bronchial epithelium are useful for toxicological testing because of their resemblance to in vivo tissue. We constructed a model of human bronchial tissue which has a fibroblast layer embedded in a collagen matrix directly below a fully-differentiated epithelial cell layer. The model was applied to whole cigarette smoke (CS) exposure repeatedly from an air-liquid interface culture while bronchial epithelial cells were differentiating. The effects of CS exposure on differentiation were determined by histological and gene expression analyses on culture day 21. We found a decrease in ciliated cells and perturbation of goblet cell differentiation. We also analyzed the effects of CS exposure on the inflammatory response, and observed a significant increase in secretion of IL-8, GRO-α, IL-1β, and GM-CSF. Interestingly, secretion of these mediators was augmented with repetition of whole CS exposure. Our data demonstrate the usefulness of our bronchial tissue model for in vitro testing and the importance of exposure repetition in perturbing the differentiation and inflammation processes.

  2. Electronic Interfacing with Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, James T.

    The direct interfacing of living cells with inorganic electronic materials, components or systems has led to the development of two broad categories of devices that can (1) transduce biochemical signals generated by biological components into electrical signals and (2) transduce electronically generated signals into biochemical signals. The first category of devices permits the monitoring of living cells, the second, enables control of cellular processes. This review will survey this exciting area with emphasis on the fundamental issues and obstacles faced by researchers. Devices and applications that use both prokaryotic (microbial) and eukaryotic (mammalian) cells will be covered. Individual devices described include microbial biofuel cells that produce electricity, bioelectrical reactors that enable electronic control of cellular metabolism, living cell biosensors for the detection of chemicals and devices that permit monitoring and control of mammalian physiology.

  3. Fuel-cell simulator interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrei V.; Zhang, Hanzhou; Sowers, B.; Burt, A.; Celik, I.

    A 3D drawing methodology based on voxel-graphics was applied to the design of multi-component engineering systems, such as fuel-cells. Using this methodology and Java-technology a graphics user interface (GUI) for a fuel-cell simulator program was developed and used in simulations of large fuel-cell stacks. The GUI is capable to setup, run and monitor simulations remotely from a web-browser. The geometric design module was implemented using 3D voxel sculpting methodology and data visualization, which is prototyped after 2D pixel graphics systems. The developed approach was primarily aimed at the design of complex multi-component engineering systems. However, the flexibility of voxel-based geometry representation enables one to use this technique for both 3D geometric design and visualization of unstructured volume data. Examples of both applications are presented, with the focus on fuel-cell stack simulations.

  4. Responsive cell-material interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dhowre, Hala S; Rajput, Sunil; Russell, Noah A; Zelzer, Mischa

    2015-01-01

    Major design aspects for novel biomaterials are driven by the desire to mimic more varied and complex properties of a natural cellular environment with man-made materials. The development of stimulus responsive materials makes considerable contributions to the effort to incorporate dynamic and reversible elements into a biomaterial. This is particularly challenging for cell-material interactions that occur at an interface (biointerfaces); however, the design of responsive biointerfaces also presents opportunities in a variety of applications in biomedical research and regenerative medicine. This review will identify the requirements imposed on a responsive biointerface and use recent examples to demonstrate how some of these requirements have been met. Finally, the next steps in the development of more complex biomaterial interfaces, including multiple stimuli-responsive surfaces, surfaces of 3D objects and interactive biointerfaces will be discussed.

  5. Film bonded fuel cell interface configuration

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. A multi-layer arrangement for the interface provides bridging electrical contact with a hot-pressed resin filling the void space.

  6. Phenotypic modification of human airway epithelial cells in air-liquid interface culture induced by exposure to the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK).

    PubMed

    Carson, Johnny L; Brighton, Luisa E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-04-01

    The nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a potent tobacco-specific carcinogen. We used an air-liquid interface epithelial cell culture system to model changes associated with NNK exposure relative to pathologies documented in human tobacco-related illnesses. Although in vitro systems exhibit certain limitations, they often offer accentuation of subtle pathologies. While the distribution of cell types in control cultures typically favors the ciliated cell phenotype, NNK-exposed cultures transitioned to non-ciliated cell phenotypes as well as reflecting features consistent with squamous metaplasia. We conclude that NNK impacts normal growth and differentiation of human airway epithelium in a short interval of time in vitro.

  7. Longitudinal Hierarchy Co3O4 Mesocrystals with High-dense Exposure Facets and Anisotropic Interfaces for Direct-Ethanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Diab; El-Safty, Sherif A; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Elmarakbi, Ahmed; Shenashen, Mohamed A; Sakai, Masaru

    2016-04-14

    Novel electrodes are needed for direct ethanol fuel cells with improved quality. Hierarchical engineering can produce catalysts composed of mesocrystals with many exposed active planes and multi-diffused voids. Here we report a simple, one-pot, hydrothermal method for fabricating Co3O4/carbon/substrate electrodes that provides control over the catalyst mesocrystal morphology (i.e., corn tubercle pellets or banana clusters oriented along nanotube domains, or layered lamina or multiple cantilevered sheets). These morphologies afforded catalysts with a high density of exposed active facets, a diverse range of mesopores in the cage interior, a window architecture, and vertical alignment to the substrate, which improved efficiency in an ethanol electrooxidation reaction compared with a conventional platinum/carbon electrode. On the atomic scale, the longitudinally aligned architecture of the Co3O4 mesocrystals resulted in exposed low- and high-index single and interface surfaces that had improved electron transport and diffusion compared with currently used electrodes.

  8. Longitudinal Hierarchy Co3O4 Mesocrystals with High-dense Exposure Facets and Anisotropic Interfaces for Direct-Ethanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassen, Diab; El-Safty, Sherif A.; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Elmarakbi, Ahmed; Shenashen, Mohamed. A.; Sakai, Masaru

    2016-04-01

    Novel electrodes are needed for direct ethanol fuel cells with improved quality. Hierarchical engineering can produce catalysts composed of mesocrystals with many exposed active planes and multi-diffused voids. Here we report a simple, one-pot, hydrothermal method for fabricating Co3O4/carbon/substrate electrodes that provides control over the catalyst mesocrystal morphology (i.e., corn tubercle pellets or banana clusters oriented along nanotube domains, or layered lamina or multiple cantilevered sheets). These morphologies afforded catalysts with a high density of exposed active facets, a diverse range of mesopores in the cage interior, a window architecture, and vertical alignment to the substrate, which improved efficiency in an ethanol electrooxidation reaction compared with a conventional platinum/carbon electrode. On the atomic scale, the longitudinally aligned architecture of the Co3O4 mesocrystals resulted in exposed low- and high-index single and interface surfaces that had improved electron transport and diffusion compared with currently used electrodes.

  9. Longitudinal Hierarchy Co3O4 Mesocrystals with High-dense Exposure Facets and Anisotropic Interfaces for Direct-Ethanol Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hassen, Diab; El-Safty, Sherif A.; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Elmarakbi, Ahmed; Shenashen, Mohamed. A.; Sakai, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Novel electrodes are needed for direct ethanol fuel cells with improved quality. Hierarchical engineering can produce catalysts composed of mesocrystals with many exposed active planes and multi-diffused voids. Here we report a simple, one-pot, hydrothermal method for fabricating Co3O4/carbon/substrate electrodes that provides control over the catalyst mesocrystal morphology (i.e., corn tubercle pellets or banana clusters oriented along nanotube domains, or layered lamina or multiple cantilevered sheets). These morphologies afforded catalysts with a high density of exposed active facets, a diverse range of mesopores in the cage interior, a window architecture, and vertical alignment to the substrate, which improved efficiency in an ethanol electrooxidation reaction compared with a conventional platinum/carbon electrode. On the atomic scale, the longitudinally aligned architecture of the Co3O4 mesocrystals resulted in exposed low- and high-index single and interface surfaces that had improved electron transport and diffusion compared with currently used electrodes. PMID:27075551

  10. Ciliatoxicity in human primary bronchiolar epithelial cells after repeated exposure at the air-liquid interface with native mainstream smoke of K3R4F cigarettes with and without charcoal filter.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Scheffler, Stefanie; Ito, Shigeaki; Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Emura, Makito

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance is the primary physical mechanism to protect the human airways against harmful effects of inhaled particles. Environmental factors play a significant role in the impairment of this defense mechanism, whereas cigarette smoke is discussed to be one of the clinically most important causes. Impaired mucociliary clearance in smokers has been connected to changes in ciliated cells such as decreased numbers, altered structure and beat frequency. Clinical studies have shown that cilia length is reduced in healthy smokers and that long-term exposure to cigarette smoke leads to reduced numbers of ciliated cells in mice. We present an in vitro model of primary normal human bronchiolar epithelial (NHBE) cells with in vivo like morphology to study the influence of cigarette mainstream smoke on ciliated cells. We exposed mucociliary differentiated cultures repeatedly to non-toxic concentrations of mainstream cigarette smoke (4 cigarettes, 5 days/week, 8 repetitions in total) at the air-liquid interface. Charcoal filter tipped cigarettes were compared to those being equipped with standard cellulose acetate filters. Histopathological analyses of the exposed cultures showed a reduction of cilia bearing cells, shortening of existing cilia and finally disappearance of all cilia in cigarette smoke exposed cells. In cultures exposed to charcoal filtered cigarette smoke, little changes in cilia length were seen after four exposure repetitions, but those effects were reversed after a two day recovery period. Those differences indicate that volatile organic compounds, being removed by the charcoal filter tip, affect primary bronchiolar epithelial cells concerning their cilia formation and function comparable with the in vivo situation. In conclusion, our in vitro model presents a valuable tool to study air-borne ciliatoxic compounds. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  11. Film bonded fuel cell interface configuration

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to improved elements for use in fuel cell stacks, and more particularly, to a stack having a corrosion-resistant, electrally conductive, fluid-impervious interface member therein.

  12. Air-liquid interface exposure to aerosols of poorly soluble nanomaterials induces different biological activation levels compared to exposure to suspensions.

    PubMed

    Loret, Thomas; Peyret, Emmanuel; Dubreuil, Marielle; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Bressot, Christophe; le Bihan, Olivier; Amodeo, Tanguy; Trouiller, Bénédicte; Braun, Anne; Egles, Christophe; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2016-11-03

    Recently, much progress has been made to develop more physiologic in vitro models of the respiratory system and improve in vitro simulation of particle exposure through inhalation. Nevertheless, the field of nanotoxicology still suffers from a lack of relevant in vitro models and exposure methods to predict accurately the effects observed in vivo, especially after respiratory exposure. In this context, the aim of our study was to evaluate if exposing pulmonary cells at the air-liquid interface to aerosols of inhalable and poorly soluble nanomaterials generates different toxicity patterns and/or biological activation levels compared to classic submerged exposures to suspensions. Three nano-TiO2 and one nano-CeO2 were used. An exposure system was set up using VitroCell® devices to expose pulmonary cells at the air-liquid interface to aerosols. A549 alveolar cells in monocultures or in co-cultures with THP-1 macrophages were exposed to aerosols in inserts or to suspensions in inserts and in plates. Submerged exposures in inserts were performed, using similar culture conditions and exposure kinetics to the air-liquid interface, to provide accurate comparisons between the methods. Exposure in plates using classical culture and exposure conditions was performed to provide comparable results with classical submerged exposure studies. The biological activity of the cells (inflammation, cell viability, oxidative stress) was assessed at 24 h and comparisons of the nanomaterial toxicities between exposure methods were performed. Deposited doses of nanomaterials achieved using our aerosol exposure system were sufficient to observe adverse effects. Co-cultures were more sensitive than monocultures and biological responses were usually observed at lower doses at the air-liquid interface than in submerged conditions. Nevertheless, the general ranking of the nanomaterials according to their toxicity was similar across the different exposure methods used. We showed that exposure

  13. Optimization of an air-liquid interface exposure system for assessing toxicity of airborne nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Latvala, Siiri; Hedberg, Jonas; Möller, Lennart; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Karlsson, Hanna L; Elihn, Karine

    2016-10-01

    The use of refined toxicological methods is currently needed for characterizing the risks of airborne nanoparticles (NPs) to human health. To mimic pulmonary exposure, we have developed an air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system for direct deposition of airborne NPs on to lung cell cultures. Compared to traditional submerged systems, this allows more realistic exposure conditions for characterizing toxicological effects induced by airborne NPs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the deposition of silver NPs (AgNPs) is affected by different conditions of the ALI system. Additionally, the viability and metabolic activity of A549 cells was studied following AgNP exposure. Particle deposition increased markedly with increasing aerosol flow rate and electrostatic field strength. The highest amount of deposited particles (2.2 μg cm(-2) ) at cell-free conditions following 2 h exposure was observed for the highest flow rate (390 ml min(-1) ) and the strongest electrostatic field (±2 kV). This was estimated corresponding to deposition efficiency of 94%. Cell viability was not affected after 2 h exposure to clean air in the ALI system. Cells exposed to AgNPs (0.45 and 0.74 μg cm(-2) ) showed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced metabolic activities (64 and 46%, respectively). Our study shows that the ALI exposure system can be used for generating conditions that were more realistic for in vitro exposures, which enables improved mechanistic and toxicological studies of NPs in contact with human lung cells.Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The use of a 0.20 μm particulate matter filter decreases cytotoxicity in lung epithelial cells following air-liquid interface exposure to motorcycle exhaust.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhang, Xueyan; Zhong, Lei; Cui, Qiang; Hu, Xiaoyu; Li, Bin; Wang, Zhongxu; Dai, Yufei; Zheng, Yuxin; Bin, Ping

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the use of a 0.20 μm particulate matter (PM) filter reduced the cytotoxicity induced by motorcycle exhaust (ME), a mixture of gases and particles, in lung epithelial cells cultured in air-liquid interface (ALI) inserts. The concentrations of PM, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, total hydrocarbons (THC), total volatile organic compounds, and nitrogen oxides in both filtered ME (fME) by a 0.20 μm filter and non-filtered ME (non-fME) were measured. Lung epithelial cells were exposed to clean air, fME, or non-fME in the ALI chamber. Cell relative viabilities (CRV) and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined. Our results revealed that PM2.5 was the main compound of PM in ME. After filtration, PM and THC levels were significantly reduced, as compared with non-fME. When compared with the clean air exposed group, the CRV in both fME and non-fME-exposed group was significantly reduced (p < 0.001), while their ROS generation were markedly increased (p < 0.001). When compared with non-fME-exposed group, the CRV and ROS generation were significantly improved following fME exposure (p < 0.05). As a result, of PM and THC concentrations were decreased approximately 90% and 22.71%, respectively, the CRV was improved from 40.4% (non-fME) to 55.7% (fME), and the increased ROS generation by non-fME was decreased about 51.6%. When BEAS-2B cells were exposed to fME, a time-dependent reduction in CRV was observed. In conclusion, our findings suggest that ME-exposure in the ALI system induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress responses. The addition of a 0.20 μm PM filter significantly modifies the particulate composition in PM and the concentration of THC, and shows protective effects by improving the survival of exposed lung epithelial cells and reducing the ROS generation. Therefore, emission factors such as different size of PM and THC from motorcycles may play a role in ME-induced toxicity. Copyright

  15. Optimization of an air–liquid interface exposure system for assessing toxicity of airborne nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Latvala, Siiri; Hedberg, Jonas; Möller, Lennart; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Karlsson, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of refined toxicological methods is currently needed for characterizing the risks of airborne nanoparticles (NPs) to human health. To mimic pulmonary exposure, we have developed an air–liquid interface (ALI) exposure system for direct deposition of airborne NPs on to lung cell cultures. Compared to traditional submerged systems, this allows more realistic exposure conditions for characterizing toxicological effects induced by airborne NPs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the deposition of silver NPs (AgNPs) is affected by different conditions of the ALI system. Additionally, the viability and metabolic activity of A549 cells was studied following AgNP exposure. Particle deposition increased markedly with increasing aerosol flow rate and electrostatic field strength. The highest amount of deposited particles (2.2 μg cm–2) at cell‐free conditions following 2 h exposure was observed for the highest flow rate (390 ml min–1) and the strongest electrostatic field (±2 kV). This was estimated corresponding to deposition efficiency of 94%. Cell viability was not affected after 2 h exposure to clean air in the ALI system. Cells exposed to AgNPs (0.45 and 0.74 μg cm–2) showed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced metabolic activities (64 and 46%, respectively). Our study shows that the ALI exposure system can be used for generating conditions that were more realistic for in vitro exposures, which enables improved mechanistic and toxicological studies of NPs in contact with human lung cells.Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26935862

  16. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  17. Process for making film-bonded fuel cell interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1990-07-03

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. A multi-layer arrangement for the interface provides bridging electrical contact with a hot-pressed resin filling the void space.

  18. Cell instructive microporous scaffolds through interface engineering.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Ngamkham, Kamolchanok; Engler, Adam J; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2012-12-12

    The design of novel biomaterials for regenerative medicine requires incorporation of well-defined physical and chemical properties that mimic the native extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of porous foams prepared by high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templating using amphiphilic copolymers that act as surfactants during the HIPE process. We combine different copolymers exploiting oil-water interface confined phase separation to engineer the surface topology of foam pores with nanoscopic domains of cell inert and active chemistries mimicking native matrix. We further demonstrate how proteins and hMSCs adhere in a domain specific manner.

  19. Evaluation of air-liquid interface exposure systems for in vitro ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure of cells to airborne pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of submerged cells. The published literature, however, describes irreproducible and/or unrealistic experimental conditions using ALI systems. We have compared five ALI systems for their ability to deliver both particulate matter (PM) and gases to cells cultured on porous membrane inserts. The ALI systems use different mechanisms to deliver pollutants to the inserts: diffusion, sedimentation, electrostatic precipitation (ESP), and thermophoresis (THP). We used fluorescent polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) as a surrogate for PM to assess the efficacy of particle deposition in each system. PM loading in each insert was determined by dissolving the PSLs in ethyl acetate and measuring the fluorescence. Results show that using ESP as an external force enhances deposition of 50-nm PSLs by 5.5-fold and 11-fold for 1-µm PSLs when compared to diffusion alone. Similarly, THP enhances deposition of 50-nm and 1-µm PSLs by 4.5-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively. The interaction of ozone with an indigo dye on the surface of the insert showed that diffusion alone permitted gas-cell interaction. For each system there were various design and operational factors, such as the flow rate, surface materials and flow path geometry that adversely affected performance. Increased flow rates correlated with increased efficacy of the systems to deliver the gas to the inserts.

  20. Lung toxicity determination by in vitro exposure at the air liquid interface with an integrated online dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülhopt, Sonja; Diabaté, S.; Krebs, T.; Weiss, C.; Paur, H.-R.

    2009-05-01

    Epidemiological studies show an association between the concentration of ultrafine particles in the atmosphere and the rate of mortality or morbidity due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. For the quantitative assessment of the toxicity of airborne nanoparticles the dose-response relationship is tested in in vitro test systems using bioassays of cell cultures as sensor. For the air-liquid interface exposure of cell cultures towards aerosols the Karlsruhe exposure system was developed. The human lung cell cultures are exposed in VITROCELL® system modules with a constant flow of the conditioned aerosol. After exposure the cells are analyzed to measure the biological responses such as viability, inflammatory or oxidative stress. For the determination of the dose response relationship the accurate knowledge of the deposited particle mass is essential. A new online method is developed in the Karlsruhe exposure system: the sensor of a quartz crystal microbalance is placed in an exposure chamber instead of the membrane insert and exposed to the aerosol in the same way as the cell cultures. The deposited mass per area unit is monitored as a function of exposure time showing a linear relationship for a constant aerosol flow with defined particle concentration. A comparison of this new dose signal to a dosimetry method using fluorescein sodium particles shows a very good correlation between the sensor signal of the quartz crystal microbalance and the deposited mass on the membranes shown by spectroscopy. This system for the first time provides an online dose measurement for in vitro experiments with nanoparticles.

  1. Usefulness of toxicological validation of VOCs catalytic degradation by air-liquid interface exposure system.

    PubMed

    Al Zallouha, Margueritta; Landkocz, Yann; Brunet, Julien; Cousin, Renaud; Genty, Eric; Courcot, Dominique; Siffert, Stéphane; Shirali, Pirouz; Billet, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Toluene is one of the most used Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the industry despite its major health impacts. Catalytic oxidation represents an efficient remediation technique in order to reduce its emission directly at the source, but it can release by-products. To complete the classical performance assessment using dedicated analytical chemistry methods, we propose to perform an untargeted toxicological validation on two efficient catalysts. Using biological system allows integrating synergy and antagonism in toxic effects of emitted VOCs and by-products, often described in case of multi-exposure condition. Catalysts Pd/α-Al2O3 and Pd/γ-Al2O3 developed for the oxidation of toluene were both coupled to a Vitrocell(®) Air-Liquid Interface (ALI) system, for exposure of human A549 lung cells during 1h to toluene or to catalysts exhaust before quantification of xenobiotics metabolizing enzymes. This study validated initially the Vitrocell(®) as an innovative, direct and dynamic model of ALI exposure in the assessment of the performances of new catalysts, showing the presence of chemically undetected by-products. The comparison of the two catalysts showed then that fewer organic compounds metabolizing genes were induced by Pd/γ-Al2O3 in comparison to Pd/α-Al2O3, suggesting that Pd/γ-Al2O3 is more efficient for toluene total oxidation from a toxicological point of view.

  2. Plastic solar cell interface and morphological characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guralnick, Brett W.

    Plastic solar cell research has become an intense field of study considering these devices may be lightweight, flexible and reduce the cost of photovoltaic devices. The active layer of plastic solar cells are a combination of two organic components which blend to form an internal morphology. Due to the poor electrical transport properties of the organic components it is important to understand how the morphology forms in order to engineer these materials for increased efficiency. The focus of this thesis is a detailed study of the interfaces between the plastic solar cell layers and the morphology of the active layer. The system studied in detail is a blend of P3HT and PCBM that acts as the primary absorber, which is the electron donor, and the electron acceptor, respectively. The key morphological findings are, while thermal annealing increases the crystallinity parallel to the substrate, the morphology is largely unchanged following annealing. The deposition and mixing conditions of the bulk heterojunction from solution control the starting morphology. The spin coating speed, concentration, solvent type, and solution mixing time are all critical variables in the formation of the bulk heterojunction. In addition, including the terminals or inorganic layers in the analysis is critical because the inorganic surface properties influence the morphology. Charge transfer in the device occurs at the material interfaces, and a highly resistive transparent conducting oxide layer limits device performance. It was discovered that the electron blocking layer between the transparent conducting oxide and the bulk heterojunction is compromised following annealing. The electron acceptor material can diffuse into this layer, a location which does not benefit device performance. Additionally, the back contact deposition is important since the organic material can be damaged by the thermal evaporation of Aluminum, typically used for plastic solar cells. Depositing a thin thermal and

  3. A sharp interface in-cell-reconstruction method for volume tracking phase interfaces in compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedelty, Dominic; Ballesteros, Carlos; Chan, Ronald; Herrmann, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    To accurately predict the interaction of the interface with shocks and rarefaction waves, sharp interface methods maintaining the interface as a discontinuity are preferable to capturing methods that tend to smear the interface. We present a hybrid capturing/tracking method (Smiljanovski et al., 1997) that couples an unsplit geometric volume tracking method (Owkes & Desjardins, 2014) to a finite volume wave propagation scheme (LeVeque, 2010). In cells containing the phase interface, states on either side are reconstructed using the jump conditions across the interface, the geometric information of the volume tracking method, and the cell averages of the finite volume method. Cell face Riemann problems are then solved within each phase separately, resulting in area fraction weighted fluxes that update the cell averages directly. This, together with a linearization of the wave interaction across cell faces avoids the small cut-cell time step limitation of typical tracking methods. However, the interaction of waves with the phase interface cannot be linearized and is solved using either exact or approximate two-phase Riemann solvers with arbitrary jumps in the equation of state. Several test cases highlight the capabilities of the new method. Support by the 2016 CTR Summer program at Stanford University and Taitech, Inc. under subcontract TS15-16-02-005 is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1986-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

  5. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  6. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao Sites, James R.; Kanevce, Ana

    2016-06-21

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔE{sub C} ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔE{sub C}, often referred to as a “spike,” creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔE{sub C} ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a “cliff” (ΔE{sub C} < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔE{sub C} of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔE{sub C}. These

  7. A Voronoi Interface approach to cell aggregate electropermeabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittet, Arthur; Poignard, Clair; Gibou, Frederic

    2017-03-01

    We present a Voronoi Interface approach to the study of cell electropermeabilization. We consider the nonlinear electropermeabilization model of Poignard et al. [20], which takes into account the jump in the voltage potential across cells' membrane. The jump condition is imposed in a sharp manner, using the Voronoi Interface Method of Guittet et al. [14], while adaptive Quad/Oc-tree grids are employed to automatically refine near the cells boundary for increased accuracy. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the accuracy of the methods. We also carry out simulations in three spatial dimensions to investigate the influence of shadowing and of the cells shape on the degree of permeabilization.

  8. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-17

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ..delta..EC, often referred to as a 'spike', creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (..delta..EC >/= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted to yield higher

  9. NANOPATTERNED INTERFACES FOR CONTROLLING CELL BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, KEVIN; DeQUACH, JESSICA A.; CHRISTMAN, KAREN L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that microscale changes to surface chemistry and topography affect cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and gene expression. More recently, studies have begun to examine cell behavior interactions with structures on the nanoscale since in vivo, cells recognize and adhere to cell adhesion receptors that are spatially organized on this scale. These studies have been enabled through various fabrication methods, many of which were initially developed for the semiconductor industry. This review explores cell responses to a variety of controlled topographical and biochemical cues using an assortment of nanoscale fabrication methods in order to elucidate which pattern dimensions are beneficial for controlling cell adhesion and differentiation. PMID:25383101

  10. Graphene-Based Interfaces Do Not Alter Target Nerve Cells.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Scaini, Denis; León, Verónica; Vázquez, Ester; Cellot, Giada; Privitera, Giulia; Lombardi, Lucia; Torrisi, Felice; Tomarchio, Flavia; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bosi, Susanna; Ferrari, Andrea C; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2016-01-26

    Neural-interfaces rely on the ability of electrodes to transduce stimuli into electrical patterns delivered to the brain. In addition to sensitivity to the stimuli, stability in the operating conditions and efficient charge transfer to neurons, the electrodes should not alter the physiological properties of the target tissue. Graphene is emerging as a promising material for neuro-interfacing applications, given its outstanding physico-chemical properties. Here, we use graphene-based substrates (GBSs) to interface neuronal growth. We test our GBSs on brain cell cultures by measuring functional and synaptic integrity of the emerging neuronal networks. We show that GBSs are permissive interfaces, even when uncoated by cell adhesion layers, retaining unaltered neuronal signaling properties, thus being suitable for carbon-based neural prosthetic devices.

  11. Interface mechanics determining biological cell shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Carthew, Richard

    2006-11-01

    To form a functional tissue, biological cells often adhere to each other establishing connections between membranes by means of cadherin molecules. The cells achieve a well-defined relative orientation as well as a faithfully prescribed shape. An excellent example is the cell cluster making up each ommatidium element in the drosophila eye. The similarity of the shape of these cells to connected soap bubbles has been remarked upon [1]. We show that, in order to explain the observed shapes of wild-type and mutant ommatidia, the soap film model has to be expanded into a realistic description of biological membranes and their mechanical properties including changes in interfacial tension due to the presence of cadherins. Surface Evolver simulations demonstrate that realistic modeling of the shape of cell clusters can be obtained using surface energy terms only, emphasizing the importance of interfacial phenomena in cell mechanics and cell morphology. [1] T. Hayashi & R. W. Carthew, Nature 431, 647 (2004)

  12. Perovskite solar cells: Stability lies at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira-Cantú, Mónica

    2017-07-01

    Perovskite solar cells are developing fast but their lifetimes must be extended. Now, large-area printed perovskite solar modules have been shown to be stable for more than 10,000 hours under continuous illumination.

  13. In vitro toxicity testing of cigarette smoke based on the air-liquid interface exposure: A review.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Cigarette smoke is a complex aerosol comprising particulate phase and gaseous vapour phase. The air-liquid interface exposure provides a possible technical means to implement whole smoke exposure for the assessment of tobacco products. In this review, the research progress in the in vitro toxicity testing of cigarette smoke based on the air-liquid interface exposure is summarized. The contents presented involve mainly cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, systems toxicology, 3D culture and cigarette smoke dosimetry related to cigarette smoke, as well as the assessment of electronic cigarette aerosol. Prospect of the application of the air-liquid interface exposure method in assessing the biological effects of tobacco smoke is discussed.

  14. Interface engineering of Graphene-Silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dikai; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Lifei; Yang, Deren

    2016-11-01

    Graphene has attracted great research interests due to its unique mechanical, electrical and optical properties, which opens up a huge number of opportunities for applications. Recently, Graphene-Silicon (Grsbnd Si) solar cell has been recognized as one interesting candidate for the future photovoltaic. Since the first Grsbnd Si solar cell reported in 2010, Grsbnd Si solar cell has been intensively investigated and the power converse efficiency (PCE) of it has been developed to 15.6%. This review presents and discusses current development of Grsbnd Si solar cell. Firstly, the basic concept and mechanism of Grsbnd Si solar cell are introduced. Then, several key technologies are introduced to improve the performance of Grsbnd Si solar cells, such as chemical doping, annealing, Si surface passivation and interlayer insertion. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies for Grsbnd Si interface engineering. Finally, new pathways and opportunities of "MIS-like structure" Grsbnd Si solar cells are described.

  15. Cigarette smoke alters primary human bronchial epithelial cell differentiation at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Schamberger, Andrea C; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A; Mise-Racek, Nikica; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-02-02

    The differentiated human airway epithelium consists of different cell types forming a polarized and pseudostratified epithelium. This is dramatically altered in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by basal and goblet cell hyperplasia, and squamous cell metaplasia. The effect of cigarette smoke on human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) differentiation remains to be elucidated. We analysed whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affected primary (p)HBEC differentiation and function. pHBEC were differentiated at the air-liquid interface (ALI) and differentiation was quantified after 7, 14, 21, or 28 days by assessing acetylated tubulin, CC10, or MUC5AC for ciliated, Clara, or goblet cells, respectively. Exposure of differentiating pHBEC to CSE impaired epithelial barrier formation, as assessed by resistance measurements (TEER). Importantly, CSE exposure significantly reduced the number of ciliated cells, while it increased the number of Clara and goblet cells. CSE-dependent cell number changes were reflected by a reduction of acetylated tubulin levels, an increased expression of the basal cell marker KRT14, and increased secretion of CC10, but not by changes in transcript levels of CC10, MUC5AC, or FOXJ1. Our data demonstrate that cigarette smoke specifically alters the cellular composition of the airway epithelium by affecting basal cell differentiation in a post-transcriptional manner.

  16. SIGNALING PATHWAYS ASSOCIATED WITH VX EXPOSURE IN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-01

    SIGNALING PATHWAYS ASSOCIATED WITH VX EXPOSURE IN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS ECBC-TR-1452 Daniel Angelini Christopher Phillips Amber Prugh... Associated with VX Exposure in Mesenchymal Stem Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Angelini...gain insights into the signaling pathways associated with VX exposure. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC

  17. Programmable cells: Interfacing natural and engineered gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Kærn, Mads; Araki, Michihiro; Chung, Kristy; Gardner, Timothy S.; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, James J.

    2004-06-01

    Novel cellular behaviors and characteristics can be obtained by coupling engineered gene networks to the cell's natural regulatory circuitry through appropriately designed input and output interfaces. Here, we demonstrate how an engineered genetic circuit can be used to construct cells that respond to biological signals in a predetermined and programmable fashion. We employ a modular design strategy to create Escherichia coli strains where a genetic toggle switch is interfaced with: (i) the SOS signaling pathway responding to DNA damage, and (ii) a transgenic quorum sensing signaling pathway from Vibrio fischeri. The genetic toggle switch endows these strains with binary response dynamics and an epigenetic inheritance that supports a persistent phenotypic alteration in response to transient signals. These features are exploited to engineer cells that form biofilms in response to DNA-damaging agents and cells that activate protein synthesis when the cell population reaches a critical density. Our work represents a step toward the development of "plug-and-play" genetic circuitry that can be used to create cells with programmable behaviors. heterologous gene expression | synthetic biology | Escherichia coli

  18. Exposure chamber measurements of mass transfer and partitioning at the plant/air interface.

    PubMed

    Maddalena, Randy L; McKone, Thomas E; Kado, Norman Y

    2002-08-15

    Dynamic measures of air and vegetation concentrations in an exposure chamber and a two-box mass balance model are used to quantify factors that control the rate and extent of chemical partitioning between vegetation and the atmosphere. A continuous stirred flow-through exposure chamber was used to investigate the gas-phase transfer of pollutants between air and plants. A probabilistic two-compartment mass balance model of plant/air exchange within the exposure chamber was developed and used with measured concentrations from the chamber to simultaneously evaluate partitioning (Kpa), overall mass transfer across the plant/air interface (Upa), and loss rates in the atmosphere (Ra) and aboveground vegetation (Rp). The approach is demonstrated using mature Capsicum annuum (bell pepper) plants exposed to phenanthrene (PH), anthracene (AN), fluoranthene (FL) and pyrene (PY). Measured values of log Kpa (V[air]/V[fresh plant]) were 5.7, 5.7, 6.0, and 6.2 for PH, AN, FL, and PY, respectively. Values of Upa (m d(-1)) under the conditions of this study ranged from 42 for PH to 119 for FL. After correcting for wall effects, the estimated reaction half-lives in air were 3, 9, and 25 h for AN, FL and PY. Reaction half-lives in the plant compartment were 17, 6, 17, and 5 d for PH, AN, FL, and PY, respectively. The combined use of exposure chamber measurements and models provides a robust tool for simultaneously measuring several different transfer factors that are important for modeling the uptake of pollutants into vegetation.

  19. Effective denitrification at the groundwater surface-water interface: exposure rather than residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, Stefan; Frei, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Effective processing of material in aquatic systems, e. g. removal of nitrate upon denitrification, requires sufficient reaction time. This statement sounds trivial albeit its implication for biogeochemistry seems to be not fully recognized. The time teff required for effective processing of nitrate is controlled by the underlying biogeochemical rate law. In the simplest case of a 1st order reaction, teff is often calculated as the time when 63% of the initial concentration is consumed setting teff as 1/kreaction. It may, however, be more appropriate to derive teff,90%or teff,99% from the respective rate law. Hence a minimum time t > teff is required that exposes a specific biogeochemical process to conditions favourable for this process, which is anoxia in case of denitrification. This exposure time τexp is not necessarily identical to the residence time τ of water in the particular system or flow path. Rather, the exposure time can be much shorter and may even fluctuate with time. As a consequence, Damköhler numbers (Da = τexp/teff) for denitrification < 1 may be the consequence even though the age of water may be comparatively high. We therefore argue that the key for understanding denitrification efficiency at the groundwater surface-water interface (or in groundwater systems in general) is the quantification of the exposure time. This contribution therefore aims i) to estimate exposure times required for effective denitrification based on an analysis of rate constants for denitrification, ii) to relate these time scales to typical residence time distributions found at the groundwater surface-water interface and iii) to discuss implications for denitrification efficiencies. References: Oldham, C; Farrow, DE; Peiffer, S (2013): A generalized Damköhler number for classifying material processing in hydrological systems, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17, 1133-1148 Frei, S; Knorr, KH; Peiffer, S; Fleckenstein, J (2012): Surface micro-topography causes

  20. Assessing wildfire exposure in the Wildland-Urban Interface area of the mountains of central Argentina.

    PubMed

    Argañaraz, J P; Radeloff, V C; Bar-Massada, A; Gavier-Pizarro, G I; Scavuzzo, C M; Bellis, L M

    2017-03-24

    Wildfires are a major threat to people and property in Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) communities worldwide, but while the patterns of the WUI in North America, Europe and Oceania have been studied before, this is not the case in Latin America. Our goals were to a) map WUI areas in central Argentina, and b) assess wildfire exposure for WUI communities in relation to historic fires, with special emphasis on large fires and estimated burn probability based on an empirical model. We mapped the WUI in the mountains of central Argentina (810,000 ha), after digitizing the location of 276,700 buildings and deriving vegetation maps from satellite imagery. The areas where houses and wildland vegetation intermingle were classified as Intermix WUI (housing density > 6.17 hu/km(2) and wildland vegetation cover > 50%), and the areas where wildland vegetation abuts settlements were classified as Interface WUI (housing density > 6.17 hu/km(2), wildland vegetation cover < 50%, but within 600 m of a vegetated patch larger than 5 km(2)). We generated burn probability maps based on historical fire data from 1999 to 2011; as well as from an empirical model of fire frequency. WUI areas occupied 15% of our study area and contained 144,000 buildings (52%). Most WUI area was Intermix WUI, but most WUI buildings were in the Interface WUI. Our findings suggest that central Argentina has a WUI fire problem. WUI areas included most of the buildings exposed to wildfires and most of the buildings located in areas of higher burn probability. Our findings can help focus fire management activities in areas of higher risk, and ultimately provide support for landscape management and planning aimed at reducing wildfire risk in WUI communities.

  1. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  2. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  3. Multifunctional Fullerene Derivative for Interface Engineering in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaowen; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Qi; Yang, Yang Michael; Liu, Yongsheng; Hong, Ziruo; Liu, Zonghao; Hsieh, Yao-Tsung; Meng, Lei; Li, Yongfang; Yang, Yang

    2015-12-16

    In perovskite based planar heterojunction solar cells, the interface between the TiO2 compact layer and the perovskite film is critical for high photovoltaic performance. The deep trap states on the TiO2 surface induce several challenging issues, such as charge recombination loss and poor stability etc. To solve the problems, we synthesized a triblock fullerene derivative (PCBB-2CN-2C8) via rational molecular design for interface engineering in the perovskite solar cells. Modifying the TiO2 surface with the compound significantly improves charge extraction from the perovskite layer. Together with its uplifted surface work function, open circuit voltage and fill factor are dramatically increased from 0.99 to 1.06 V, and from 72.2% to 79.1%, respectively, resulting in 20.7% improvement in power conversion efficiency for the best performing devices. Scrutinizing the electrical properties of this modified interfacial layer strongly suggests that PCBB-2CN-2C8 passivates the TiO2 surface and thus reduces charge recombination loss caused by the deep trap states of TiO2. The passivation effect is further proven by stability testing of the perovskite solar cells with shelf lifetime under ambient conditions improved by a factor of more than 4, from ∼40 h to ∼200 h, using PCBB-2CN-2C8 as the TiO2 modification layer. This work offers not only a promising material for cathode interface engineering, but also provides a viable approach to address the challenges of deep trap states on TiO2 surface in planar perovskite solar cells.

  4. Updating the Tools Used to Estimate Space Radiation Exposures for Operations: Codes, Models and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapp, E.; Shelfer, T.; Semones, E.; Johnson, A.; Weyland, M.; Golightly, M.; Smith, G.; Dardano, C.

    In order to estimate the exposure to a crew in space, there are three essential steps to be performed: first, the ambient radiation environment at the vehicle must be characterized; second, the mass distribution properties of the vehicle, including the crewmembers themselves must be developed, and third a model of the interactions of space radiations with matter must be employed in order to characterize the radiation field at the dose point of interest. The Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at the NASA, Johnson Space Center carries the primary responsibility for the operational radiation protection support function associated with manned space flight. In order to provide support during the various planning, execution, and analysis/recording phase activities associated with a given mission, tools have been developed to allow rapid, repeatable calculations of exposure on orbit. The majority of these tools implicitly contain numerical approximations, or other limitations included as a result of either hardware limitations (i.e. processor clock speed, RAM, etc.) present at the time of inception and initial development, or of limitations in scope inherent in the programming language(s) and version(s) of the time. Over the last ten years, prevalent desktop/daily use hardware has increased in speed by approximately three orders of magnitude, and there has been a concurrent improvement in the capacity, scope, and interoperability of programming languages. These improvements in available technology make possible updates to the tools used in exposure evaluation. Obviously, one expects an increase in speed purely as a result of executing existing algorithms on faster hardware. Beyond this, however, removal of some system constraints allows for a re-design of the tool suite in such a way as to provide for greater flexibility, an expanded scope of calculation, the addition of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs), improved calculation stability and precision, and an additional

  5. Cell-cell adhesion interface: rise of the lateral membrane

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vivian

    2017-01-01

    The lateral membrane plays an important role in the mechanical stability of epithelial cell sheet in steady state. In addition, the lateral membrane is continuously remodeled during dynamic processes such as cell extrusion, cytokinesis, and intercellular cell movement. In wound healing, the lateral membrane must be built from flat and spread cells that had crawled into the area of the wound. Thus, forming the lateral membrane is a phenomenon that occurs not only in development but also during homeostatic maintenance and regeneration of differentiated epithelial tissues. PMID:28357057

  6. Interfacing carbon nanotubes with living mammalian cells and cytotoxicity issues.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hui-Fang; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Luong, John H T; Sheu, Fwu-Shan

    2010-07-19

    The unique structures and properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted extensive investigations for many applications, such as those in the field of biomedical materials and devices, biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. Anticipated large-scale productions for numerous diversified applications of CNTs might adversely affect the environment and human health. For successful applications in the biomedical field, the issue of interfacing between CNTs and mammalian cells in vitro needs to be addressed before in vivo studies can be carried out systematically. We review the important studies pertaining to the internalization of CNTs into the cells and the culturing of cells on the CNT-based scaffold or support materials. The review will focus on the description of a variety of factors affecting CNT cytotoxicity: type of CNTs, impurities, lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, dispersion, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity.

  7. Tunable high aspect ratio polymer nanostructures for cell interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Cooil, Simon P.; Wells, Justin W.; Sikorski, Pawel

    2015-04-01

    Nanoscale topographies and chemical patterns can be used as synthetic cell interfaces with a range of applications including the study and control of cellular processes. Herein, we describe the fabrication of high aspect ratio nanostructures using electron beam lithography in the epoxy-based polymer SU-8. We show how nanostructure geometry, position and fluorescence properties can be tuned, allowing flexible device design. Further, thiol-epoxide reactions were developed to give effective and specific modification of SU-8 surface chemistry. SU-8 nanostructures were made directly on glass cover slips, enabling the use of high resolution optical techniques such as live-cell confocal, total internal reflection and 3D structured illumination microscopy to investigate cell interactions with the nanostructures. Details of cell adherence and spreading, plasma membrane conformation and actin organization in response to high aspect ratio nanopillars and nanolines were investigated. The versatile structural and chemical properties combined with the high resolution cell imaging capabilities of this system are an important step towards the better understanding and control of cell interactions with nanomaterials.Nanoscale topographies and chemical patterns can be used as synthetic cell interfaces with a range of applications including the study and control of cellular processes. Herein, we describe the fabrication of high aspect ratio nanostructures using electron beam lithography in the epoxy-based polymer SU-8. We show how nanostructure geometry, position and fluorescence properties can be tuned, allowing flexible device design. Further, thiol-epoxide reactions were developed to give effective and specific modification of SU-8 surface chemistry. SU-8 nanostructures were made directly on glass cover slips, enabling the use of high resolution optical techniques such as live-cell confocal, total internal reflection and 3D structured illumination microscopy to investigate cell

  8. Performance degradation of c-Si solar cells under UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojung; Choi, Pyungho; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kuh, Hyungsuk; Beak, Dohyun; Lee, Jaehyung; Yi, Junsin; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2014-05-01

    Current-Voltage (I-V) and Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) characteristics of crystalline silicon solar cells were obtained under UV exposure. The solar cell parameters degraded with increasing exposure time. For example, open-circuit voltage (V(oc)), short-circuit current (J(sc)), fill-factor (FF) and efficiency (eta) were degraded. In this study, solar cell did not degrade at the p-n junction or silicon substrate effective lifetime by UltraViolet (UV) light exposure. The main degradation occurred at the SiN(x) layer, the commonly used anti-reflection coating (ARC), due to the positive charges generated by the high-energy UV light source. UV light changed the characteristics of the SiN(x) layer and the Si/SiN(x) interface to degrade the cell efficiency.

  9. Interface engineering for efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shivanna, Ravichandran; Narayan, K. S. E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in; Rajaram, Sridhar E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate the role of zinc oxide (ZnO) morphology and addition of an acceptor interlayer to achieve high efficiency fullerene-free bulk heterojunction inverted organic solar cells. Nanopatterning of the ZnO buffer layer enhances the effective light absorption in the active layer, and the insertion of a twisted perylene acceptor layer planarizes and decreases the electron extraction barrier. Along with an increase in current homogeneity, the reduced work function difference and selective transport of electrons prevent the accumulation of charges and decrease the electron-hole recombination at the interface. These factors enable an overall increase of efficiency to 4.6%, which is significant for a fullerene-free solution-processed organic solar cell.

  10. Interface engineering for efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivanna, Ravichandran; Rajaram, Sridhar; Narayan, K. S.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the role of zinc oxide (ZnO) morphology and addition of an acceptor interlayer to achieve high efficiency fullerene-free bulk heterojunction inverted organic solar cells. Nanopatterning of the ZnO buffer layer enhances the effective light absorption in the active layer, and the insertion of a twisted perylene acceptor layer planarizes and decreases the electron extraction barrier. Along with an increase in current homogeneity, the reduced work function difference and selective transport of electrons prevent the accumulation of charges and decrease the electron-hole recombination at the interface. These factors enable an overall increase of efficiency to 4.6%, which is significant for a fullerene-free solution-processed organic solar cell.

  11. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces.

  12. Calcium at the cell wall-cytoplast interface.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Peter K; Winship, Lawrence J

    2010-02-01

    Attention is given to the role of Ca(2+) at the interface between the cell wall and the cytoplast, especially as seen in pollen tubes. While the cytoplasm directs the synthesis and deposition of the wall, it is less well appreciated that the wall exerts considerable self control and influences activities of the cytoplasm. Ca(2+) participates as a crucial factor in this two way communication. In the cytoplasm, a [Ca(2+)] above 0.1 microM, regulates myriad processes, including secretion of cell wall components. In the cell wall Ca(2+), at 10 microM to 10 mM, binds negative charges on pectins and imparts structural rigidity to the wall. The plasma membrane occupies a pivotal position between these two compartments, where selective channels regulate influx of Ca(2+), and specific carriers pump the ion back into the wall. In addition we draw attention to different factors, which either respond to the wall or are present in the wall, and usually generate elevated [Ca(2+)] in the cytoplasm. These factors include: (i) stretch activated channels; (ii) calmodulin; (iii) annexins; (iv) wall associated kinases; (v) oligogalacturonides; and (vi) extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Together they provide evidence for a rich and multifaceted system of communication between the cytoplast and cell wall, with Ca(2+) as a carrier of information.

  13. Foam cell formation by particulate matter (PM) exposure: a review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Long, Jimin; Ji, Yuejia; Chen, Gui; Shen, Yuexin; Gong, Yu; Li, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that exposure of particulate matter (PM) from traffic vehicles, e.g., diesel exhaust particles (DEP), was associated with adverse vascular effects, e.g., acceleration of atherosclerotic plaque progression. By analogy, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) could also induce similar effects. The formation of lipid laden foam cells, derived predominately from macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), is closely associated with the development of atherosclerosis and adverse vascular effects. We reviewed current studies about particle exposure-induced lipid laden foam cell formation. In vivo studies using animal models have shown that exposure of air pollution by PM promoted lipid accumulation in alveolar macrophages or foam cells in plaques, which was likely associated with pulmonary inflammation or systemic oxidative stress, but not blood lipid profile. In support of these findings, in vitro studies showed that direct exposure of cultured macrophages to DEP or NP exposure, with or without further exposure to external lipids, promoted intracellular lipid accumulation. The mechanisms remained unknown. Although a number studies found increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) or an adaptive response to oxidative stress, the exact role of oxidative stress in mediating particle-induced foam cell formation requires future research. There is currently lack of reports concerning VSMC as a source for foam cells induced by particle exposure. In the future, it is necessary to explore the role of foam cell formation in particle exposure-induced atherosclerosis development. In addition, the formation of VSMC derived foam cells by particle exposure may also need extensive studies.

  14. Occupational exposure to solvents and hairy cell leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, J.; Mandereau, L.; Conso, F.; Limasset, J. C.; Pourmir, I.; Flandrin, G.; Hemon, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The role of occupational exposures in hairy cell leukaemia was investigated through a multicentre, hospital based, case-control study. This paper analyses the role of exposure to solvents other than benzene in hairy cell leukaemia. METHODS: The study included 226 male cases and 425 matched controls, exposure to solvents was evaluated by expert case by case review of the detailed data on occupational exposures generated by specific interviews. Also, exposure to solvents was evaluated with an independently constructed job exposure matrix (JEM). RESULTS: No association was found between hairy cell leukaemia and previous employment in a job exposed to solvents (odds ratio (OR) 0.9 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.6 to 1.3). ORs for the main occupational tasks exposed to solvents were around 1 and did not increase with the frequency or the duration of the tasks. No specific type of paint or glue was found to be significantly associated with hairy cell leukaemia. No association was found with exposure to solvents, taken as a whole, with either expert assessments or the JEM. No association was found with aromatic, chlorinated, or oxygenated subgroups of solvents. The ORs did not increase with the average intensity of exposure assessed by the experts, with the frequency of use, or with the duration of exposure. Finally, no association was found with non-occupational exposure to solvents. CONCLUSIONS: The study did not show any association between exposure to solvents and hairy cell leukaemia.   PMID:9536165

  15. Multisensory Interface for 5D Stem Cell Image Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Koerner, Michael; Wait, Eric; Winter, Mark; Bjornsson, Chris; Kokovay, Erzsebet; Wang, Yue; Goderie, Susan K; Temple, Sally; Cohen, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Biological imaging of live cell and tissue using 3D microscopy is able to capture time-lapse image sequences showing multiple molecular markers labeling different biological structures simultaneously. In order to analyze this complex multi-dimensional image sequence data, there is a need for automated quantitative algorithms, and for methods to visualize and interact with both the data and the analytical results. Traditional computational human input devices such as the keyboard and mouse are no longer adequate for complex tasks such as manipulating and navigating 3+ dimensional volumes. In this paper, we have developed a new interaction system for interfacing with big data sets using the human visual system together with touch, force and audio feedback. This system includes real-time dynamic 3D visualization, haptic interaction via exoskeletal glove, and tonal auditory components that seamlessly create an immersive environment for efficient qualitative analysis. PMID:25570174

  16. Interface and Composition Analysis on Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Matteocci, Fabio; Busby, Yan; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques; Divitini, Giorgio; Cacovich, Stefania; Ducati, Caterina; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-12-02

    Organometal halide (hybrid) perovskite solar cells have been fabricated following four different deposition procedures and investigated in order to find correlations between the solar cell characteristics/performance and their structure and composition as determined by combining depth-resolved imaging with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The interface quality is found to be strongly affected by the perovskite deposition procedure, and in particular from the environment where the conversion of the starting precursors into the final perovskite is performed (air, nitrogen, or vacuum). The conversion efficiency of the precursors into the hybrid perovskite layer is compared between the different solar cells by looking at the ToF-SIMS intensities of the characteristic molecular fragments from the perovskite and the precursor materials. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the STEM confirms the macroscopic ToF-SIMS findings and allows elemental mapping with nanometer resolution. Clear evidence for iodine diffusion has been observed and related to the fabrication procedure.

  17. A glucose fuel cell for implantable brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Benjamin I; Kedzierski, Jakub T; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3.4 μW cm(-2) steady-state power and up to 180 μW cm(-2) peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, employing semiconductor fabrication techniques, and is therefore well suited for manufacture together with integrated circuits on a single silicon wafer. Thus, it can help enable implantable microelectronic systems with long-lifetime power sources that harvest energy from their surrounds. The fuel reactions are mediated by robust, solid state catalysts. Glucose is oxidized at the nanostructured surface of an activated platinum anode. Oxygen is reduced to water at the surface of a self-assembled network of single-walled carbon nanotubes, embedded in a Nafion film that forms the cathode and is exposed to the biological environment. The catalytic electrodes are separated by a Nafion membrane. The availability of fuel cell reactants, oxygen and glucose, only as a mixture in the physiologic environment, has traditionally posed a design challenge: Net current production requires oxidation and reduction to occur separately and selectively at the anode and cathode, respectively, to prevent electrochemical short circuits. Our fuel cell is configured in a half-open geometry that shields the anode while exposing the cathode, resulting in an oxygen gradient that strongly favors oxygen reduction at the cathode. Glucose reaches the shielded anode by diffusing through the nanotube mesh, which does not catalyze glucose oxidation, and the Nafion layers, which are permeable to small neutral and cationic species. We demonstrate computationally that the natural recirculation of cerebrospinal fluid around the human brain theoretically permits glucose energy harvesting at a rate on the order of at least 1 mW with no adverse physiologic effects. Low-power brain-machine interfaces can thus potentially benefit from having their implanted units powered or recharged by

  18. A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable Brain–Machine Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.; Kedzierski, Jakub T.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing steady-state power and up to peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, employing semiconductor fabrication techniques, and is therefore well suited for manufacture together with integrated circuits on a single silicon wafer. Thus, it can help enable implantable microelectronic systems with long-lifetime power sources that harvest energy from their surrounds. The fuel reactions are mediated by robust, solid state catalysts. Glucose is oxidized at the nanostructured surface of an activated platinum anode. Oxygen is reduced to water at the surface of a self-assembled network of single-walled carbon nanotubes, embedded in a Nafion film that forms the cathode and is exposed to the biological environment. The catalytic electrodes are separated by a Nafion membrane. The availability of fuel cell reactants, oxygen and glucose, only as a mixture in the physiologic environment, has traditionally posed a design challenge: Net current production requires oxidation and reduction to occur separately and selectively at the anode and cathode, respectively, to prevent electrochemical short circuits. Our fuel cell is configured in a half-open geometry that shields the anode while exposing the cathode, resulting in an oxygen gradient that strongly favors oxygen reduction at the cathode. Glucose reaches the shielded anode by diffusing through the nanotube mesh, which does not catalyze glucose oxidation, and the Nafion layers, which are permeable to small neutral and cationic species. We demonstrate computationally that the natural recirculation of cerebrospinal fluid around the human brain theoretically permits glucose energy harvesting at a rate on the order of at least 1 mW with no adverse physiologic effects. Low-power brain–machine interfaces can thus potentially benefit from having their implanted units powered or recharged by glucose fuel cells. PMID

  19. Renal cell cancer and exposure to gasoline: A review

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.K.

    1993-12-01

    A review of the epidemiology of renal cell cancer is presented. Risk factors for renal cell cancer such as cigarette smoking, obesity, diet, and use of analgesics and prescription diuretics are examined. Although uncommon, occupational risk factors are also reviewed. Studies examining gasoline exposure and renal cell cancer are evaluated, including investigations recently presented at a meeting on this topic. Overall, most studies find no link between gasoline exposure and renal cell cancer; moreover, the experimental evidence that initiated the health concern is no longer considered relevant to humans. Positive associations, however, reported in two recent studies prevent a firm conclusion of no risk for this exposure. 48 refs.

  20. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs.

  1. Short exposure time sensitivity of white cells to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Carter, Janell; Hristova, Katia; Harasaki, Hiroaki; Smith, W A

    2003-01-01

    White cells are a critical functional element circulating in blood. This study sheared fresh whole bovine blood in stainless steel and polymeric capillary tubes of various lengths and diameters. Flow rate was constant, resulting in a range of exposure times and shear stresses. White cell count, cell integrity (trypan blue exclusion), and phagocytic index (latex bead ingestion) were assayed. It was found that cell function declined at lower stresses than cell count. White cell count was maintained at higher stress levels at the short exposure times used here compared with the published results at longer times. This study suggests that function, not count, is the critical parameter when studying shear effects on white cells, and that, like red cells, there may be an exposure time effect and that white cell function is impacted at stresses lower than are required for hemolysis.

  2. Prenatal and Postnatal Cell Phone Exposures and Headaches in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sudan, Madhuri; Kheifets, Leeka; Arah, Onyebuchi; Olsen, Jorn; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Children today are exposed to cell phones early in life, and may be at the greatest risk if exposure is harmful to health. We investigated associations between cell phone exposures and headaches in children. Study Design The Danish National Birth Cohort enrolled pregnant women between 1996 and 2002. When their children reached age seven years, mothers completed a questionnaire regarding the child’s health, behaviors, and exposures. We used multivariable adjusted models to relate prenatal only, postnatal only, or both prenatal and postnatal cell phone exposure to whether the child had migraines and headache-related symptoms. Results Our analyses included data from 52,680 children. Children with cell phone exposure had higher odds of migraines and headache-related symptoms than children with no exposure. The odds ratio for migraines was 1.30 (95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.68) and for headache-related symptoms was 1.32 (95% confidence interval: 1.23–1.40) for children with both prenatal and postnatal exposure. Conclusions In this study, cell phone exposures were associated with headaches in children, but the associations may not be causal given the potential for uncontrolled confounding and misclassification in observational studies such as this. However, given the widespread use of cell phones, if a causal effect exists it would have great public health impact. PMID:23750182

  3. Prenatal and Postnatal Cell Phone Exposures and Headaches in Children.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Madhuri; Kheifets, Leeka; Arah, Onyebuchi; Olsen, Jorn; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2012-12-05

    Children today are exposed to cell phones early in life, and may be at the greatest risk if exposure is harmful to health. We investigated associations between cell phone exposures and headaches in children. The Danish National Birth Cohort enrolled pregnant women between 1996 and 2002. When their children reached age seven years, mothers completed a questionnaire regarding the child's health, behaviors, and exposures. We used multivariable adjusted models to relate prenatal only, postnatal only, or both prenatal and postnatal cell phone exposure to whether the child had migraines and headache-related symptoms. Our analyses included data from 52,680 children. Children with cell phone exposure had higher odds of migraines and headache-related symptoms than children with no exposure. The odds ratio for migraines was 1.30 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.68) and for headache-related symptoms was 1.32 (95% confidence interval: 1.23-1.40) for children with both prenatal and postnatal exposure. In this study, cell phone exposures were associated with headaches in children, but the associations may not be causal given the potential for uncontrolled confounding and misclassification in observational studies such as this. However, given the widespread use of cell phones, if a causal effect exists it would have great public health impact.

  4. Nanosilver and Nano Zero-Valent Iron Exposure Affects Nutrient Exchange Across the Sediment-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Buchkowski, Robert W; Williams, Clayton J; Kelly, Joel; Veinot, Jonathan G C; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A

    2016-01-01

    To examine how nanoparticles influence biogeochemical cycles in streams, we studied the acute impact of nanosilver (nAg) and nanoparticulate zero-valent iron (nZVI) exposure on nutrient and oxygen exchange across the sediment-water interface of two streams (agricultural canal and wetland) that differed in their water quality and sediment characteristics. At the agricultural site, nAg increased oxygen consumption and decreased N2 flux rates from that observed in control incubations. nZVI caused sediment-water systems from both streams to go hypoxic within 1.5 h of exposure. N2 flux rates were at least an order of magnitude higher in nZVI treatments as compared to control. Water column nitrate and nitrite concentrations were not impacted by nZVI exposure but total dissolved phosphorus concentrations were higher in cores treated with nZVI. nAg and nZVI exposure to surface water ecosystems can disrupt ecological function across the sediment-water interface.

  5. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  6. Aerosolized ZnO nanoparticles induce toxicity in alveolar type II epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yumei; Williams, Nolann G.; Tolic, Ana; Chrisler, William B.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Maddux, Bettye L.; Pounds, Joel G.; Laskin, Alexander; Orr, Galya

    2012-01-20

    The majority of in vitro studies characterizing the impact of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cells that line the respiratory tract were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in suspension. This approach introduces processes that are unlikely to occur during inhaled NP exposures in vivo, such as the shedding of toxic doses of dissolved ions. ZnO NPs are used extensively and pose significant sources for human exposure. Exposures to airborne ZnO NPs can induce adverse effects, but the relevance of the dissolved Zn2+ to the observed effects in vivo is still unclear. Our goal was to mimic in vivo exposures to airborne NPs and decipher the contribution of the intact NP from the contribution of the dissolved ions to airborne ZnO NP toxicity. We established the exposure of alveolar type II epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI), and compared the impact of aerosolized ZnO NPs and NPs in suspension at the same cellular doses, measured as the number of particles per cell. By evaluating membrane integrity and cell viability 6 and 24 hours post exposure we found that aerosolized NPs induced toxicity at the ALI at doses that were in the same order of magnitude as doses required to induce toxicity in submersed cultures. In addition, distinct patterns of oxidative stress were observed in the two exposure systems. These observations unravel the ability of airborne ZnO NPs to induce toxicity without the contribution of dissolved Zn2+ and suggest distinct mechanisms at the ALI and in submersed cultures.

  7. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-04-23

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans.

  8. Hairy cell leukaemia and occupational exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, J; Conso, F; Limasset, J C; Mandereau, L; Roche, P; Flandrin, G; Hémon, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The role of occupational exposures in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) was investigated through a multicentre, hospital based, case-control study. This paper analyses the role of exposure to benzene in HCL. METHODS: A population of 226 male cases of HCL and 425 matched controls were included in the study. Benzene exposure was evaluated by expert review of the detailed data on occupational exposures generated by case-control interviews. RESULTS: No association was found between HCL and employment in a job exposed to benzene (odds ratio (OR) 0.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.6-1.3)). The sample included 125 subjects, 34 cases (15%), and 91 controls (21%) who had been exposed to benzene, as individually assessed by the experts, for at least one hour a month during one of their jobs. Benzene exposure was not associated with a risk of HCL (OR 0.8 (0.5-1.2)). No trend towards an increase in OR was detected for increasing exposures, the percentage of work time involving exposure to > 1 ppm, or the duration of exposure. No findings suggested a particular risk period, when the OR associated with the time since first or last exposure, or since the end of exposure, were examined. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, with the low exposures prevalent in the sample, the study did not show any association between benzene exposure and HCL. PMID:8983464

  9. Interface Engineering of High Efficiency Organic-Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixia; Liu, Yaoping; Chen, Wei; Wang, Yan; Liang, Huili; Mei, Zengxia; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Du, Xiaolong

    2016-01-13

    Insufficient interface conformity is a challenge faced in hybrid organic-silicon heterojunction solar cells because of using conventional pyramid antireflection texturing provoking the porosity of interface. In this study, we tested alternative textures, in particular rounded pyramids and inverted pyramids to compare the performance. It was remarkably improved delivering 7.61%, 8.91% and 10.04% efficiency employing conventional, rounded, and inverted pyramids, respectively. The result was interpreted in terms of gradually improving conformity of the Ag/organic/silicon interface, together with the gradually decreasing serial resistance. Altogether, the present data may guide further efforts arising the interface engineering for mastering high efficient heterojunction solar cells.

  10. Materials, device, and interface engineering to improve polymer-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, Steven Kin

    The continued depletion of fossil fuel resources has lead to the rise in energy production costs which has lead to the search for an economically viable alternative energy source. One alternative of particular interest is solar energy. A promising alternative to inorganic materials is organic semiconductor polymer solar cells due to their advantages of being cheaper, light weight, flexible and made into large areas by roll-to-roll processing. In this dissertation, an integrated approach is taken to improve the overall performance of polymer-based solar cells by the development of new polymer materials, device architectures, and interface engineering of the contacts between layers. First, a new class of metallated conjugated polymers is explored as potential solar cell materials. Systematic modifications to the molecular units on the main chain of amorphous metallated Pt-polymers show a correlation that improving charge carrier mobility also improves solar cell performance leading to mobilities as high as 1 x 10-2 cm2/V·s and efficiencies as high as 4.1%. Second, an inverted device architecture using a more air stable electrode (Ag) is demonstrated to improve the ambient stability of unencapsulated P3HT:PCBM devices showing over 80% efficiency retention after 40 days of exposure. To further demonstrate the potential for roll-to-roll processing of polymer solar cells, solution processed Ag-nanoparticles were used to replace the vacuum deposited Ag anode electrode for inverted solar cells showing efficiencies as high as 3%. In addition, solution processed polymer based electrodes were demonstrated as a replacement to the expensive and brittle indium tin oxide showing efficiencies of 3% on flexible substrate solar cells. Third, interface engineering of the n-type (high temperature sol-gel processed TiO2 or ZnO, low temperature processed ZnO nanoparticles) electron selective metal oxide contacts in inverted solar cells with self-assembled monolayers (SAM) show improved

  11. Toxic effects following phosgene exposure of human epithelial lung cells in vitro using a CULTEX® system.

    PubMed

    Wijte, Dorien; Alblas, Marcel J; Noort, Daan; Langenberg, Jan P; van Helden, Herman P M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate toxic effects following phosgene exposure of human epithelial lung cells (A549) in vitro using a CULTEX® system. In particular, toxic effects regarding early biomarkers emerging during the latency period following exposure might be of great value for medical treatment. Cells cultured on semi-permeable membranes were directly exposed at the liquid-air interface to different concentrations of phosgene, or dry medical air. Cell membrane integrity (leakage of LDH), metabolic activity (reduction of Alamar Blue), oxidative damage (GSH, and HO-1, in cell lysates), and release of IL-8, were studied. For most of the above-mentioned biological end-point markers, significant changes could be assessed following a 20 min exposure to 1.0 ppm and 2.0 ppm phosgene. Moreover, except for IL-8, all biological marker profiles showed to be in line with results obtained by others in animal studies. The C×t value of 40 ppm min appeared to be constant. The overall results suggest that at 4 h post-exposure a maximal level of toxicity was achieved. Our results demonstrate the suitability of a CULTEX® system to detect toxic effects induced by phosgene on human epithelial lung cells, which may contribute to the discovery of early biomarkers for new medical countermeasures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Numerical simulation of red blood cell suspensions behind a moving interface in a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shihai; Pan, Tsorng-Whay

    2013-11-01

    Computational modeling and simulation are presented on the motion of red blood cells behind a moving interface in a capillary. The methodology is based on an immersed boundary method and the skeleton structure of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane is modeled as a spring network. The computational domain is moving with either a designated RBC or an interface in an infinitely long two-dimensional channel with an undisturbed flow field in front of the domain. The tanking-treading and the inclination angle of a cell in a simple shear flow are briefly discussed for the validation purpose. We then present the results of the motion of red blood cells behind a moving interface in a capillary, which show that the RBCs with higher velocity than the interface speed form a concentrated slug behind the interface. It is a key mechanism responsible for penetration failure in a capillary behind the meniscus. This work is funded by NSF.

  13. Time course of bronchial cell inflammation following exposure to diesel particulate matter using a modified EAVES.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Brie; McKenna, Dave; Marchese, Anthony; Volckens, John

    2014-08-01

    Electrostatic deposition of particles onto the surface of well-differentiated airway cells is a rapid and efficient means to screen for toxicity associated with exposure to fine and ultrafine particulate air pollution. This work describes the development and application of an electrostatic aerosol in vitro exposure system (EAVES) with increased throughput and ease-of-use. The modified EAVES accommodates standard tissue culture plates and uses an alternating electric field to deposit a net neutral charge of aerosol onto air-interface cell cultures. Using this higher-throughput design, we were able to examine the time-course (1, 3, 6, 9, and 24 h post-exposure) of transcript production and cytotoxicity in well-differentiated human bronchial cells exposed to diesel particulate matter at levels of 'real-world' significance. Statistically significant responses were observed at exposure levels (∼0.4 μg/cm(2)) much lower than typically reported in vitro using traditional submerged/resuspended techniques. Levels of HO-1, IL-8, CYP1A1, COX-2, and HSP-70 transcripts increased immediately following diesel particulate exposure and persisted for several hours; cytotoxicity was increased at 24h. The modified EAVES provides a platform for higher throughput, more efficient and representative testing of aerosol toxicity in vitro.

  14. Exposure to tobacco-derived materials induces overproduction of secreted proteinases in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Small-Howard, Andrea; Turner, Helen . E-mail: hturner@queens.org

    2005-04-15

    Mast cells reside at interfaces with the environment, including the mucosa of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This localization exposes mast cells to inhaled, or ingested, environmental challenges. In the airways of smokers, resident immune cells will be in contact with the condensed components of cigarette smoke. Mast cells are of particular interest due to their ability to promote airway remodeling and mucus hypersecretion. Clinical data show increased levels of mast cell-secreted tryptase and increased numbers of degranulated mast cells in the lavage and bronchial tissue of smokers. Since mast cell-secreted proteinases (MCPTs), including tryptases, contribute to pathological airway remodeling, we investigated the relationship between mast cell proteinases and smoke exposure. We exposed a mast cell line to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). We show that CSC exposure increases MCPT levels in mast cells using an assay for tryptase-type MCPT activity. We hypothesized that this increase in MCPT activity reflects a CSC-induced increase in the cytosolic pool of proteinase molecules, via stimulation of MCPT transcription. Transcript array data suggested that mRNA changes in response to CSC were limited in number and peaked after 3 h of CSC exposure. However, we noted marked transcriptional regulation of several MCPT genes. CSC-induced changes in the mRNA levels for MCPTs were confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke up-regulates MCPT levels in mast cells at both the protein and the mRNA level. We suggest that the pathological airway remodeling that has been described in clinical studies of smoke inhalation may be attributable to MCPT overproduction in vivo.

  15. Minimal Peroxide Exposure of Neuronal Cells Induces Multifaceted Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Zhou, Yu; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Mitchell, Nicholas; Stone, Matthew D.; Becker, Kevin G.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative exposure of cells occurs naturally and may be associated with cellular damage and dysfunction. Protracted low level oxidative exposure can induce accumulated cell disruption, affecting multiple cellular functions. Accumulated oxidative exposure has also been proposed as one of the potential hallmarks of the physiological/pathophysiological aging process. We investigated the multifactorial effects of long-term minimal peroxide exposure upon SH-SY5Y neural cells to understand how they respond to the continued presence of oxidative stressors. We show that minimal protracted oxidative stresses induce complex molecular and physiological alterations in cell functionality. Upon chronic exposure to minimal doses of hydrogen peroxide, SH-SY5Y cells displayed a multifactorial response to the stressor. To fully appreciate the peroxide-mediated cellular effects, we assessed these adaptive effects at the genomic, proteomic and cellular signal processing level. Combined analyses of these multiple levels of investigation revealed a complex cellular adaptive response to the protracted peroxide exposure. This adaptive response involved changes in cytoskeletal structure, energy metabolic shifts towards glycolysis and selective alterations in transmembrane receptor activity. Our analyses of the global responses to chronic stressor exposure, at multiple biological levels, revealed a viable neural phenotype in-part reminiscent of aged or damaged neural tissue. Our paradigm indicates how cellular physiology can subtly change in different contexts and potentially aid the appreciation of stress response adaptations. PMID:21179406

  16. Mifepristone-exposured human endometrial endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helmestam, Malin; Lindgren, Karin Elvine; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Olovsson, Matts

    2014-03-01

    The antiprogestin mifepristone has been used for more than 20 years as a medical alternative for early pregnancy termination. After mifepristone administration, significant changes have been observed in the endometrial vessels, with cell injury and cell death in capillary endothelial cells. In this study, the effect of mifepristone on human endometrial endothelial cells (HEECs) in vitro was evaluated using proliferation and viability assays, quantitative polymerase chain reaction of markers important for the regulation of angiogenesis, and by tube formation assay. There were no detectable effects of mifepristone on HEECs messenger RNA expression of the studied markers. Exposure to mifepristone did not alter tube formation. However, mifepristone exposure to HEECs cocultured with endometrial stromal cells significantly reduced the activity in the tube formation assay compared with mifepristone exposure of HEECs in monoculture. This implies that mifepristone causes changes in HEEC-associated angiogenic activity and that this effect is mediated through stromal cells via paracrine mechanisms.

  17. Mifepristone-Exposured Human Endometrial Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Karin Elvine; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Olovsson, Matts

    2014-01-01

    The antiprogestin mifepristone has been used for more than 20 years as a medical alternative for early pregnancy termination. After mifepristone administration, significant changes have been observed in the endometrial vessels, with cell injury and cell death in capillary endothelial cells. In this study, the effect of mifepristone on human endometrial endothelial cells (HEECs) in vitro was evaluated using proliferation and viability assays, quantitative polymerase chain reaction of markers important for the regulation of angiogenesis, and by tube formation assay. There were no detectable effects of mifepristone on HEECs messenger RNA expression of the studied markers. Exposure to mifepristone did not alter tube formation. However, mifepristone exposure to HEECs cocultured with endometrial stromal cells significantly reduced the activity in the tube formation assay compared with mifepristone exposure of HEECs in monoculture. This implies that mifepristone causes changes in HEEC-associated angiogenic activity and that this effect is mediated through stromal cells via paracrine mechanisms. PMID:23885098

  18. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively1–6, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography7 to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells toward higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces. PMID:26213899

  19. An application programming interface for CellNetAnalyzer.

    PubMed

    Klamt, Steffen; von Kamp, Axel

    2011-08-01

    CellNetAnalyzer (CNA) is a MATLAB toolbox providing computational methods for studying structure and function of metabolic and cellular signaling networks. In order to allow non-experts to use these methods easily, CNA provides GUI-based interactive network maps as a means of parameter input and result visualization. However, with the availability of high-throughput data, there is a need to make CNA's functionality also accessible in batch mode for automatic data processing. Furthermore, as some algorithms of CNA are of general relevance for network analysis it would be desirable if they could be called as sub-routines by other applications. For this purpose, we developed an API (application programming interface) for CNA allowing users (i) to access the content of network models in CNA, (ii) to use CNA's network analysis capabilities independent of the GUI, and (iii) to interact with the GUI to facilitate the development of graphical plugins. Here we describe the organization of network projects in CNA and the application of the new API functions to these projects. This includes the creation of network projects from scratch, loading and saving of projects and scenarios, and the application of the actual analysis methods. Furthermore, API functions for the import/export of metabolic models in SBML format and for accessing the GUI are described. Lastly, two example applications demonstrate the use and versatile applicability of CNA's API. CNA is freely available for academic use and can be downloaded from http://www.mpi-magdeburg.mpg.de/projects/cna/cna.html.

  20. Asbestos exposure increases human bronchial epithelial cell fibrinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gross, T J; Cobb, S M; Gruenert, D C; Peterson, M W

    1993-03-01

    Chronic exposure to asbestos fibers results in fibrotic lung disease. The distal pulmonary epithelium is an early target of asbestos-mediated injury. Local plasmin activity may be important in modulating endoluminal inflammatory responses in the lung. We studied the effects of asbestos exposure on cell-mediated plasma clot lysis as a marker of pericellular plasminogen activation. Exposing human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells to 100 micrograms/ml of asbestos fibers for 24 h resulted in increased plasma clot lysis. Fibrinolytic activity was augmented in a dose-dependent fashion, was not due to secreted protease, and occurred only when there was direct contact between the plasma clot and the epithelial monolayer. Further analysis showed that asbestos exposure increased HBE cell-associated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity in a time-dependent manner. The increased cell-associated PA activity could be removed by acid washing. The increase in PA activity following asbestos exposure required new protein synthesis because it was abrogated by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Therefore, asbestos exposure increases epithelial-mediated fibrinolysis by augmenting expression of uPA activity at the cell surface by mechanisms that require new RNA and protein synthesis. These observations suggest a novel mechanism whereby exposure of the distal epithelium to inhaled particulates may result in a chronic inflammatory response that culminates in the development of fibrotic lung disease.

  1. Determinants of cell-material crosstalk at the interface: towards engineering of cell instructive materials.

    PubMed

    Ventre, Maurizio; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A

    2012-09-07

    The development of novel biomaterials able to control cell activities and direct their fate is warranted for engineering functional biological tissues, advanced cell culture systems, single-cell diagnosis as well as for cell sorting and differentiation. It is well established that crosstalk at the cell-material interface occurs and this has a profound influence on cell behaviour. However, the complete deciphering of the cell-material communication code is still far away. A variety of material surface properties have been reported to affect the strength and the nature of the cell-material interactions, including biological cues, topography and mechanical properties. Novel experimental evidence bears out the hypothesis that these three different signals participate in the same material-cytoskeleton crosstalk pathway via adhesion plaque formation dynamics. In this review, we present the relevant findings on material-induced cell response along with the description of cell behaviour when exposed to arrays of signals-biochemical, topographical and mechanical. Finally, with the aid of literature data, we attempt to draw unifying elements of the material-cytoskeleton-cell fate chain.

  2. Cell deformation at the air-liquid interface induces Ca2+-dependent ATP release from lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsingh, Ronaldo; Grygorczyk, Alexandra; Solecki, Anna; Cherkaoui, Lalla Siham; Berthiaume, Yves; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2011-04-01

    Extracellular nucleotides regulate mucociliary clearance in the airways and surfactant secretion in alveoli. Their release is exquisitely mechanosensitive and may be induced by stretch as well as airflow shear stress acting on lung epithelia. We hypothesized that, in addition, tension forces at the air-liquid interface (ALI) may contribute to mechanosensitive ATP release in the lungs. Local depletion of airway surface liquid, mucins, and surfactants, which normally protect epithelial surfaces, facilitate such release and trigger compensatory mucin and fluid secretion processes. In this study, human bronchial epithelial 16HBE14o(-) and alveolar A549 cells were subjected to tension forces at the ALI by passing an air bubble over the cell monolayer in a flow-through chamber, or by air exposure while tilting the cell culture dish. Such stimulation induced significant ATP release not involving cell lysis, as verified by ethidium bromide staining. Confocal fluorescence microscopy disclosed reversible cell deformation in the monolayer part in contact with the ALI. Fura 2 fluorescence imaging revealed transient intracellular Ca(2+) elevation evoked by the ALI, which did not entail nonspecific Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space. ATP release was reduced by ∼40 to ∼90% from cells loaded with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM and was completely abolished by N-ethylmalemide (1 mM). These experiments demonstrate that in close proximity to the ALI, surface tension forces are transmitted directly on cells, causing their mechanical deformation and Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic ATP release. Such a signaling mechanism may contribute to the detection of local deficiency of airway surface liquid and surfactants on the lung surface.

  3. Occupational Sunlight Exposure and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Stewart, Patricia; Rothman, Nathaniel; Hunting, Katherine L.; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brennan, Paul; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E.; Zaridze, David; Mukeria, Anush; Janout, Vladimir; Kollarova, Helena; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Navritalova, Marie; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Mates, Dana; Gromiec, Jan P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent findings indicate that vitamin D obtained from ultraviolet (UV) exposure may reduce the risk of a number of different cancers. Vitamin D is metabolized to its active form within the kidney, the major organ for vitamin D metabolism and activity. Since both the incidence of renal cell cancer and prevalence of vitamin D deficiency have increased over the past few decades, this study sought to explore whether occupational UV exposure was associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk. Methods A hospital-based case-control study of 1,097 RCC cases and 1,476 controls was conducted in four Central and Eastern European countries. Demographic and occupational information was collected to examine the association between occupational UV exposure and RCC risk. Results A significant (24%-38%) reduction in RCC risk was observed with increasing occupational UV exposure among male participants. No association between UV exposure and RCC risk was observed among female participants. When analyses were stratified by latitude as another estimate of sunlight intensity, a stronger (71%-73%) reduction in RCC risk was observed between UV exposure and cancer risk among males residing at the highest latitudes. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that among males there is an inverse association between occupational UV exposure and renal cancer risk. Replication studies are warranted to confirm these results. PMID:20213683

  4. Modified procedure of a direct in vitro exposure system for mammalian cells to whole cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Yasuo; Ogura, Maiko; Eguchi, Kentaro; Shibagaki, Makoto; Suzuki, Mutsuaki

    2004-03-01

    In vitro biological studies on cigarette smoke have usually been made using either cigarette smoke condensate--obtained by trapping the particulate phase of smoke on a filter, or soluble smoke components--obtained by trapping cigarette smoke in buffer solution. However, these approaches may not truly reflect the physical and chemical condition of freshly generated smoke. Clearly it is important to be able to evaluate the biological effects of fresh smoke on mammalian cells for a better understanding of the potential effects of smoking. The CULTEX technology is a new experimental system for cultivation and exposure techniques enhanced the efficiency of in vitro studies, and allows direct exposure of cells intermittently at the air/liquid interface with ultrafine particles, gases, or mixtures of both which fixedly flows. The CULTEX technology has therefore been modified to evaluate the biological effects of whole cigarette smoke in an in vitro system. The exposure system design was based on a combination of the sedimentation procedure and the CULTEX cultivation technique. After freshly generated smoke was delivered onto cells, the flow was shut off and the medium was slowly removed. In this manner, cells were exposed to both the vapor and particulate phase of smoke efficiently. Cells were maintained in the liquid medium except during the exposure period to maintain the culture conditions and to protect the cells from both the influence of puff pressure and the airflow, which served to remove residual cigarette smoke. The medium was changed at every puff of smoke and so effectively eliminating the possibility of any effects caused by accumulation of soluble cigarette smoke components into the medium. This cycle was repeated and cells were exposed to freshly generated cigarette smoke intermittently.

  5. Cell wide responses to low oxygen exposure in Desulfovibriovulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Redding, A.; Joachimiak, M.; Arkin, A.; Borglin, S.; Dehal, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Geller, J.; Hazen, T.; He, Q.; Joyner, D.; Martin, V.; Wall, J.; Yang, Z.; Zhou, J.; Keasling, J.

    2007-03-11

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low oxygen exposure (0.1% O{sub 2}) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O{sub 2} caused a decrease in growth rate without affecting viability. A concerted up regulation in the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure. Several of these candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the up regulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during this low O{sub 2} exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were down regulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell wide response to low and high O{sub 2} levels of in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O{sub 2} levels in its environment.

  6. Radiofrequency exposure and mammalian cell toxicity, genotoxicity, and transformation.

    PubMed

    Meltz, Martin L

    2003-01-01

    The published in vitro literature relevant to the issue of the possible induction of toxicity, genotoxicity, and transformation of mammalian cells due to radiofrequency field (RF) exposure is examined. In some instances, information about related in vivo studies is presented. The review is from the perspective of technical merit and also biological consistency, especially with regard to those publications reporting a positive effect. The weight of evidence available indicates that, for a variety of frequencies and modulations with both short and long exposure times, at exposure levels that do not (or in some instances do) heat the biological sample such that there is a measurable increase in temperature, RF exposure does not induce (a). DNA strand breaks, (b). chromosome aberrations, (c). sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), (d). DNA repair synthesis, (e). phenotypic mutation, or (f). transformation (cancer-like changes). While there is limited experimental evidence that RF exposure induces micronuclei formation, there is abundant evidence that it does not. There is some evidence that RF exposure does not induce DNA excision repair, suggesting the absence of base damage. There is also evidence that RF exposure does not inhibit excision repair after the induction of thymine dimers by UV exposure, as well as evidence that indicates that RF is not a co-carcinogen or a tumor promoter. The article is in part a tutorial, so that the reader can consider similarities and discrepancies between reports of RF-induced effects relative to one another.

  7. Occupational exposure to dusts and risk of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karami, S; Boffetta, P; Stewart, P S; Brennan, P; Zaridze, D; Matveev, V; Janout, V; Kollarova, H; Bencko, V; Navratilova, M; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Mates, D; Gromiec, J; Slamova, A; Chow, W-H; Rothman, N; Moore, L E

    2011-01-01

    Background: Occupational exposures to dusts have generally been examined in relation to cancers of the respiratory system and have rarely been examined in relation to other cancers, such as renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Although previous epidemiological studies, though few, have shown certain dusts, such as asbestos, to increase renal cancer risk, the potential for other occupational dust exposures to cause kidney damage and/or cancer may exist. We investigated whether asbestos, as well as 20 other occupational dust exposures, were associated with RCC risk in a large European, multi-center, hospital-based renal case–control study. Methods: General occupational histories and job-specific questionnaires were reviewed by occupational hygienists for subject-specific information. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) between RCC risk and exposures were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Among participants ever exposed to dusts, significant associations were observed for glass fibres (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1–3.9), mineral wool fibres (OR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.2–5.1), and brick dust (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.0–2.4). Significant trends were also observed with exposure duration and cumulative exposure. No association between RCC risk and asbestos exposure was observed. Conclusion: Results suggest that increased RCC risk may be associated with occupational exposure to specific types of dusts. Additional studies are needed to replicate and extend findings. PMID:21540858

  8. Chronic Alcohol Exposure Renders Epithelial Cells Vulnerable to Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Stephen; Pithadia, Ravi; Rehman, Tooba; Zhang, Lijuan; Plichta, Jennifer; Radek, Katherine A.; Forsyth, Christopher; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shafikhani, Sasha H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite two centuries of reports linking alcohol consumption with enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections and in particular gut-derived bacteria, there have been no studies or model systems to assess the impact of long-term alcohol exposure on the ability of the epithelial barrier to withstand bacterial infection. It is well established that acute alcohol exposure leads to reduction in tight and adherens junctions, which in turn leads to increases in epithelial cellular permeability to bacterial products, leading to endotoxemia and a variety of deleterious effects in both rodents and human. We hypothesized that reduced fortification at junctional structures should also reduce the epithelial barrier’s capacity to maintain its integrity in the face of bacterial challenge thus rendering epithelial cells more vulnerable to infection. In this study, we established a cell-culture based model system for long-term alcohol exposure to assess the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on the ability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells to withstand infection when facing pathogenic bacteria under the intact or wounded conditions. We report that daily treatment with 0.2% ethanol for two months rendered Caco-2 cells far more susceptible to wound damage and cytotoxicity caused by most but not all bacterial pathogens tested in our studies. Consistent with acute alcohol exposure, long-term ethanol exposure also adversely impacted tight junction structures, but in contrast, it did not affect the adherens junction. Finally, alcohol-treated cells partially regained their ability to withstand infection when ethanol treatment was ceased for two weeks, indicating that alcohol’s deleterious effects on cells may be reversible. PMID:23358457

  9. Light transmittance as an index of cell volume in hippocampal slices: optical differences of interfaced and submerged positions.

    PubMed

    Kreisman, N R; LaManna, J C; Liao, S C; Yeh, E R; Alcala, J R

    1995-09-25

    Light transmittance (T) in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices was measured during exposure to media of various osmolarities to determine the utility of optical measurements as an index of changes in cell volume. In slices positioned at the gas-liquid interface, hypo-osmotic medium consistently produced a decrease in T and hyperosmotic medium produced an increase in T. The magnitude of deltaT was graded as a function of the strength of osmotic change. All changes in T were reversible upon return to isosmotic medium. In contrast, osmotically induced changes in T in submerged slices were consistently opposite in direction to those observed in slices at the interface. The magnitude and direction of deltaT could be altered by systematic variation of the level of the bathing medium within the same chamber, indicating that both extrinsic optical properties of various interfaces, such as refraction and reflection, and intrinsic optical properties of the tissue contribute to the observed T. Spectral measurements eliminated the possibility that osmotically induced deltaT was the result of changes in light absorbance by intrinsic chromophores such as cytochromes or hemoglobin. The results show that measurements of deltaT can be a useful index of changes in cell volume in brain slices, provided that the level of the bath remains constant.

  10. Nanofibrous glass tailored with apatite-fibronectin interface for bone cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2008-06-01

    Exploring a material with smart and biomimetic interface has great potential in the biomaterials and tissue engineering field. This paper reports a novel nanofibrous bone matrix that was developed to retain a cell-stimulating and bone-mimetic biointerface. The bone mineral, apatite, and the cell adhesive protein, fibronectin (FN), were hybridized on the interface of a bioactive glass nanofibrous mesh, through the dissolution-and-reprecipitation process. The hybridized nanofibrous mesh showed significant improvement in the initial responses of the bone-derived cells. It is believed that this biomimetic and cell-stimulating nanofibrous mesh can be used as a potential bone regeneration matrix.

  11. Epigenetic Regulation: The Interface Between Prenatal and Early-Life Exposure and Asthma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    de Planell-Saguer, Mariangels; Lovinsky-Desir, Stephanie; Miller, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease with genetic and environmental influences and emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic regulation is also a major contributor. Here, we focus on the developing paradigm that epigenetic dysregulation in asthma and allergy may start as early as in utero following several environmental exposures. We summarize the pathways important to the allergic immune response that are epigenetically regulated, the key environmental exposures associated with epigenetic changes in asthma genes, and newly identified epigenetic bio-markers that have been linked to clinical asthma. We conclude with a brief discussion about the potential to apply newly developing technologies in epigenetics to the diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergy. The inherent plasticity of epigenetic regulation following environmental exposures offers opportunities for prevention using environmental remediation, measuring novel biomarkers for early identification of those at risk, and applying advances in pharmaco-epigenetics to tailor medical therapies that maximize efficacy of treatment. ‘Precision Medicine’ in asthma and allergy is arriving. As the field advances this may involve an individually tailored approach to the prevention, early detection, and treatment of disease based on the knowledge of an individual’s epigenetic profile. PMID:24323745

  12. Effects of space flight exposure on cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Yuehui; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Tong, Yongqing; Zhou, Guohua; Xie, Pingli; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2008-12-01

    It is well recognized that harsh outer space environment, consisting of microgravity and radiation, poses significant health risks for human cells. To investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on cancer cells we examined the biological changes in Caski cells carried by the "Shen Zhou IV" spaceship. After exposure for 7 days in spaceflight, 1440 survival subclonal cell lines were established and 4 cell lines were screened. 44F10 and 17E3 were selected because of their increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while 48A9 and 31F2 had slower cytological events. Experiments with cell proliferation assay, flow cytometry, soft agar assay, tumorigenesis assay and DNA microarray analysis have shown that selected cell lines presented multiple biological changes in cell morphology, cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression. These results suggest that space environment exposure can make significant biological impact on cancer cells and provide an entry point to find the immunological target of tumorigenesis.

  13. Uniform dose atmospheric pressure microplasma exposure of individual bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, David; Mahony, Charles; Spence, Sarah; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Kelsey, Colin; Hamilton, Neil; Diver, Declan; Bennet, Euan; Potts, Hugh; Mariotti, Davide; McDowell, David; Maguire, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Plasma - bacteria interactions have been studied for some time with a view to using plasma exposure for wound healing, sterilization and decontamination. While high efficacy has been demonstrated, important fundamental mechanisms are not understood and may be critical for ultimate acceptance. The dose variation across the exposed population and the impact of non-lethal exposure on subsequent bacterial growth are important issues. We demonstrate that individual bacterial cells can remain viable after exposure to a uniform plasma dose. Each bacteria cell (E coli) is delivered to the atmospheric pressure plasma in an aerosolised droplet (d ~ 10 micron). The estimated plasma density is 1E13 - 1E14 cm-3, gas temperature <400 K, and exposure times vary between 0.04 and 0.1ms. Droplet evaporation in flight is ~2 micron and plasma - cell interactions are mediated by the surrounding liquid (Ringers solution) where plasma-induced droplet surface chemistry and charging is known to occur. We report the cell viability and recovery dynamics of individual exposed cells as well as impact on DNA and membrane components with reference to measured plasma parameters. This research was funded by EPSRC (Grants: EP/K006088/1 & EP/K006142/1).

  14. Evaluation of an air-liquid interface cell culture model for studies on the inflammatory and cytotoxic responses to tobacco smoke aerosols.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, David; Haswell, Linsey E; Foss-Smith, Geoff; Hewitt, Katherine; Asquith, Nathan; Corke, Sarah; Phillips, Gary

    2015-10-01

    In vitro toxicological studies for tobacco product assessment have traditionally been undertaken using the particulate phase of tobacco smoke. However, this does not truly reflect exposure conditions that occur in smokers. Thus in vitro cell culture systems are required in which cells are exposed to tobacco whole smoke (WS) at the air-liquid interface (ALI). In this study bronchial epithelial cells were cultured on semi-permeable membranes, transitioned to the ALI and the robustness and sensitivity of the cells to tobacco WS and vapour phase (VP) assessed. Although no effect of air exposure was observed on cell viability, IL-6 and IL-8 release was increased. Exposure to WS resulted in a significant dose dependent decrease in cell viability and a significant non-dose dependent increase in inflammatory mediator secretion. The VP was found to contribute approximately 90% of the total cytotoxicity derived from WS. The cell culture system was also able to differentiate between two smoking regimens and was sensitive to passage number with increased inflammatory mediator secretion and lower cell viability observed in cell cultures of low passage number following WS exposure. This simple cell culture system may facilitate studies on the toxicological impact of future tobacco products and nicotine delivery devices.

  15. Carrier collection losses in interface passivated amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neumüller, A. Sergeev, O.; Vehse, M.; Agert, C.; Bereznev, S.; Volobujeva, O.; Ewert, M.; Falta, J.

    2016-07-25

    In silicon thin-film solar cells the interface between the i- and p-layer is the most critical. In the case of back diffusion of photogenerated minority carriers to the i/p-interface, recombination occurs mainly on the defect states at the interface. To suppress this effect and to reduce recombination losses, hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) is usually applied. As an alternative to using state of the art HPT we apply an argon plasma treatment (APT) before the p-layer deposition in n-i-p solar cells. To study the effect of APT, several investigations were applied to compare the results with HPT and no plasma treatment at the interface. Carrier collection losses in resulting solar cells were examined with spectral response measurements with and without bias voltage. To investigate single layers, surface photovoltage and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were conducted. The results with APT at the i/p-interface show a beneficial contribution to the carrier collection compared with HPT and no plasma treatment. Therefore, it can be concluded that APT reduces the recombination centers at the interface. Further, we demonstrate that carrier collection losses of thin-film solar cells are significantly lower with APT.

  16. Carrier collection losses in interface passivated amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumüller, A.; Bereznev, S.; Ewert, M.; Volobujeva, O.; Sergeev, O.; Falta, J.; Vehse, M.; Agert, C.

    2016-07-01

    In silicon thin-film solar cells the interface between the i- and p-layer is the most critical. In the case of back diffusion of photogenerated minority carriers to the i/p-interface, recombination occurs mainly on the defect states at the interface. To suppress this effect and to reduce recombination losses, hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) is usually applied. As an alternative to using state of the art HPT we apply an argon plasma treatment (APT) before the p-layer deposition in n-i-p solar cells. To study the effect of APT, several investigations were applied to compare the results with HPT and no plasma treatment at the interface. Carrier collection losses in resulting solar cells were examined with spectral response measurements with and without bias voltage. To investigate single layers, surface photovoltage and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were conducted. The results with APT at the i/p-interface show a beneficial contribution to the carrier collection compared with HPT and no plasma treatment. Therefore, it can be concluded that APT reduces the recombination centers at the interface. Further, we demonstrate that carrier collection losses of thin-film solar cells are significantly lower with APT.

  17. Defectivity reduction by optimization of 193-nm immersion lithography using an interfaced exposure-track system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcasi, Michael; Hatakeyama, Shinichi; Nafus, Kathleen; Moerman, Richard; van Dommelen, Youri; Huisman, Peter; Hooge, Joshua; Scheer, Steven; Foubert, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    As the integration of semiconductor devices continues, pattern sizes required in lithography get smaller and smaller. To achieve even more scaling down of these patterns without changing the basic infrastructure technology of current cutting-edge 193-nm lithography, 193-nm immersion lithography is being viewed as a powerful technique that can accommodate next-generation mass productions needs. Therefore this technology has been seriously considered and after proof of concept it is currently entering the stage of practical application. In the case of 193-nm immersion lithography, however, because liquid fills the area between the projection optics and the silicon wafer, several causes of concern have been raised - namely, diffusion of moisture into the resist film due to direct resist-water interaction during exposure, dissolution of internal components of the resist into the de-ionized water, and the influence of residual moisture generated during exposure on post-exposure processing. To prevent these unwanted effects, optimization of the three main components of the lithography system: materials, track and scanner, is required. For the materials, 193nm resist formulation improvements specifically for immersion processing have reduced the leaching and the sensitivity to water related defects, further benefits can be seen by the application of protective top coat materials. For the track component, optimization of the processing conditions and immersion specific modules are proven to advance the progress made by the material suppliers. Finally, by optimizing conditions on the 3 rd generation immersion scanner with the latest hardware configuration, defectivity levels comparable to dry processing can be achieved. In this evaluation, we detail the improvements that can be realized with new immersion specific track rinse modules and formulate a hypothesis for the improvements seen with the rinsing process. Additionally, we show the current status of water induced

  18. Multifunctional Interface Modification of Energy Relay Dye in Quasi-solid Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Cui, Yixiu; Liu, Xiaojiang; Wang, Liduo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) has been used in interface modification of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) with combined effects of retarding charge recombination and Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET). DCJTB interface modification significantly improved photovoltaic performance of DSCs. I–V curves shows the conversion efficiency increases from 4.27% to 5.64% with DCJTB coating. The application of DCJTB with combined effects is beneficial to explore more novel multi-functional interface modification materials to improve the performance of DSCs. PMID:24993900

  19. Skin and dermal appendages stem cells exposure to tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Kolanko, Emanuel; Czekaj, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to persist throughout human life possessing enormous capacity for proliferation and differentiation. These cells and their microenvironment are potential targets for environmental pollutions, for example tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke consists of thousands of substances which can disturb stem cell homeostasis by evoking, in particular, oxidative stress and hypoxia. It causes also deep, irreversible changes in the affected tissues. It is strongly linked with carcinogenesis. Skin is one of the most exposed tissues to tobacco smoke. Self-renewal dermal tissues, such as epidermis and its appendages, are composed of various stem cell populations. The tissue of the skin that is richest in SC is the hair follicle. In wound healing are involved: epidermal KSC population and stem populations from hair follicle, such as CD34+ and Lrig6+ cells. Some skin cancers, i.e., squamous cell carcinoma, originate from skin stem cells and are considered to be most associated with long-term smoking. Dermal stem cells can be affected by tobacco smoke components in two ways: internal, where xenobiotics are delivered with blood stream, and external, where the tissues are directly exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, as well as to third-hand smoke. Assessment of the dose- and time-response of the skin and dermal appendages to tobacco smoke exposure can allow to estimate the adverse health effects risk. Usually, to assess tobacco smoke exposure time, hairs and toenails are used. This is because they have a unique ability to store xenobiotics for longer periods of time in respect to their temporal appearance in the blood. Current scientific and medical problem is searching for more adequate biomarkers for TS exposure assessment. The unresolved question is, if stem cells isolated from the skin and its appendages might be good biomarkers for tobacco smoke exposure. We should take into consideration stem cell biology (proliferation vs. differentiation), expression of

  20. Regulation of phosphatidylserine exposure in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Bach; Wagner-Britz, Lisa; Maia, Sara; Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian; Kaestner, Lars; Bernhardt, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    The exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer membrane leaflet of red blood cells (RBCs) serves as a signal for eryptosis, a mechanism for the RBC clearance from blood circulation. The process of PS exposure was investigated as function of the intracellular Ca(2+) content and the activation of PKCα in human and sheep RBCs. Cells were treated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), 4-bromo-A23187, or phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA) and analysed by flow cytometry, single cell fluorescence video imaging, or confocal microscopy. For human RBCs, no clear correlation existed between the number of cells with an elevated Ca(2+) content and PS exposure. Results are explained by three different mechanisms responsible for the PS exposure in human RBCs: (i) Ca(2+)-stimulated scramblase activation (and flippase inhibition) by LPA, 4-bromo-A23187, and PMA; (ii) PKC activation by LPA and PMA; and (iii) enhanced lipid flop caused by LPA. In sheep RBCs, only the latter mechanism occurs suggesting absence of scramblase activity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. TCDD exposure disrupts mammary epithelial cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Loretta L.; Lew, Betina J.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2011-01-01

    Mammary gland growth and differentiation during pregnancy is a developmental process that is sensitive to the toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). TCDD is a widespread environmental contaminant and a potent ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We demonstrate reduced β-casein protein induction in mouse mammary glands and in cultured SCp2 mammary epithelial cells following exposure to TCDD. SCp2 cells exposed to TCDD also show reduced cell clustering and less alveolar-like structure formation. SCp2 cells express transcriptionally active AhR, and exposure to TCDD induces expression of the AhR target gene CYP1B1. Exposure to TCDD during pregnancy reduced expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin in the mammary gland and decreased phosphorylation of STAT5, a known regulator of β-casein gene expression. These data provide morphological and molecular evidence that TCDD-mediated AhR activation disrupts structural and functional differentiation of the mammary gland, and present an in vitro model for studying the effects of TCDD on mammary epithelial cell function. PMID:19490989

  2. Operando X-ray Investigation of Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Model Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We employed operando anomalous surface X-ray diffraction to investigate the buried interface between the cathode and the electrolyte of a model solid oxide fuel cell with atomic resolution. The cell was studied under different oxygen pressures at elevated temperatures and polarizations by external potential control. Making use of anomalous X-ray diffraction effects at the Y and Zr K-edges allowed us to resolve the interfacial structure and chemical composition of a (100)-oriented, 9.5 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal electrolyte below a La0.6Sr0.4CoO3−δ (LSC) electrode. We observe yttrium segregation toward the YSZ/LSC electrolyte/electrode interface under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, the interface becomes Y depleted. The yttrium segregation is corroborated by an enhanced outward relaxation of the YSZ interfacial metal ion layer. At the same time, an increase in point defect concentration in the electrolyte at the interface was observed, as evidenced by reduced YSZ crystallographic site occupancies for the cations as well as the oxygen ions. Such changes in composition are expected to strongly influence the oxygen ion transport through this interface which plays an important role for the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The structure of the interface is compared to the bare YSZ(100) surface structure near the microelectrode under identical conditions and to the structure of the YSZ(100) surface prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. PMID:27346923

  3. Operando X-ray Investigation of Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Model Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Sergey; Vonk, Vedran; Khorshidi, Navid; Franz, Dirk; Kubicek, Markus; Kilic, Volkan; Felici, Roberto; Huber, Tobias M; Navickas, Edvinas; Rupp, Ghislain M; Fleig, Jürgen; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-06-14

    We employed operando anomalous surface X-ray diffraction to investigate the buried interface between the cathode and the electrolyte of a model solid oxide fuel cell with atomic resolution. The cell was studied under different oxygen pressures at elevated temperatures and polarizations by external potential control. Making use of anomalous X-ray diffraction effects at the Y and Zr K-edges allowed us to resolve the interfacial structure and chemical composition of a (100)-oriented, 9.5 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal electrolyte below a La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ (LSC) electrode. We observe yttrium segregation toward the YSZ/LSC electrolyte/electrode interface under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, the interface becomes Y depleted. The yttrium segregation is corroborated by an enhanced outward relaxation of the YSZ interfacial metal ion layer. At the same time, an increase in point defect concentration in the electrolyte at the interface was observed, as evidenced by reduced YSZ crystallographic site occupancies for the cations as well as the oxygen ions. Such changes in composition are expected to strongly influence the oxygen ion transport through this interface which plays an important role for the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The structure of the interface is compared to the bare YSZ(100) surface structure near the microelectrode under identical conditions and to the structure of the YSZ(100) surface prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions.

  4. Relationship between asbestos exposure and lung cancer cell type

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A nested case-control study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between asbestos exposure and lung cancer cell type. Cases were former employees of two Virginia shipyards, and were identified from the Virginia Tumor Registry. All cases were diagnosed with lung cancer between 1975-82. A stratified random sample of controls was selected from among former shipyard workers from the same two yards as the cases. Job histories were abstracted from shipyard personnel records on all cases and controls and were the primary source of data used to derive measures of asbestos exposure. Analyses were conducted using the conditional maximum likelihood estimate of the odds ratio an logistic regression. The results from the analysis showed that adenocarcinoma had the strongest association with asbestos exposure and the only case group to be associated with a multiplicative interaction effect between asbestos exposure and smoking. The most significant associations were found for adenocarcinoma cases employed before 1950. Strikingly negative dose-response relationships were found for the other three case groups. The results suggest indirectly that squamous and small cell cancer may have shorter latency from exposure to diagnosis and that proportionately more of these cases were not captured in this study. Problems which are related to a calendar time criteria for case ascertainment, i.e., diagnosis between 1975-82, limit the conclusiveness of these findings.

  5. Engineering Interface Structure to Improve Efficiency and Stability of Organometal Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Longbin; Ono, Luis K; Jiang, Yan; Leyden, Matthew R; Raga, Sonia R; Wang, Shenghao; Qi, Yabing

    2017-05-25

    The rapid rise of power conversion efficiency (PCE) of low cost organometal halide perovskite solar cells suggests that these cells are a promising alternative to conventional photovoltaic technology. However, anomalous hysteresis and unsatisfactory stability hinder the industrialization of perovskite solar cells. Interface engineering is of importance for the fabrication of highly stable and hysteresis free perovskite solar cells. Here we report that a surface modification of the widely used TiO2 compact layer can give insight into interface interaction in perovskite solar cells. A highest PCE of 18.5% is obtained using anatase TiO2, but the device is not stable and degrades rapidly. With an amorphous TiO2 compact layer, the devices show a prolonged lifetime but a lower PCE and more pronounced hysteresis. To achieve a high PCE and long lifetime simultaneously, an insulating polymer interface layer is deposited on top of TiO2. Three polymers, each with a different functional group (hydroxyl, amino, or aromatic group), are investigated to further understand the relation of interface structure and device PCE as well as stability. We show that it is necessary to consider not only the band alignment at the interface, but also interface chemical interactions between the thin interface layer and the perovskite film. The hydroxyl and amino groups interact with CH3NH3PbI3 leading to poor PCEs. In contrast, deposition of a thin layer of polymer consisting of an aromatic group to prevent the direct contact of TiO2 and CH3NH3PbI3 can significantly enhance the device stability, while the same time maintaining a high PCE. The fact that a polymer interface layer on top of TiO2 can enhance device stability, strongly suggests that the interface interaction between TiO2 and CH3NH3PbI3 plays a crucial role. Our work highlights the importance of interface structure and paves the way for further optimization of PCEs and stability of perovskite solar cells.

  6. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  7. Nanowire Nanoelectronics: Building Interfaces with Tissue and Cells at the Natural Scale of Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Karni, Itzhaq Tzahi

    The interface between nanoscale electronic devices and biological systems enables interactions at length-scales natural to biology, and thus should maximize communication between these two diverse yet complementary systems. Moreover, nanostructures and nanostructured substrates show enhanced coupling to artificial membranes, cells, and tissue. Such nano-bio interfaces offer better sensitivity and spatial resolution as compared to conventional planar structures. In this work, I will report the electrical properties of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) interfaced with embryonic chicken hearts and cultured cardiomyocytes. I developed a scheme that allows us to manipulate the nanoelectronic to tissue/cell interfaces while monitoring their electrical activity. In addition, by utilizing the bottom-up approach, we extend our work to the sub-cellular regime, and interface cells with the smallest reported device ever and thus exceed the spatial and temporal resolution limits of other electrical recording techniques. The exceptional synthetic control and flexible assembly of nanowires provides powerful tools for fundamental studies and applications in life science, and opens up the potential of merging active transistors with cells such that the distinction between nonliving and living systems is blurred.

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) following exposure to whole cigarette smoke on a direct in vitro exposure system.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Takemi

    2006-07-01

    Many in vitro studies have employed cigarette smoke condensates or soluble smoke components to investigate the biological effects of cigarette smoke. However, neither of these methods evaluates the biological effects of fresh whole cigarette smoke. It is most desirable to conduct in vitro biological studies under conditions which accommodate the dynamic physicochemical character of fresh cigarette smoke. Previously we reported the development of a whole smoke exposure system to assess the biological effects of mainstream cigarette smoke. The exposure system design was based on a combination of the sedimentation procedure and the CULTEX cultivation technique, which includes a systemized air/liquid interface methodology and exposes the cells to fresh smoke at every puff. The aim of this study was to adopt the other biological endpoint to our whole smoke exposure system. We focused on heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA gene expression, an enzyme which has recently been shown to be highly responsible for oxidative stress. In the present study, a dose-response relationship between the HO-1 mRNA expression based on the reverse transcription real-time PCR method and total exposure to cigarette smoke was observed. When a Cambridge filter pad was placed between the cigarette and exposure module, to ensure the cells were only exposed to the gas/vapor phase, the latter, as well as the whole smoke, induced HO-1 mRNA dose dependently. For the next step, acetate plain and charcoal filters with the same pressure drop were prepared to assess the potential ability of charcoal filters with regard to the vapor phase performance. The results revealed reduced HO-1 mRNA gene expression when a charcoal filter was used. Direct whole smoke exposure is a significant approach and may reflect the conditions of exposure essentially resulting from direct contact between cells and a dynamic mixture of gaseous and particulate constituents. We were able to adopt a gene expression assay for oxidative

  9. Metabolic shift in lung alveolar cell mitochondria following acrolein exposure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit R; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein, an α,β unsaturated electrophile, is an environmental pollutant released in ambient air from diesel exhausts and cooking oils. This study examines the role of acrolein in altering mitochondrial function and metabolism in lung-specific cells. RLE-6TN, H441, and primary alveolar type II (pAT2) cells were exposed to acrolein for 4 h, and its effect on mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates was studied by XF Extracellular Flux analysis. Low-dose acrolein exposure decreased mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner because of alteration in the metabolism of glucose in all the three cell types. Acrolein inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, leading to decreased substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN, H441, and pAT2 cells; the reduced GAPDH activity was compensated in pAT2 cells by an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the regulatory control of the pentose phosphate pathway. The decrease in pyruvate from glucose metabolism resulted in utilization of alternative sources to support mitochondrial energy production: palmitate-BSA complex increased mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN and pAT2 cells. The presence of palmitate in alveolar cells for surfactant biosynthesis may prove to be the alternative fuel source for mitochondrial respiration. Accordingly, a decrease in phosphatidylcholine levels and an increase in phospholipase A2 activity were found in the alveolar cells after acrolein exposure. These findings have implications for understanding the decrease in surfactant levels frequently observed in pathophysiological situations with altered lung function following exposure to environmental toxicants.

  10. Pup exposure elicits hippocampal cell proliferation in the prairie vole.

    PubMed

    Ruscio, Michael G; Sweeny, Timothy D; Hazelton, Julie L; Suppatkul, Patrin; Boothe, Emily; Carter, C Sue

    2008-02-11

    The onset of parental behavior has profound and enduring effects on behavior and neurobiology across a variety of species. In some cases, mere exposure to a foster neonate (and a subsequent parental response) can have similar effects. In the present experiment, we exposed adult male and female prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) to two foster pups for 20 min and quantified cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG), medial amygdala (MeA) and cortical amygdala (CorA). Prairie voles are highly social rodents that typically display biparental care and spontaneous parental care when exposed to foster pups. Comparisons were made between the animals that responded parentally or non-parentally towards the pups, as well as control conditions. Cell proliferation was assessed using injections of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and immunocytochemical localization of this marker. The phenotype of the cells was determined using double label immunofluoresence for BrdU and TuJ1 (a neuronal marker). An increase in cell proliferation in the DG was seen in animals exposed to pups. However, animals that responded non-parentally had a greater number of BrdU labeled cells in the DG compared to those that responded parentally. The majority of BrdU labeled cells co-expressed TuJ1 across all groups. These results demonstrate that exposure to a foster pup and the behavioral reaction to it (parental or non-parental) are associated with site-specific changes in cell proliferation.

  11. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2013-08-15

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect.

  12. Cell mechanosensory recognizes ligand compliance at biomaterial interface.

    PubMed

    Cosenza, Chiara; Lettera, Vincenzo; Causa, Filippo; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cells activate signalling through ligand-receptor bonds by sensing the mechanical properties of the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). Ligands, indeed, have to withstand the pulling force elicited by cell receptors through focal adhesions (FAs). On this basis, we developed functional ligands to be simply adsorbed on surfaces and constituted by a two-domain peptide: one derived from ECM proteins and available to receptors to offer biochemical cues, and another adsorbed on material to withstand the tension upon receptor engagement. Tuneable compliance of the anchoring domain of the peptide ligand was verified by single peptide analysis through molecular dynamics and adsorption measurements. We showed that the highest adsorbed peptides combined with integrin cell-binding motifs allow for the cell recognition and polarization with larger mature FA areas. On the contrary, the lowest adsorbed sequences did not provide mechanical resistance to the integrin pulling action, leading to more rounded cells with smaller FA areas. This evidence demonstrates that cell mechanosensory can discriminate ligands on surfaces and should be considered as a criterion in ligand design for material bioactivation.

  13. Dimethylsulfoxide exposure modulates HL-60 cell rolling interactions.

    PubMed

    Gee, David J; Wright, L Kate; Zimmermann, Jonathan; Cole, Kayla; Soule, Karen; Ubowski, Michelle

    2012-08-01

    Human leukaemic HL-60 cells are widely used for studying interactions involving adhesion molecules [e.g. P-selectin and PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1)] since their rolling behaviour has been shown to mimic the dynamics of leucocyte rolling in vitro. HL-60 cells are neutrophilic promyelocytes that can undergo granulocytic differentiation upon exposure to compounds such as DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide). Using a parallel plate flow chamber functionalized with recombinant P-selectin-Fc chimaera, undifferentiated and DMSO-induced (48, 72 and 96 h) HL-60 cells were assayed for rolling behaviour. We found that depending on P-selectin incubation concentration, undifferentiated cells incurred up to a 6-fold increase in rolling velocity while subjected to an approximately 10-fold increase in biologically relevant shear stress. HL-60 cells exposed to DMSO for up to 72 h incurred up to a 3-fold increase in rolling velocity over the same shear stress range. Significantly, cells exposed for up to 96 h incurred up to a 9-fold decrease in rolling velocity, compared with undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Although cell surface and nuclear morphological changes were evident upon exposure to DMSO, flow cytometric analysis revealed that PSGL-1 expression was unchanged, irrespective of treatment duration. The results suggest that DMSO-treated HL-60 cells may be problematic as a substitute for neutrophils for trafficking studies during advanced stages of the LAC (leucocyte adhesion cascade). We suggest that remodelling of the cell surface during differentiation may affect rolling behaviour and that DMSO-treated HL-60 cells would behave differently from the normal leucocytes during inflammatory response in vivo.

  14. Dimethylsulfoxide exposure modulates HL-60 cell rolling interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gee, David J.; Wright, L. Kate; Zimmermann, Jonathan; Cole, Kayla; Soule, Karen; Ubowski, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Human leukaemic HL-60 cells are widely used for studying interactions involving adhesion molecules [e.g. P-selectin and PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1)] since their rolling behaviour has been shown to mimic the dynamics of leucocyte rolling in vitro. HL-60 cells are neutrophilic promyelocytes that can undergo granulocytic differentiation upon exposure to compounds such as DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide). Using a parallel plate flow chamber functionalized with recombinant P-selectin–Fc chimaera, undifferentiated and DMSO-induced (48, 72 and 96 h) HL-60 cells were assayed for rolling behaviour. We found that depending on P-selectin incubation concentration, undifferentiated cells incurred up to a 6-fold increase in rolling velocity while subjected to an approximately 10-fold increase in biologically relevant shear stress. HL-60 cells exposed to DMSO for up to 72 h incurred up to a 3-fold increase in rolling velocity over the same shear stress range. Significantly, cells exposed for up to 96 h incurred up to a 9-fold decrease in rolling velocity, compared with undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Although cell surface and nuclear morphological changes were evident upon exposure to DMSO, flow cytometric analysis revealed that PSGL-1 expression was unchanged, irrespective of treatment duration. The results suggest that DMSO-treated HL-60 cells may be problematic as a substitute for neutrophils for trafficking studies during advanced stages of the LAC (leucocyte adhesion cascade). We suggest that remodelling of the cell surface during differentiation may affect rolling behaviour and that DMSO-treated HL-60 cells would behave differently from the normal leucocytes during inflammatory response in vivo. PMID:22494057

  15. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  16. Photovoltaics. Interface engineering of highly efficient perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Li, Gang; Luo, Song; Song, Tze-bing; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Hong, Ziruo; You, Jingbi; Liu, Yongsheng; Yang, Yang

    2014-08-01

    Advancing perovskite solar cell technologies toward their theoretical power conversion efficiency (PCE) requires delicate control over the carrier dynamics throughout the entire device. By controlling the formation of the perovskite layer and careful choices of other materials, we suppressed carrier recombination in the absorber, facilitated carrier injection into the carrier transport layers, and maintained good carrier extraction at the electrodes. When measured via reverse bias scan, cell PCE is typically boosted to 16.6% on average, with the highest efficiency of ~19.3% in a planar geometry without antireflective coating. The fabrication of our perovskite solar cells was conducted in air and from solution at low temperatures, which should simplify manufacturing of large-area perovskite devices that are inexpensive and perform at high levels. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Engineering the Interface Between Inorganic Materials and Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, David

    2014-05-31

    To further optimize cell function in hybrid “living materials”, it would be advantageous to render mammalian cells responsive to novel “orthogonal” cues, i.e. signals they would not ordinarily respond to but that can be engineered to feed into defined intracellular signaling pathways. We recently developed an optogenetic method, based on A. thaliana Cry2, for rapid and reversible protein oligomerization in response to blue light. We also demonstrated the ability to use this method to channel the light input into several defined signaling pathways, work that will enhance communication between inorganic devices and living systems.

  18. Organic Thin-Film Solar Cells Based on Donor-Acceptor Interpenetrating Nano-Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Akihiko; Hori, Tetsuro; Moritou, Hiroki; Fukuoka, Naoki; Sakamoto, Junki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2010-12-23

    Photovoltaic cells with interpenetrating interfaces between a conducting polymer layer and a fullerene layer fabricated by a solvent corrosion method have been investigated. Using a weakly dissoluble combination of a solvent and an underlayer film, we fabricated a ''semi-layered'' structure that was maintaining a bilayer structure and furthermore interpenetrating at the interface of the conducting polymer and the fullerene layers. In these cells, high external quantum efficiencies (EQE) were obtained. The photovoltaic properties have been interpreted by the effective absorption of incident photons around the interface of conducting polymer and fullerene, the interpenetrating fullerene / conducting polymer interface involving the efficient photo-induced charge transfer, and the short distance between the electron-generation region and electrode resulting in the enhancement of the electron collection to the electrode. In these cells, both of the efficient exciton dissociations at the interpenetrating interface and the efficient carrier transports by each continuous pathway for electrons between fullerene molecules and for holes between conducting polymers occur.

  19. Bacterial Exposure Induces and Activates Matrilysin in Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Boado, Yolanda S.; Wilson, Carole L.; Hooper, Lora V.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Parks, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Matrilysin, a matrix metalloproteinase, is expressed and secreted lumenally by intact mucosal and glandular epithelia throughout the body, suggesting that its regulation and function are shared among tissues. Because matrilysin is produced in Paneth cells of the murine small intestine, where it participates in innate host defense by activation of prodefensins, we speculated that its expression would be influenced by bacterial exposure. Indeed, acute infection (10–90 min) of human colon, bladder, and lung carcinoma cells, primary human tracheal epithelial cells, and human tracheal explants with type 1–piliated Escherichia coli mediated a marked (25–50-fold) and sustained (>24 h) induction of matrilysin production. In addition, bacterial infection resulted in activation of the zymogen form of the enzyme, which was selectively released at the apical surface. Induction of matrilysin was mediated by a soluble, non-LPS bacterial factor and correlated with the release of defensin-like bacteriocidal activity. Bacteria did not induce matrilysin in other cell types, and expression of other metalloproteinases by epithelial cells was not affected by bacteria. Matrilysin was not detected in germ-free mice, but the enzyme was induced after colonization with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. These findings indicate that bacterial exposure is a potent and physiologically relevant signal regulating matrilysin expression in epithelial cells. PMID:10725342

  20. Acute acid exposure increases rabbit esophageal cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Carpizo, D R; Reaka, A J; Glaws, W R; Pooley, N; Schmidt, L; Halline, A G; Goldstein, J L; Layden, T J

    1998-02-01

    In the present study we examined whether an acute infusion of HCl into the esophagus of rabbits would cause an increase in esophageal cellular proliferation independent of morphologic evidence of cell injury. To examine this question, the distal two thirds of the rabbit esophagus was infused for 1 hour with either 40 mmol/L HCl or NSS (control), and cellular proliferation was studied 24 and 48 hours later by using bromodeoxyuridine (BrDu) to label the nuclei of dividing cells and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) enzyme activity as a biochemical index of cell division. Although there was no gross or microscopic evidence of cell necrosis or mucosal inflammation 24 hours after H+ infusion, BrDu labeling of basal cell nuclei was significantly greater 24 hours after H+ infusion (31%+/-6%) as compared with that in control animals infused with NSS (15%+/-4%). This increase in labeling index was paralleled by a threefold greater ODC enzyme activity at 24 hours with H+ infusion. Rete pegs were infrequent in control tissues (4+/-4 rete pegs per 100 microm of esophageal length) or in animals examined 24 hours after acid exposure (4+/-2 rete pegs per 100 microm). However, rete pegs were very prominent 48 hours after acid infusion (22+/-6 rete pegs per 100 microm). A short exposure to acid can cause a significant increase in mucosal proliferation independent of injury, suggesting that esophageal cell acidification either directly or indirectly acts as a tissue mitogen.

  1. Effects of isothermal and cyclic exposures on interface structure and mechanical properties of FPalpha-Al2O3/aluminum composites. [polycrystaline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. M.; Koczak, M. J.; Lawley, A.

    1979-01-01

    The microstructural and interface stability of FPalpha-Al203/Al-Li composites are investigated as a function of isothermal exposure at 500 C or thermal cycling between 140 and 500 C with hold time at Tmax. Interfacial morphology, growth kinetics, crystal structure, and composition of interfacial reaction products are characterized. Strength is monitored in the transverse orientation, and fracture mechanics is analyzed in terms of interface reaction products. The interfacial reaction product in FP/Al is Li2O.5Al2O3. Significant fiber-matrix reaction occurs during fabrication. The number of thermal cycles rather than total time at Tmax is the determining factor in strength degradation, thermal cycling giving rise to voids at the fiber-matrix interface. Extensive interface failures occur at composite fracture stresses below about 128 MPa; above this stress level failure is attributed to ductile matrix fracture.

  2. An interface reconstruction method based on an analytical formula for 3D arbitrary convex cells

    DOE PAGES

    Diot, Steven; François, Marianne M.

    2015-10-22

    In this study, we are interested in an interface reconstruction method for 3D arbitrary convex cells that could be used in multi-material flow simulations for instance. We assume that the interface is represented by a plane whose normal vector is known and we focus on the volume-matching step that consists in finding the plane constant so that it splits the cell according to a given volume fraction. We follow the same approach as in the recent authors' publication for 2D arbitrary convex cells in planar and axisymmetrical geometries, namely we derive an analytical formula for the volume of the specificmore » prismatoids obtained when decomposing the cell using the planes that are parallel to the interface and passing through all the cell nodes. This formula is used to bracket the interface plane constant such that the volume-matching problem is rewritten in a single prismatoid in which the same formula is used to find the final solution. Finally, the proposed method is tested against an important number of reproducible configurations and shown to be at least five times faster.« less

  3. An interface reconstruction method based on an analytical formula for 3D arbitrary convex cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Steven; François, Marianne M.

    2015-10-22

    In this study, we are interested in an interface reconstruction method for 3D arbitrary convex cells that could be used in multi-material flow simulations for instance. We assume that the interface is represented by a plane whose normal vector is known and we focus on the volume-matching step that consists in finding the plane constant so that it splits the cell according to a given volume fraction. We follow the same approach as in the recent authors' publication for 2D arbitrary convex cells in planar and axisymmetrical geometries, namely we derive an analytical formula for the volume of the specific prismatoids obtained when decomposing the cell using the planes that are parallel to the interface and passing through all the cell nodes. This formula is used to bracket the interface plane constant such that the volume-matching problem is rewritten in a single prismatoid in which the same formula is used to find the final solution. Finally, the proposed method is tested against an important number of reproducible configurations and shown to be at least five times faster.

  4. Optimization of Organic Solar Cells: Materials, Devices and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanjia

    Due to the increasing demand for sustainable clean energy, photovoltaic cells have received intensified attention in the past decade in both academia and industry. Among the types of cells, organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells offer promise as alternatives to conventional inorganic-type solar cells owning to several unique advantages such as low material and fabrication cost. To maximize power conversion efficiencies (PCEs), extensive research efforts focus on frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energy engineering of photoactive materials. Towards this objective, a series of novel donor polymers incorporating a new building block, bithiophene imide (BTI) group are developed, with narrow bandgap and low-lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies to increase short circuit current density, Jsc, and open circuit voltage, Voc.. Compared to other PV technologies, OPVs often suffer from large internal recombination loss and relatively low fill factors (FFs) <70%. Through a combination of materials design and device architecture optimization strategies to improve both microscopic and macroscopic thin film morphology, OPVs with PCEs up to 8.7% and unprecedented FF approaching 80% are obtained. Such high FF are close to those typically achieved in amorphous Si solar cells. Systematic variations of polymer chemical structures lead to understanding of structure-property relationships between polymer geometry and the resulting blend film morphology characteristics which are crucial for achieving high local mobilities and long carrier lifetimes. Instead of using fullerene as the acceptors, an alternative type of OPV is developed employing a high electron mobility polymer, P(NDI2OD-T2), as the acceptor. To improve the all-polymer blend film morphology, the influence of basic solvent properties such as solvent boiling point and solubility on polymer phase separation and charge transport properties is investigated, yielding to a high PCE of 2.7% for all-polymer solar cells

  5. Contact variables for exposure to avian influenza H5N1 virus at the human-animal interface.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, P; Perdue, M; Mumford, E

    2010-06-01

    Although the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus continues to cause infections in both avian and human populations, the specific zoonotic risk factors remain poorly understood. This review summarizes available evidence regarding types of contact associated with transmission of H5N1 virus at the human-animal interface. A systematic search of the published literature revealed five analytical studies and 15 case reports describing avian influenza transmission from animals to humans for further review. Risk factors identified in analytical studies were compared, and World Health Organization-confirmed cases, identified in case reports, were classified according to type of contact reported using a standardized algorithm. Although cases were primarily associated with direct contact with sick/unexpectedly dead birds, some cases reported only indirect contact with birds or contaminated environments or contact with apparently healthy birds. Specific types of contacts or activities leading to exposure could not be determined from data available in the publications reviewed. These results support previous reports that direct contact with sick birds is not the only means of human exposure to avian influenza H5N1 virus. To target public health measures and disease awareness messaging for reducing the risk of zoonotic infection with avian influenza H5N1 virus, the specific types of contacts and activities leading to transmission need to be further understood. The role of environmental virus persistence, shedding of virus by asymptomatic poultry and disease pathophysiology in different avian species relative to human zoonotic risk, as well as specific modes of zoonotic transmission, should be determined.

  6. Strategies to engineer tendon/ligament-to-bone interface: Biomaterials, cells and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Font Tellado, Sonia; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Van Griensven, Martijn

    2015-11-01

    Integration between tendon/ligament and bone occurs through a specialized tissue interface called enthesis. The complex and heterogeneous structure of the enthesis is essential to ensure smooth mechanical stress transfer between bone and soft tissues. Following injury, the interface is not regenerated, resulting in high rupture recurrence rates. Tissue engineering is a promising strategy for the regeneration of a functional enthesis. However, the complex structural and cellular composition of the native interface makes enthesis tissue engineering particularly challenging. Thus, it is likely that a combination of biomaterials and cells stimulated with appropriate biochemical and mechanical cues will be needed. The objective of this review is to describe the current state-of-the-art, challenges and future directions in the field of enthesis tissue engineering focusing on four key parameters: (1) scaffold and biomaterials, (2) cells, (3) growth factors and (4) mechanical stimuli.

  7. Innate lymphoid cells at the interface between obesity and asthma.

    PubMed

    Everaere, Laetitia; Ait Yahia, Saliha; Bouté, Mélodie; Audousset, Camille; Chenivesse, Cécile; Tsicopoulos, Anne

    2017-09-07

    Obesity and asthma prevalence has dramatically and concomitantly increased over the last 25 years, and many epidemiological studies have highlighted obesity as an important risk factor for asthma. Although many studies have been performed, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Innate mechanisms have been involved in both diseases, in particular through the recently described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). ILCs are subdivided into three groups that are defined by their cytokine production and by their master transcription factor expression, in sharp correlation with their T helper counterparts. However, unlike T helper cells, ILCs do not express antigen-specific receptors, but respond to damage-induced signals. ILCs have been found in target tissues of both diseases, and data have implicated these cells in the pathogenesis of both diseases. In particular group 2 ILCs (ILC2) are activated in both the adipose and lung tissues under the effect of interleukin-33 and interleukin-25 expression. However, counter-intuitively to the well-known association between obesity and asthma, ILC2 are beneficial for obesity but deleterious for asthma. This review will examine the roles of ILCs in each disease and recent data highlighting ILCs as a putative link between obesity and asthma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Organic and perovskite solar cells: Working principles, materials and interfaces.

    PubMed

    Marinova, Nevena; Valero, Silvia; Delgado, Juan Luis

    2017-02-15

    In the last decades organic solar cells (OSCs) have been considered as a promising photovoltaic technology with the potential to provide reasonable power conversion efficiencies combined with low cost and easy processability. Unexpectedly, Perovskite Solar Cells (PSCs) have experienced unprecedented rise in Power Conversion Efficiency (PCE) thus emerging as a highly efficient photovoltaic technology. OSCs and PSCs are two different kind of devices with distinct charge generation mechanism, which however share some similarities in the materials processing, thus standard strategies developed for OSCs are currently being employed in PSCs. In this article, we recapitulate the main processes in these two types of photovoltaic technologies with an emphasis on interfacial processes and interfacial modification, spotlighting the materials and newest approaches in the interfacial engineering. We discuss on the relevance of well-known materials coming from the OSCs field, which are now being tested in the PSCs field, while maintaining a focus on the importance of the material design for highly efficient, stable and accessible solar cells.

  9. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  10. Female germ cell loss from radiation and chemical exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, R.L.; Felton, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Female germ cells in some mammals are extremely sensitive to killing by ionizing radiation, especially during development. Primordial oocytes in juvenile mice have an LD50 of only 6-7 rad, and the germ cell pool in squirrel monkeys is destroyed by prenatal exposure of 0.7 rad/day. Sensitivity varies greatly with species and germ cell stage. Unusually high sensitivity has not been found in macaques and may not occur in man, but this has not been established for all developmental stages. The exquisite oocyte radiosensitivity in mice apparently reflects vulnerability of the plasma membrane, not DNA, which may have implications for estimating human genetic risks. Germ cells can be killed also by chemicals. Such oocyte loss, with similarities to radiation effects, is under increasing study, including chemotherapy observations in women. More than 75 compounds have been tested in mice, with in vivo toxicity quantified by oocyte loss; certain chemicals apparently act on the membrane.

  11. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Tang, Lauren N; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2013-12-01

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of high- and low-density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the high-density side into the low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a low-to-high density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration.

  12. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Francois; Tang, Lauren N.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of High and Low density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the High-density side into the Low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a Low-to-High density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration. PMID:24304905

  13. Fabrication of mediator-free hybrid nano-interfaced electrochemical biosensor for monitoring cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Madhurantakam, Sasya; Jayanth Babu, K; Balaguru Rayappan, John Bosco; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2017-01-15

    Glucose, a chief energy source in cellular metabolism, has a significant role in cell proliferation. Cancer cells utilize more glucose than normal cells to meet the energy demand arising due to their uncontrolled proliferation. The present work reports the development of a nano-interfaced amperometric biosensor for rapid and accurate monitoring of glucose utilization by cancer cells. A hybrid nano-interface comprising a blend of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene (GR) was employed to enhance the surface area of the working electrode and favour direct electron transfer. Glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized on the interface serves as the sensing element due to its high selectivity and sensitivity towards glucose. Utilization of glucose was monitored at pre-determined time intervals in MiaPaCa-2 cancer cells. The results obtained from the amperometric technique were compared with the values obtained from a commercial glucometer. Alamar blue assay was performed to check the proliferation rate of the cells. A good correlation was obtained between the proliferation rate and glucose utilization. The designed biosensor was found to be unaffected by the presence of potential interferents and hence may serve as a novel in vitro tool to rapidly quantify the proliferation rates of cancer cells in response to different treatment strategies.

  14. Origin of photogenerated carrier recombination at the metal-active layer interface in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dubey, Ashish; Reza, Khan Mamun; Adhikari, Nirmal; Qiao, Qiquan; Bommisetty, Venkat

    2015-11-07

    The role of the metal-active layer interface in photogenerated recombination has been investigated using nanoscale current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) in as-deposited, pre-annealed and post-annealed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Aluminum (Al) confined post-annealed BHJ solar cells exhibited a significantly improved device efficiency compared to pre-annealed BHJ solar cells having similar photocarrier harvesting ability in the active layer. The nanoscale topography and CS-AFM results indicate a uniform PCBM rich phase at the metal-active layer interface in the post-annealed cells, but PCBM segregation in the pre-annealed cells. These two different annealing processes showed different carrier dynamics revealed using IMPS under various light intensities. The IMPS results suggest reduced photo generated carrier recombination in uniform PCBM rich post-annealed BHJ solar cells. This study reveals the importance of the metal-bend interface in BHJ solar cells in order to obtain efficient charge carrier extraction for high efficiency.

  15. Evaluating the interfacial reaction kinetics of the bipolar membrane interface in the bipolar membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sikan; Lu, Shanfu; Zhang, Jin; Sui, Pang-Chieh; Xiang, Yan

    2013-07-21

    A reaction kinetic model of the bipolar membrane interface in the bipolar membrane fuel cell (BPMFC) was proposed based on the p-n junction theory and chemical reaction kinetics. It verified the self-humidification feasibility of the BPMFC successfully.

  16. Sample cells for probing solid/liquid interfaces with broadband sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreault, Dominique; Kurz, Volker; Howell, Caitlin; Koelsch, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Two sample cells designed specifically for sum-frequency-generation (SFG) measurements at the solid/liquid interface were developed: one thin-layer analysis cell allowing measurement of films on reflective metallic surfaces through a micrometer layer of solution and one spectroelectrochemical cell allowing investigation of processes at the indium tin oxide/solution interface. Both sample cells are described in detail and data illustrating the capabilities of each are shown. To further improve measurements at solid/liquid interfaces, the broadband SFG system was modified to include a reference beam which can be measured simultaneously with the sample signal, permitting background correction of SFG spectra in real time. Sensitivity tests of this system yielded a signal-to-noise ratio of 100 at a surface coverage of 0.2 molecules/nm2. Details on data analysis routines, pulse shaping methods of the visible beam, as well as the design of a purging chamber and sample stage setup are presented. These descriptions will be useful to those planning to set up a SFG spectrometer or seeking to optimize their own SFG systems for measurements of solid/liquid interfaces.

  17. Organization of ETRAMPs and EXP-1 at the parasite-host cell interface of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Tobias; Gardiner, Donald L; Beck, Hans-Peter; Trenholme, Katharine R; Kemp, David J

    2006-02-01

    The parasite-host cell interface is a key compartment of vacuolated intracellular pathogens but little is known about its molecular composition and architecture. We used in vivo cross-linking to analyse the parasite-host cell interface of asexual stages of the most virulent human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We show that the integral membrane protein members of the early transcribed membrane protein (ETRAMP) family and exported protein 1 (EXP-1), which are components of the parasite-host cell interface, form complexes of oligomeric arrays in this compartment. The most notable feature is that each ETRAMP member and EXP-1 define separate arrays, demonstrating that the protein distribution in this membrane is non-random. Each of three recombinant ETRAMPs readily oligomerized in bacterial membranes, confirming that these arrays can form independently of other Plasmodium proteins. We propose that the malaria parasite-host cell interface contains patches of integral membrane proteins forming a mosaic of different microdomains in this membrane.

  18. Bio-Mechanical Interfaces for Cell-Based Microsystems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-22

    R.M., Evans A.G., Deshpande V.S. "Simulation of the contractile response of cells on an array of micro-posts," Philos. Transact. A Math . Phys. Eng. Sci...C.S. Chen. "Microfabricated Tissue Gauges to Measure and Manipulate Cellular Forces in 3D Tissues," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ...Nanotechnology Alliance Investigators Meeting, Manhattan Beach, CA; “Role of PCAST in Science ,” (2009). 9.UOP-Honeywell, Des Plaines, IL; “Unconventional

  19. Red blood cell adhesion on a solid/liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Lavalle, Ph.; Stoltz, J.-F.; Senger, B.; Voegel, J.-C.; Schaaf, P.

    1996-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs), previously fixed with glutaraldehyde, adhere to glass slides coated with fibrinogen. The RBC deposition process on the horizontal glass surface is investigated by analyzing the relative surface covered by the RBCs, as well as the variance of this surface coverage, as a function of the concentration of particles. This study is performed by optical microscopy and image analysis. A model, derived from the classical random sequential adsorption model, has been developed to account for the experimental results. This model highlights the strong influence of the hydrodynamic interactions during the deposition process. PMID:8986776

  20. Mathematical model for cell competition: Predator-prey interactions at the interface between two groups of cells in monolayer tissue.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Seiya; Takamatsu, Atsuko; Ohsawa, Shizue; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2016-09-07

    The phenomenon of 'cell competition' has been implicated in the normal development and maintenance of organs, such as in the regulation of organ size and suppression of neoplastic development. In cell competition, one group of cells competes with another group through an interaction at their interface. Which cell group "wins" is governed by a certain relative fitness within the cells. However, this idea of cellular fitness has not been clearly defined. We construct two types of mathematical models to describe this phenomenon of cell competition by considering the interaction at the interface as a predator-prey type interaction in a monolayer tissue such as epithelium. Both of these models can reproduce several typical experimental observations involving systems of mutant cells (losers) and normal cells (winners). By analyzing one of the model and defining an index for the degree of fitness in groups of cells, we show that the fate of each group mainly depends on the relative carrying capacities of certain resources and the strength of the predator-prey interaction at the interface. This contradicts the classical hypothesis in which the relative proliferation rate determines the winner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The complex interface chemistry of thin-film silicon/zinc oxide solar cell structures.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, D; Wimmer, M; Wilks, R G; Félix, R; Kronast, F; Ruske, F; Bär, M

    2014-12-21

    The interface between solid-phase crystallized phosphorous-doped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si(n(+))) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) was investigated using spatially resolved photoelectron emission microscopy. We find the accumulation of aluminum in the proximity of the interface. Based on a detailed photoemission line analysis, we also suggest the formation of an interface species. Silicon suboxide and/or dehydrated hemimorphite have been identified as likely candidates. For each scenario a detailed chemical reaction pathway is suggested. The chemical instability of the poly-Si(n(+))/ZnO:Al interface is explained by the fact that SiO2 is more stable than ZnO and/or that H2 is released from the initially deposited a-Si:H during the crystallization process. As a result, Zn (a deep acceptor in silicon) is "liberated" close to the silicon/zinc oxide interface presenting the inherent risk of forming deep defects in the silicon absorber. These could act as recombination centers and thus limit the performance of silicon/zinc oxide based solar cells. Based on this insight some recommendations with respect to solar cell design, material selection, and process parameters are given for further knowledge-based thin-film silicon device optimization.

  2. Using Synthetic Biology to Engineer Living Cells That Interface with Programmable Materials.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Keith C; Scott, Felicia Y; Paek, Sung-Ho; Zhang, Ruihua; Ruder, Warren C

    2017-03-09

    We have developed an abiotic-biotic interface that allows engineered cells to control the material properties of a functionalized surface. This system is made by creating two modules: a synthetically engineered strain of E. coli cells and a functionalized material interface. Within this paper, we detail a protocol for genetically engineering selected behaviors within a strain of E. coli using molecular cloning strategies. Once developed, this strain produces elevated levels of biotin when exposed to a chemical inducer. Additionally, we detail protocols for creating two different functionalized surfaces, each of which is able to respond to cell-synthesized biotin. Taken together, we present a methodology for creating a linked, abiotic-biotic system that allows engineered cells to control material composition and assembly on nonliving substrates.

  3. Proteomic and histopathological characterization of the interface between oral squamous cell carcinoma invasion fronts and non-cancerous epithelia.

    PubMed

    Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Xu, Bo; Babkair, Hamzah; Sumita, Yoshimasa; Cheng, Jun; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Saku, Takashi

    2017-02-27

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) are frequently associated with pre-invasive lesions including carcinoma in-situ (CIS), and CISs further form lateral interfaces against surrounding normal or dysplastic epithelia (ND). At the interface where keratin (K) 17 positive (+) SCC/CIS cells are in contact with K13+ ND cells, "cell competition" must be evoked between two such different cell types. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize the histopathology of the SCC/CIS-ND interface and to determine protein profiles around the interface by proteomics. A total of 112 lateral interfaces were collected from 55 CIS and 57 SCC foci, and they were investigated by immunohistochemistry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The interfaces were morphologically classified into three types: vertical, oblique, and convex. There were several cellular changes characteristic to the interface, including apoptosis and hyaline bodies, which were more emphasized in SCC/CIS sides. The results suggested that ND cells were winners of cell competition against SCC/CIS cells. Then, the interfaces were divided into four vertical segments, and each segment was separately laser-microdissected from tissue sections with immunostaining for K13 or K17; the four segments included SCC/CIS away from (#1) or adjacent to (#2) the interface, and ND adjacent to (#3) or away from (#4) the interface. Proteome analyses revealed approximately 4000 proteins from SCC/CIS sides [#1 and #2] and 2800 proteins from ND sides [#3 and #4]. We quantitatively selected the top 25 proteins including ladinin-1 or interleukin-1 receptor antagonist protein, which were most contrastively increased or decreased in SCC/CIS or ND sides, respectively, and their specific immunohistochemical expression modes were confirmed in tissue sections as well as in cultured SCC cells. These molecules should be involved in the cellular crosstalk toward cell competition at the lateral interface of oral SCC/CIS and would be new

  4. Engineering nanoscale stem cell niche: direct stem cell behavior at cell-matrix interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gordon, Andrew; Qian, Weiyi; Chen, Weiqiang

    2015-09-16

    Biophysical cues on the extracellular matrix (ECM) have proven to be significant regulators of stem cell behavior and evolution. Understanding the interplay of these cells and their extracellular microenvironment is critical to future tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, both of which require a means of controlled differentiation. Research suggests that nanotopography, which mimics the local, nanoscale, topographic cues within the stem cell niche, could be a way to achieve large-scale proliferation and control of stem cells in vitro. This Progress Report reviews the history and contemporary advancements of this technology, and pays special attention to nanotopographic fabrication methods and the effect of different nanoscale patterns on stem cell response. Finally, it outlines potential intracellular mechanisms behind this response.

  5. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Miranda L; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl(2) (10ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2weeks of age. At 7weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4(+)FoxP3(+)CD25(+) (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8(+)CD223(+) T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term detrimental

  6. Note: Sample cells to investigate solid/liquid interfaces with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rennie, Adrian R. Hellsing, Maja S.; Lindholm, Eric; Olsson, Anders

    2015-01-15

    The design of sample cells to study solid/liquid interfaces by neutron reflection is presented. Use of standardized components and a modular design has allowed a wide range of experiments that include grazing incidence scattering and conventional small-angle scattering. Features that reduce background scattering are emphasized. Various flow arrangements to fill and replenish the liquid in the cell as well as continuous stirring are described.

  7. Smart interface materials integrated with microfluidics for on-demand local capture and release of cells.

    PubMed

    Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Tasoglu, Savas; Akkaynak, Derya; Avci, Oguzhan; Unluisler, Sebnem; Canikyan, Serli; Maccallum, Noah; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-09-01

    Stimuli responsive, smart interface materials are integrated with microfluidic technologies creating new functions for a broad range of biological and clinical applications by controlling the material and cell interactions. Local capture and on-demand local release of cells are demonstrated with spatial and temporal control in a microfluidic system. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in lung epithelial cells exposed at the air-liquid interface compared with in vivo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuefang; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of spark-generated copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) was evaluated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) using an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system. Dose-response results were compared to in vivo inhalation and instillation studies of CuONP. Cells were exposed to particle-free clean air (controls) or spark-generated CuONPs. The number median diameter, geometric standard deviation and total number concentration of CuONPs were 9.2 nm, 1.48 and 2.27×107 particles/cm3, respectively. Outcome measures included cell viability, cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and proinflammatory chemokine production. Exposure to clean air (2 or 4 hr) did not induce toxicity in HBEC or A549 cells. Compared with controls, CuONP exposures significantly reduced cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. A549 cells were significantly more susceptible to CuONP effects than HBEC. Antioxidant treatment reduced CuONP-induced cytotoxicity. When dose was expressed per area of exposed epithelium there was good agreement of toxicity measures with murine in vivo studies. This demonstrates that in vitro ALI studies can provide meaningful data on nanotoxicity of metal oxides. PMID:25575782

  9. Lung dendritic cells at the innate-adaptive immune interface

    PubMed Central

    Condon, Tracy Voss; Sawyer, Richard T.; Fenton, Matthew J.; Riches, David W. H.

    2011-01-01

    This review updates the basic biology of lung DCs and their functions. Lung DCs have taken center stage as cellular therapeutic targets in new vaccine strategies for the treatment of diverse human disorders, including asthma, allergic lung inflammation, lung cancer, and infectious lung disease. The anatomical distribution of lung DCs, as well as the division of labor between their subsets, aids their ability to recognize and endocytose foreign substances and to process antigens. DCs can induce tolerance in or activate naïve T cells, making lung DCs well-suited to their role as lung sentinels. Lung DCs serve as a functional signaling/sensing unit to maintain lung homeostasis and orchestrate host responses to benign and harmful foreign substances. PMID:21807741

  10. Different cell responses induced by exposure to maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo, Yurena; Nardecchia, Stefania; Morales, María Puerto; Serrano, M. Concepción

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have permitted the development of a wide repertoire of inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with extensive promise for biomedical applications. Despite this remarkable potential, many questions still arise concerning the biocompatible nature of NPs when in contact with biological systems. Herein, we have investigated how controlled changes in the physicochemical properties of iron oxide NPs at their surface (i.e., surface charge and hydrodynamic size) affect, first, their interaction with cell media components and, subsequently, cell responses to NP exposure. For that purpose, we have prepared iron oxide NPs with three different coatings (i.e., dimercaptosuccinic acid - DMSA, (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane - APS and dextran) and explored the response of two different cell types, murine L929 fibroblasts and human Saos-2 osteoblasts, to their exposure. Interestingly, different cell responses were found depending on the NP concentration, surface charge and cell type. In this sense, neutral NPs, as those coated with dextran, induced negligible cell damage, as their cellular internalization was significantly reduced. In contrast, surface-charged NPs (i.e., those coated with DMSA and APS) caused significant cellular changes in viability, morphology and cell cycle under certain culture conditions, as a result of a more active cellular internalization. These results also revealed a particular cellular ability to detect and remember the original physicochemical properties of the NPs, despite the formation of a protein corona when incubated in culture media. Overall, conclusions from these studies are of crucial interest for future biomedical applications of iron oxide NPs.Recent advances in nanotechnology have permitted the development of a wide repertoire of inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with extensive promise for biomedical applications. Despite this remarkable potential, many questions still arise concerning the biocompatible

  11. Osteochondral interface generation by rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts coculture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Ravi, Sujata; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2012-09-01

    Physiological osteochondral interface regeneration is a significant challenge. This study aims to investigate the effect of the coculture of chondrogenic rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) with rabbit osteoblasts in a specially designed two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) co-interface culture to develop the intermediate osteochondral region in vitro. The 2D-3D coculture system was set up by first independently culturing chondrogenic rBMSCs on a scaffold and osteoblasts in cell culture plates, and subsequently placed in contact and cocultured. As control, samples not cocultured with osteoblasts were used. The regulatory effects exerted by osteoblasts on chondrogenic rBMSCs were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To study the effect of coculture on cells located in different parts of the scaffold, samples were separated into two parts and significantly different gene expression patterns were found between them. In comparison with the control group, a significant moderate downregulation of chondrogenic marker genes, such as Collagen II and Aggrecan was observed. However, the Sox-9 and Collagen I expression increased. More importantly, chondrogenic rBMSCs in the coculture system were shown to form the osteochondral interface layer by expressing calcified cartilage zone specific extracellular matrix marker Collagen X and the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker MMP-13, which were not observed in the control group. Specifically, only the chondrogenic rBMSC layer in contact with the osteoblasts expressed Collagen X and MMP-13, indicating the positive influence of the coculture upon interface formation. Biochemical analyses, histology results, and immunohistochemical staining further supported this observation. In conclusion, this study revealed that specific regulatory stimulations from osteoblasts in the 2D-3D interface coculture system could induce the formation of ostochondral interface for the purpose of osteochondral tissue engineering.

  12. Solution of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations in the cell-substrate interface.

    PubMed

    Pabst, M; Wrobel, G; Ingebrandt, S; Sommerhage, F; Offenhäusser, A

    2007-09-01

    Electrogenic cells are able to generate electrical signals which can be measured by various invasive electrophysiological methods such as patch-clamp or sharp microelectrode recordings. Growing cells on the surfaces of e.g. metal microelectrodes or field-effect transistors allows the recording of an extracellular component of these signals. For an understanding of such extracellular signals it is mandatory to get detailed topographical as well as electrical information about the cell-sensor interface. In a first approximation, this interface can be described by a flat disk between cell membrane and sensor surface. For a correct description of the signals, the electrodiffusion of ions in this interface is modeled by using the stationary Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. We solve the equations analytically, and derive expressions for the potential, the ionic charge densities, and the seal resistance. The results provide a method for determining the distance h between sensor surface and cell membrane. For human embryonic kidney cells, we receive h approximately 70 nm. Comparison with literature shows good agreement.

  13. Interface modification in solar cell contact electrode using pre-cleaning treatment chemistries.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yinhua; Kim, Areum; Lee, Seonjea; Choi, Eunmi; Yoon, Sung Pil; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2014-12-01

    Promoting and employing photovoltaic power as an alternative energy source, the solar cell industry has made rapid strides. However, improving the efficiency of these solar cells using low-cost fabrication processes is still needed. The interface between the Si surface and the electrode plays a very important role in the process of electrode formation of the solar cell. In this study, the electrode interface underwent four different pre-treatments in order to enhance the efficiency of Si-based solar cells. We analyzed the adhesion properties at the interface between the Si wafer and the electrode and conducted an analysis of the variation in contact resistance between the two contact surfaces. To reduce the cost of the entire experiment, we replaced the existing Ag screen printing-based electrode fabrication method with a low-temperature, low-cost Ni/Cu electroless plating method. The test cells exhibited improved adhesion and therefore improved efficiency as compared to cells treated with the currently used diluted HF.

  14. Evaluation of E-cigarette liquid vapor and mainstream cigarette smoke after direct exposure of primary human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Stefanie; Dieken, Hauke; Krischenowski, Olaf; Förster, Christine; Branscheid, Detlev; Aufderheide, Michaela

    2015-04-08

    E-cigarettes are emerging products, often described as "reduced-risk" nicotine products or alternatives to combustible cigarettes. Many smokers switch to e-cigarettes to quit or significantly reduce smoking. However, no regulations for e-cigarettes are currently into force, so that the quality and safety of e-liquids is not necessarily guaranteed. We exposed primary human bronchial epithelial cells of two different donors to vapor of e-cigarette liquid with or without nicotine, vapor of the carrier substances propylene glycol and glycerol as well as to mainstream smoke of K3R4F research cigarettes. The exposure was done in a CULTEX® RFS compact  module, allowing the exposure of the cells at the air-liquid interface. 24 h post-exposure, cell viability and oxidative stress levels in the cells were analyzed. We found toxicological effects of e-cigarette vapor and the pure carrier substances, whereas the nicotine concentration did not have an effect on the cell viability. The viability of mainstream smoke cigarette exposed cells was 4.5-8 times lower and the oxidative stress levels 4.5-5 times higher than those of e-cigarette vapor exposed cells, depending on the donor. Our experimental setup delivered reproducible data and thus provides the opportunity for routine testing of e-cigarette liquids to ensure safety and quality for the user.

  15. Polarization Energies at Organic-Organic Interfaces: Impact on the Charge Separation Barrier at Donor-Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryno, Sean M; Fu, Yao-Tsung; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-22

    We probe the energetic landscape at a model pentacene/fullerene (C60) interface to investigate the interactions between positive and negative charges, which are critical to the processes of charge separation and recombination in organic solar cells. Using a polarizable force field, we find that polarization energy, i.e., the stabilization a charge feels due to its environment, is larger at the interface than in the bulk for both a positive and a negative charge. The combination of the charge being more stabilized at the interface and the Coulomb attraction between the charges results in a barrier to charge separation at the pentacene/C60 interface that can be in excess of 0.7 eV for static configurations of the donor and acceptor locations. However, the impact of molecular motions, i.e., the dynamics, at the interface at room temperature results in a distribution of polarization energies and in charge separation barriers that can be significantly reduced. The dynamic nature of the interface is thus critical, with the polarization energy distributions indicating that sites along the interface shift in time between favorable and unfavorable configurations for charge separation.

  16. Autophagy, apoptosis and organelle features during cell exposure to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Vergilio, Cristiane dos Santos; de Melo, Edésio José Tenório

    2013-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces several effects in different tissues, but our knowledge of the toxic effects on organelles is insufficient. To observe the progression of Cd effects on organelle structure and function, HuH-7 cells (human hepatic carcinoma cell line) were exposed to CdCl2 in increasing concentrations (1 microM - 20 microM) and exposure times (2 h - 24 h). During Cd treatment, the cells exhibited a progressive decrease in viability that was both time- and dose-dependent. Cd treated cells displayed progressive morphological changes that included cytoplasm retraction and nuclear condensation preceding a total loss of cell adhesion. Treatment with 10 microM for 12 h led to irreversible damages. Before these drastic and irreparable damages, treated cells (5 microM for 12 h) presented a progressive loss of mitochondrial function and cytoplasm acidification as well as dysfunction and disorganization of microfilaments and endoplasmic reticulum. These damages led to the induction of apoptotic events and an increase in autophagic bodies in the cytoplasm. These results revealed that Cd affects multiple intra-cellular targets that induce alterations in the mitochondria, cytoskeleton, endoplasmic reticulum and acidic compartments, ultimately culminating in cell death via apoptotic and autophagic pathways.

  17. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can

  18. Development of Efficient and Stable Inverted Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) Solar Cells Using Different Metal Oxide Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Litzov, Ivan; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2013-01-01

    Solution-processed inverted bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells have gained much more attention during the last decade, because of their significantly better environmental stability compared to the normal architecture BHJ solar cells. Transparent metal oxides (MeOx) play an important role as the dominant class for solution-processed interface materials in this development, due to their excellent optical transparency, their relatively high electrical conductivity and their tunable work function. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of the most common synthesis methods used for the wet chemical preparation of the most relevant n-type- and p-type-like MeOx interface materials consisting of binary compounds AxBy. Their performance for applications as electron transport/extraction layers (ETL/EEL) and as hole transport/extraction layers (HTL/HEL) in inverted BHJ solar cells will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:28788423

  19. Dual interface gratings design for absorption enhancement in thin crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinqiannan; Yu, Zhongyuan; Liu, Yumin; Chai, Hongyu; Hao, Jing; Ye, Han

    2017-09-01

    We numerically study and analyze the light absorption enhancement in thin crystalline silicon solar cell with dual interface gratings. The structure combines the front dielectric nanowalls and the sinusoidal plasmonic grating at back reflector. We show that having specific interfaces with well-chosen period, fill factor and height can allow more efficient dielectric and plasmonic modes coupling into active layer and can improve the solar cell performance. For 1 μm active layer case, the optimal result for the proposed structure achieves short-circuit current of 23.6 mA/cm2, which performs over 50% better than flat solar cell structure, the short-circuit current of which is 15.5 mA/cm2. In addition, the active layer thickness and angular analysis show that the proposed structure maintains its advantage over flat structure.

  20. Versatile dual organic interface layer for performance enhancement of polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqi; Liu, Chunyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Liu; Zhang, Xinyuan; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-11-01

    The electron transport layer plays a crucial role on determining electron injection and extraction, resulting from the effect of balancing charge transport and reducing the interfacial energy barrier. Decreasing the inherent incompatibility and enhancing electrical contact via employing appropriate buffer layer at the surface of hydrophobic organic active layer and hydrophilic inorganic electrode are also essential for charge collection. Herein, we demonstrate that an efficient dual polyelectrolytes interfacial layer composed of polyethylenimine (PEI) and conducting poly(9,9-dihexylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PDHFD) is incorporated to investigate the interface energetics and electron transport in polymer solar cells (PSCs). The composited PEI/PDHFD interface layer (PPIL) overcomed the low conductivity of bare PEI polymer, which decreased series resistance and facilitated electron extraction at the ITO/PPIL-active layer interface. The introduction of the interface energy state of the PPIL reduced the work function of ITO so that it can mate the top of the valence band of the photoactive materials and promoted the formation of ohmic contact at ITO electrode interface. As a result, the composited PPIL tuned energy alignment and accelerated the electron transfer, leading to significantly increased photocurrent and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices based on various representative polymer:fullerene systems.

  1. Elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the Tegmentum vasculosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Lee, D. H.; Martin, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    Elliptical cells (E-P) are present at the perilymphatic interface lumen (PIL) of the lagena. The E-P cells often separate from the tegmentum vasculosum (TV) and have touching processes that form a monolayer between the K+ rich perilymph and the Na+ rich endolymph, similar to the mammalian Reissner's membrane. We examined the TV of chicks (Gallus domesticus) and quantitated the expression of anti-S100 alphaalphabetabeta and S100 beta. There was a 30% increase of S100 beta saturation in the light cells facing the PIL when compared to other TV light cells. We show that: (1) the dimer anti- S100 alphaalphabetabeta and the monomer anti-S100 beta are expressed preferentially in the light cells and the E-P cells of TV; (2) expression of S100 beta is higher in light cells facing the PIL than in adjacent cells; (3) the expression of the dimer S100 alphaalphabetabeta and monomer S100 beta overlaps in most inner ear cell types, including the cells of the TV, most S100 alphaalphabetabeta positive cells express S 100 beta, but S100 beta positive cells do not always express S100 alphaalphabetabeta; and (4) the S100 beta expression in light cells, the abundant Na+-K+ ATPase on dark cells of the TV, and previously demonstrated co-localization of S100 beta/GABA in sensory cells suggest that S100 beta could have, in the inner ear, a dual neurotrophic-ionic modulating function.

  2. Elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the Tegmentum vasculosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Lee, D. H.; Martin, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    Elliptical cells (E-P) are present at the perilymphatic interface lumen (PIL) of the lagena. The E-P cells often separate from the tegmentum vasculosum (TV) and have touching processes that form a monolayer between the K+ rich perilymph and the Na+ rich endolymph, similar to the mammalian Reissner's membrane. We examined the TV of chicks (Gallus domesticus) and quantitated the expression of anti-S100 alphaalphabetabeta and S100 beta. There was a 30% increase of S100 beta saturation in the light cells facing the PIL when compared to other TV light cells. We show that: (1) the dimer anti- S100 alphaalphabetabeta and the monomer anti-S100 beta are expressed preferentially in the light cells and the E-P cells of TV; (2) expression of S100 beta is higher in light cells facing the PIL than in adjacent cells; (3) the expression of the dimer S100 alphaalphabetabeta and monomer S100 beta overlaps in most inner ear cell types, including the cells of the TV, most S100 alphaalphabetabeta positive cells express S 100 beta, but S100 beta positive cells do not always express S100 alphaalphabetabeta; and (4) the S100 beta expression in light cells, the abundant Na+-K+ ATPase on dark cells of the TV, and previously demonstrated co-localization of S100 beta/GABA in sensory cells suggest that S100 beta could have, in the inner ear, a dual neurotrophic-ionic modulating function.

  3. Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Due to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Ho; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Kennedy, Ian M.; Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Although inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) is known to cause systemic disease (i.e., metal fume fever), little is known about mechanisms underlying injury to alveolar epithelium. Objectives: Investigate ZnO NP–induced injury to alveolar epithelium by exposing primary cultured rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECMs) to ZnO NPs. Methods: RAECMs were exposed apically to ZnO NPs or, in some experiments, to culture fluid containing ZnCl2 or free Zn released from ZnO NPs. Transepithelial electrical resistance (RT) and equivalent short-circuit current (IEQ) were assessed as functions of concentration and time. Morphologic changes, lactate dehydrogenase release, cell membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial activity were measured. Measurements and Main Results: Apical exposure to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs decreased RT and IEQ of RAECMs by 100% over 24 hours, whereas exposure to 11 μg/ml ZnO NPs had little effect. Changes in RT and IEQ caused by 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs were irreversible. ZnO NP effects on RT yielded half-maximal concentrations of approximately 20 μg/ml. Apical exposure for 24 hours to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs induced decreases in mitochondrial activity and increases in lactate dehydrogenase release, permeability to fluorescein sulfonic acid, increased intracellular ROS, and translocation of ZnO NPs from apical to basolateral fluid (most likely across injured cells and/or damaged paracellular pathways). Conclusions: ZnO NPs cause severe injury to RAECMs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, mediated, at least in part, by free Zn released from ZnO NPs, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased intracellular ROS. PMID:20639441

  4. ARSENIC EXPOSURE INDUCES THE WARBURG EFFECT IN CULTURED HUMAN CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. PMID:23648393

  5. Synergism between rhinovirus infection and oxidant pollutant exposure enhances airway epithelial cell cytokine production.

    PubMed Central

    Spannhake, E William; Reddy, Sekhar P M; Jacoby, David B; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Saatian, Bahman; Tian, Jingyan

    2002-01-01

    Of the several factors believed to exacerbate asthmatic symptoms, air pollution and viral infections are considered to be particularly important. Although evidence indicates that each of these respiratory insults individually can increase asthma severity in susceptible individuals, we know little about the extent to which exposure to environmental oxidant pollutants can influence the course of respiratory viral infection and its associated inflammation. To investigate the interaction of these two stimuli within their common epithelial cell targets in the upper and lower respiratory tracks, we infected primary human nasal epithelial cells and cells of the BEAS-2B line grown at the air-liquid interface with human rhinovirus type 16 (RV16) and exposed them to NO2 (2.0 ppm) or O3 (0.2 ppm) for 3 hr. Independently, RV16, NO2, and O3 rapidly increased release of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 through oxidant-dependent mechanisms. The combined effect of RV16 and oxidant ranged from 42% to 250% greater than additive for NO2 and from 41% to 67% for O3. We abrogated these effects by treating the cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) underwent additive enhancement in response to combined stimulation. These data indicate that oxidant pollutants can amplify the generation of proinflammatory cytokines by RV16-infected cells and suggest that virus-induced inflammation in upper and lower airways may be exacerbated by concurrent exposure to ambient levels of oxidants commonly encountered the indoor and outdoor environments. PMID:12117643

  6. Adolescent binge alcohol exposure alters hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation in rats: effects on cell cycle kinetics.

    PubMed

    McClain, Justin A; Hayes, Dayna M; Morris, Stephanie A; Nixon, Kimberly

    2011-09-01

    Binge alcohol exposure in adolescent rats potently inhibits adult hippocampal neurogenesis by altering neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation and survival; however, it is not clear whether alcohol results in an increase or decrease in net proliferation. Thus, the effects of alcohol on hippocampal NPC cell cycle phase distribution and kinetics were assessed in an adolescent rat model of an alcohol use disorder. Cell cycle distribution was measured using a combination of markers (Ki-67, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and phosphohistone H3) to determine the proportion of NPCs within G1, S, and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Cell cycle kinetics were calculated using a cumulative bromodeoxyuridine injection protocol to determine the effect of alcohol on cell cycle length and S-phase duration. Binge alcohol exposure reduced the proportion of NPCs in S-phase, but had no effect on G1 or G2/M phases, indicating that alcohol specifically targets S-phase of the cell cycle. Cell cycle kinetics studies revealed that alcohol reduced NPC cell cycle duration by 36% and shortened S-phase by 62%, suggesting that binge alcohol exposure accelerates progression through the cell cycle. This effect would be expected to increase NPC proliferation, which was supported by a slight, but significant increase in the number of Sox-2+ NPCs residing in the hippocampal subgranular zone following binge alcohol exposure. These studies suggest the mechanism of alcohol inhibition of neurogenesis and also reveal the earliest evidence of the compensatory neurogenesis reaction that has been observed a week after binge alcohol exposure.

  7. Cell-directed-assembly: Directing the formation of nano/bio interfaces and architectures with living cells

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Helen K.; Carnes, Eric C.; Ashley, Carlee E.; Lopez, DeAnna M.; Douthit, Cynthia; Karlin, Shelly; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Background The desire to immobilize, encapsulate, or entrap viable cells for use in a variety of applications has been explored for decades. Traditionally, the approach is to immobilize cells to utilize a specific functionality of the cell in the system. Scope of Review This review describes our recent discovery that living cells can organize extended nanostructures and nano-objects to create a highly biocompatible nano//bio interface [1]. Major Conclusions We find that short chain phospholipids direct the formation of thin film silica mesophases during evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) [2], and that the introduction of cells alter the self-assembly pathway. Cells organize an ordered lipid-membrane that forms a coherent interface with the silica mesophase that is unique in that it withstands drying - yet it maintains accessibility to molecules introduced into the 3D silica host. Cell viability is preserved in the absence of buffer, making these constructs useful as standalone cell-based sensors. In response to hyperosmotic stress, the cells release water, creating a pH gradient which is maintained within the nanostructured host and serves to localize lipids, proteins, plasmids, lipidized nanocrystals, and other components at the cellular surface. This active organization of the bio/nano interface can be accomplished during ink-jet printing or selective wetting - processes allowing patterning of cellular arrays - and even spatially-defined genetic modification. General Significance Recent advances in the understanding of nanotechnology and cell biology encourage the pursuit of more complex endeavors where the dynamic interactions of the cell and host material act symbiotically to obtain new, useful functions. PMID:20933574

  8. Tuning back contact property via artificial interface dipoles in Si/organic hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dan; Sheng, Jiang Wu, Sudong; Zhu, Juye; Chen, Shaojie; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun

    2016-07-25

    Back contact property plays a key role in the charge collection efficiency of c-Si/poly(3,4-ethylthiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) hybrid solar cells (Si-HSCs), as an alternative for the high-efficiency and low-cost photovoltaic devices. In this letter, we utilize the water soluble poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) to modify the Al/Si interface to be an Ohmic contact via interface dipole tuning, decreasing the work function of the Al film. This Ohmic contact improves the electron collection efficiency of the rear electrode, increasing the short circuit current density (J{sub sc}). Furthermore, the interface dipoles make the band bending downward to increase the total barrier height of built-in electric field of the solar cell, enhancing the open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}). The PEO solar cell exhibits an excellent performance, 12.29% power conversion efficiency, a 25.28% increase from the reference solar cell without a PEO interlayer. The simple and water soluble method as a promising alternative is used to develop the interfacial contact quality of the rear electrode for the high photovoltaic performance of Si-HSCs.

  9. Tuning back contact property via artificial interface dipoles in Si/organic hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Sheng, Jiang; Wu, Sudong; Zhu, Juye; Chen, Shaojie; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun

    2016-07-01

    Back contact property plays a key role in the charge collection efficiency of c-Si/poly(3,4-ethylthiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) hybrid solar cells (Si-HSCs), as an alternative for the high-efficiency and low-cost photovoltaic devices. In this letter, we utilize the water soluble poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) to modify the Al/Si interface to be an Ohmic contact via interface dipole tuning, decreasing the work function of the Al film. This Ohmic contact improves the electron collection efficiency of the rear electrode, increasing the short circuit current density (Jsc). Furthermore, the interface dipoles make the band bending downward to increase the total barrier height of built-in electric field of the solar cell, enhancing the open circuit voltage (Voc). The PEO solar cell exhibits an excellent performance, 12.29% power conversion efficiency, a 25.28% increase from the reference solar cell without a PEO interlayer. The simple and water soluble method as a promising alternative is used to develop the interfacial contact quality of the rear electrode for the high photovoltaic performance of Si-HSCs.

  10. Interface Optoelectronics Engineering for Mechanically Stacked Tandem Solar Cells Based on Perovskite and Silicon.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Hiroyuki; Uzum, Abdullah; Nishino, Hitoshi; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Imahori, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2016-12-14

    Engineering of photonics for antireflection and electronics for extraction of the hole using 2.5 nm of a thin Au layer have been performed for two- and four-terminal tandem solar cells using CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite (top cell) and p-type single crystal silicon (c-Si) (bottom cell) by mechanically stacking. Highly transparent connection multilayers of evaporated-Au and sputtered-ITO films were fabricated at the interface to be a point-contact tunneling junction between the rough perovskite and flat silicon solar cells. The mechanically stacked tandem solar cell with an optimized tunneling junction structure was ⟨perovskite for the top cell/Au (2.5 nm)/ITO (154 nm) stacked-on ITO (108 nm)/c-Si for the bottom cell⟩. It was confirmed the best efficiency of 13.7% and 14.4% as two- and four-terminal devices, respectively.

  11. Effects of flame made zinc oxide particles in human lung cells - a comparison of aerosol and suspension exposures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Predominantly, studies of nanoparticle (NPs) toxicology in vitro are based upon the exposure of submerged cell cultures to particle suspensions. Such an approach however, does not reflect particle inhalation. As a more realistic simulation of such a scenario, efforts were made towards direct delivery of aerosols to air-liquid-interface cultivated cell cultures by the use of aerosol exposure systems. This study aims to provide a direct comparison of the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs when delivered as either an aerosol, or in suspension to a triple cell co-culture model of the epithelial airway barrier. To ensure dose–equivalence, ZnO-deposition was determined in each exposure scenario by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Biological endpoints being investigated after 4 or 24h incubation include cytotoxicity, total reduced glutathione, induction of antioxidative genes such as heme-oxygenase 1 (HO–1) as well as the release of the (pro)-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Results Off-gases released as by-product of flame ZnO synthesis caused a significant decrease of total reduced GSH and induced further the release of the cytokine TNFα, demonstrating the influence of the gas phase on aerosol toxicology. No direct effects could be attributed to ZnO particles. By performing suspension exposure to avoid the factor “flame-gases”, particle specific effects become apparent. Other parameters such as LDH and HO–1 were not influenced by gaseous compounds: Following aerosol exposure, LDH levels appeared elevated at both timepoints and the HO–1 transcript correlated positively with deposited ZnO-dose. Under submerged conditions, the HO–1 induction scheme deviated for 4 and 24h and increased extracellular LDH was found following 24h exposure. Conclusion In the current study, aerosol and suspension-exposure has been compared by exposing cell cultures to equivalent amounts of ZnO. Both exposure strategies differ fundamentally in their dose–response pattern

  12. [Viability of human cancer cells in culture after exposure to diagnostic ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Farges, M F; Gioanni, J; Bruneton, J N; Costa, A; Lalanne, C M

    1985-01-01

    Reports have appeared in the literature regarding biological damage to human cells following exposure to diagnostic ultrasound. We have examined the effects of diagnostic ultrasound (Sonel 400, C.G.R.) on human cell lines established in our laboratory. We report here that exposure to diagnostic ultrasound, at maximum exposure intensity and at exposure time as long as 60 minutes, produces no cell lysis as determined by vital dye exclusion ability, and as confirmed by electron microscopy. However, the exposure to ultrasound produced by an apparatus delivering an acoustic power higher than the diagnostic levels (Sonoscope-Alcatel) can cause the complete lysis of the same cells.

  13. Robotics, Stem Cells and Brain Computer Interfaces in Rehabilitation and Recovery from Stroke; Updates and Advances

    PubMed Central

    Boninger, Michael L; Wechsler, Lawrence R.; Stein, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the current state and latest advances in robotics, stem cells, and brain computer interfaces in rehabilitation and recovery for stroke. Design The authors of this summary recently reviewed this work as part of a national presentation. The paper represents the information included in each area. Results Each area has seen great advances and challenges as products move to market and experiments are ongoing. Conclusion Robotics, stem cells, and brain computer interfaces all have tremendous potential to reduce disability and lead to better outcomes for patients with stroke. Continued research and investment will be needed as the field moves forward. With this investment, the potential for recovery of function is likely substantial PMID:25313662

  14. Interface Characterization of Single-Crystal CdTe Solar Cells With VOC > 950 mV

    SciTech Connect

    Burst, James M.; Duenow, Joel N.; Kanevce, Ana; Moutinho, Helio R.; Jiang, Chun Sheng; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Reese, Matthew Owen; Albin, David S.; Aguiar, Jeffrey A.; Colegrove, Eric; Ablekim, Tursun; Swain, Santosh K.; Lynn, Kelvin G.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Barnes, Teresa M.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2016-11-01

    Advancing CdTe solar cell efficiency requires improving the open-circuit voltage (VOC) above 900 mV. This requires long carrier lifetime, high hole density, and high-quality interfaces, where the interface recombination velocity is less than about 104 cm/s. Using CdTe single crystals as a model system, we report on CdTe/CdS electrical and structural interface properties in devices that produce open-circuit voltage exceeding 950 mV.

  15. Epigenetic Changes Induced by Air Toxics: Formaldehyde Exposure Alters miRNA Expression Profiles in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Julia E.; Smeester, Lisa; Jaspers, Ilona; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to formaldehyde, a known air toxic, is associated with cancer and lung disease. Despite the adverse health effects of formaldehyde, the mechanisms underlying formaldehyde-induced disease remain largely unknown. Research has uncovered microRNAs (miRNAs) as key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression that may influence cellular disease state. Although studies have compared different miRNA expression patterns between diseased and healthy tissue, this is the first study to examine perturbations in global miRNA levels resulting from formaldehyde exposure. Objectives We investigated whether cellular miRNA expression profiles are modified by formaldehyde exposure to test the hypothesis that formaldehyde exposure disrupts miRNA expression levels within lung cells, representing a novel epigenetic mechanism through which formaldehyde may induce disease. Methods Human lung epithelial cells were grown at air–liquid interface and exposed to gaseous formaldehyde at 1 ppm for 4 hr. Small RNAs and protein were collected and analyzed for miRNA expression using microarray analysis and for interleukin (IL-8) protein levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Gaseous formaldehyde exposure altered the miRNA expression profiles in human lung cells. Specifically, 89 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated in formaldehyde-exposed samples versus controls. Functional and molecular network analysis of the predicted miRNA transcript targets revealed that formaldehyde exposure potentially alters signaling pathways associated with cancer, inflammatory response, and endocrine system regulation. IL-8 release increased in cells exposed to formaldehyde, and results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions Formaldehyde alters miRNA patterns that regulate gene expression, potentially leading to the initiation of a variety of diseases. PMID:21147603

  16. Catch Bonds at T Cell Interfaces: Impact of Surface Reorganization and Membrane Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Pullen, Robert H; Abel, Steven M

    2017-07-11

    Catch bonds are characterized by average lifetimes that initially increase with increasing tensile force. Recently, they have been implicated in T cell activation, where small numbers of antigenic receptor-ligand bonds at a cell-cell interface can stimulate a T cell. Here, we use computational methods to investigate small numbers of bonds at the interface between two membranes. We characterize the time-dependent forces on the bonds in response to changes in the membrane shape and the organization of other surface molecules. We then determine the distributions of bond lifetimes using recent force-dependent lifetime data for T cell receptors bound to various ligands. Strong agonists, which exhibit catch bond behavior, are markedly more likely to remain intact than an antagonist whose average lifetime decreases with increasing force. Thermal fluctuations of the membrane shape enhance the decay of the average force on a bond, but also lead to fluctuations of the force. These fluctuations promote bond rupture, but the effect is buffered by catch bonds. When more than one bond is present, the bonds experience reduced average forces that depend on their relative positions, leading to changes in bond lifetimes. Our results highlight the importance of force-dependent binding kinetics when bonds experience time-dependent and fluctuating forces, as well as potential consequences of collective bond behavior relevant to T cell activation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Atom-probe tomographic study of interfaces of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, S. Asahi, R.; Itoh, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Ohishi, K.; Isheim, D.; Seidman, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    The heterophase interfaces between the CdS buffer layer and the Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) absorption layers are one of the main factors affecting photovoltaic performance of CZTS cells. We have studied the compositional distributions at heterophase interfaces in CZTS cells using three-dimensional atom-probe tomography. The results demonstrate: (a) diffusion of Cd into the CZTS layer; (b) segregation of Zn at the CdS/CZTS interface; and (c) a change of oxygen and hydrogen concentrations in the CdS layer depending on the heat treatment. Annealing at 573 K after deposition of CdS improves the photovoltaic properties of CZTS cells probably because of the formation of a heterophase epitaxial junction at the CdS/CZTS interface. Conversely, segregation of Zn at the CdS/CZTS interface after annealing at a higher temperature deteriorates the photovoltaic properties.

  18. Solar cell radiation response near the interface of different atomic number materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, E. A.; Cappelli, J. R.; Lowe, L. F.; Wall, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The response of cobalt 60 irradiated N/P silicon solar cells was measured as a function of the atomic number of the medium adjacent to the cell and the direction of the gamma ray beam. The interpositioning of various thicknesses of aluminum between the adjacent material and the cell had the effect of moving the cell to various locations in an approximate monatomic numbered medium. Using this technique the solar cell response was determined at various distances from the interface for gold and beryllium. The results were compared with predictions based upon ionization chamber measurements of dose perturbations in aluminum and found to agree within five percent. Ionization chamber data was then used to estimate the influence of various base contact materials.

  19. Phosphatidylserine Exposure in Human Red Blood Cells Depending on Cell Age.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mauro C; Wagner-Britz, Lisa; Huppert, Henri; Hanf, Benjamin; Hertz, Laura; Nguyen, Duc Bach; Bernhardt, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer membrane leaflet of red blood cells (RBCs) serves as a signal for suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which may be of importance for cell clearance from blood circulation. PS externalisation is realised by the scramblase activated by an increase of intracellular Ca2+ content. It has been described in literature that RBCs show an increased intracellular Ca2+ content as well as PS exposure when becoming aged up to 120 days (which is their life span). However, these investigations were carried out after incubation of the RBCs for 48 h. The aim of this study was to investigate this effect after short-time incubation using a variety of stimulating substances for Ca2+ uptake and PS exposure. We separated RBCs by age in five different fractions by centrifugation using Percoll density gradient. The intracellular Ca2+ content and the PS exposure of RBCs with different age has been investigated after treatment with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) as well as after activation of protein kinase C (PKC) using phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA). For positive control RBCs were treated with 4-bromo-A23187. Measurement techniques included flow cytometry and live cell imaging (fluorescence microscopy). The percentage of RBCs showing increased Ca2+ content as well as the PS exposure did not change significantly in dependence on cell age after short-time incubation in control experiments (without stimulating substances) or using LPA or PMA. However, we confirm findings reported that Ca2+ content and the PS exposure of RBCs increased after 48 h incubation. No significant differences of intracellular Ca2+ content and PS exposure can be seen for RBCs of different age in resting state or after stimulation of Ca2+ uptake at short-time incubation. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Recombination in Perovskite Solar Cells: Significance of Grain Boundaries, Interface Traps, and Defect Ions

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Trap-assisted recombination, despite being lower as compared with traditional inorganic solar cells, is still the dominant recombination mechanism in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and limits their efficiency. We investigate the attributes of the primary trap-assisted recombination channels (grain boundaries and interfaces) and their correlation to defect ions in PSCs. We achieve this by using a validated device model to fit the simulations to the experimental data of efficient vacuum-deposited p–i–n and n–i–p CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells, including the light intensity dependence of the open-circuit voltage and fill factor. We find that, despite the presence of traps at interfaces and grain boundaries (GBs), their neutral (when filled with photogenerated charges) disposition along with the long-lived nature of holes leads to the high performance of PSCs. The sign of the traps (when filled) is of little importance in efficient solar cells with compact morphologies (fused GBs, low trap density). On the other hand, solar cells with noncompact morphologies (open GBs, high trap density) are sensitive to the sign of the traps and hence to the cell preparation methods. Even in the presence of traps at GBs, trap-assisted recombination at interfaces (between the transport layers and the perovskite) is the dominant loss mechanism. We find a direct correlation between the density of traps, the density of mobile ionic defects, and the degree of hysteresis observed in the current–voltage (J–V) characteristics. The presence of defect states or mobile ions not only limits the device performance but also plays a role in the J–V hysteresis. PMID:28540366

  1. MERS-CoV at the Animal-Human Interface: Inputs on Exposure Pathways from an Expert-Opinion Elicitation.

    PubMed

    Funk, Anna L; Goutard, Flavie Luce; Miguel, Eve; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Chevalier, Veronique; Faye, Bernard; Peiris, J S Malik; Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Roger, Francois Louis

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 4 years after the first report of the emergence of Middle-East respiratory syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and nearly 1800 human cases later, the ecology of MERS-CoV, its epidemiology, and more than risk factors of MERS-CoV transmission between camels are poorly understood. Knowledge about the pathways and mechanisms of transmission from animals to humans is limited; as of yet, transmission risks have not been quantified. Moreover the divergent sanitary situations and exposures to animals among populations in the Arabian Peninsula, where human primary cases appear to dominate, vs. other regions in the Middle East and Africa, with no reported human clinical cases and where the virus has been detected only in dromedaries, represents huge scientific and health challenges. Here, we have used expert-opinion elicitation in order to obtain ideas on relative importance of MERS-CoV risk factors and estimates of transmission risks from various types of contact between humans and dromedaries. Fourteen experts with diverse and extensive experience in MERS-CoV relevant fields were enrolled and completed an online questionnaire that examined pathways based on several scenarios, e.g., camels-camels, camels-human, bats/other species to camels/humans, and the role of diverse biological substances (milk, urine, etc.) and potential fomites. Experts believed that dromedary camels play the largest role in MERS-CoV infection of other dromedaries; however, they also indicated a significant influence of the season (i.e. calving or weaning periods) on transmission risk. All experts thought that MERS-CoV-infected dromedaries and asymptomatic humans play the most important role in infection of humans, with bats and other species presenting a possible, but yet undefined, risk. Direct and indirect contact of humans with dromedary camels were identified as the most risky types of contact, when compared to consumption of various camel products, with estimated "most likely" incidence

  2. MERS-CoV at the Animal–Human Interface: Inputs on Exposure Pathways from an Expert-Opinion Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Anna L.; Goutard, Flavie Luce; Miguel, Eve; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Chevalier, Veronique; Faye, Bernard; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Roger, Francois Louis

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 4 years after the first report of the emergence of Middle-East respiratory syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and nearly 1800 human cases later, the ecology of MERS-CoV, its epidemiology, and more than risk factors of MERS-CoV transmission between camels are poorly understood. Knowledge about the pathways and mechanisms of transmission from animals to humans is limited; as of yet, transmission risks have not been quantified. Moreover the divergent sanitary situations and exposures to animals among populations in the Arabian Peninsula, where human primary cases appear to dominate, vs. other regions in the Middle East and Africa, with no reported human clinical cases and where the virus has been detected only in dromedaries, represents huge scientific and health challenges. Here, we have used expert-opinion elicitation in order to obtain ideas on relative importance of MERS-CoV risk factors and estimates of transmission risks from various types of contact between humans and dromedaries. Fourteen experts with diverse and extensive experience in MERS-CoV relevant fields were enrolled and completed an online questionnaire that examined pathways based on several scenarios, e.g., camels–camels, camels–human, bats/other species to camels/humans, and the role of diverse biological substances (milk, urine, etc.) and potential fomites. Experts believed that dromedary camels play the largest role in MERS-CoV infection of other dromedaries; however, they also indicated a significant influence of the season (i.e. calving or weaning periods) on transmission risk. All experts thought that MERS-CoV-infected dromedaries and asymptomatic humans play the most important role in infection of humans, with bats and other species presenting a possible, but yet undefined, risk. Direct and indirect contact of humans with dromedary camels were identified as the most risky types of contact, when compared to consumption of various camel products, with estimated “most likely

  3. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Person, Rachel J; Tokar, Erik J; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N Olive; Waalkes, Michael P

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. © 2013.

  4. Oral Gingival Cell Cigarette Smoke Exposure Induces Muscle Cell Metabolic Disruption.

    PubMed

    Baeder, Andrea C; Napa, Kiran; Richardson, Sarah T; Taylor, Oliver J; Andersen, Samantha G; Wilcox, Shalene H; Winden, Duane R; Reynolds, Paul R; Bikman, Benjamin T

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure compromises health through damaging multiple physiological systems, including disrupting metabolic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of oral gingiva in mediating the deleterious metabolic effects of cigarette smoke exposure on skeletal muscle metabolic function. Using an in vitro conditioned medium cell model, skeletal muscle cells were incubated with medium from gingival cells treated with normal medium or medium containing suspended cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Following incubation of muscle cells with gingival cell conditioned medium, muscle cell mitochondrial respiration and insulin signaling and action were determined as an indication of overall muscle metabolic health. Skeletal muscle cells incubated with conditioned medium of CSE-treated gingival cells had a profound reduction in mitochondrial respiration and respiratory control. Furthermore, skeletal muscle cells had a greatly reduced response in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Altogether, these results provide a novel perspective on the mechanism whereby cigarette smoke affects systemic metabolic function. In conclusion, we found that oral gingival cells treated with CSE create an altered milieu that is sufficient to both disrupted skeletal muscle cell mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity.

  5. Oral Gingival Cell Cigarette Smoke Exposure Induces Muscle Cell Metabolic Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Baeder, Andrea C.; Napa, Kiran; Richardson, Sarah T.; Taylor, Oliver J.; Andersen, Samantha G.; Wilcox, Shalene H.; Winden, Duane R.; Reynolds, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure compromises health through damaging multiple physiological systems, including disrupting metabolic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of oral gingiva in mediating the deleterious metabolic effects of cigarette smoke exposure on skeletal muscle metabolic function. Using an in vitro conditioned medium cell model, skeletal muscle cells were incubated with medium from gingival cells treated with normal medium or medium containing suspended cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Following incubation of muscle cells with gingival cell conditioned medium, muscle cell mitochondrial respiration and insulin signaling and action were determined as an indication of overall muscle metabolic health. Skeletal muscle cells incubated with conditioned medium of CSE-treated gingival cells had a profound reduction in mitochondrial respiration and respiratory control. Furthermore, skeletal muscle cells had a greatly reduced response in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Altogether, these results provide a novel perspective on the mechanism whereby cigarette smoke affects systemic metabolic function. In conclusion, we found that oral gingival cells treated with CSE create an altered milieu that is sufficient to both disrupted skeletal muscle cell mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27034671

  6. Dye-sensitized solar cells: Atomic scale investigation of interface structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei; Zhang, Fan; Meng, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    Recent progress in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) research is reviewed, focusing on atomic-scale investigations of the interface electronic structures and dynamical processes, including the structure of dye adsorption onto TiO2, ultrafast electron injection, hot-electron injection, multiple-exciton generation, and electron—hole recombination. Advanced experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are briefly summarized, and then progressive achievements in photovoltaic device optimization based on insights from atomic scale investigations are introduced. Finally, some challenges and opportunities for further improvement of dye solar cells are presented.

  7. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship

  8. Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect in Human Lymphoblastoid TK6 Cells Following [13C2]-Acetaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The dose-response relationship for biomarkers of exposure (N2-ethylidene-dG adducts) and effect (cell survival and micronucleus formation) was determined across 4.5 orders of magnitude (50nM–2mM) using [13C2]-acetaldehyde exposures to human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells for 12h. There was a clear increase in exogenous N 2-ethylidene-dG formation at exposure concentrations ≥ 1µM, whereas the endogenous adducts remained nearly constant across all exposure concentrations, with an average of 3.0 adducts/107 dG. Exogenous adducts were lower than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≤ 10µM and were greater than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≥ 250µM. When the endogenous and exogenous adducts were summed together, statistically significant increases in total adduct formation over the endogenous background occurred at 50µM. Cell survival and micronucleus formation were monitored across the exposure range and statistically significant decreases in cell survival and increases in micronucleus formation occurred at ≥ 1000µM. This research supports the hypothesis that endogenously produced reactive species, including acetaldehyde, are always present and constitute the majority of the observed biological effects following very low exposures to exogenous acetaldehyde. These data can replace default assumptions of linear extrapolation to very low doses of exogenous acetaldehyde for risk prediction. PMID:23425604

  9. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Bong Geun; Park, Jeong Won; Hu, Jia Sheng; Huang, Carlos; Monuki, Edwin S; Jeon, Noo Li

    2007-01-01

    Background Microfluidics is an enabling technology with a number of advantages over traditional tissue culture methods when precise control of cellular microenvironment is required. However, there are a number of practical and technical limitations that impede wider implementation in routine biomedical research. Specialized equipment and protocols required for fabrication and setting up microfluidic experiments present hurdles for routine use by most biology laboratories. Results We have developed and validated a novel microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional tissue culture methods to generate and maintain controlled soluble environments in a Petri dish. It incorporates separate sets of fluidic channels and vacuum networks on a single device that allows reversible application of microfluidic gradients onto wet cell culture surfaces. Stable, precise concentration gradients of soluble factors were generated using simple microfluidic channels that were attached to a perfusion system. We successfully demonstrated real-time optical live/dead cell imaging of neural stem cells exposed to a hydrogen peroxide gradient and chemotaxis of metastatic breast cancer cells in a growth factor gradient. Conclusion This paper describes the design and application of a versatile microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional cell culture methods. This platform provides a simple yet versatile tool for incorporating the advantages of a microfluidic approach to biological assays without changing established tissue culture protocols. PMID:17883868

  10. Interface contribution to GaAs/Ge heterojunction solar cell efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, John N.; Wu, C. H.; Wise, Joseph F.

    1989-07-01

    A solar cell formed by growing a p-on-n AlGaAs/GaAs heteroface homojunction on a thin Ge substrate is studied by investigating the contribution of the GaAs/Ge heterostructure to the solar-cell efficiency. The existence of interface states is required in the absence of a Ge p-n junction to produce the photovoltaic effect with a V(oc) enhancement as experimentally observed. Dark I-V characteristics of the GaAs/Ge heterojunction are calculated when the carrier transport is by thermionic emission and tunneling mechanisms. The evaluations correctly explain the observed changes of efficiency, the decrease of fill factor, the increase of V(oc), and the insignificant change of I(sc) as compared to a GaAs/GaAs solar cell. If the I(sc) from the heterojunction is on the order of 25 mA/sq cm, which is less than that of the p-n junction cell, the reduction of the solar cell efficiency is about 0.5-1.5 percent over a wide range of GaAs/Ge doping concentrations. Very few interface states tend to yield a diodelike dark I-V curve.

  11. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bong Geun; Park, Jeong Won; Hu, Jia Sheng; Huang, Carlos; Monuki, Edwin S; Jeon, Noo Li

    2007-09-20

    Microfluidics is an enabling technology with a number of advantages over traditional tissue culture methods when precise control of cellular microenvironment is required. However, there are a number of practical and technical limitations that impede wider implementation in routine biomedical research. Specialized equipment and protocols required for fabrication and setting up microfluidic experiments present hurdles for routine use by most biology laboratories. We have developed and validated a novel microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional tissue culture methods to generate and maintain controlled soluble environments in a Petri dish. It incorporates separate sets of fluidic channels and vacuum networks on a single device that allows reversible application of microfluidic gradients onto wet cell culture surfaces. Stable, precise concentration gradients of soluble factors were generated using simple microfluidic channels that were attached to a perfusion system. We successfully demonstrated real-time optical live/dead cell imaging of neural stem cells exposed to a hydrogen peroxide gradient and chemotaxis of metastatic breast cancer cells in a growth factor gradient. This paper describes the design and application of a versatile microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional cell culture methods. This platform provides a simple yet versatile tool for incorporating the advantages of a microfluidic approach to biological assays without changing established tissue culture protocols.

  12. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell’s ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. PMID:23811327

  13. Assessment of planctomycetes cell viability after pollutants exposure.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carlos; Catita, José A M; Lage, Olga Maria

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the growth of six different planctomycetes, a particular ubiquitous bacterial phylum, was assessed after exposure to pollutants. In addition and for comparative purposes, Pseudomonas putida, Escherichia coli and Vibrio anguillarum were tested. Each microorganism was exposed to several concentrations of 21 different pollutants. After exposure, bacteria were cultivated using the drop plate method. In general, the strains exhibited a great variation of sensitivity to pollutants in the order: V. anguillarum > planctomycetes > P. putida > E. coli. E. coli showed resistance to all pollutants tested, with the exception of phenol and sodium azide. Copper, Ridomil® (fungicide), hydrazine and phenol were the most toxic pollutants. Planctomycetes were resistant to extremely high concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium but they were the only bacteria sensitive to Previcur N® (fungicide). Sodium azide affected the growth on plates of E. coli, P. putida and V. anguillarum, but not of planctomycetes. However, this compound affected planctomycetes cell respiration but with less impact than in the aforementioned bacteria. Our results provide evidence for a diverse response of bacteria towards pollutants, which may influence the structuring of microbial communities in ecosystems under stress, and provide new insights on the ecophysiology of planctomycetes.

  14. Colloidal gold nanoparticle modified carbon paste interface for studies of tumor cell adhesion and viability.

    PubMed

    Du, Dan; Liu, Shengli; Chen, Jing; Ju, Huangxian; Lian, Hongzhen; Li, Jianxin

    2005-11-01

    A non-toxic biomimetic interface for immobilization of living cells and electrochemical exogenous effect study of cell viability was constructed by mixing colloidal gold nanoparticles in carbon paste. A new approach to study the effects of anti-tumor drug and other exogenous factors on cell viability was proposed. The nanoparticles were efficient for preserving the activity of immobilized living cells and preventing their leakage from the electrode surface. The immobilized living AsPC-1 cells (pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells derived from ascites) exhibited an irreversible voltammetric response related to the oxidation of guanine. The presence of guanine was verified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The contents of guanine in cytoplasm of each AsPC-1 and normal pancreatic cell were detected to be 370 and 22amol, respectively. The cytotoxic effect of adriamycin resulted in a decrease in peak current of guanine. The optimal exogenous factors that affected cell viability, including pH, temperature and salt concentration of electrolyte, were just consistent with cell growth conditions in culture. This simple and rapid method could be applied for the electrochemical investigation of exogenous effect and characterization of the viability of living cells.

  15. Modelling the effects of microgravity on the permeability of air interface respiratory epithelial cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Marlise A.; Bosquillon, Cynthia; Russomano, Thais; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Falcão, Felipe; Marriott, Christopher; Forbes, Ben

    2010-09-01

    Although it has been suggested that microgravity might affect drug absorption in vivo, drug permeability across epithelial barriers has not yet been investigated in vitro during modelled microgravity. Therefore, a cell culture/diffusion chamber was designed specifically to accommodate epithelial cell layers in a 3D-clinostat and allow epithelial permeability to be measured under microgravity conditions in vitro with minimum alteration to established cell culture techniques. Human respiratory epithelial Calu-3 cell layers were used to model the airway epithelium. Cells grown at an air interface in the diffusion chamber from day 1 or day 5 after seeding on 24-well polyester Transwell cell culture inserts developed a similar transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) to cells cultured in conventional cell culture plates. Confluent Calu-3 layers exposed to modelled microgravity in the 3D-clinostat for up to 48 h maintained their high TER. The permeability of the paracellular marker 14C-mannitol was unaffected after a 24 h rotation of the cell layers in the 3D-clinostat, but was increased 2-fold after 48 h of modelled microgravity. It was demonstrated that the culture/diffusion chamber developed is suitable for culturing epithelial cell layers and, when subjected to rotation in the 3D-clinostat, will be a valuable in vitro system in which to study the influence of microgravity on epithelial permeability and drug transport.

  16. 13% efficiency hybrid organic/silicon-nanowire heterojunction solar cell via interface engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peichen; Tsai, Chia-Ying; Chang, Jan-Kai; Lai, Chih-Chung; Chen, Po-Han; Lai, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Pei-Ting; Li, Ming-Chin; Pan, Huai-Te; Huang, Yang-Yue; Wu, Chih-I; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Chen, Shih-Wei; Du, Chen-Hsun; Horng, Sheng-Fu; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2013-12-23

    Interface carrier recombination currently hinders the performance of hybrid organic-silicon heterojunction solar cells for high-efficiency low-cost photovoltaics. Here, we introduce an intermediate 1,1-bis[(di-4-tolylamino)phenyl]cyclohexane (TAPC) layer into hybrid heterojunction solar cells based on silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and conjugate polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The highest power conversion efficiency reaches a record 13.01%, which is largely ascribed to the modified organic surface morphology and suppressed saturation current that boost the open-circuit voltage and fill factor. We show that the insertion of TAPC increases the minority carrier lifetime because of an energy offset at the heterojunction interface. Furthermore, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy reveals that TAPC can effectively block the strong oxidation reaction occurring between PEDOT:PSS and silicon, which improves the device characteristics and assurances for reliability. These learnings point toward future directions for versatile interface engineering techniques for the attainment of highly efficient hybrid photovoltaics.

  17. Bulk and interface recombination in planar lead halide perovskite solar cells: A Drift-Diffusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyaeefar, Babak; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab; Asgari, Asghar

    2017-10-01

    A theoretical approach based on Drift-Diffusion equations is presented to study planar mixed lead halide perovskite solar cells. Updated physical parameters such as permittivity, mobility, effective density of states and doping density is employed in simulations. Current-voltage curve data for two experimental sample is imported and through fitting with the model, density of bulk and interface defects is calculated. We obtain the bulk defect density around 1016 cm-3 and surface recombination velocities in the range of 10 cm/s. These values which are in good agreement with experimental measurements and considerably deviated from previous theoretical studies, verify the model and adopted constants. Shockley-Queisser limit is also presented as the ideal device and the effect of bulk and interface defects are presented as loss factors that cause departure from this limit. Our simulations conclude that the overall efficiency of perovskite solar cells is mainly governed by the open-circuit voltage and also identify the interface defects as the major loss factor in these devices.

  18. The Degradation Interface of Magnesium Based Alloys in Direct Contact with Human Primary Osteoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Laipple, Daniel; Luthringer, Bérengère; Feyerabend, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been identified as a new generation material of orthopaedic implants. In vitro setups mimicking physiological conditions are promising for material / degradation analysis prior to in vivo studies however the direct influence of cell on the degradation mechanism has never been investigated. For the first time, the direct, active, influence of human primary osteoblasts on magnesium-based materials (pure magnesium, Mg-2Ag and Mg-10Gd alloys) is studied for up to 14 days. Several parameters such as composition of the degradation interface (directly beneath the cells) are analysed with a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray and focused ion beam. Furthermore, influence of the materials on cell metabolism is examined via different parameters like active mineralisation process. The results are highlighting the influences of the selected alloying element on the initial cells metabolic activity. PMID:27327435

  19. The Degradation Interface of Magnesium Based Alloys in Direct Contact with Human Primary Osteoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Agha, Nezha; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Laipple, Daniel; Luthringer, Bérengère; Feyerabend, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been identified as a new generation material of orthopaedic implants. In vitro setups mimicking physiological conditions are promising for material / degradation analysis prior to in vivo studies however the direct influence of cell on the degradation mechanism has never been investigated. For the first time, the direct, active, influence of human primary osteoblasts on magnesium-based materials (pure magnesium, Mg-2Ag and Mg-10Gd alloys) is studied for up to 14 days. Several parameters such as composition of the degradation interface (directly beneath the cells) are analysed with a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray and focused ion beam. Furthermore, influence of the materials on cell metabolism is examined via different parameters like active mineralisation process. The results are highlighting the influences of the selected alloying element on the initial cells metabolic activity.

  20. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification.

  1. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-05-17

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm(2). Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification.

  2. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification. PMID:27185635

  3. Surface segregation at the aluminum interface of poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orimo, Akiko; Masuda, Kohji; Honda, Satoshi; Benten, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinzaburo; Ohkita, Hideo; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2010-01-25

    The effects of thermal annealing before and after Al deposition on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend solar cells were investigated by current density-voltage measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Compared to the preannealed device, the postannealed device exhibited enhanced open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), which is ascribed to the decrease in the reverse saturation current density J{sub 0}. The XPS measurements demonstrated that P3HT is dominant at the Al interface in the preannealed device while PCBM is instead dominant in the postannealed device. This surface-segregated PCBM formed in the postannealed device can serve as a hole-blocking layer at the Al interface to reduce J{sub 0}, and therefore improve V{sub OC}.

  4. In-vitro Cell Exposure Studies for the Assessment of Nanoparticle Toxicity in the Lung - A Dialogue between Aerosol Science and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hanns-Rudolf, Paur; Cassee, Flemming R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Fissan, Heinz; Diabate, Silvia; Aufderheide, M.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Hanninen, Otto; Kasper, G.; Riediker, Michael; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Schmid, Otmar

    2011-10-01

    The rapid introduction of engineered nanostructured materials into numerous industrial and consumer products will result in enhanced exposure to engineered nanoparticles. Workplace exposure has been identified as the most likely source of uncontrolled inhalation of engineered aerosolized nanoparticles, but release of engineered nanoparticles may occur at any stage of the lifecycle of consumer products. The dynamic development of new nanomaterials with possibly unknown toxicological effects poses a challenge for the assessment of nanoparticle induced toxicity and safety. In this consensus document from a workshop on in-vitro cell systems for nanotoxicity testing an overview is given of the main issues concerning inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, lung physiology, nanoparticle-related biological mechanisms, in-vitro cell exposure systems for nanoparticles and social aspects of nanotechnology. The workshop participants recognized the large potential of in-vitro cell exposure systems for reliable, high-throughput screening of nanotoxicity. For the investigation of pulmonary nanotoxicity, a strong preference was expressed for air-liquid interface (ALI) cell exposure systems (rather than submerged cell exposure systems) as they closely resemble in-vivo conditions in the lungs and they allow for unaltered and dosimetrically accurate delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles to the cells. The members of the workshop believe that further advances in in-vitro cell exposure studies would be greatly facilitated by a more active role of the aerosol scientists. The technical know-how for developing and running ALI in-vitro exposure systems is available in the aerosol community and at the same time biologists/toxicologists are required for proper assessment of the biological impact of nanoparticles.

  5. Role of charge separation mechanism and local disorder at hybrid solar cell interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenreich, Philipp; Pfadler, Thomas; Paquin, Francis; Dion-Bertrand, Laura-Isabelle; Paré-Labrosse, Olivier; Silva, Carlos; Weickert, Jonas; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Dye-sensitized metal oxide polymer hybrid solar cells deliver a promising basis in organic solar cell development due to many conceptual advantages. Since the power conversion efficiency is still in a noncompetitive state, it has to be understood how the photocurrent contribution can be maximized (i.e., which dye-polymer properties are most beneficial for efficient charge generation in hybrid solar cells). By the comparison of three model systems for hybrid solar cells with Ti O2 -dye-polymer interfaces, this paper was aimed at elucidating the role of the exact mechanism of charge generation. In the exciton dissociation (ED) case, an exciton that is generated in the polymer is split at the dye-polymer interface. Alternatively, this exciton can be transferred to the dye via an energy transfer (ET), upon which charge separation occurs between dye and Ti O2 . For comparison, the third case is included in which the high lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the dye does not allow exciton separation or ET from the dye to the polymer, so that the dye only is responsible for charge generation. To separate effects owing to differences in energy levels of the involved materials from the impact of local order and disorder in the polymer close to the interface, this paper further comprises a detailed analysis of the polymer crystallinity based on the H-aggregate model. While the massive impact of the poly(3-hexylthiophene) crystallinity on device function has been outlined for bare metal oxide-polymer interfaces, it has not been considered for hybrid solar cells with dye-sensitized Ti O2 . The results presented here indicate that all dye molecules in general influence the polymer morphology, which has to be taken into account for future optimization of hybrid solar cells. Apart from that, it can be suggested that ED on the polymer needs an additional driving force to work efficiently; thus, energy transfer seems to be currently the most promising strategy to increase the

  6. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Response to Heavy Particle Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill

    2012-07-01

    A battery of non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) are being used to examine the molecular changes that lead to lung carcinogenesis after exposure to heavy particles found in the free space environment. The goal is to ultimately identify biomarkers of radioresponse that can be used for prediction of carcinogenic risk for fatal lung cancer. Our initial studies have focused on the cell line HBEC3 KT and the isogenic variant HBEC3 KTR53, which overexpresses the RASv12 mutant and where p53 has been knocked down by shRNA, and is considered to be a more oncogenically progressed variant. We have previously described the response of HBEC3 KT at the cellular and molecular level, however, the focus here is on the rate of cellular transformation after HZE radiation exposure and the molecular changes in transformed cells. When comparing the two cell lines we find that there is a maximum rate of cellular transformation at 0.25 Gy when cells are exposed to 1 GeV Fe particles, and, for the HBEC3 KTR53 there are multiple pathways upregulated that promote anchorage independent growth including the mTOR pathway, the TGF-1 pathway, RhoA signaling and the ERK/MAPK pathway as early as 2 weeks after radiation. This does not occur in the HBEC3 KT cell line. Transformed HBEC3 KT cells do not show any morphologic or phenotypic changes when grown as cell cultures. HBEC3 KTR53 cells on the other hand show substantial changes in morphology from a cobblestone epithelial appearance to a mesenchymal appearance with a lack of contact inhibition. This epithelial to mesenchymal change in morphology is accompanied by the expression of vimentin and a reduction in the expression of E-cadherin, which are hallmarks of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, for HBEC3 KT transformed cells there are no mutations in the p53 gene, 2 of 15 clones were found to be heterozygous for the RASV12 mutation, and 3 of 15 clones expressed high levels of BigH3, a TGFB

  7. Alterations in Cell Signaling Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells after Environmental Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, K; McCutcheon-Maloney, S M; Bennett, L M

    2003-02-01

    Recent human epidemiological studies suggest that up to 75% of human cancers can be attributed to environmental exposures. Understanding the biologic impact of being exposed to a lifetime of complex environmental mixtures that may not be fully characterized is currently a major challenge. Functional endpoints may be used to assess the gross health consequences of complex mixture exposures from groundwater contamination, superfund sites, biologic releases, or nutritional sources. Such endpoints include the stimulation of cell growth or the induction of a response in an animal model. An environmental exposure that upsets normal cell growth regulation may have important ramifications for cancer development. Stimulating cell growth may alter an individual's cancer risk by changing the expression of genes and proteins that have a role in growth regulatory pathways within cells. Modulating the regulation of these genes and their products may contribute to the initiation, promotion or progression of disease in response to environmental exposure. We are investigating diet-related compounds that induce cell proliferation in breast cancer cell lines. These compounds, PhIP, Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign}, may be part of an everyday diet. PhIP is a naturally occurring mutagen that is formed in well-cooked muscle meats. PhIP consistently causes dose-dependent breast tumor formation in rats and consumption of well-done meat has been linked to increased risk of breast cancer in women. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} herbal tonics are complementary and alternative medicines used by women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer as an alternative therapy for disease treatment and prevention. The long-term goal of this work is to identify those cellular pathways that are altered by a chemical or biologic environmental exposure and understand how those changes correlate with and or predict changes in human health risk. This project addressed this goal by

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  9. A composite hydrogel platform for the dissection of tumor cell migration at tissue interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rape, Andrew D; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse infiltration of tumor cells into brain tissue, which severely complicates surgical resection and contributes to tumor recurrence. The most rapid mode of tissue infiltration occurs along blood vessels or white matter tracts, which represent topological interfaces thought to serve as "tracks" that speed cell migration. Despite this observation, the field lacks experimental paradigms that capture key features of these tissue interfaces and allow reductionist dissection of mechanisms of this interfacial motility. To address this need, we developed a culture system in which tumor cells are sandwiched between a fibronectin-coated ventral surface representing vascular basement membrane and a dorsal hyaluronic acid (HA) surface representing brain parenchyma. We find that inclusion of the dorsal HA surface induces formation of adhesive complexes and significantly slows cell migration relative to a free fibronectin-coated surface. This retardation is amplified by inclusion of integrin binding peptides in the dorsal layer and expression of CD44, suggesting that the dorsal surface slows migration through biochemically specific mechanisms rather than simple steric hindrance. Moreover, both the reduction in migration speed and assembly of dorsal adhesions depend on myosin activation and the stiffness of the ventral layer, implying that mechanochemical feedback directed by the ventral layer can influence adhesive signaling at the dorsal surface.

  10. A composite hydrogel platform for the dissection of tumor cell migration at tissue interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rape, Andrew; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse infiltration of tumor cells into brain tissue, which severely complicates surgical resection and contributes to tumor recurrence. The most rapid mode of tissue infiltration occurs along blood vessels or white matter tracts, which represent topological interfaces thought to serve as “tracks” that speed cell migration. Despite this observation, the field lacks experimental paradigms that capture key features of these tissue interfaces and allow reductionist dissection of mechanisms of this interfacial motility. To address this need, we developed a culture system in which tumor cells are sandwiched between a ventral fibronectin-coated dorsal surface representing vascular basement membrane and a dorsal hyaluronic acid (HA) surface representing brain parenchyma. We find that inclusion of the dorsal HA surface induces formation of adhesive complexes and significantly slows cell migration relative to a free fibronectin-coated surface. This retardation is amplified by inclusion of integrin binding peptides in the dorsal layer and expression of CD44, suggesting that the dorsal surface slows migration through biochemically specific mechanisms rather than simple steric hindrance. Moreover, both the reduction in migration speed and assembly of dorsal adhesions depend on myosin activation and the stiffness of the ventral layer, implying that mechanochemical feedback directed by the ventral layer can influence adhesive signaling at the dorsal surface. PMID:25047626

  11. Delayed BMP4 exposure increases germ cell differentiation in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Zarei Fard, Nehleh; Bahmanpour, Soghra; Jaberipour, Mansoureh; Hosseini, Ahmah; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Fate mapping studies have revealed that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) signaling has a key role in segregation of primordial germ cells from proximal epiblast. Adding BMP4 to the culture media of embryonic stem (ES) cells could induce expression of germ cell markers; however, to provide a desired number of germ cells has remained a challenge. In the current study, we intended to establish an in vitro system to obtain reliable germ cells derived from ES cells. Differentiation was induced in ES cells via embryoid body (EB) and monolayer culture system. Cells were cultured with BMP4 from the beginning (++BMP4) or after 48 hours (+BMP4) of culturing for five days. The cultures were assessed for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, expression of Oct4, Mvh and c-kit. In EB culture protocol, the expression of Mvh, Oct4 and ALP activity significantly increased in +BMP4 culture condition, but a significant down-regulation in the expression of germ cell markers was shown in ++BMP4 condition compared with the control group. Parallel differentiation experiments using monolayer culture system indicated the number of putative germ cells did not change. In the current study, we compared two differentiation methods (EB and monolayer) to achieve an optimal germ cell production. The EBs with a short exposure time period to BMP4, showing typical characteristics of germ cells. Therefore, our approach provides a strategy for the production of germline cells from ES cells.

  12. Cell proliferation and cell death are disturbed during prenatal and postnatal brain development after uranium exposure.

    PubMed

    Legrand, M; Elie, C; Stefani, J; N Florès; Culeux, C; Delissen, O; Ibanez, C; Lestaevel, P; Eriksson, P; Dinocourt, C

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is more susceptible to neurotoxic compounds than adult brain. It is also well known that disturbances during brain development cause neurological disorders in adulthood. The brain is known to be a target organ of uranium (U) exposure and previous studies have noted that internal U contamination of adult rats induces behavioral disorders as well as affects neurochemistry and neurophysiological properties. In this study, we investigated whether depleted uranium (DU) exposure affects neurogenesis during prenatal and postnatal brain development. We examined the structural morphology of the brain, cell death and finally cell proliferation in animals exposed to DU during gestation and lactation compared to control animals. Our results showed that DU decreases cell death in the cortical neuroepithelium of gestational day (GD) 13 embryos exposed at 40mg/L and 120mg/L and of GD18 fetuses exposed at 120mg/L without modification of the number of apoptotic cells. Cell proliferation analysis showed an increase of BrdU labeling in the dentate neuroepithelium of fetuses from GD18 at 120mg/L. Postnatally, cell death is increased in the dentate gyrus of postnatal day (PND) 0 and PND5 exposed pups at 120mg/L and is associated with an increase of apoptotic cell number only at PND5. Finally, a decrease in dividing cells is observed in the dentate gyrus of PND21 rats developmentally exposed to 120mg/L DU, but not at PND0 and PND5. These results show that DU exposure during brain development causes opposite effects on cell proliferation and cell death processes between prenatal and postnatal development mainly at the highest dose. Although these modifications do not have a major impact in brain morphology, they could affect the next steps of neurogenesis and thus might disrupt the fine organization of the neuronal network.

  13. Investigation into the diffusion and oxidation behavior of the interface between a plasma-sprayed anode and a porous steel support for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Liu, Meilin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Porous metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have attracted much attention because their potential to dramatically reduce the cost while enhancing the robustness and manufacturability. In particular, 430 ferritic steel (430L) is one of the popular choice for SOFC support because of its superior performance and low cost. In this study, we investigate the oxidation and diffusion behavior of the interface between a Ni-based anode and porous 430L support exposed to a humidified (3% H2O) hydrogen atmosphere at 700 °C. The Ni-GDC (Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ) cermet anodes are deposited on the porous 430L support by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The effect of exposure time on the microstructure and phase structure of the anode and the supports is studied and the element diffusion across the support/anode interface is characterized. Results indicate that the main oxidation product of the 430L support is Cr2O3, and that Cr and Fe will diffuse to the anode and the diffusion thickness increases with the exposure time. The diffusion thickness of Cr and Fe reach about 5 and 2 μm, respectively, after 1000 h exposure. However, the element diffusion and oxidation has little influence on the area-specific resistance, indicating that the porous 430L steel and plasma sprayed Ni-GDC anode are promising for durable SOFCs.

  14. Immature, Semi-Mature, and Fully Mature Dendritic Cells: Toward a DC-Cancer Cells Interface That Augments Anticancer Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Aleksandra M.; Martin, Shaun; Garg, Abhishek D.; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the sentinel antigen-presenting cells of the immune system; such that their productive interface with the dying cancer cells is crucial for proper communication of the “non-self” status of cancer cells to the adaptive immune system. Efficiency and the ultimate success of such a communication hinges upon the maturation status of the DCs, attained following their interaction with cancer cells. Immature DCs facilitate tolerance toward cancer cells (observed for many apoptotic inducers) while fully mature DCs can strongly promote anticancer immunity if they secrete the correct combinations of cytokines [observed when DCs interact with cancer cells undergoing immunogenic cell death (ICD)]. However, an intermediate population of DC maturation, called semi-mature DCs exists, which can potentiate either tolerogenicity or pro-tumorigenic responses (as happens in the case of certain chemotherapeutics and agents exerting ambivalent immune reactions). Specific combinations of DC phenotypic markers, DC-derived cytokines/chemokines, dying cancer cell-derived danger signals, and other less characterized entities (e.g., exosomes) can define the nature and evolution of the DC maturation state. In the present review, we discuss these different maturation states of DCs, how they might be attained and which anticancer agents or cell death modalities (e.g., tolerogenic cell death vs. ICD) may regulate these states. PMID:24376443

  15. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  16. Radiation exposure as a possible etiologic factor in hairy cell leukemia (leukemic reticuloendotheliosis)

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.J.; Keating, M.J.

    1980-10-01

    The frequency of prior occupational, accidental, or therapeutic radiation exposure was significantly higher for hairy cell leukemia patients than for a control group of solid tumor patients. Hairy cell leukemia patients were also more frequently involved in occupations at high risk of radiation exposure such as chemist, engineer, physicist, and health care facility worker. The observation that the incidence of thyroid disorders among hairy cell leukemia patients was also unusually high was interpreted as further indirect evidence of excessive radiation exposure. It appears that radiation exposure may be an important contributing factor in the development of some cases of hairy cell leukemia.

  17. Simple way to engineer metal-semiconductor interface for enhanced performance of perovskite organic lead iodide solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuzhuan; Shi, Jiangjian; Lv, Songtao; Zhu, Lifeng; Dong, Juan; Wu, Huijue; Xiao, Yin; Luo, Yanhong; Wang, Shirong; Li, Dongmei; Li, Xianggao; Meng, Qingbo

    2014-04-23

    A thin wide band gap organic semiconductor N,N,N',N'-tetraphenyl-benzidine layer has been introduced by spin-coating to engineer the metal-semiconductor interface in the hole-conductor-free perovskite solar cells. The average cell power conversion efficiency (PCE) has been enhanced from 5.26% to 6.26% after the modification and a highest PCE of 6.71% has been achieved. By the aid of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dark current analysis, it is revealed that this modification can increase interfacial resistance of CH3NH3PbI3/Au interface and retard electron recombination process in the metal-semiconductor interface.

  18. The role of buffer/kesterite interface recombination and minority carrier lifetime on kesterite thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courel, Maykel; Andrade-Arvizu, J. A.; Vigil-Galán, O.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents for the first time a theoretical study of the impact of kesterite/buffer interface recombination and kesterite minority carrier lifetime on both CZTS and CZTSe solar cells. It demonstrates that only an 11% efficiency can be reached in CZTS solar cells by improving absorber crystalline quality, pointing out the need for an improved CdS/CZTS interface. It further demonstrates that a CZTS solar cell efficiency enhancement of up to 18%, with an open-circuit voltage value of up to 918 mV, can be achieved depending on CZTS minority carrier lifetime and CdS/CZTS interface recombination speed values. Moreover, this paper shows that by improving CZTSe crystalline quality, a record efficiency value of 17% could be achieved without focusing on improving CdS/CZTSe interface quality. Consequently, CZTSe is presented as a better candidate for solar cell applications. Conditions under which CdS/kesterite interface recombination and trap-assisted tunneling recombination become dominant are provided. In particular, we find that CdS/CZTS interface recombination is the dominant transport mechanism for CZTS minority carrier lifetime values higher than 5 ns, while for CZTSe minority carrier lifetime values lower than 0.1 μs, CdS/CZTSe interface losses are negligible.

  19. Organic solar cells: a rigorous model of the donor-acceptor interface for various bulk heterojunction morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raba, Adam; Leroy, Yann; Cordan, Anne-Sophie

    2014-02-01

    Theoretical studies of organic solar cells are mostly based on one dimensional models. Despite their accuracy to reproduce most of the experimental trends, they intrinsically cannot correctly integrate the effects of morphology in cells based on a bulk heterojunction structure. Therefore, accounting for these effects requires the development of two dimensional models, in which donor and acceptor domains are explicitly distinct. In this context, we propose an analytical approach, which focuses on the description of the interface between the two domains. Assuming pinned charge transfer states, we rigorously derive the corresponding boundary conditions and explore the differences between this model and other existing models in the literature for various morphologies of the active layer. On one hand, all tested models are equivalent for an ideal interdigitated bulk heterojunction solar cell with a planar donor-acceptor interface, but divergences between the models rise for small sizes of the donor domain. On the other hand, we carried out a comparison on a less ideal case of cell, with a rough interface between the two domains. Simulations with such cells exhibit distinct behaviors for each model. We conclude that the boundary condition for the interface between the materials is of great importance for the study of solar cells with a non-planar interface. The model must account initially for the roughness of the interface.

  20. Graphene-enhanced thermal interface materials for heat removal from photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadah, M.; Gamalath, D.; Hernandez, E.; Balandin, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The increase in the temperature of photovoltaic (PV) solar cells affects negatively their power conversion efficiency and decreases their lifetime. The negative effects are particularly pronounced in concentrator solar cells. Therefore, it is crucial to limit the PV cell temperature by effectively removing the excess heat. Conventional thermal phase change materials (PCMs) and thermal interface materials (TIMs) do not possess the thermal conductivity values sufficient for thermal management of the next generation of PV cells. In this paper, we report the results of investigation of the increased efficiency of PV cells with the use of graphene-enhanced TIMs. Graphene reveals the highest values of the intrinsic thermal conductivity. It was also shown that the thermal conductivity of composites can be increased via utilization of graphene fillers. We prepared TIMs with up to 6% of graphene designed specifically for PV cell application. The solar cells were tested using the solar simulation module. It was found that the drop in the output voltage of the solar panel under two-sun concentrated illumination can be reduced from 19% to 6% when grapheneenhanced TIMs are used. The proposed method can recover up to 75% of the power loss in solar cells.

  1. Interaction and Localization of Synthetic Nanoparticles in Healthy and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells: Effect of Ozone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Raemy, David O.; Loader, Joan E.; Kailey, Jenai M; Neeves, Keith B.; White, Carl W.; Ahmad, Aftab; Gehr, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Nanoparticles (NPs) produced by nanotechnology processes have taken the field of medicine by storm. Concerns about safety of these NPs in humans, however, have recently been raised. Although studies of NP toxicity have focused on lung disease the mechanistic link between NP exposure and lung injury remained unclear. This is primarily due to a lack of availability of appropriate airway disease models and sophisticated microscopic techniques to study nano-sized particulate delivery and resulting responses. Methods Air–liquid interface (ALI) cultures of non-cystic fibrosis (CF) and CF airway epithelial cells were exposed to the FITC-labeled NPs using a PennCentury microsprayer™. Uptake of NPs was assessed by FACS. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was performed and the images were analyzed by an advanced imaging software to study particle deposition and uptake. Results Flow cytometry data revealed that CF cells accumulated increased amounts of NPs. The increased NP uptake could be attributed to the reduced CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function as a similar increased retention/uptake was observed in cells whose CFTR expression was downregulated by antisense oligonucleotide. NPs alone did not induce pro-inflammatory cytokine release or cell death. The cell culture system was sensitive to ozone but exposure to the uncoated synthetic NPs used in this study, did not cause any synergistic or suppressive effects. LSM imaging and subsequent image restoration further indicated particle uptake and intracellular localization. Exposure to ozone increased nuclear uptake in both non-CF and CF cells. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate the uptake of NPs using ALI cultures of non-CF and CF airway epithelial cells. The NPs used here were useful in demonstrating uptake by airway epithelial cells without causing adverse effects in presence or absence of ozone. However, to totally exclude toxic effects, chronic studies under in vivo conditions using

  2. NK cell-derived IL-10 is critical for DC-NK cell dialogue at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Blois, Sandra M; Freitag, Nancy; Tirado-González, Irene; Cheng, Shi-Bin; Heimesaat, Markus M; Bereswill, Stefan; Rose, Matthias; Conrad, Melanie L; Barrientos, Gabriela; Sharma, Surendra

    2017-05-19

    DC-NK cell interactions are thought to influence the development of maternal tolerance and de novo angiogenesis during early gestation. However, it is unclear which mechanism ensures the cooperative dialogue between DC and NK cells at the feto-maternal interface. In this article, we show that uterine NK cells are the key source of IL-10 that is required to regulate DC phenotype and pregnancy success. Upon in vivo expansion of DC during early gestation, NK cells expressed increased levels of IL-10. Exogenous administration of IL-10 was sufficient to overcome early pregnancy failure in dams treated to achieve simultaneous DC expansion and NK cell depletion. Remarkably, DC expansion in IL-10(-/-) dams provoked pregnancy loss, which could be abrogated by the adoptive transfer of IL-10(+/+) NK cells and not by IL-10(-/-) NK cells. Furthermore, the IL-10 expressing NK cells markedly enhanced angiogenic responses and placental development in DC expanded IL-10(-/-) dams. Thus, the capacity of NK cells to secrete IL-10 plays a unique role facilitating the DC-NK cell dialogue during the establishment of a healthy gestation.

  3. Profilin as a regulator of the membrane-actin cytoskeleton interface in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tiantian; Li, Shanwei; Ren, Haiyun

    2013-12-19

    Membrane structures and cytoskeleton dynamics are intimately inter-connected in the eukaryotic cell. Recently, the molecular mechanisms operating at this interface have been progressively addressed. Many experiments have revealed that the actin cytoskeleton can interact with membranes through various discrete membrane domains. The actin-binding protein, profilin has been proven to inhibit actin polymerization and to promote F-actin elongation. This is dependent on many factors, such as the profilin/G-actin ratio and the ionic environment of the cell. Additionally, profilin has specific domains that interact with phosphoinositides and poly-L-proline rich proteins; theoretically, this gives profilin the opportunity to interact with membranes, and a large number of experiments have confirmed this possibility. In this article, we summarize recent findings in plant cells, and discuss the evidence of the connections among actin cytoskeleton, profilin and biomembranes through direct or indirect relationships.

  4. Rational Design of Materials Interface for Efficient Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong‐Qiang; Chandran, Bevita K.

    2015-01-01

    Originating from primary tumors and penetrating into blood circulation, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a vital role in understanding the biology of metastasis and have great potential for early cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized therapy. By exploiting the specific biophysical and biochemical properties of CTCs, various material interfaces have been developed for the capture and detection of CTCs from blood. However, due to the extremely low number of CTCs in peripheral blood, there exists a need to improve the efficiency and specificity of the CTC capture and detection. In this regard, a critical review of the numerous reports of advanced platforms for highly efficient and selective capture of CTCs, which have been spurred by recent advances in nanotechnology and microfabrication, is essential. This review gives an overview of unique biophysical and biochemical properties of CTCs, followed by a summary of the key material interfaces recently developed for improved CTC capture and detection, with focus on the use of microfluidics, nanostructured substrates, and miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance‐based systems. Challenges and future perspectives in the design of material interfaces for capture and detection of CTCs in clinical applications are also discussed. PMID:27980914

  5. Interface control in organic heterojunction photovoltaic cells by phase separation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heier, Jakob; Castro, Fernando A.; Nüesch, Frank; Hany, Roland

    2007-09-01

    Significant progress is being made in the photovoltaic energy conversion using organic semiconducting materials. One of the focuses of attention is the nanoscale morphology of the donor-acceptor mixture, to ensure efficient charge generation and loss-free charge transport at the same time. Using small molecule and polymer blend systems, recent efforts highlight the problems to ensure an optimized relationship between molecular structure, morphology and device properties. Here, we present two examples using a host/guest mixture approach for the controlled, sequential design of bilayer organic solar cell architectures that consist of a large interface area with connecting paths to the respective electrodes at the same time. In the first example, we employed polymer demixing during spin coating to produce a rough interface: surface directed spinodal decomposition leads to a 2-dimensional spinodal pattern with submicrometer features at the polymer-polymer interface. The second system consists of a solution of a blend of small molecules, where phase separation into a bilayer during spin coating is followed by dewetting. For both cases, the guest can be removed using a selective solvent after the phase separation process, and the rough host surface can be covered with a second active, semiconducting component. We explain the potential merits of the resulting interdigitated bilayer films, and explore to which extent polymer-polymer and surface interactions can be employed to create surface features in the nanometer range.

  6. Permissive Schwann cell graft/spinal cord interfaces for axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ryan R; Henao, Martha; Pearse, Damien D; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of autologous Schwann cells (SCs) to repair the injured spinal cord is currently being evaluated in a clinical trial. In support, this study determined properties of spinal cord/SC bridge interfaces that enabled regenerated brainstem axons to cross them, possibly leading to improvement in rat hindlimb movement. Fluid bridges of SCs and Matrigel were placed in complete spinal cord transections. Compared to pregelled bridges of SCs and Matrigel, they improved regeneration of brainstem axons across the rostral interface. The regenerating brainstem axons formed synaptophysin(+) bouton-like terminals and contacted MAP2A(+) dendrites at the caudal interface. Brainstem axon regeneration was directly associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP(+)) astrocyte processes that elongated into the SC bridge. Electron microscopy revealed that axons, SCs, and astrocytes were enclosed together within tunnels bounded by a continuous basal lamina. Neuroglycan (NG2) expression was associated with these tunnels. One week after injury, the GFAP(+) processes coexpressed nestin and brain lipid-binding protein, and the tips of GFAP(+)/NG2(+) processes extended into the bridges together with the regenerating brainstem axons. Both brainstem axon regeneration and number of GFAP(+) processes in the bridges correlated with improvement in hindlimb locomotion. Following SCI, astrocytes may enter a reactive state that prohibits axon regeneration. Elongation of astrocyte processes into SC bridges, however, and formation of NG2(+) tunnels enable brainstem axon regeneration and improvement in function. It is important for spinal cord repair to define conditions that favor elongation of astrocytes into lesions/transplants.

  7. Design and Implementation of Functional Nanoelectronic Interfaces With Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissue Using Nanowire Device Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Brian P.; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Tian, Bozhi; Lieber, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Nanowire FETs (NWFETs) are promising building blocks for nanoscale bioelectronic interfaces with cells and tissue since they are known to exhibit exquisite sensitivity in the context of chemical and biological detection, and have the potential to form strongly coupled interfaces with cell membranes. We present a general scheme that can be used to assemble NWs with rationally designed composition and geometry on either planar inorganic or biocompatible flexible plastic surfaces. We demonstrate that these devices can be used to measure signals from neurons, cardiomyocytes, and heart tissue. Reported signals are in millivolts range, which are equal to or substantially greater than those recorded with either planar FETs or multielectrode arrays, and demonstrate one unique advantage of NW-based devices. Basic studies showing the effect of device sensitivity and cell/substrate junction quality on signal magnitude are presented. Finally, our demonstrated ability to design high-density arrays of NWFETs enables us to map signal at the subcellular level, a functionality not enabled by conventional microfabricated devices. These advances could have broad applications in high-throughput drug assays, fundamental biophysical studies of cellular function, and development of powerful prosthetics. PMID:21785576

  8. From Morphology to Interfaces to Tandem Geometries: Enhancing the Performance of Perovskite/Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas

    We have taken a new approach to develop mesoporous lead iodide scaffolds, using the nucleation and growth of lead iodide crystallites in a wet film. A simple time-dependent growth control enabled the manipulation of the mesoporous lead iodide layer quality in a continuous manner. The morphology of lead iodide is shown to influence the subsequent crystallization of methyamoniumleadiodide film by using angle-dependent grazing incidence x-ray scattering. The morphology of lead iodide film can be fine-tuned, and thus the methyamoniumleadiodide film quality can be effectively controlled, leading to an optimization of the perovskite active layer. Using this strategy, perovskite solar cells with inverted PHJ structure showed a PCE of 15.7 per cent with little hysteresis. Interface engineering is critical for achieving efficient solar cells, yet a comprehensive understanding of the interface between metal electrode and electron transport layer (ETL) is lacking. A significant power conversion efficiency (PCE) improvement of fullerene/perovskite planar heterojunction solar cells was achieved by inserting a fulleropyrrolidine interlayer between the silver electrode and electron transport layer. The interlayer was found to enhance recombination resistance, increases electron extraction rate and prolongs free carrier lifetime. We also uncovered a facile solution-based fabrication of high performance tandem perovskite/polymer solar cells where the front sub-cell consists of perovskite and the back sub-cell is a polymer-based layer. A record maximum PCE of 15.96 per cent was achieved, demonstrating the synergy between the perovskite and semiconducting polymers. This design balances the absorption of the perovskite and the polymer, eliminates the adverse impact of thermal annealing during perovskite fabrication, and affords devices with no hysteresis. This work was performed in collaboration with Y. Liu, Z. Page, D. Venkataraman and T. Emrick (UMASS), F. Liu (LBNL) and Q. Hu and R

  9. Interface Energetics in Organo-Metallic Halide Perovskite-based Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Philip

    2015-03-01

    In my presentation I will talk about the most recent findings on the electronic structure of methylammonium lead tri-halide (MAPbX3, X =I, Br) perovskite films and their interfaces to adjacent transport layers. Intricate knowledge of the electronic alignment at the contact interfaces in perovskite solar cells is essential for the understanding of the working principle as well as improving design and thus performance of respective devices. In our studies we employ ultra-violet, X-ray and inverse photoemission spectroscopy (UPS, XPS, IPES) to directly determine valence and conduction band offsets. In this way we are able to report a direct measurement of the electronic band gap as well as ionization energy and electron affinity found for perovskite surfaces. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the electronic energy level alignment of adjacent organic hole transport layers, such as spiro-MeOTAD, can limit the maximum attainable open circuit voltage (Voc) in solar cells if the highest occupied molecular orbital of the hole transport material is not well aligned to the valence band maximum of the perovskite layer. Using better suited hole transporters, like CBP, values for Voc larger than 1.5 V could be achieved in the case of MAPbBr3 based devices. More recently, inverted perovskite solar cells based on nickel oxide bottom anodes have been reported to yield viable power conversion efficiencies and stability. We find that the interface between the p-doped NiO surface and the MAPbI3 layer on top lead to p-type perovskite filsm while the same material deposited on TiO2 in the conventional cell geometry turns out to be n-type. A further investigation of a C60 layer deposited on top of p-type perovskite films reveals an ideal alignment between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the organic electron transport materials and the conduction band minimum of the perovskite film underneath. These results explain why the inverted solar cell structure could achieve

  10. Temperature-responsive intelligent interfaces for biomolecular separation and cell sheet engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2009-01-01

    Temperature-responsive intelligent surfaces, prepared by the modification of an interface with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its derivatives, have been used for biomedical applications. Such surfaces exhibit temperature-responsive hydrophilic/hydrophobic alterations with external temperature changes, which, in turn, result in thermally modulated interactions with biomolecules and cells. In this review, we focus on the application of these intelligent surfaces to chromatographic separation and cell cultures. Chromatographic separations using several types of intelligent surfaces are mentioned briefly, and various effects related to the separation of bioactive compounds are discussed, including wettability, copolymer composition and graft polymer architecture. Similarly, we also summarize temperature-responsive cell culture substrates that allow the recovery of confluent cell monolayers as contiguous living cell sheets for tissue-engineering applications. The key factors in temperature-dependent cell adhesion/detachment control are discussed from the viewpoint of grafting temperature-responsive polymers, and new methodologies for effective cell sheet culturing and the construction of thick tissues are summarized. PMID:19324682

  11. T Cell Chemo-Vaccination Effects after Repeated Mucosal SHIV Exposures and Oral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen N.; Adams, Debra R.; Youngpairoj, Ae S.; Luo, Wei; Zheng, Qi; Cong, Mian-er; Aung, Wutyi; Mitchell, James; Otten, Ron; Hendry, R. Michael; Heneine, Walid; McNicholl, Janet; Garcia-Lerma, J. Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with anti-viral drugs is currently in clinical trials for the prevention of HIV infection. Induction of adaptive immune responses to virus exposures during anti-viral drug administration, i.e., a “chemo-vaccination” effect, could contribute to PrEP efficacy. To study possible chemo-vaccination, we monitored humoral and cellular immune responses in nine rhesus macaques undergoing up to 14 weekly, low-dose SHIVSF162P3 rectal exposures. Six macaques concurrently received PrEP with intermittent, oral Truvada; three were no-PrEP controls. PrEP protected 4 macaques from infection. Two of the four showed evidence of chemo-vaccination, because they developed anti-SHIV CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; SHIV-specific antibodies were not detected. Control macaques showed no anti-SHIV immune responses before infection. Chemo-vaccination-induced T cell responses were robust (up to 3,940 SFU/106 PBMCs), predominantly central memory cells, short-lived (≤22 weeks), and appeared intermittently and with changing specificities. The two chemo-vaccinated macaques were virus-challenged again after 28 weeks of rest, after T cell responses had waned. One macaque was not protected from infection. The other macaque concurrently received additional PrEP. It remained uninfected and T cell responses were boosted during the additional virus exposures. In summary, we document and characterize PrEP-induced T cell chemo-vaccination. Although not protective after subsiding in one macaque, chemo-vaccination-induced T cells warrant more comprehensive analysis during peak responses for their ability to prevent or to control infections after additional exposures. Our findings highlight the importance of monitoring these responses in clinical PrEP trials and suggest that a combination of vaccines and PrEP potentially might enhance efficacy. PMID:21541293

  12. Cell-to-cell modeling of the interface between atrial and sinoatrial anisotropic heterogeneous nets.

    PubMed

    López Garza, Gabriel; Castellanos, Norma P; Godínez, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    The transition between sinoatrial cells and atrial cells in the heart is not fully understood. Here we focus on cell-to-cell mathematical models involving typical sinoatrial cells and atrial cells connected with experimentally observed conductance values. We are interested mainly in the geometry of the microstructure of the conduction paths in the sinoatrial node. We show with some models that appropriate source-sink relationships between atrial and sinoatrial cells may occur according to certain geometric arrangements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of temperature on the location of the gas-liquid interface in a PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-I.; Chu, Hsin-Sen

    The objective of this study is to investigate the location of the gas-liquid interface at various temperatures in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell under non-isothermal conditions. A mathematical model, coupled with the electrochemical process, two-phase flows, species transfer, and heat transfer is employed. A finite volume-based CFD approach is applied to investigate the species transport behavior in a fuel cell. The effects of two model parameters, namely cell temperature (T cell) and humidification temperature (T h), on the gas-liquid interface and cell performance are presented. Simulation results indicate that variations of these two parameters influence the location of the gas-liquid interface, the cell performance, and the distribution of liquid water saturation. At lower cell temperatures, the gas-liquid interface moves toward the inlet port of the channel when the humidification temperature is greater than the cell temperature. Therefore, the cell performance decreases as the liquid water clogs the passage for the transport of oxygen. Furthermore, these two factors are closely related to the membrane temperature distribution. Obvious variations in magnitude are seen at a cell temperature of 323 K and a humidification temperature of 343 K.

  14. Impact of a small cell on the RF-EMF exposure in a train.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Sam; Plets, David; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2015-02-27

    The deployment of a miniature mobile-phone base station or small cell in a train car significantly improves the coverage and the capacity of a mobile network service on the train. However, the impact of the small cell on the passengers' exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is unknown. In this study, we assessed experimentally the RF-EMF exposure of a mobile-phone user who is either connected to the outdoor macrocell network or to an in-train small cell, while traveling on the train, by means of the absorbed-dose concept, which combines the base station downlink exposure with the mobile-phone uplink exposure. For Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology at 1800 MHz, we found that by connecting to a small cell, the brain exposure of the user could realistically be reduced by a factor 35 and the whole-body exposure by a factor 11.

  15. Impact of a Small Cell on the RF-EMF Exposure in a Train

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Sam; Plets, David; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2015-01-01

    The deployment of a miniature mobile-phone base station or small cell in a train car significantly improves the coverage and the capacity of a mobile network service on the train. However, the impact of the small cell on the passengers’ exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is unknown. In this study, we assessed experimentally the RF-EMF exposure of a mobile-phone user who is either connected to the outdoor macrocell network or to an in-train small cell, while traveling on the train, by means of the absorbed-dose concept, which combines the base station downlink exposure with the mobile-phone uplink exposure. For Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology at 1800 MHz, we found that by connecting to a small cell, the brain exposure of the user could realistically be reduced by a factor 35 and the whole-body exposure by a factor 11. PMID:25734793

  16. Can cell proliferation of umbilical cord blood cells reflect environmental exposures?

    PubMed

    Novack, Lena; Manor, Esther; Gurevich, Elena; Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Landau, Daniella; Sarov, Batia; Hershkovitz, Reli; Dukler, Doron; Vodonos, Tali; Karakis, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Environmental hazards were shown to have an impact on cell proliferation (CP). We investigated CP of lymphocytes in umbilical cord blood in relation to prenatal environmental exposures in a sample of 346 Arab-Bedouin women giving birth in a local hospital. Information on subjects' addresses at pregnancy, potential household exposures and demographical status was collected in an interview during hospitalization. This population is usually featured by high rates of neonatal morbidity and multiple environmental exposures, originating from the local industrial park (IP), household hazards and frequent male smoking. A geometric mean CP ratio 2.17 (2.06; 2.29), and was high in women residing in a direction of prevailing winds from the local IP (p value = 0.094) and who gave birth during fall-winter season (p value = 0.024). Women complaining on disturbing exposure to noise had lower CP (p value = 0.015), compared to other women. CP was not indicative of neonatal morbidity. However, our findings suggest that CP of umbilical cord might be modified by environmental exposures. A long-term follow-up of the children is required to assess their developmental outcomes.

  17. Three dimensional tubular structure self-assembled by vascular mesenchymal cells at stiffness interfaces of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolu; Gojgini, Shiva; Chen, Ting-Hsuan; Teng, Fang; Fei, Peng; Dong, Siyan; Segura, Tatiana; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we report a rational and robust methodology to construct three dimensional (3D) tubular-structures solely by self-assembly of vascular mesenchymal cells (VMCs). Using the cell-laden hyaluronic acid hydrogel surrounded by cell-free gel with a higher stiffness, VMCs spontaneously migrated across the interface and assembled into 3D tubes, which composes of numerous cells. Based on turing instability which describes the reaction-diffusion processes of inhibitors and activators, this result of 3D tubular structure formation agrees with theoretical predictions from simulations of the reaction-diffusion of morphogens and cells under the initial conditions of patterned cell-laden hydrogel. We showed that this combination of theoretical prediction and experiments is able to produce multi-cellular 3D tubes with desired dimensions and determinate orientation in hydrogel mimicking the 3D features of tubular tissue. This work provides a reliable methodology for creating tubular structures with controllable sizes inside the 3D hydrogel through multi-cellular self-organization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Interfacing Inorganic Nanowire Arrays and Living Cells for Cellular Function Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Minsuk; Han, Lin; Chen, Jonathan J; Fan, Rong

    2015-11-11

    Inorganic nanowires are among the most attractive functional materials, which have emerged in the past two decades. They have demonstrated applications in information technology and energy conversion, but their utility in biological or biomedical research remains relatively under-explored. Although nanowire-based sensors have been frequently reported for biomolecular detection, interfacing nanowire arrays and living mammalian cells for the direct analysis of cellular functions is a very recent endeavor. Cell-penetrating nanowires enabled effective delivery of biomolecules, electrical and optical stimulation and recording of intracellular signals over a long period of time. Non-penetrating, high-density nanowire arrays display rich interactions between the nanostructured substrate and the micro/nanoscale features of cell surfaces. Such interactions enable efficient capture of rare cells including circulating tumor cells and trafficking leukocytes from complex biospecimens. It also serves as a platform for probing cell traction force and neuronal guidance. The most recent advances in the field that exploits nanowire arrays (both penetrating and non-penetrating) to perform rapid analysis of cellular functions potentially for disease diagnosis and monitoring are reviewed.

  19. A futuristic approach towards interface layer modifications for improved efficiency in inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, J. P. E-mail: tiwarijp@mail.nplindia.org; Ali, Farman; Sharma, Abhishek; Chand, Suresh; Pillai, Sriraj; Parakh, Sonal

    2014-01-27

    Inverted polymer Solar Cells of the classical poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C{sub 61}butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 61}BM) blend on indium tin oxide substrates were fabricated, which shows improved device performance, by using a facile solution–processed ZnO-polyelectrolytes [poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC), Poly (acrylic acid sodium salt) (PAS), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS), and Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)] nanocomposite as a cathode interface layer compared to devices using pristine ZnO as cathode buffer layer in ambient conditions. The devices with different combinations of polyelectrolyte with ZnO show different improvements in the device efficiency. The combinations of ZnO with PVP and PDADMAC show highest amount of improvements in the efficiency by a factor of ∼17–19. The improvement of the efficiency may be due to various phenomena, such as the passivation of ZnO surface as well as bulk traps, work function modification, improved energy level alignment, improved electronic coupling of the inorganic/organic interface, improved light harvesting, and decrease of surface as well as bulk charge recombination in the device. The introduction of polyelectrolyte into ZnO inhibits the aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles yielding the large area ZnO nanoclusters; and hence, forming the uniform film of ZnO resulting in the modifications of morphology as well as electronic structure of ZnO-polyelectrolyte nano-composite favouring better electronic coupling between cathode and active layer and hence enhancing the current and, consequently, the efficiency. This simple low temperature ZnO-polyelectrolyte nanocomposite based protocol proposed for cathode interface layer modification may be very much useful for roll to roll industrial manufacturing of organic solar cells.

  20. Ionizing Radiation Exposure and Basal Cell Carcinoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changzhao; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This commentary summarizes studies showing risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) development in relationship to environmental, occupational and therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). BCC, the most common type of human cancer, is driven by the aberrant activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a tumor suppressor gene of Hh signaling pathway, and Smoothened play a key role in the development of radiation-induced BCCs in animal models. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that humans exposed to radiation as observed among the long-term, large scale cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, bone marrow transplant recipients, patients with tinea capitis and radiologic workers enhances risk of BCCs. Overall, this risk is higher in Caucasians than other races. People who were exposed early in life develop more BCCs. The enhanced IR correlation with BCC and not other common cutaneous malignancies is intriguing. The mechanism underlying these observations remains undefined. Understanding interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways and those which drive BCC development may be important in unraveling the mechanism associated with this enhanced risk. Recent studies showed that Vismodegib, a Smoothened inhibitor, is effective in treating radiation-induced BCCs in humans, suggesting that common strategies are required for the intervention of BCCs development irrespective of their etiology. PMID:26930381

  1. Ionizing Radiation Exposure and Basal Cell Carcinoma Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changzhao; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    This commentary summarizes studies showing risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) development in relationship to environmental, occupational and therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). BCC, the most common type of human cancer, is driven by the aberrant activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a tumor suppressor gene of Hh signaling pathway, and Smoothened play a key role in the development of radiation-induced BCCs in animal models. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that humans exposed to radiation as observed among the long-term, large scale cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, bone marrow transplant recipients, patients with tinea capitis and radiologic workers enhances risk of BCCs. Overall, this risk is higher in Caucasians than other races. People who were exposed early in life develop more BCCs. The enhanced IR correlation with BCC and not other common cutaneous malignancies is intriguing. The mechanism underlying these observations remains undefined. Understanding interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways and those which drive BCC development may be important in unraveling the mechanism associated with this enhanced risk. Recent studies showed that Vismodegib, a Smoothened inhibitor, is effective in treating radiation-induced BCCs in humans, suggesting that common strategies are required for the intervention of BCCs development irrespective of their etiology.

  2. Reducing Interface Recombination through Mixed Nanocrystal Interlayers in PbS Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Santanu; Stavrinadis, Alexandros; Gupta, Shuchi; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2017-08-23

    The performance of ZnO/PbS colloidal quantum dot (CQD)-based heterojunction solar cells is hindered by charge carrier recombination at the heterojunction interface. Reducing interfacial recombination can improve charge collection and the photocurrent of the device. Here we report the use of a mixed nanocrystal (MNC) buffer layer comprising zinc oxide nanocrystals and lead sulfide quantum dots at the respective heterojunction interface. Remote trap passivation of the PbS CQDs taking place within this MNC layer reduces interfacial recombination and electron back transfer which in turn improves charge collection efficiency. Upon the addition of the MNC layer, the overall power conversion efficiency increases from 9.11 to 10.16% and Short-circuit current density (JSC) increases from 23.54 to 25.23 mA/cm(2). Optoelectronic characterization of the solar cells confirms that the effects underlying device improvement are reduced trap density and improved charge collection efficiency due to the presence of the MNC buffer layer.

  3. Understanding and controlling type I collagen adsorption and assembly at interfaces, and application to cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2014-12-01

    Collagen is a large anisotropic and self-assembling extracellular matrix protein. Understanding and controlling its adsorption and assembly at interfaces is expected to increase our general knowledge of protein adsorption as well as to open the way to the development of biointerfaces of interest for biomaterials science and tissue engineering. The work related to type I collagen adsorption performed in our laboratory over the past twenty years is reviewed. Substrate chemical nature and adsorption conditions (collagen concentration, adsorption duration) were shown to affect collagen adsorbed amount and supramolecular organization. Collagen assemblies were formed starting from the interface, and assembly was favored by hydrophobic substrates and high adsorbed amount. Substrates were designed to better control collagen adsorption and assembly. The spatial control of adsorption was ensured by chemically heterogeneous substrates, which also affected collagen assembly when domains with a dimension smaller than the length of the collagen molecule (i.e. 300nm) were prepared. Mixed polymer brushes were used to achieve a temporal control of adsorption: adsorption and desorption were reversibly triggered by changes of pH and ionic strength. Layer-by-layer assembly of collagen in a nanoporous template was used to elaborate collagen-based nanotubes, which were further deposited on ITO glass substrates by electrophoretic deposition. Finally, the evaluation of cell behavior on the created biointerfaces showed that the control of collagen organization can be successfully used to alter cell behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Does Onodi cell limit the exposure of sella during transsphenoidal pituitary surgery?].

    PubMed

    İmre, Abdulkadir; Pinar, Ercan; Yüceer, Nurullah; Songu, Murat; Olgun, Yüksel; Aladağ, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the association between the presence of Onodi cell and sella exposure during endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery (EETPS). Forty-two patients who underwent EETPS for a pituitary adenoma with the collaboration of Neurosurgery and Otorhinolaryngology Departments at Katip Çelebi University Atatürk Training and Research Hospital between February 2011 and March 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative paranasal sinus tomography and intraoperative findings were evaluated for the presence of Onodi cells. The location of the Onodi cell and its relation with sella exposure during surgery were also assessed. The incidence of Onodi cell was 19%. The Onodi cells were observed in eight of 42 patients on preoperative paranasal sinus computed tomography. The Onodi cells were unilateral in five patients and bilateral in three. Intraoperative findings were correlated with tomographic findings. In seven patients, Onodi cells limited the exposure of sellar floor and the inferior-medial wall of these cells were removed and connected with the sphenoid sinus and the entire sellar floor was exposed. In the remaining one patient, the Onodi cell was smaller and located superolaterally. This cell was not removed, as it did not limited the sellar exposure. The Onodi cell may limit the sella exposure during transsphenoidal surgery. Onodi cell should be removed and connected with the sphenoid sinus cavity for the entire sellar floor exposure.

  5. Cell-free biology: exploiting the interface between synthetic biology and synthetic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Harris, D. Calvin; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Just as synthetic organic chemistry once revolutionized the ability of chemists to build molecules (including those that did not exist in nature) following a basic set of design rules, cell-free synthetic biology is beginning to provide an improved toolbox and faster process for not only harnessing but also expanding the chemistry of life. At the interface between chemistry and biology, research in cell-free synthetic systems is proceeding in two different directions: using synthetic biology for synthetic chemistry and using synthetic chemistry to reprogram or mimic biology. In the coming years, the impact of advances inspired by these approaches will make possible the synthesis of non-biological polymers having new backbone compositions, new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. PMID:22483202

  6. Cell-free biology: exploiting the interface between synthetic biology and synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Harris, D Calvin; Jewett, Michael C

    2012-10-01

    Just as synthetic organic chemistry once revolutionized the ability of chemists to build molecules (including those that did not exist in nature) following a basic set of design rules, cell-free synthetic biology is beginning to provide an improved toolbox and faster process for not only harnessing but also expanding the chemistry of life. At the interface between chemistry and biology, research in cell-free synthetic systems is proceeding in two different directions: using synthetic biology for synthetic chemistry and using synthetic chemistry to reprogram or mimic biology. In the coming years, the impact of advances inspired by these approaches will make possible the synthesis of nonbiological polymers having new backbone compositions, new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions.

  7. Wide exposure to Coxiella burnetii in ruminant and feline species living in a natural environment: zoonoses in a human-livestock-wildlife interface.

    PubMed

    Candela, M G; Caballol, A; Atance, P M

    2017-02-01

    Assessment of the role of wild and domestic hosts as potential reservoirs of misdiagnosed zoonoses, such as Q fever by Coxiella burnetii, is an important public health issue today both for wildlife conservation and management of disease in human-livestock-wildlife interface. This study used ELISA, an indirect antibody, to research (2003-2013) C. burnetii infection in seven free-living wild and domestic ruminant species and in European wildcats (Felis silvestris). The animals studied were 0 European wildcats, 21 Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica), 314 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 556 fallow deer (Dama dama), 211 European mouflon (Ovis aries musimon), eight roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 407 bovines (Bos taurus) and 3739 sheep (Ovis aries). All the animals shared the same habitat in the Serranía de Cuenca Natural Park (Castile-La Mancha, Spain). The study area is an example of human-domestic-wildlife interface where people and domestic animals live in close proximity to wildlife. Observed C. burnetii seropositive frequencies were: 33·3% European wildcats, 23·8% Spanish ibex, 22·5% domestic sheep 1·5% red deer, 1·4% European mouflon, 0·24% cattle, 0·18% fallow deer and 0% roe deer. The study found a wide C. burnetii prevalence of previous and present exposure in wild and domestic ruminant hosts in the Serranía de Cuenca Natural Park and reports the first evidence of C. burnetii exposure in free-living European wildcats.

  8. Investigation of engineered bacterial adhesins for opportunity to interface cells with abiotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Dong, Hong; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Small, Meagan C.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    The convenience of cellular genetic engineering has afforded the power to build `smart' synthetic biological tools with novel applications. Here, we have explored opportunities to hybridize engineered cells with inorganic materials toward the development of 'living' device-compatible systems. Cellular structural biology is engineerable based on the ability to rewrite genetic code to generate recombinant, foreign, or even unnatural proteins. With this capability on the biological end, it should be possible to achieve superior abio-compatibility with the inorganic materials that compose current microfabricated technology. This work investigated the hair-like appendages of Escherichia coli known as Type 1 fimbriae that enable natural adhesion to glycosylated substrates. Sequence alterations within the fimbrial gene cluster were found to be well-tolerated, evidenced by tagging the fimbriae with peptide-based probes. As a further development, fimbriae tips could be reconfigured to, in turn, alter cell binding. In particular, the fimbriae were fused with a genetically optimized peptide-for-inorganics to enable metal binding. This work established methodologies to systematically survey cell adhesion properties across a suite of fimbriae-modified cell types as well as to direct patterned cell adhesion. Cell types were further customized for added complexity including turning on secondary gene expression and binding to gold surfaces. The former demonstrates potential for programmable gene switches and the latter for interfacing biology with inorganic materials. In general, the incorporation of 'programmed' cells into devices can be used to provide the feature of dynamic and automated cell response. The outcomes of this study are foundational toward the critical feature of deliberate positioning of cells as configurable biocomponentry. Overall, cellular integration into bioMEMs will yield advanced sensing and actuation.

  9. KCN Chemical Etch for Interface Engineering in Cu2ZnSnSe4 Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Buffière, Marie; Brammertz, Guy; Sahayaraj, Sylvester; Batuk, Maria; Khelifi, Samira; Mangin, Denis; El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Arzel, Ludovic; Hadermann, Joke; Meuris, Marc; Poortmans, Jef

    2015-07-15

    The removal of secondary phases from the surface of the kesterite crystals is one of the major challenges to improve the performances of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells. In this contribution, the KCN/KOH chemical etching approach, originally developed for the removal of CuxSe phases in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films, is applied to CZTSe absorbers exhibiting various chemical compositions. Two distinct electrical behaviors were observed on CZTSe/CdS solar cells after treatment: (i) the improvement of the fill factor (FF) after 30 s of etching for the CZTSe absorbers showing initially a distortion of the electrical characteristic; (ii) the progressive degradation of the FF after long treatment time for all Cu-poor CZTSe solar cell samples. The first effect can be attributed to the action of KCN on the absorber, that is found to clean the absorber free surface from most of the secondary phases surrounding the kesterite grains (e.g., Se0, CuxSe, SnSex, SnO2, Cu2SnSe3 phases, excepting the ZnSe-based phases). The second observation was identified as a consequence of the preferential etching of Se, Sn, and Zn from the CZTSe surface by the KOH solution, combined with the modification of the alkali content of the absorber. The formation of a Cu-rich shell at the absorber/buffer layer interface, leading to the increase of the recombination rate at the interface, and the increase in the doping of the absorber layer after etching are found to be at the origin of the deterioration of the FF of the solar cells.

  10. Multichannel Spectroscopic Ellipsometry for CdTe Photovoltaics: from Materials and Interfaces to Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Prakash

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the mid-infrared to ultraviolet range has been implemented in order to develop and evaluate optimization procedures for CdTe solar cells at the different stages of fabrication. In this dissertation research, real time SE (RT-SE) has been applied during the fabrication of the as-deposited CdS/CdTe solar cell. Two areas of background research were addressed before undertaking the challenging RT-SE analysis procedures. First, optical functions were parameterized versus temperature for the glass substrate and its overlayers, including three different SnO2 layers. This database has applications not only for RT-SE analysis but also for on-line monitoring of the coated glass itself at elevated temperature. Second, post-deposition modifications of substrate have been studied by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry (IR-SE) prior to the RT-SE analysis in order to evaluate the need for such modification in the analysis. With support from these background studies, RT-SE has been implemented in analyses of the evolution of the thin film structural properties during sputter deposition of polycrystalline CdS/CdTe solar cells on the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) coated glass substrates. The real time optical spectra collected during CdS/CdTe deposition were analyzed using the optical property database for all substrate components as a function of measurement temperature. RT-SE enables characterization of the filling process of the surface roughness modulations on the top-most SnO2 substrate layer, commonly referred to as the high resistivity transparent (HRT) layer. In this filling process, the optical properties of this surface layer are modified in accordance with an effective medium theory. In addition to providing information on interface formation to the substrate during film growth, RT-SE also provides information on the bulk layer CdS growth, its surface roughness evolution, as well as overlying CdTe interface formation and bulk layer

  11. Biofunctionalization of conductive hydrogel coatings to support olfactory ensheathing cells at implantable electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hassarati, Rachelle T; Marcal, Helder; John, L; Foster, R; Green, Rylie A

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical discrepancies between conventional platinum (Pt) electrodes and neural tissue often result in scar tissue encapsulation of implanted neural recording and stimulating devices. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a supportive glial cell in the olfactory nervous system which can transition through glial scar tissue while supporting the outgrowth of neural processes. It has been proposed that this function can be used to reconnect implanted electrodes with the target neural pathways. Conductive hydrogel (CH) electrode coatings have been proposed as a substrate for supporting OEC survival and proliferation at the device interface. To determine an ideal CH to support OECs, this study explored eight CH variants, with differing biochemical composition, in comparison to a conventional Pt electrodes. All CH variants were based on a biosynthetic hydrogel, consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) and heparin, through which the conductive polymer (CP) poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) was electropolymerized. The biochemical composition was varied through incorporation of gelatin and sericin, which were expected to provide cell adherence functionality, supporting attachment, and cell spreading. Combinations of these biomolecules varied from 1 to 3 wt %. The physical, electrical, and biological impact of these molecules on electrode performance was assessed. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrated that the addition of these biological molecules had little significant effect on the coating's ability to safely transfer charge. Cell attachment studies, however, determined that the incorporation of 1 wt % gelatin in the hydrogel was sufficient to significantly increase the attachment of OECs compared to the nonfunctionalized CH.

  12. Laser scanning microscopy of broad freezing interfaces with applications to biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neils, Christopher Martin

    2000-09-01

    A new, vertical cryostage was used for microscopic observation of broad-front freezing in aqueous solutions. This cryostage complements traditional studies of cell behavior and interface morphology in cryobiology. Traditional systems directionally solidify thin samples perpendicular to the optical axis. Thin samples confer thermal and optical advantages for video brightfield microscopy. However, sample thickness can affect the interface morphology. In the new cryostage, ice propagates parallel to the microscope optical axis. The sample cup is 1 cm tall and 1.5 cm in diameter, with insulated sides and a nitrogen-cooled base to freeze the solution upward. The top of the solution is warmed passively through a cover glass or immersion objective. The freezing solutions contain dilute fluorescein dye, which is visible where it is concentrated by exclusion from the ice. The stage is mounted on a confocal laser-scanning microscope, and thermal control and image capture routines are centralized in a LabView user interface. Filtered water, physiological saline, 9.5% glycerol, and 10% glycerol with PBS were frozen at rates between -2°C/min and -10°C/min and sequential images at one plane were captured. Images distinctly revealed a lamellar interface but could not resolve 3-D morphology. The average lamellar spacing was quantified using image analysis. Physiological saline was frozen in flat glass capillary tubes with 0.05 to 0.4 mm path length, mounted vertically to observe internal ice in cross-section. Lamellae were randomly oriented with respect to the glass, suggesting caution when measuring dendrite spacing in a horizontal cryostage. No correlation between capillary size and lamellar spacing was noted. Cell monolayers and synthetic membranes were mounted horizontally to let a well-developed ice front approach the layer broadly. In transparent membranes, ice-membrane interaction was visible until ice grew over and obscured the membrane. The vertical cryostage improved

  13. Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Francesca; Zhao, Wenting; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Duan, Liting; Schnitker, Jan; van de Burgt, Yoeri; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Liu, Bofei; Salleo, Alberto; Cui, Lifeng; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2017-08-22

    The interface between cells and nonbiological surfaces regulates cell attachment, chronic tissue responses, and ultimately the success of medical implants or biosensors. Clinical and laboratory studies show that topological features of the surface profoundly influence cellular responses; for example, titanium surfaces with nano- and microtopographical structures enhance osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration as compared to a smooth surface. To understand how cells and tissues respond to different topographical features, it is of critical importance to directly visualize the cell-material interface at the relevant nanometer length scale. Here, we present a method for in situ examination of the cell-to-material interface at any desired location, based on focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging to resolve the cell membrane-to-material interface with 10 nm resolution. By examining how cell membranes interact with topographical features such as nanoscale protrusions or invaginations, we discovered that the cell membrane readily deforms inward and wraps around protruding structures, but hardly deforms outward to contour invaginating structures. This asymmetric membrane response (inward vs outward deformation) causes the cleft width between the cell membrane and the nanostructure surface to vary by more than an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that surface topology is a crucial consideration for the development of medical implants or biosensors whose performances are strongly influenced by the cell-to-material interface. We anticipate that the method can be used to explore the direct interaction of cells/tissue with medical devices such as metal implants in the future.

  14. A corrugated mesoscale structure on electrode-electrolyte interface for enhancing cell performance in anode-supported SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Akio; Iwai, Hiroshi; Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo

    For enhancing the power density of a solid oxide fuel cell, mesoscale-structure control of electrode-electrolyte interfaces in an anode-supported cell is proposed. We define 'mesoscale' as a size range of the order of 10-100 μm which is larger than the 'microscale' of electrode particles but smaller than the 'macroscale' of cell geometries. Mesoscale-structure control enlarges the electrode-electrolyte interface, and this enlargement extends an active electrochemical reaction zone where a charge-transfer reaction occurs actively near the interface. A corrugated mesoscale electrolyte was adopted which enlarged the interface structures of both anode and cathode sides. We performed a 2-D numerical simulation, and discussed the effects of such structure not only on the overall performance but also on the detailed distributions of electric potentials, gas concentrations and local electrochemical reaction rate. As a result, it was observed that the corrugated mesoscale structure reduced both activation overpotential and ohmic loss by ion transport, and hence enhanced the power generation performance. When the interface area enlargement factor was 1.73, an enhancement of a power density having a maximum value of 59% was achieved with the mesoscale-corrugated cell rather than with the flat cell.

  15. Architecture of the Interface between the Perovskite and Hole-Transport Layers in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Masahiro; Hirotani, Daisuke; Ohta, Tsuyoshi; Ogomi, Yuhei; Shen, Qing; Ripolles, Teresa S; Yoshino, Kenji; Toyoda, Taro; Minemoto, Takashi; Hayase, Shuzi

    2016-09-22

    The interface between the perovskite (PVK, CH3 NH3 PbI3 ) and hole-transport layers in perovskite solar cells is discussed. The device architecture studied is as follows: F-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass/compact TiO2 /mesoporous TiO2 /PVK/2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (Spiro-MeOTAD)/Au. After a thin layer of 4,4,4-trifluorobutylammonium iodide (TFBA) was inserted at the interface between PVK and Spiro-MeOTAD, the photovoltaic efficiency increased from 11.6-14.5 % to 15.1-17.6 %. TFBA (10 ppm) was added in the PVK solution before coating. Owing to the low surface tension of TFBA, TFBA rose to the surface of the PVK layer spontaneously during spin-coating to make a thin organic layer. The PVK grain boundaries also seemed to be passivated with the addition of TFBA. However, large differences in Urbach energies and valence band energy level were not observed for the PVK layer with and without the addition of TFBA. The charge recombination time constant between the PVK and the Spiro-MeOTAD became slower (from 8.4 to 280 μsec) after 10 ppm of TFBA was added in the PVK. The experimental results using TFBA conclude that insertion of a very thin layer at the interface between PVK and Spiro-MeOTAD is effective for suppressing charge recombination and increasing photovoltaic performances.

  16. Band alignment measurements at heterojunction interfaces in layered thin film solar cells & thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang

    2011-12-01

    Public awareness of the increasing energy crisis and the related serious environmental concerns has led to a significantly growing demand for alternative clean and renewable energy resources. Thin film are widely applied in multiple renewable energy devices owing to the reduced amount of raw materials and increase flexibility of choosing from low-cost candidates, which translates directly into reduced capital cost. This is a key driving force to make renewable technology competitive in the energy market. This thesis is focused on the measurement of energy level alignments at interfaces of thin film structures for renewable energy applications. There are two primary foci: II -VI semiconductor ZnSe/ZnTe thin film solar cells and Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 thin film structures for thermoelectric applications. In both cases, the electronic structure and energy band alignment at interfaces usually controls the carrier transport behavior and determines the quality of the device. High-resolution photoemission spectroscopy (lab-based XPS & synchrotron-based UPS) was used to investigate the chemical and electronic properties of epitaxial Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films, in order to validate the anticipated band alignment at interfaces in Bi 2Te3/Sb2Te3 superlattices as one favoring electron-transmission. A simple, thorough two-step treatment of a chemical etching in dilute hydrochloric acid solution and a subsequent annealing at ˜150°C under ultra-high vacuum environment is established to remove the surface oxides completely. It is an essential step to ensure the measurements on electronic states are acquired on stoichimetric, oxide-free clean surface of Bi 2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. The direct measurement of valence band offsets (VBO) at a real Sb 2Te3/Bi2Te3 interface is designed based on the Kraut model; a special stacking film structure is prepared intentionally: sufficiently thin Sb2Te3 film on top of Bi2Te 3 that photoelectrons from both of them are collected simultaneously. From a

  17. Three-Dimensional BC/PEDOT Composite Nanofibers with High Performance for Electrode-Cell Interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuntao; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Qi; Feng, Zhangqi; Zhu, Chunlin; Yu, Yalin; Li, Kangming; Zhao, Mengyao; Yang, Jiazhi; Liu, Jian; Sun, Dongping

    2015-12-30

    There is an increasing need to synthesize biocompatible nanofibers with excellent mechanical and electrical performance for electrochemical and biomedical applications. Here we report a facile approach to prepare electroactive and flexible 3D nanostructured biomaterials with high performance based on bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers. Our approach can coat BC nanofibers with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) by in situ interfacial polymerization in a controllable manner. The PEDOT coating thickness is adjustable by the monomer concentration or reaction time during polymerization, producing nanofibers with a total diameter ranging from 30 to 200 nm. This fabrication process also provides a convenient method to tune different parameters such as the average pore size and electrical conductivity on the demands of actual applications. Our experiments have demonstrated that the 3D BC/PEDOT nanofibers exhibit high specific surface area, excellent mechanical properties, electroactive stability, and low cell cytotoxicity. With electrical stimulation, calcium imaging of PC12 neural cells on BC/PEDOT nanofibers has revealed a significant increase in the percentage of cells with higher action potentials, suggesting an enhanced capacitance effect of charge injection. As an attractive solution to the challenge of designing better electrode-cell interfaces, 3D BC/PEDOT nanofibers promise many important applications such as biosensing devices, smart drug delivery systems, and implantable electrodes for tissue engineering.

  18. A Model of a Synthetic Biological Communication Interface between Mammalian Cells and Mechatronic Systems.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Keith C; Ruder, Warren C

    2016-12-01

    The creation of communication interfaces between abiotic and biotic systems represents a significant research challenge. In this work, we design and model a system linking the biochemical signaling pathways of mammalian cells to the actions of a mobile robotic prosthesis. We envision this system as a robotic platform carrying an optically monitored bioreactor that harbors mammalian cells. The cellular, optical signal is captured by an onboard fluorescent microscope and converted into an electronic signal. We first present a design for the overall cell-robot system, with a specific focus on the design of the synthetic gene networks needed for the system. We use these synthetic networks to encode motion commands within the cell's endogenous, oscillatory calcium signaling pathways. We then describe a potential system whereby this oscillatory signal could be outputted and monitored as a change in cellular fluorescence. Next, we use the changes resulting from the synthetic biological modifications as new parameters in a simulation of a well-established mathematical model for intracellular calcium signaling. The resulting signal is processed in the frequency domain, with specific frequencies activating cognate robot motion subroutines.

  19. Tubulin and Actin Interplay at the T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off. PMID:22566814

  20. CPV Cell Characterization Following One-Year Exposure in Golden, Colorado: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2014-08-01

    A CPV module containing 30 III-V multijunction cells was operated on?sun for one year in Golden, Colorado. Each cell was characterized prior to and following exposure. A module power degradation of 10% was observed and found to be a result as an overall decrease in cell short circuit current and the presence of at least one shunted cell. A positive correlation between initial shunt current and an increase in shunt current following exposure was also found. Cell exfoliation was also observed and found to be coincident with the presence of water and/or charring of the cell package due to an off-sun event.

  1. Air–liquid interface enhances oxidative phosphorylation in intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2

    PubMed Central

    Klasvogt, Sonja; Zuschratter, Werner; Schmidt, Anke; Kröber, Andrea; Vorwerk, Sandra; Wolter, Romina; Isermann, Berend; Wimmers, Klaus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Nossol, Constanze

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal porcine epithelial cell line IPEC-J2, cultured under the air–liquid interface (ALI) conditions, develops remarkable morphological characteristics close to intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. Improved oxygen availability has been hypothesised to be the leading cause of this morphological differentiation. We assessed oxygen availability in ALI cultures and examined the influence of this cell culture method on glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in IPEC-J2 using the submerged membrane culture (SMC) and ALI cultures. Furthermore, the role of HIF-1 as mediator of oxygen availability was analysed. Measurements of oxygen tension confirmed increased oxygen availability at the medium–cell interface and demonstrated reduced oxygen extraction at the basal compartment in ALI. Microarray analysis to determine changes in the genetic profile of IPEC-J2 in ALI identified 2751 modified transcripts. Further examinations of candidate genes revealed reduced levels of glycolytic enzymes hexokinase II and GAPDH, as well as lactate transporting monocarboxylate transporter 1 in ALI, whereas expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 remained unchanged. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit 5B protein analysis was increased in ALI, although mRNA level remained at constant level. COX activity was assessed using photometric quantification and a three-fold increase was found in ALI. Quantification of glucose and lactate concentrations in cell culture medium revealed significantly reduced glucose levels and decreased lactate production in ALI. In order to evaluate energy metabolism, we measured cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aggregation in homogenised cell suspensions showing similar levels. However, application of the uncoupling agent FCCP reduced ATP levels in ALI but not in SMC. In addition, HIF showed reduced mRNA levels in ALI. Furthermore, HIF-1α protein was reduced in the nuclear compartment of ALI when compared to SCM as confirmed by confocal microscopy

  2. Interface Engineering through Atomic Layer Deposition towards Highly Improved Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hao; Tian, Wei; Guo, Jun; Li, Liang

    2015-08-01

    A composite photoanode comprising ultralong ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles was prepared and its performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) was optimized and compared to the photoanode consisting of conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. The ultralong ZnO nanobelts were synthesized in high yield by a facile solution approach at 90 oC followed by annealing at 500 oC. The effect of the ratio of ZnO nanobelts to TiO2 nanoparticles on the light scattering, specific surface area, and interface recombination were investigated. An optimum amount of ZnO nanobelts enhanced the photon-conversion efficiency by 61.4% compared to that of the conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. To further reduce the recombination rate and increase the carrier lifetime, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technique was utilized to coat a continuous TiO2 film surrounding the ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles, functioning as a barrier-free access of all electrons to conductive electrodes. This ALD treatment improved the interface contact within the whole photoanode system, finally leading to significant enhancement (137%) in the conversion efficiency of DSSCs.

  3. Mechanical characterization of oxide coating-interconnect interfaces for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, Sajedur R.; Walter, Mark E.; Kidner, Neil J.; Seabaugh, Matthew M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of interfaces between oxide coatings and metallic interconnects that are used in planar solid oxide fuel cells. With the reduction of operating temperatures to 800 °C, it is possible to replace ceramic interconnects with less expensive stainless steels. However, when incorporating chromia-forming metallic interconnects, steps must be taken to inhibit chromium poisoning. One approach to prevent chromium poisoning, is to deposit dense, protective coatings, such as manganese cobalt spinel oxide (MCO). The brittle nature of MCO makes it susceptible to damage under mechanical and thermal stresses during operation. A four point bend experiment is designed to assess the strength and adhesion of reduced and oxidized coatings deposited on SS441 or Crofer interconnects. Resulting tensile cracking patterns on the convex side of bend specimen are used to quantify the interfacial shear strength with a shear lag model. Using energy based fracture mechanics, interfacial fracture energy is calculated from the strain at the onset of coating spallation. Scanning electron microscopy images of the cracked coating surfaces are processed to analyze the failure mechanisms, crack spacing and spalled areas. At 3% strain, the weakest interface is found in the Crofer system with the oxidized coating.

  4. Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (pigmented villonodular synovitis-)-like changes in periprosthetic interface membranes.

    PubMed

    Söder, Stephan; Sesselmann, Stefan; Aigner, Thomas; Oehler, Stephan; Agaimy, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (TSGCT; synonym, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS)) is a rare low-grade mesenchymal neoplasm of either intra-articular or extra-articular origin. The etiopathogenesis of TSGCT is still uncertain, but recent studies showed a translocation involving colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) gene in a subset of cases. Histological features mimicking TSGCT can sometimes be encountered in periprosthetic interface membranes. To investigate the frequency and morphologic spectrum of this phenomenon, we conducted a systematic analysis of 477 periprosthetic interface membranes and performed immunohistochemical analysis on a subset of lesions compared to genuine TSGCT. In 26 of 477 periprosthetic membrane samples (5 %), at least some TSGCT-like features were found and 18 cases (4 %) strongly resembled it. Wear particles were detected in 100 % of the TSGCT-like lesions but only in 63.3 % of the whole cohort of periprosthetic membranes (p value <0.001). Immunohistochemistry comparing true TSGCT and TSGCT-like membranes showed similar inflammatory infiltrates with slightly elevated CD3+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and a slightly higher proliferation index in TSGCT samples. In conclusion, TSGCT-like changes in periprosthetic membranes likely represent exuberant fibrohistiocytic inflammatory response induced by wear particles and should be distinguished from genuine (neoplastic) TSGCT. Although TSGCT and TSGCT-like periprosthetic membranes represent different entities, their comparable morphology might reflect analogous morphogenesis.

  5. A feasibility study for controlling self-organized production of plasmonic enhancement interfaces for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari Borra, Mona; Kayra Güllü, Seda; Es, Fırat; Demircioğlu, Olgu; Günöven, Mete; Turan, Raşit; Bek, Alpan

    2014-11-01

    The decoration of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) by the self-organized mechanism of dewetting is utilized as a suitable method for plasmonic interface integration to large area full-scale solar cell (SC) devices. Reflection measurements are performed on both flat and textured silicon (Si) SCs in order to investigate the local plasmonic resonances of the MNPs. The effects of particle size and thickness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) anti-reflection coating layer are investigated by reflection measurements and the shift of plasmon resonance peak position. It is found that surface roughness, annealing time, annealing temperature, and varying Si3N4 thickness can be used as mechanisms to control the size distribution, shape of the resultant nano-islands, and SC efficiency. The findings on the most suitable nanoparticle system production parameters by this method, depends on the applied substrate properties which are expected to guide further applications of plasmonic interfaces and also to the other kinds of device structures in the ultimate quest for attaining affordable high efficiency SCs.

  6. Interface Engineering through Atomic Layer Deposition towards Highly Improved Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hao; Tian, Wei; Guo, Jun; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    A composite photoanode comprising ultralong ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles was prepared and its performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) was optimized and compared to the photoanode consisting of conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. The ultralong ZnO nanobelts were synthesized in high yield by a facile solution approach at 90 oC followed by annealing at 500 oC. The effect of the ratio of ZnO nanobelts to TiO2 nanoparticles on the light scattering, specific surface area, and interface recombination were investigated. An optimum amount of ZnO nanobelts enhanced the photon-conversion efficiency by 61.4% compared to that of the conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. To further reduce the recombination rate and increase the carrier lifetime, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technique was utilized to coat a continuous TiO2 film surrounding the ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles, functioning as a barrier-free access of all electrons to conductive electrodes. This ALD treatment improved the interface contact within the whole photoanode system, finally leading to significant enhancement (137%) in the conversion efficiency of DSSCs. PMID:26238737

  7. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2015-01-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in-vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air–liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submerged cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly three-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submerged cultures, and eight-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs. PMID:24289294

  8. Occupational and Environmental Exposures Associated with Testicular Germ Cell Tumours: Systematic Review of Prenatal and Life-Long Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Béranger, Rémi; Le Cornet, Charlotte; Schüz, Joachim; Fervers, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    Background Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) are the most common cancers in men aged between 15 and 44 years and the incidence has increased steeply over the past 30 years. The rapid increase in the incidence, the spatial variation and the evolution of incidence in migrants suggest that environmental risk factors play a role in TGCT aetiology. The purpose of our review is to summarise the current state of knowledge on occupational and environmental factors thought to be associated with TGCT. Methods A systematic literature search of PubMed. All selected articles were quality appraised by two independent researchers using the ‘Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale’. Results After exclusion of duplicate reports, 72 relevant articles were selected; 65 assessed exposure in adulthood, 7 assessed parental exposures and 2 assessed both. Associations with occupation was reported for agricultural workers, construction workers, firemen, policemen, military personnel, as well as workers in paper, plastic or metal industries. Electromagnetic fields, PCBs and pesticides were also suggested. However, results were inconsistent and studies showing positive associations tended to had lower quality ranking using the assessment scale (p=0.02). Discussion Current evidence does not allow concluding on existence of any clear association between TGCT and adulthood occupational or environmental exposure. The limitations of the studies may partly explain the inconsistencies observed. The lack of association with adulthood exposure is in line with current hypotheses supporting the prenatal origin of TGCT. Future research should focus on prenatal or early life exposure, as well as combined effect of prenatal and later life exposure. National and international collaborative studies should allow for more adequately powered epidemiological studies. More sophisticated methods for assessing exposure as well as evaluating gene–environment interactions will be necessary to establish

  9. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs.

  10. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D’Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs. PMID:25482337

  11. Interface electric properties of Si/organic hybrid solar cells using impedance spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhu, Juye; Ding, Li; Gao, Pingqi; Pan, Xiaoyin; Sheng, Jiang; Ye, Jichun

    2016-05-01

    The internal resistance and capacitance of Si/organic hybrid solar cells (Si-HSC) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) are investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Three types of Nyquist plots in Si-HSC are observed firstly at different bias voltages, while suitable equivalent circuit models are established to evaluate the details of interface carrier transfer and recombination. In particular, the carrier transport property of the PEDOT:PSS film responds at a high frequency (6 × 104-1 × 106 Hz) in three-arc spectra. Therefore, EIS could help us deeply understand the electronic properties of Si-HSC for developing high performance devices.

  12. Parallel macromolecular delivery and biochemical/electrochemical interface to cells employing nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli V; Griffin, Guy D; Guillorn, Michael A; Merkulov, Vladimir L; Simpson, Michael L

    2015-03-31

    Systems and methods are described for parallel macromolecular delivery and biochemical/electrochemical interface to whole cells employing carbon nanostructures including nanofibers and nanotubes. A method includes providing a first material on at least a first portion of a first surface of a first tip of a first elongated carbon nanostructure; providing a second material on at least a second portion of a second surface of a second tip of a second elongated carbon nanostructure, the second elongated carbon nanostructure coupled to, and substantially parallel to, the first elongated carbon nanostructure; and penetrating a boundary of a biological sample with at least one member selected from the group consisting of the first tip and the second tip.

  13. Interface Engineering of Metal Oxides using Ammonium Anthracene in Inverted Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Il; Zeljkovic, Sasa; Kondo, Kei; Yoshizawa, Michito; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-11-09

    In this work, by casting water-soluble ammonium anthracene on metal oxides, the organic surface modifier re-engineered the interface of the metal oxide to improve charge transport. The energy level of ammonium anthracene increased the work function of indium tin oxide (ITO), functioning as a hole-blocker (electron-transporter). Solar cells in which ITO was treated by the ammonium anthracene produced an average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.8% without ZnO, the electron-transporting layer. When the ammonium anthracene was applied to ZnO, an average PCE of 8.1% was achieved, which is higher than the average PCE of 7.5% for nontreated ZnO-based devices.

  14. In vitro atrazine-exposure inhibits human natural killer cell lytic granule release

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B. . E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2007-06-01

    The herbicide atrazine is a known immunotoxicant and an inhibitor of human natural killer (NK) cell lytic function. The precise changes in NK cell lytic function following atrazine exposure have not been fully elucidated. The current study identifies the point at which atrazine exerts its affect on the stepwise process of human NK cell-mediated lyses of the K562 target cell line. Using intracellular staining of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, it was determined that a 24-h in vitro exposure to atrazine did not decrease the level of NK cell lytic proteins granzyme A, granzyme B or perforin. Thus, it was hypothesized that atrazine exposure was inhibiting the ability of the NK cells to bind to the target cell and subsequently inhibit the release of lytic protein from the NK cell. To test this hypothesis, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were employed to analyze NK cell-target cell co-cultures following atrazine exposure. These assays demonstrated no significant decrease in the level of target cell binding. However, the levels of NK intracellular lytic protein retained and the amount of lytic protein released were assessed following a 4-h incubation with K562 target cells. The relative level of intracellular lytic protein was 25-50% higher, and the amount of lytic protein released was 55-65% less in atrazine-treated cells than vehicle-treated cells following incubation with the target cells. These results indicate that ATR exposure inhibits the ability of NK cells to lyse target cells by blocking lytic granule release without affecting the ability of the NK cell to form stable conjugates with target cells.

  15. Organic Photovoltaic Cells: Engineering of the Interfaces Electrodes/Organic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernède, J. C.

    2011-10-01

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic photovoltaic cells (OPV) depends of the efficiency of four steps, exciton generation by light absorption, exciton diffusion to an electron donor/electron acceptor (ED/EA) interface, charge separation giving free holes and electrons and finally, carrier transport and collection. Therefore, in OPV, besides good photoactive materials, the properties of the interfaces between the organic layers and the electrodes are crucial for achieving high carrier collection efficiency and high PCE. Optoelectronic devices require at least one transparent electrode, usually a transparent conductive oxide (TCO). Electrode contacts play a critical role in determining the device efficiencies. Rates of charge collection at the electrodes must be fast and selective. Contact selectivity is often achieved using buffer interlayers interposed between the electrodes and the organic materials. Efficiency of OPV cells, based on organic donor/acceptor heterojunctions can be strongly improved when the transparent conductive anode, is covered by an anode buffer layer (ABL). Currently, indium-tin oxide (ITO) is the most widely used transparent electrode for organic optoelectronic. Here, the effects of different ABLs (0.5 nm of Au, 3 to 4 nm of MoO3 or CuI) onto the ITO anode are studied using electron donors with different HOMO and LUMO levels. The results indicate that a good matching between the work function, of the anode and the HOMO of the organic electron donor, and the value of the anode surface energy, are important factors for an efficient hole transfer. General rules on the ABL efficiency can be deduced from this study.

  16. Impedances of thin and layered systems: cells with even or odd numbers of interfaces.

    PubMed

    Buck, R P

    1992-01-01

    Impedance data, e.g., system responses, from perturbing small amplitude applied sinusoid signals of near DC to high kilohertz frequencies, give chemical information. Analysis of frequency-dependent imaginary and real impedance proceeds from equivalent analog circuit elements to chemical and physical significance determined from many model systems. Already, it is possible to interpret bulk transport processes, surface kinetic effects, diffusion phenomena, and dependencies on the type of contacts: symmetric ion contact, symmetric metal contact or asymmetric metal-ion interfaces, and cell design; even (battery or sensor) and odd numbered (constrained junction or immiscible liquid) interfaces in a system. These analyses cover the chemical origins, locations and meanings of the lumped resistances, capacitances and transmission lines that are introduced by engineers in their strict analog interpretations of the impedance data. Examples cover simple ohmic, simple diffusive behavior, complex behavior with surface interfacial kinetics or surface resistances, and with finite (nonblocking) or infinite (blocking) DC impedance. High and low frequency responses may show so-called constant phase element character that suggests fractal behavior. Low frequency data occasionally appear in the second quadrant of impedance plane plots. These results are caused by negative capacitances and resistances. In this paper, chemical interpretations of analog circuit elements are mainly based on theory and observations of thin cells of electrolytes and solid and liquid films (membranes) that are ionic or mixed ionic/electronic conductors. The information should carry over into thickened, gelled, and tissue electrolyte phases and serve as a basis for medically-oriented, perhaps diagnostic impedance measurement applications already pioneered by Herman Schwan.

  17. Oxygen vacancy diffusion across cathode/electrolyte interface in solid oxide fuel cells: An electrochemical phase-field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Hu, Jia-Mian; Gerdes, Kirk; Chen, Long-Qing

    2015-08-01

    An electrochemical phase-field model is developed to study electronic and ionic transport across the cathode/electrolyte interface in solid oxide fuel cells. The influences of local current density and interfacial electrochemical reactions on the transport behaviors are incorporated. This model reproduces two electrochemical features. Nernst equation is satisfied through the thermodynamic equilibriums of the electron and oxygen vacancy. The distributions of charged species around the interface induce charge double layer. Moreover, we verify the nonlinear current/overpotential relationship. This model facilitates the exploration of problems in solid oxide fuel cells, which are associated with transport of species and electrochemical reactions at high operating temperature.

  18. Functional Interfaces in Polymer-Based Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: Establishment of a Cluster for Interdisciplinary Research and Training

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Alan J; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen

    2009-01-05

    Remarkable scientific progress has been demonstrated toward the creation of a low cost (“printable”) solar cell technology by the interdisciplinary group at UC Santa Barbara. Multi-layer architectures were implemented with clean interfaces were demonstrated; the various interfaces are sharp; there is no evidence of inter-layer mixing. This is indeed remarkable since each of these layers was processed from solution. The use of “Processing Additives” such as the alkanedithiols was demonstrated to increase the power conversion efficiency of BHJ solar cells by a factor of two. Equally important, the mechanism by which these Processing Additives function has been identified.

  19. One-Year stable perovskite solar cells by 2D/3D interface engineering.

    PubMed

    Grancini, G; Roldán-Carmona, C; Zimmermann, I; Mosconi, E; Lee, X; Martineau, D; Narbey, S; Oswald, F; De Angelis, F; Graetzel, M; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2017-06-01

    Despite the impressive photovoltaic performances with power conversion efficiency beyond 22%, perovskite solar cells are poorly stable under operation, failing by far the market requirements. Various technological approaches have been proposed to overcome the instability problem, which, while delivering appreciable incremental improvements, are still far from a market-proof solution. Here we show one-year stable perovskite devices by engineering an ultra-stable 2D/3D (HOOC(CH2)4NH3)2PbI4/CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite junction. The 2D/3D forms an exceptional gradually-organized multi-dimensional interface that yields up to 12.9% efficiency in a carbon-based architecture, and 14.6% in standard mesoporous solar cells. To demonstrate the up-scale potential of our technology, we fabricate 10 × 10 cm(2) solar modules by a fully printable industrial-scale process, delivering 11.2% efficiency stable for >10,000 h with zero loss in performances measured under controlled standard conditions. This innovative stable and low-cost architecture will enable the timely commercialization of perovskite solar cells.

  20. A cell-phone-based brain-computer interface for communication in daily life.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Te; Wang, Yijun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Moving a brain-computer interface (BCI) system from a laboratory demonstration to real-life applications still poses severe challenges to the BCI community. This study aims to integrate a mobile and wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) system and a signal-processing platform based on a cell phone into a truly wearable and wireless online BCI. Its practicality and implications in a routine BCI are demonstrated through the realization and testing of a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI. This study implemented and tested online signal processing methods in both time and frequency domains for detecting SSVEPs. The results of this study showed that the performance of the proposed cell-phone-based platform was comparable, in terms of the information transfer rate, with other BCI systems using bulky commercial EEG systems and personal computers. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a truly portable, cost-effective and miniature cell-phone-based platform for online BCIs.

  1. One-Year stable perovskite solar cells by 2D/3D interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grancini, G.; Roldán-Carmona, C.; Zimmermann, I.; Mosconi, E.; Lee, X.; Martineau, D.; Narbey, S.; Oswald, F.; de Angelis, F.; Graetzel, M.; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2017-06-01

    Despite the impressive photovoltaic performances with power conversion efficiency beyond 22%, perovskite solar cells are poorly stable under operation, failing by far the market requirements. Various technological approaches have been proposed to overcome the instability problem, which, while delivering appreciable incremental improvements, are still far from a market-proof solution. Here we show one-year stable perovskite devices by engineering an ultra-stable 2D/3D (HOOC(CH2)4NH3)2PbI4/CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite junction. The 2D/3D forms an exceptional gradually-organized multi-dimensional interface that yields up to 12.9% efficiency in a carbon-based architecture, and 14.6% in standard mesoporous solar cells. To demonstrate the up-scale potential of our technology, we fabricate 10 × 10 cm2 solar modules by a fully printable industrial-scale process, delivering 11.2% efficiency stable for >10,000 h with zero loss in performances measured under controlled standard conditions. This innovative stable and low-cost architecture will enable the timely commercialization of perovskite solar cells.

  2. Electronic Interfacing Between a Living Cell and a Nanodevice: A Bio-Nano Hybrid System

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Ravi F.

    2013-12-31

    The primary goal of this program was to couple physical electronics with live cells to leverage the highly sophisticated functions of a biological system to ultimately create advanced functionality. The study was built on a unique self-assembled architecture of nanoparticles that exhibits transport properties that are sensitive to single-electron charge modulation. At room temperature, the energy of switching due to single-electron charge modulation was in the range of 4 to 100 kT. The structure invented in the principal investigator’s lab is a two-dimensional (2D) network of one-dimensional (1D) necklaces of 10 nm Au nanoparticles. The electron transport through the necklace network is regulated by quantum mechanical single-electron traps. As a result of the single electron traps, the all metal nanoparticle network array displays a conduction band gap. Fundamental studies on the transport properties of the network in air and water were studied to regulate the band gap by tailoring the network structure to demonstrate the first electrochemical single electron transistor operating in water. Cells were interfaced with the network to observe electrochemical activity in a cell during photosynthesis and single viral infection.

  3. One-Year stable perovskite solar cells by 2D/3D interface engineering

    PubMed Central

    Grancini, G.; Roldán-Carmona, C.; Zimmermann, I.; Mosconi, E.; Lee, X.; Martineau, D.; Narbey, S.; Oswald, F.; De Angelis, F.; Graetzel, M.; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2017-01-01

    Despite the impressive photovoltaic performances with power conversion efficiency beyond 22%, perovskite solar cells are poorly stable under operation, failing by far the market requirements. Various technological approaches have been proposed to overcome the instability problem, which, while delivering appreciable incremental improvements, are still far from a market-proof solution. Here we show one-year stable perovskite devices by engineering an ultra-stable 2D/3D (HOOC(CH2)4NH3)2PbI4/CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite junction. The 2D/3D forms an exceptional gradually-organized multi-dimensional interface that yields up to 12.9% efficiency in a carbon-based architecture, and 14.6% in standard mesoporous solar cells. To demonstrate the up-scale potential of our technology, we fabricate 10 × 10 cm2 solar modules by a fully printable industrial-scale process, delivering 11.2% efficiency stable for >10,000 h with zero loss in performances measured under controlled standard conditions. This innovative stable and low-cost architecture will enable the timely commercialization of perovskite solar cells. PMID:28569749

  4. A Model of a Synthetic Biological Communication Interface between Mammalian Cells and Mechatronic Systems.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Keith Cameron; Ruder, Warren Christopher

    2016-10-25

    The creation of communication interfaces between abiotic and biotic systems represents a significant research challenge. In this work, we design and model a system linking the biochemical signaling pathways of mammalian cells to the actions of a mobile robotic prosthesis. We envision this system as a robotic platform carrying an optically monitored bioreactor that harbors mammalian cells. The cellular, optical signal is captured by an onboard fluorescent microscope and converted into an electronic signal. We first present a design for the overall cellrobot system, with a specific focus on the design of the synthetic gene networks needed for the system. We use these synthetic networks to encode motion commands within the cell's endogenous, oscillatory calcium signaling pathways. We then describe a potential system whereby this oscillatory signal could be outputted and monitored as a change in cellular fluorescence. Next, we use the changes resulting from the synthetic biological modifications as new parameters in a simulation of a wellestablished mathematical model for intracellular calcium signaling. The resulting signal is processed in the frequency domain, with specific frequencies activating cognate robot motion subroutines.

  5. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  6. Interfacing biomembrane mimetic polymer surfaces with living cells Surface modification for reliable bioartificial liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Takami, Utae; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2008-11-01

    The surface design used for reducing nonspecific biofouling is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. We present here a newly synthesized a carbohydrate-immobilized phosphorylcholine polymer for surface modification of medical devices to control the interface with living cells. A random copolymer composed of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), n-butyl methacrylate (BMA), and 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate (LAMA) was synthesized by conventional radical polymerization. The monomer feeding ratio in the copolymer was adjusted to 24/75/1 (MPC/BMA/LAMA). The copolymer (PMBL1.0) could be coated by solvent evaporation from an ethanol solution. Cells of the human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) having asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) were seeded on PMBL1.0 or poly(BMA) (PBMA)-coated PET plates. On PBMA, many adherent cells were observed and were well spread with monolayer adhesion. HepG2 adhesion was observed on PMBL1.0 because the cell has ASGPRs. Furthermore, some of the cells adhering to PMBL1.0 had a spheroid formation and similarly shaped spheroids were scattered on the surface. According to confocal laser microscopic observation after 96 h cultivation, it was found that albumin production preferentially occurred in the center of the spheroid. The albumin production of the cells that adhered to PBMA was sparse. The amount of albumin production per unit cell that adhered to PMBL1.0 was determined by ELISA and was significantly higher than that which adhered to PBMA. Long-term cultivation of HepG2 was also performed using hollow fiber mini-modules coated with PMBL1.0. The concentration of albumin produced from HepG2 increased continuously for one month. In the mini-module, the function of HepG2 was effectively preserved for that period. On the hollow fiber membrane, spheroid formation of HepG2 cells was also observed. In conclusion, PMBL1.0 can provide a suitable surface for the cultivation of

  7. Dynamic Reorganization and Enzymatic Remodeling of Type IV Collagen at Cell-Biomaterial Interface.

    PubMed

    Coelho, N M; Llopis-Hernández, V; Salmerón-Sánchez, M; Altankov, G

    Vascular basement membrane remodeling involves assembly and degradation of its main constituents, type IV collagen (Col IV) and laminin, which is critical during development, angiogenesis, and tissue repair. Remodeling can also occur at cell-biomaterials interface altering significantly the biocompatibility of implants. Here we describe the fate of adsorbed Col IV in contact with endothelial cells adhering on positively charged NH2 or hydrophobic CH3 substrata, both based on self-assembly monolayers (SAMs) and studied alone or mixed in different proportions. AFM studies revealed distinct pattern of adsorbed Col IV, varying from single molecular deposition on pure NH2 to network-like assembly on mixed SAMs, turning to big globular aggregates on bare CH3. Human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) interact better with Col IV adsorbed as single molecules on NH2 surface and readily rearrange it in fibril-like pattern that coincide with secreted fibronectin fibrils. The cells show flattened morphology and well-developed focal adhesion complexes that are rich on phosphorylated FAK while expressing markedly low pericellular proteolytic activity. Conversely, on hydrophobic CH3 substrata HUVECs showed abrogated spreading and FAK phosphorylation, combined with less reorganization of the aggregated Col IV and significantly increased proteolytic activity. The later involves both MMP-2 and MMP-9, as measured by zymography and FITC-Col IV release. The mixed SAMs support intermediate remodeling activity. Taken together these results show that chemical functionalization combined with Col IV preadsorption provides a tool for guiding the endothelial cells behavior and pericellular proteolytic activity, events that strongly affect the fate of cardiovascular implants. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of an Alveolar Epithelial Cell Line to Airborne Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface: A Comparison with Conventional, Submerged Cell-Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Karg, Erwin; Brendel, Ellen; Hinze-Heyn, Helga; Maier, Konrad L.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Stoeger, Tobias; Schmid, Otmar

    2013-01-01

    The biological effects of inhalable nanoparticles have been widely studied in vitro with pulmonary cells cultured under submerged and air-liquid interface (ALI) conditions. Submerged exposures are experimentally simpler, but ALI exposures are physiologically more realistic and hence potentially biologically more meaningful. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of human alveolar epithelial-like cells (A549) to airborne agglomerates of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles at the ALI, compared it to the response under submerged culture conditions, and provided a quantitative comparison with the literature data on different types of particles and cells. For ZnO nanoparticle doses of 0.7 and 2.5 μg ZnO/cm2 (or 0.09 and 0.33 cm2 ZnO/cm2), cell viability was not mitigated and no significant effects on the transcript levels of oxidative stress markers (HMOX1, SOD-2 and GCS) were observed. However, the transcript levels of proinflammatory markers (IL-8, IL-6, and GM-CSF) were induced to higher levels under ALI conditions. This is consistent with the literature data and it suggests that in vitro toxicity screening of nanoparticles with ALI cell culture systems may produce less false negative results than screening with submerged cell cultures. However, the database is currently too scarce to draw a definite conclusion on this issue. PMID:23484138

  9. 75 FR 14391 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN54 Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy... between exposure to herbicides and the subsequent development of hairy cell leukemia and other chronic B... amendment is to establish presumptive service connection for these diseases based on herbicide...

  10. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1): Pathways of Exposure at the Animal‐Human Interface, a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Mumford, Elizabeth; Mounts, Anthony W.; Bresee, Joseph; Ly, Sowath; Bridges, Carolyn B.; Otte, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Background The threat posed by highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses to humans remains significant, given the continued occurrence of sporadic human cases (499 human cases in 15 countries) with a high case fatality rate (approximately 60%), the endemicity in poultry populations in several countries, and the potential for reassortment with the newly emerging 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain. Therefore, we review risk factors for H5N1 infection in humans. Methods and Findings Several epidemiologic studies have evaluated the risk factors associated with increased risk of H5N1 infection among humans who were exposed to H5N1 viruses. Our review shows that most H5N1 cases are attributed to exposure to sick poultry. Most cases are sporadic, while occasional limited human-to-human transmission occurs. The most commonly identified factors associated with H5N1 virus infection included exposure through contact with infected blood or bodily fluids of infected poultry via food preparation practices; touching and caring for infected poultry; consuming uncooked poultry products; exposure to H5N1 via swimming or bathing in potentially virus laden ponds; and exposure to H5N1 at live bird markets. Conclusions Research has demonstrated that despite frequent and widespread contact with poultry, transmission of the H5N1 virus from poultry to humans is rare. Available research has identified several risk factors that may be associated with infection including close direct contact with poultry and transmission via the environment. However, several important data gaps remain that limit our understanding of the epidemiology of H5N1 in humans. Although infection in humans with H5N1 remains rare, human cases continue to be reported and H5N1 is now considered endemic among poultry in parts of Asia and in Egypt, providing opportunities for additional human infections and for the acquisition of virus mutations that may lead to more efficient spread among humans and other mammalian species

  11. Dibutyltin exposure decreases granzyme B and perforin in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Reetta; Shah, Hemangini; Bankhurst, Arthur D; Whalen, Margaret M

    2005-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that are capable of killing tumor and virally-infected cells. Dibutyltin (DBT) is a catalyst in the production of PVC plastics and a breakdown product of tributyltin (TBT). DBT is a significant environmental contaminant. This study investigates the mechanism by which DBT exposure decreases the immune function of human NK cells. NK cells destroy their target cells by releasing cytotoxic proteins, perforin, and granzyme B. We examined the effect of DBT exposures on the levels of cytotoxic proteins and their mRNAs. Exposure of NK cells to DBT for 1h caused significant decreases in the mRNAs for granzyme B and perforin but not in protein levels. A 24h exposure to DBT decreased mRNAs as well as protein levels for both granzyme B and perforin. Exposure to DBT for 1h followed by either a 24 or 48h period in DBT-free media, decreased levels of granzyme B and perforin. The results indicate that decreases in granzyme B and perforin levels in NK cells are consequences of DBT exposure. Additionally, DBT causes rapid decreases in mRNAs for perforin and granzyme B, suggesting decreases in transcription and/or increases in mRNA degradation.

  12. Morphological changes in vascular and circulating blood cells following exposure to detergent sclerosants.

    PubMed

    Cooley-Andrade, O; Connor, D E; Ma, D D F; Weisel, J W; Parsi, K

    2016-04-01

    To investigate morphological changes in vascular and circulating blood cells following exposure to detergent sclerosants sodium tetradecyl sulfate and polidocanol. Samples of whole blood, isolated leukocytes, platelets, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts were incubated with varying concentrations of sclerosants. Whole blood smears were stained with Giemsa and examined by light and bright field microscopy. Phalloidin and Hoechst stains were used to analyze cytoplasmic and nuclear morphology by fluorescence microscopy. Endothelial cell and fibroblasts were analyzed by live cell imaging. Higher concentrations of sclerosants induced cell lysis. Morphological changes in intact cells were observed at sublytic concentrations of detergents. Low concentration sodium tetradecyl sulfate induced erythrocyte acanthocytosis and macrocytosis, while polidocanol induced Rouleaux formation and increased the population of target cells and stomatocytes. Leukocytes showed swelling, blebbing, vacuolation, and nuclear degradation following exposure to sodium tetradecyl sulfate, while polidocanol induced pseudopodia formation, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation. Platelets exhibited pseudopodia with sodium tetradecyl sulfate and a "fried egg" appearance with polidocanol. Exposure to sodium tetradecyl sulfate resulted in size shrinkage in both endothelial cell and fibroblasts, while endothelial cell developed distinct spindle morphology. Polidocanol induced cytoplasmic microfilament bundles in both endothelial cell and fibroblasts. Patchy chromatin condensation was observed following exposure of fibroblasts to either agent. Detergent sclerosants are biologically active at sublytic concentrations. The observed morphological changes are consistent with cell activation, apoptosis, and oncosis. The cellular response is concentration dependent, cell-specific, and sclerosant specific. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Summary of solar cell data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, David C.; Rose, M. Frank

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of many separate experiments, some of which contained solar cells. These solar cells were distributed at various positions on the LDEF and, therefore, were exposed to the space environment with an orientational dependence. This report will address the space environmental effects on solar cells and solar cell assemblies (SCA's), including electrical interconnects and associated insulation blankets where flown in conjunction with solar cells.

  14. A method for the in vitro exposure of human cells to environmental and complex gaseous mixtures: application to various types of atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Knebel, Jan W; Ritter, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    The application of in vitro methods to the analysis of the effects of airborne materials is still limited, because there are no generally accepted concepts and technologies for efficiently exposing adherent growing cells to test atmospheres, especially those comprising complex mixtures of gaseous and particulate phases. The introduction of in vitro research into the field of inhalation toxicology offers a unique possibility for using human cells and tissues for pre-screening studies, thus reducing the necessity for animal experiments, and cutting the numbers of animals used in toxicological testing. We therefore developed a novel experimental concept that uses an exposure device based on the cell cultivation system CULTEX (Patent No. DE 198011763; PCT/EP99/00295). This allowed us to investigate environmental atmospheres, which were chemically and physically unmodified, in an in vitro system, by exposing the target cells directly at the air/liquid interface. The exposure device itself is small and flexible enough to be connected to a variety of aerosol-generating systems without the need for an incubator, as it fulfils all the requirements for maintaining cell viability over a defined period. The general applicability and the sensitivity of this in vitro approach for testing various generated atmospheres under the same cell-exposure conditions were demonstrated by studying dose-dependent cytotoxic effects in human lung epithelial cells exposed to air contaminated with single gases or complex mixtures, such as diesel exhaust fumes and side-stream cigarette smoke.

  15. Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL) Decays in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

  16. Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence Decays (TRPL) in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

  17. Review of grain interior, grain boundary, and interface effects of K in CIGS solar cells: Mechanisms for performance enhancement

    DOE PAGES

    Muzzillo, Christopher P.

    2017-07-16

    Introducing K into Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIGS) absorbers has led to recent world record power conversion efficiencies for thin film polycrystalline solar cells. In this work, the diverse phenomena associated with K in CIGS were reviewed, and overarching mechanisms were identified. The effects of K depend on its distribution among grain interiors (GIs), grain boundaries (GBs), and interfaces. High substrate Na and low temperature favor GI K incorporation, while low Na and high temperature favor segregation of K at GBs. Depositing KInSe2 (or KIn1-yGaySe2) by co-evaporation or KF post-deposition treatment onto CIGS reduces buffer interface recombination in the final solar cells. KInSe2more » decomposes in air, which makes characterization difficult and may affect performance. In conclusion, the mechanism for reduced interface recombination could be direct passivation, beneficial compound precursor, oxidation barrier, or favorable diffusion alteration.« less

  18. Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Raylman, R R; Clavo, A C; Wahl, R L

    1996-01-01

    Proposals to enhance the amount of radiation dose delivered to small tumors with radioimmunotherapy by constraining emitted electrons with very strong homogeneous static magnetic fields has renewed interest in the cellular effects of prolonged exposures to such fields. Past investigations have not studied the effects on tumor cell growth of lengthy exposures to very high magnetic fields. Three malignant human cell lines, HTB 63 (melanoma), HTB 77 IP3 (ovarian carcinoma), and CCL 86 (lymphoma: Raji cells), were exposed to a 7 Tesla uniform static magnetic field for 64 hours. Following exposure, the number of viable cells in each group was determined. In addition, multicycle flow cytometry was performed on all cell lines, and pulsed-field electrophoresis was performed solely on Raji cells to investigate changes in cell cycle patterns and the possibility of DNA fragmentation induced by the magnetic field. A 64 h exposure to the magnetic field produced a reduction in viable cell number in each of the three cell lines. Reductions of 19.04 +/- 7.32%, 22.06 +/- 6.19%, and 40.68 +/- 8.31% were measured for the melanoma, ovarian carcinoma, and lymphoma cell lines, respectively, vs. control groups not exposed to the magnetic field. Multicycle flow cytometry revealed that the cell cycle was largely unaltered. Pulsed-field electrophoresis analysis revealed no increase in DNA breaks related to magnetic field exposure. In conclusion, prolonged exposure to a very strong magnetic field appeared to inhibit the growth of three human tumor cell lines in vitro. The mechanism underlying this effect has not, as yet, been identified, although alteration of cell growth cycle and gross fragmentation of DNA have been excluded as possible contributory factors. Future investigations of this phenomenon may have a significant impact on the future understanding and treatment of cancer.

  19. Development, qualification, validation and application of the neutral red uptake assay in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells using a VITROCELL® VC10® smoke exposure system.

    PubMed

    Fields, Wanda; Fowler, Kathy; Hargreaves, Victoria; Reeve, Lesley; Bombick, Betsy

    2017-04-01

    Cytotoxicity assessment of combustible tobacco products by neutral red uptake (NRU) has historically used total particulate matter (TPM) or solvent captured gas vapor phase (GVP), rather than fresh whole smoke. Here, the development, validation and application of the NRU assay in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, following exposure to fresh whole smoke generated with the VITROCELL® VC10® system is described. Whole smoke exposure is particularly important as both particulate and vapor phases of tobacco smoke show cytotoxicity in vitro. The VITROCELL® VC10® system provides exposure at the air liquid interface (ALI) to mimic in vivo conditions for assessing the toxicological impact of smoke in vitro. Instrument and assay validations are crucial for comparative analyses.

  20. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  1. Cell-Wide Responses to Low-Oxygen Exposure in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa; Joachimiak, Marcin; Arkin, Adam; Borglin, sharon; Dehal, Paramvir; Chakraborty, Romy; Geller, Jil; Hazen, Terry; HE, Qiang; Joyner, Dominique C.; Martin, Vincent; Wall, Judy; Yang, Zamin Koo; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling, Jay

    2007-08-01

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low-oxygen exposure (0.1% O2) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O2 caused a decrease in the growth rate without affecting viability. Concerted upregulation of the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O2 exposure. Several of the candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the upregulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during the low-O2 exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O2 exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O2 exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were downregulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell-wide responses to low and high O2 levels in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O2 levels in its environment.

  2. Cell-Wide Responses to Low-Oxygen Exposure in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa M.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Arkin, Adam P.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Chakraborty, Romy; Geller, Jil T.; Hazen, Terry C.; He, Qiang; Joyner, Dominique C.; Martin, Vincent J. J.; Wall, Judy D.; Yang, Zamin Koo; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low-oxygen exposure (0.1% O2) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O2 caused a decrease in the growth rate without affecting viability. Concerted upregulation of the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O2 exposure. Several of the candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the upregulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during the low-O2 exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O2 exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O2 exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were downregulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell-wide responses to low and high O2 levels in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O2 levels in its environment. PMID:17545284

  3. Subcellular glucose exposure biases the spatial distribution of insulin granules in single pancreatic beta cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Kyohei; Gel, Murat; Okonogi, Atsuhito; Fuke, Ariko; Okitsu, Teru; Tada, Takashi; Suzuki, Takaaki; Nagamatsu, Shinya; Washizu, Masao; Kotera, Hidetoshi

    2014-02-01

    In living tissues, a cell is exposed to chemical substances delivered partially to its surface. Such a heterogeneous chemical environment potentially induces cell polarity. To evaluate this effect, we developed a microfluidic device that realizes spatially confined delivery of chemical substances at subcellular resolution. Our microfluidic device allows simple setup and stable operation for over 4 h to deliver chemicals partially to a single cell. Using the device, we showed that subcellular glucose exposure triggers an intracellular [Ca2+] change in the β-cells. In addition, the imaging of a cell expressing GFP-tagged insulin showed that continuous subcellular exposure to glucose biased the spatial distribution of insulin granules toward the site where the glucose was delivered. Our approach illustrates an experimental technique that will be applicable to many biological experiments for imaging the response to subcellular chemical exposure and will also provide new insights about the development of polarity of β-cells.

  4. Effects of Simultaneous Radiofrequency Radiation and Chemical Exposure of Mammalian Cells. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    genotoxic chemical will result in an alteration of the genotoxic activity of the chemical alone., For 4-hr pulsed wave RP.F exposures at 2.45 GHz...RFR) in the microwave range, and specifically at 2.45 GHz (pulsed wave ), at moderate power levels and specific absorption rates, was genotoxic in...a) that RFR by itself is genotoxic to mammalian cells in vitro; and b) that a simultaneous exposure of mammalian cells to RFR during treatment with a

  5. Photoinduced charge separation at polymer-fullerene interfaces of BHJ solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluektov, Oleg G.; Niklas, Jens; Mardis, Kristy

    2016-09-01

    While photovoltaic cells are highly promising man-made devices for direct solar energy utilization, a number of fundamental questions about how the organic bulk heterojunction cell enables efficient long-lived and long-range charge separation remain unanswered. These questions were address by employing an advanced suite of EPR spectroscopy in combination with DFT calculations to study mechanism of charge separation at the polymer-fullerene interfaces of photo-active BHJ. Observed charge delocalization in BHJ upon photoinduced ET is analogous to that in organic donor-acceptor material. This is an efficient mechanism of charge stabilization in photosynthetic assemblies. Time-resolved EPR spectra show a strong polarization pattern for all polymer-fullerene blends under study, which is caused by non-Boltzmann population of the electron spin energy levels in the radical pairs. The first observation of this phenomenon was reported in natural and artificial photosynthetic assemblies, and comparison with these systems allows us to better understand charge separation processes in OPVs. The spectral analysis presented here, in combination with DFT calculations, shows that CS processes in OPV materials are similar to that in organic photosynthetic systems. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 at Argonne National Laboratory.

  6. Open, microfluidic flow cell for studies of interfacial processes at gas-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Khanh C; Malakhov, Dmitry; Momsen, William E; Brockman, Howard L

    2006-03-01

    Interfacial processes involving peripheral proteins depend on the composition and packing density of the interfacial lipid molecules. As a biological membrane model, lipid monolayers at the gas-liquid interface allow independent control of these parameters. However, measuring protein adsorption to monolayers has been difficult. To aid in this and other studies of the interfacial processes, we have developed an open, microfluidic flow cell with which surface physical properties can be controlled and monitored in well-defined lipid monolayers while varying aqueous-phase composition. Using this apparatus, we implement a recently described fluorescence method (Momsen, W. E.; Mizuno, N. K.; Lowe, M. E.; Brockman, H. L. Anal. Biochem. 2005, 346, 139-49) to characterize the adsorption/desorption of glucagon to 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers at 27 mN/m. Analysis of the data gives reasonable and self-consistent results for kinetic and thermodynamic constants. Varying the packing density of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol does not alter the extent of glucagon adsorption, but comparable measurements with 1-steaoryl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine show a critical dependence. Because it allows a high degree of control of both lipid monolayer properties and aqueous-phase composition, this microfluidic flow cell should find wide applicability in many areas of research into interfacial processes.

  7. High-Efficiency Silicon/Organic Heterojunction Solar Cells with Improved Junction Quality and Interface Passivation.

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Gao, Pingqi; Ling, Zhaoheng; Ding, Li; Yang, Zhenhai; Ye, Jichun; Cui, Yi

    2016-12-27

    Silicon/organic heterojunction solar cells (HSCs) based on conjugated polymers, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), and n-type silicon (n-Si) have attracted wide attention due to their potential advantages of high efficiency and low cost. However, the state-of-the-art efficiencies are still far from satisfactory due to the inferior junction quality. Here, facile treatments were applied by pretreating the n-Si wafer in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution and using a capping copper iodide (CuI) layer on the PEDOT:PSS layer to achieve a high-quality Schottky junction. Detailed photoelectric characteristics indicated that the surface recombination was greatly suppressed after TMAH pretreatment, which increased the thickness of the interfacial oxide layer. Furthermore, the CuI capping layer induced a strong inversion layer near the n-Si surface, resulting in an excellent field effect passivation. With the collaborative improvements in the interface chemical and electrical passivation, a competitive open-circuit voltage of 0.656 V and a high fill factor of 78.1% were achieved, leading to a stable efficiency of over 14.3% for the planar n-Si/PEDOT:PSS HSCs. Our findings suggest promising strategies to further exploit the full voltage as well as efficiency potentials for Si/organic solar cells.

  8. Chronic pepsin exposure promotes anchorage-independent growth, and migration of a hypopharyngeal squamous cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Samuels, Tina L.; Johnston, Nikki

    2015-01-01

    Outcome Objectives 1.Investigate the role of reflux, specifically pepsin, in laryngopharyngeal carcinogenesis. 2.Evaluate effects of chronic pepsin exposure on cell migration, apoptosis, and colony forming ability in hypopharyngeal cells. Study Design Translation research. Setting Academic research laboratory. Methods Human hypopharyngeal squamous carcinoma FaDu cells were chronically exposed to nonacidic pepsin (exposed for 24 hours, 4 times over 2 weeks at the following concentrations: 0.01mg/ml, 0.1 mg/ml, or 1mg/ml). Precise wounds were created in confluent cell plates and rates of cell migration into wounds were quantified. Separately, cell viability of chronic pepsin exposed FaDu cells acutely treated with paclitaxel was measured. Finally, a clonogenic assay was performed on these cells to measure effects of chronic pepsin exposure on colony forming ability. Results An increased rate of relative wound density was observed in chronic pepsin treated (0.01mg/ml, 0.1mg/ml) cells compared to control (P<0.001), suggesting greater rates of cell migration. Pepsin treated (0.1 mg/ml) cells demonstrated on average, greater cell viability compared to control after exposure to paclitaxel suggesting possible apoptotic resistance, however this was not statistically significant. Chronic pepsin exposure (0.1mg/ml, 1mg/ml) was associated with dose dependent increase in colony forming ability relative to control (P<0.001). Conclusion Hypopharyngeal squamous cell line chronically exposed to pepsin demonstrated increased cell migration, and colony forming ability relative to control cells. These experiments indicate that chronic pepsin exposure acts as a promoter of tumorigenesis and metastasis of airway epithelium, suggesting a role for pepsin in laryngopharyngeal carcinogenesis attributed to gastric reflux. PMID:24376122

  9. Chronic pepsin exposure promotes anchorage-independent growth and migration of a hypopharyngeal squamous cell line.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Elizabeth A; Samuels, Tina L; Johnston, Nikki

    2014-04-01

    (1) Investigate the role of reflux, specifically pepsin, in laryngopharyngeal carcinogenesis. (2) Evaluate effects of chronic pepsin exposure on cell migration, apoptosis, and colony-forming ability in hypopharyngeal cells. Translation research. Academic research laboratory. Human hypopharyngeal squamous carcinoma FaDu cells were chronically exposed to nonacidic pepsin (exposed for 24 hours, 4 times over 2 weeks at the following concentrations: 0.01 mg/mL, 0.1 mg/mL, or 1 mg/mL). Precise wounds were created in confluent cell plates, and rates of cell migration into wounds were quantified. Separately, cell viability of chronic pepsin-exposed FaDu cells acutely treated with paclitaxel was measured. Finally, a clonogenic assay was performed on these cells to measure effects of chronic pepsin exposure on colony-forming ability. An increased rate of relative wound density was observed in chronic pepsin-treated (0.01 mg/mL, 0.1 mg/mL) cells compared with control (P < .001), suggesting greater rates of cell migration. Pepsin-treated (0.1 mg/mL) cells demonstrated on average greater cell viability compared with control after exposure to paclitaxel, suggesting possible apoptotic resistance; however, this was not statistically significant. Chronic pepsin exposure (0.1 mg/mL, 1 mg/mL) was associated with a dose-dependent increase in colony-forming ability relative to control (P < .001). Hypopharyngeal squamous cell line chronically exposed to pepsin demonstrated increased cell migration and colony-forming ability relative to control cells. These experiments indicate that chronic pepsin exposure acts as a promoter of tumorigenesis and metastasis of airway epithelium, suggesting a role for pepsin in laryngopharyngeal carcinogenesis attributed to gastric reflux.

  10. [Stem cell derived therapy for cutaneous radiation exposure].

    PubMed

    Rezvani, M

    2013-12-01

    Radiation injury to skin results in a variety of deterministic effects including inflammatory reactions and cell depletion leading to distinct clinical symptoms following a defined time pattern. Therapeutic approaches are still limited, a complete restitution of affected areas is so far impossible. In the last few years increasing experimental knowledge about acquisition and administration of autologous stem cells also in the field of radiation injuries has been obtained. Evidence reviewed in this article shows that the beneficial effects of stem cell transplantation are not necessarily due to the replacement of damaged cells by transplanted cells but most probably due in the most part to a paracrine effect. Transplanted cells secrete bioactive factors that initiate the stimulation of the host stem cells to regenerate the damaged tissues. Transplanted stem cells produce trophic factors which aid the systemic healing of the victims. Furthermore, administration of stem cell secretomes in the form of conditioned media containing microvesicles or exosomes can be as effective as administering the stem cells. This hypothesis is supported by findings that cell-free derivatives from hMSCs were useful for wound healing purposes and could circumvent the need for intact cells. Furthermore, the beneficial effect of MSC injection on reperfusion and tissue damage in a mouse model of hind limb ischemia could be attributed to paracrine mechanisms with local release of arteriogenic cytokines. Further evaluation of the paracrine potential of autologous stem cells may open new means for treatment of acute as well as chronic sequelae of cutaneous radiation injuries.

  11. Cell phone radiation exposure on brain and associated biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Meena, Ramovatar; Verma, H N; Kumar, Shivendra

    2013-03-01

    Wireless technologies are ubiquitous today and the mobile phones are one of the prodigious output of this technology. Although the familiarization and dependency of mobile phones is growing at an alarming pace, the biological effects due to the exposure of radiations have become a subject of intense debate. The present evidence on mobile phone radiation exposure is based on scientific research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at radiofrequency (RF)/ electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. The conflict in conclusions is mainly because of difficulty in controlling the affecting parameters. Biological effects are dependent not only on the distance and size of the object (with respect to the object) but also on the environmental parameters. Health endpoints reported to be associated with RF include childhood leukemia, brain tumors, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, infertility and some cardiovascular effects. Most of the reports conclude a reasonable suspicion of mobile phone risk that exists based on clear evidence of bio-effects which with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. The present study summarizes the public issue based on mobile phone radiation exposure and their biological effects. This review concludes that the regular and long term use of microwave devices (mobile phone, microwave oven) at domestic level can have negative impact upon biological system especially on brain. It also suggests that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role by enhancing the effect of microwave radiations which may cause neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Exposure to inhaled isobutyl nitrite reduces T cell-dependent responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, L.S.F.; Barnett, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Isobutyl nitrite is a drug of abuse popular among male homosexuals and among adolescents. In order to approximate the nitrite exposures of inhalant abusers, mice were treated with 900 ppm isobutyl nitrite in an inhalation chamber for 45 min per day for 14 days. At 72 hr after the last exposure, mice were assayed for immune competence. Under these conditions, mice gained only half the weight of mice exposed to air. The spleens of nitrite exposed mice weighed 15% less and had 24% fewer cells per spleen than controls. Adjusted for equal cell numbers, T cell mitogenic and allogeneic proliferative responses were significantly reduce by 33% and 47%, respectively. Unstimulated spleen cells had elevated levels of IL-2 transcription following exposure to isobutyl nitrite suggesting that nitrite inhalation caused a nonspecific induction of T cells. In contrast, B cell proliferative responses to LPS were unaltered. Exposure to the nitrite reduced the frequency of T-dependent antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC) by 63% and the total number of reduced by 60% after as few as five daily exposures to isobutyl nitrite. Therefore, the data suggest that habitual inhalation of isobutyl nitrite impairs immune competence and that toxicity appears to be directed toward T cell functions.

  13. Chronic exposure to trichloroethylene increases DNA methylation of the Ifng promoter in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Blossom, Sarah J; Erickson, Stephen W; Broadfoot, Brannon; West, Kirk; Bai, Shasha; Li, Jingyun; Cooney, Craig A

    2016-10-17

    CD4(+) T cells in female MRL+/+ mice exposed to solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) skew toward effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, and demonstrate seemingly non-monotonic alterations in IFN-γ production. In the current study we examined the mechanism for this immunotoxicity using effector/memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells isolated every 6 weeks during a 40 week exposure to TCE (0.5mg/ml in drinking water). A time-dependent effect of TCE exposure on both Ifng gene expression and IFN-γ protein production was observed in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, with an increase after 22 weeks of exposure and a decrease after 40 weeks of exposure. No such effect of TCE was observed in naïve CD4(+) T cells. A cumulative increase in DNA methylation in the CpG sites of the promoter of the Ifng gene was observed in effector/memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells over time. Also unique to the Ifng promoter was an increase in methylation variance in effector/memory compared to naïve CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, the CpG sites of the Ifng promoter in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells were especially sensitive to the effects of TCE exposure, which may help explain the regulatory effect of the chemical on this gene.

  14. Effects of combined radiofrequency radiation exposure on the cell cycle and its regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan-Yong; Kim, Bong Cho; Han, Na-Kyung; Lee, Yun-Sil; Kim, Taehong; Yun, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Nam; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether single or combined radio frequency (RF) radiation exposure has effects on the cell cycle and its regulatory proteins. Exposure of MCF7 cells to either single (837 MHz) or combined (837 and 1950 MHz) RF radiation was conducted at specific absorption rate values of 4 W/kg for 1 h. During the exposure period, the chamber was made isothermal by circulating water through the cavity. After RF radiation exposure, DNA synthesis rate and cell cycle distribution were assessed. The levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins, p53, p21, cyclins, and cyclin-dependent kinases were also examined. The positive control group was exposed to 0.5 and 4 Gy doses of ionizing radiation (IR) and showed changes in DNA synthesis and cell cycle distribution. The levels of p53, p21, cyclin A, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1 were also affected by IR exposure. In contrast to the IR-exposed group, neither the single RF radiation- nor the combined RF radiation-exposed group elicited alterations in DNA synthesis, cell cycle distribution, and levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These results indicate that neither single nor combined RF radiation affect cell cycle progression.

  15. Primary in vitro culture of porcine tracheal epithelial cells in an air-liquid interface as a model to study airway epithelium and Aspergillus fumigatus interactions.

    PubMed

    Khoufache, Khaled; Cabaret, Odile; Farrugia, Cécile; Rivollet, Danièle; Alliot, Annie; Allaire, Eric; Cordonnier, Catherine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Botterel, Françoise

    2010-12-01

    Since the airway epithelium is the first tissue encountered by airborne fungal spores, specific models are needed to study this interaction. We developed such a model using primary porcine tracheal epithelial cells (PTEC) as a possible alternative to the use of primary human cells. PTEC were obtained from pigs and were cultivated in an air-liquid interface. Fluorescent brightener was employed to quantify the internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. Potential differences (Vt) and transepithelial resistances (Rt) after challenge with the mycotoxin, verruculogen, were studied. Primers for porcine inflammatory mediator genes IL-8, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF were designed for a quantitative real-time PCR procedure to study cellular responses to challenges with A. fumigatus conidia. TEM showed the differentiation of ciliated cells and the PTEC ability to internalize conidia. The internalization rate was 21.9 ± 1.4% after 8 h of incubation. Verruculogen (10(-6) M) significantly increased Vt without having an effect on the Rt. Exposure of PTEC to live A. fumigatus conidia for 24 h induced a 10- to 40-fold increase in the mRNA levels of inflammatory mediator genes. PTEC behave similarly to human cells and are therefore a suitable alternative to human cells for studying interaction between airway epithelium and A. fumigatus.

  16. Fibronectin antibody labels corneal stromal collagen fibrils in situ along their length and circumference and demonstrates distinct staining along the cell and stromal interfaces of Descemet's membrane.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sheldon R

    2014-03-01

    An immunoperoxidase cytochemical study of fibronectin localization in the rat corneal stroma and Descemet's membrane was conducted following organ culture to determine whether stromal swelling allowed better primary antibody penetration into the normally tough fibrous corneal stroma. Following 24 h organ culture, corneas were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, washed and stained overnight at 4 °C in anti-fibronectin followed by washing and incubation in an appropriate secondary antibody and exposure to protein A-HRP. Cytochemical processing was carried out in a DAB-containing medium followed by dehydration and Epon embedding. Observations of the stromal lamellae revealed the presence of a novel punctate staining pattern along the length of the collagen fibrils that extended around the fibril's circumference. Measurements on the peroxidase reaction product spacing indicated a periodicity of approximately 20.69 ± 3.57 nm along the fibril's length. Light microscopic immunocytochemistry revealed the presence of fibronectin staining occurred within the endothelial cell layer but only along the DM/stromal interface. Electron microscopic observations however, revealed that fibronectin staining occurred in distinct linear patterns along the length of both the endothelial and stromal DM interfaces. Results indicate that organ culture mediated swelling helps facilitate the penetration of primary antibody into the corneal stroma. Observations suggest a novel association exists between fibronectin and stromal collagen fibrils that helps to mediate the arrangement and organization of the stromal extracellular matrix. Results also definitively indicate that fibronectin is deposited along both DM interfaces suggesting that it plays a role in the adhesion of both the endothelial cell layer and stroma to Descemet's membrane to help maintain the tissue architecture within this region of the cornea.

  17. Ethanol exposure disrupts extraembryonic microtubule cytoskeleton and embryonic blastomere cell adhesion, producing epiboly and gastrulation defects

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, Swapnalee; Muralidharan, Pooja; Curtis, Courtney L.; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Buente, Bryce B.; Holdgrafer, David J.; Ogbeifun, Osato; Olorungbounmi, Opeyemi C.; Patino, Liliana; Lucas, Ryan; Gilbert, Sonya; Groninger, Evan S.; Arciero, Julia; Edenberg, Howard J.; Marrs, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) occurs when pregnant mothers consume alcohol, causing embryonic ethanol exposure and characteristic birth defects that include craniofacial, neural and cardiac defects. Gastrulation is a particularly sensitive developmental stage for teratogen exposure, and zebrafish is an outstanding model to study gastrulation and FASD. Epiboly (spreading blastomere cells over the yolk cell), prechordal plate migration and convergence/extension cell movements are sensitive to early ethanol exposure. Here, experiments are presented that characterize mechanisms of ethanol toxicity on epiboly and gastrulation. Epiboly mechanisms include blastomere radial intercalation cell movements and yolk cell microtubule cytoskeleton pulling the embryo to the vegetal pole. Both of these processes were disrupted by ethanol exposure. Ethanol effects on cell migration also indicated that cell adhesion was affected, which was confirmed by cell aggregation assays. E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule expression was not affected by ethanol exposure, but E-cadherin distribution, which controls epiboly and gastrulation, was changed. E-cadherin was redistributed into cytoplasmic aggregates in blastomeres and dramatically redistributed in the extraembryonic yolk cell. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to identify potential causative factors for early development defects, and expression of the cell adhesion molecule protocadherin-18a (pcdh18a), which controls epiboly, was significantly reduced in ethanol exposed embryos. Injecting pcdh18a synthetic mRNA in ethanol treated embryos partially rescued epiboly cell movements, including enveloping layer cell shape changes. Together, data show that epiboly and gastrulation defects induced by ethanol are multifactorial, and include yolk cell (extraembryonic tissue) microtubule cytoskeleton disruption and blastomere adhesion defects, in part caused by reduced pcdh18a expression. PMID:24167711

  18. Critical interfaces in organic solar cells and their influence on the open-circuit voltage.

    PubMed

    Potscavage, William J; Sharma, Asha; Kippelen, Bernard

    2009-11-17

    Organic photovoltaics, which convert sunlight into electricity with thin films of organic semiconductors, have been the subject of active research over the past 20 years. The global energy challenge has greatly increased interest in this technology in recent years. Low-temperature processing of organic small molecules from the vapor phase or of polymers from solution can confer organic semiconductors with a critical advantage over inorganic photovoltaic materials since the high-temperature processing requirements of the latter limit the range of substrates on which they can be deposited. Unfortunately, despite significant advances, the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells remains low, with maximum values in the range of 6%. A better understanding of the physical processes that determine the efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells is crucial to enhancing their competitiveness with other thin-film technologies. Maximum values for the photocurrent can be estimated from the light-harvesting capability of the individual molecules or polymers in the device. However, a better understanding of the materials-level processes, particularly those in layer-to-layer interfaces, that determine the open-circuit voltage (V(OC)) in organic solar cells is critical and remains the subject of active research. The conventional wisdom is to use organic semiconductors with smaller band gaps to harvest a larger portion of the solar spectrum. This method is not always an effective prescription for increasing efficiency: it ignores the fact that the value of V(OC) is generally decreased in devices employing materials with smaller band gaps, as is the case with inorganic semiconductors. In this Account, we discuss the influence of the different interfaces formed in organic multilayer photovoltaic devices on the value of V(OC); we use pentacene-C(60) solar cells as a model. In particular, we use top and bottom electrodes with different work function values, finding that V(OC) is

  19. Rational material, interface, and device engineering for high-performance polymer and perovskite solar cells (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Alex K.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of polymer and hybrid solar cells is also strongly dependent on their efficiency in harvesting light, exciton dissociation, charge transport, and charge collection at the metal/organic/metal oxide or the metal/perovskite/metal oxide interfaces. Our laboratory employs a molecular engineering approach to develop processible low band-gap polymers with high charge carrier mobility that can enhance power conversion efficiency of the single junction solar cells to values as high as ~11%. We have also developed several innovative strategies to modify the interface of bulk-heterojunction devices and create new device architectures to fully explore their potential for solar applications. In this talk, the integrated approach of combining material design, interface, and device engineering to significantly improve the performance of polymer and hybrid perovskite photovoltaic cells will be discussed. Specific emphasis will be placed on the development of low band-gap polymers with reduced reorganizational energy and proper energy levels, formation of optimized morphology of active layer, and minimized interfacial energy barriers using functional conductive surfactants. At the end, several new device architectures and optical engineering strategies to make tandem cells and semitransparent solar cells will be discussed to explore the full promise of polymer and perovskite hybrid solar cells.

  20. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lestard, Nathalia R.

    2016-01-01

    Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells. PMID:27478480

  1. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Lestard, Nathalia R; Capella, Marcia A M

    2016-01-01

    Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells.

  2. Exposure of human lung fibroblasts to ozone: cell mortality and hyaluronan metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.; Branscheid, D. )

    1992-04-01

    Exposure of cultures of human lung fibroblasts to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h resulted in a significant increase in cellular mortality by 29%; after exposure to 2.5 ppm ozone for 4 h, the increase amounted to 74%. A marked difference in sensitivity to ozone was observed between fibroblast lines from different individuals. This variability in resistance to ozone was more evident after exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h, when compared with 2.5 ppm ozone for 4 h. In one fibroblast line, synthesis of hyaluronan was enhanced by exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h. The concentrations of hyaluronan in culture media increased in experiments using different fibroblast cell lines, a phenomenon that was obvious both if cell numbers and combined protein concentrations of cells and media are selected as references for hyaluronan concentrations.

  3. Exposure to Carbon Nanotube Material: Assessment of Nanotube Cytotoxicity Using Human Keratinocyte Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Castranova, Vincent; Kisin, Elena R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Murray, Ashley R.; Gandelsman, Vadim Z.; Maynard, Andrew; Baron, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are new members of carbon allotropes similar to fullerenes and graphite. Because of their unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, carbon nanotubes are important for novel applications in the electronics, aerospace, and computer industries. Exposure to graphite and carbon materials has been associated with increased incidence of skin diseases, such as carbon fiber dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, and naevi. We investigated adverse effects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) using a cell culture of immortalized human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). After 18 h of exposure of HaCaT to SWCNT, oxidative stress and cellular toxicity were indicated by formation of free radicals, accumulation of peroxidative products, antioxidant depletion, and loss of cell viability. Exposure to SWCNT also resulted in ultrastructural and morphological changes in cultured skin cells. These data indicate that dermal exposure to unrefined SWCNT may lead to dermal toxicity due to accelerated oxidative stress in the skin of exposed workers.

  4. Exposure to Carbon Nanotube Material: Assessment of Nanotube Cytotoxicity Using Human Keratinocyte Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Castranova, Vincent; Kisin, Elena R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Murray, Ashley R.; Gandelsman, Vadim Z.; Maynard, Andrew; Baron, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are new members of carbon allotropes similar to fullerenes and graphite. Because of their unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, carbon nanotubes are important for novel applications in the electronics, aerospace, and computer industries. Exposure to graphite and carbon materials has been associated with increased incidence of skin diseases, such as carbon fiber dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, and naevi. We investigated adverse effects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) using a cell culture of immortalized human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). After 18 h of exposure of HaCaT to SWCNT, oxidative stress and cellular toxicity were indicated by formation of free radicals, accumulation of peroxidative products, antioxidant depletion, and loss of cell viability. Exposure to SWCNT also resulted in ultrastructural and morphological changes in cultured skin cells. These data indicate that dermal exposure to unrefined SWCNT may lead to dermal toxicity due to accelerated oxidative stress in the skin of exposed workers.

  5. Prenatal and postnatal exposure to cell phone use and behavioral problems in children.

    PubMed

    Divan, Hozefa A; Kheifets, Leeka; Obel, Carsten; Olsen, Jørn

    2008-07-01

    The World Health Organization has emphasized the need for research into the possible effects of radiofrequency fields in children. We examined the association between prenatal and postnatal exposure to cell phones and behavioral problems in young children. Mothers were recruited to the Danish National Birth Cohort early in pregnancy. When the children of those pregnancies reached 7 years of age in 2005 and 2006, mothers were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the current health and behavioral status of children, as well as past exposure to cell phone use. Mothers evaluated the child's behavior problems using the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. Mothers of 13,159 children completed the follow-up questionnaire reporting their use of cell phones during pregnancy as well as current cell phone use by the child. Greater odds ratios for behavioral problems were observed for children who had possible prenatal or postnatal exposure to cell phone use. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratio for a higher overall behavioral problems score was 1.80 (95% confidence interval = 1.45-2.23) in children with both prenatal and postnatal exposure to cell phones. Exposure to cell phones prenatally-and, to a lesser degree, postnatally-was associated with behavioral difficulties such as emotional and hyperactivity problems around the age of school entry. These associations may be noncausal and may be due to unmeasured confounding. If real, they would be of public health concern given the widespread use of this technology.

  6. Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens in pancreatic allograft recipients with preexisting beta cell autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Muhammad Ahmad; Fridell, Jonathan; Book, Benita; Faiz, Sara; Sharfuddin, Asif; Wiebke, Eric; Rigby, Mark; Taber, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens and its relevance in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in pancreatic allograft recipients is not well known. Thirty-three patients requiring a pancreas transplant were enrolled in an IRB approved study. They underwent prospective monitoring for DSA and beta cell autoantibody (BCAA) levels to GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2), insulin (micro-IAA [mIAA]), and islet-specific zinc transporter isoform-8 (ZnT8). Twenty-five (75.7%) had pre-transplant BCAA. Twenty had a single antibody (mIAA n = 15, GAD65 n = 5); five had two or more BCAA (GAD65 + mIAA n = 2, GAD65 + mIAA+IA-2 n = 2, GA65 + mIAA+IA-2 + ZnT8 = 1). No changes in GAD65 (p > 0.29), IA-2 (>0.16), and ZnT8 (p > 0.07) were observed between pre-transplant and post-transplant at 6 or 12 months. A decrease in mIAA from pre- to post-6 months (p < 0.0001), 12 months (p < 0.0001), and from post-6 to post-12 months (p = 0.0002) was seen. No new BCAA was observed at one yr. Seven (21.0%) developed de novo DSA. The incidence of DSA was 24% in patients with BCAA vs. 25% in patients without BCAA (p = 0.69). Pancreatic allograft function of patients with vs. without BCAA, and with and without BCAA + DSA was comparable until last follow-up (three yr). Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens by pancreas transplant may not lead to increased levels or development of new BCAA or pancreatic allograft dysfunction.

  7. Controlling mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into contractile smooth muscle cells on a TiO2 micro/nano interface: Towards benign pericytes environment for endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingan; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Feng; Yang, Ping; He, Zikun; Zhao, Ansha; Huang, Nan

    2016-09-01

    Building healthy and oriented smooth muscle cells (SMCs) environment is an effective method for improving the surface endothelialization of the cardiovascular implants. However, a long-term and stable source of SMCs for implantation without immune rejection and inflammation has not been solved, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation may be a good choice. In this work, two types of TiO2 micro/nano interfaces were fabricated on titanium surface by photolithography and anodic oxidation. These TiO2 micro/nano interfaces were used to regulate the differentiation of the MSCs. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) detection showed that the TiO2 micro/nano interfaces possessed the anatase crystal structure, suggesting good cytocompatibility. The CCK-8 results indicated the TiO2 micro/nano interfaces improved MSC proliferation, further immunofluorescence staining and calculation of the cell morphology index proved the micro/nano surfaces also elongated MSCs and regulated MSCs oriented growth. The specific staining of α-SMA, CNN-1, vWF, CD44 and CD133 markers revealed that the micro/nano surfaces induced MSCs differentiation to contractile SMCs, and the endothelial cells (ECs) culture experiment indicated that the MSCs induced by micro/nano interfaces contributed to the ECs attachment and proliferation. This method will be further studied and applied for the surface modification of the cardiovascular implants.

  8. Endothelial cells and lymphatics at the interface between the immune and central nervous systems: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Céline; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Liblau, Roland S

    2017-06-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a unique relationship with the immune system. This review highlights the distinct roles of lymphatic vessels and endothelial cells in the interface between CNS and immune cells and invites to revisit the concept of CNS immune privilege. T cells can follow several routes to penetrate the CNS parenchyma but may also benefit, together with antigen-loaded presenting cells, from the newly described lymphatic network to exit the CNS. CNS endothelial cells (EC) critically positioned at the interface between circulating immune cells and the CNS regulate the multistep cascade for immune cell trafficking into the CNS. They can also be considered as semiprofessional antigen-presenting cells through their ability to present antigens to T cells and to regulate their activation through co-stimulatory and inhibitory molecules. The lymphatic network linking the CNS to draining lymph nodes may contribute to the inflammatory reaction occurring in multiple sclerosis (MS). The abundance and strategic positioning of endothelial cells at the blood-brain barrier level most likely endow them with an important role in controlling local adaptive immune responses, rendering them potential therapeutic targets in neuro-inflammatory such as MS.

  9. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  10. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  11. Cellular stress response in Eca-109 cells inhibits apoptosis during early exposure to isorhamnetin.

    PubMed

    Shi, C; Fan, L Y; Cai, Z; Liu, Y Y; Yang, C L

    2012-01-01

    The flavonol aglycone isorhamnetin shows anti-proliferative activity in a variety of cancer cells. Previous work, from our laboratory showed that isorhamnetin inhibits the proliferation of human esophageal squamous carcinoma Eca-109 cells in vitro, but only after 72 h of exposure. This led us to propose that isorhamnetin exposure induces a cellular stress response that inhibits the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of the compound during early exposure. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined the effects of isorhamnetin on Eca-109 cells during the first 72 h of exposure. Cell growth was assessed using the trypan blue exclusion assay, and expression of IκBα, NF-κB/p65, NF-κB/p50, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, COX-2, Mcl-1, Bax, p53 and Id-1 were analyzed by Western blot. During the first 72 h of exposure, NF-κB/p65 and NF-κB/p50 accumulated in nuclei and expression of COX-2, Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 increased. In contrast, expression of IκBα and Bax fell initially but later increased. Expression of phospho-Akt and p53 showed no detectable change during the first 48 h. Pretreatment with the NF-κB inhibitor MG132 before exposure to isorhamnetin blocked the nuclear accumulation of p50 and p65, thereby inhibiting cell proliferation. These results show that during early exposure of Eca-109 cells to isorhamnetin, the NF-κB signaling pathway is activated and COX-2 expression increases, and this increase in expression partially inhibits isorhamnetin-induced apoptosis. Beyond 72 h of exposure, however, the apoptotic effect of isorhamnetin dominates, leading to inhibition of the NF-κB pathway and of cellular proliferation. These results will need to be taken into account when exploring the use of isorhamnetin against cancer in vivo.

  12. Necrotic Cells Actively Attract Phagocytes through the Collaborative Action of Two Distinct PS-Exposure Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zao; Venegas, Victor; Nagaoka, Yuji; Morino, Eri; Raghavan, Prashant; Audhya, Anjon; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu; Zhou, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Necrosis, a kind of cell death closely associated with pathogenesis and genetic programs, is distinct from apoptosis in both morphology and mechanism. Like apoptotic cells, necrotic cells are swiftly removed from animal bodies to prevent harmful inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, gain-of-function mutations in certain ion channel subunits result in the excitotoxic necrosis of six touch neurons and their subsequent engulfment and degradation inside engulfing cells. How necrotic cells are recognized by engulfing cells is unclear. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an important apoptotic-cell surface signal that attracts engulfing cells. Here we observed PS exposure on the surface of necrotic touch neurons. In addition, the phagocytic receptor CED-1 clusters around necrotic cells and promotes their engulfment. The extracellular domain of CED-1 associates with PS in vitro. We further identified a necrotic cell-specific function of CED-7, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, in promoting PS exposure. In addition to CED-7, anoctamin homolog-1 (ANOH-1), the C. elegans homolog of the mammalian Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scramblase TMEM16F, plays an independent role in promoting PS exposure on necrotic cells. The combined activities from CED-7 and ANOH-1 ensure efficient exposure of PS on necrotic cells to attract their phagocytes. In addition, CED-8, the C. elegans homolog of mammalian Xk-related protein 8 also makes a contribution to necrotic cell-removal at the first larval stage. Our work indicates that cells killed by different mechanisms (necrosis or apoptosis) expose a common “eat me” signal to attract their phagocytic receptor(s); furthermore, unlike what was previously believed, necrotic cells actively present PS on their outer surfaces through at least two distinct molecular mechanisms rather than leaking out PS passively. PMID:26061275

  13. Necrotic Cells Actively Attract Phagocytes through the Collaborative Action of Two Distinct PS-Exposure Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Zao; Venegas, Victor; Nagaoka, Yuji; Morino, Eri; Raghavan, Prashant; Audhya, Anjon; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu; Zhou, Zheng

    2015-06-01

    Necrosis, a kind of cell death closely associated with pathogenesis and genetic programs, is distinct from apoptosis in both morphology and mechanism. Like apoptotic cells, necrotic cells are swiftly removed from animal bodies to prevent harmful inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, gain-of-function mutations in certain ion channel subunits result in the excitotoxic necrosis of six touch neurons and their subsequent engulfment and degradation inside engulfing cells. How necrotic cells are recognized by engulfing cells is unclear. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an important apoptotic-cell surface signal that attracts engulfing cells. Here we observed PS exposure on the surface of necrotic touch neurons. In addition, the phagocytic receptor CED-1 clusters around necrotic cells and promotes their engulfment. The extracellular domain of CED-1 associates with PS in vitro. We further identified a necrotic cell-specific function of CED-7, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, in promoting PS exposure. In addition to CED-7, anoctamin homolog-1 (ANOH-1), the C. elegans homolog of the mammalian Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipid scramblase TMEM16F, plays an independent role in promoting PS exposure on necrotic cells. The combined activities from CED-7 and ANOH-1 ensure efficient exposure of PS on necrotic cells to attract their phagocytes. In addition, CED-8, the C. elegans homolog of mammalian Xk-related protein 8 also makes a contribution to necrotic cell-removal at the first larval stage. Our work indicates that cells killed by different mechanisms (necrosis or apoptosis) expose a common "eat me" signal to attract their phagocytic receptor(s); furthermore, unlike what was previously believed, necrotic cells actively present PS on their outer surfaces through at least two distinct molecular mechanisms rather than leaking out PS passively.

  14. Molecular-scale interface engineering of metal nanoparticles for plasmon-enhanced dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yanyan; Yuan, Shuai; Zhao, Yin; Hu, Pengfei; Wang, Zhuyi; Zhang, Meihong; Shi, Liyi; Li, Dongdong

    2013-04-21

    A molecular surface chemical treatment is introduced into a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) incorporating metal nanoparticles to suppress the charge recombination. Dodecanethiol molecules as a surface treatment agent are successfully anchored onto the exposed Au nanoparticle sites of the ZnO nanorods/Au nanoparticles/N719 photoanode. ATR-FTIR and Raman measurements are conducted to understand the adsorptions of different molecules (dodecanethiol, N719) on the ZnO nanorods and Au nanoparticles surface. The effects of the dodecanethiol surface treatment on the performance of the plasmon-enhanced DSSC are investigated by UV-vis absorption, incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The plasmon-enhanced light absorption due to the presence of Au nanoparticles is not affected by the dodecanethiol surface treatment. The charge recombination on the ZnO nanorods-dye-electrolyte interface is substantially retarded by insulating the exposed Au nanoparticle sites from the oxidized form of the electrolyte via dodecanethiol molecules. The strategy of a molecular surface chemical treatment on the photoanode of a DSSC with metal nanoparticles fully exploits the plasmon-enhanced light absorption and explores a simple method to protect the metal nanoparticles for the plasmon-enhanced DSSC.

  15. Stability of the fluid interface in a Hele-Shaw cell subjected to horizontal vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, T. P.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Sadilov, E. S.; Popov, D. M.

    2017-07-01

    The stability of the horizontal interface of two immiscible viscous fluids in a Hele-Shaw cell subject to gravity and horizontal vibrations is studied. The problem is reduced to the generalized Hill equation, which is solved analytically by the multiple scale method and numerically. The long-wave instability, the resonance (parametric resonance) excitation of waves at finite frequencies of vibrations (for the first three resonances), and the limit of high-frequency vibrations are studied analytically under the assumption of small amplitudes of vibrations and small viscosity. For finite amplitudes of vibrations, finite wave numbers, and finite viscosity, the study is performed numerically. The influence of the specific natural control parameters and physical parameters of the system on its instability threshold is discussed. The results provide extension to other results [J. Bouchgl, S. Aniss, and M. Souhar, Phys. Rev. E 88, 023027 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.023027], where the authors considered a similar problem but took into account viscosity in the basic state and did not consider it in the equations for perturbations.

  16. Effects of long term low- and high-dose sodium arsenite exposure in human transitional cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianming; Wang, Feng; Luo, Fen; Chen, Xuedan; Liang, Xi; Jiang, Wenbin; Huang, Zhizhong; Lei, Jiafan; Shan, Fabo; Xu, Xueqing

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed the association between increased risk of bladder cancer and chronic arsenic exposure. Here, we explored biological effects of arsenic in T24. Microarray analysis was applied to analyze mRNA in T24 following 0, 2 or 5 μM sodium arsenite (As) exposure for 72 hours. Long term (up to 140 days) low-dose (200 nM) and high-dose (1,000 nM) As decreased E-cadherin protein level through different mechanisms because the mRNA levels of E-cadherin increased following low-dose As exposure but decreased following high-dose As exposure. Long term As increased the protein levels of N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and slug. Low-dose As exposure resulted in a change in the morphology of T24 cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal-like appearance. Knockdown of E-cadherin increased the protein levels of N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and slug. Cell proliferation and growth of T24 with or without As exposure for 100 days were assayed using EdU and WST, respectively. Low-dose As exposure increased cell proliferation and growth while high-dose As exposure decreased both. Long term As activated p53 on account of increasing protein levels of p53, p-p53 (Ser15), and mRNA levels of p21. These demonstrate that arsenic exposure exerts multiple effects. Long term low- or high-dose arsenic induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition, likely via downregulation of E-cadherin, activates p53, and differently affects cell proliferation/growth. PMID:28337271

  17. Cryo DualBeam Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy to Evaluate the Interface Between Cells and Nanopatterned Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Edwin; Walboomers, X Frank; Domanski, Maciej; McKerr, George; O'Hagan, Barry M; Barnes, Clifford A; Peto, Lloyd; Luttge, Regina; Winnubst, Louis A J A; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Jansen, John A

    2011-01-01

    With the advance of nanotechnology in biomaterials science and tissue engineering, it is essential that new techniques become available to observe processes that take place at the direct interface between tissue and scaffold materials. Here, Cryo DualBeam focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) was used as a novel approach to observe the interactions between frozen hydrated cells and nanometric structures in high detail. Through a comparison of images acquired with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), conventional FIB-SEM operated at ambient temperature, and Cryo DualBeam FIB-SEM, the advantages and disadvantages of each technique were evaluated. Ultrastructural details of both (extra)cellular components and cell organelles were best observe with TEM. However, processing artifacts such as shrinkage of cells at the substrate interface were introduced in both TEM and conventional FIB-SEM. In addition, the cellular contrast in conventional FIB-SEM was low; consequently, cells were difficult to distinguish from the adjoining substrate. Cryo DualBeam FIB-SEM did preserve (extra)cellular details like the contour, cell membrane, and mineralized matrix. The three described techniques have proven to be complementary for the evaluation of processes that take place at the interface between tissue and substrate.

  18. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p<0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4(+)CD8(-) and peripheral CD4(+) T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8(+) population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4(+) T cells, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4(+) T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression.

  19. Sticky water surfaces: Helix-coil transitions suppressed in a cell-penetrating peptide at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schach, Denise; Globisch, Christoph; Roeters, Steven J.; Woutersen, Sander; Fuchs, Adrian; Weiss, Clemens K.; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Landfester, Katharina; Bonn, Mischa; Peter, Christine; Weidner, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    GALA is a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide consisting of a Glu-Ala-Leu-Ala repeat and is known to undergo a reversible structural transition from a disordered to an α-helical structure when changing the pH from basic to acidic values. In its helical state GALA can insert into and disintegrate lipid membranes. This effect has generated much interest in GALA as a candidate for pH triggered, targeted drug delivery. GALA also serves as a well-defined model system to understand cell penetration mechanisms and protein folding triggered by external stimuli. Structural transitions of GALA in solution have been studied extensively. However, cell penetration is an interfacial effect and potential biomedical applications of GALA would involve a variety of surfaces, e.g., nanoparticles, lipid membranes, tubing, and liquid-gas interfaces. Despite the apparent importance of interfaces in the functioning of GALA, the effect of surfaces on the reversible folding of GALA has not yet been studied. Here, we use sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) to probe the structural response of GALA at the air-water interface and IR spectroscopy to follow GALA folding in bulk solution. We combine the SFG data with molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a molecular-level picture of the interaction of GALA with the air-water interface. Surprisingly, while the fully reversible structural transition was observed in solution, at the water-air interface, a large fraction of the GALA population remained helical at high pH. This "stickiness" of the air-water interface can be explained by the stabilizing interactions of hydrophobic leucine and alanine side chains with the water surface.

  20. Versatile plasmonic-effects at the interface of inverted perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shalan, Ahmed Esmail; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Sawayanagi, Hiroki; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ueno, Kosei; Sun, Quan; Wu, Hui-Ping; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2017-01-19

    Plasmonics is a highly promising approach to enhancing the light-harvesting properties of hybrid organic/inorganic perovskite solar cells. In the present work, our cells have a p-i-n inverted planar structure. An ultrathin NiO film with two different thicknesses of 5 and 10 nm prepared by a pulsed laser deposition process on an ITO substrate with a faceted and furrowed surface enabled the formation of a continuous and compact layer of well-crystallized CH3NH3PbI3via an anti-solvent chlorobenzene process. The coverage mechanism of the NiO film on the ITO was clearly demonstrated through the J-V and external quantum efficiency (EQE) curves. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the gold nanoislands (Au NIs) increased the power conversion efficiency to 5.1%, almost double that of the samples without Au NIs. This result is due to the excitation of surface plasmons, which is characterized by strong scattering and enhancement of the electric field in the vicinity of the Au NIs loaded at the interface between the NiO and perovskite films. Additionally, we observed an enhancement of the EQE at wavelengths shorter than the plasmon resonance peak. In the current state, we speculate that the plasmoelectric potential effect is considered to be a good explanation of the photocurrent enhancement at the off-resonance region. Our work provides good guidance for the design and fabrication of solar-energy-related devices employing NiO electrodes and plasmonic Au NIs.

  1. Culturing of cells as influenced by exposure to AC and DC fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Salam, M.; Nakano, M.; Tanino, M.; Mizuno, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper is aimed at investigating culturing of living cells as influenced by exposure to AC and DC ionized and non-ionized fields in a point-to-plane gap. A cell suspension including yeast was placed on the ground plane at the gap axis and exposed to AC and DC fields of varying magnitudes. The effect of exposure time, frequency of the AC fields and magnitude of the applied fields on the survival rate of cells was investigated. The survival rate was also investigated as influenced by blowing the ionized field by air.

  2. Damage Thresholds for Exposure to NIR and Blue Lasers in an In Vitro RPE Cell System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    vivo results. Thresholds for both blue exposures (cw and ml) were identical. Overnight treatment of cells with ascorbic acid (AA) minimized cell...experiments, cells received 2 mM ascorbic acid (AA; BP351-500; Fisher Scientific, Fair Lawn, ND or 1 mM A’-acetyl-L- cysteine (NAC; A9165, Sigma...Aldrich) in fresh complete medium 18 to 20 hours before exposures. Ascorbic acid serves as a well-known physiological antioxidant in the RPE layer,23

  3. Generation of ROS in cells on exposure to CW and pulsed near-infrared laser tweezers.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Samarendra Kumar; Sharma, Mrinalini; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of a study on generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in the membrane potential of mitochondria of carcinoma of cervix (HeLa) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells following exposure to continuous wave (cw) or pulsed Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm). For a given laser irradiation, the generation of ROS and induced changes in the membrane potential of mitochondria were more pronounced for HeLa cells as compared to CHO cells. However, in both the cells the laser dose required to elicit a given change was much lower with pulsed laser exposure compared to that required with a cw laser exposure. This suggests involvement of photothermal effects in the laser irradiation induced changes. Mechanistic studies using quenchers for ROS suggest that laser irradiation leads to generation of hydroxyl radicals.

  4. Long-term exposure of bacterial cells to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouia, Fathi; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Ott, Mark C.; Willson, Richard C.; Pierson, Duane L.; Fox, George E.

    2012-10-01

    Previous space flight experience has demonstrated that microorganisms are just as ubiquitous in space habitats as they are on Earth. Numerous incidences of biofilm formation within space habitats have been reported; some of which were identified only after damage to spacecraft structures and irritation to astronaut's skin occurred. As we increase the duration of spaceflight missions, it becomes legitimate to question the long-term effects of microgravity on bacteria. To begin this assessment, Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 was grown for one thousand generations (1000G) under low shear modeled microgravity. Subsequently, growth kinetics and the presence of biofilm were assessed in the 1000G strain as compared to a strain (1G) briefly exposed to LSMMG. Overall, the analysis revealed that (i) there was no obvious difference in growth kinetics between the 1G and 1000G strains, and (ii) although biofilm formation was not seen in the 1G strain it did in fact occur as exposure time increased. The results suggest that long-term exposure to the space environment likely favors biofilm formation in many organisms.

  5. Nanopore formation in neuroblastoma cells following ultrashort electric pulse exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Payne, Jason A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrashort or nanosecond electrical pulses (USEP) cause repairable damage to the plasma membranes of cells through formation of nanopores. These nanopores are able to pass small ions such as sodium, calcium, and potassium, but remain impermeable to larger molecules like trypan blue and propidium iodide. What remains uncertain is whether generation of nanopores by ultrashort electrical pulses can inhibit action potentials in excitable cells. In this paper, we explored the sensitivity of excitable cells to USEP using Calcium Green AM 1 ester fluorescence to measure calcium uptake indicative of nanopore formation in the plasma membrane. We determined the threshold for nanopore formation in neuroblastoma cells for three pulse parameters (amplitude, pulse width, and pulse number). Measurement of such thresholds will guide future studies to determine if USEP can inhibit action potentials without causing irreversible membrane damage.

  6. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    PubMed Central

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52 wk exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMAIII [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMAIII [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMAIII, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12 wk exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single strand breaks at 12 wk exposure consistently elevated through 52 wk. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2 wk removal of MMAIII. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36 wk MMAIII exposure, suggesting the presence of MMAIII is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMAIII results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMAIII; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMAIII induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMAIII. PMID:19699219

  7. Morphological changes and viability of primary cultured human ocular trabecular meshwork cells after exposure to air.

    PubMed

    Kopsachilis, Nikolaos; Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Carifi, Gianluca; Welge-Luessen, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the possible toxic effect of air exposure for an in vitro model of primary human ocular trabecular meshwork cells (HTM). HTM were isolated from five donor eyes and cultivated at 37 °C. After reaching confluence the cells were seeded on two well chamber slides. The chamber slides were turned upside down in a Petri culture dish full of culture medium and filled with air using a 5 ml syringe, starting this way the exposure of the cells to the air. Subsequently they were placed in the incubation chamber at 37 °C. Six groups of HTM cultures were set up: group 1 consisted of samples in which HTM were exposed to air for 30 min, group 2 for 1 h, group 3 for 3 h, group 4 for 6 h, group 5 for 12 h and group 6 for 24 h. At 3 h after exposure, the morphology of the cells was still intact, at 6 h few cells appeared deformed and exhibited characteristics of more senescent cells. At 12 h after exposure to air the HTM cells started losing their typical morphology and appeared enlarged and compromised. Viability was superior to 94% in groups 1-3 while for groups 4, 5, 6 it was 82.7%, 39.5% and 12.7% respectively. The toxic effect of air exposure for the studied in vitro model of HTM is not significant for the time period of one to three hours. However it starts reducing viability and alternating morphology 6 h after exposure until the time period of 24 h, where the percentage of living cells is drastically decreased. Therefore, we suggest that the use of an air bubble especially in glaucomatous patients should be applied with caution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High-throughput PBPK and Microdosimetry: Cell-level Exposures in a Virtual Tissue Context (WC9)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicokinetic (TK) models can determine whether chemical exposures produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations. Tissue microdosimetry TK models relate whole-body chemical exposures to cell-scale concentrations. As a proof of concept, we approximated the micro-anatomic arc...

  9. High-throughput PBPK and Microdosimetry: Cell-level Exposures in a Virtual Tissue Context (WC9)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicokinetic (TK) models can determine whether chemical exposures produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations. Tissue microdosimetry TK models relate whole-body chemical exposures to cell-scale concentrations. As a proof of concept, we approximated the micro-anatomic arc...

  10. Cell Survival After Exposure to a Novel Endodontic Irrigant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-13

    developed for use as an endodontic irrigant. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Endocyn on human periodontal ligament (PDL...principle cause of apical periodontitis (1,2,3). Since the goal of endodontic therapy is the prevention and treatment of apical periodontitis , the...dissolve necrotic tissue (5). A significant disadvantage of using sodium hypochlorite is its toxicity to periodontal ligament cells (6), stem cells of

  11. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in rat mammary glands following combinational exposure to bisphenol A and genistein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Jenkins, Sarah; Lamartiniere, Coral A

    2014-05-29

    Humans are exposed to an array of both harmful and beneficial hormonally active compounds in the environment and through diet. Two such chemicals are Bisphenol A (BPA), a plasticizer, and genistein, a component of soy. Prepubertal exposure to BPA increased mammary carcinogenesis, while genistein suppressed cancer in a chemically-induced model of rodent mammary cancer. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of combinational exposure to genistein and BPA on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and associated proteins as markers of cancer in mammary glands of rats exposed prepubertally to these environmental chemicals. Prepubertal rats (postpartum days (PND) 2-20) were exposed through lactation via nursing dams treated orally with sesame oil (SO), BPA, genistein, or a combination of BPA and genistein (BPA + Gen). Cell proliferation, apoptosis and protein expressions were investigated for mechanistic studies in mammary glands of rats exposed to these environmental chemicals. Prepubertal exposure to genistein increased cell proliferation in mammary glands of PND21 rats, while BPA increased cell proliferation in adult (PND50) rats. Prepubertal combinational exposure to BPA + Gen increased cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis in PND21 rats, but reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in PND50 rats. The altered mechanisms behind these cellular responses appear to be centered on differential protein expression of caspases, PARP, Bad, p21, Akts, PTEN, ER-β and SRCs 1-3, in the rat mammary gland. Prepubertal BPA exposure resulted in increased cell proliferation in mammary glands of PND50 rats, a process associated with increased risk of cancer development in a chemically-induced mammary cancer. On the other hand, genistein stimulated cell proliferation at PND21, a process that correlates with mammary gland maturation and chemoprevention. In contrast to single chemical exposure, combinational exposure to BPA + Gen performed most similarly to

  12. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in rat mammary glands following combinational exposure to bisphenol A and genistein

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Humans are exposed to an array of both harmful and beneficial hormonally active compounds in the environment and through diet. Two such chemicals are Bisphenol A (BPA), a plasticizer, and genistein, a component of soy. Prepubertal exposure to BPA increased mammary carcinogenesis, while genistein suppressed cancer in a chemically-induced model of rodent mammary cancer. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of combinational exposure to genistein and BPA on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and associated proteins as markers of cancer in mammary glands of rats exposed prepubertally to these environmental chemicals. Methods Prepubertal rats (postpartum days (PND) 2–20) were exposed through lactation via nursing dams treated orally with sesame oil (SO), BPA, genistein, or a combination of BPA and genistein (BPA + Gen). Cell proliferation, apoptosis and protein expressions were investigated for mechanistic studies in mammary glands of rats exposed to these environmental chemicals. Results Prepubertal exposure to genistein increased cell proliferation in mammary glands of PND21 rats, while BPA increased cell proliferation in adult (PND50) rats. Prepubertal combinational exposure to BPA + Gen increased cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis in PND21 rats, but reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in PND50 rats. The altered mechanisms behind these cellular responses appear to be centered on differential protein expression of caspases, PARP, Bad, p21, Akts, PTEN, ER-β and SRCs 1–3, in the rat mammary gland. Conclusion Prepubertal BPA exposure resulted in increased cell proliferation in mammary glands of PND50 rats, a process associated with increased risk of cancer development in a chemically-induced mammary cancer. On the other hand, genistein stimulated cell proliferation at PND21, a process that correlates with mammary gland maturation and chemoprevention. In contrast to single chemical exposure, combinational exposure to

  13. Variation of carrier concentration and interface trap density in 8MeV electron irradiated c-Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Sathyanarayana Rao, Asha; Krishnan, Sheeja; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Suresh, E. P.

    2014-04-24

    The capacitance and conductance measurements were carried out for c-Si solar cells, irradiated with 8 MeV electrons with doses ranging from 5kGy – 100kGy in order to investigate the anomalous degradation of the cells in the radiation harsh environments. Capacitance – Voltage measurements indicate that there is a slight reduction in the carrier concentration upon electron irradiation due to the creation of radiation induced defects. The conductance measurement results reveal that the interface state densities and the trap time constant increases with electron dose due to displacement damages in c-Si solar cells.

  14. Does sunlight exposure improve survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Hasan; Buyukcelik, Abdullah; Aksahin, Arzu; Kibar, Mustafa; Cihan, Yasemin Benderli; Kaya, Eser; Seyrek, Ertugrul; Yavuz, Sinan; Erden, Abdulsamet; Calikusu, Zuleyha; Aslan, Tuncay; Akca, Zeki

    2013-01-01

    Some epidemiological studies reported that sunlight exposure and highvitamin D levels may decrease the morbidity and mortality related to cancer. We aimed to evaluate whether sunlight exposure has an impact on survival in patients with non small cell lung cancer. A total of 546 patients with NSCLC from two different regions (Kayseri and Adana) differing according to sunlight exposure were analysed retrospectively. The median overall survival (OS) rates were 11. 6 (CI: 9.50-13.6) and 15.6 months (CI: 12.4-18.8) for Kayseri and Adana, respectively, in all patients (p=0.880). There were no differences between groups in terms of OS. While there is strong evidence regarding inverse relationship between cancer incidence and sunlight exposure, it is still controversial whether sunlight exposure is a good prognostic factor for survival in patients with lung cancer.

  15. A novel in vitro survival assay of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Masanori; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nakasono, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    The microcolony assay developed by Withers and Elkind has been a gold standard to assess the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to high (≥8 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR), but is not applicable in cases of exposure to lower doses. Here, we developed a novel in vitro assay that enables assessment of the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower IR doses. The assay includes in vitro culture of small intestinal stem cells, which allows the stem cells to develop into epithelial organoids containing all four differentiated cell types of the small intestine. We used Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2/ROSA26-tdTomato mice to identify Lgr5(+) stem cells and their progeny. Enzymatically dissociated single crypt cells from the duodenum and jejunum of mice were irradiated with 7.25, 29, 101, 304, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mGy of X-rays immediately after plating, and the number of organoids was counted on Day 12. Organoid-forming efficiency of irradiated cells relative to that of unirradiated controls was defined as the surviving fraction of stem cells. We observed a significant decrease in the surviving fraction of stem cells at ≥1000 mGy. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses and passage of the organoids revealed that proliferation of stem cells surviving IR is significantly potentiated. Together, the present study demonstrates that the in vitro assay is useful for quantitatively assessing the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower doses of IR as compared with previous examinations using the microcolony assay.

  16. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality.

    PubMed

    Dinkla, Sip; Peppelman, Malou; Van Der Raadt, Jori; Atsma, Femke; Novotný, Vera M J; Van Kraaij, Marian G J; Joosten, Irma; Bosman, Giel J C G M

    2014-04-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibility of red blood cells to stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage. Phosphatidylserine exposure may, therefore, constitute a link between donor variation and the quality of red blood cell concentrates. In order to examine the relationship between storage parameters and donor characteristics, the percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was measured in red blood cell concentrates during storage and in fresh red blood cells from blood bank donors. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was compared with red blood cell susceptibility to osmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure in vitro, with the regular red blood cell concentrate quality parameters, and with the donor characteristics age, body mass index, haemoglobin level, gender and blood group. Phosphatidylserine exposure varies between donors, both on red blood cells freshly isolated from the blood, and on red blood cells in red blood cell concentrates. Phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage time, and is correlated with stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. Increased phosphatidylserine exposure during storage was found to be associated with haemolysis and vesicle concentration in red blood cell concentrates. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells showed a positive correlation with the plasma haemoglobin concentration of the donor. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells is a parameter of red blood cell integrity in red blood cell concentrates and may be an indicator of red blood cell survival after transfusion. Measurement of phosphatidylserine exposure may be useful in the selection of donors and

  17. Diverse profiles of ricin-cell interactions in the lung following intranasal exposure to ricin.

    PubMed

    Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Alcalay, Ron; Gal, Yoav; Seliger, Nehama; Sabo, Tamar; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-11-17

    Ricin, a plant-derived exotoxin, inhibits protein synthesis by ribosomal inactivation. Due to its wide availability and ease of preparation, ricin is considered a biothreat, foremost by respiratory exposure. We examined the in vivo interactions between ricin and cells of the lungs in mice intranasally exposed to the toxin and revealed multi-phasic cell-type-dependent binding profiles. While macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) displayed biphasic binding to ricin, monophasic binding patterns were observed for other cell types; epithelial cells displayed early binding, while B cells and endothelial cells bound toxin late after intoxication. Neutrophils, which were massively recruited to the intoxicated lung, were refractive to toxin binding. Although epithelial cells bound ricin as early as MΦs and DCs, their rates of elimination differed considerably; a reduction in epithelial cell counts occurred late after intoxication and was restricted to alveolar type II cells only. The differential binding and cell-elimination patterns observed may stem from dissimilar accessibility of the toxin to different cells in the lung and may also reflect unequal interactions of the toxin with different cell-surface receptors. The multifaceted interactions observed in this study between ricin and the various cells of the target organ should be considered in the future development of efficient post-exposure countermeasures against ricin intoxication.

  18. System for the exposure of cell suspensions to power-frequency electric fields.

    PubMed

    Kaune, W T; Frazier, M E; King, A J; Samuel, J E; Hungate, F P; Causey, S C

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that uses an oscillating magnetic field to produce power-frequency electric fields with strengths in excess of those produced in an animal or human standing under a high-voltage electric-power transmission line. In contrast to other types of exposure systems capable of generating fields of this size, no electrodes are placed in the conducting growth media: the possibility of electrode contamination of the exposed suspension is thereby eliminated. Electric fields in the range 0.02-3.5 V/m can be produced in a cell culture with total harmonic distortions less than 1.5%. The magnetic field used to produce electric fields for exposure is largely confined within a closed ferromagnetic circuit, and experimental and control cells are exposed to leakage magnetic flux densities less than 5 microT . The temperatures of the experimental and control cell suspensions are held fixed within +/- 0.1 degrees C by a water bath. Special chambers were developed to hold cell cultures during exposure and sham exposure. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells incubated in these chambers grew for at least 48 h and had population doubling times of 16-17 h, approximately the same as for CHO cells grown under standard cell-culture conditions.

  19. Acute ethanol exposure affects spermatogonial stem cell homeostasis in pre-pubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Caires, Kyle C; Shima, Christina M; de Avila, Jeanene; McLean, Derek J

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is a known modulator of neural stem cell development, but the consequences of ethanol toxicity on the cell fate decisions of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is poorly understood. Using an in vivo treatment and stem cell transplantation approach, we investigated the effects of acute ethanol exposure on formation of the growing adult SSC population in neonatal and pre-pubertal mice. Treatment with a single dose of ethanol disrupted SSC homeostasis in vivo evidenced by a significant reduction (7-fold) of stem cell colonization efficiency in the testes of recipient mice following transplantation. Ethanol treatment also increased the rate of apoptosis in adult differentiating germ cells in situ. Gene expression analysis indicates that ethanol exposure has transient and long-term effects on the expression of GDNF and VEGF family molecules and supports the hypothesis that the niche microenvironment for SSCs is sensitive to ethanol toxicity during pre-pubertaland adult life.

  20. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro causes acquisition of multiple tumor cell characteristics in human pancreatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wei; Tokar, Erik J; Kim, Andrew J; Bell, Matthew W; Waalkes, Michael P

    2012-09-01

    Cancer may be a stem cell (SC)-based disease involving formation of cancer SCs (CSCs) potentially arising from transformation of normal SCs. Cadmium has been linked to human pancreatic cancer. We studied cadmium exposure of human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE) cells and whether SCs may be targeted in this process. We chronically exposed HPDE cells to low level cadmium (1 μM) for ≤ 29 weeks. Nonadherent spheroid formation was used to indicate CSC-like cell production, and we assessed tumor cell characteristics in such spheres. Assessed tumor cell characteristics including secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), invasion, and colony formation were fortified by evaluating expression of relevant genes by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and by Western blot. Increased MMP-9 secretion and overexpression of the pancreatic cancer marker S100P occurred in chronic (29 weeks of exposure) cadmium-exposed (CCE) cells. CCE cells also showed markedly higher colony formation and invasion, typical of cancer cells. Floating "spheres" of viable cells, known to contain an abundance of normal SCs or CSCs, form in vitro with many cell types. CCE cells produced 3-fold more spheres than control cells and were more invasive, secreted more MMP-9, and overexpressed markers for pancreatic SCs/CSCs (i.e., CXCR4, OCT4, CD44) and S100P, a marker for pancreatic cancer. CCE-derived spheres rapidly produced aggressive, highly branched, and poorly differentiated glandular-like structures in Matrigel. Chronic cadmium exposure produced multiple tumor cell characteristics in HPDE cells and CCE cell-derived spheres. These data support the plausibility of cadmium as a human pancreatic carcinogen.

  1. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Exposure Reduces Hypoxia and Inflammation Damage in Neuron-Like and Microglial Cells.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Ravani, Annalisa; Pasquini, Silvia; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of low-frequency, low-energy pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been investigated by using different cell lines derived from neuron-like cells and microglial cells. In particular, the primary aim was to evaluate the effect of PEMF exposure in inflammation- and hypoxia-induced injury in two different neuronal cell models, the human neuroblastoma-derived SH-SY5Y cells and rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and in N9 microglial cells. In neuron-like cells, live/dead and apoptosis assays were performed in hypoxia conditions from 2 to 48 h. Interestingly, PEMF exposure counteracted hypoxia damage significantly reducing cell death and apoptosis. In the same cell lines, PEMFs inhibited the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), the master transcriptional regulator of cellular response to hypoxia. The effect of PEMF exposure on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in both neuron-like and microglial cells was investigated considering their key role in ischemic injury. PEMFs significantly decreased hypoxia-induced ROS generation in PC12, SH-SY5Y, and N9 cells after 24 or 48 h of incubation. Moreover, PEMFs were able to reduce some of the most well-known pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 release in N9 microglial cells stimulated with different concentrations of LPS for 24 or 48 h of incubation time. These results show a protective effect of PEMFs on hypoxia damage in neuron-like cells and an anti-inflammatory effect in microglial cells suggesting that PEMFs could represent a potential therapeutic approach in cerebral ischemic conditions. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1200-1208, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Imidacloprid Exposure Suppresses Neural Crest Cells Generation during Early Chick Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Wang, Guang; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Meng; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; He, Xiao-Song; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-06-15

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is widely used in the control pests found on crops and fleas on pets. However, it is still unclear whether imidacloprid exposure could affect early embryo development-despite some studies having been conducted on the gametes. In this study, we demonstrated that imidacloprid exposure could lead to abnormal craniofacial osteogenesis in the developing chick embryo. Cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) are the progenitor cells of the chick cranial skull. We found that the imidacloprid exposure retards the development of gastrulating chick embryos. HNK-1, PAX7, and Ap-2α immunohistological stainings indicated that cranial NCCs generation was inhibited after imidacloprid exposure. Double immunofluorescent staining (Ap-2α and PHIS3 or PAX7 and c-Caspase3) revealed that imidacloprid exposure inhibited both NCC proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, it inhibited NCCs production by repressing Msx1 and BMP4 expression in the developing neural tube and by altering expression of EMT-related adhesion molecules (Cad6B, E-Cadherin, and N-cadherin) in the developing neural crests. We also determined that imidacloprid exposure suppressed cranial NCCs migration and their ability to differentiate. In sum, we have provided experimental evidence that imidacloprid exposure during embryogenesis disrupts NCCs development, which in turn causes defective cranial bone development.

  3. Apoptotic cells subjected to cold/warming exposure disorganize apoptotic microtubule network and undergo secondary necrosis.

    PubMed

    Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Fernández-Vega, Alejandro; de la Mata, Mario; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cotán, David; Paz, Marina Villanueva; Pavón, Ana Delgado; Cordero, Mario D; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Lema, Rafael; Zaderenko, Ana Paula; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2014-09-01

    Apoptotic microtubule network (AMN) is organized during apoptosis, forming a cortical structure beneath the plasma membrane which plays a critical role in preserving cell morphology and plasma membrane integrity. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of cold/warming exposure on apoptotic microtubules and plasma membrane integrity during the execution phase of apoptosis. We demonstrated in camptothecin-induced apoptotic H460 cells that cold/warming exposure disorganized apoptotic microtubules and allowed the access of active caspases to the cellular cortex and the cleavage of essential proteins in the preservation of plasma membrane permeability. Cleavage of cellular cortex and plasma membrane proteins, such as α-spectrin, paxilin, focal adhesion kinase and calcium ATPase pump (PMCA-4) involved in cell calcium extrusion resulted in increased plasma permeability and calcium overload leading apoptotic cells to secondary necrosis. The essential role of caspase-mediated cleavage in this process was demonstrated because the addition of the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD during cold/warming exposure that induces AMN depolymerization avoided the cleavage of cortical and plasma membrane proteins and prevented apoptotic cells to undergo secondary necrosis. Likewise, apoptotic microtubules stabilization by taxol during cold/warming exposure also prevented cellular cortex and plasma membrane protein cleavage and secondary necrosis. Furthermore, microtubules stabilization or caspase inhibition during cold/warming exposure was also critical for proper phosphatidylserine externalization and apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages. These results indicate that cold/warming exposure of apoptotic cells induces secondary necrosis which can be prevented by both, microtubule stabilization or caspase inhibition.

  4. Common Mechanisms of Neuronal Cell Death After Exposure to Diverse Environmental Insults: Implications for Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    Neuronal cell death after exposure to neurotoxins or after central nervous system (CNS) injury is the major cause of devastating neurological...neuronal cell death is critical to development of appropriate treatment strategies. Although the environmental causes of CNS injury are diverse (e.g...of cellular and molecular events is responsible for the vast majority of cell death . The research results contained in this annual report summarize the

  5. Alterations in fetal thymic and liver hematopoietic cells as indicators of exposure to developmental immunotoxicants.

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, S D; Luster, M I

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that immune development in humans and other species may be altered after perinatal exposure to immunotoxic environmental contaminants. However, limited information is available regarding appropriate tests that may adequately detect developmental immunotoxic compounds. Experiments in which pregnant laboratory rodents were exposed to a variety of immunotoxic environmental agents indicate that fetal thymus and liver immune cells may be quantitatively and qualitatively altered by immunotoxicant exposure and, thus, may serve as sensitive markers of developmental immunotoxicant exposure. In particular, depression of fetal thymic cell counts appears to be a common event following gestational exposure to immunotoxicants that produce this response in adult animals. Total hematopoietic cell counts in fetal liver, however, may be a poor indicator of immunotoxicant exposure. Altered marker expression in both fetal thymus and liver appears to be a highly sensitive indicator of gestational immunotoxicant exposure. Together, these reports suggest that immune tests with high predictability for immunosuppression in adults may also be appropriate for the detection of developmental immunotoxic agents. PMID:8880003

  6. Synergistic effects on dopamine cell death in a Drosophila model of chronic toxin exposure

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ciara A.; Barajas, Angel; Lawless, George; Lawal, Hakeem O.; Assani, Khadij; Lumintang, Yosephine P.; Nunez, Vanessa; Krantz, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The neurodegenerative effects of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are marked by a selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic exposure to the pesticide paraquat may increase the risk for PD and DA cell loss. However, combined exposure with additional fungicide(s) including maneb and/or ziram may be required for pathogenesis. To explore potential pathogenic mechanisms, we have developed a Drosophila model of chronic paraquat exposure. We find that while chronic paraquat exposure alone decreased organismal survival and motor function, combined chronic exposure to both paraquat and maneb was required for DA cell death in the fly. To initiate mechanistic studies of this interaction, we used additional genetic reagents to target the ubiquitin proteasome system, implicated in some rare familial forms of PD and the toxic effects of ziram. Genetic inhibition of E1 ubiquitin ligase, but not the proteasome itself, increased DA cell death in combination with maneb but not paraquat. These studies establish a model for long-term exposure to multiple pesticides, and support the idea that pesticide interactions relevant to PD may involve inhibition of protein ubiquitination. PMID:25160001

  7. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup Cip1} is likely dispensable when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces senescence in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21{sup Cip1}/PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  8. Exposure to zidovudine adversely affects mitochondrial turnover in primary T cells.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Zoë R; Sanderson, Sharon; Simon, Anna Katarina; Dorrell, Lucy

    2016-09-01

    Zidovudine (ZDV) is a widely used component of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, despite its known adverse effects, which include mitochondrial toxicity in muscle, liver and adipose tissue. It has also been associated with impaired immunological recovery. We hypothesised that ZDV might impair mitochondrial health and survival of primary T cells. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of mitochondrial function, mitophagy and susceptibility to apoptosis in healthy donor primary T cells after exposure to ZDV in vitro, together with T cells from patients who were virologically suppressed on ZDV-containing ART regimens for ≥1 year and age-matched subjects receiving non-ZDV ART regimens. The proportion of T cells expressing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) was significantly higher after in vitro (CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells) and in vivo (CD4(+) T cells) exposure to ZDV than other antiretroviral agents. We did not detect any effect of ZDV on mitophagy, as indicated by change in autophagic flux. However, spontaneous apoptosis, indicated by upregulation of caspase-3 was greater in ZDV-exposed T cells. In conclusion, ZDV exposure was associated with impaired mitochondrial turnover and increased susceptibility to apoptosis in T cells. These mechanisms could contribute to sub-optimal immune reconstitution.

  9. Cell adhesion and proliferation on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) with plasma-metal and plasma-metal-carbon interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznickova, Alena; Kvitek, Ondrej; Kolarova, Katerina; Smejkalova, Zuzana; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the effect of the interface between plasma activated, gold and carbon coated poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) on in vitro adhesion and spreading of mouse fibroblasts (L929). Surface properties of pristine and modified PTFE were studied by several experimental techniques. The thickness of a deposited gold film is an increasing function of the sputtering time, conversely thickness of carbon layer decreases with increasing distance between carbon source and the substrate. Because all the used surface modification techniques take place in inert Ar plasma, oxidized degradation products are formed on the PTFE surface, which affects wettability of the polymer surface. Cytocompatibility tests indicate that on samples with Au/C interface, the cells accumulate on the part of sample with evaporated carbon. Number of L929 cells proliferated on the studied samples is comparable to tissue culture polystyrene standard.

  10. Robotics, stem cells, and brain-computer interfaces in rehabilitation and recovery from stroke: updates and advances.

    PubMed

    Boninger, Michael L; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Stein, Joel

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the current state and latest advances in robotics, stem cells, and brain-computer interfaces in rehabilitation and recovery for stroke. The authors of this summary recently reviewed this work as part of a national presentation. The article represents the information included in each area. Each area has seen great advances and challenges as products move to market and experiments are ongoing. Robotics, stem cells, and brain-computer interfaces all have tremendous potential to reduce disability and lead to better outcomes for patients with stroke. Continued research and investment will be needed as the field moves forward. With this investment, the potential for recovery of function is likely substantial.

  11. Inflammatory Cell signaling following Exposures to Particulate Matter and Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review mainly focuses on major inflammatory cell signaling pathways triggered byexposure to PM and 03. The receptors covered in this review include the EGF receptor, toll like receptor,and NOD-like receptor. Intracellular signaling protein kinases depicted in this review are...

  12. Antibacterial Defense of Human Airway Epithelial Cells from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Induced by Acute Exposure to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: Modulation by Cigarette Smoke.

    PubMed

    Amatngalim, Gimano D; Schrumpf, Jasmijn A; Henic, Almira; Dronkers, Esther; Verhoosel, Renate M; Ordonez, Soledad R; Haagsman, Henk P; Fuentes, Maria E; Sridhar, Sriram; Aarbiou, Jamil; Janssen, Richard A J; Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2017-02-08

    Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are a central component of the antibacterial activity of airway epithelial cells. It has been proposed that a decrease in antibacterial lung defense contributes to an increased susceptibility to microbial infection in smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, whether reduced AMP expression in the epithelium contributes to this lower defense is largely unknown. We investigated the bacterial killing activity and expression of AMPs by air-liquid interface-cultured primary bronchial epithelial cells from COPD patients and non-COPD (ex-)smokers that were stimulated with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). In addition, the effect of cigarette smoke on AMP expression and the activation of signaling pathways was determined. COPD cell cultures displayed reduced antibacterial activity, whereas smoke exposure suppressed the NTHi-induced expression of AMPs and further increased IL-8 expression in COPD and non-COPD cultures. Moreover, smoke exposure impaired NTHi-induced activation of NF-κB, but not MAP-kinase signaling. Our findings demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of cultured airway epithelial cells induced by acute bacterial exposure was reduced in COPD and suppressed by cigarette smoke, whereas inflammatory responses persisted. These findings help to explain the imbalance between protective antibacterial and destructive inflammatory innate immune responses in COPD.

  13. Summary of solar cell data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, David C.; Rose, M. Frank

    1994-01-01

    The contractor has obtained and reviewed data relating solar cells assemblies (SCA's) flown as part of the following LDEF experiments: the Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment (S0014); the Solar Array Materials Passive LDEF Experiment (A0171); the Advanced Solar Cell and Coverglass Analysis Experiment (M0003-4); the LDEF Heat Pipe Experiment (S1001); the Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings Y Solar Cells Experiment (S1002); and the Space Plasma-High Voltage Drainage Experiment (A0054). Where possible, electrical data have been tabulated and correlated with various environmental effects, including meteoroid and debris impacts, radiation exposure, atomic oxygen exposure, contamination, UV radiation exposure, and thermal cycling. The type, configuration, and location of all SCA's are documented here. By gathering all data and results together, a comparison of the survivability of the various types and configurations can be made.

  14. Correlation of spectroscopic and biochemical assays post-ionising radiation exposure in human skin cell analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, A. D.; Byrne, H. J.; Lyng, F. M.

    2005-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy, as an evaluation of the products of ionising radiation exposure in biological systems, has been utilised mainly in the evaluation of the impact of exposure in tissue, cellular constituents and live animals. It has also been recently demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy can demonstrate key spectroscopic changes in the live cell associated with significant apoptotic and necrotic chemical damage. The present preliminary work utilises Raman spectroscopy at 514.5 nm to evaluate the results of exposure to γ-rays in HaCaT cells from a Co-60 therapy source, in tandem with other biological assays. The results demonstrate that Raman spectral changes may be correlated with changes in the cell also identified in parallel biochemical assays.

  15. Cocaine Exposure Reorganizes Cell-Type and Input-Specific Connectivity in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    MacAskill, Andrew F.; Cassel, John M.; Carter, Adam G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine alters the structural and functional properties of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc). These changes suggest a rewiring of the NAc circuit, with an enhancement of excitatory synaptic connections onto MSNs. However, it is unknown how drug exposure alters the balance of long-range afferents onto different cell types in the NAc. Here we use whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, optogenetics and pharmacogenetics to show how repeated cocaine alters connectivity in the mouse NAc medial shell. We first determine that cocaine selectively enhances amygdala innervation of D1-MSNs relative to D2-MSNs. We then show that amygdala activity is required for cocaine-induced changes to behavior and connectivity. Finally, we establish how heightened amygdala innervation can explain the structural and functional changes induced by cocaine. Our findings reveal how exposure to drugs of abuse fundamentally reorganizes cell-type and input-specific connectivity in the NAc. PMID:25108911

  16. The Effects of Gamma and Proton Radiation Exposure on Hematopoietic Cell Counts in the Ferret Model

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wan, X. Steven; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Wroe, Andrew J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to total-body radiation induces hematological changes, which can detriment one's immune response to wounds and infection. Here, the decreases in blood cell counts after acute radiation doses of γ-ray or proton radiation exposure, at the doses and dose-rates expected during a solar particle event (SPE), are reported in the ferret model system. Following the exposure to γ-ray or proton radiation, the ferret peripheral total white blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte counts decreased whereas neutrophil count increased within 3 hours. At 48 hours after irradiation, the WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts decreased in a dose-dependent manner but were not significantly affected by the radiation type (γ-rays verses protons) or dose rate (0.5 Gy/minute verses 0.5 Gy/hour). The loss of these blood cells could accompany and contribute to the physiological symptoms of the acute radiation syndrome (ARS). PMID:25356435

  17. Human Airway Epithelial Cell Responses to Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Exposure: Nanorope-Residual Body Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, Barbara J.; Warren, John B.; Kisslinger, Kim; Crosson, Kenya; Maye, Mathew M.

    2012-11-01

    This investigation examines the 'first contact responses' of in vitro human epithelial airway cells exposed to unrefined single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) [containing metal catalyst, carbon black, amorphous carbon, graphitic shells, and SWCNTs], and refined acid/peroxide cleaned and cut SWCNTs at low and high dose exposures (0.16 ug/L and 1.60 ug/L) for 2, 3 and 3.5 hours. FTIR, X-ray compositional analysis, morphological TEM analysis and UV-Vis were used to physicochemically characterize the SWCNTs in this study. Following SWCNT exposure to human lung NCI-H292 epithelial monolayers, the airway cells were prepared for light microscopy vital staining, or fixed in glutaraldehyde for SEM/TEM imaging to determine SWCNT binding, uptake, intracellular processing and organellar/SWCNT fate within the exposure period. At 2 hr exposures to both unrefined Carbolex, and refined SWCNTs (at both high and low doses), there were no increases in lung cell necrosis compared to controls. However high dose, 3 hr exposures to unrefined Carbolex material produced severe cell damage (apical and basal plasma membrane holes, decreased mitochondria, numerous intracellular vesicles containing nanomaterial and membrane fragments) and increased cell necrosis. The refined SWCNTs exposed for 3 hr at low dose produced no increase in cell death, although high dose exposure produced significant cell death. By TEM, Acid/peroxide cleaned SWCNT 3 hr exposures at high and low doses, revealed SWCNTs attachment to cell surface mucin, and SWCNT uptake into the cells during membrane recycling. Membranes and SWCNTs were seen within cytoplasmic lamellar body-type vesicles, where vesicular contents were bio-degraded, eventually forming long SWCNT-nanoropes, which were subsequently released into the cytoplasm as clusters of attached nanoropes, as the vesicle membranes fragmented. These Nanorope-Residual Bodies did not cause damage to the surrounding organelles or cytoplasm, and seemed very stabile in the

  18. Lateral Chain Length in Polyalkyl Acrylates Determines the Mobility of Fibronectin at the Cell/Material Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells, by interacting with surfaces indirectly through a layer of extracellular matrix proteins, can respond to a variety of physical properties, such as topography or stiffness. Polymer surface mobility is another physical property that is less well understood but has been indicated to hold the potential to modulate cell behavior. Polymer mobility is related to the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the system, the point at which a polymer transitions from an amorphous solid to a more liquid-like state. This work shows that changes in polymer mobility translate to interfacial mobility of extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed on the material surface. This study has utilized a family of polyalkyl acrylates with similar chemistry but different degrees of mobility, obtained through increasing length of the side chain. These materials are used, in conjunction with fluorescent fibronectin, to determine the mobility of this interfacial layer of protein that constitutes the initial cell–material interface. Furthermore, the extent of fibronectin domain availability (III9, III10, - the integrin binding site), cell-mediated reorganization, and cell differentiation was also determined. A nonmonotonic dependence of fibronectin mobility on polymer surface mobility was observed, with a similar trend noted in cell-mediated reorganization of the protein layer by L929 fibroblasts. The availability of the integrin-binding site was higher on the more mobile surfaces, where a similar organization of the protein into networks at the material interface was observed. Finally, differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was seen to be highly sensitive to surface mobility upon inhibition of cell contractility. Altogether, these findings show that polymer mobility is a subtle influence that translates to the cell/material interface through the protein layer to alter the biological activity of the surface. PMID:26715432

  19. Exposure of human cells to electromagnetic fields. Final report, 1 January 1988-31 December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1990-02-27

    This study addressed the following basic question: How does extremely low-level non-ionizing radiation affect human cells, and if there are cellular responses that can be directly related to signal parameters such as frequency, amplitude and time of exposure. The focus of these studies was to identify transcriptional changes in human cultured cells, HL60, which result from exposure of these cells to defined extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (elf EMFS). Our experiments show a pronounced measurable response observed as transcript increase, with associated changes in protein synthesis. The major findings relative to transcriptional changes are fourfold: (1) transcript changes in human cells correlate with previous findings of transcriptional and translational changes in Drosophila salivary gland cells; (2) the frequency of the signal in the amplitude (with resulting changes in E- and B-fields) in log increments from 0.5 to 500 uV at 60 Hz gives both amplitude and time-dependent windows, and (4) genes not usually expressed in HL-60 are unaffected by exposure to elf EMFs. Changes in the overall protein synthetic pattern have also been observed following exposure of HL60 cells to 60 Hz signals.

  20. Efflux of reduced glutathione after exposure of human lung epithelial cells to crocidolite asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Golladay, S A; Park, S H; Aust, A E

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated glutathione (GSH) homeostasis in human lung epithelial cells (A549) exposed to crocidolite. Exposure of A549 cells to 3 micrograms/cm2 crocidolite resulted in a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione by 36% without a corresponding increase in GSH disulfide. After a 24-hr exposure to crocidolite, 75% of the intracellular GSH lost was recovered in the extracellular medium, of which 50% was in reduced form. Since the half-life of reduced GSH in culture medium was less than 1 hr, this suggests that reduced GSH was released continuously from the cells after treatment. The release of GSH did not appear to result from nonspecific membrane damage, as there was no concomitant release of lactate dehydrogenase or 14C-adenine from loaded cells after crocidolite treatment for 24 hr. Crocidolite exposure resulted in the formation of S-nitrosothiols but no increase in the level of GSH-protein mixed disulfides or GSH conjugates. Exposure of A549 cells to crocidolite for 24 hr decreased gamma glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) activity by 47% without changes in the activities of GSH reductase, GSH peroxidase, GSH S-transferase, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Treatment of cells with crocidolite pretreated with the iron chelator desferrioxamine B resulted in the same level of intracellular GSH depletion and efflux and the same decrease in gamma-GCS activity as treatment with unmodified crocidolite, which suggests that iron-catalyzed reactions were not responsible for the GSH depletion. PMID:9400737

  1. Effect of duration and intensity of ganciclovir exposure on lymphoblastoid cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Janoly-Dumenil, Audrey; Rouvet, Isabelle; Bleyzac, Nathalie; Bertrand, Yves; Aulagner, Gilles; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus infection is still a major complication after pediatric bone marrow transplantation and could be fatal in some cases. The toxicity of the drug in dividing transplanted haematopoietic cells combined with the suppression of cell growth caused by the virus remains a major problem in managing human cytomegalovirus infection. The aim of the current in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the intensity (1-20 mg/l) and duration (1, 2, 7 or 14 days) of ganciclovir exposure on toxicity in B lymphoblastoid cells (using cell counting and viability measurements). A correlation was found between the dose of ganciclovir exposure and a decrease in total cell number when duration exceeded 2 days (r(2)=0.92 and 0.93 after 7 and 14 days, respectively). High levels (20 mg/l) of ganciclovir were not more toxic than lowest levels (1 mg/l) for the shortest durations of ganciclovir exposure (1 and 2 days). Moreover, 50% cytotoxic concentrations markedly decreased with the duration of ganciclovir exposure (374-3 mg/l from 1 to 14 days respectively) after 14 days of culture. This in vitro study demonstrated for the first time that ganciclovir exhibited an in vitro duration-dependent toxicity on haematopoietic-derived cells when in vivo doses of the drug were used.

  2. Immunogenic tumor cell death for optimal anticancer therapy: the calreticulin exposure pathway.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Kepp, Oliver; Senovilla, Laura; Menger, Laurie; Chaput, Nathalie; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-06-15

    In response to some chemotherapeutic agents such as anthracyclines and oxaliplatin, cancer cells undergo immunogenic apoptosis, meaning that their corpses are engulfed by dendritic cells and that tumor cell antigens are presented to tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells, which then control residual tumor cells. One of the peculiarities of immunogenic apoptosis is the early cell surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT), a protein that usually resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). When elicited by anthracyclines or oxaliplatin, the CRT exposure pathway is activated by pre-apoptotic ER stress and the phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2alpha by the kinase PERK, followed by caspase-8-mediated proteolysis of the ER-sessile protein BAP31, activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak, anterograde transport of CRT from the ER to the Golgi apparatus and exocytosis of CRT-containing vesicles, finally resulting in CRT translocation onto the plasma membrane surface. Interruption of this complex pathway abolishes CRT exposure, annihilates the immunogenicity of apoptosis, and reduces the immune response elicited by anticancer chemotherapies. We speculate that human cancers that are incapable of activating the CRT exposure pathway are refractory to the immune-mediated component of anticancer therapies.

  3. Effects of combined radiofrequency radiation exposure on levels of reactive oxygen species in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung; Hong, Mi-Na; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined RF radiation (837 MHz CDMA plus 1950 MHz WCDMA) signal on levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neuronal cells. Exposure of the combined RF signal was conducted at specific absorption rate values of 2 W/kg of CDMA plus 2 W/kg of WCDMA for 2 h. Co-exposure to combined RF radiation with either H2O2 or menadione was also performed. The experimental exposure groups were incubator control, sham-exposed, combined RF radiation-exposed with or without either H2O2 or menadione groups. The intracellular ROS level was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Intracellular ROS levels were not consistently affected by combined RF radiation exposure alone in a time-dependent manner in U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y cells. In neuronal cells exposed to combined RF radiation with either H2O2 or menadione, intracellular ROS levels showed no statically significant alteration compared with exposure to menadione or H2O2 alone. These findings indicate that neither combined RF radiation alone nor combined RF radiation with menadione or H2O2 influences the intracellular ROS level in neuronal cells such as U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y. PMID:24105709

  4. New exposure system to evaluate the toxicity of (scooter) exhaust emissions in lung cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Müller, Loretta; Comte, Pierre; Czerwinski, Jan; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas C R; Gehr, Peter; Burtscher, Heinz; Morin, Jean-Paul; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2010-04-01

    A constantly growing number of scooters produce an increasing amount of potentially harmful emissions. Due to their engine technology, two-stroke scooters emit huge amounts of adverse substances, which can induce adverse pulmonary and cardiovascular health effects. The aim of this study was to develop a system to expose a characterized triple cell coculture model of the human epithelial airway barrier, to freshly produced and characterized total scooter exhaust emissions. In exposure chambers, cell cultures were exposed for 1 and 2 h to 1:100 diluted exhaust emissions and in the reference chamber to filtered ambient air, both controlled at 5% CO(2), 85% relative humidity, and 37 degrees C. The postexposure time was 0-24 h. Cytotoxicity, used to validate the exposure system, was significantly increased in exposed cell cultures after 8 h postexposure time. (Pro-) inflammatory chemo- and cytokine concentrations in the medium of exposed cells were significantly higher at the 12 h postexposure time point. It was shown that the described exposure system (with 2 h exposure duration, 8 and 24 h postexposure time, dilution of 1:100, flow of 2 L/min as optimal exposure conditions) can be used to evaluate the toxic potential of total exhaust emissions.

  5. Transmitted mutational events induced in mouse germ cells following acrylamide or glycidamide exposure.

    PubMed

    Favor, Jack; Shelby, Michael D

    2005-02-07

    An increase in the germ line mutation rate in humans will result in an increase in the incidence of genetically determined diseases in subsequent generations. Thus, it is important to identify those agents that are mutagenic in mammalian germ cells. Acrylamide is water soluble, absorbed and distributed in the body, chemically reactive with nucleophilic sites, and there are known sources of human exposure. Here we review all seven published studies that assessed the effectiveness of acrylamide or its active metabolite, glycidamide, in inducing transmitted reciprocal translocations or gene mutations in the mouse. Major conclusions were (a) acrylamide is mutagenic in spermatozoa and spermatid stages of the male germ line; (b) in these spermatogenic stages acrylamide is mainly or exclusively a clastogen; (c) per unit dose, i.p. exposure is more effective than dermal exposure; and (d) per unit dose, glycidamide is more effective than acrylamide. Since stem cell spermatogonia persist and may accumulate mutations throughout the reproductive life of males, assessment of induced mutations in this germ cell stage is critical for the assessment of genetic risk associated with exposure to a mutagen. The two specific-locus mutation experiments which studied the stem cell spermatogonial stage yielded conflicting results. This discrepancy should be resolved. Finally, it is noted that no experiments have studied the mutagenic potential of acrylamide to increase the frequency of transmitted mutational events following exposure in the female germ line.

  6. Effects of combined radiofrequency radiation exposure on levels of reactive oxygen species in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung; Hong, Mi-Na; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined RF radiation (837 MHz CDMA plus 1950 MHz WCDMA) signal on levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neuronal cells. Exposure of the combined RF signal was conducted at specific absorption rate values of 2 W/kg of CDMA plus 2 W/kg of WCDMA for 2 h. Co-exposure to combined RF radiation with either H2O2 or menadione was also performed. The experimental exposure groups were incubator control, sham-exposed, combined RF radiation-exposed with or without either H2O2 or menadione groups. The intracellular ROS level was measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Intracellular ROS levels were not consistently affected by combined RF radiation exposure alone in a time-dependent manner in U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y cells. In neuronal cells exposed to combined RF radiation with either H2O2 or menadione, intracellular ROS levels showed no statically significant alteration compared with exposure to menadione or H2O2 alone. These findings indicate that neither combined RF radiation alone nor combined RF radiation with menadione or H2O2 influences the intracellular ROS level in neuronal cells such as U87, PC12 or SH-SY5Y.

  7. Anomalous system-size dependence of electrolytic cells with an electrified oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Westbroek, Marise; Boon, Niels; van Roij, René

    2015-10-14

    Manipulation of the charge of the dielectric interface between two bulk liquids not only enables the adjustment of the interfacial tension but also controls the storage capacity of ions in the ionic double layers adjacent to each side of the interface. However, adjusting this interfacial charge by static external electric fields is difficult since the external electric fields are readily screened by ionic double layers that form in the vicinity of the external electrodes. This leaves the liquid-liquid interface, which is at a macroscopic distance from the electrodes, unaffected. In this study we show theoretically, in agreement with recent experiments, that control over this surface charge at the liquid-liquid interface is nonetheless possible for macroscopically large but finite closed systems in equilibrium, even when the distance between the electrode and interface is orders of magnitude larger than the Debye screening lengths of the two liquids. We identify a crossover system-size below which the interface and the electrodes are effectively coupled. Our calculations of the interfacial tension for various electrode potentials are in good agreement with recent experimental data.

  8. Chronic exposure to IFNα drives medullar lymphopoiesis towards T-cell differentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Marianna; Gil-Fariña, Irene; Vanrell, Lucia; Sánchez-Bayona, Rodrigo; Alignani, Diego; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; Berraondo, Pedro; Prieto, Jesús; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-08-01

    Interferon-α is a potent antiviral agent and a vigorous adjuvant in the induction of T-cell responses but its use is limited by hematologic toxicity. Interferon-α alters hematopoietic stem cell dormancy and impairs myelocytic and erythrocytic/megakaryocytic differentiation from hematopoietic progenitors. However, the effect of chronic interferon-α exposure on hematopoietic precursors has still not been well characterized. Here, we transduced the liver of mice with an adenoassociated vector encoding interferon-α to achieve sustained high serum levels of the cytokine. The bone marrow of these animals showed diminished long-term and short-term hematopoietic stem cells, reduction of multipotent progenitor cells, and marked decrease of B cells, but significant increase in the proportion of CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells. Upon adoptive transfer to RAG(-/-) mice, bone marrow cells from interferon-α-treated animals generated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells while CD19(+), CD11b(+) and NK1.1(+) lineages failed to develop. These effects are associated with the transcriptional downregulation of transcription factors involved in B-cell differentiation and modulation of key factors for T-cell development. Thus, sustained interferon-α exposure causes hematopoietic stem cells exhaustion and drives common lymphoid progenitors towards T-cell generation.

  9. Stem cell responses after radiation exposure: A key to the evaluation and prediction of its effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fliedner, T.M.; Paul, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.P.

    1996-06-01

    A biomathematical model of granulocytopoiesis is described and used to analyze the blood granulocyte changes seen in the blood of dogs and humans after continuous and after acute external radiation exposure. This allows to relate the cell change pattern seen to the extent of stem cell damage in the hematopoietic bone marrow distributed as semiautonomous units throughout the skeletal bones. The model is described briefly and consists of 8 cellular and 2 regulatory compartments and is described by 37 differential equations. With the help of this model, it can be shown that the chronic radiation exposure of dogs at a rate of between 0.003 and 0.12 Gy per day results in a system failure with subsequent death of the animal, if the stem cell pool decreases below 2.5% of its normal content. In human beings exposed to a single radiation exposure (as seen in radiation accidents) the simulation of the granulocyte pattern results in the finding that a reduction of the stem pool to 5-10% of normal is compatible with the assumption of its {open_quotes}reversible{close_quotes} damage (to be treated by conventional replacement therapy including cytokines), whereas the reduction of blood granulocytes to levels of less than 200-300 per mm{sup 3} on day 5-6 after exposure indicates that no stem cells remain from which a spontaneous regeneration could occur and hence would require a substitution therapy by stem cell transplantation. The same model was used to correlate the changing granulocyte pattern seen after autologous blood stem cell transfusion in patients treated with supralethal radiochemo conditioning regimen. The results indicate a proportionality of progenitor cells in the transfusate with the calculated stem cell number of the modeling exercise. It is proposed to use the pattern of granulocyte changes in the blood as a principal indicator to predict the outcome of a radiation exposure and to select appropriate therapeutic strategies. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2015-07-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm-2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  11. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 μg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  12. Designing a Binding Interface for Control of Cancer Cell Adhesion via 3D Topography and Metabolic Oligosaccharide Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jian; Che, Pao-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yun; Aich, Udayanath; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    This study combines metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE), a technology where the glycocalyx of living cells is endowed with chemical features not normally found in sugars, with custom-designed three dimensional biomaterial substrates to enhance the adhesion of cancer cells and control their morphology and gene expression. Specifically, Ac5ManNTGc, a thiol-bearing analogue of N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) was used to introduce thiolated sialic acids into the glycocalyx of human Jurkat T-lymphoma derived cells. In parallel 2D films and 3D electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds were prepared from polyethersulfone (PES) and (as controls) left unmodified or aminated. Alternately, the materials were malemided or gold-coated to provide bioorthogonal binding partners for the thiol groups newly expressed on the cell surface. Cell attachment was modulated by both the topography of the substrate surface and by the chemical compatibility of the binding interface between the cell and the substrate; a substantial increase in binding for normally non-adhesive Jurkat line for 3D scaffold compared to 2D surfaces with an added degree of adhesion resulting from chemoselective binding to malemidede-derivatived or gold-coated surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells attached to the 3D scaffolds via MOE-mediated adhesion was dramatically altered and the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion changed in a time-dependent manner. This study showed that cell adhesion could be enhanced, gene expression modulated, and cell fate controlled by introducing the 3D topograhical cues into the growth substrate and by creating a glycoengineered binding interface where the chemistry of both the cell surface and biomaterials scaffold was controlled to facilitate a new mode of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion. PMID:21549424

  13. Loss of T cell precursors after spaceflight and exposure to vector-averaged gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Chris C.; Banks, Krista E.; Gruener, Raphael; DeLuca, Dominick

    2003-01-01

    Using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC), we examined the effects of spaceflight and vector-averaged gravity on T cell development. Under both conditions, the development of T cells was significantly attenuated. Exposure to spaceflight for 16 days resulted in a loss of precursors for CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ T cells in a rat/mouse xenogeneic co-culture. A significant decrease in the same precursor cells, as well as a decrease in CD4-CD8- T cell precursors, was also observed in a murine C57BL/6 FTOC after rotation in a clinostat to produce a vector-averaged microgravity-like environment. The block in T cell development appeared to occur between the pre-T cell and CD4+CD8+ T cell stage. These data indicate that gravity plays a decisive role in the development of T cells.

  14. Loss of T cell precursors after spaceflight and exposure to vector-averaged gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Chris C.; Banks, Krista E.; Gruener, Raphael; DeLuca, Dominick

    2003-01-01

    Using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC), we examined the effects of spaceflight and vector-averaged gravity on T cell development. Under both conditions, the development of T cells was significantly attenuated. Exposure to spaceflight for 16 days resulted in a loss of precursors for CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ T cells in a rat/mouse xenogeneic co-culture. A significant decrease in the same precursor cells, as well as a decrease in CD4-CD8- T cell precursors, was also observed in a murine C57BL/6 FTOC after rotation in a clinostat to produce a vector-averaged microgravity-like environment. The block in T cell development appeared to occur between the pre-T cell and CD4+CD8+ T cell stage. These data indicate that gravity plays a decisive role in the development of T cells.

  15. Effects of molecular interface modification in hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Chiatzun; Scully, Shawn R.; McGehee, Michael D.

    2007-06-01

    We have systematically investigated the effects of surface modification of titania (TiO2) in hybrid TiO2/regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) photovoltaic cells. By employing a series of para-substituted benzoic acids with varying dipoles and a series of multiply substituted benzene carboxylic acids, the energy offset at the TiO2/polymer interface and thus the open-circuit voltage of devices can be tuned systematically by 0.25 V. Transient photovoltage measurements showed that the recombination kinetics was dominated by charge carrier concentration in these devices and were closely associated with the dark current. The saturated photocurrent of TiO2/P3HT devices exhibited more than a twofold enhancement when molecular modifiers with large electron affinity were employed. The ability of modifiers to accept charge from polymers, as revealed in photoluminescence quenching measurement with blends of polymers, was shown to be correlated with the enhancement in device photocurrent. A planar geometry photoluminescence quenching measurement showed that TiO2 substrates modified by these same molecules that accept charge quenched more excitons in regioregular P3HT than bare TiO2 surfaces. An exciton diffusion length in P3HT as large as 6.5-8.5 nm was extracted. By measuring the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of working devices, it was found that all of the excitons that were quenched were accountable as extracted photocurrent. EQE was effectively increased from 5% to 10%-14% with certain surface modifiers; consequently exciton harvesting was more than doubled. The use of ruthenium (II) sensitizing dyes with good exciton harvesting property coupled with suppression of the recombination kinetics improved the efficiency of optimized bilayer TiO2/P3HT devices from 0.34% to 0.6% under AM 1.5 solar illuminations. The implication of this work is directly relevant to the design of nanostructured bulk heterojunction inorganic-organic cells, in which efficient exciton

  16. Nanoscale Interfaces in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells: Physical Insights and Materials Engineering Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Kyle Wayne

    With growing global energy demand there will be an increased need for sources of renewable energy such as solar cells. To make these photovoltaic technologies more competitive with conventional energy sources such as coal and natural gas requires further reduction in manufacturing costs that can be realized by solution processing and roll-to-roll printing. Colloidal quantum dots are a bandgap tunable, solution processible, semiconductor material which may offer a path forward to efficient, inexpensive photovoltaics. Despite impressive progress in performance with these materials, there remain limitations in photocarrier collection that must be overcome. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of charge recombination and transport in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, and the application of this knowledge to the development of new and better materials. Core-shell, PbS-CdS, quantum dots were investigated in an attempt to achieve better surface passivation and reduce electronic defects which can limit performance. Optimization of this material led to improved open circuit voltage, exceeding 0.6 V for the first time, and record published performance of 6% efficiency. Using temperature-dependent and transient photovoltage measurements we explored the significance of interface recombination on the operation of these devices. Careful engineering of the electrode using atomic layer deposition of ZnO helped lead to better TiO2 substrate materials and allowed us to realize a nearly two-fold reduction in recombination rate and an enhancement upwards of 50 mV in open circuit voltage. Carrier extraction efficiency was studied in these devices using intensity dependent current-voltage data of an operational solar cell. By developing an analytical model to describe recombination loss within the active layer of the device we were able to accurately determine transport lengths ranging up to 90 nm. Transient absorption and photoconductivity techniques were used to study

  17. E-beam exposure system using multi column cell (MCC) with CP for mask writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Akio; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Yamabe, Masaki

    2008-10-01

    In the Mask D2I project at ASET, the authors designed a novel electron beam exposure system using the concepts of MCC (multi column cell), CP (character projection), and VSB (variable shaped beam) to improve the throughput of electron beam exposure systems. They presented outlines of a proof-of-concept system of MCC, and have shown the performances of VSB and CP in the system. They evaluated the impacts on beam position in one column cell caused by deflections in another column cell. The impacts were found to be less than 0.1nm in presence of major deflections in the neighboring column cell. Hence it was concluded that there was no noticeable impact on deflections cause by the neighboring column cells in the MCC system.

  18. Safety Evaluation of Dry Powder Formulations by Direct Dispersion onto Air-Liquid Interface Cultured Cell Layer.

    PubMed

    Asai, Ayumu; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Yamauchi, Tomoyo; Sugiura, Yuka; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Most safety evaluations of dry powder inhalers (DPIs) using cultured cells have been performed with dry powder formulations dissolved in a medium. However, this method is not considered to be suitable to evaluate the safety of inhaled dry powder formulations correctly since it cannot reflect the actual phenomenon on the respiratory epithelial surface. In this study, we established a novel in-vitro safety evaluation system suitable for DPIs by combining an air-liquid interface cultured cell layer and a device for dispersing dry powders, and evaluated the safety of candidate excipients of dry powders for inhalation. The safety of excipients (sugars, amino acids, cyclodextrins, and positive controls) in solutions was compared using submerged cell culture systems with a conventional 96-well plate and Transwell(®). The sensitivity of the cells grown in Transwell(®) was lower than that of those grown in the 96-well plate. Dry powders were prepared by spray-drying and we evaluated their safety with a novel in-vitro safety evaluation system using an air-liquid interface cultured cell layer. Dry powders decreased the cell viability with doses more than solutions. On the other hand, dissolving the dry powders attenuated their cytotoxicity. This suggested that the novel in-vitro safety evaluation system would be suitable to evaluate the safety of DPIs with high sensitivity.

  19. Analysis of cell-cycle regulation following exposure of lung-derived cells to γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trani, D.; Lucchetti, C.; Cassone, M.; D'Agostino, L.; Caputi, M.; Giordano, A.

    Acute exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation results in a delay of cell-cycle progression and/or augmentation of apoptosis. Following ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, cell-cycle arrest in the G1- or G2-phase of the cell-cycle prevents or delays DNA replication or mitosis, providing time for the DNA repair machinery to exert its function. Deregulation or failing of cell-cycle checkpoints and/or DNA repair mechanisms may lead normal cells bearing chromosome mutations to acquire neoplastic autonomy, which in turn can trigger the onset of cancer. Existing studies have focused on the impact of p53 status on the radiation response of lung cancer (LC) cell lines in terms of both cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis, while no comparative studies have been performed on the radiation response of lung derived normal and cancerous epithelial cells. To investigate the radiation response in normal and cancerous phenotypes, along with the role and impact of p53 status, and possible correlations with pRb/p105 or other proteins involved in carcinogenesis and cell-cycle regulation, we selected two lung-derived epithelial cell lines, one normal (NL20, p53 wild-type) and one non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), H358 (known to be p53-deficient). We compared the levels of γ-induced cell proliferation ability, cell-cycle arrest, apoptotic index, and expression levels of cell-cycle regulating and regulated proteins. The different cell sensitivity, apoptotic response and protein expression profiles resulting from our study for NL20 and H358 cells suggest that still unknown mechanisms involving p53, pRb/p105 and their target molecules might play a pivotal role in determining cell sensitivity and resistance upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  20. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    DOE PAGES

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; ...

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specificmore » fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.« less

  1. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A; Smith, Jordan N; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Orr, Galya

    2015-02-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in-vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn(2+), together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn(2+) in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn(2+) values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submerged cultures, intracellular Zn(2+) values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn(2+) values that were nearly three-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submerged cultures, and eight-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn(2+). At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn(2+) was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn(2+) following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn(2+) have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.

  2. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes

  3. Roles of Energy/Charge Cascades and Intermixed Layers at Donor/Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kyohei; Suzuki, Kaori; Chen, Yujiao; Tajima, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    The secret to the success of mixed bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) in yielding highly efficient organic solar cells (OSCs) could reside in the molecular structures at their donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of energy and charge cascade structures at the interfaces by using well-defined planar heterojunctions (PHJs) as a model system. The results showed that (1) the charge cascade structure enhanced VOC because it shuts down the recombination pathway through charge transfer (CT) state with a low energy, (2) the charge cascade layer having a wider energy gap than the bulk material decreased JSC because the diffusion of the excitons from the bulk to D/A interface was blocked; the energy of the cascade layers must be appropriately arranged for both the charges and the excitons, and (3) molecular intermixing in the cascade layer opened the recombination path through the low-energy CT state and decreased VOC. Based on these findings, we propose improved structures for D/A interfaces in BHJs. PMID:27404948

  4. Roles of Energy/Charge Cascades and Intermixed Layers at Donor/Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kyohei; Suzuki, Kaori; Chen, Yujiao; Tajima, Keisuke

    2016-07-01

    The secret to the success of mixed bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) in yielding highly efficient organic solar cells (OSCs) could reside in the molecular structures at their donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of energy and charge cascade structures at the interfaces by using well-defined planar heterojunctions (PHJs) as a model system. The results showed that (1) the charge cascade structure enhanced VOC because it shuts down the recombination pathway through charge transfer (CT) state with a low energy, (2) the charge cascade layer having a wider energy gap than the bulk material decreased JSC because the diffusion of the excitons from the bulk to D/A interface was blocked; the energy of the cascade layers must be appropriately arranged for both the charges and the excitons, and (3) molecular intermixing in the cascade layer opened the recombination path through the low-energy CT state and decreased VOC. Based on these findings, we propose improved structures for D/A interfaces in BHJs.

  5. Novel dose metric for apparent cytotoxicity effects generated by in vitro cell exposure to silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2011-02-18

    This study aimed at identifying the dose metric applicable to studies on the viability of cells exposed to nanoparticles (NPs) in vitro. A previously reported set of data was evaluated very carefully. The extent of cell death after 24-h exposure of three cell lines to suspended silica NPs (<30 nm) was quantified using four different viability/cytotoxicity assays. Data on NP uptake in cells after 6-h exposure were also reported. Evidence is provided that, in spite of the small size of the NPs, mass transport to the cells cannot be explained solely by diffusion. Gravitational settling must have contributed significantly, presumably as the result of the formation of large agglomerates. Appropriately adjusted response data, with typically 22 combinations of mass concentration and height of the medium for each cell line, could be integrated in universal diagrams, provided the dose was quoted in terms of the areal density of NP mass delivered to the cells. Loss of viability became observable only if cells were exposed to the equivalent of 1 to 5 closely packed layers of NPs; the dose required for complete cell death ranged between 4 and about 20 layers of NPs. The results suggest that the cell-death phenomena observed in the evaluated work and in many similar studies reported in the literature constitute a matter of cell overload with nanostructured matter. This finding also implies that the toxic potential of individual silicate NPs is very low. Strategies for the design of advanced future work are outlined.

  6. Cytoprotective effect of glutaraldehyde erythropoietin on HEK293 kidney cells after silver nanoparticle exposure.

    PubMed

    Sooklert, Kanidta; Chattong, Supreecha; Manotham, Krissanapong; Boonwong, Chawikan; Klaharn, I-yanut; Jindatip, Depicha; Sereemaspun, Amornpun

    2016-01-01

    The toxic effects from exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which are broadly present in many consumer products, have long raised concerns. Many studies have focused on the mechanisms of nanosilver, which cause toxicity in human cells, but little is known about prevention of this type of injury. This study investigated the in vitro effects of glutaraldehyde erythropoietin (GEPO), a cytoprotective compound derived from erythropoietin, in terms of cell protection against AgNP-induced injury. HEK293 cells were pretreated with or without GEPO before administration of AgNPs. The protective effects of GEPO in this cell line were assessed by the percentage of viable cells, alterations of cell morphology, and the proliferative capability of the cells. In addition, we assessed the role of GEPO in lowering cellular oxidative stress and regulating expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2. The results showed rescue effects on the percentage of viable and proliferative cells among GEPO pretreated cells. Pretreatment with GEPO maintained the normal cell shape and ultrastructural morphology. Moreover, GEPO reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species in cells and activated expression of Bcl2, which are the major mechanisms in protection against cellular toxicity induced by AgNPs. In conclusion, our study showed that the cytotoxic effects from exposure to AgNPs can be prevented by GEPO.

  7. Exposure to endocrine disruptor induces transgenerational epigenetic deregulation of microRNAs in primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Brieño-Enríquez, Miguel A; García-López, Jesús; Cárdenas, David B; Guibert, Sylvain; Cleroux, Elouan; Děd, Lukas; Hourcade, Juan de Dios; Pěknicová, Jana; Weber, Michael; Del Mazo, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, germ cell differentiation is initiated in the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs) during fetal development. Prenatal exposure to environmental toxicants such as endocrine disruptors may alter PGC differentiation, development of the male germline and induce transgenerational epigenetic disorders. The anti-androgenic compound vinclozolin represents a paradigmatic example of molecule causing transgenerational effects on germ cells. We performed prenatal exposure to vinclozolin in mice and analyzed the phenotypic and molecular changes in three successive generations. A reduction in the number of embryonic PGCs and increased rate of apoptotic cells along with decrease of fertility rate in adult males were observed in F1 to F3 generations. Blimp1 is a crucial regulator of PGC differentiation. We show that prenatal exposure to vinclozolin deregulates specific microRNAs in PGCs, such as miR-23b and miR-21, inducing disequilibrium in the Lin28/let-7/Blimp1 pathway in three successive generations of males. As determined by global maps of cytosine methylation, we found no evidence for prominent changes in DNA methylation in PGCs or mature sperm. Our data suggest that embryonic exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors induces transgenerational epigenetic deregulation of expression of microRNAs affecting key regulatory pathways of germ cells differentiation.

  8. Repeated toluene exposure increases c-Fos in catecholaminergic cells of the nucleus accumbens shell.

    PubMed

    Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Aulerich, Kelsey E; Bowen, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Toluene is a frequently abused solvent. Previous studies have suggested that toluene acts like other drugs of abuse, specifically on the dopaminergic system in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the mesolimbic pathway. Although changes in dopamine (DA) levels and c-Fos have been observed in both acute and repeated exposure paradigms, the extent to which c-Fos is localized to catecholaminergic cells is unknown. The present study tested the effects of repeated toluene exposure (1000-4000ppm) on locomotor activity and cells containing c-Fos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), or both in the core and shell of the NAc, as well as the anterior and posterior VTA. We focused our study on adolescents, since adolescence is a time of great neural change and a time when individuals tend to be more susceptible to drug abuse. In early tests, toluene dose-dependently increased locomotor activity. Repeated exposure to the highest concentration of toluene resulted in sensitization to toluene's effects on locomotor activity. Although the number of cells immunopositive for c-Fos or TH did not significantly differ across groups, cells immunopositive for TH+c-Fos were higher in the NAc shell of animals exposed to 4000ppm than in animals exposed to air (control) or 1000ppm. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that repeated high dose toluene exposure increases locomotor activity as well as activation of catecholaminergic cells in the shell of the NAc. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic Exposure to Combined Carcinogens Enhances Breast Cell Carcinogenesis with Mesenchymal and Stem-Like Cell Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in North America and Europe. More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to small quantities of multiple carcinogens. To understand how multiple carcinogens act together to induce cellular carcinogenesis, we studied the activity of environmental carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) using our breast cell carcinogenesis model. Our study revealed, for the first time, that combined NNK and B[a]P enhanced breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by PhIP in both non-cancerous and cancerous breast cells. Co-exposure was more potent than sequential exposure to combined NNK and B[a]P followed by PhIP in inducing carcinogenesis. Initiation of carcinogenesis was measured by transient endpoints induced in a single exposure, while progression of carcinogenesis was measured by acquisition of constitutive endpoints in cumulative exposures. Transient endpoints included DNA damage, Ras-Erk-Nox pathway activation, reactive oxygen species elevation, and increased cellular proliferation. Constitutive endpoints included various cancer-associated properties and signaling modulators, as well as enrichment of cancer stem-like cell population and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program. Using transient and constitutive endpoints as targets, we detected that a combination of the green tea catechins ECG and EGCG, at non-cytotoxic levels, was more effective than individual agents in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by combined NNK, B[a]P, and PhIP. Thus, use of combined ECG and EGCG should be seriously considered for early intervention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens. PMID:25372613

  10. Chronic exposure to combined carcinogens enhances breast cell carcinogenesis with mesenchymal and stem-like cell properties.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in North America and Europe. More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to small quantities of multiple carcinogens. To understand how multiple carcinogens act together to induce cellular carcinogenesis, we studied the activity of environmental carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) using our breast cell carcinogenesis model. Our study revealed, for the first time, that combined NNK and B[a]P enhanced breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by PhIP in both non-cancerous and cancerous breast cells. Co-exposure was more potent than sequential exposure to combined NNK and B[a]P followed by PhIP in inducing carcinogenesis. Initiation of carcinogenesis was measured by transient endpoints induced in a single exposure, while progression of carcinogenesis was measured by acquisition of constitutive endpoints in cumulative exposures. Transient endpoints included DNA damage, Ras-Erk-Nox pathway activation, reactive oxygen species elevation, and increased cellular proliferation. Constitutive endpoints included various cancer-associated properties and signaling modulators, as well as enrichment of cancer stem-like cell population and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program. Using transient and constitutive endpoints as targets, we detected that a combination of the green tea catechins ECG and EGCG, at non-cytotoxic levels, was more effective than individual agents in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by combined NNK, B[a]P, and PhIP. Thus, use of combined ECG and EGCG should be seriously considered for early intervention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens.

  11. Fabrication of CuInS2-sensitized solar cells via an improved SILAR process and its interface electron recombination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xueqing; Wan, Qingcui; Luan, Chunyan; Mei, Fengjiao; Zhao, Qian; An, Ping; Liang, Zhurong; Xu, Gang; Zapien, Juan Antonio

    2013-11-13

    Tetragonal CuInS2 (CIS) has been successfully deposited onto mesoporous TiO2 films by in-sequence growth of InxS and CuyS via a successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) process and postdeposition annealing in sulfur ambiance. X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements showed that the obtained tetragonal CIS consisted of a chalcopyrite phase and Cu-Au ordering, which related with the antisite defect states. For a fixed Cu-S deposition cycle, an interface layer of β-In2S3 formed at the TiO2/CIS interface with suitable excess deposition of In-S. In the meantime, the content of the Cu-Au ordering phase decreased to a reasonable level. These facts resulted in the retardance of electron recombination in the cells, which is proposed to be dominated by electron transfer from the conduction band of TiO2 to the unoccupied defect states in CIS via exponentially distributed surface states. As a result, a relatively high efficiency of ~0.92% (V(oc) = 0.35 V, J(sc) = 8.49 mA cm(-2), and FF = 0.31) has been obtained. Last, but not least, with an overloading of the sensitizers, a decrease in the interface area between the sensitized TiO2 and electrolytes resulted in deceleration of hole extraction from CIS to the electrolytes, leading to a decrease in the fill factor of the solar cells. It is indicated that the unoccupied states in CIS with energy levels below EF0 of the TiO2 films play an important role in the interface electron recombination at low potentials and has a great influence on the fill factor of the solar cells.

  12. Zeta potential change of Neuro-2a tumor cells after exposure to alumina nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, Sergey O.; Fomenko, Alla N.; Korovin, Matvey S.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, researches have paid much attention to the physical, chemical, biophysical and biochemical properties of a cell surface. It is known that most of the cells' surfaces are charged. This charge depends on the biochemical structure of the cell membranes. Therefore, measurement of a cell surface charge is a significant criterion that gives information about the cell surface. Evaluation of the cells zeta-potential is important to understand the interaction mechanisms of various drugs, antibiotics, as well as the interaction of nanoparticles with the cell surface. In this study, we use the dynamic light scattering method to detect the zeta-potential change of Neuro-2a tumor cells. It has been observed that zeta-potential shifted to negative values after exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles and inducing apoptosis.

  13. Study of gaseous benzene effects upon A549 lung epithelial cells using a novel exposure system.

    PubMed

    Mascelloni, Massimiliano; Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Hodges, Nikolas J; Harrison, Roy M

    2015-08-19

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are ubiquitous pollutants known to be present in both indoor and outdoor air arising from various sources. Indoor exposure has increasingly become a major cause of concern due to the effects that such pollutants can have on health. Benzene, along with toluene, is one of the main components of the VOC mixture and is a known carcinogen due to its genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of an in vitro model to study the short-term effects of exposure of lung cells to airborne benzene. We studied the effects of exposure on DNA and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A549 cells, exposed to various concentrations of benzene (0.03; 0.1; 0.3 ppm) in gaseous form using a custom designed cell exposure chamber. Results showed a concentration-dependent increase of DNA breaks and an increase of ROS production, confirming the feasibility of the experimental procedure and validating the model for further in vitro studies of exposure to other VOCs.

  14. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Brian R; Ross, Brennan; Chou, Joan Wang; Khankan, Rana; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bui, Kimberly; Carpenter, Ellen M

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors-reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon-gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. DNA damage in male gonad cells of Green mussel (Perna viridis) upon exposure to tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Nagarajappa; Ganguly, Anutosh; Goswami, Usha

    2006-05-01

    DNA damage (determined by the Comet Assay) and the occurrence of deformed nuclei were measured as endpoints of genotoxicity in male gonad cells of the marine mussel (Perna viridis). Upon exposure of the organism to varying concentrations of extracts of smoked and non-smoked cigar tobacco over a period of 16 days, DNA damage was found to be highest in marine mussels exposed to extracts of smoked cigar tobacco. Conversely, more deformed nuclei were detected in marine mussels exposed to extracts of non-smoked cigar tobacco. The level of DNA damage and the number of deformed nuclei reach a maximum at day 12 of exposure to both extracts but decrease thereafter. This phenomenon is attributed to the organism's capacity to maintain the integrity of its genetic material upon exposure to potential genotoxicants present in the tobacco extracts. A dose response in DNA damage and deformed nuclei was also detected in isolated gonad cells upon in vitro exposure to hydrogen peroxide a known DNA strand breaking agent. The results of this study indicate that the DNA in male gonad cells of the marine mussel is damaged upon exposure to genotoxicants, and suggests the suitability of the organism for future investigations into the effect of such agents on its reproductive capacities.

  16. A newly designed experimental system for exposure of mammalian cells to extremely low frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miyakoshi, J; Ohtsu, S; Tatsumi-Miyajima, J; Takebe, H

    1994-03-01

    To examine the biological effects of extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELFMF), we have designed and manufactured a new equipment for long-term and high-density exposure of cells to ELFMF. The ELFMF exposure system consists of a generator of magnets with a built-in CO2 incubator, an alternating current (AC) power supply, a gas compressor and a thermocontroller for the incubator, and a cooling unit for the magnets. The CO2 incubator made of acrylic resin is inserted into the inner-space of the silicon steel strip-cores. In this system, the temperature of the incubator is maintained at 37 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The maximum magnetic flux density on the exposure area of the incubator is 500 mT (T; tesla) at a current of 556 Arms (rms; root mean square) at 50 Hz. The long-term (up to 120 hr) exposure of 400 mT ELFMF did not affect the growth of both HL60RG and CCRF-CEM cells originated from human leukemia. The post-X-irradiation exposure of 400 mT ELFMF for 2 hr also did not affect the radiation sensitivity of GM0637 and TAT2SF cells originated from a normal human and an ataxia telangiectasia patient.

  17. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Brian R.; Ross, Brennan; Chou, Joan Wang; Khankan, Rana; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bui, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors—reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon—gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology. PMID:27364165

  18. Differential regulation of intracellular factors mediating cell cycle, DNA repair and inflammation following exposure to silver nanoparticles in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Investigating the cellular and molecular signatures in eukaryotic cells following exposure to nanoparticles will further our understanding on the mechanisms mediating nanoparticle induced effects. This study illustrates the molecular effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) in normal human lung cells, IMR-90 and human brain cancer cells, U251 with emphasis on gene expression, induction of inflammatory mediators and the interaction of Ag-np with cytosolic proteins. Results We report that silver nanoparticles are capable of adsorbing cytosolic proteins on their surface that may influence the function of intracellular factors. Gene and protein expression profiles of Ag-np exposed cells revealed up regulation of many DNA damage response genes such as Gadd 45 in both the cell types and ATR in cancer cells. Moreover, down regulation of genes necessary for cell cycle progression (cyclin B and cyclin E) and DNA damage response/repair (XRCC1 and 3, FEN1, RAD51C, RPA1) was observed in both the cell lines. Double strand DNA damage was observed in a dose dependant manner as evidenced in γH2AX foci assay. There was a down regulation of p53 and PCNA in treated cells. Cancer cells in particular showed a concentration dependant increase in phosphorylated p53 accompanied by the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP. Our results demonstrate the involvement of NFκB and MAP kinase pathway in response to Ag-np exposure. Up regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukins (IL-8, IL-6), macrophage colony stimulating factor, macrophage inflammatory protein in fibroblasts following Ag-np exposure were also observed. Conclusion In summary, Ag-np can modulate gene expression and protein functions in IMR-90 cells and U251 cells, leading to defective DNA repair, proliferation arrest and inflammatory response. The observed changes could also be due to its capability to adsorb cytosolic proteins on its surface. PMID:22321936

  19. Trade-off between oxygen and iron acquisition in bacterial cells at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2011-07-01

    The air-liquid interface is a selectively advantageous niche for aerobes due to the accessibility to oxygen. Various species of aerobes form a biofilm-like structure at air-liquid interfaces, known as a pellicle. Although the pellicle is one of the major growth modes of microorganisms, the metabolic features of pellicle cells and the determinative factors for pellicle formation are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the factors affecting pellicle growth by the facultative aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and also examined the gene expression profiles of pellicle cells in order to characterize features of the pellicle lifestyle. A mutant strain deficient in the production of exopolysaccharides displayed poor pellicle-forming ability and a growth disadvantage under static conditions compared with the wild-type strain. Notably, supplementation of culture medium with an alternative electron acceptor, nitrate, led to diminished pellicle formation. Nitrate facilitated the growth of an anaerobic planktonic cell subpopulation that acted as a competitor for iron with the aerobic subpopulation, resulting in the observed pellicle reduction. Transcriptome analysis revealed that pellicle cells were under aerobic and iron-depleted states. Thus, although pellicle formation certainly confers a growth advantage under static conditions, pellicle cells face a nutritional trade-off between oxygen and iron acquisition. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prenatal exposure to cypermethrin modulates rat NK cell cytotoxic functions.

    PubMed

    Santoni, G; Cantalamessa, F; Mazzucca, L; Romagnoli, S; Piccoli, M

    1997-07-11

    The synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin, was given during gestation to pregnant rats by gavage in corn oil. Peripheral blood and spleen cytotoxic activity of dams and their offspring were then evaluated at different times (30, 60, 90, 120 days) after birth. Pups showed a significant increase in peripheral blood natural killer (NK) and antibody-dependent (ADCC) cytotoxic activity paralleled with a similar increase in the percentage of NK-RP1+ cells and decreased activity in the spleen. Pregnant cypermethrin-exposed dams showed no changes in peripheral blood or spleen cytotoxic function during the postnatal period. Overall, these results suggest that immunomodulation of cytotoxic activity observed in the offspring is likely attributable to a specific effect of cypermethrin administered during the prenatal period.

  1. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

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