Science.gov

Sample records for interfacial durability study

  1. Acoustic and optoelectronic nature and interfacial durability of modified CNT and GnP-PVDF composites with nanostructural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kwon, Dong-Jun; Wang, Zuo-Jia; DeVries, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Nano- and hetero-structures of modified carbon nanotube (CNT) and Graphene nano Platelet (GnP) can control significantly piezoresistive and optoelectronic properties in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) as acoustic actuators. Interfacial durability and electrical properties of modified CNT and GnP embedded in poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanocomposites were investigated for use in acoustic actuator applications. Modified GnP coated PVDF nanocomposite exhibited better electrical conductivity than neat and modified CNT due to the unique electrical nature of GnP. Modified GnP coating also exhibited good acoustical properties. Contact angle, surface energy, work of adhesion, and spreading coefficient measurements were contributed to explore the interfacial adhesion durability between neat CNT or plasma treated CNT and plasma treated PVDF. Acoustic actuation performance of modified GnP coated PVDF nanocomposites were investigated for different radii of curvature and different coating conditions, using a sound level meter. Modified GnP can be a more appropriate acoustic actuator than CNT cases because of improved electrical properties. Optimum radius of curvature and coating thickness was also obtained for the most appropriate sound pressure level (SPL) performance. This study can provide manufacturing parameters of transparent sound actuators with good quality practically.

  2. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Reuben J.; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, S.; Lim, Christina Y. H.

    2015-01-28

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (∼10–20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ∼7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiN{sub x}) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiN{sub x}/C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads.

  3. Optoelectronic and acoustic properties and their interfacial durability of GnP/PVDF/GnP composite actuators with nano-structural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kwon, Dong-Jun; Wang, Zuo-Jia; Gu, Ga-Young; DeVries, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    Nano- and hetero-structures of carbon nanotube (CNT), indium tin oxide (ITO), and Graphene nano Platelet (GnP) can control significantly piezoelectric and optoelectronic properties in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) as acoustic actuators. Interfacial durability and electrical properties of CNT, ITO or GnP coated poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanocomposites were investigated for use in acoustic actuator applications. The GnP coated PVDF nanocomposite exhibited better electrical conductivity than either CNT or ITO, due to the unique electrical properties of GnP. GnP nanocomposite coatings also exhibited good acoustical properties. Contact angle, surface energy, work of adhesion, and spreading coefficient measurements were used to explore the interfacial adhesion durability between neat CNT (or plasma treated CNT) and plasma treated PVDF. The acoustic actuation performance of GnP coated PVDF nanocomposites were investigated for different radii of curvature and different coating conditions, using a sound level meter. GnP is considered to be a more appropriate acoustic actuator than either CNT or ITO because of its characteristic electrical properties. A radius of curvature of about 15 degrees was established as being most appropriate. Sound characteristics differed with varying coating thicknesses. The results of this study suggest that it should be possible to manufacture transparent actuators with good sound quality.

  4. Stretchable carbon nanotube/ion-gel supercapacitors with high durability realized through interfacial microroughness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiho; Kim, Wonbin; Kim, Woong

    2014-08-27

    A critical problem with stretchable supercapacitors developed to date has been evaporation of a volatile component of their electrolyte, causing failure. In this work, we demonstrated successful use of an ionic-liquid-based nonvolatile gel (ion-gel) electrolyte in carbon nanotube (CNT)-based stretchable supercapacitors. The CNT/ion-gel supercapacitors showed high capacitance retention (96.6%) over 3000 stretch cycles at 20% strain. The high durability against stretch cycles was achieved by introducing microroughness at the interfaces between different materials. The microroughness was produced by the simple process of imprinting the surface microstructure of office paper onto a poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate; the surface texture is reproduced in successive current collector and CNT layers. Adhesion between the different layers was strengthened by this roughness and prevented delamination over repeated stretch cycles. The addition of a CNT layer decreased the sensitivity of electrical characteristics to stretching. Moreover, the ion-gel increases the operating voltage window (3 V) and hence the energy density. We believe our demonstration will greatly contribute to the development of flexible and/or stretchable energy-storage devices with high durability.

  5. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Spernjak, Dusan; Baker, Andrew M.; Lujan, Roger W.; Langlois, David Alan; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Papadia, D. D.; Weber, Adam Z.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Shi, Shouwnen; More, K. L.; Grot, Steve

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  6. Experimental study on durability improvement of fly ash concrete with durability improving admixture.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%-20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized.

  7. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  8. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  9. Durability of a novel durable bait for control of subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae): results of five-year field aging studies.

    PubMed

    Eger, J E; Hamm, R L; Demark, J J; Chin-Heady, E; Tolley, M P; Benson, E P; Zungoli, P A; Smith, M S; Spomer, N A

    2014-06-01

    A durable termite bait containing 0.5% noviflumuron was evaluated for physical durability, retention of active ingredient, consumption by termites, and toxicity to termites over 5 yr in field studies at locations in Indiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina. Plots in Indiana and Mississippi included both natural rainfall and irrigated plots, while plots in South Carolina received only natural rainfall. Samples collected every 3 mo for the first 4 yr were evaluated for consumption with a 7 d no-choice bioassay using Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar). Consumption and toxicity of 5 yr samples were evaluated in similar bioassays conducted for 42 d. Durable baits received from field sites had some cracking, and a small amount of external flaking, but no major deterioration based on visual observation. There were no significant differences in noviflumuron concentration over the 5-yr period and no trend toward reduced concentrations of noviflumuron over time. Consumption of aged durable baits over 4 yr was variable, but termites usually consumed more aged durable bait than fresh durable bait and the differences were frequently significant. There were some exceptions, but termites consumed significantly more fresh durable bait than aged durable bait in only 4% of observations. When 5 yr samples were evaluated, consumption was lowest for fresh durable bait and termites consumed significantly more aged durable bait from irrigated plots in Indiana and from both natural and irrigated plots in Mississippi than fresh durable bait. Survival of termites fed blank durable bait was significantly higher than that for termites fed any of the baits containing noviflumuron and there were no significant differences in survival among the noviflumuron durable baits. Our results suggest that the bait would be durable for at least 5 yr and possibly longer under most environmental conditions.

  10. Studies on the disbonding initiation of interfacial cracks.

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Brian J.; Pearson, Raymond A.

    2005-08-01

    With the continuing trend of decreasing feature sizes in flip-chip assemblies, the reliability tolerance to interfacial flaws is also decreasing. Small-scale disbonds will become more of a concern, pointing to the need for a better understanding of the initiation stage of interfacial delamination. With most accepted adhesion metric methodologies tailored to predict failure under the prior existence of a disbond, the study of the initiation phenomenon is open to development and standardization of new testing procedures. Traditional fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable, as the mathematics assume failure to originate at a disbond or crack tip. Disbond initiation is believed to first occur at free edges and corners, which act as high stress concentration sites and exhibit singular stresses similar to a crack tip, though less severe in intensity. As such, a 'fracture mechanics-like' approach may be employed which defines a material parameter--a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub c})--that can be used to predict when initiation of a disbond at an interface will occur. The factors affecting the adhesion of underfill/polyimide interfaces relevant to flip-chip assemblies were investigated in this study. The study consisted of two distinct parts: a comparison of the initiation and propagation phenomena and a comparison of the relationship between sub-critical and critical initiation of interfacial failure. The initiation of underfill interfacial failure was studied by characterizing failure at a free-edge with a critical stress intensity factor. In comparison with the interfacial fracture toughness testing, it was shown that a good correlation exists between the initiation and propagation of interfacial failures. Such a correlation justifies the continuing use of fracture mechanics to predict the reliability of flip-chip packages. The second aspect of the research involved fatigue testing of tensile butt joint specimens to determine lifetimes at sub

  11. Micromechanical study of concrete materials with interfacial transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambheera, Ramesh

    This thesis describes analytical and finite element micromechanical studies for investigating the mechanical behavior of concrete materials. A concrete material is treated as a three phase composite consisting of aggregate, bulk paste and an interfacial transition zone around the aggregate. Experimental work on the microstructure of concrete has demonstrated the existence of interfacial transition zone and that this is the weakest link in the composite system of concrete material. Hence, the main focus of this thesis is to understand the role of the interfacial transition zone on the overall mechanical behavior of concrete materials. A four phase composite model consisting of aggregate, ITZ, bulk paste and an equivalent homogeneous medium is proposed to represent the concrete material. Analytical solutions are derived for the overall elastic moduli of the four phase composite model. The effects of volume fraction and the elastic moduli of the transition zone on the overall elastic moduli are investigated. The results obtained using the analytical model are in good agreement with those obtained from experiments. Analytical stress solutions are also derived for the four phase composite model subjected to uniaxial compression in two and three dimensions. The stress concentration and the tensile stress development in the interfacial transition zone are investigated. The effect of imperfect shear interfacial bond on the overall elastic moduli and on the stresses in the transition zone is also investigated. Basic concepts of damage mechanics are applied to model the damage in the transition zone. The effect of local damage in the transition zone on the overall damage in a concrete material is illustrated. For the specific case of uniaxial compression, the pre-peak stress-strain curves are generated. Computational analysis of micromechanical models of concrete materials requires efficient finite elements. This thesis proposes the use of hybrid finite elements for the

  12. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  13. Interfacial Adsorption of Antifreeze Proteins: A Neutron Reflection Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Perumal, Shiamalee; Zhao, Xiubo; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Zongchao; Lu, Jian R.

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial adsorption from two antifreeze proteins (AFP) from ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus, type III AFP, AFP III, or maAFP) and spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, isoform 501, or cfAFP) were studied by neutron reflection. Hydrophilic silicon oxide was used as model substrate to facilitate the solid/liquid interfacial measurement so that the structural features from AFP adsorption can be examined. All adsorbed layers from AFP III could be modeled into uniform layer distribution assuming that the protein molecules were adsorbed with their ice-binding surface in direct contact with the SiO2 substrate. The layer thickness of 32 Å was consistent with the height of the molecule in its crystalline form. With the concentration decreasing from 2 mg/ml to 0.01 mg/ml, the volume fraction of the protein packed in the monolayer decreased steadily from 0.4 to 0.1, consistent with the concentration-dependent inhibition of ice growth observed over the range. In comparison, insect cfAFP showed stronger adsorption over the same concentration range. Below 0.1 mg/ml, uniform layers were formed. But above 1 mg/ml, the adsorbed layers were characterized by a dense middle layer and two outer diffuse layers, with a total thickness around 100 Å. The structural transition indicated the responsive changes of conformational orientation to increasing surface packing density. As the higher interfacial adsorption of cfAFP was strongly correlated with the greater thermal hysteresis of spruce budworm, our results indicated the important relation between protein adsorption and antifreeze activity. PMID:18234809

  14. Study on durability for thermal cycle of planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Motoo; Nakata, Kei-ichi; Wakayama, Sin-ichi

    1996-12-31

    TONEN CORPORATION has developed planar type SOFC since 1986. We demonstrated the output of 1.3 kW in 1991 and 5.1 kW in 1995. Simultaneously we have studied how to raise electric efficiency and reliability utilizing hydrogen and propane as fuel. Durability for thermal cycle is one of the most important problems of planar SOFC to make it more practical. The planar type SOFC is made up of separator, zirconia electrolyte and glass sealant. The thermal expansion of these components are expected to be the same value, however, they still possess small differences. In this situation, a thermal cycle causes a thermal stress due to the difference of the cell components and is often followed by a rupture in cell components, therefore, the analysis of the thermal stress should give us much useful information. The thermal cycle process consists of a heating up and cooling down procedure. Zirconia electrolyte is not bonded to the separator under the condition of the initial heating up procedure, and glass sealant becomes soft or melts and glass seals spaces between the zirconia and separator. The glass sealant becomes harder with the cooling down procedure. Moreover, zirconia is tightly bonded with separator below a temperature which is defined as a constraint temperature and thermal stress also occurs. This indicates that the heating up process relaxes the thermal stress and the cooling down increases it. In this paper, we simulated dependence of the stress on the sealing configuration, thermal expansion of sealant and constraint temperature of sealant glass. Furthermore, we presented SOFC electrical properties after a thermal cycle.

  15. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Shutthanandan, V.; Hu, Jian Z.; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2014-01-10

    The interfacial region between graphene and an imidazolium based ionic liquid is studied using spectroscopic analysis and computational modelling. This combined approach reveals that the molecular level structure of the interfacial region is significantly influenced by functional group defects on the graphene surface.The combined experimental and computational study reveals that the molecular structure at interfacial region between graphene and imidazolium based ionic liquid is defined by the hydroxyl functional groups on the graphene surface

  16. A Thermodynamic Study of Dopant Interfacial Segregation Effect on Nanostability and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Longjia

    Nanoparticles, with great surface area and high surface to volume ratio, have been widely applied in many applications due to their unique size related effects. However, this high surface area character of nanoparticles also brings great excess energy to the whole system, making the system unstable and even causing the failure of nanoparticles, especially at higher temperatures. In order to maintain nanocrystalline structure of the materials, nanostability enhancement is of great significance in nanotechnology. It is well known that the global driving force for particles growth is to eliminate the excess energy brought by surface and grain boundary. Therefore, interfacial energetics has a great influence on the nanostability of the materials. And according to previous studies, dopant interfacial segregation could be a potential way to control the interfacial energetics of the nanoparticles and possibly lead to an improved nanostability. Furthermore, the interfacial energetics even can affect mechanical properties of nano-grain ceramic materials based on recent research. The main goals of the present work were to experimentally measure the interfacial energies of nanoparticles as well as nano-grain ceramics, modify the interfacial energetics through dopant segregation effect and engineer the nanostability and mechanical properties of the nanocrystalline materials through interfacial energetics modification. To achieve this goal, Mn cation has been chosen to introduce Mn interfacial segregation on ceria nanoparticles, and La cation has been added to 12 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (12YSZ) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MAO) two-phase nano-grain ceramics to cause La interfacial segregation. Both of the dopant segregation phenomena were directly proved by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). To quantify the dopant segregation effect on the interfacial energies, high-temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry, water adsorption calorimetry and differential

  17. Optoelectronic properties and interfacial durability of CNT and ITO on boro-silicate glass and PET substrates with nano- and heterostructural aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joung-Man; Wang, Zuo-Jia; Kwon, Dong-Jun; DeVries, Lawrence

    2011-02-01

    Nano- and hetero-structures of carbon nanotube (CNT) and indium tin oxide (ITO) can control significantly piezoelectric and optoelectronic properties in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) as sensing and actuator under cyclic loading. Optimized preparing conditions were obtained for multi-functional purpose of the specimen by obtaining the best dispersion and turbidity in the solution. Optical transmittance and electrical properties were investigated for CNT and ITO dipping and spraying coating on boro-silicate glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by electrical resistance measurement under cyclic loading and wettability test. Uniform dip-coating was performed using Wilhelmy plate method due to its simple and convenience. Spraying coating was applied to the specimen additionally. The change in the electrical resistance and optical properties of coated layer were mainly dependent upon the number of dip-coating, the concentration of CNT and ITO solutions, and the surface treatment condition. Electric properties of coating layers were measured using four-point probe method, and surface resistance was calculated using a dual configuration method. Optical transmittance of CNT and ITO coated PET film was also evaluated using UV spectrum. Surface energy and their hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of CNT and ITO coated substrates were investigated by wettability test via static and dynamic contact angle measurements. As the elapsing time of cyclic loading passed, the stability of surface resistance and thus comparative interfacial adhesion between coated layer and substrates was evaluated to compare the thermodynamic work of adhesion, Wa. As dip-coating number increased, surface resistance of coated CNT decreased, whereas the transmittance decreased step-by-step due to the thicker CNT and ITO networked layer. Nano- and heterostructural effects of CNT and ITO solution on the optical and electrical effects have been studied continuously.

  18. Calorimetric study of surface and interfacial properties of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Melkus, T.G.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the surface/interfacial properties of fine coal, heat flux calorimeter was used to make heat of immersion (..delta..H/sub imm/) measurements. These heats have been shown to be a valuable means of investigating the chemistry and surface properties of solids as they interact with adsorbate molecules. In addition, heats of immersion can be used to characterize a solid in terms of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and estimate its relative wetting tendency. The first phase of experiments that were performed served as a basis for comparison of coal components/characteristics immersed in deionized, distilled water. The results of these experiments were found to correlate well with reported flotation trends. In the second phase of experiments, the solids that were previously investigated were immersed in various wetting media. The solids were characterized in terms of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and their relative wetting tendency was also established. Heat of immersion measurements using surfactant solutions demonstrated that preferential adsorption of the surfactant molecule occurs on the coal surface, thereby altering its surface properties. This was supported by laboratory vacuum filtration tests. Using flotation agents as the wetting medium, the heat of immersion was found to vary with kerosene concentration, pH, kaolin addition and oxidation of the solid surface. The results of these ..delta..H/sub imm/ measurements were found to correlate very well with results obtained by independent flotation experiments performed under the same conditions.

  19. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  20. Interfacial assembly of proteins and peptides: recent examples studied by neutron reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, XiuBo; Pan, Fang; Lu, Jian R.

    2009-01-01

    Through reviewing a number of recent neutron reflection studies of interfacial adsorption of peptides and proteins, this paper aims to demonstrate the significance of this technique in studying interfacial biomolecular processes by illustrating the typical structural details that can be derived. The review will start with the introduction of relevant theoretical background, followed by an outline of representative biomolecular systems that have recently been studied to indicate the technical strengths of neutron reflection. PMID:19656822

  1. A Study on a Prognosis Algorithm for PEMFC Lifetime Prediction based on Durability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xian; Pisu, Pierluigi; Toops, Todd J

    2010-01-01

    Of the fuel cells being studied, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is viewed as the most promising for transportation. Yet until today, the commercialization of the PEMFC has not been widespread in spite of its large expectation. Poor long term performances or durability, and high production and maintenance costs account for the main reasons. For the final commercialization of fuel cell in transportation field, the durability issue must be addressed, while the costs should be further brought down. In the meantime, health-monitoring and prognosis techniques are of great significance in ensuring the normal operation of the fuel cell and preventing or predicting its likely abrupt and catastrophic failure.

  2. Studying the Dependency of Interfacial Formation with Carbon Nanotube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-27

    observed that the sliding of nano -chips platelets from the CNCF occurs during sonication. Figure 4.1.1. SEM images of fracture surfaces for...was focused on understanding the capabilities of polymeric materials to form interfacial structures around carbon nanotubes and other nano -carbon...materials. The proposed effort led to the development of a new processing route for dispersing nano -carbons in dilute polymer solutions. This dispersion

  3. Study of interfacial phenomena for bio/chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hwall

    This work presents the fundamental study of biological and chemical interfacial phenomena and (bio)chemical sensing applications using high frequency resonator arrays. To realize a versatile (bio)chemical sensing system for the fundamental study as well as their practical applications, the following three distinct components were studied and developed: i) detection platforms with high sensitivity, ii) novel innovative sensing materials with high selectivity, iii) analytical model for data interpretation. 8-pixel micromachined quartz crystal resonator (muQCR) arrays with a fundamental resonance frequency of 60 ¡V 90 MHz have been used to provide a reliable detection platform with high sensitivity. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) has been explored and integrated into the sensing system as a smart chemical sensing material. The use of nanoporous gold (np-Au) enables the combination of the resonator and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for both quantitative and qualitative measurement. A statistical model for the characterization of resonator behavior to study the protein adsorption kinetics is developed by random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach with the integration of an effective surface depletion theory. The investigation of the adsorption kinetics of blood proteins is reported as the fundamental study of biological phenomena using the proposed sensing system. The aim of this work is to study different aspects of protein adsorption and kinetics of adsorption process with blood proteins on different surfaces. We specifically focus on surface depletion effect in conjunction with the RSA model to explain the observed adsorption isotherm characteristics. A number of case studies on protein adsorption conducted using the proposed sensing system has been discussed. Effort is specifically made to understand adsorption kinetics, and the effect of surface on the adsorption process as well as the properties of the adsorbed protein layer. The second half of the

  4. Sorption and Interfacial Rheology Study of Model Asphaltene Compounds.

    PubMed

    Pradilla, Diego; Simon, Sébastien; Sjöblom, Johan; Samaniuk, Joseph; Skrzypiec, Marta; Vermant, Jan

    2016-03-29

    The sorption and rheological properties of an acidic polyaromatic compound (C5PeC11), which can be used to further our understanding of the behavior of asphaltenes, are determined experimentally. The results show that C5PeC11 exhibits the type of pH-dependent surface activity and interfacial shear rheology observed in C6-asphaltenes with a decrease in the interfacial tension concomitant with the elastic modulus when the pH increases. Surface pressure-area (Π-A) isotherms show evidence of aggregation behavior and π-π stacking at both the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Similarly, interactions between adsorbed C5PeC11 compounds are evidenced through desorption experiments at the oil/water interface. Contrary to indigenous asphaltenes, adsorption is reversible, but desorption is slower than for noninteracting species. The reversibility enables us to create layers reproducibly, whereas the presence of interactions between the compounds enables us to mimic the key aspects of interfacial activity in asphaltenes. Shear and dilatational rheology show that C5PeC11 forms a predominantly elastic film both at the liquid/air and the liquid/liquid interfaces. Furthermore, a soft glassy rheology model (SGR) fits the data obtained at the liquid/liquid interface. However, it is shown that the effective noise temperature determined from the SGR model for C5PeC11 is higher than for indigenous asphaltenes measured under similar conditions. Finally, from a colloidal and rheological standpoint, the results highlight the importance of adequately addressing the distinction between the material functions and true elasticity extracted from a shear measurement and the apparent elasticity measured in dilatational-pendant drop setups.

  5. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial crack propagation in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.M. |; Selinger, R.L.B.

    1999-08-01

    The authors use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the evolution of a crack front in interfacial fracture in three dimensions. They find that when a crack passes through a localized region of heterogeneous toughness, crack front waves are initiated and propagate laterally. They also investigate the development of roughness of the crack front when the crack propagates in a region of heterogeneous toughness. They find that in steady state the mean square width W of the front scales with system size L as W {approximately} L{sup 0.35}, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  6. Durability Studies on Confined Concrete using Fiber Reinforced Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponmalar, V.; Gettu, R.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, 24 concrete cylinders with a notch at the centre were prepared. Among them six cylinders were wrapped using single and double layers of fiber reinforced polymer; six cylinders were coated with epoxy resin; the remaining cylinders were used as a control. The cylinders were exposed to wet and dry cycling and acid (3 % H2SO4) solution for the period of 120 days. Two different concrete strengths M30 and M50 were considered for the study. It is found that the strength, ductility and failure mode of wrapped cylinders depend on number of layers and the nature of exposure conditions. It was noticed that the damage due to wet and dry cycling and acid attack was severe in control specimen than the epoxy coated and wrapped cylinders.

  7. Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

  8. Importance of microscopy in durability studies of solidified and stabilized contaminated soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klich, I.; Wilding, L.P.; Drees, L.R.; Landa, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is recognized by the U.S. EPA as a best demonstrated available technology for the containment of contaminated soils and other hazardous wastes that cannot be destroyed by chemical, thermal, or biological means. Despite the increased use of S/S technologies, little research has been conducted on the weathering and degradation of solidified and stabilized wastes once the treated materials have been buried. Published data to verify the performance and durability of landfilled treated wastes over time are rare. In this preliminary study, optical and electron microscopy (scanning electron microscopy [SEM], transmission electron microscopy [TEM] and electron probe microanalyses [EPMA]) were used to evaluate weathering features associated with metal-bearing contaminated soil that had been solidified and stabilized with Portland cement and subsequently buried on site, stored outdoors aboveground, or achieved in a laboratory warehouse for up to 6 yr. Physical and chemical alteration processes identified include: freeze-thaw cracking, cracking caused by the formation of expansive minerals such as ettringite, carbonation, and the movement of metals from waste aggregates into the cement micromass. Although the extent of degradation after 6 yr is considered slight to moderate, results of this study show that the same environmental concerns that affect the durability of concrete must be considered when evaluating the durability and permanence of the solidification and stabilization of contaminated soils with cement. In addition, such evaluations cannot be based on leaching and chemical analyses alone. The use of all levels of microscopic analyses must be incorporated into studies of the long-term performance of S/S technologies.Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is recognized by the U.S. EPA as a best demonstrated available technology for the containment of contaminated soils and other hazardous wastes that cannot be destroyed by chemical

  9. Open, microfluidic flow cell for studies of interfacial processes at gas-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Khanh C; Malakhov, Dmitry; Momsen, William E; Brockman, Howard L

    2006-03-01

    Interfacial processes involving peripheral proteins depend on the composition and packing density of the interfacial lipid molecules. As a biological membrane model, lipid monolayers at the gas-liquid interface allow independent control of these parameters. However, measuring protein adsorption to monolayers has been difficult. To aid in this and other studies of the interfacial processes, we have developed an open, microfluidic flow cell with which surface physical properties can be controlled and monitored in well-defined lipid monolayers while varying aqueous-phase composition. Using this apparatus, we implement a recently described fluorescence method (Momsen, W. E.; Mizuno, N. K.; Lowe, M. E.; Brockman, H. L. Anal. Biochem. 2005, 346, 139-49) to characterize the adsorption/desorption of glucagon to 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers at 27 mN/m. Analysis of the data gives reasonable and self-consistent results for kinetic and thermodynamic constants. Varying the packing density of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol does not alter the extent of glucagon adsorption, but comparable measurements with 1-steaoryl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine show a critical dependence. Because it allows a high degree of control of both lipid monolayer properties and aqueous-phase composition, this microfluidic flow cell should find wide applicability in many areas of research into interfacial processes.

  10. Dynamics of Pickering Emulsions in the Presence of an Interfacial Reaction: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangliang; Zhan, Bicai; Hu, Yaofeng; Fan, Zhaoyu; Pera-Titus, Marc; Liu, Honglai

    2016-12-13

    Pickering emulsions combining surface-active and catalytic properties offer a promising platform for conducting interfacial reactions between immiscible reagents. Despite the significant progress in the design of Pickering interfacial catalysts for a broad panel of reactions, the dynamics of Pickering emulsions under reaction conditions is still poorly understood. Herein, using benzene hydroxylation with aqueous H2O2 as a model system, we explored the dynamics of benzene/water Pickering emulsions during reaction by dissipative particle dynamics. Our study points out that the surface wettability of the silica nanoparticles is affected to a higher extent by the degree of polymer grafting rather than an increase of the chain length of hydrophobic polymer moieties. A remarkable decline of the oil-in-water (O/W) interfacial tension was observed when increasing the yield of the reaction product (phenol), affecting the emulsion stability. However, phenol did not alter to an important extent the distribution of immiscible reagents around the nanoparticles sitting at the benzene/water interface. A synergistic effect between phenol and silica nanoparticles on the O/W interfacial tension of the biphasic system could be ascertained.

  11. A nanoscale study of charge extraction in organic solar cells: the impact of interfacial molecular configurations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fu-Ching; Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yen, Chia-Te; Chang, Jay; Chou, Wei-Yang; Gilbert Chang, Shih-Hui; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2015-01-07

    In the optimization of organic solar cells (OSCs), a key problem lies in the maximization of charge carriers from the active layer to the electrodes. Hence, this study focused on the interfacial molecular configurations in efficient OSC charge extraction by theoretical investigations and experiments, including small molecule-based bilayer-heterojunction (sm-BLHJ) and polymer-based bulk-heterojunction (p-BHJ) OSCs. We first examined a well-defined sm-BLHJ model system of OSC composed of p-type pentacene, an n-type perylene derivative, and a nanogroove-structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (NS-PEDOT) hole extraction layer. The OSC with NS-PEDOT shows a 230% increment in the short circuit current density compared with that of the conventional planar PEDOT layer. Our theoretical calculations indicated that small variations in the microscopic intermolecular interaction among these interfacial configurations could induce significant differences in charge extraction efficiency. Experimentally, different interfacial configurations were generated between the photo-active layer and the nanostructured charge extraction layer with periodic nanogroove structures. In addition to pentacene, poly(3-hexylthiophene), the most commonly used electron-donor material system in p-BHJ OSCs was also explored in terms of its possible use as a photo-active layer. Local conductive atomic force microscopy was used to measure the nanoscale charge extraction efficiency at different locations within the nanogroove, thus highlighting the importance of interfacial molecular configurations in efficient charge extraction. This study enriches understanding regarding the optimization of the photovoltaic properties of several types of OSCs by conducting appropriate interfacial engineering based on organic/polymer molecular orientations. The ultimate power conversion efficiency beyond at least 15% is highly expected when the best state-of-the-art p-BHJ OSCs are combined with present arguments.

  12. Ability of three desensitizing agents in dentinal tubule obliteration and durability: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pathan, Azher Banu; Bolla, Nagesh; Kavuri, Sarath Raj; Sunil, Chukka Ram; Damaraju, Bhargavi; Pattan, Sadhiq Khan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three desensitizing agents on dentinal tubule obliteration and their durability in use on the dentinal tubules. Materials and Methods: Sixty specimens were obtained from 30 extracted sound human maxillary first premolars. Each tooth was mesiodistally sectioned to obtain 30 buccal and 30 lingual surfaces, and enamel was removed in order to simulate hypersensitive dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups with 15 specimens each. Group 1 samples were immersed in artificial saliva, Group 2 samples were coated with Vivasens, Group 3 samples were coated with VOCO Admira Protect, and Group 4 samples were coated with Neo Active Apatite suspension. These specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) to find out the occluding ability of the respective products. The specimens were brushed to find out their durability for 1 week and 1 month and were examined under SEM. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. Results: Group 1 differed significantly from the Vivasens, Admira, and Neo Active Apatite groups at 5% level of significance (P < 0.05). The Vivasens group differed significantly from the Admira and Neo Active Apatite groups at 5% level of significance (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The Ormocer-based Admira Protect showed the best results. PMID:26957790

  13. Interaction of pepsin-[C16mim]Br system: interfacial dilational rheology and conformational studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Chong; Liu, Zi-lin; Li, Yang; Du, Feng-pei

    2014-09-21

    The interfacial rheological property is closely related to the stabilities of foams and emulsions, yet there have been limited studies on the interaction between proteins with ionic liquid-type imidazolium surfactants at the decane-water interface as well as in the bulk. Herein, we investigated the interfacial and bulk properties of pepsin (PEP) and an ionic liquid (IL), 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide, [C(16)mim]Br. The interfacial pressure and dilational rheology studies were performed to describe the formation of [C(16)mim]Br-pepsin complexes. The influence of the oscillating frequency and the bulk concentration of [C(16)mim]Br on the dilational properties were explored. The conformational changes were studied by monitoring the fluorescence and far UV-CD spectra. The results reveal that the globular structure of pepsin is one of the decisive factors controlling the nature of the interfacial film. The monotonous increase in the dilational elastic modulus of pepsin-[C(16)mim]Br solutions with the surface age indicates that no loops and tails had formed. Interestingly, with an increase in the concentration of [C(16)mim]Br, the εd-c curve first passes through a plateau value due to steric hindrance and the electrostatic barrier of already absorbed tenacious pepsin-[C(16)mim]Br complexes. With the further addition of [C(16)mim]Br, the remarkable decrease in dilational elastic modulus indicates that the compact structure is destroyed gradually. The results of the fluorescence spectra and far UV-CD spectra confirm that [C(16)mim]Br did not produce perceptible changes in pepsin at the concentrations studied in the dilational experiment. Possible schematic programs of the pepsin-[C(16)mim]Br interaction model at the interface and in bulk phase are proposed.

  14. Spin polarized photoemission studies of interfacial and thin film magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.D.; Brookes, N.B.; Chang, Y.; Garrison, K.

    1993-01-01

    Spin polarized photoemission is used to study the electronic structure of noble metals deposited on ferromagnetic substrates. Studies of Ag deposited on an Fe(001) substrate reveal a series of minority spin interface or quantum well states with binding energies dependent on the thickness of the silver. Similar behavior is observed for Cu films deposited on a fct Co(001) substrate. Tight-binding modeling reproduces many of the observations and shows that hybridization of the sp-bands with the noble metal d-bands cannot be ignored.

  15. Spin polarized photoemission studies of interfacial and thin film magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.D.; Brookes, N.B.; Chang, Y.; Garrison, K.

    1993-06-01

    Spin polarized photoemission is used to study the electronic structure of noble metals deposited on ferromagnetic substrates. Studies of Ag deposited on an Fe(001) substrate reveal a series of minority spin interface or quantum well states with binding energies dependent on the thickness of the silver. Similar behavior is observed for Cu films deposited on a fct Co(001) substrate. Tight-binding modeling reproduces many of the observations and shows that hybridization of the sp-bands with the noble metal d-bands cannot be ignored.

  16. Selection and durability of seal materials for a bedded salt repository: preliminary studies

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.M.; Grutzeck, M.W.; Wakeley, L.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report details preliminary results of both experimental and theoretical studies of cementitious seal materials for use in a proposed nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. Effects of changes in bulk composition and environment upon phase stability and physical/mechanical properties have been evaluated for more than 25 formulations. Bonding and interfacial characteristics of the region between host rock and seal material or concrete aggregate and cementitious matrix for selected formulations have been studied. Compatibilities of clays and zeolites in brines typical of the SE New Mexico region have been investigated, and their stabilities reviewed. Results of these studies have led to the conclusion that cementitious materials can be formulated which are compatible with the major rock types in a bedded salt repository environment. Strengths are more than adequate, permeabilities are consistently very low, and elastic moduli generally increase only very slightly with time. Seal formulation guidelines and recommendations for present and future work are presented. 73 references, 25 figures, 61 tables.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of contact mechanics: contact area and interfacial separation from small to full contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunyan; Persson, Bo

    2008-03-01

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the contact between a rigid solid with a randomly rough surface and an elastic block with a flat surface. We study the contact area and the interfacial separation from small contact (low load) to full contact (high load). For small load the contact area varies linearly with the load and the interfacial separation depends logarithmically on the load [1-4]. For high load the contact area approaches to the nominal contact area (i.e., complete contact), and the interfacial separation approaches to zero. The present results may be very important for soft solids, e.g., rubber, or for very smooth surfaces, where complete contact can be reached at moderate high loads without plastic deformation of the solids. References: [1] C. Yang and B.N.J. Persson, arXiv:0710.0276, (to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.) [2] B.N.J. Persson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 125502 (2007) [3] L. Pei, S. Hyun, J.F. Molinari and M.O. Robbins, J. Mech. Phys. Sol. 53, 2385 (2005) [4] M. Benz, K.J. Rosenberg, E.J. Kramer and J.N. Israelachvili, J. Phy. Chem. B.110, 11884 (2006)

  18. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  19. Synergetic Surface and Chemical Durability Study of the Aesthetically Enhanced Natural Quartz by Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Rout, Prajna P.; Singh, Saroj K.; Mishra, Barada K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2017-03-01

    The change in surface behavior of natural quartz stone before and after heat treatment with metal oxides such as: cobalt oxide (Co3O4) and copper oxide (Cu2O) under vacuum and open atmosphere has been investigated. The surface feature, bulk density and hardness value of quartz changed after heat treatment, converting to a high value product. Difference in crystallinity of quartz, pre- and post-heat treatment was obtained through X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The electron probe microanalysis results clearly explicated the diffusion of metal ion in quartz matrix exposed under vacuum atmosphere but as coating on the surface under open atmosphere. The structural transformation of quartz after heat treatment has been observed from the XRD data and well corroborated with the nanoindentation results. Durability of such quartz to chemical hazardous environment was observed. Thus, this communication demonstrates the change in physical and chemical characteristics of natural quartz stone after heat treatment under different atmosphere.

  20. Synergetic Surface and Chemical Durability Study of the Aesthetically Enhanced Natural Quartz by Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Rout, Prajna P.; Singh, Saroj K.; Mishra, Barada K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2017-01-01

    The change in surface behavior of natural quartz stone before and after heat treatment with metal oxides such as: cobalt oxide (Co3O4) and copper oxide (Cu2O) under vacuum and open atmosphere has been investigated. The surface feature, bulk density and hardness value of quartz changed after heat treatment, converting to a high value product. Difference in crystallinity of quartz, pre- and post-heat treatment was obtained through X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The electron probe microanalysis results clearly explicated the diffusion of metal ion in quartz matrix exposed under vacuum atmosphere but as coating on the surface under open atmosphere. The structural transformation of quartz after heat treatment has been observed from the XRD data and well corroborated with the nanoindentation results. Durability of such quartz to chemical hazardous environment was observed. Thus, this communication demonstrates the change in physical and chemical characteristics of natural quartz stone after heat treatment under different atmosphere.

  1. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of

  2. Numerical study on the mechanism of active interfacial debonding detection for rectangular CFSTs based on wavelet packet analysis with piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Chen, Hongbing; Xia, Song

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, Piezoelectric Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based active interfacial debonding defect detection approach for concrete-filled steel tubular (CFST) columns has been proposed and validated experimentally. In order to investigate the mechanism of the PZT based interfacial debonding detection approach, a multi-physics coupling finite element model (FEM) composed of surface-mounted PZT actuator, embedded PZT sensor and a rectangular CFST column is constructed to numerically simulate the stress wave propagation induced by the surface-mounted PZT actuator under different excitation signals with different frequency and amplitude. The measurements of the embedded PZT sensor in concrete core of the CFST columns with different interfacial debonding defect lengths and depths are determined numerically with transient dynamic analysis. The linearity between the PZT response and the input amplitude, the effect of different frequency and measurement distance are discussed and the stress wave fields of CFST members without and with interface debonding defects are compared. Then, the response of the embedded PZT in concrete core is analyzed with wavelet packet analysis. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) of wavelet packet energy spectrum of the PZT measurement is employed as an evaluation index for the interfacial debonding detection. The results showed that the defined index under continuous sinusoidal and sweep frequency signals changes with the interfacial defects length and depth and is capable of effectively identifying the interfacial debonding defect between the concrete core and the steel tubular. Moreover, the index under sweep frequency signal is more sensitive to the interfacial debonding. The simulation results indicate that the interfacial debonding defect leads to the changes in the propagation path, travel time and the magnitude of stress waves. The simulation results meet the findings from the previous experimental study by the authors and help

  3. Non linear viscoelasticity applied for the study of durability of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardon, A.; Brinson, H. F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is described for the durability analysis of polymer matrix composites, based on nonlinear viscoelasticity theory. The durability analysis is performed on the basis of a certain number of tests carried out on limited and, if possible, short time scale by the use of accelerating factors. The method was applied to thermomatrix composites under uniaxial and biaxial loadings, showing satisfactory agreement between the life-time predictions and the published data on real-time behavior.

  4. Combined in-situ dilatometer and contact angle studies of interfacial reaction kinetics in brazing.

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, V. R.; Javernick, D. A.; Thoma, D. J.; Cola, M. J.; Hollis, K. J.; Smith, F. M.; Dauelsberg, L. B.

    2001-01-01

    Multi-component dissimilar material braze joints as shown in Figure 1 consisting of dissimilar base materials, filler materials and wetting agents are of tantamount importance in a wide variely of applications. This work combines dilatometry and contact angle measurements to characterize in-situ the multiple interfacial reaction pathways that occur in such systems. Whereas both of these methods are commonly used tools in metallurgical investigation, their combined use within the context of brazing studies is new and offers considerable additional insight. Applications are discussed to joints made between Beryllium and Monel with TiH{sub 2} as the wetting agent and Cu-28%Ag as the filler material.

  5. Conflicts of Interest in GM Bt Crop Efficacy and Durability Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lombaert, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Public confidence in genetically modified (GM) crop studies is tenuous at best in many countries, including those of the European Union in particular. A lack of information about the effects of ties between academic research and industry might stretch this confidence to the breaking point. We therefore performed an analysis on a large set of research articles (n = 672) focusing on the efficacy or durability of GM Bt crops and ties between the researchers carrying out these studies and the GM crop industry. We found that ties between researchers and the GM crop industry were common, with 40% of the articles considered displaying conflicts of interest (COI). In particular, we found that, compared to the absence of COI, the presence of a COI was associated with a 50% higher frequency of outcomes favorable to the interests of the GM crop company. Using our large dataset, we were able to propose possible direct and indirect mechanisms behind this statistical association. They might notably include changes of authorship or funding statements after the results of a study have been obtained and a choice in the topics studied driven by industrial priorities. PMID:27977705

  6. Studies on interfacial tension and contact angle of synthesized surfactant and polymeric from castor oil for enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Keshak; Pal, Nilanjan; Bera, Achinta; Saxena, V. K.; Mandal, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    New synthesized polymeric surfactants have immensely attracted the researchers for further development of chemical enhanced oil recovery method particularly in surfactant flooding. Contact angle and interfacial tension measurement tests are the effective ways to identify proper chemicals/surfactants for enhanced oil recovery by chemical/surfactant flooding. In the present study a new polymeric surfactant was synthesized from pre-synthesized sodium methyl ester sulfonate (surfactant) and acrylamide for application in chemical enhanced oil recovery. The synthesized surfactant and polymeric surfactant were used to measure interfacial tension between their aqueous phase and crude oil phase to investigate the efficiency of the surfactants in reduction of interfacial tension. The synthesized polymeric surfactant has also ability to control the mobility because of its viscous nature in aqueous solution. Contact angles of solid-crude oil-surfactant interface were also measured to study the effect of the synthesized surfactant and polymeric surfactant on wettability alteration mechanism. Synergistic effect was studied by using NaCl and synthesized surfactants on interfacial tension. Dynamic interfacial tensions of the surfactant and polymeric surfactant solutions with crude oil were measured at different NaCl concentrations. Interfacial tension was found to be lowered up to 10-2 to 10-3 mN/m which is effective for oil recovery. Measurement of contact angle indicates the wettability change of the quartz surface. Comparative studies on efficiencies of synthesized sodium methyl ester sulfonate surfactant and polymeric surfactant were also carried out with respect to interfacial tension reduction and contact angle change.

  7. Interfacial chemistry of a perfluoropolyether lubricant studied by XPS and TDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar C.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1992-01-01

    The interfacial chemistry of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyether used as lubricant for space applications, with different metallic surfaces: 440C steel, gold and aluminum was studied. Thin layers of Fomblin Z25 were evaporated onto the oxide-free substrates and the interfacial chemistry studied using XPS and TDS. The reactions were induced by heating the substrate and by rubbing the substrate with a steel ball. Gold was found to be completely unreactive towards Fomblin at any temperature. Reaction at room temperature was observed only in the case of the aluminum substrate, the most reactive towards Fomblin Z25 of the substrates studied. It was necessary to heat the 440C steel substrate to 190 degree C to induce decomposition of the fluid. The degradation of the fluid was indicated by the formation of a debris layer at the interface. This debris layer, composed of inorganic and organic reaction products, when completely formed, passivated the surface from further attack to the Fromblin on top. The tribologically induced reactions on 440C steel formed a debris layer of similar chemical characteristics to the thermally induced layer. In all cases, the degradation reaction resulted in preferential consumption of the difluoroformyl carbon (-OCF2O-).

  8. Study for the prediction of the long-term durability of seismic isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, T. ); Ishida, K.; Mazda, T.; Nishikawa, I.; Muramatsu, Y.; Hamanaka, T.; Yoshizawa, T.; Sueyasu, T.

    1994-12-01

    The application of seismic rubber isolators is considered as one of the steps in assuring the reliability and safe operation of the Fast Breeder Reactor Plant. In order to propose a precise test method for estimating the durability of seismic isolators, we examined the depth-dependent profiles of tensile properties in thick natural rubber blocks after thermal aging at 60-100[degrees]C. The results of this study established the following conclusions: After thermal aging, the rubber blocks exhibited heterogeneous degradation behavior. These rubber blocks could be divided into two areas, the oxidative degraded area near the surface showing large changes in the properties, and the thermal degraded area in the interior showing small property changes. It was established that the depth of oxidation showed temperature dependence, with greater depth of oxidation at lower temperatures. There was also found to be a linear relationship between the logarithm of the depth of oxidation and the reciprocal of the absolute temperature. As a result, the depths of oxidation at normal temperature may be estimated to depths of 6-10 cm. Having calculated the activation energy at depths of 2 mm each from the surface in the oxidative degraded area, it was found that the activation energy held a fixed value independent of depth. 7 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Vanadium redox flow battery efficiency and durability studies of sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene)s

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Kim, Soowhan; Stains, Ronald; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-01

    Sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP) was examined for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) use. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied from 1.4, 1.6 and 2.0 meq/g in order to tune the proton conductivity and vanadium permeability. Coulombic efficiencies between 92 to 99% were observed, depending on IEC (lower IEC, higher coulombic efficiencies). In all cases the SDAPP displayed comparable energy efficiencies (88 - 90%) to Nafion 117 (88%) at 50mA/cm2. Membrane durability also was dependent on IEC; SDAPP with the highest IEC lasted slightly over 50 cycles while SDAPP with the lowest IEC lasted over 400 cycles and testing was discontinued only due to time constraints. Accelerated vanadium lifetime studies were initialed with SDAPP, by soaking films in a 0.1 M V5+ and 5.0 M total SO4-2 solution. The rate of degradation was also proportional with IEC; the 2 meq/g sample dissolved within 376 hours, the 1.6 meq/g sample dissolved after 860 hours, while the 1.4 meq/g sample broke apart after 1527 hours.

  10. Mixed hydrocarbon/fluoropolymer membrane/ionomer MEAs for durability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Kim, Yu Seung; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Wilson, Mahlon S; Welch, Cynthia; Fenton, James

    2010-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Commercial viability depends on improving the durability of the fuel cell components to increase the system reliability. The aim of this work is to separate ionomer degradation from membrane degradation via mixed membrane/ionomer MEA experiments. The challenges of mixed MEA fabrication due to the incompatibility of the membrane and the electrode are addressed. OCV accelerated testing experiment (AST) were performed. Development of in situ diagnostics and unique experiments to characterize the performance and properties of the ionomer in the electrode as a function of time is reported. These measurements, along with extensive ex situ and post-mortem characterization, can delineate the degradation mechanisms in order to develop more durable fuel cells and fuel cell components.

  11. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE DURABILITY OF MATERIALS FOR INTERCONNECTS IN SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2003-06-30

    This report describes the result of the first eight months of effort on a project directed at improving metallic interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results include cyclic oxidation studies of a group of ferritic alloys, which are candidate interconnect materials. The exposures have been carried out in simulated fuel cell atmospheres. The oxidation morphologies have been characterized and the ASR has been measured for the oxide scales. The effect of fuel cell electric current density on chromia growth rates has been considered The thermomechanical behavior of the scales has been investigated by stress measurements using x-ray diffraction and interfacial fracture toughness measurements using indentation. The ultimate goal of this thrust is to use knowledge of changes in oxide thickness, stress and adhesion to develop accelerated testing methods for evaluating SOFC interconnect alloys. Finally a theoretical assessment of the potential for use of ''new'' metallic materials as interconnect materials has been conducted and is presented in this report. Alloys being considered include materials based on pure nickel, materials based on the ''Invar'' concept, and coated materials to optimize properties in both the anode and cathode gases.

  12. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE DURABILITY OF MATERIALS FOR INTERCONNECTS IN SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.; Laney, S.; Jackson, W.; Pettit, F.; Meier, J.; Dhanaraj, N.; Beuth, J.

    2005-01-28

    This task involves theoretical analysis of possible alternative metallic interconnect schemes including: Ni and dispersion-strengthened Ni, low CTE alloys based on Fe-Ni (Invar), coatings to suppress evaporation, and incorporation of high conductivity paths. The most promising systems are being evaluated experimentally with regard to durability and oxide conductivity.

  13. Void initiation from interfacial debonding of spherical silicon particles inside a silicon-copper nanocomposite: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi; Chen, Zengtao

    2017-02-01

    Silicon particles with diameters from 1.9 nm to 30 nm are embedded in a face-centered-cubic copper matrix to form nanocomposite specimens for simulation. The interfacial debonding of silicon particles from the copper matrix and the subsequent growth of nucleated voids are studied via molecular dynamics (MD). The MD results are examined from several different perspectives. The overall mechanical performance is monitored by the average stress-strain response and the accumulated porosity. The ‘relatively farthest-traveled’ atoms are identified to characterize the onset of interfacial debonding. The relative displacement field is plotted to illustrate both subsequent interfacial debonding and the growth of a nucleated void facilitated by a dislocation network. Our results indicate that the initiation of interfacial debonding is due to the accumulated surface stress if the matrix is initially dislocation-free. However, pre-existing dislocations can make a considerable difference. In either case, the dislocation emission also contributes to the subsequent debonding process. As for the size effect, the debonding of relatively larger particles causes a drop in the stress-strain curve. The volume fraction of second-phase particles is found to be more influential than the size of the simulation box on the onset of interfacial debonding. The volume fraction of second-phase particles also affects the shape of the nucleated void and, therefore, influences the stress response of the composite.

  14. USING MOLECULAR PROBES TO STUDY INTERFACIAL REDOX REACTION AT FE-BEARING SMECTITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interfacial electron transfer of clay-water systems has a wide range of significance in geochemical and biogeochernical environments. However the mechanism of interfacial electron transport is poorly understood. The electron transfer mechanism at the solid-water interfaces of...

  15. Experimental study on interfacial area transport in downward two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyi

    In view of the importance of two group interfacial area transport equations and lack of corresponding accurate downward flow database that can reveal two group interfacial area transport, a systematic database for adiabatic, air-water, vertically downward two-phase flow in a round pipe with inner diameter of 25.4 mm was collected to gain an insight of interfacial structure and provide benchmarking data for two-group interfacial area transport models. A four-sensor conductivity probe was used to measure the local two phase flow parameters and data was collected with data sampling frequency much higher than conventional data sampling frequency to ensure the accuracy. Axial development of local flow parameter profiles including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, and Sauter mean diameter were presented. Drastic inter-group transfer of void fraction and interfacial area was observed at bubbly to slug transition flow. And the wall peaked interfacial area concentration profiles were observed in churn-turbulent flow. The importance of local data about these phenomenon on flow structure prediction and interfacial area transport equation benchmark was analyzed. Bedsides, in order to investigate the effect of inlet conditions, all experiments were repeated after installing the flow straightening facility, and the results were briefly analyzed. In order to check the accuracy of current data, the experiment results were cross-checked with rotameter measurement as well as drift-flux model prediction, the averaged error is less than 15%. Current models for two-group interfacial area transport equation were evaluated using these data. The results show that two-group interfacial area transport equations with current models can predict most flow conditions with error less than 20%, except some bubbly to slug transition flow conditions and some churn-turbulent flow conditions. The disagreement between models and experiments could result from underestimate of inter

  16. Study On Matrix Homogeneity And Interfacial Zone Of Sodium-poly(sialate-siloxo) Geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subaer, Haris, Abdul; van Riessen, Arie

    2010-12-01

    Geopolymers are relatively novel materials with a wide range of potential application. The purpose of the present study was to experimentally investigate the composition-microstructure-property relationship of these materials. Na-PSS geopolymers were prepared by thermally assisted alkali-activation of metakaolinite. Microstructural characterization by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) revealed that the morphology of geopolymers consists of aluminosilicate matrix, unreacted metakaoline, micro pores and secondary micro cracks. Computed Tomography Imaging (CT-Scan) was used to further examine the development of micro cracks on the surface of geopolymers with and without the inclusion of aggregate. It was also observed that the interfacial zone between geopolymer paste and aggregate has the same chemical composition as the rest of the matrix.

  17. Study of the interfacial structures and behavior of smectic liquid crystals using synchrotron light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yufei

    2003-10-01

    Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering with a synchrotron X-ray source is used to study the depth dependence of the interfacial structure of smectic liquid crystal (8CB) hybrid films. The advancement and market potential of liquid crystal technologies lead to inventions of new materials and surface treatments. The knowledge of interfacial structures and behavior is very critical to these thin film devices such as Liquid Crystal Display. Photolithography in a clean room is adopted to make gratings on very thin glass, which offers better quality than conventional methods in terms of uniformity, reproducibility, reliability, and endurance. Liquid crystal thin films are bounded by a grated glass substrate and air, and have been studied as a function of both temperature and thickness. Experimental measurements indicate the existence of chevron, tilt, and bookshelf structure, as well as Twisted Grain Boundary (TGB) structure that has not previously been observed by X-ray in non-chiral smectic liquid crystals. These structures are a result of liquid crystal anchoring at two dissimilar competing confining surfaces, air-smectics and smectics-grating substrate. With deeper grating, smectic liquid crystals are more constrained in structure and more resilient to temperature change. The smectic phase also persisted at a higher temperature above the smectic-nematic transition point on a deeper grating substrate. When the thickness of liquid crystal samples is beyond a certain point, the smectic liquid crystal begins to form different layers. Chevron structures appear in most situations, which is consistent with previous research A TGB structure is not tamable in a thicker sample where liquid crystals tend to realign themselves in a more stable structure.

  18. Interfacial structure of sugar beet pectin studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gromer, A; Kirby, A R; Gunning, A P; Morris, V J

    2009-07-21

    Unlike pectins from other origins, sugar beet pectin (SBP) acts as an emulsifier, a property which has been correlated to its more hydrophobic character and high protein content. In this work, we have investigated the structure of SBP at interfaces by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three situations were studied: the mica/water, graphite/water, and air/water interface. For the latter, the interfacial film was transferred onto mica using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. While the adsorption of individual pectin chains on mica requires the addition of divalent cations, on graphite a thin layer containing amorphous areas and rodlike chains forms spontaneously. We suggest that the layer contains proteins and pectin chains which are bound to the graphite via CH-pi interactions. SBP adsorbed at the air/water interface forms an elastic layer, as evidenced by pendant drop and surface shear rheology measurements. AFM Images reveal the layer is crippled with holes and contains rodlike chains, suggesting that the pectin chains prevent the formation of a densely packed protein layer. Nevertheless, we show that the interfacial pectin film is more resistant to displacement by surfactants than a pure protein film, possibly because of the formation of linkages between the pectin chains. In contrast, alkali treatment of the pectin appears to remove the pectin chains from the air/water interface and leaves a film that behaves similarly to pure protein. This work gives a new insight into the nanoscale organization of polysaccharides and polysaccharide-protein mixtures at macroscopic surfaces. The results gathered from the different interfaces studied permit a better understanding of the likely structure of SBP at the interface of emulsion droplets. Such knowledge might be used to modify rationally the pectin in order to improve its emulsifying properties, leading to broader commercial applications.

  19. A study of the durability of beryllium rocket engines. [space shuttle reaction control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paster, R. D.; French, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental test program was performed to demonstrate the durability of a beryllium INTEREGEN rocket engine when operating under conditions simulating the space shuttle reaction control system. A vibration simulator was exposed to the equivalent of 100 missions of X, Y, and Z axes random vibration to demonstrate the integrity of the recently developed injector-to-chamber braze joint. An off-limits engine was hot fired under extreme conditions of mixture ratio, chamber pressure, and orifice plugging. A durability engine was exposed to six environmental cycles interspersed with hot-fire tests without intermediate cleaning, service, or maintenance. Results from this program indicate the ability of the beryllium INTEREGEN engine concept to meet the operational requirements of the space shuttle reaction control system.

  20. Study of the effects of fuel vortex film cooling on high temperature coating durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A report on the effects of fuel vortex film cooling on high temperature coating durability is presented. The program evaluated candidate high temperature oxidation resistant reaction control system engine thrust chamber material. As a result of the evaluation, the current and future programs may be optimized from the materials standpoint. Engine firing data for the evaluation of one material system is generated. The subjects considered are: (1) screening of materials, (2) thrust chamber fabrication, (3) engine testing, and (4) analysis of the data.

  1. Fundamental Studies of the Durability of Materials for Interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2006-06-30

    Ferritic stainless steels are a leading candidate material for use as an SOFC interconnect, but have the problem of forming volatile chromia species that lead to cathode poisoning. This project has focused both on optimization of ferritic alloys for SOFC applications and evaluating the possibility of using alternative materials. The initial efforts involved studying the oxidation behavior of a variety of chromia-forming ferritic stainless steels in the temperature range 700-900 C in atmospheres relevant to solid oxide fuel cell operation. The alloys exhibited a wide variety of oxidation behavior based on composition. A method for reducing the vaporization is to add alloying elements that lead to the formation of a thermally grown oxide layer over the protective chromia. Several commercial steels form manganese chromate on the surface. This same approach, combined with observations of TiO{sub 2} overlayer formation on the chromia forming, Ni-based superalloy IN 738, has resulted in the development of a series of Fe-22 Cr-X Ti alloys (X=0-4 wt%). Oxidation testing has indicated that this approach results in significant reduction in chromia evaporation. Unfortunately, the Ti also results in accelerated chromia scale growth. Fundamental thermo-mechanical aspects of the durability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect alloys have also been investigated. A key failure mechanism for interconnects is the spallation of the chromia scale that forms on the alloy, as it is exposed to fuel cell environments. Indentation testing methods to measure the critical energy release rate (Gc) associated with the spallation of chromia scale/alloy systems have been evaluated. This approach has been used to evaluate the thermomechanical stability of chromia films as a function of oxidation exposure. The oxidation of pure nickel in SOFC environments was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the NiO scaling kinetics and a four-point probe was used to measure

  2. Study on Durability and Stability of an Aqueous Electrolyte Solution for Zinc Bromide Hybrid Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-bromine flow battery using aqueous electrolyte has advantages of cost effective and high energy density, but there still remains a problem improving stability and durability of electrolyte materials during long-time cell operation. This paper focuses on providing a homogeneous aqueous solution for durability and stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. For performance experiments of conventional and proposed electrolyte solutions, detailed cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements (at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in the range of -1.5 V~1.5 V) are carried out for 40 cycles and five kinds of electrolytes containing which has one of additives, such as (conventionally) zinc chloride, potassium chloride, (newly) lithium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate and zeolite-Y are compared with the 2.0 M ZnBr2 electrolyte, respectively. Experimental results show that using the proposed three additives provides higher anodic and cathodic peak current density of electrolytes than using other two conventional additives, and can lead to improved chemical reversibility of zinc bromide electrolyte. Especially, the solution of which the zeolite-Y added, shows enhanced electrochemical stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. Consequently, proposed electrolytes have a significant advantage in comparison with conventional electrolytes on higher stability and durability.

  3. Collagenase injections for Dupuytren's disease: prospective cohort study assessing 2-year treatment effect durability

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzson, Anna; Atroshi, Isam

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess 2-year durability of joint contracture correction following collagenase injections for Dupuytren's disease. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Orthopaedic Department in Sweden. Participants Patients with palpable Dupuytren's cord and active extension deficit (AED) ≥30° in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and/or proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint. A surgeon injected 0.80 mg collagenase into multiple cord parts and performed finger manipulation under local anaesthesia after 24–48 hours. A hand therapist measured joint contracture before and 5 weeks after injection in all treated patients. Of 57 consecutive patients (59 hands), 48 patients (50 hands) were examined by a hand therapist 24–35 months (mean 26) after injection. Five of the patients had received a second injection in the same finger within 6 months of the first injection. Outcome measures Primary outcome was proportion of treated joints with ≥20° worsening in AED from 5 weeks to 2 years. Results Between the 5-week and the 2-year measurements, AED had worsened by ≥20° in seven MCP and seven PIP joints (28% of the treated hands; all had received a single injection). Mean AED for the MCP joints was 54° before injection, 6° at 5 weeks and 9° at 2 years and for the PIP joints 30°, 13° and 16°, respectively. For joints with ≥10° contracture at baseline, mean (95 % CI) baseline to 2 years AED improvement was for MCP 49° (41–54) and for PIP 25° (17–32). No treatment-related adverse events were observed at the 2-year follow-up evaluation. Conclusions Two years after collagenase injections for Dupuytren's disease, improvement was maintained in 72% of the treated hands. Complete contracture correction was seen in more than 80% of the MCP but in less than half of the PIP joints. PMID:28298365

  4. Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction studied by time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körner, H. S.; Stigloher, J.; Bauer, H. G.; Hata, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Moriyama, T.; Ono, T.; Back, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) on the propagation of Damon-Eshbach spin waves in micrometer-sized Pt(2 nm)/Co(0.4 nm)/Py(5 nm)/MgO(5 nm) stripes. We use time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy to image the spin waves excited by a microwave antenna and to directly access their dispersion. The presence of an interfacial DMI manifests itself in an asymmetry in the dispersion for counterpropagating spin waves which reverses sign upon reversal of the direction of the externally applied magnetic field. From this asymmetry we deduce the strength of the interfacial DMI. Micromagnetic simulations confirm that the observed difference in the wave numbers and the signature of the asymmetry are characteristic for the occurrence of an interfacial DMI at the Pt/Co interface and cannot be explained by the uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy field originating from the same interface.

  5. DURABILITY AND NEPHELINE CRYSTALLIZATION STUDY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) SLUDGE BATCH 4 (SB4) GLASSES FORMULATED WITH FRIT 503

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2006-06-06

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is about to process High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). This sludge batch is high in alumina and nepheline can crystallize readily depending on the glass composition. Large concentrations of crystallized nepheline can have an adverse effect on HLW glass durability. Several studies have been performed to study the potential for nepheline formation in SB4. The Phase 3 Nepheline Formation study of SB4 glasses examined sixteen different glasses made with four different frits. Melt rate experiments were performed by the Process Science and Engineering Section (PS&E) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using the four frits from the Phase 3 work, plus additional high B2O3/high Fe2O3 frits. Preliminary results from these tests showed the potential for significant improvements in melt rate for SB4 glasses using a higher B2O3-containing frit, particularly Frit 503. The main objective of this study was to investigate the durability of SB4 glasses produced with a high B2O3 frit likely to be recommended for SB4 processing. In addition, a range of waste loadings (WLs) was selected to continue to assess the effectiveness of a nepheline discriminator in predicting concentrations of nepheline crystallization that would be sufficient to influence the durability response of the glass. Five glasses were selected for this study, covering a WL range of 30 to 50 wt% in 5 wt% increments. The Frit 503 glasses were batched and melted. Specimens of each glass were heat-treated to simulate cooling along the centerline of a DWPF-type canister (ccc) to gauge the effects of thermal history on product performance. Visual observations on both quenched and ccc glasses were documented. A representative sample from each glass was submitted to the SRNL Process Science Analytical Laboratory (PSAL) for chemical analysis to confirm that the as-fabricated glasses corresponded to the defined target compositions. The Product Consistency Test

  6. Designing durable icephobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P. R.; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T.; Mabry, Joseph M.; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-01-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months. PMID:26998520

  7. Designing durable icephobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P R; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-03-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months.

  8. Study of Sub-interfacial Quasi-static Crack Propagation Using Shearing Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hansuk; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    Cracks on the interface between two materials have been extensively studied in view of their applications to failure processes in composite materials [1-3]. In this work, we look at the case of cracks that are off but close to an interface. Some early studies have indicated that under certain circumstances such sub-interfacial cracks tend to grow along a path that is parallel to the interface at a characteristic distance from the interface depending on the loading and material properties of the two materials. In this study, we optically map crack-tip stress fields for cracks that start off the interface, and track them as they subsequently propagate off the interface. The optical technique that was developed in our laboratory and which is used in this study will be explained. This shearing interferometer is used in conjunction with a 1000 frame/sec video camera. The resulting fringe patterns are evaluated to obtain information about the stress-state during initiation and propagation. The conditions for crack propagation parallel to the interface are explained. The experimental results are compared with crack trajectories predicted by finite element simulations.

  9. Toward picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption studies of interfacial photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Oliver; Mahl, Johannes; Neppl, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress toward developing a novel picosecond time-resolved transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TRXAS) capability for time-domain studies of interfacial photochemistry. The technique is based on the combination of a high repetition rate picosecond laser system with a time-resolved X-ray fluorescent yield setup that may be used for the study of radiation sensitive materials and X-ray spectroscopy compatible photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. The mobile system is currently deployed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and may be used in all operating modes (two-bunch and multi-bunch) of the synchrotron. The use of a time-stamping technique enables the simultaneous recording of TRXAS spectra with delays between the exciting laser pulses and the probing X-ray pulses spanning picosecond to nanosecond temporal scales. First results are discussed that demonstrate the viability of the method to study photoinduced dynamics in transition metal-oxide semiconductor (SC) samples under high vacuum conditions and at SC-liquid electrolyte interfaces during photoelectrochemical water splitting. Opportunities and challenges are outlined to capture crucial short-lived intermediates of photochemical processes with the technique. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Research Program.

  10. A SANS study of the interfacial curvatures and the phase behavior in bicontinuous microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sung-Min

    A microemulsion is a three-component system in which oil and water are solubilized via an interfacial surfactant monolayer. Depending on the composition and various external conditions, it exhibits a wide variety of phases with corresponding mesoscopic scale interfacial structures. For scientific as well as industrial purposes, knowledge of the relation between the interfacial structure and the phase behavior is crucial but its quantitative measure is lacking. To identify the relation in a quantitative way, the natural parameters to be measured are the interfacial curvatures: Gaussian, mean, and square mean curvatures. A new small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data analysis method to extract the interfacial curvatures was developed and applied to various microemulsions. The method involves the use of a clipped random wave model with an inverse 8th order polynomial spectral function. The spectral density function contains three basic length scales: the inter- domain distance, the coherence length, and the surface roughness parameter. These three length scales are essential to describe mesoscopic scale interfaces. A series of SANS experiments were performed at various phase points of isometric and non-isometric microemulsions. Using the developed model, the three interfacial curvatures at each phase point were determined for the first time in a practical way. In isometric bicontinuous microemulsions, the Gaussian curvature is negative and has a parabolic dependence on the surfactant volume fraction. In non-isometric systems, based on the measured interfacial curvatures, a characteristic structural transformation was identified. As the water and oil volume ratio moves away from unity, the bicontinuous structure transforms to a spherical structure through an intermediate cylindrical structure. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  11. The effects of excipients on protein aggregation during agitation: an interfacial shear rheology study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Qi, Wei; Schwartz, Daniel K; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the effects of excipients in solutions of keratinocyte growth factor 2 (KGF-2) on protein aggregation during agitation as well as on interfacial shear rheology at the air-water interface. Samples were incubated with or without agitation, and in the presence or absence of the excipients heparin, sucrose, or polysorbate 80 (PS80). The effect of excipients on the extent of protein aggregation was determined by UV-visible spectroscopy and micro-flow imaging. Interfacial shear rheology was used to detect the gelation time and strength of protein gels at the air-water interface. During incubation, protein particles of size ≥1 μm and insoluble aggregates formed faster for KGF-2 solutions subjected to agitation. Addition of either heparin or sucrose promoted protein aggregation during agitation. In contrast, PS80 substantially inhibited agitation-induced KGF-2 aggregation but facilitated protein particulate formation in quiescent solutions. The combination of PS80 and heparin or sucrose completely prevented protein aggregation during both nonagitated and agitated incubations. Interfacial rheological measurements showed that KGF-2 in buffer alone formed an interfacial gel within a few minutes. In the presence of heparin, KGF-2 interfacial gels formed too quickly for gelation time to be determined. KGF-2 formed gels in about 10 min in the presence of sucrose. The presence of PS80 in the formulation inhibited gelation of KGF-2. Furthermore, the interfacial gels formed by the protein in the absence of PS80 were reversible when PS80 was added to the samples after gelation. Therefore, there is a correspondence between formulations that exhibited interfacial gelation and formulations that exhibited agitation-induced aggregation.

  12. Electrochemical and spectroscopic study of interfacial interactions between chalcopyrite and typical flotation process reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbano, Gustavo; Lázaro, Isabel; Rodríguez, Israel; Reyes, Juan Luis; Larios, Roxana; Cruz, Roel

    2016-02-01

    Comparative voltammetry and differential double-layer capacitance studies were performed to evaluate interfacial interactions between chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and n-isopropyl xanthate (X) in the presence of ammonium bisulfite/39wt% SO2 and caustic starch at different pH values. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and microflotation tests were used to establish the type and extent of xanthate adsorption as well as the species involved under different mineral surface conditions in this study. The results demonstrate that the species that favor a greater hydrophobicity of chalcopyrite are primarily CuX and S0, whereas oxides and hydroxides of Cu and Fe as well as an excess of starch decrease the hydrophobicity. A conditioning of the mineral surface with ammonium bisulfite/39wt% SO2 at pH 6 promotes the activation of surface and enhances the xanthate adsorption. However, this effect is diminished at pH ≥ 8, when an excess of starch is added during the preconditioning step.

  13. Fundamental studies of interfacial excited-state charge transfer in molecularly tethered semiconductor nanoassemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youker, Diane Greer

    The research presented in this dissertation focuses on elucidating the parameters affecting dynamics and yield of electron transfer reactions in semiconducting nanoparticle assemblies through the use of time-resolved spectroscopy. In particular, the dissertation focuses on photoinduced electron injection in assemblies of CdSe, CdS, or PbS quantum dots covalently bound to either metal oxide films or each other through the use of bifunctional molecular linkers. Chapter 2 elucidates the influence of electronic coupling on excited-state electron transfer from CdS quantum dots to TiO2 nanoparticles via molecular linkers with phenylene bridges. We establish that the efficiency of electron injection from CdS quantum dots to TiO2 nanoparticle varies dramatically with electronic coupling, which can be controlled by tuning the properties of molecular linkers. Chapter 3 presents the role of excitation energy on interfacial electron transfer in tethered assemblies of CdSe quantum dots and TiO2 nanoparticles. Through this work, we determined that injection efficiency from band-edge states is independent of excitation energy. However, the efficiency of injection from trap-states decreases at lower-energy excitation. We attribute the decrease to a lower energy distribution of emissive trap-states from which injection is less efficient. Chapter 4 presents the observation of multiphasic electron injection dynamics from photoexcited PbS quantum dots to TiO2 nanoparticles. In this collaborative study with Dr. Masumoto from the University of Tsukuba we observed electron injection on multiple timescales. We determined that electron injection occurred in this system through two different mechanisms. The first involved injection from thermalized PbS excited states and the second through injection of hot electrons through Auger recombination of biexcitons that creates high lying excitonic states. Chapter 5 investigates charge transfer in covalently bound quantum dot assemblies. We utilize

  14. Application of nanoindentation testing to study of the interfacial transition zone in steel fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaohui Jacobsen, Stefan; He Jianying; Zhang Zhiliang; Lee, Siaw Foon; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2009-08-15

    The characteristics of the profiles of elastic modulus and hardness of the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zones in steel fiber reinforced mortars have been investigated by using nanoindentation and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), where two sets of parameters, i.e. water/binder ratio and content of silica fume were considered. Different interfacial bond conditions in the interfacial transition zones (ITZ) are discussed. For sample without silica fume, efficient interfacial bonds across the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfaces are shown in low water/binder ratio mortar; while in high water/binder ratio mortar, due to the discontinuous bleeding voids underneath the fiber, the fiber-matrix bond is not very good. On the other hand, for sample with silica fume, the addition of 10% silica fume leads to no distinct presence of weak ITZ in the steel fiber-matrix interface; but the effect of the silica fume on the steel fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zone is not obvious due to voids in the vicinity of steel fiber.

  15. Early stages of plasma induced nitridation of Si (111) surface and study of interfacial band alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, Satish; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2016-02-07

    We report here a systematic study of the nitridation of the Si (111) surface by nitrogen plasma exposure. The surface and interface chemical composition and surface morphology are investigated by using RHEED, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). At the initial stage of nitridation two superstructures—“8 × 8” and “8/3 × 8/3”—form, and further nitridation leads to 1 × 1 stoichiometric silicon nitride. The interface is seen to have the Si{sup 1+} and Si{sup 3+} states of silicon bonding with nitrogen, which suggests an atomically abrupt and defect-free interface. The initial single crystalline silicon nitride layers are seen to become amorphous at higher thicknesses. The AFM image shows that the nitride nucleates at interfacial dislocations that are connected by sub-stoichiometric 2D-nitride layers, which agglomerate to form thick overlayers. The electrical properties of the interface yield a valence band offset that saturates at 1.9 eV and conduction band offset at 2.3 eV due to the evolution of the sub-stoichiometric interface and band bending.

  16. Study of the environmental and optical durability of AR microstructures in sapphire, ALON, and diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.

    2009-05-01

    Data is presented for the erosion resistance and pulsed laser damage threshold of anti-reflecting (AR) microstructures built in the surface of the infrared light transmitting window materials sapphire, ALON, and diamond. It was found that the erosion resistance of AR microstructures (ARMs) in sapphire is comparable to the resistance of sapphire with no AR treatment. Such environmental durability, combined with the enhanced light transmission of windows incorporating ARMs, provides system designers with an effective solution for applications requiring high transmission over long mission times operating in abrasive environments. In addition, the optical power handling capacity of sapphire and ALON windows was investigated through pulsed laser damage threshold measurements with a laser source operating in the near infrared at a wavelength of 1573nm. As with prior results reported for ARMs in fused silica and borosilicate glass, the measured damage threshold of 19 J/cm2 for ARMs treated sapphire windows is comparable to the damage level measured for untreated sapphire windows, and this level is at least two times higher than that found with the most durable thin-film AR coatings designed for fused silica. The damage thresholds measured for untreated and ARMs treated ALON windows was also comparable, but at a level more than four times less than the sapphire windows. Lastly, the long-wave infrared light transmission of high performance ARMs fabricated in clear diamond windows is presented. The Air Force Research Laboratoy's Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory at WPAFB tested the damage threshold of the ARMs treated diamond windows along with untreated diamond windows using their pulsed CO2 laser setup operating at 9.56μm. Although the results of the tests using two different laser settings were quite variable and inconsistent due to the nature of the diamond material, the damage thresholds measured were in the 50 to 100 J/cm2 range, a level much higher than

  17. The chemical durability of tektites - A laboratory study and correlation with long-term corrosion behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkatt, A.; Boulos, M. S.; Barkatt, A.; Sousanpour, W.; Boroomand, M. A.; Macedo, P. B.; O'Keefe, J. A.

    1984-02-01

    Leach tests carried out on tektite specimens (indochinites and australites) under high-dilution conditions show a common behavior characterized by low leach rates (0.00018 g/sq m per d, or 7.2 x 10 to the -12th m/d at 23 C) and an activation energy of (79,600 + or - 700 J/mol). The extent of selective leaching is very small, of the order of 10 to the -8th m. Extrapolation of test results over the lifetime of the tektites gives an excellent agreement with field observations on the extent of corrosion, and this is an important step in establishing the validity of laboratory tests as a basis for the development of models and predictions concerning long-term durabilities at least in the limiting case of high dilution or rapid flow. The results are also shown to be in agreement with various previous observations on the corrosion resistance of tektites. The chemical durability of tektites is observed to be consistent with their composition, highlighting requirements of high corrosion resistance in glasses; these requirements include a silica content in excess of 67 mol percent, an extremely low water content, and an alkali content which is low both absolutely and relative to the di- and poly-valent metal oxide levels. It is shown that artificial glasses which fulfil these criteria are no less corrosion-resistant than the corresponding natural glasses. These conclusions have bearing on the development, as well as on the evaluation, of glasses intended for very long service, such as radioactive waste vitrification media.

  18. The chemical durability of tektites - A laboratory study and correlation with long-term corrosion behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkatt, A.; Boulos, M. S.; Barkatt, A.; Sousanpour, W.; Boroomand, M. A.; Macedo, P. B.; Okeefe, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Leach tests carried out on tektite specimens (indochinites and australites) under high-dilution conditions show a common behavior characterized by low leach rates (0.00018 g/sq m per d, or 7.2 x 10 to the -12th m/d at 23 C) and an activation energy of (79,600 + or - 700 J/mol). The extent of selective leaching is very small, of the order of 10 to the -8th m. Extrapolation of test results over the lifetime of the tektites gives an excellent agreement with field observations on the extent of corrosion, and this is an important step in establishing the validity of laboratory tests as a basis for the development of models and predictions concerning long-term durabilities at least in the limiting case of high dilution or rapid flow. The results are also shown to be in agreement with various previous observations on the corrosion resistance of tektites. The chemical durability of tektites is observed to be consistent with their composition, highlighting requirements of high corrosion resistance in glasses; these requirements include a silica content in excess of 67 mol percent, an extremely low water content, and an alkali content which is low both absolutely and relative to the di- and poly-valent metal oxide levels. It is shown that artificial glasses which fulfil these criteria are no less corrosion-resistant than the corresponding natural glasses. These conclusions have bearing on the development, as well as on the evaluation, of glasses intended for very long service, such as radioactive waste vitrification media.

  19. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  20. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  1. Sample Fabrication and Experimental Design for Studying Interfacial Creep at Thin Film / Silicon Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    from that expected for bulk polycrystalline material. Diffusionally accommodated interfacial creep at activation energy levels well below those...of micro electrical and microelectro-mechanical devices are stressed [6]. The measured kinetics of that investigation showed that the mechanism of

  2. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  3. First-order mean-spherical approximation for interfacial phenomena: a unified method from bulk-phase equilibria study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yiping

    2005-11-22

    The recently proposed first-order mean-spherical approximation (FMSA) [Y. Tang, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 10605 (2004)] for inhomogeneous fluids is extended to the study of interfacial phenomena. Computation is performed for the Lennard-Jones fluid, in which all phase equilibria properties and direct correlation function for density-functional theory are developed consistently and systematically from FMSA. Three functional methods, including fundamental measure theory for the repulsive force, local-density approximation, and square-gradient approximation, are applied in this interfacial investigation. Comparisons with the latest computer simulation data indicate that FMSA is satisfactory in predicting surface tension, density profile, as well as relevant phase equilibria. Furthermore, this work strongly suggests that FMSA is very capable of unifying homogeneous and inhomogeneous fluids, as well as those behaviors outside and inside the critical region within one framework.

  4. Comparative study on dispersion and interfacial properties of single walled carbon nanotube/polymer composites using Hansen solubility parameters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Larsen, Raino Mikael

    2013-02-01

    Dispersion and interfacial strain transfer of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are two major challenges for the utilization of SWNTs as reinforcements in polymer composites. Surface modifications could help change the dispersion and interfacial properties. In this study, nanocomposites were fabricated by solution blending 1 wt % SWNTs with various modification (nonmodified, nitric acid functionalized, and amine functionalized SWNTs) and three kinds of polymeric materials (polycarbonate, polyvinylidene fluoride, and epoxy). Chemical compatibilities between SWNTs and solvents or polymers are calculated by the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) method. The dispersion of the SWNTs in solvents is evaluated by dynamic light scattering. The dispersion of SWNTs in polymers evaluated by a light optical microscope (LOM) generally agrees with the HSP prediction. The strain transfer from the matrix to SWNTs is mainly related to the dispersion, the bundle size, the residual thermal stresses on the sample, and, to lesser degree, the HSP.

  5. Studying interfacial reactions of cholesterol sulfate in an unsaturated phosphatidylglycerol layer with ozone using field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae Yoon; Choi, Sun Mi; Rhee, Young Min; Beauchamp, J L; Kim, Hugh I

    2012-01-01

    Field-induced droplet ionization (FIDI) is a recently developed ionization technique that can transfer ions from the surface of microliter droplets to the gas phase intact. The air-liquid interfacial reactions of cholesterol sulfate (CholSO(4)) in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) surfactant layer with ozone (O(3)) are investigated using field-induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS). Time-resolved studies of interfacial ozonolysis of CholSO(4) reveal that water plays an important role in forming oxygenated products. An epoxide derivative is observed as a major product of CholSO(4) oxidation in the FIDI-MS spectrum after exposure of the droplet to O(3) for 5 s. The abundance of the epoxide product then decreases with continued O(3) exposure as the finite number of water molecules at the air-liquid interface becomes exhausted. Competitive oxidation of CholSO(4) and POPG is observed when they are present together in a lipid surfactant layer at the air-liquid interface. Competitive reactions of CholSO(4) and POPG with O(3) suggest that CholSO(4) is present with POPG as a well-mixed interfacial layer. Compared with CholSO(4) and POPG alone, the overall ozonolysis rates of both CholSO(4) and POPG are reduced in a mixed layer, suggesting the double bonds of both molecules are shielded by additional hydrocarbons from one another. Molecular dynamics simulations of a monolayer comprising POPG and CholSO(4) correlate well with experimental observations and provide a detailed picture of the interactions between CholSO(4), lipids, and water molecules in the interfacial region.

  6. Ultrasonic and optical evaluation of surgical implant materials and devices. A durability study of pericardial bioprostheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and accelerated fatigue testing were used in an attempt to assess the durability of two cardiac value bioprostheses. The LDA system was used to monitor the function of the cardiac valves over time. This was done through flow characterization in an aortic flow chamber, designed to closely simulate in vivo conditions, both in the near vicinity (sinuses of valsalva region) and also somewhat downstream (aortic region) from the values. The accelerated fatigue tester was operated by opening and closing the valves at a rate of 1300 R.P.M., about 18 x the normal rate. The results from the two test valves indicate a definite change in the flow characteristics downstream from the valve after certain accelerated test intervals. The high velocity cross-sectional flow area seems to increase over time in use, causing a decrease in the peak velocity. The tissue became more flaccid in certain areas, and tears were apparent at about 9.4 million cycles for the Ionescu-Shiley valve and at 24 million cycles for the Carpentier-Edwards valve. The use of Doppler ultrasound as a technique for monitoring the function of bioprostheses over time in vivo is also discussed.

  7. Studying bacterial hydrophobicity and biofilm formation at liquid-liquid interfaces through interfacial rheology and pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Rühs, P A; Böcker, L; Inglis, R F; Fischer, P

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial adsorption to interfaces is a key factor in biofilm formation. One major limitation to understanding biofilm formation and development is the accurate measurement of bacterial cell adhesion to hydrophobic interfaces. With this study, bacterial attachment and biofilm growth over time at water-oil interface was monitored through interfacial rheology and tensiometry. Five model bacteria (Pseudomonas putida KT2442, Pseudomonas putida W2, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis) were allowed to adsorb at the water-oil interface either in their non-growing or growing state. We found that we were able to observe the initial kinetics of bacterial attachment and the transient biofilm formation at the water-oil interface through interfacial rheology and tensiometry. Electrophoretic mobility measurements and bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH) tests were performed to characterize the selected bacteria. To validate interfacial rheology and tensiometry measurements, we monitored biofilm formation utilizing both confocal laser scanning microscopy and light microscopy. Using this combination of techniques, we were able to observe the elasticity and tension development over time, from the first bacterial attachment up to biofilm formation.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Effects of Water Speciation on Interfacial Structure and Dynamics in Silica-Filled PDMS Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Maxwell, R S; Dinh, L N; Balazs, B

    2001-11-21

    Significant changes in materials properties of siloxane based polymers can be obtained by the addition of inorganic fillers. In silica-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based composites the mechanism of this reinforcing behavior is presumably hydrogen bonding between surface hydroxyls and backbone siloxane species. We have chosen to investigate in detail the effect of chemisorbed and physisorbed water on the interfacial structure and dynamics in silica-filled PDMS based composites. Toward this end, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and experimental studies employing DMA and Nh4R analysis. Our results suggest that the polymer-silica contact distance and the mobility of interfacial polymer chains significantly decreased as the hydration level at the interface was reduced. The reduced mobility of the PDMS chains in the interfacial domain reduced the overall, bulk, motional properties of the polymer, thus causing an effective ''stiffening'' of the polymer matrix. The role of the long-ranged Coulombic interactions on the structural features and chain dynamics of the polymer were also examined. Both are found to be strongly influenced by the electrostatic interactions as identified by the bond orientation time correlation function and local density distribution functions. These results have important implications for the design of nanocomposite silica-siloxane materials.

  9. Effect of weld schedule variation on the weldability and durability of AHSS spot weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishaupt, Eric Raymond

    Tensile strength testing and high cycle fatigue testing of advanced high strength steel spot welded shear lap joints were performed for the various weld conditions. The materials used in this study were DP 980, DP 780 and TRIP 780. The microstructure and microhardness of the shear lap joints were examined in an effort to identify the effect of microstructural changes on the strength and fatigue durability of the spot weld specimens. The occurrence of interfacial failure was recorded for the differing weld processes. Several weld schedules were examined and used to produce shear lap spot weld joints, specifically varying the squeeze force and the average current. The weld force used to produce a spot weld does not have a significant effect on the fracture mode of the specimen given the average current is constant. The average current used to produce a spot weld has a significant effect on the fracture mode of the spot weld for several squeeze forces. Interfacial failure of spot welded TRIP 780 can be mitigated using a certain range of currents when welding. This appears to come as a tradeoff for sacrificing the strength of the joint. Higher values of weld strength were obtainable; however, welds that failed with higher strengths also experienced interfacial failure. A fracture mechanics approach to estimating the high cycle fatigue life of the shear lap specimen is also proposed and represents a conservative estimate of the shear lap specimen durability.

  10. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  11. First-Principles Study of Interfacial Boundaries in Ni-Ni3AL (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    yield stress, creep , fatigue) of these alloys is strongly influenced by the manner in which dislocations interact with the pre- cipitates and the...based superalloy (DD6). This particular alloy contains 2 wt.% Re, an element not present in Rene-88DT, which is known to improve high-temperature creep ...are used to estimate the interfacial excess free energies (IEFEs) and composition and long -range order profiles of these defects as a function of

  12. First-principles study of the interfacial adhesion between Si O2 and Mo Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D. E.; Carter, Emily A.

    2005-10-01

    Upon oxidation, a silica scale forms on MoSi2 , a potential high-temperature coating material for metals. This silica scale protects MoSi2 against high-temperature corrosive gases or liquids. We use periodic density functional theory to examine the interface between SiO2 and MoSi2 . The interfacial bonding is localized, as evidenced by an adhesion energy that changes only slightly with the thickness of the SiO2 layer. Moreover, the adhesion energy displays a relatively large (0.40J/m2) variation with the relative lateral position of the SiO2 and MoSi2 lattices due to changes in Si-O bonding across the interface. The most stable interfacial structure yields an ideal work of adhesion of 5.75J/m2 within the local density approximation ( 5.02J/m2 within the generalized-gradient approximation) to electron exchange and correlation, indicating extremely strong adhesion. Local densities of states and electron density difference plots demonstrate that the interfacial Si-O bonds are covalent in character. Mo-O interactions are not found in the SiO2/MoSi2 interface investigated here. Our work predicts that the SiO2 scale strongly adheres to MoSi2 , and further supports the potential of MoSi2 as a high-temperature structural material and coating.

  13. Study of the Durability of Doped Lanthanum Manganite and Cobaltite Cathode Materials under ''Real World'' Air Exposure Atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Prabhakar; Mahapatra, Manoj; Ramprasad, Rampi; Minh, Nguyen; Misture, Scott

    2014-11-30

    The overall objective of the program is to develop and validate mechanisms responsible for the overall structural and chemical degradation of lanthanum manganite as well as lanthanum ferrite cobaltite based cathode when exposed to “real world” air atmosphere exposure conditions during SOFC systems operation. Of particular interest are the evaluation and analysis of degradation phenomena related to and responsible for (a) products formation and interactions with air contaminants, (b) dopant segregation and oxide exolution at free surfaces, (c) cation interdiffusion and reaction products formation at the buried interfaces, (d) interface morphology changes, lattice transformation and the development of interfacial porosity and (e) micro-cracking and delamination from the stack repeat units. Reaction processes have been studied using electrochemical and high temperature materials compatibility tests followed by structural and chemical characterization. Degradation hypothesis has been proposed and validated through further experimentation and computational simulation.

  14. Environmental durability of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Palmese, G.R.; Chawalwala, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past two decades, polymer concrete has increasingly been used for a number of applications including piping, machine bases, chemically resistant flooring, and bridge overlays. Currently, the use of polymer concrete as a wear surface for polymeric composite bridge decks is being investigated. Polymer concrete is a particulate composite comprised of mineral aggregate bound by a polymeric matrix. Such materials possess significantly higher mechanical properties than Portland cement concrete. However, the mechanical characteristics and environmental durability of polymer concrete are influenced by a number of factors. Among these are the selection of aggregate and resin, surface treatment, and cure conditions. In this work the influence of matrix selection and cure history on the environmental durability of polymer concrete was investigated. Particular attention was given to the effects of water on composite properties and to the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. The basalt-based polymer concrete systems investigated were susceptible to attack by water. Furthermore, results suggest that property loss associated with water exposure was primarily a result of interfacial weakening.

  15. Effect of Sizings on the Durability of High Temperature Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Shin, E. Eugene; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Wheeler, Donald; Sutter, James K.

    2003-01-01

    To increase performance and durability of high-temperature composite for potential rocket engine components, it is necessary to optimize wetting and interfacial bonding between high modulus carbon fibers and high-temperature polyimide resins. Sizing commercially supplied on most carbon fiber are not compatible with polyimides. In this study, the chemistry of sizing on two high modulus carbon fiber (M40J and M60J, Tiray) was characterized. A continuous desizling system that uses an environmentally friendly chemical-mechanical process was developed for tow level fiber. Composites were fabricated with fibers containing the manufacturer's sizing, desized, and further treated with a reactive finish. Results of room-temperature tests after thermal aging show that the reactive finish produces a higher strength and more durable interface compared to the manufacturer's sizing. When exposed to moisture blistering tests, however, the butter bonded composite displayed a tendency to delaminate, presumably due to trapping of volatiles.

  16. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  17. In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of interfacial reactions of Cu thin films on amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Bo; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Phillipp, Fritz; Jeon, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Chang Kyung

    2006-02-01

    Interfacial reactions of Cu with amorphous silicon (a-Si) in the Cu /a-Si/glass system are studied by in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy at 550°C. Various Cu silicides, such as η-Cu3Si, Cu15Si4, and Cu5Si, and Cu particles are observed. The formation of the Cu particles can be attributed to a heating effect from electron beam irradiation. Around the Cu silicides, crystallization of a-Si occurs. Around the Cu particles, however, crystallization does not occur. Crystallization appears to be enhanced by Cu dissolved in a-Si.

  18. Experimental studies on the surface and interfacial properties of polysiloxanes and their interaction with blood proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, James Oliver

    1998-12-01

    The research in this thesis is concerned with the surface and interfacial properties of polysiloxanes and their interaction with blood proteins, particularly fibrinogen. Polysiloxane properties at the polymer/air interface were investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and contact angle measurements. Polysiloxane properties at the polymer/water interface were studied using a Langmuir film balance. Interaction with blood proteins was investigated by SIMS and by aggregation studies of polysiloxanes emulsified in the presence of various blood components, namely serum, plasma, and fibrinogen solution upon exposure to the enzyme thrombin. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), poly(phenylmethylsiloxane) (PPMS), and poly(trifluoropropylmethylsiloxane) (PTFPMS) homopolymers and diblock copolymers thereof were studied using SIMS and contact angle measurements. Also studied were a newly synthesized series of random copolymers of poly(methyl(methyl undecanoate)siloxane)-co-poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PMMUS). Key findings include the resolution of discrepancies in SIMS mass fragment assignments in PDMS and establishment of mass peak assignments for PPMS, PTFPMS, and PMMUS. Also, it was shown by SIMS that complete surface saturation of the siloxane components of solution casts films of PDMS/PS and PTFPMS/PS diblock copolymers and blends with PS was achieved at siloxane concentrations as low as 2.0 percent by weight. On the other hand, PPMS/PS diblock copolymers show signature peaks of both polymers at siloxane concentrations as high as 51 percent by weight. All results correspond well with contact angle measurements on the same systems. Finally, the detection of trimethylsilyl end-groups was determined through systemic variation of chain termini and polymer molecular weight. The monolayer behavior of the PMMUS copolymer series of the siloxanes containing cholesteryl ester side-groups was examined using a langmuir film balance. The isotherms of the PMMUS polymers showed

  19. NEPHELINE FORMATION POTENTIAL IN SLUDGE BATCH 4 AND ITS IMPACT ON DURABILITY: SELECTING GLASSES FOR A PHASE 3 STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K

    2006-01-27

    Savannah River National Laboratory's frit development effort for SB4 is being driven by the most current CBU option for this sludge, referred to as Case 15C Blend 1. Candidate frits have been identified for this option via a paper study approach developed by Peeler and Edwards with the intent of down-selecting to a set of key frits whose operating windows (i.e., WL intervals that meet PCCS MAR criteria) are robust to and/or selectively optimal for this sludge option. The primary frits that appear attractive on paper (i.e., down-selected via the paper study) are now being incorporated into this experimental study. The potential for the formation of a nepheline primary crystalline phase is an important factor in frit development for SB4, due to the high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of this sludge. Based upon earlier work by Li et al., glasses that do not satisfy the constraint: (SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} + Na{sub 2}O + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) > 0.62 where the oxides are expressed as mass fractions in the glass, will precipitate nepheline as their primary crystalline phase, hindering the durability of the glass. Based on the most recent compositional projection from the CBU for SB4 (Case 15C Blend 1), 16 glasses have been selected to complement the earlier work by continuing the investigation into the ability of the above constraint to predict the occurrence of a nepheline primary crystalline phase for SB4 glasses and into the impact of such phases on the durability of the SB4 glasses. Glasses were selected to cover WLs which tightly bound the nepheline discriminator value of 0.62, with the intent of refining this value to a level of confidence where it can be incorporated into offline administrative controls and/or the PCCS to support SME acceptability decisions. In addition, glass specimens at WLs of 35 and 40% will be prepared and analyzed to contribute needed data to the ComPro{trademark} database in anticipation of a variability study for SB4. The glasses in Table 4-3 are to

  20. Durable solar mirror films

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Mark B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Hebrink, Timothy J.; Katare, Rajesh K.; Jing, Naiyong; North, Diane; Peterson, Eric M.

    2017-02-14

    The present disclosure generally relates to durable solar mirror films, methods of making durable solar mirror films, and constructions including durable solar mirror films. In one embodiment, the present disclosure relates to a solar mirror film comprising: a multilayer optical film layer including having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion of less than about 30 ppm per percent relative humidity; and a reflective layer having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion.

  1. Density functional theory study of the interfacial properties of Ni/Ni3Si eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuhong; Wen, Zhiqin; Hou, Hua; Guo, Wei; Han, Peide

    2014-06-01

    In order to clarify the heterogeneous nucleation potential of α-Ni grains on Ni3Si particles in Ni-Ni3Si eutectic alloy, the work of adhesion (Wad), fracture toughness (G), interfacial energy (γi), and electronic structure of the index (0 0 1), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) Ni/Ni3Si interfaces with two different cohesive manners are investigated using first-principles method based on density functional theory. Results indicate that the center site stacking sequence (OM) is preferable to continue the natural stacking sequence of bulk Ni and Ni3Si. Since OM stacking interfaces have larger Wad, G and γi than that of the top site stacking (OT) interfaces. The Ni/Ni3Si (1 1 0) interface with OM stacking has the best mechanical properties. Therefore, the formation of this interface can improve the stability, ductility and fracture toughness of Ni-Ni3Si eutectic alloy. The calculated interfacial energy of Ni/Ni3Si (0 0 1), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) interfaces with OM stacking proves the excellent nucleation potency of Ni3Si particles for α-Ni phase from thermodynamic considerations. Besides, the electronic structure and chemical bonding of (1 1 0) interface with OM stacking are also discussed.

  2. Interfacial metallurgy study of brazed joints between tungsten and fusion related materials for divertor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxuan; Galloway, Alexander; Wood, James; Robbie, Mikael Brian Olsson; Easton, David; Zhu, Wenzhong

    2014-11-01

    In the developing DEMO divertor, the design of joints between tungsten to other fusion related materials is a significant challenge as a result of the dissimilar physical metallurgy of the materials to be joined. This paper focuses on the design and fabrication of dissimilar brazed joints between tungsten and fusion relevant materials such as EUROFER 97, oxygen-free high thermal conductivity (OFHC) Cu and SS316L using a gold based brazing foil. The main objectives are to develop acceptable brazing procedures for dissimilar joining of tungsten to other fusion compliant materials and to advance the metallurgical understanding within the interfacial region of the brazed joint. Four different butt-type brazed joints were created and characterised, each of which were joined with the aid of a thin brazing foil (Au80Cu19Fe1, in wt.%). Microstructural characterisation and elemental mapping in the transition region of the joint was undertaken and, thereafter, the results were analysed as was the interfacial diffusion characteristics of each material combination produced. Nano-indentation tests are performed at the joint regions and correlated with element composition information in order to understand the effects of diffused elements on mechanical properties. The experimental procedures of specimen fabrication and material characterisation methods are presented. The results of elemental transitions after brazing are reported. Elastic modulus and nano-hardness of each brazed joints are reported.

  3. First-principles study of the Al(001)-Al3Nb(001) interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yanhong; Xu, Rui

    2017-03-01

    The adhesion, interfacial energy and bonding on fcc-Al(001)/D022-Al3Nb(001) interface were investigated using density functional calculations. Considering different terminations of Al3Nb(001) (Al+Nb-terminated and Al-terminated) and stacking sites (top-, bridge- and center-sites), six Al(001)/Al3Nb(001) models were calculated. For the models with same stacking site, Al+Nb-terminated model has larger work of adhesion (Wad) than the Al-terminated one. For the models with same termination, the work of adhesion increases, and the interface energy decreases as the order of center-sited, bridge-sited and top-sited. Al+Nb-terminated-center-sited and Al-terminated-center-sited models are more stable among six models. The interfacial bonding was discussed with analysis of valence electron density distribution and partial density of states (PDOS). The bonding is mainly contributed from Al-Nb covalent bonds and Al-Al metallic interactions.

  4. Interfacial chemistry of a perfluoropolyether lubricant studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature desorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1993-01-01

    The interfacial chemistry of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyether used as lubricant for space applications was studied with different metallic surfaces: 440C steel, gold, and aluminum. Thin layers of Fomblin Z25 were evaporated onto the oxide-free substrates, and the interfacial chemistry was studied using XPS and TDS. The reactions were induced by heating the substrate and by rubbing the substrate with a steel ball. Gold was found to be completely unreactive towards Fomblin at any temperature. Reaction at room temperature was observed only in the case of the aluminum substrate, the most reactive towards Fomblin Z25 of the substrates studied. It was necessary to heat the 440C steel substrate to 190 C to induce decomposition of the fluid. The degradation of the fluid was indicated by the formation of a debris layer at the interface. This debris layer, composed of inorganic and organic reaction products, when completely formed, passivated the surface from further attack to the Fromblin on top. The tribologically induced reactions on 440C steel formed a debris layer of similar chemical characteristics to the thermally induced layer. In all cases, the degradation reaction resulted in preferential consumption of the difluoroformyl carbon (-OCF2O-).

  5. A testing platform for durability studies of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under concurrent hygrothermo-mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-12-11

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus.

  6. A Testing Platform for Durability Studies of Polymers and Fiber-reinforced Polymer Composites under Concurrent Hygrothermo-mechanical Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus. PMID:25548950

  7. Biodegradable-Polymer Biolimus-Eluting Stents versus Durable-Polymer Everolimus-Eluting Stents at One-Year Follow-Up: A Registry-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Ehsan; Saroukhani, Sepideh; Majlessi, Fereshteh; Poorhosseini, Hamidreza; Lofti-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Jalali, Arash; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Nematipour, Ebrahim; Alidoosti, Mohammad; Aghajani, Hassan; Amirzadegan, Alireza; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim

    2016-04-01

    We compared outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention patients who received biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stents with those who received durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stents. At Tehran Heart Center, we performed a retrospective analysis of the data from January 2007 through December 2011 on 3,270 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent or the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent. We excluded patients with histories of coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous coronary intervention, acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, or the implantation of 2 different stent types. Patients were monitored for 12 months. The primary endpoint was a major adverse cardiac event, defined as a composite of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and target-vessel and target-lesion revascularization. Durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stents were implanted in 2,648 (81%) and biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stents in 622 (19%) of the study population. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups (2.7% vs 2.7%; P=0.984) in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events. The cumulative adjusted probability of major adverse cardiac events in the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent group did not differ from that of such events in the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent group (hazard ratio=0.768; 95% confidence interval, 0.421-1.44; P=0.388). We conclude that in our patients the biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stent was as effective and safe, during the 12-month follow-up period, as was the durable-polymer everolimus-eluting stent.

  8. Effect of Cu2+ Activation on Interfacial Water Structure at the Sphalerite Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-12-10

    In the first part of this paper, an experimental contact angle study of the fresh and Cu2+ activated sphalerite-ZnS surface as well as the covellite-CuS (001) surface is reported describing the increased hydrophobic character of the surface during Cu2+ activation. In addition to these experimental results, the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite- CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS). Our MDS results on the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite-CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces include simulated contact angles, water number density distribution, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The copper content at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface seems to account for the increased hydrophobicity as revealed by both experimental and MD simulated contact angle measurements. The relatively greater hydrophobic character developed at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface and at the copper-zinc sulfide surface has been described by MDS, based on the structure of interfacial water and its dynamic properties. L.X.D. acknowledges funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  9. A Study of Influencing Factors on the Tensile Response of a Titanium Matrix Composite With Weak Interfacial Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of cells micromechanics model is utilized to analyze the tensile stress-strain response of a representative titanium matrix composite with weak interfacial bonding. The fiber/matrix interface is modeled through application of a displacement discontinuity between the fiber and matrix once a critical debonding stress has been exceeded. Unidirectional composites with loading parallel and perpendicular to the fibers are examined, as well as a cross-ply laminate. For each of the laminates studied, analytically obtained results are compared to experimental data. The application of residual stresses through a cool-down process was found to have a significant effect on the tensile response. For the unidirectional laminate with loading applied perpendicular to the fibers, fiber packing and fiber shape were shown to have a significant effect on the predicted tensile response. Furthermore, the interface was characterized through the use of semi-emperical parameters including an interfacial compliance and a "debond stress;" defined as the stress level across the interface which activates fiber/matrix debonding. The results in this paper demonstrate that if architectural factors are correctly accounted for and the interface is appropriately characterized, the macro-level composite behavior can be correctly predicted without modifying any of the fiber or matrix constituent properties.

  10. Effect of abutment angulation in the retention and durability of three overdenture attachment systems: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ustrell, Raul; Mendes, Jose Manuel; Braga, Ana Cristina; Berastegui, Esther

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This in vitro study investigated and compared the durability and retention of three types of attachments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three commercially available attachments were investigated: Clix®, Dalbo-Plus® and Locator®. In total, 72 samples of these attachments were placed in the acrylic resin forms and subjected to mechanical testing (5400 cycles of insertion and removal) over the respective ball or Locator abutments immersed in artificial saliva at pH 7 and 37℃. The abutments were placed at angulations of 0°, 10° and 20°. The retention force was recorded at the beginning and after 540, 1080, 2160, 3240, 4320 and 5400 insertion-removal cycles. RESULTS The results revealed that there were significant differences in the average values of the insertion/removal force due to angulation (F (2.48) = 343619, P<.05) and the type of attachment (F (7.48) = 23.220, P<.05). CONCLUSION Greater angulation of the abutments was found to influence the retention capacity of the attachments, and the fatigue test simulating 5 years of denture insertion and removal did not produce wear in the metal abutments. PMID:26949484

  11. Mechanical durability of polymeric coatings studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy: correlation between cyclic loading and free volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Peng, Q.; Huang, Y. Y.; Zhang, R.; Mallon, P. E.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.; Wu, Y.; Richardson, J. R.; Sandreczki, T. C.; Jean, Y. C.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2002-06-01

    The mechanical durability of seven commercially polymeric coatings is investigated using slow positron beam techniques to monitor changes in sub-nanometer defects during the process of cyclic loading. Doppler broadened energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were performed as a function of the slow positron energy at different periods of cycling loading. The positron annihilation dada show that both S-defect parameter and o-positronium (Ps) lifetime decrease as the loading cycle increases. The results indicate a loss of free volumes due to the loss of mechanical durability by cyclic loading. A direct correlation between the loss of S-defect parameter and the period of loading cycle is observed. This is interpreted as that durability of polymeric coatings is controlled by the atomic level free volumes. It is shown that the slow positron beam is a very successful probe in detecting the very early stages of coating degradation due to mechanical processes.

  12. Sericin/Poly(ethylcyanoacrylate) Nanospheres by Interfacial Polymerization for Enhanced Bioefficacy of Fenofibrate: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Ortensia I; Fiorillo, Marco; Scrivano, Luca; Sinicropi, Maria S; Dolce, Vincenza; Iacopetta, Domenico; Puoci, Francesco; Cappello, Anna R

    2015-10-12

    Fenofibrate is a lipophilic drug used in hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia as a lipid-regulating agent; however, it is characterized by poor water solubility and low dissolution rate, which result in a low oral bioavailability. In the present study, sericin/poly(ethylcyanoacrylate) nanospheres are synthesized by interfacial polymerization in aqueous media and investigated as a novel sericin-based delivery system for improved and enhanced oral bioefficacy of fenofibrate. The incorporation of sericin into the prepared cyanoacrylate nanoparticles and their spherical shape are confirmed by Lowry assay and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Hydrophilic and mucoadhesive properties of the synthesized nanospheres are also evaluated. Finally, both in vitro release and in vivo studies are performed and the oral absorbable amount of fenofibrate is calculated to be higher than 70% when incorporated into the polymeric material, reducing the levels of total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerols (TG), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) compared to fenofibrate alone.

  13. Experimental study of relationship between interfacial electroadhesive force and applied voltage for different substrate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Bamber, T.; Petzing, J.; Justham, L.; Jackson, M.

    2017-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the relationship between the interfacial electroadhesive force and applied voltage up to 20 kV has been presented. Normal electroadhesive forces have been obtained between a double-electrode electroadhesive pad and three optically flat and different substrate materials: glass, acrylic, and polycarbonate. The results have shown that not all substrate materials are good for the generation of electroadhesive forces. Only 15.7 Pa has been obtained between the pad and the polycarbonate substrate under 20 kV, whereas 46.3 Pa and 123.4 Pa have been obtained on the acrylic and glass substrate, respectively. Based on the experimental data, empirical models, with an adjusted R-square value above 0.995 in all cases, have been obtained for the three substrates. However, it has not been possible to develop a general empirical model which is suitable for all substrates. This further indicates the need for a large quantity of experimental data to obtain robust empirical models for different substrate materials in order to reliably use electroadhesive technologies for material handling applications.

  14. Interfacial tension-driven relaxation of magma foam: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuki, Shizuka; Nakamura, Michihiko; Okumura, Satoshi; Sasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    To improve our understanding of permeability evolution of magmas in a shallow volcanic conduit, we experimentally investigated the interfacial tension-driven microstructural relaxation of foamed magma. By heating pumice cubes at temperatures of 800-1000°C and ≤6 MPa vapor pressure, we simulated magmas in interexplosion periods of vulcanian activity, including magmatic clasts welding within a shallow conduit. Outlines and internal pore microstructures of run products relaxed significantly in 3-5 and 30 min at 1000 and 900°C, respectively. In addition, self-contraction was caused by the expulsion of pores connected to sample surfaces. As a result of self-contraction, the porosity of 3 mm side pumice cubes decreased from 72 to 15% in 8 h at 900°C. For larger starting materials (9 mm side pumice cubes), multiple-contraction units formed melt globs, which promoted the formation of connected pores with concave outward shapes between globs. In contrast to the interbubble network, such pores are expected to maintain high permeability on a macroscopic scale; therefore, magma outgassing could be facilitated. These interglob pores were pinched off due to gravitational compaction after 8-32 h at 1000°C. The rapid and drastic changes in pore microstructures via relaxation, contraction, and compaction processes may be responsible for vent plugging during vulcanian explosion cycles.

  15. Final Technical Report: Supporting Wind Turbine Research and Testing - Gearbox Durability Study

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Malkin

    2012-04-30

    The combination of premature failure of wind turbine gearboxes and the downtime caused by those failures leads to an increase in the cost of electricity produced by the wind. There is a need for guidance to asset managers regarding how to maximize the longevity of their gearboxes in order to help keep the cost of wind energy as low as possible. A low cost of energy supports the US Department of Energy's goal of achieving 20% of the electricity in the United States produced by wind by the year 2030. DNV KEMA has leveraged our unique position in the industry as an independent third party engineering organization to study the problem of gearbox health management and develop guidance to project operators. This report describes the study. The study was conducted in four tasks. In Task 1, data that may be related to gearbox health and are normally available to wind project operators were collected for analysis. Task 2 took a more in-depth look at a small number of gearboxes to gain insight in to relevant failure modes. Task 3 brought together the previous tasks by evaluating the available data in an effort to identify data that could provide early indications of impending gearbox failure. Last, the observations from the work were collected to develop recommendations regarding gearbox health management.

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Durable Energy Builders - Houston, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Houston, Texas, that scored HERS 39 without PV and HERS 29 with PV. This 5,947 ft2 custom home has 11.5-inch ICF walls. The attic is insulated along the roof line with 5 to 7 inches of open-cell spray foam. Most of the home's drinking water is supplied by a 11,500-gallon rainwater cistern. Hurricane strapping connects the roof to the walls. The triple-pane windows are impact resistant. The foundation is a raised slab.

  17. 193-nm radiation durability study of MoSi binary mask and resulting lithographic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servin, Isabelle; Belledent, Jérôme; Pain, Laurent; Connolly, Brid; Sczyrba, Martin; Lamantia, Matt

    2011-05-01

    Dimensions on mask continue to shrink to keep up with the ITRS roadmap. This has implications on the material of choice for the blanks. For example, the new binary OMOG stack (Opaque MOSi on Glass) was successfully introduced to meet the mask specifications at the 32nm technology node. Obviously 193-nm optical lithography will be further used in production at even higher NA and lower k1 emphasizing, for example, the impact on wafer of any electromagnetic field migration effects. Indeed, long term radiation damage inducing CD growth and consequently, device yield loss, has already been reported [1, 2]. This mechanism, known as Electric Field induced Migration of chrome (EMF) often shortens the mask's lifetime. Here, a study was conducted to investigate the impact of intensive ArF scanner exposure both on final wafer and mask performances. The Si printed wafers measured with top-down CD-SEM were characterized with respect to CD uniformity, linearity, Sub Resolution Assist Feature (SRAF) printability through process window, MEEF, DOF, and OPC accuracy. The data was also correlated to advanced mask inspection results (e.g. AIMSTM) taken at the same location. More precisely, this work follows a preliminary study [1] which pointed out that OMOG is less sensitive to radiation than standard COG (Chrome On Glass). And, in this paper, we report on results obtained at higher energy to determine the ultimate lifetime of OMOG masks.

  18. Time Resolved Studies of Interfacial Reactions of Ozone with Pulmonary Phospholipid Surfactants Using Field Induced Droplet Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hugh I.; Kim, Hyungjun; Shin, Young Shik; Beegle, Luther W.; Goddard, William A.; Heath, James R.; Kanik, Isik; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS) comprises a soft ionization method to sample ions from the surface of microliter droplets. A pulsed electric field stretches neutral droplets until they develop dual Taylor cones, emitting streams of positively and negatively charged submicrometer droplets in opposite directions, with the desired polarity being directed into a mass spectrometer for analysis. This methodology is employed to study the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) at the air–liquid interface in negative ion mode using FIDI mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate unique characteristics of the heterogeneous reactions at the air–liquid interface. We observe the hydroxyhydroperoxide and the secondary ozonide as major products of POPG ozonolysis in the FIDI-MS spectra. These products are metastable and difficult to observe in the bulk phase, using standard electrospray ionization (ESI) for mass spectrometric analysis. We also present studies of the heterogeneous ozonolysis of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids at the air–liquid interface. A mixture of the saturated phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and unsaturated POPG is investigated in negative ion mode using FIDI-MS while a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) surfactant is studied in positive ion mode. In both cases FIDI-MS shows the saturated and unsaturated pulmonary surfactants form a mixed interfacial layer. Only the unsaturated phospholipid reacts with ozone, forming products that are more hydrophilic than the saturated phospholipid. With extensive ozonolysis only the saturated phospholipid remains at the droplet surface. Combining these experimental observations with the results of computational analysis provides an improved understanding of the interfacial structure and chemistry of a surfactant layer system

  19. Fabrication and interfacial electronic structure studies on polypyrrole/TiO2 nano hybrid systems for photovoltaic aspects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ganesan Mohan; Kawakita, Jin; Jayavel, Ramasamy

    2011-05-01

    The progress in studying the interfacial electronic structures of the developing new class of hybrid organic/inorganic material systems have envisaged a new dimension into the field of photovoltaics, which could be of great help in understanding the nature of charge transfer in them. In this regard, electropolymerization of pyrrole monomers have been carried out at room temperature on the surface of TiO2 working electrodes (assisted by UV radiations) and their interfacial electronic structure has been studied as a function of the applied photo anodic potentials. The formation of polypyrrole deposits has been ensured using FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Surface analysis of the hybrid matrix revealed the tendency of polymer molecules to cover up the spherical surface of TiO2 nanoparticles that could help in improving the light absorption rate. Signals (bands) corresponding to pyrrole molecules observed in the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements have been correlated with the polaronic states formed and identified to shift as a function of the applied photo anodic potentials, revealing the decrease in work function of the hybrid system to take place (confirmed using cyclic voltammetry measurements). The decreasing trend in the work function elucidates the adjustment in electronic structure of the system (hybrid materials possessing smaller work functions are generally preferred for photovoltaic studies). The aforementioned behavioural aspects have been reasoned with the increase in overpotential values for polarization, from the decrease in up-take rate of the anionic dopant, which increases the current density values, thereby modifying the conductivity of the systems.

  20. Interfacial characteristics of resin-modified glass-ionomer materials: a study on fluid permeability using confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S K; Watson, T F

    1998-09-01

    The tooth interface with resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RM GICs) is poorly understood. This study examined the interface, especially with dentin. Cervical cavities in extracted teeth were restored with Fuji II LC, Vitremer, Photac-Fil, or a conventional GIC, Fuji Cap II. Fluorescent dye was placed in the pulp chambers for 3 hrs before the specimens were sectioned. Examination of the tooth/material interface with a confocal microscope showed that dye uptake by the restoration varied among materials. A "structureless", non-particulate, highly-stained layer of GIC was observed next to dentin in Fuji II LC. This layer varied in width, was prominent where the dentin tubules were cut "end-on" and in areas closer to the pulp, and was not seen adjacent to enamel. Vitremer showed minimal dye uptake, and the "structureless" layer was barely discernible. Photac-Fil showed more uniform uptake and absence of this layer. Cracking of enamel was also noted with these materials. The conventional GIC did not show any dye uptake, presence of a "structureless" layer, or enamel cracking. We elucidated the potential mechanisms involved in the formation of a "structureless" interfacial layer in Fuji II LC by studying the variables of cavity design, surface pre-treatment, water content of the tooth, time for it to develop, early finishing, and coating of the restoration. This layer, the "absorption layer", is probably related to water flux within the maturing cement, depending on environmental moisture changes and communication with the pulp in a wet tooth. The "micropermeability model" was useful in this study of the interfacial characteristics of RM GICs.

  1. Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for real-time studies of interfacial charge transfer dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Cordones, Amy; Vura-Weis, Josh; Siefermann, Katrin; Slaughter, Daniel; Sturm, Felix; Weise, Fabian; Bluhm, Hendrik; Strader, Matthew; Cho, Hana; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus; Guo, Jinghua; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Prendergast, David; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nilsson, Anders R.; Krupin, Oleg; Turner, Joshua J.; Schlotter, William F.; Holmes, Michael R.; Heimann, Philip A.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Minitti, Michael P.; Beye, Martin; Gul, Sheraz; Zhang, Jin Z.; Huse, Nils; Gessner, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    X-ray based spectroscopy techniques are particularly well suited to gain access to local oxidation states and electronic dynamics in complex systems with atomic pinpoint accuracy. Traditionally, these techniques are applied in a quasi-static fashion that usually highlights the steady-state properties of a system rather than the fast dynamics that often define the system function on a molecular level. Novel x-ray spectroscopy techniques enabled by free electron lasers (FELs) and synchrotron based pump-probe schemes provide the opportunity to monitor intramolecular and interfacial charge transfer processes in real-time and with element and chemical specificity. Two complementary time-domain xray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are presented that are applied at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to study charge transfer processes in N3 dye-sensitized ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals, which are at the heart of emerging light-harvesting technologies.

  2. Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for real-time studies of interfacial charge transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Hertlein, Marcus; Guo Jinghua; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Cordones, Amy; Vura-Weis, Josh; Siefermann, Katrin; Slaughter, Daniel; Sturm, Felix; Weise, Fabian; Khurmi, Champak; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten; Gessner, Oliver; Bluhm, Hendrik; Strader, Matthew; Cho, Hana; Coslovich, Giacomo; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; and others

    2013-04-19

    X-ray based spectroscopy techniques are particularly well suited to gain access to local oxidation states and electronic dynamics in complex systems with atomic pinpoint accuracy. Traditionally, these techniques are applied in a quasi-static fashion that usually highlights the steady-state properties of a system rather than the fast dynamics that often define the system function on a molecular level. Novel x-ray spectroscopy techniques enabled by free electron lasers (FELs) and synchrotron based pump-probe schemes provide the opportunity to monitor intramolecular and interfacial charge transfer processes in real-time and with element and chemical specificity. Two complementary time-domain xray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are presented that are applied at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to study charge transfer processes in N3 dye-sensitized ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals, which are at the heart of emerging light-harvesting technologies.

  3. Selected durability studies of geopolymer concrete with respect to carbonation, elevated temperature, and microbial induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badar, Mohammad Sufian

    This thesis reports a comprehensive study related to the experimental evaluation of carbonation in reinforced geopolymer concrete, the evaluation of geopolymer concretes at elevated temperature, and the resistance of geopolymer concrete to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Carbonation: Reinforced concretes, made of geopolymer, prepared from two class F fly ashes and one class C fly ash, were subjected to accelerated carbonation treatment for a period of 450 days. Electrochemical, microstructure and pore structure examinations were performed to evaluate the effect of corrosion caused due to carbonation. GPC specimens prepared from class F fly ash exhibited lower corrosion rates by a factor of 21, and higher pH values (pH>12) when compared with concrete specimens prepared from class C Fly ash (GPCMN). Microstructure and pore characterization of GPC prepared using class F fly ash revealed lower porosity by a factor of 2.5 as compared with thier counterparts made using GPC-MN. The superior performace of GPC prepared with the class F fly ash could be attributed to the dense pore structure and formation of the protective layer of calcium and sodium alumino silicate hydrates (C/N-A-S-H) geopolymeric gels around the steel reinforcement. Elevated Temperature: Geopolymers are an emerging class of cementitious binders which possess a potential for high temperature resistance that could possibly be utilized in applications such as nozzles, aspirators and refractory linings. This study reports on the results of an investigation into the performance of a fly ash based geopolymer binder in high temperature environments. Geopolymer concrete (GPC) was prepared using eleven types of fly ashes obtained from four countries. High content alumina and silica sand was used in the mix for preparing GPC. GPC was subjected to thermal shock tests following ASTM C 1100-88. The GPC samples prepared with tabular alumina were kept at 1093° C and immediately quenched in water. GPC specimens

  4. A retrospective observational study of the effect of surface treatments and cementing media on the durability of gold palatal veneers.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, R G; Linklater, K I

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a retrospective observational study that sought to determine both the longevity and effects of surface treatments of gold palatal veneers used to restore tooth surface loss. Details of all gold palatal veneers fabricated from Mattident 60 were sourced from hospital records spanning 11 years and 9 months. The case notes of each individual were accessed and, for each restoration, a note was made of the date and method of cementation, together with the period of patient follow-up. When patients continued their routine checkups, the records were scrutinized closely for evidence of restoration failure. This yielded a data set of 151 palatal gold veneer cementations for which the surface treatments and/or cementing media were known. Survival analysis by the Kaplan-Meier method of alumina blasted veneers revealed median survival times of 4,663 days when cemented with Panavia 21 and 687 days if cemented with Aquacem. Veneers that were alumina blasted, oxidized and cemented with Panavia 21 had a survival probability of 1.0. A Logrank test revealed highly statistically significant differences between the survival curves (p<0.0001). It was concluded that: (1) Alumina blasting the fit surface of a gold veneer prior to cementation with Panavia 21 resulted in a significantly more durable restoration compared to alumina blasting and cementation with Aquacem and no etching of tooth substance. (2) Due to low MST cementing, gold palatal veneers with a conventional glass polyalkenoate cement are not recommended. (3) Pre-treatment of gold palatal veneers by alumina blasting and oxidation prior to cementing with Panavia 21 appears to improve the chances of obtaining a dependable restoration. A greater number of restorations would be required to statistically test this trend.

  5. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  6. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sibener, Steven J.

    2014-03-11

    This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon

  7. Water adsorption in interfacial silane layers by neutron reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; McNamara, W.F.; Domeier, L.; Wong, A.P.Y.; Wu, W.L.

    1997-03-01

    It is well known that water plays an important role in the degradation of adhesive strength between a wide variety of materials. It is also well established that silane coupling agents can provide excellent bond durability in aqueous environments. However, the detrimental effects of interfacial water are not limited to adhesive failure. The present study was motivated by concerns in the printed circuit board industry regarding the loss of electrical resistance, as well as adhesive failure, which may arise from water at epoxy/silane/E-glass interphases. The commercial silane finish used in this study provides excellent adhesive strength between epoxy and E-glass, and remarkable bond durability even after extensive conditioning in boiling water or a pressure cooker. However, circuit boards with this finish do not perform well in insulation resistance testing following such conditioning. The goal of this work is to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanism by which water interacts with a resin/silane interphase, with a focus on the consequences for both electrical resistance and adhesion. The present report focuses on the measurement of profiles of adsorbed moisture by neutron reflection.

  8. Experimental studies of oxygen and carbon segregation at the interfacial boundaries of a 90W-7Ni-3Fe tungsten heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, E.; Sikorski, K. . E-mail: sikorski@inmat.pw.edu.pl; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2004-07-15

    The paper presents the results of a study of the heat treatment effect on the segregation in a 90%W-7%Ni-3%Fe alloy by an X-ray microanalysis and nanoSIMS technique. The measurements revealed oxygen and carbon segregations as well as enrichment of interfacial boundaries with nickel and iron.

  9. Use of self-assembled monolayers to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-03-02

    The relationship between the nature and spatial distribution of fundamental interfacial interactions and fracture stress/fracture toughness of a glassy adhesive-inorganic solid joint is not understood. This relationship is important from the standpoint of designing interfacial chemistry sufficient to provide the level of mechanical strength required for a particular application. In addition, it is also important for understanding the effects of surface contamination. Different types of contamination, or different levels of contamination, likely impact joint strength in different ways. Furthermore, the relationship is also important from the standpoint of aging. If interfacial chemical bonds scission over time due to the presence of a contaminant such as water, or exposure to UV, etc, the relationship between joint strength/fracture toughness and interface strength is important for predicting reliability with time. A fundamental understanding of the relationship between joint strength and fundamental interfacial interactions will give insight into these issues.

  10. Freezing point and solid-liquid interfacial free energy of Stockmayer dipolar fluids: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Apte, Pankaj A; Morris, James R; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2013-09-21

    Stockmayer fluids are a prototype model system for dipolar fluids. We have computed the freezing temperatures of Stockmayer fluids at zero pressure using three different molecular-dynamics simulation methods, namely, the superheating-undercooling method, the constant-pressure and constant-temperature two-phase coexistence method, and the constant-pressure and constant-enthalpy two-phase coexistence method. The best estimate of the freezing temperature (in reduced unit) for the Stockmayer (SM) fluid with the dimensionless dipole moment μ*=1, √2, √3 is 0.656 ± 0.001, 0.726 ± 0.002, and 0.835 ± 0.005, respectively. The freezing temperature increases with the dipolar strength. Moreover, for the first time, the solid-liquid interfacial free energies γ of the fcc (111), (110), and (100) interfaces are computed using two independent methods, namely, the cleaving-wall method and the interfacial fluctuation method. Both methods predict that the interfacial free energy increases with the dipole moment. Although the interfacial fluctuation method suggests a weaker interfacial anisotropy, particularly for strongly dipolar SM fluids, both methods predicted the same trend of interfacial anisotropy, i.e., γ100 > γ110 > γ111.

  11. Study of Interfacial Interactions Using Thing Film Surface Modification: Radiation and Oxidation Effects in Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2014-01-09

    Interfaces play a key role in dictating the long-term stability of materials under the influence of radiation and high temperatures. For example, grain boundaries affect corrosion by way of providing kinetically favorable paths for elemental diffusion, but they can also act as sinks for defects and helium generated during irradiation. Likewise, the retention of high-temperature strength in nanostructured, oxide-dispersion strengthened steels depends strongly on the stoichiometric and physical stability of the (Y, Ti)-oxide particles/matrix interface under radiation and high temperatures. An understanding of these interfacial effects at a fundamental level is important for the development of materials for extreme environments of nuclear reactors. The goal of this project is to develop an understanding stability of interfaces by depositing thin films of materials on substrates followed by ion irradiation of the film-substrate system at elevated temperatures followed by post-irradiation oxidation treatments. Specifically, the research will be performed by depositing thin films of yttrium and titanium (~500 nm) on Fe-12%Cr binary alloy substrate. Y and Ti have been selected as thin-film materials because they form highly stable protective oxides layers. The Fe-12%Cr binary alloy has been selected because it is representative of ferritic steels that are widely used in nuclear systems. The absence of other alloying elements in this binary alloy would allow for a clearer examination of structures and compositions that evolve during high-temperature irradiations and oxidation treatments. The research is divided into four specific tasks: (1) sputter deposition of 500 nm thick films of Y and Ti on Fe-12%Cr alloy substrates, (2) ion irradiation of the film-substrate system with 2MeV protons to a dose of 2 dpa at temperatures of 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C, (3) oxidation of as-deposited and ion-irradiated samples in a controlled oxygen environment at 500°C and 700°C, (4

  12. Influence of chlorhexidine concentration on the durability of etch-and-rinse dentin bonds: a 12-month in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Breschi, Lorenzo; Cammelli, Federica; Visintini, Erika; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Vita, Francesca; Carrilho, Marcela; Cadenaro, Milena; Foulger, Stephen; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of 0.2% and 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) used as a therapeutic primer on the long-term bond strengths of two etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Methods Adper Scotchbond 1XT (SB1) and XP-Bond (XPB) were evaluated. Etched dentin substrates were assigned to six treatment groups: (1) 0.2% CHX + SB1; (2) 2% CHX + SB1; (3) SB1 (control); (4) 0.2% CHX + XPB; (5) 2% CHX + XPB; (6) XPB (control). Composite build-ups were made and beams prepared for microtensile bond strength test. Beams were divided in three subgroups and either immediately pulled to failure or stored in artificial saliva for 6 or 12 months prior to testing. Data were evaluated by three-way ANOVA. Additional adhesive interfaces were prepared to investigate nanoleakage expression by TEM. Results SB1 and XPB showed similar immediate bond strength values with or without CHX pre-treatment (p>0.05). After 12 months, bonds fell from 43.9 ± 9.5 MPa to 20.1 ± 5.4 MPa and from 39.6 ± 9.4 MPa to 14.2 ± 5.0 MPa in control specimens for SB1 and XPB respectively, while bond fell only from 41.9±9.6MPa to 33.2 ± 8.3 MPa and 38.3 ± 8.9 MPa to 26.5 ± 10.9 (for SB1 and XPB respectively) when 0.2% CHX was previously used. CHX concentration did not affect bond strength values (0.2% vs 2%, p>.05). Nanoleakage increased during aging in controls, but reduced silver deposits were found in CHX-treated specimens. Conclusions Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the loss of bond strength seen in control bonds. Since no bacterial growth was present in the aging conditions, the results of this study suggest that endogenous factors thought to degrade the adhesive interface can be inhibited by CHX. Further in vivo trials should confirm the role of CHX in bond durability. PMID:19603582

  13. Sensitivity and directionality of lipid bilayer mechanotransduction studied using a revised, highly durable membrane-based hair cell sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddoni, Nima; Freeman, Eric C.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-06-01

    A bioinspired, membrane-based hair cell sensor consists of a planar lipid bilayer formed between two lipid-coated water droplets that connect to an artificial hair. This assembly enables motion of the hair caused by mechanical stimuli to vibrate the bilayer and produce a capacitive current. In this work, the mechanoelectrical transduction mechanism and sensing performance is experimentally characterized for a more-durable, revised hair cell embodiment that includes a cantilevered hair rooted firmly in the surrounding solid substrate. Specifically, this study demonstrates that the revised membrane-based hair cell sensor produces higher time rates of change in capacitance (0.8-6.0 nF s-1) in response to airflow across the hair compared to the original sensor (45-60 pF s-1) that did not feature a cantilevered hair. The 10-fold to 100-fold increase in the time rate change of capacitance corresponds to greater membrane bending and, thus, higher sensing currents. Membranes in the revised sensor exhibit changes in area due to bending on the order of 0.2-2.0%, versus 0.02% for the original sensor. Experiments also reveal that the bilayer displays highest sensitivity to mechanical perturbations normal to the plane of the bilayer, a membrane can transduce hair motion at frequencies below the hair’s characteristic frequency, and bilayers formed between polymerized hydrogel volumes exhibit a higher sensing currents than those formed between liquid aqueous volumes. Finally, measurements of sensitivity (5-35 pA m-1 s-1) and minimum (4.0-0.6 m s-1) and maximum (28-13 m s-1) sensing thresholds to airflow are performed for the first time, and we observe maximum electrical power (˜65 pW) in the membrane occurs for combinations of slower airflow and higher voltage. These results highlight that along with the dimensions of the hair and the compositions of the aqueous volumes, sensing performance can be tuned with applied voltage.

  14. Kinetic and structural studies, origins of selectivity, and interfacial charge transfer in the artificial photosynthesis of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Smieja, Jonathan M.; Benson, Eric E.; Kumar, Bhupendra; Grice, Kyle A.; Seu, Candace; Miller, Alexander J.; Mayer, James M.; Kubiak, Cliff

    2012-09-25

    The effective design of an artificial photosynthetic system entails the optimization of several important interactions. Herein we report stopped-flow UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, X-ray crystallographic, density functional theory (DFT), and electrochemical kinetic studies of the Re(bipy-tBu) (CO)3(L) catalyst for the reduction of CO2 to CO. A remarkable selectivity for CO2 over Hþ was observed by stopped-flow UV-vis spectroscopy of [Re(bipy-tBu)3]-1. The reaction with CO2 is about 25 times faster than the reaction with water or methanol at the same concentrations. X-ray crystallography and DFT studies of the doubly reduced anionic species suggest that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) has mixed metal-ligand character rather than being purely doubly occupied dz2, which is believed to determine selectivity by favoring CO2 (σ+π) over H+ (σ only) binding. Electrocatalytic studies performed with the addition of Brönsted acids reveal a primary H/D kinetic isotope effect, indicating that transfer of protons to Re-CO2 is involved in the rate limiting step. Lastly, the effects of electrode surface modification on interfacial electron transfer between a semiconductor and catalyst were investigated and found to affect the observed current densities for catalysis more than threefold, indicating that the properties of the electrode surface need to be addressed when developing a homogeneous artificial photosynthetic system.

  15. Kinetic and structural studies, origins of selectivity, and interfacial charge transfer in the artificial photosynthesis of CO

    PubMed Central

    Smieja, Jonathan M.; Benson, Eric E.; Kumar, Bhupendra; Grice, Kyle A.; Seu, Candace S.; Miller, Alexander J. M.; Mayer, James M.; Kubiak, Clifford P.

    2012-01-01

    The effective design of an artificial photosynthetic system entails the optimization of several important interactions. Herein we report stopped-flow UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, X-ray crystallographic, density functional theory (DFT), and electrochemical kinetic studies of the Re(bipy-tBu)(CO)3(L) catalyst for the reduction of CO2 to CO. A remarkable selectivity for CO2 over H+ was observed by stopped-flow UV-vis spectroscopy of [Re(bipy-tBu)(CO)3]-1. The reaction with CO2 is about 25 times faster than the reaction with water or methanol at the same concentrations. X-ray crystallography and DFT studies of the doubly reduced anionic species suggest that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) has mixed metal-ligand character rather than being purely doubly occupied , which is believed to determine selectivity by favoring CO2 (σ + π) over H+ (σ only) binding. Electrocatalytic studies performed with the addition of Brönsted acids reveal a primary H/D kinetic isotope effect, indicating that transfer of protons to Re -CO2 is involved in the rate limiting step. Lastly, the effects of electrode surface modification on interfacial electron transfer between a semiconductor and catalyst were investigated and found to affect the observed current densities for catalysis more than threefold, indicating that the properties of the electrode surface need to be addressed when developing a homogeneous artificial photosynthetic system. PMID:22652573

  16. "Low-Li2O" Frits: Selecting Glasses that Support the Melt Rate Studies and Challenge the Current Durability Model

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-07-30

    During the progressive development of the cold cap model (as it applies to a potential melt rate predictive tool), the formation of an Al-Li-silicate phase was identified as an intermediate reaction phase that could possibly hinder melt rate for SB4. To test this theory, six glasses were designed (using Frit 320's composition as the baseline) to maintain a constant 20 wt% sum of alkali content (in frit) by varying Na{sub 2}O to Li{sub 2}O ratios. The Li{sub 2}O concentration ranged from 8 wt% down to 0% in either 2% or 1% increments with the differences being accounted for by an increase in Na{sub 2}O concentration. Although the primary objective of the ''lower Li{sub 2}O'' frits was to evaluate the potential for melt rate improvements, assessments of durability (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) were also performed. The results suggest that durable glasses can be produced with these ''lower Li{sub 2}O'' frits should it be necessary to pursue this option for improving melt rate. In addition to the series of glasses to support melt rate assessments, a series of frits were also developed to challenge the current durability model based on the limits proposed by Edwards et al. (2004). Although the ''new'' limits allow access into compositional regions of interest (i.e., higher alkali systems) which can improve melt rate and/or waste loading, there may still be ''additional'' conservatism. In this report, two series of glasses were developed to challenge the ''new'' durability limits for the SB4 system. In the first series, the total alkali of the Frit 320-based glasses (designed to support the melt rate program) was increased from 20 wt% to 21 wt% (in the frit), but the series also evaluated the possible impact of various Na{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}O mass ratio differences. The second series pushed the alkali limit in the frit even further with frits containing either 22 or 24 wt% total alkali as well as various Na{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}O mass ratios. The

  17. Further evidence that interfacial water is the main "driving force" of protein dynamics: a neutron scattering study on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Combet, Sophie; Zanotti, Jean-Marc

    2012-04-14

    The fundamental role of hydration water (also called interfacial water) is widely recognized in protein flexibility, especially in the existence of the so-called protein "dynamical transition" at around 220 K. In the present study, we take advantage of perdeuterated C-phycocyanin (CPC) and elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) to distinguish between protein dynamics and interfacial water dynamics. Powders of hydrogenated (hCPC) and perdeuterated (dCPC) CPC protein have been hydrated, respectively, with D(2)O or H(2)O and measured by EINS to separately probe protein dynamics (hCPC/D(2)O) and water dynamics (dCPC/H(2)O) at different time- and length-scales. We find that "fast" (<20 ps) local mean-square displacements (MSD) of both protein and interfacial water coincide all along the temperature range, with the same dynamical transition temperature at ~220 K. On higher resolution (<400 ps), two different types of motions can be separated: (i) localized motions with the same amplitude for CPC and hydration water and two transitions at ~170 and ~240 K for both; (ii) large scale fluctuations exhibiting for both water molecules and CPC protein a single transition at ~240 K, with a significantly higher amplitude for the interfacial water than for CPC. Moreover, by comparing these motions with bulk water MSD measured under the same conditions, we show no coupling between bulk water dynamics and protein dynamics all along the temperature range. These results show that interfacial water is the main "driving force" governing both local and large scale motions in proteins.

  18. Polarization effects on the interfacial conductivity in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Behtash, Maziar; Nazir, Safdar; Wang, Yaqin; Yang, Kesong

    2016-03-07

    We studied the influence of uniaxial [100] strain (-1% to +1%) on the electron transport properties of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the n-type interface of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3(LAO/STO) heterostructure (HS)-based slab system from the perspective of polarization effects via first-principles density functional theory calculations. We first analyzed the unstrained system, and found that the induced polarization toward the vacuum in the LAO film leads to a small charge carrier density on the order of 10(13) cm(-2) (less than the theoretical value of 3.3 × 10(14) cm(-2) from the superlattice-model-based polar catastrophe mechanism), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental values of oxygen-annealed LAO/STO HS samples. Upon applying [100] tensile strain on the STO substrate, we found a significant reduction of the induced polarization in the LAO film. This reduction weakens the driving force against charge transfer from LAO to STO, causing an increase in the interfacial charge carrier density. The uniaxial strain also leads to a decrease of the effective mass of interfacial mobile electrons, resulting in a higher electron mobility. These findings suggest that applying uniaxial [100] tensile strain on the STO substrate can significantly enhance the interfacial conductivity of the LAO/STO HS system, which gives a comprehensive explanation for experimental observations. In contrast, compressively strained LAO/STO systems show stronger LAO film polarization than the unstrained system, which reduces the interfacial charge carrier density and increases the electron effective mass, thus suppressing the interfacial conductivity.

  19. West Valley glass product qualification durability studies, FY 1987--1988: Effects of composition, redox state, thermal history, and groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Piepel, G.F.; Mellinger, G.B.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1988-11-01

    The product qualification subtask of the West Valley Support Task (WVST) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provides support for the waste form qualification efforts at West Valley Nuclear Services Co. Testing is being conducted to determine waste form chemical durability in support of these efforts. The effects of composition, ferrous/ferric ratio (redox state), thermal history, and groundwater are being investigated. Glasses were tested using modified Materials Characterization Center (MCC) -3 and MCC-1 test methods. Results obtained in fiscal years (FY) 1987 and 1988 are presented here. 13 refs., 27 figs., 36 tabs.

  20. Electrochemical study of highly durable cathode with Pt supported on ITO-CNT composite for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sehkyu; Shao, Yuyan; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a highly stable cathode containing a Pt catalyst supported on an indium tin oxide (ITO) and carbon nanotube (CNT) composite. The dependence of cathode performance and durability on the ITO content and the diameter of the CNTs were investigated by electrochemical techniques. The cathode with 30 wt% ITO and CNTs with diameters 10–20 nm in the composite offered preferred locations for Pt stabilization and was very resistant to carbon corrosion (i.e., 82.7% ESA retention and 105.7% mass activity retention after an accelerated stress test for 400 h).

  1. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian

    2015-04-07

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  2. Scanning probe microscopies for the creation and characterization of interfacial architectures: Studies of alkyl thiolate monolayers at gold

    SciTech Connect

    Green, John -Bruce

    1997-01-10

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) offers access to the structural and material properties of interfaces, and when combined with macroscopic characterization techniques results in a powerful interfacial development tool. However, the relative infancy of SPM techniques has dictated that initial investigations concentrate on model interfacial systems as benchmarks for testing the control and characterization capabilities of SPM. One such family of model interfacial systems results from the spontaneous adsorption of alkyl thiols to gold. This dissertation examines the application of SPM to the investigation of the interfacial properties of these alkyl thiolate monolayers. Structural investigations result in a proposed explanation for counterintuitive correlations between substrate roughness and heterogeneous electron transfer barrier properties. Frictional measurements are used for characterization of the surface free energy of a series of end-group functionalized monolayers, as well as for the material properties of monolayers composed of varying chain length alkyl thiols. Additional investigations used these characterization techniques to monitor the real-time evolution of chemical and electrochemical surface reactions. The results of these investigations demonstrates the value of SPM technology to the compositional mapping of surfaces, elucidation of interfacial defects, creation of molecularly sized chemically heterogeneous architectures, as well as to the monitoring of surface reactions. However, it is the future which will demonstrate the usefulness of SPM technology to the advancement of science and technology.

  3. Competitive adsorption of surfactants and hydrophilic silica particles at the oil-water interface: interfacial tension and contact angle studies.

    PubMed

    Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2012-07-01

    The effect of surfactants' type and concentration on the interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of hydrophilic silica particles was investigated. Silica particles have been shown to have an antagonistic effect on interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of both W/O and O/W surfactants. Silica particles, combined with W/O surfactant, have no effect on interfacial tension, which is only dictated by the surfactant concentration, while they strongly affect interfacial tension when combined with O/W surfactants. At low O/W surfactant, both particles and surfactant are adsorbed at the interface, modifying the interface structure. At higher concentration, interfacial tension is only dictated by the surfactant. By increasing the surfactant concentration, the contact angle that a drop of aqueous phase assumes on a glass substrate placed in oil media decreases or increases depending on whether the surfactant is of W/O or O/W type, respectively. This is due to the modification of the wettability of the glass by the oil or water induced by the surfactants. Regardless of the surfactant's type, the contact angle profile was dictated by both particles and surfactant at low surfactant concentration, whereas it is dictated by the surfactant only at high concentration.

  4. WOODSTOVE DURABILITY TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of an accelerated laboratory test to simulate in-home woodstove aging and degradation. nown as a stress test, the protocol determines the long-term durability of woodstove models in a 1- to 2-week time frame. wo avenues of research have been t...

  5. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, Paul O.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Jorgensen, Gary J.; Shinton, Yvonne D.; Goggin, Rita M.

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  6. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  7. Durability of oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapp, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of dynamometer and vehicle durability testing from a variety of sources, as well as common causes of failure for oxygen sensors. The data indicates that oxygen sensors show low failure rates, even at mileages of 80,000 miles and beyond.

  8. Thermodynamic and kinetic study on interfacial reaction and diamond graphitization of Cu—Fe-based diamond composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Sheng; Zhang, Jie; Dong, Hong-Feng; Chu, Ke; Wang, Shun-Cai; Liu, Yi; Li, Ya-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Cu—Fe based diamond composites used for saw-blade segments are directly fabricated by vacuum and pressure-assisted sintering. The carbide forming elements Cr and Ti are added to improve interfacial bonding between diamond and the Cu—Fe matrix. The interfacial reactions between diamond/graphite and Cr or Ti, and diamond graphitization are investigated by thermodynamics/kinetics analyses and experimental methods. The results show that interfacial reactions and graphitization of diamond can automatically proceed thermodynamically. The Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6, and TiC are formed at the interfaces of composites by reactions between diamond and Cr or Ti; diamond graphitization does not occur because of the kinetic difficulty at 1093 K under the pressure of 13 MPa.

  9. Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-13

    investigation supported by this grant moved beyond past studies of interfacial and colloidal phenomena involving isotropic liquids to explore and understand a...2010 20-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 liquid crystals, interfacial phenomena, colloids , amphiphiles

  10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of graphitic materials and interfacial interactions in carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Hema L.

    This dissertation involves the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) study of the chemistry associated with carbon fiber-reinforced composites fabricated using PAN-based carbon fibers and a thermoplastic polyimide resin. The mechanical properties of the ultimate composite are significantly affected by the nature of the fiber/matrix interface. Interfacial interaction can be promoted by the electrochemical modification of the fiber surface. The determination of carbon fiber microstructure was conducted through angle-resolved valence band photoemission studies of highly ordered graphite. The change in orientation of the basal planes and reactive edge sites with take-off angle provided a method for the determination of surface microstructure. The electronic structure of solid-state graphite was described using a band structure model and the results obtained were compared with the multiple scattered wave X a calculations. PAN-based fibers were electrochemically oxidized and studied using monochromatic X-radiation. The extremely narrow natural linewidth of the monochromatized Al K a radiation allowed previously unresolved features to be seen. In addition, sample decomposition due to radiative heat from the X-ray source is eliminated. Fibers that were pretreated by the manufacturer were subjected to further electrochemical oxidation. The fibers behaved in an erratic and non-reproducible manner. The surface treatment was removed by heating the fibers in vacuum, followed by XPS analysis and electrochemical oxidation. The fiber/matrix interface was simulated by coating a very thin layer of the polyimide resin on the surface of the fiber followed by XPS analysis. The validity of a proposed structure for the resin was confirmed by comparison with ab initio calculations conducted on the resin repeat unit. A high level of fiber/matrix interaction was observed for electrochemically oxidized fibers. The possibility of solvent interaction with the fiber surface was eliminated by

  11. Kinetic and structural studies, origins of selectivity, and interfacial charge transfer in the artificial photosynthesis of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Smieja, Jonathan M.; Benson, Eric E.; Kumar, Bhupendra; Grice, Kyle A.; Seu, Candace; Miller, Alexander J.; Mayer, James M.; Kubiak, Cliff

    2012-09-25

    The effective design of an artificial photosynthetic system entails the optimization of several important interactions. Herein we report stopped-flow UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, DFT, and electrochemical kinetic studies of the Re(bipy-tBu)(CO)3(L) catalyst system. A remarkable selectivity for CO2 over H+ was observed by stopped-flow UV-Vis spectroscopy of [Re(bipy-tBu)(CO)3]-. The pseudo-first order rate constant for the reaction with 10 mM CO2 in THF is 35 s-1. This is ca. 15-20 times faster than the reactions with water or methanol at the same concentration in THF. X-ray crystallography and DFT studies of the doubly-reduced anionic species suggest that the HOMO has mixed metal-ligand character rather than being purely dz 2, which is thought to aid catalytic selectivity by favoring binding of CO2 over H+. Electrocatalytic studies performed with the addition of Brönsted acids reveal a primary H/D kinetic isotope effect, indicating that transfer of protons to Re-CO2 is involved in the rate limiting step. Lastly, the effects of electrode surface modification on interfacial electron transfer between a semiconductor and catalyst were investigated and found to affect the observed catalytic rates up to seven-fold, indicating that the properties of the electrode surface should not be overlooked when developing a homogeneous artificial photosynthetic system. This research was supported at the University of Washington, Seattle by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry (for a fellowship to A. J. M. M.), and, for funds to purchase the stopped-flow instrument, the U.S. National Institutes of Health 13 (Grant GM-50422 to JMM), and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Effect of rotary cutting instruments on the resin-tooth interfacial ultra structure: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Sherawat, Sudhir; Tewari, Sanjay; Duhan, Jigyasa; Singla, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of cutting teeth with different types of burs at various speeds on surface topography of tooth surface and interfacial gap formation at resin-tooth interface. Material and Methods: The human molars were divided into seven groups: Diamond bur in airrotor (DA) & micromotor (DM), crosscut carbide bur in airrotor (CCA) & micromotor (CCM), plain carbide bur in airrotor (CA) & micromotor (CM) and #600-grit silicon carbide paper (SiC). In five samples from each group Class II box-only cavities were restored. The occlusal surface of four teeth per group was flattened. Two out of four teeth were acid etched. Teeth were subjected for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Interfacial gap was observed in all groups with no significant difference. SEM observations revealed CA, CCA & DA were coarser than CM, CCM, DM and SiC. SEM of etched tooth surfaces revealed complete removal of amorphous smear layer in CA & CM, partial removal in CCA, CCM, DA & DM and no removal in SiC. Conclusions: Selecting an appropriate bur and its speed may not play an important role in bonding in terms of interfacial gap formation. Variable changes were observed in surface topography with different burs before and after acid etching. Key words:Surface topography, resin-tooth interface, interfacial gap, bonding. PMID:25674310

  13. In situ study on the effect of thermomigration on intermetallic compounds growth in liquid-solid interfacial reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Lin; Zhao, Ning; Ma, Haitao Zhao, Huijing; Huang, Mingliang

    2014-05-28

    Synchrotron radiation real-time imaging technology was carried out in situ to observe and characterize the effect of thermomigration on the growth behavior of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in Cu/Sn/Cu solder joint during soldering. The thermomigration resulted in asymmetrical formation and growth of the interfacial IMCs. Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} and Cu{sub 3}Sn IMCs formed at the cold end and grew rapidly during the whole soldering process. However, only Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} IMC formed at the hot end and remained relatively thin until solidification. The IMCs at the cold end were nearly seven times thicker than that at the hot end after solidification. The Cu dissolution at the cold end was significantly restrained, while that at the hot end was promoted, which supplied Cu atoms to diffuse toward the cold end under thermomigration to feed the rapid IMC growth. Moreover, the thermomigration also caused asymmetrical morphology of the interfacial IMCs at the cooling stage, i.e., the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} IMC at the cold end transformed into facet structure, while that at the hot end remained scallop-type. The asymmetrical growth behavior of the interfacial IMCs was analyzed from the view point of kinetics.

  14. Surface plasmon optical study of the interfacial phase transition of elastinlike polypeptide grafted on gold.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Joon, Huang Min; Trabbic-Carlson, Kimberly; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2008-09-01

    The conformational changes in elastinlike polypeptides (ELPs) grafted to a solid/solution interface via different architectures were studied using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). SPFS provides a simple and convenient optical method to study the influence of the grafting method and the graft density on the conformational changes in ELPs at the solid-solution interface as a function of environmental variables. A typical response of the ELP, consistent with its stimuli responsiveness, was a gradual collapse upon increasing the ionic strength; this effect was inversely correlated with the surface graft density of the ELP.

  15. Studies on frequency and gate voltage effects on the dielectric properties of Au/n-Si (110) structure with PVA-nickel acetate composite film interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunç, T.; Gökçen, M.; Uslu, İ.

    2012-11-01

    The admittance technique was used in order to investigate the frequency dependence of dielectric constant ( ɛ'), dielectric loss ( ɛ″), dielectric loss tangent (tan δ), the ac electrical conductivity ( σ ac), and the electric modulus of PVA (Ni-doped) structure. Experimental results revealed that the values of ɛ' , ɛ″, (tan δ), σ ac and the electric modulus show fairly large frequency and gate bias dispersion due to the interface charges and polarization. The σ ac is found to increase with both increasing frequency and voltage. It can be concluded that the interface charges and interfacial polarization have strong influence on the dielectric properties of metal-polymer-semiconductor (MIS) structures especially at low frequencies and in depletion and accumulation regions. The results of this study indicate that the ɛ' values of Au/PVA/n-Si with Nickel-doped PVA interfacial layer are quite higher compared to those with pure and other dopant/mixture's of PVA.

  16. A study of the interfacial chemistry of pyrite and coal in fine coal cleaning using flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chengliang

    1993-01-01

    Surface oxidation, surface charge, and flotation properties have been systematically studied for coal, coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. Electrochemical studies show that coal-pyrite exhibits much higher and more complex surface oxidation than ore-pyrite and its oxidation rate depends strongly on the carbon/coal content. Flotation studies indicate that pyrites have no self-induced floatability. Fuel oil significantly improves the floatability of coal and induces considerable flotation for coal-pyrite due to the hydrophobic interaction of fuel oil with the carbon/coal inclusions on the pyrite surface. Xanthate is a good collector for ore-pyrite but a poor collector for coal and coal-pyrite. The results from thermodynamic calculations, flotation and zeta potential measurements show that iron ions greatly affect the flotation of pyrite with xanthate and fuel oil. Various organic and inorganic chemicals have been examined for depressing coal-pyrite. It was found, for the first time, that sodium pyrophosphate is an effective depressant for coal-pyrite. Solution chemistry shows that pyrophosphate reacts with iron ions to form stable iron pyrophosphate complexes. Using pyrophosphate, the complete separation of pyrite from coal can be realized over a wide pH range at relatively low dosage.

  17. Study on the interfacial adhesion property of low-k thin film by the surface acoustic waves with cohesive zone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xia; Qi, Haiyang; Tao, Ye; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2016-12-01

    The cohesive zone model being increasingly used in discrete fracture processes simulation is adopted to study the interfacial adhesion property of low dielectric constant film deposited on the silicon substrate in this work. The two parameters, maximum normal traction and normal interface characteristic length in cohesive zone model, are taken into account to calculate the theoretical surface acoustic wave dispersion curves. Broadband surface acoustic wave signals with effective frequency up to 200 MHz are generated by short pulse ultraviolet laser source and detected by a piezoelectric transducer. The interfacial adhesion properties of dense and porous films determined accurately by matching the experimental dispersion curves with the calculated theoretical dispersion curves are 10.7 PPa/m and 2.8 PPa/m, respectively. The results show that the adhesion quality of dense low dielectric constant film is better than that of the porous. The study exhibits that the adhesion properties determined by improved laser-generated surface acoustic wave technique have the same trends with the test results of the nanoscratch technique, which indicates that the surface acoustic wave technique with cohesive zone model is a promising and nondestructive method for determining interfacial adhesion properties between low dielectric constant film and substrate.

  18. [Studies on the pre-treatment of dental alloy for adhesive restorations. 4. Adhesive durability of adhesive resin to various dental alloys treated with composite plating].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Y; Yamashita, A; Suzuki, K; Omura, I; Yamauchi, J I

    1989-07-01

    In this study, the durability of adhesion between an adhesive resin (Panavia EX) and dental alloys (gold or Ni-Cr) were examined in regard to thermal cycling, immersion, either in water (70 degrees C or 100 degrees C) or in sodium chloride solutions (pH was 3, 7 and 9). An favourable adhesive strength, such as 450-500 kgf/cm2, was obtained even after 24 hours immersion in 37 degrees C water, when the surface pre-treatment of the alloy was done with either Sn- or composite (TMSAC/Sn or PVC/Sn)-plating. However, during the durability test, the adhesive strength has decreased to such on extent, that about 60% of early strength with Sn-plating and 80% with TMSAC/Sn composite plating. But, with PVC/Sn composite-plating, more than 90% of the early strength was maintained. In regard to the pH of the corrosive solution, no apparent difference was observed regarding the above mentioned adhesive characteristics.

  19. Combustor liner durability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1981-01-01

    An 18 month combustor liner durability analysis program was conducted to evaluate the use of advanced three dimensional transient heat transfer and nonlinear stress-strain analyses for modeling the cyclic thermomechanical response of a simulated combustor liner specimen. Cyclic life prediction technology for creep/fatigue interaction is evaluated for a variety of state-of-the-art tools for crack initiation and propagation. The sensitivity of the initiation models to a change in the operating conditions is also assessed.

  20. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  1. A Study of Interfacial-Instability-Induced Mixing in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Annamalai, Subramanian; Ouellet, Frederick

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when a bed of particles is explosively dispersed, a multiphase instability front may occur, and lead to the formation of aerodynamically stable jet-particle structures. It is believed that these coherent structures originates from the early phase of explosive dispersal, in particular, in the manner in which the initial layer of particles undergoes instability, as it rapidly expands in the radial direction. In this work we want to isolate and study the effect of gas-particle two-way interaction on the nature of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities of an explosively driven particle layer. As a result we perform numerical experiments, where we limit the initial volume fraction of the particle layer. The focus of this investigation is on the RT and RM growth mechanisms in the linear and non-linear stages under the complexity of the cylindrical geometry, very high pressures and densities associated with the detonation process. Thus, in addition to the initial disturbance created by the random distribution of particles, we explicitly vary the initial density of the particle and gas distribution. Detailed analyses of single mode and two-mode RT/RM-induced mixing are presented. This work was supported (in part) by the U.S. DoE, NNSA, ASC Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  2. Molecular weight effects on interfacial properties of linear and ring polymer melts: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddah, Chahrazed; Milchev, Andrey; Sabeur, Sid Ahmed; Skvortsov, Alexander M.

    2016-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study and compare the pressure, P, and the surface tension, γ , of linear chains and of ring polymers at the hard walls confining both melts into a slit. We examine the dependence of P and γ on the length (i.e., molecular weight) N of the macromolecules. For linear chains, we find that both pressure and surface tension are inversely proportional to the chain length, P (N ) -P (N →∞ ) ∝N-1,γ (N ) -γ (N →∞ ) ∝N-1 , irrespective of whether the confining planes attract or repel the monomers. In contrast, for melts comprised of cyclic (ring) polymers, neither the pressure nor the surface tension is found to depend on molecular weight N for both kinds of wall-monomer interactions. While other structural properties as, e.g., the probability distributions of trains and loops at impenetrable walls appear quantitatively indistinguishable, we observe an amazing dissimilarity in the probability to find a chain end or a tagged monomer of a ring at a given distance from the wall in both kinds of polymeric melts. In particular, we demonstrate that the conformational equivalence of linear chains in a confined melt to a single chain under conditions of critical adsorption to a planar surface, established two decades ago, does also hold for ring polymers in a melt of linear chains. This analogy does not hold, however, for linear and ring chains in a confined melt of ring chains.

  3. Interfacial water on crystalline silica: A comparative molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tuan A.; Argyris, D.; Cole, David; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the dynamics of aqueous electrolyte solutions confined in slit-shaped silica nanopores of various degrees of protonation. Five degrees of protonation were prepared by randomly removing surface hydrogen atoms from fully protonated crystalline silica surfaces. Aqueous electrolyte solutions containing NaCl or CsCl salt were simulated at ambient conditions. In all cases, the ionic concentration was 1 M. The results were quantified in terms of atomic density distributions within the pores, and the self-diffusion coefficient along the direction parallel to the pore surface. We found evidence for ion-specific properties that depend on ion surface, water ion, and only in some cases ion ion correlations. The degree of protonation strongly affects the structure, distribution, and the dynamic behavior of confined water and electrolytes. Cl ions adsorb on the surface at large degrees of protonation, and their behavior does not depend significantly on the cation type (either Na+ or Cs+ ions are present in the systems considered). The cations show significant ion-specific behavior. Na+ ions occupy different positions within the pore as the degree of protonation changes, while Cs+ ions mainly remain near the pore center at all conditions considered. For a given degree of protonation, the planar self-diffusion coefficient of Cs+ is always greater than that of Na+ ions. The results are useful for better understanding transport under confinement, including brine behavior in the subsurface, with important applications such as environmental remediation.

  4. Study of the low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited tungsten-silicon interface: Interfacial fluorine

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Chopra, D.R.; Dillingham, T.R.; Gnade, B.; Smith, G.

    1989-03-15

    Single-crystal silicon <100> substrates uniformly doped at approx. >12 ..cap omega.. cm with boron were deposited with approx.800 A of low-pressure chemically vapor deposited W in a hot-quartz-walled (Anicon) system at a deposition temperature of 300 /sup 0/C. The samples studied include an as-deposited sample and two others which were post-deposition annealed at 600 /sup 0/C in Ar for 15 min each. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with an Ar/sup +/ ion sputter profiling technique was employed to investigate these structures as a function of depth. Particular emphasis was placed on the depth distribution, content, and chemical state of the fluorine present. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray diffraction were used to corroborate the XPS data. Results show that, for the as-deposited and 600 /sup 0/C annealed sample, the maximum concentration of fluorine (0.6--0.8 at. %) is observed, not at the W/Si interface, but rather at the W (H/sub 2/ reduction)/W (Si displacement) interface. For the sample annealed at 850 /sup 0/C, WSi/sub 2/ is formed in the overlayer, and the peak in the F profile corresponds to the position of the WSi/sub 2//Si interface. The maximum concentration of fluorine is reduced by approximately 75% to 0.23 at. % in this sample. From the XPS spectra of the F 1s region, the chemical species of fluorine present in these samples have been identified as WF/sub 6/, WF/sub 5/, and WF/sub 4/.

  5. Water-in-model oil emulsions studied by small-angle neutron scattering: interfacial film thickness and composition.

    PubMed

    Verruto, Vincent J; Kilpatrick, Peter K

    2008-11-18

    The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. Traditional problems associated with these feedstocks, particularly stable water-in-petroleum emulsions, are drawing increasing attention. Despite considerable research on the interfacial assembly of asphaltenes, resins, and naphthenic acids, much about the resulting interfacial films is not well understood. Here, we describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate interfacial film properties from model emulsion systems. Modeling the SANS data with both a polydisperse core/shell form factor as well as a thin sheet approximation, we have deduced the film thickness and the asphaltenic composition within the stabilizing interfacial films of water-in-model oil emulsions prepared in toluene, decalin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. Film thicknesses were found to be 100-110 A with little deviation among the three solvents. By contrast, asphaltene composition in the film varied significantly, with decalin leading to the most asphaltene-rich films (30% by volume of the film), while emulsions made in toluene and methylnaphthalene resulted in lower asphaltenic contents (12-15%). Through centrifugation and dilatational rheology, we found that trends of decreasing water resolution (i.e., increasing emulsion stability) and increasing long-time dilatational elasticity corresponded with increasing asphaltene composition in the film. In addition to the asphaltenic composition of the films, here we also deduce the film solvent and water content. Our analyses indicate that 1:1 (O/W) emulsions prepared with 3% (w/w) asphaltenes in toluene and 1 wt % NaCl aqueous solutions at pH 7 and pH 10 resulted in 80-90 A thick films, interfacial areas around 2600-3100 cm (2)/mL, and films that were roughly 25% (v/v) asphaltenic, 60-70% toluene, and 8-12% water. The increased asphaltene and water film

  6. Electrochemical corrosion studies of carbon supports and electrocatalysts and their effects on the durability of low-temperature PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowlapalli, Madhusudhana R.

    Performance of a PEM fuel cell relies heavily on the durability of the platinum and platinum-alloy based electrocatalysts supported on carbon blacks. Carbon corrosion has been widely accepted as an important issue affecting the degradation of the catalytic layer in PEMFCs. Traditional carbon blacks used in today's fuel cell industry are not tailored to suit the corrosive conditions encountered in PEMFCs. Advanced carbon supports should have excellent electrochemical corrosion resistance, good conductivity, high surface area and optimum hydrophilic properties. The principal objective of this work is to investigate the corrosive behavior of carbon blacks and electrocatalysts supported on such carbon blacks in conditions that are typical for fuel cells. Physical and chemical changes during oxidation of these carbon blacks have been reviewed along with methodology for studying their corrosion in a low-temperature fuel cell environment. This study provides an ex-situ corrosion measurement protocol and a gas diffusion electrode half-cell setup to study the electrochemical oxidation resistance behavior of standard carbon blacks, modified carbon blacks, and advanced carbon supports in acid electrolyte at 25°C. Corrosion current-time relationships were evaluated and transient mode of corrosion study was employed to simulate automobile startup/shutdown. The effects of various surface modifications on carbon corrosion behavior have been studied in detail. The aggravated corrosion of carbon supports at potentials higher than the thermodynamic stable regime of water was investigated and a mechanism is proposed to address the same. The role of the metal phase on carbon corrosion at the catalyst-support interphase has also been investigated. The corrosion current dependence on the microstructure and nature of surface groups present on these carbons was examined. Further, measuring carbon corrosion effects on the durability of a single membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) cathode

  7. Interfacial reactions in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A study of the interfacial reaction characteristics of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide and disordered titanium alloy composites has determined that the matrix alloy compositions affect the microstructure and the distribution of the reaction products, as well as the growth kinetics of the reaction zones. The interfacial reaction products in the ordered titanium aluminide composite are more complicated than those in the disordered titanium-alloy composite. The activation energy of the interfacial reaction in the ordered titanium aluminide composite is also higher than that in the disordered titanium alloy composite. Designing an optimum interface is necessary to enhance the reliability and service life at elevated temperatures. 16 refs.

  8. Characterizing interfacial friction in bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate reverse micelles from photoisomerization studies of carbocyanine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangamallaiah, V.; Dutt, G. B.

    2011-01-01

    Photoisomerization of two carbocyanine derivatives has been examined in bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles to understand the factors that govern this process in the interfacial region of organized assemblies. To this effect, fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of 3,3'-diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide and merocyanine 540 have been measured in AOT/isooctane/water and AOT/cyclohexane/water reverse micellar systems as a function of the mole ratio of water to the surfactant, W. The nonradiative rate constants, which have been identified as the rates of photoisomerization for these solutes, were obtained from the experimentally measured parameters. The steady rise and subsequent saturation observed in the nonradiative rate constants upon increasing W has been rationalized in terms of micellar packing. An inverse correlation has been obtained between the nonradiative rate constants and the critical packing parameter, indicating that the interfacial friction experienced by the solute molecule is essentially described by this parameter.

  9. A systematic study on the interfacial energy of O-line interfaces in fcc/bcc systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fuzhi; Zhang, Wenzheng

    2013-10-01

    Habit planes between face-centered cubic (fcc)/body-centered cubic (bcc) phases usually exhibit irrational orientations, which often agree with the O-line criterion. Previously, energy calculation was made to test whether the habit planes were energetically favorable, but the values of the energy were found very sensitive to the initial atomic configuration in an irrationally orientated interface. In this paper, under the O-line condition, simple selection criteria are proposed to define and remove interfacial interstitials and vacancies in the initial atomic configuration. The criteria are proved to be effective in obtaining robust energy results. Interfacial energies of two types of O-line interfaces in fcc/bcc systems are calculated following the criteria. The observed transformation crystallography of precipitates in Ni-Cr and Cu-Cr systems can be explained consistently as the irrational habit plane in each system is associated with the lowest energy O-line interface.

  10. Studies concerning the durability of concrete vaults for intermediate level radioactive waste disposal: Electrochemical monitoring and corrosion aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Arva, E. A.; Giordano, C. M.; Lafont, C. J.

    2006-11-01

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible of the development of a management nuclear waste disposal programme. This programme contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive waste. The proposed concept is the near-surface monolithic repository similar to those in operation in El Cabril, Spain. The design of this type of repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers. Since the vault and cover are major components of the engineered barriers, the durability of these concrete structures is an important aspect for the facilities integrity. This work presents a laboratory and field investigation performed for the last 6 years on reinforced concrete specimens, in order to predict the service life of the intermediate level radioactive waste disposal vaults from data obtained from electrochemical techniques. On the other hand, the development of sensors that allow on-line measurements of rebar corrosion potential and corrosion current density; incoming oxygen flow that reaches the metal surface; concrete electrical resistivity and chloride concentration is shown. Those sensors, properly embedded in a new full scale vault (nowadays in construction), will allow the monitoring of the corrosion process of the steel rebars embedded in thestructure.

  11. Study on improvement of durability for reinforced concrete by surface-painting migrating corrosion inhibitor and engineering application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ning; WANG, Zixiao; LIU, Zhiyong; Zhou, Jiyuan; Zheng, Duo

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion currents of steel bar in concrete with three W/B and four chloride contents after surface-painting two migrating corrosion inhibitors (PCI-2015 and MCI-A) 14d to 150d in atmospheric condition were measured. The results showed that the corrosion current density (I corr) of steel bar reduced to 0.1 μA.cm-2 from the initial highest 3.833 μA.cm-2 (W/B=0.65, NaCl-1%) after surface-painting PCI-2015 14 d, and the I corr was still lower than 0.1 μA.cm-2 until 150d. The compressive strength and chloride migration coefficient of concrete specimens were tested. The possible reasons of the mechanisms of durability improvement for reinforced concrete by applying PCI-2015 inhibitor were PCI-2015 may be reacted with calcium hydroxide in cement concrete and lots of inhibitor particles may be adsorbed on the active sites first and then a stable protective layer may be formed. The I corr of steel bars in a hydraulic aqueduct concrete structure after painting PCI-2015, MCI-A (the United States) and MCI-B (Europe) during 6 months was monitored by Gecor 8 tester. The results showed that the average values of I corr of steel bars after painting the PCI-2015 150d fulfilled the specification requirements in “Design code for concrete structure strengthening (E.3) ”(GB 50367-2013).

  12. Influence of interphase morphology on adhesion and composite durability in semicrystalline polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.L. Jr.; Kander, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The microstructure of the interphase in semicrystalline polymer matrix composites has a dramatic influence on their mechanical properties. Studies have been performed to alter this region and to correlate various interphase morphologies with changes in fiber-matrix adhesion. A reinforced nylon 66 composite, when subjected to specific thermal histories, contains an interphase composed of transcrystallinity. This region has been altered by coating fibers with a diluent, poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), and/or adding the diluent to the matrix material in very small quantities. Interphase morphology was investigated with optical microscopy, and adhesion was measured using a modified fiber pull-out test. It was found that transcrystallinity increases the interfacial shear strength. The effect different interphase morphologies have on the durability of bulk composite samples is currently under investigation.

  13. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  14. Multicentre studies of insecticide-treated durable wall lining in Africa and South-East Asia: entomological efficacy and household acceptability during one year of field use

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Indoor residual spraying (IRS) is a primary method of malaria vector control, but its potential impact is constrained by several inherent limitations: spraying must be repeated when insecticide residues decay, householders can tire of the annual imposition and campaign costs are recurrent. Durable lining (DL) can be considered an advanced form of long-lasting IRS where insecticide is gradually released from an aesthetically attractive wall lining material to provide vector control for several years. A multicentre trial was carried out in Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Mali, South Africa and Vietnam to assess the feasibility, durability, bioefficacy and household acceptability of DL, compared to conventional IRS or insecticide-treated curtains (LLITCs), in a variety of operational settings. Methods This study was conducted in 220 households in traditional rural villages over 12-15 months. In all sites, rolls of DL were cut to fit house dimensions and fixed to interior wall surfaces (usually with nails and caps) by trained teams. Acceptability was assessed using a standardized questionnaire covering such topics as installation, exposure reactions, entomology, indoor environment, aesthetics and durability. Bioefficacy of interventions was evaluated using WHO cone bioassay tests at regular intervals throughout the year. Results The deltamethrin DL demonstrated little to no decline in bioefficacy over 12-15 months, supported by minimal loss of insecticide content. By contrast, IRS displayed a significant decrease in bioactivity by 6 months and full loss after 12 months. The majority of participants in DL households perceived reductions in mosquito density (93%) and biting (82%), but no changes in indoor temperature (83%). Among those households that wanted to retain the DL, 73% cited protective reasons, 20% expressed a desire to keep theirs for decoration and 7% valued both qualities equally. In Equatorial Guinea, when offered a choice of vector control product at

  15. Nepheline Formation Potential in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) and Its Impact on Durability: Selecting Glasses for a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D

    2005-08-15

    The likelihood for the formation of nepheline in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glass systems and the potential impact of nepheline on the durability of these systems is part of the frit development efforts for SB4. The effect of crystallization on glass durability is complex and depends on several interrelated factors including the change in residual glass composition, the formation of internal stress or microcracks, and the preferential attack at the glass-crystal interface. Perhaps one of the most significant effects is the type and extent (or fraction) of crystallization and the change to the residual glass composition. A strong increase in glass dissolution (or decrease in durability) has been observed in previous studies in glasses that formed aluminum-containing crystals, such as NaAlSiO{sub 4} (nepheline) and LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and crystalline SiO{sub 2}. Although it is well known that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na{sup +}-[AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} pairs), the combination of high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}). Given the projected high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SB4 and the potential use of a high Na{sub 2}O based frit to improve melt rate and a high Na{sub 2}O sludge due to settling problems, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems continues to be assessed. The most recent compositional projections from the Closure Business Unit (CBU) for SB4 may be framed around three decision areas: the sodium molarity of the sludge (at values of 1M Na and 1.6M Na), the SB3 heel that will be included in the batch (expressed in inches of SB3 sludge with values of 0, 40, and 127''), and the introduction of an ARP stream into the sludge (which is represented by six options: no ARP, ARPa, ARPe, ARPk, ARPm, and ARPv). Candidate frits are being identified for these options via a

  16. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  17. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  18. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  19. Measuring air-water interfacial areas with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Peng, Sheng; Schnaar, Gregory; Murao, Asami

    2007-03-15

    Air-water interfacial areas as a function of water saturation were measured for a sandy, natural porous medium using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. In addition, interfacial areas measured in a prior study with the gas-phase interfacial partitioning tracer-test method for the same porous medium were included for comparison. For all three methods, total air-water interfacial areas increased with decreasing water saturation. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer-test methods were generally larger than those obtained from microtomography, and the disparity increased as water saturation decreased. The interfacial areas measured by microtomography extrapolated to a value (147 cm(-1)) very similar to the specific solid surface area (151 cm(-1)) calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, indicating that the method does not characterize the area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity (surface roughness, microporosity). This is consistent with the method resolution of approximately 12 microm. In contrast, the interfacial areas measured with the gas-phase tracer tests approached the N2/BET measured specific solid surface area (56000 cm(-1)), indicating that this method does characterize the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. The largest interfacial area measured with the aqueous-phase tracer tests was 224 cm(-1), while the extrapolated maximum interfacial area was approximately 1100 cm(-1). Both of these values are larger than the smooth-sphere specific solid surface area but much smaller than the N2/BET specific solid surface area, which suggests that the method measures a limited portion of the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. All three methods provide measures of total (capillary + film) interfacial area, a primary difference being that the film-associated area is a smooth-surface equivalent for the

  20. Molybdenum-Doped PdPt@Pt Core-Shell Octahedra Supported by Ionic Block Copolymer-Functionalized Graphene as a Highly Active and Durable Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kie Yong; Yeom, Yong Sik; Seo, Heun Young; Kumar, Pradip; Lee, Albert S; Baek, Kyung-Youl; Yoon, Ho Gyu

    2017-01-18

    Development of highly active and durable electrocatalysts that can effectively electrocatalyze oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) still remains one important challenge for high-performance electrochemical conversion and storage applications such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Herein, we propose the combination of molybdenum-doped PdPt@Pt core-shell octahedra and the pyrene-functionalized poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly[(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] ionic block copolymer-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (Mo-PdPt@Pt/IG) to effectively augment the interfacial cohesion of both components using a tunable ex situ mixing strategy. The rationally designed Mo-PdPt@Pt core-shell octahedra have unique compositional benefits, including segregation of Mo atoms on the vertexes and edges of the octahedron and 2-3 shell layers of Pt atoms on a PdPt alloy core, which can provide highly active sites to the catalyst for ORR along with enhanced electrochemical stability. In addition, the ionic block copolymer functionalized graphene can facilitate intermolecular charge transfer and good stability of metal NPs, which arises from the ionic block copolymer interfacial layer. When the beneficial features of the Mo-PdPt@Pt and IG are combined, the Mo-PdPt@Pt/IG exhibits substantially enhanced activity and durability for ORR relative to those of commercial Pt/C. Notably, the Mo-PdPt@Pt/IG shows mass activity 31-fold higher than that of Pt/C and substantially maintains high activities after 10 000 cycles of intensive durability testing. The current study highlights the crucial strategies in designing the highly active and durable Pt-based octahedra and effective combination with functional graphene supports toward the synergetic effects on ORR.

  1. Recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, P; Hoeben, M A; van der Lans, R G J M; Kwant, G; van der Wielen, L A M

    2002-05-20

    In this article, a qualitative study of the recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning in liquid-liquid biphasic systems is presented. A range of crystallised biomolecules with varying polarities have been chosen such as glycine, phenylglycine and ampicillin. Liquid-liquid biphasic systems in a range of polarity differences were selected such as an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), water-butanol and water-hexanol. The results indicate that interfacial partitioning of crystals occurs even when their density exceeds that of the individual liquid phases. Yet, not all crystals partition to the same extent to the interface to form a stable and thick interphase layer. This indicates some degree of selectivity. From the analysis of these results in relation to the physicochemical properties of the crystals and the liquid phases, a hypothetical mechanism for the interfacial partitioning is deduced. Overall these results support the potential of interfacial partitioning as a large scale separation technology.

  2. Durability of Waste Glass Flax Fiber Reinforced Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-01

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  3. Durability of waste glass flax fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-17

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  4. A new advanced experimental setup for in-depth study of the interfacial reaction during reactive wetting.

    PubMed

    Frenznick, Sascha; Stratmann, Martin; Rohwerder, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Reactive wetting plays a crucial role in many technical processes, from soldering in microelectronics, production of metal/ceramic composites, to hot dip galvanizing in mass production of zinc coated steel sheet. In all these cases the wetting behavior of metal melts on different surfaces plays a crucial role in material joining and coating. In all these processes the formation of the interfacial reaction layer has to occur within as short a time as possible in order to ensure a fast overall production speed. As the interfacial layer determines the stability of the formed composites, detailed knowledge of its growth mechanisms is required for a directed process optimization. However, the investigation of the processes occurring at the buried interface between substrate and wetting phase is difficult, especially for the case of liquid metal wetting metallic or ceramic solid substrates at high temperatures. Here, a novel advanced technique for the investigation of high temperature wetting processes up to a temperature of 1100 K is presented. It is based on the sessile drop technique but, in addition, allows spinning off the droplet at any chosen wetting time, thus providing direct access to the interfacial reaction layer. Since the experimental setup is integrated into a UHV compatible reaction chamber, not only excellent control of the composition of the atmosphere is ensured, but also direct transfer to surface analytical tools such as scanning electron microscope or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis without intermediate exposure to air is realized. As will be shown for the case of hot dip galvanising of steel, this is an outstanding advance compared to existing methods.

  5. A new advanced experimental setup for in-depth study of the interfacial reaction during reactive wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenznick, Sascha; Stratmann, Martin; Rohwerder, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Reactive wetting plays a crucial role in many technical processes, from soldering in microelectronics, production of metal/ceramic composites, to hot dip galvanizing in mass production of zinc coated steel sheet. In all these cases the wetting behavior of metal melts on different surfaces plays a crucial role in material joining and coating. In all these processes the formation of the interfacial reaction layer has to occur within as short a time as possible in order to ensure a fast overall production speed. As the interfacial layer determines the stability of the formed composites, detailed knowledge of its growth mechanisms is required for a directed process optimization. However, the investigation of the processes occurring at the buried interface between substrate and wetting phase is difficult, especially for the case of liquid metal wetting metallic or ceramic solid substrates at high temperatures. Here, a novel advanced technique for the investigation of high temperature wetting processes up to a temperature of 1100K is presented. It is based on the sessile drop technique but, in addition, allows spinning off the droplet at any chosen wetting time, thus providing direct access to the interfacial reaction layer. Since the experimental setup is integrated into a UHV compatible reaction chamber, not only excellent control of the composition of the atmosphere is ensured, but also direct transfer to surface analytical tools such as scanning electron microscope or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis without intermediate exposure to air is realized. As will be shown for the case of hot dip galvanising of steel, this is an outstanding advance compared to existing methods.

  6. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  7. Influence of compaction on the interfacial transition zone and the permeability of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch; Muench, Beat; Gasser, Philippe; Holzer, Lorenz

    2006-08-15

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is regarded as a key feature for the transport properties and the durability of concrete. In this study one self-compacting concrete (SCC) mixture and two conventionally vibrated concrete (CVC) mixtures are studied in order to determine the influence of compaction on the porosity of the ITZ. Additionally oxygen permeability and water conductivity were measured in vertical and horizontal direction. The quantitative analysis of images made with an optical microscope and an environmental scanning electron microscope shows a significantly increased porosity and width of the ITZ in CVC compared to SCC. At the same time oxygen permeability and water conductivity of CVC are increased in comparison to SCC. Moreover, considerable differences in the porosity of the lower, lateral and upper ITZ are observed in both types of concrete. The anisotropic distribution of pores in the ITZ does not necessarily cause anisotropy in oxygen permeability and water conductivity though.

  8. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  9. Urban Decline and Durable Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Gyourko, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Urban decline is not the mirror image of growth, and durable housing is the primary reason the nature of decline is so different. This paper presents a model of urban decline with durable housing and verifies these implications of the model: (1) city growth rates are skewed so that cities grow more quickly than they decline; (2) urban decline is…

  10. Interfacial properties and electron structure of Al/B4C interface: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yajiang; Qiu, Ruizhi; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Pengcheng

    2016-09-01

    This research aims at investigating the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of the Al (111)/B4C (0001) interface by first-principles calculations. This model geometry Al (111)/B4C (0001) is chosen because the close-packed planes of Al and B4C have the (111) and (0001) orientation, respectively, and the lattice mismatch is only ∼2.1%. Among four B4C (0001) surfaces with different terminations, our calculation of surface free energies predicted that C-terminated B4C (0001) surface is the most stable one. Relaxed atomic geometries, the work of adhesion and interfacial free energies were calculated for three C-terminated B4C (0001)/Al (111) interfaces with different stacking sequences (top-site, hollow-site, and bridge-site). Results reveal that the relaxed top-site (hollow-site-like) Al/B4C interface has the best adhesion force and also be the most stable. The interfacial electron structure including charge density difference, Bader charge and density of states (DOS) is analyzed to determine the nature of metal/carbide bonding and we find the formation of Alsbnd C bond and possibly the formation of Al4C3 in the interface.

  11. Key Durability Issues with Mullite-Based Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si-Based Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed mullite (3Al2O3 central dot 2SiO2) and mullite/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) dual layer coatings have been developed to protect silicon-based ceramics from environmental attack. Mullite-based coating systems show excellent durability in air. However, in combustion environments, corrosive species such as molten salt or water vapor penetrate through cracks in the coating and attack the Si-based ceramics along the interface, Thus modification of the coating system for enhanced crack-resistance is necessary for long-term durability in combustion environments. Other key durability issues include interfacial contamination and coating/substrate bonding. Interfacial contamination leads to enhanced oxidation and interfacial pore formation, while weak coating/substrate bonding leads to rapid attack of the interface by corrosive species, both of which can cause premature failure of the coating. Interfacial contamination can be minimized by limiting impurities in coating and substrate materials. The interface may be modified to improve the coating/substrate bond.

  12. Key Durability Issues with Mullite-Based Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si-Based Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2) and mullite/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) dual layer coatings have been developed to protect silicon -based ceramics from environmental attack. Mullite-based coating systems show excellent durability in air. However, in combustion environments, corrosive species such as molten salt or water vapor penetrate through cracks in the coating and attack the Si-based ceramics along the interface. Thus the modification of the coating system for enhanced crack-resistance is necessary for long-term durability in combustion environments. Other key durability issues include interfacial contamination and coating/substrate bonding. Interfacial contamination leads to enhanced oxidation and interfacial pore formation, while a weak coating/substrate bonding leads to rapid attack of the interface by corrosive species, both of which can cause a premature failure of the coating. Interfacial contamination can be minimized by limiting impurities in coating and substrate materials. The interface may be modified to improve the coating/substrate bond.

  13. TEM study on the interfacial reaction between electroless plated Ni-P/Au UBM and Sn-3.5Ag solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min-Ho; Kwon, Eun-Jung; Kang, Han-Byul; Jung, Seung-Boo; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2007-06-01

    This study examined the interfacial reaction between electroless plated Ni-P/Au under bump metallization (UBM) and a eutectic Sn-3.5Ag solder using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The chemical and crystallographic analysis using TEM provided important information on the microstructural evolution at the interface. In this study, UBM was prepared by the electroless plating of Au (0.15 μm)/Ni-15 at %P (5 μm) on a bare Cu substrate and was then reacted with a Sn-3.5Ag eutectic solder at 260°C for various amounts of time to examine the different sequential stages of the interfacial reaction TEM analyses confirmed that beside the Ni3Sn4 layer, there were three more IMC layers at the interface: the Ni-Sn-P ternary layer, Ni3P layer, and the layer of phase mixture of the Ni3P and Ni2SnP ternary phases.

  14. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution.

  15. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  16. Modulation of organic interfacial spin polarization by interfacial angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Guang-ping; Ren, Jun-feng; Wang, Chuan-kui; Hu, Gui-chao

    2017-01-01

    Based on ab initio theory, we theoretically investigated the interfacial spin polarization by adsorbing a benzene-dithiolate molecule onto a nickel surface with different interfacial angles. A variable magnitude and even an inversion of the interfacial spin polarization are observed with the increase of the interfacial angle. The orbital analysis shows that the interfacial spin polarization is codetermined by two kinds of orbital hybridization between the molecule and the ferromagnet, the pz-d hybridization and the sp3-d hybridization, which show different dependence on the angle. These results indicate a new way to manipulate the spin polarization at organic spinterface.

  17. Dielectric studies on the heterogeneity and interfacial property of composites made of polyacene quinone radical polymers and sulfonated polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Juan; Bin, Yuezhen; Xu, Chunye; Shen, Jian; Matsuo, Masaru

    2012-03-08

    Sulfonated polyurethane (PUI, matrix) is synthesized and composited with polyacene quinone radical polymers (PAQRs, filler). The polarization mechanism of these polymers and composites were investigated in terms of their frequency, temperature, and filler-concentration-dependent dielectric properties. We found that PUI/PAQR composites have a high permittivity, which is attributed to the filler-matrix interfacial polarization and the contact effect. The PAQR-concentration-dependent permittivity of different PUI/PAQR composites reveals a percolation threshold at 20-30 wt % with scaling exponents that indicate the intercluster polarization. The frequency dependence of dielectric response is well-fitted by using the Debye and Cole-Cole functions on the basis of the structural diagrams and equivalent circuit, leading to a detailed evaluation on heterogeneous structures of different PUI/PAQR composites.

  18. Infrared Spectroscopic Study on Structural Change and Interfacial Interaction in Rubber Composites Filled with Silica-Kaolin Hybrid Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Guan, J.; Hu, H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, L.

    2016-07-01

    A series of natural rubber/styrene butadiene rubber/polybutadiene rubber composites was prepared with nanometer silica and micron kaolin by a dry modification process, mechanical compounding, and mold vulcanization. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the structural changes and interfacial interactions in composites. The results showed that the "seesaw" structure was formed particularly with the incorporation of silica particles in the preparation process, which would be beneficial to the dispersibility of fillers in the rubber matrix. The kaolinite platelets were generally arranged in directional alignment. Kaolinite with smaller particle size and low-defect structure was more stable in preparation, but kaolinite with larger particle size and high defect structure tended to change the crystal structure. The composite prepared in this research exhibited excellent mechanical and thermal properties.

  19. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; ...

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  20. Photo-visualization Study Illustrating the Effects of Interfacial Properties on Multiphase Flow in Glass Bead Micromodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianci, J. A.; Hwang, S. I.; Powers, S. E.

    2001-05-01

    The mechanics of mobilization and dynamics that affect the path and fate of the DNAPL in the subsurface are not fully understood. Dynamics such as fingering may short-circuit and ultimately lead to trapped pockets of DNAPL in the subsurface. These physical flow phenomena can be changed by adjusting chemical conditions of the NAPL/water interface, wettability properties of the subsurface particles, or by the introduction of biosurfactants to the subsurface system. This research focuses on multiphase flow phenomena in glass bead micromodels as effected by surface tension and wettability changes. Two-dimensional glass bead micromodels are constructed with 0.5-mm glass beads with, water wetting and NAPL wetting capillary barriers. Images are captured on a streaming video feed and analyzed using integrated computer capture and analysis software. Under initially water-saturated conditions, transient conditions are characterized by overall model drainage dynamics, fingering dynamics, and pressure-saturation comparisons. Steady state attributes are qualified by spatial distribution of residual saturation, and quantified by size and shape analysis of the capturing pores, and blob analysis of the residual NAPL. Micro scale analysis is being performed to evaluate changes in curvature of liquid/bead interfaces. The micromodels have been performing according to our expectations. Systems with lower interfacial tensions are characterized by lower capillary entry pressures and wider fingers, which are not easily short-circuited to form residual NAPL pockets. Residual blob sizes are smaller than in the system with a higher interfacial tension. It is anticipated by understanding differences in these pore scale processes, we can produce conditions such that the fingering dynamics of the system can be altered and, ultimately, the trapped pockets of residual NAPL can be minimized.

  1. Prediction of glass durability as a function of environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1988-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of glass durability is applied to natural, ancient, and nuclear waste glasses. The durabilities of over 150 different natural and man-made glasses, including actual ancient Roman and Islamic glasses (Jalame ca. 350 AD, Nishapur 10-11th century AD and Gorgon 9-11th century AD), are compared. Glass durability is a function of the thermodynamic hydration free energy, ..delta..G/sub hyd/, which can be calculated from glass composition and solution pH. The durability of the most durable nuclear waste glasses examined was /approximately/10/sup 6/ years. The least durable waste glass formulations were comparable in durability to the most durable simulated medieval window glasses of /approximately/10/sup 3/ years. In this manner, the durability of nuclear waste glasses has been interpolated to be /approximately/10/sup 6/ years and no less than 10/sup 3/ years. Hydration thermodynamics have been shown to be applicable to the dissolution of glass in various natural environments. Groundwater-glass interactions relative to geologic disposal of nuclear waste, hydration rind dating of obsidians, andor other archeological studies can be modeled, e.g., the relative durabilities of six simulated medieval window glasses have been correctly predicted for both laboratory (one month) and burial (5 years) experiments. Effects of solution pH on glass dissolution has been determined experimentally for the 150 different glasses and can be predicted theoretically by hydration thermodynamics. The effects of solution redox on dissolution of glass matrix elements such as SI and B have shown to be minimal. The combined effects of solution pH and Eh have been described and unified by construction of thermodynamically calculated Pourbaix (pH-Eh) diagrams for glass dissolution. The Pourbaix diagrams have been quantified to describe glass dissolution as a function of environmental conditions by use of the data derived from hydration thermodynamics. 56 refs., 7 figs.

  2. A comprehensive study on the effects of temperature, surface age, added surfactant, salinity, and bulk viscosity on coalescence time, film rigidity, and interfacial tension: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A.; Lorenz, P.B.

    1988-01-01

    The interfacial behavior of a Wilmington crude oil was studied as part of our investigations of enhanced oil recovery by weakly alkaline solutions. For some systems, the spinning drop appratus can be used to measure transient interfacial tension (IFT) effects, coalescence times of oil drops, and film rigidity simultaneously, for rapid screening of chemical slug composition for the potential of improving oil recovery by the mechanisms of oil mobilization and oil bank formation. The experimental results presented include the effects of temperature, surface age, salinity, added surfactant, and polymer on coalescence time, film rigidity, and IFT behavior. Oil displacement tests were performed using surfactant-enhanced bicarbonte solutions formulated for improved mobility control and for improved oil mobilization and oil drop coalescence. The most significant result of this work was that we were able to measure the dynamics in IFT between 2 coalescing oil drops as perturbations in the equilibrium concentration of surfactant at the interface occurred during film drainage. The accuracy of the technique for measuring IFT and film rigidity improved as the contact radii between the oil drops increased. 17 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Combined surface pressure-interfacial shear rheology studies of the interaction of proteins with spread phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Simon A; Kellaway, Ian W; Taylor, Kevin M G; Warburton, Brian; Peters, Kevin

    2005-08-26

    The adsorption of two model proteins, catalase and lysozyme, to phospholipid monolayers spread at the air-water interface has been studied using a combined surface pressure-interfacial shear rheology technique. Monolayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG) and DPPC:DPPG (7:3) were spread on a phosphate buffer air-water interface at pH 7.4. Protein solutions were introduced to the subphase and the resultant changes in surface pressure and interfacial storage and loss moduli were recorded with time. The results show that catalase readily adsorbs to all the phospholipid monolayers investigated, inducing a transition from liquid-like to gel-like rheological behaviour in the process. The changes in surface rheology as a result of the adsorption of catalase increase in the order DPPC

  4. Molecular dynamics study of the interfacial thermal conductance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and van der Waals force induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Qingyuan; Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Thermal boundary resistance (TBR) plays an important role in the thermal conduction of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based materials and CNT networks (e.g., thin films, arrays, and aerogels). Although individual CNTs have extremely high thermal conductivity, interfacial resistances can dominate the overall resistance and largely influence their thermal performance. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically study the interfacial thermal conductance (ITC, the inverse of TBR) of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-substrate interfaces and MWNT-MWNT junctions, and compare the CNT-CNT junctions with graphene-graphene junctions. The results show that for CNTs with the diameter of a few nanometers, the total ITCs first decrease and then stabilize with the increase of the number of walls, mainly due to the changes of mechanical strength and adhesive energy. Increasing the CNT diameter leads to a larger total ITC and it is mainly due to a larger contact area. The area normalized ITC of CNT-CNT junctions increases and then saturates with the number of walls, and it behaves non-monotonically with the diameter. Furthermore, a trapezoidal model of multi-layer graphene-graphene junctions is used to explain the number of wall dependence of ITC. We also find that with the same adhesive energy, total ITCs of CNT-CNT junctions and graphene-graphene junctions are similar, which allows us to roughly estimate ITCs of CNT-CNT junctions without performing numerical simulations.

  5. Studies on interfacial behavior and wettability change phenomena by ionic and nonionic surfactants in presence of alkalis and salt for enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sunil; Mandal, Ajay

    2016-05-01

    Surfactant flooding is one of the most promising method of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) used after the conventional water flooding. The addition of alkali improves the performance of surfactant flooding due to synergistic effect between alkali and surfactant on reduction of interfacial tension (IFT), wettability alteration and emulsification. In the present study the interfacial tension, contact angle, emulsification and emulsion properties of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and polysorbate 80 (Tween 80) surfactants against crude oil have been investigated in presence of sodium chloride (NaCl) and alkalis viz. sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH), sodium metaborate (SMB) and diethanolamine (DEA). All three surfactants significantly reduce the IFT values, which are further reduced to ultra-low value (∼10-4 mN/m) by addition of alkalis and salt. It has been found experimentally that alkali-surfactant systems change the wettability of an intermediate-wet quartz rock to water-wet. Emulsification of crude oil by surfactant and alkali has also been investigated in terms of the phase volume and stability of emulsion. A comparative FTIR analysis of crude oil and different emulsions were performed to investigate the interactions between crude oil and displacing water in presence of surfactant and alkali.

  6. Evaluation and improvement of frost durability of clay bricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroth, Surej Raghavan

    In cold regions like Canada, frost action was reported to be the major cause of disintegration of brick veneer. Two approaches to ensure frost durability of clay bricks were studied in this research. One involved the evaluation of durability, while the other studied the improvement of durability through impregnation. In order to carry out these studies, three major objectives were set out for this research. They were: (1) to develop an index to evaluate frost durability, (2) to investigate the feasibility of using nondestructive methods to evaluate durability, and (3) to study the effect of impregnation with different materials on improving durability. It was intended in this research to develop a general durability index for clay bricks, irrespective of the manufacturing process adopted. The performance of the brick was studied using laboratory freeze-thaw test. As the time and facility requirements necessary for the unidirectional freezing test were beyond the constraints which existed in this research, an accelerated omnidirectional freeze-thaw test was used. This fact must be considered while interpreting the results from the freeze-thaw test. The study carried out to compare the performance of existing durability indices showed that they had limitations in reliably assessing durability. Therefore new durability indices were developed based on water absorption properties of bricks. These indices were found to overcome the limitations of existing indices. The feasibility study on nondestructive evaluation of durability was carried out using ultrasonic pulse velocity. New durability provisions were derived based on pulse velocity, using ASTM C216 specifications. At this stage it can be used only along with the ASTM method but it can avoid the time consuming ASTM procedure in many cases. Studies on impregnated bricks showed that there was a general shifting of pore sizes towards lower diameter region. Paraffin impregnated brick showed excellent freeze

  7. A preliminary study on the dynamic-mechanical behaviour of compression moulded polypropylene/carbon fiber composites interfacially modified by a succinic anhydride grafted atactic polypropylene from polymer wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Martínez, Jesús María; Areso, Susana; Collar, Emilia P.

    2016-05-01

    Present communication is devoted to the study of the effect of a novel interfacial agent in polypropylene/carbon fibre composites. The interfacial agent used is a succinic anhydride grafted atactic polypropylene containing both succinic bridges and side grafts (aPP-SASA) and with 5.6% (5.6.10-4g/mol) of grafting content obtained at the GIP labs. The study considers the study dynamic-mechanical behaviour with temperature at a frequency of 1 hz to ascertain the differences in the interfacial activity. The samples were compression molded in order to isolate as far as possible the effect of the solely aPP-SASA in absence of those synergetic effects due to the preferential orientation of the fibres.

  8. Durability Evaluation of Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Akihiko; Ogata, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Masahiko; Asahara, Tetsuo; Herai, Toshiki; Nishikawa, Yoichi

    2006-06-01

    It is one of the most essential things to verify the durability of devices and components of JR-Maglev system to realize the system into the future inauguration. Since the load requirements were insufficient in terms of the durability under vibrations under mere running tests carried out on Yamanashi Maglev Test Line hereinafter referred to YMTL, we have developed supplemental method with bench tests. Superconducting magnets hereinafter referred to SCM as used in the experimental running for the last seven years on the YMTL were brought to Kunitachi Technical Research Institute; we conducted tests to evaluate the durability of SCM up to a period of the service life in commercial use. The test results have indicated that no irregularity in each part of SCM proving that SCM are sufficiently durable for the practical application.

  9. Durability of Expedient Repair Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    by the Flofida Department of Transportation. I&. SUWIUET" TERMS 󈧓. NUMBER OF 1A1ES Expedient Repair Materials 21PAGE Shotcrete Air Force Base...produced by CTS Cemem Company. A dry process shotcrete standard, MicrosilR, and a State of Florida corrosion - resistant concrete system, referred to as...34 durability of the rapid repair materials tested by conventional methods for determining durability. E. CONCLUSIONS The blended Rapid-SetR shotcrete system

  10. A preliminary durability study of two types of low-profile pericardial bioprosthetic valves through the use of accelerated fatigue testing and flow characterization.

    PubMed

    Schuster, P R; Wagner, J W

    1989-02-01

    Bioprosthetic heart valves are being used more often because of certain advantages they have over artificial valves. The bioprostheses are less thrombogenic, cause a lower incidence of hemolysis, and usually fail in a slow progressive manner. A combination of flow characterization and accelerated testing was used to assess the durability of two types of pericardial valves, the Ionescu-Shiley Low Profile Mitral and the Carpentier-Edwards Low Profile Aortic valve. The flow characterization work was done in an aortic chamber designed for in vivo simulation. The function of the valve was monitored between different stages of the accelerated testing using laser Doppler anemometry. Accelerated testing was performed at 1300 cardiac cycles per minute, and physiologic conditions both in closing pressures and the ambient temperature were maintained. Results indicated a change in flow characteristics owing to cyclic loading of the leaflet tissue. The flow orifice increased over time leading to a decrease in peak velocity. Future developments in Doppler ultrasound may facilitate non-invasive assessment of these peak velocity variations. Calcification of the tissue was not considered, since this was an in vitro study.

  11. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  12. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 2, Single particle kinetic studies of sulfidation and regeneration reactions of candidate zinc ferrite sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Silaban, A.; Harrison, D.P.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  13. HEMA inhibits interfacial nano-layering of the functional monomer MDP.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Yoshihara, K; Hayakawa, S; Nagaoka, N; Okihara, T; Matsumoto, T; Minagi, S; Osaka, A; Van Landuyt, K; Van Meerbeek, B

    2012-11-01

    Previous research showed that the functional monomer 10-methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) ionically bonds to hydroxyapatite (HAp) and forms a nano-layered structure at the interface with HAp-based substrates. Such hydrophobic nano-layering is considered to contribute to the long-term durability of the bond to tooth tissue. However, dental adhesives are complex mixtures usually containing different monomers. This study investigated the effect of the monomer 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) on the chemical interaction of MDP with HAp by x-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). We examined the chemical interaction of 5 experimental MDP solutions with increasing concentrations of HEMA. XRD revealed that addition of HEMA inhibits nano-layering at the interface, while NMR confirmed that MDP remained adsorbed onto the HAp surface. QCM confirmed this adsorption of MDP to HAp, as well as revealed that the demineralization rate of HAp by MDP was reduced by HEMA. It was concluded that even though the adsorption of MDP to HAp was not hindered, addition of HEMA inhibited interfacial nano-layering. Potential consequences with regard to bond durability necessitate further research.

  14. Studies on Interfacial Phenomena in Titanium Carbide/Liquid Steel Systems for Development of Functionally Graded Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiviö, Miia; Holappa, Lauri; Louhenkilpi, Seppo; Nakamoto, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    In modern materials' applications, versatile, often contradictory requirements are set for properties like high strength, hardness, and toughness. However, e.g., in steel castings, typically only certain surfaces should be hard and wear resistant, whereas the other "bulk" might have only standard properties. Then the critical parts of the surface should be "locally reinforced" to get functionally graded material. Expensive alloying elements are saved, and manufacturing stages are minimized. Titanium carbide is an extremely hard material widely applied in carbide tools. It could be used to reinforce steel castings. When TiC particles are added to liquid steel, wettability, stability, and dissolution are key phenomena that should be understood to better design and control manufacturing processes. In this work, the interfacial phenomena and reactions between TiC and iron/steel melts were examined by wetting experiments with special emphasis on the influence of Cr, Ni, and Mo. No significant effect on wettability was observed by Ni or Mo. High Cr melts showed somewhat higher contact angles. Partial penetration of liquid metal took place in the substrate along the grain boundaries. Ni seemed to promote penetration. During longer experiments, re-precipitation of carbides occurred on the liquid droplet influencing the apparent wetting angle. Cr and Mo promoted carbide formation.

  15. Active coatings for SiC particles to reduce the degradation by liquid aluminium during processing of aluminium matrix composites: study of interfacial reactions.

    PubMed

    Ureña, A.; Rodrigo, P.; Baldonedo, J. L.; Gil, L.

    2001-02-01

    The application of a surface coating on SiC particles is studied as an alternative means of solving problems of reactivity between SiC reinforcements and molten aluminium and problems of low wetting which limit the application of casting routes for fabrication of Al-SiCp composites. The selected active barrier was a ceramic composed of SiO2, which was generated by controlled oxidation of the SiC particles. The coating behaves as an active barrier, preventing a direct reaction between molten aluminium and SiC to form Al4C3 as the main degradation product. At the same time, the SiO2 provokes other interfacial reactions, which are responsible for an improvement in wetting behaviour. Composites were prepared by mixing and compacting SiC particles with Al powders followed by melting in a vacuum furnace, and varying the residence time. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) and field emission TEM were employed as the main characterization techniques to study the interfacial reactions occurring between the barrier and the molten aluminium. These studies showed that the SiO2 coating behaves as an active barrier which reacts with the molten Al to form a glassy phase Al-Si-O. This compound underwent partial crystallization during the composite manufacture to form mullite. The formation of an outer crystalline layer, composed mainly of Al2O3, was also detected. Participation of other secondary interface reactions inside the active barrier was also identified by HREM techniques.

  16. Determination of Interfacial Adhesion Strength between Oxide Scale and Substrate for Metallic SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-01-21

    The interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of metallic interconnects in SOFC operating environments. It is necessary, therefore, to establish a methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the metallic interconnect substrate, and furthermore to design and optimize the interconnect material as well as the coating materials to meet the design life of an SOFC system. In this paper, we present an integrated experimental/analytical methodology for quantifying the interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and a ferritic stainless steel interconnect. Stair-stepping indentation tests are used in conjunction with subsequent finite element analyses to predict the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and Crofer 22 APU substrate.

  17. Quantifying the Interfacial Strength of Oxide Scale and SS 441 Substrate Used in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-08-15

    Under a typical SOFC working environment, oxide scale will grow on the metallic interconnects in oxidant environment. The growth of the oxide scale induces the growth stresses in the oxide scale and on the scale/substrate interface combined with the thermal stresses induced by thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the oxide scale and the substrate, which may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during stack cooling, even leading to serious cell performance degradation. Therefore, the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of the metallic interconnect in SOFC operating environments. As a powerful contender of ferritic interconnects used in SOFC, its interfacial strength between the oxide scale and SS 441 substrate is very important for its application. In this paper, we applied an integrated experimental/analytical methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and metallic interconnect. The predicted interfacial strength is discussed in detailed

  18. Preliminary studies on NiAl/Nb2Be17 reaction and effectiveness of BeO as an interfacial reaction barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial reaction between NiAl and Nb2Be17 (used as a reinforcement for the alloy) was studied by measuring diffusion bonding of NiAl and Nb2Be17 plates in a hot press under a vacuum of 10 exp -5 atm. It was found that, after 2 hrs of hot pressing at 1373 K, the reaction between NiAl and Nb2Be17 was extensive. A 40 to 50-micron-thick reaction zone consisted of three distinct layers at the NiAl/Nb2Be17 interface: layer A next to Nb2Be17, layer B in the middle, and layer C next to NiAl. Results of analysis of the reaction layers using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were inconclusive because of the inabiliaty of EDS to detect Be.

  19. Durability of styrene-butadiene latex modified concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Shaker, F.A.; El-Dieb, A.S.; Reda, M.M.

    1997-05-01

    The durability of reinforced concrete structures represents a major concern to many investigators. The use of latex modified concrete (LMC) in construction has urged researchers to review and investigate its different properties. This study is part of a comprehensive investigation carried on the use of polymers in concrete. The main objective of this study to investigate and evaluate the main durability aspects of Styrene-Butadiene latex modified concrete (LMC) compared to those of conventional concrete. Also, the main microstructural characteristics of LMC were studied using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The SEM investigation of the LMC showed major differences in its microstructure compared to that of the conventional concrete. The LMC proved to be superior in its durability compared to the durability of conventional concrete especially its water tightness (measured by water penetration, absorption, and sorptivity tests), abrasion, corrosion, and sulphate resistance.

  20. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  1. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  2. Interfacial interactions of pectin with bovine serum albumin studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring: effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Ruengruglikit, Chada; Wang, Yu-Wen; Huang, Qingrong

    2007-12-12

    The effect of ionic strength ( I) on the interfacial interactions between pectin and the bovine serum albumin (BSA) surface has been investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). As I increases from 0.01 to 0.02 M, the frequency shift (Delta F) decreases, whereas the energy dissipation shift (Delta D) changes toward a higher value. Further increase of I from 0.02 to 0.5 M causes both Delta F and Delta D to gradually return to almost zero. The adsorbed mass and thickness of the pectin adlayer estimated from the Voigt model confirm that the adsorption of pectin and the formation of thicker pectin adlayers on a BSA surface are favored by the increase of ionic strength at I = 0.01 approximately 0.02 M. An increase of I above 0.02 M hinders pectin adsorption and causes the formation of a thinner pectin adlayer. The ionic strength-enhanced effect at I values lower than 0.02 M is explained as an increase of ionic strength that can screen the electrostatic repulsion to a larger extent than the electrostatic attraction between pectin and BSA. However, when I is higher than 0.02 M, both electrostatic repulsion and attraction can be significantly screened by the increasing ionic strength, resulting in the ionic strength-reduced effect. On the other hand, the high viscoelasticity of the pectin adlayer revealed by the Voigt model suggests the formation of a network-structured pectin adlayer on the BSA surface, which contains two steps for higher pectin adsorptions at I = 0.0125 approximately 0.1 M by the indication of two slopes in Delta D-Delta F plots.

  3. Significance of durability of mineral fibers for their toxicity and carcinogenic potency in the abdominal cavity of rats in comparison with the low sensitivity of inhalation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Pott, F; Roller, M; Kamino, K; Bellmann, B

    1994-01-01

    At the same time that carcinogenicity of very thin glass fibers after intrapleural and intraperitoneal (ip) administration was demonstrated (1,2) researchers found that gypsum fibers and HCI-leached chrysotile fibers were easily soluble in the peritoneal cavity. This led to the conclusion that the chemical composition of fibers was not responsible for the carcinogenesis but that the degree of carcinogenic potency of a fiber depended on the extent to which it retained its fibrous structure. A thin glass fiber with a low biodurability did not induce tumors after ip injection of a high dose, although the ip test had been criticized for being "overly sensitive." The ip model has been the most successful for determining carcinogenicity of inorganic fibers and establishing dose-response relationships; but to determine the possibilities and limitations of this test model, very high doses of nonfibrous silicon carbide and of a slightly durable glass fiber type were injected ip in Wistar rats. No obviously acute or chronic toxic effect was observed in 90 weeks, but there was a 40% incidence of serosal tumors in the group treated with glass fibers. A pilot study on the persistence of slag fibers in the omentum of rats after ip injection showed a half-time of about 1 year. It was calculated that an ip injection of 10(9) fibers would lead to a concentration of fiber numbers in the ash of the omentum in the same range as the concentration in the lung after 2 years of inhalation exposure. The long-term inhalation study with fibers in rats has been called the "gold standard" for risk characterization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7882919

  4. Holmium:YAG laser and guidewires; is there a durability difference among guidewires against laser energy? An in-vitro experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bagbanci, Sahin

    2017-03-07

    Purpose To evaluate the durability differences between five different type of guidewire against laser energy in an in-vitro experimental ureteral model. Methods The study was performed at the Department of Urology, Medicine Faculty of Ahi Evran University. An in-vitro experimental ureteral model was created for the work; a silicon ureteral model in a saline filled container. Experiments were performed on five different type of guidewire; ZIPwire, Sensor PTFE Nitinol guidewire, Roadrunner® PC wire guide, Amplatz Super Stiff and Zebra Urologic Guidewire. These guidewires were grouped from one to five, respectively. Laser fibers were contacted to the guidewire, and laser energy was fired to the pre-marked tip and body parts in different adjustments. Results The breakage of the guidewires was detected only on the flexible tip parts in group1.a, group1.b, group2.a, group 2.b, group4.a, and group4.b. The body parts of the guidewires were resistant against laser energy in all groups and did not break. The breakage of the guidewires occurred after 3-joule x 10 hertz (30 Watt) experiment. Group-1a and 1b were different from group-2a,2b,4a, and 4b according to Kruskal-Wallis H test. Conclusions The body parts of the guidewires in all study groups were resistant against laser energy. The tip parts of ZipwireTM, SensorTM PTFE Nitinol, and Amplatz Super StiffTM guidewire should be kept away from the surgical field when the high power settings of the laser are being used. The body parts of the guidewires can be utilized in the surgical field safely.

  5. Study of the durability of the Ru-capped MoSi multilayer surface under megasonic cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtuldu, Hüseyin; Rastegar, Abbas; House, Matthew

    2012-11-01

    Because EUV masks lack of a pellicle, they are prone to particle contamination and must be cleaned frequently. Despite the relatively good resistance of the TaN absorber lines to pattern damage by megasonic cleaning, the Ru cap can be easily damaged by it. We demonstrate that the type and concentration of the dissolved gas are critical factors in determining the cavitation that eventually introduces pits on the surface of Ru-capped multilayer films. In particular, oxygen creates many more pits than CO2 under similar conditions. In this paper, we present the results of SEMATECH's extensive experimental studies of pit creation on Ru-capped multilayer EUV blanks by megasonics as a function of acoustic field power, gas type and concentration in ultra-pure water, and chemicals during sonication.

  6. Mephisto: Interfacial Destabilization in Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favier, J. J.; Malmejac, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The destabilizing mechanisms at a solidification interface were studied to obtain information on the kinetics and morphologies in the transient and steady state, and to separate the influences of liquid phase instabilities from interfacial instabilities. A differential seebeck voltage measurements technique was developed to provide a continuous record of the solid-liquid interface temperature as the solidification rate is varied to determine the kinetic coefficients. Signal processing and noise suppression techniques allow nonovolt precision which corresponds to mK accuracy for the interfacial temperature.

  7. Durability of Bricks Coated with Red mud Based Geopolymer Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Smita; Basavanagowda, S. N.; Aswath, M. U.; Ranganath, R. V.

    2016-09-01

    The present study is undertaken to assess the durability of concrete blocks coated with red mud - fly ash based geopolymer paste. Concrete blocks of size 200 x 200 x 100mm were coated with geopolymer paste synthesized by varying the percentages of red mud and fly ash. Uncoated concrete blocks were also tested for the durability for comparison. In thermal resistance test, the blocks were subjected to 600°C for an hour whereas in acid resistance test, they were kept in 5% sulphuric acid solution for 4 weeks. The specimens were thereafter studied for surface degradation, strength loss and weight loss. Pastes with red mud percentage greater than 50% developed lot of shrinkage cracks. The blocks coated with 30% and 50% red mud paste showed better durability than the other blocks. The use of blocks coated with red mud - fly ash geopolymer paste improves the aesthetics, eliminates the use of plaster and improves the durability of the structure.

  8. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  9. Impact of Different Screw Designs on Durability of Fracture Fixation: In Vitro Study with Cyclic Loading of Scaphoid Bones

    PubMed Central

    Gruszka, Dominik; Herr, Robert; Hely, Hans; Hofmann, Peer; Klitscher, Daniela; Hofmann, Alexander; Rommens, Pol Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of new headless compression screws (HCSs) for scaphoid fixation is growing, but the nonunion rate has remained constant. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of fixation resulting from four modern HCSs using a simulated fracture model to determine the optimal screw design(s). Methods We tested 40 fresh-frozen cadaver scaphoids treated with the Acumed Acutrak 2 mini (AA), the KLS Martin HBS2 midi (MH), the Stryker TwinFix (ST) and the Synthes HCS 3.0 with a long thread (SH). The bones with simulated fractures and implanted screws were loaded uniaxially into flexion for 2000 cycles with a constant bending moment of 800 Nmm. The angulation of the fracture fragments was measured continuously. Data were assessed statistically using the univariate ANOVA test and linear regression analysis, and the significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results The median angulation of bone fragments φ allowed by each screw was 0.89° for AA, 1.12° for ST, 1.44° for SH and 2.36° for MH. With regards to linear regression, the most reliable curve was achieved by MH, with a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.827. This was followed by AA (R2 = 0.354), SH (R2 = 0.247) and ST (R2 = 0.019). Data assessed using an adapted ANOVA model showed no statistically significant difference (p = 0.291) between the screws. Conclusions The continuous development of HCSs has resulted in very comparable implants, and thus, at this time, other factors, such as surgeons’ experience, ease of handling and price, should be taken into consideration. PMID:26741807

  10. Effectiveness, durability, and safety of darunavir/ritonavir in HIV-1-infected patients in routine clinical practice in Italy: a postauthorization noninterventional study

    PubMed Central

    Antinori, Andrea; Meraviglia, Paola; Monforte, Antonella d’Arminio; Castagna, Antonella; Mussini, Cristina; Bini, Teresa; Gianotti, Nicola; Rusconi, Stefano; Colella, Elisa; Airoldi, Giuseppe; Mancusi, Daniela; Termini, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Current antiretroviral (ARV) therapy for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients provides long-term control of viral load (VL). Darunavir (DRV) is a nonpeptidomimetic protease inhibitor approved for use with a ritonavir booster (DRV/r). This study evaluated the effectiveness of DRV/r in combination with other ARV agents in routine clinical practice in Italy. In this descriptive observational study, data on utilization of DRV/r, under the conditions described in the marketing authorization, were collected from June 2009 to December 2012. Effectiveness (VL <50 copies/mL), tolerability, and durability in four patient groups (two DRV/r-experienced, one ARV-experienced DRV/r-naïve, and one ARV-naïve) were analyzed. Secondary objectives included immunological response, safety, and persistence/discontinuation rates. In total, 875 of 883 enrolled patients were included in the analysis: of these, 662 (75.7%) completed the follow-up until the end of 2012 and 213 (24.3%) withdrew from the study earlier. Initial DRV dose was 600 mg twice daily (67.1%) or 800 mg once daily (32.9%). Only 16 patients (1.8%) withdrew from the study due to virological failure. Virological response proportions were higher in patients virologically suppressed at study entry versus patients with baseline VL ≥50 copies/mL in each ARV-experienced group, while there was no consistent difference across study groups and baseline VL strata according to baseline CD4+ cell count. CD4+ cell count increased from study entry to last study visit in all the four groups. DRV/r was well tolerated, with few discontinuations due to study-emergent nonfatal adverse events (3.0% overall, including 2.1% drug-related) or deaths (3.0% overall, all non-drug-related); 35.3% of patients reported ≥1 adverse events. These observational data show that DRV/r was effective and well tolerated in the whole patient population described here. The DRV/r-containing regimen provided viral suppression

  11. Durable coatings for IR windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Jha, Santosh K.; Gunda, Nilesh; Cooke, Rick; Agarwal, Neeta; Sastri, Suri A.; Harker, Alan; Kirsch, Jim

    2005-05-01

    Durable coatings of silicon-carbon-oxy-nitride (a.k.a. SiCON) are being developed to protect high-speed missile windows from the environmental loads during flight. Originally developed at Rockwell Scientific Corporation (RSC) these coatings exhibited substantial promise, but were difficult to deposit. Under a DoD DARPA SBIR Phase I program, Surmet Corporation, working closely with RSC, is depositing these coatings using an innovative vacuum vapor deposition process. High rate of coating deposition and the ease of manipulating the process variables, make Surmet"s process suitable for the deposition of substantially thick films (up to 30 μm) with precisely controlled chemistry. Initial work has shown encouraging results, and the refinement of the coating and coating process is still underway. Coupons of SiN and SiCON coatings with varying thickness on a variety of substrates such as Si-wafer, ZnS and ALON were fabricated and used for the study. This paper will present and discuss the results of SiN and SiCON coatings deposition and characterization (physical, mechanical and optical properties) as a basis for evaluating their suitability for high speed missile windows application.

  12. Durable silver coating for mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Thomas, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A durable multilayer mirror includes reflective layers of aluminum and silver and has high reflectance over a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to visible to infrared. An adhesion layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride is deposited on an aluminum surface, and a thin layer of silver is then deposited on the adhesion layer. The silver layer is protected by a passivation layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride and by one or more durability layers made of metal oxides and typically a first layer of metal nitride. The durability layers may include a composite silicon aluminum nitride and an oxinitride transition layer to improve bonding between nitride and oxide layers.

  13. Metal speciation in a complexing soft film layer: a theoretical dielectric relaxation study of coupled chemodynamic and electrodynamic interfacial processes.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Jenny; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2012-04-07

    We report a comprehensive formalism for the dynamics of metal speciation across an interphase formed between a complexing soft film layer and an electrolyte solution containing indifferent ions and metal ions that form complexes with charged molecular ligands distributed throughout the film. The analysis integrates the intricate interplay between metal complexation kinetics and diffusive metal transfer from/toward the ligand film, together with the kinetics of metal electrostatic partitioning across the film/solution interphase. This partitioning is determined by the settling dynamics of the interfacial electric double layer (EDL), as governed by time-dependent conduction-diffusion transports of both indifferent and reactive metal ions. The coupling between such chemodynamic and electrodynamic processes is evaluated via derivation of the dielectric permittivity increment for the ligand film/electrolyte interphase that is perturbed upon application of an ac electric field (pulsation ω) between electrodes supporting the films. The dielectric response is obtained from the ω-dependent distributions of all ions across the ligand film, as ruled by coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations amended for a chemical source term involving the intra-film complex formation and dissociation pulsations (ω(a) and ω(d) respectively). Dielectric spectra are discussed for bare and film coated-electrodes over a wide range of field pulsations and Deborah numbers De = ω(a,d)/ω(diff), where ω(diff) is the electric double layer relaxation pulsation. The frequency-dependent dynamic or inert character of the formed metal complexes is then addressed over a time window that ranges from transient to fully relaxed EDL. The shape and magnitude of the dielectric spectra are further shown to reflect the lability of dynamic complexes, i.e. whether the overall speciation process at a given pulsation ω is primarily rate-limited either by complexation kinetics or by ion-transport dynamics. The

  14. Durability Assessment of Gamma Tial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Pereira, J. Michael; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Arya, Vinod K.; Zhuang, Wyman

    2004-01-01

    Gamma TiAl was evaluated as a candidate alloy for low-pressure turbine blades in aeroengines. The durability of g-TiAl was studied by examining the effects of impact or fretting on its fatigue strength. Cast-to-size Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb was studied in impact testing with different size projectiles at various impact energies as the reference alloy and subsequently fatigue tested. Impacting degraded the residual fatigue life. However, under the ballistic impact conditions studied, it was concluded that the impacts expected in an aeroengine would not result in catastrophic damage, nor would the damage be severe enough to result in a fatigue failure under the anticipated design loads. In addition, other gamma alloys were investigated including another cast-to-size alloy, several cast and machined specimens, and a forged alloy. Within this Ti-48-2-2 family of alloys aluminum content was also varied. The cracking patterns as a result of impacting were documented and correlated with impact variables. The cracking type and severity was reasonably predicted using finite element models. Mean stress affects were also studied on impact-damaged fatigue samples. The fatigue strength was accurately predicted based on the flaw size using a threshold-based, fracture mechanics approach. To study the effects of wear due to potential applications in a blade-disk dovetail arrangement, the machined Ti-47-2-2 alloy was fretted against In-718 using pin-on-disk experiments. Wear mechanisms were documented and compared to those of Ti-6Al-4V. A few fatigue samples were also fretted and subsequently fatigue tested. It was found that under the conditions studied, the fretting was not severe enough to affect the fatigue strength of g-TiAl.

  15. Interfacial potential approach for Ag/ZnO (0001) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Quan; Shen, Jiang; Qian, Ping; Chen, Nan-Xian

    2014-12-01

    Systematic approaches are presented to extract the interfacial potentials from the ab initio adhesive energy of the interface system by using the Chen—Möbius inversion method. We focus on the interface structure of the metal (111)/ZnO (0001) in this work. The interfacial potentials of Ag—Zn and Ag—O are obtained. These potentials can be used to solve some problems about Ag/ZnO interfacial structure. Three metastable interfacial structures are investigated in order to check these potentials. Using the interfacial potentials we study the procedure of interface fracture in the Ag/ZnO (0001) interface and discuss the change of the energy, stress, and atomic structures in tensile process. The result indicates that the exact misfit dislocation reduces the total energy and softens the fracture process. Meanwhile, the formation and mobility of the vacancy near the interface are observed.

  16. Effect of interfacial Maxwell stress on time periodic electro-osmotic flow in a thin liquid film with a flat interface.

    PubMed

    Mayur, Manik; Amiroudine, Sakir; Lasseux, Didier; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    Electro-osmotic flows (EOF) have seen remarkable applications in lab-on-a-chip based microdevices owing to their lack of moving components, durability, and nondispersive nature of the flow profiles under specifically designed conditions. However, such flows may typically suffer from classical Faradaic artifacts like electrolysis of the solvent, which affects the flow rate control. Such a problem has been seen to be overcome by employing time periodic EOFs. Electric field induced transport of a conductive liquid is another nontrivial problem that requires careful study of interfacial dynamics in response to such an oscillatory flow actuation. The present study highlights the role of electric field generated Maxwell stress and free surface potential along with the electric double layer thickness and forcing frequency, toward influencing the interfacial transport and fluid flow in free-surface electro-osmosis under a periodically varying external electric field, in a semi-analytical formalism. Our results reveal interesting regimes over which the pertinent interfacial phenomena as well as bulk transport characteristics may be favorably tuned by employing time varying electrical fields.

  17. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a substrate for culture of PC12 cells: an interfacial model for functional studies in neurons.

    PubMed

    Medina Benavente, Johan Jaime; Mogami, Hideo; Sakurai, Takashi; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nitride is a biocompatible material that is currently used as an interfacial surface between cells and large-scale integration devices incorporating ion-sensitive field-effect transistor technology. Here, we investigated whether a poly-L-lysine coated silicon nitride surface is suitable for the culture of PC12 cells, which are widely used as a model for neural differentiation, and we characterized their interaction based on cell behavior when seeded on the tested material. The coated surface was first examined in terms of wettability and topography using contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy and then, conditioned silicon nitride surface was used as the substrate for the study of PC12 cell culture properties. We found that coating silicon nitride with poly-L-lysine increased surface hydrophilicity and that exposing this coated surface to an extracellular aqueous environment gradually decreased its roughness. When PC12 cells were cultured on a coated silicon nitride surface, adhesion and spreading were facilitated, and the cells showed enhanced morphological differentiation compared to those cultured on a plastic culture dish. A bromodeoxyuridine assay demonstrated that, on the coated silicon nitride surface, higher proportions of cells left the cell cycle, remained in a quiescent state and had longer survival times. Therefore, our study of the interaction of the silicon nitride surface with PC12 cells provides important information for the production of devices that need to have optimal cell culture-supporting properties in order to be used in the study of neuronal functions.

  18. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  19. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  20. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  1. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  2. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  3. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  4. Development of an efficient and durable photocatalytic system for hydride reduction of an NAD(P)+ model compound using a ruthenium(II) complex based on mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yasuo; Koga, Kichitaro; Kobayashi, Atsuo; Konno, Hideo; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Morimoto, Tatsuki; Ishitani, Osamu

    2010-08-04

    The mechanism of photocatalytic reduction of 1-benzylnicotinamidium cation (BNA(+)) to the 1,4-dihydro form (1,4-BNAH) using [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(L)](2+) (Ru-L(2+), where tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and L = pyridine and MeCN) as a photocatalyst and NEt(3) as a reductant has been clarified. On the basis of this mechanistic study, an efficient and durable photocatalytic system for selective hydride reduction of an NAD(P)(+) model compound has been developed. The photocatalytic reaction is initiated by the formation of [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(NEt(3))](2+) (Ru-NEt(3)(2+)) via the photochemical ligand substitution of Ru-L(2+). For this reason, the production rate of 1,4-BNAH using [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(MeCN)](2+) (Ru-MeCN(2+)) as a photocatalyst, from which the quantum yield of photoelimination of the MeCN ligand is greater than that of the pyridine ligand from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(pyridine)](2+) (Ru-py(2+)), was faster than that using Ru-py(2+), especially in the first stage of the photocatalytic reduction. The photoexcitation of Ru-NEt(3)(2+) yields [Ru(tpy)(bpy)H](+) (Ru-H(+)), which reacts with BNA(+) to give 1:1 adduct [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(1,4-BNAH)](2+) (Ru-BNAH(2+)). In the presence of excess NEt(3) in the reaction solution, a deprotonation of the carbamoyl group in Ru-BNAH(2+) proceeds rapidly, mainly forming [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(1,4-BNAH-H(+))](+) (Ru-(BNAH-H(+))(+)). Although photocleavage of the adduct yields 1,4-BNAH and the cycle is completed by the re-coordination of a NEt(3) molecule to the Ru(II) center, this process competes with hydride abstraction from Ru-(BNAH-H(+))(+) by BNA(+) giving 1,4-BNAH and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(BNA(+)-H(+))](2+). This adduct was observed as the major complex in the reaction solution after the photocatalysis was depressed and is a dead-end product because of its stability. Based on the information about the reaction mechanism and the deactivation process, we have successfully developed a new photocatalytic system using Ru-MeCN(2+) with 2 M of NEt(3) as

  5. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, A. E.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  6. Durability of polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liu

    The purpose of this research is to examine structural durability of advanced composite materials under critical loading conditions, e.g., combined thermal and mechanical loading and shear fatigue loading. A thermal buckling model of a burnt column, either axially restrained or under an axial applied force was developed. It was predicted that for a column exposed to the high heat flux under simultaneous constant compressive load, the response of the column is the same as that of an imperfection column; the instability of the burnt column happens. Based on the simplified theoretical prediction, the post-fire compressive behavior of fiberglass reinforced vinyl-ester composite columns, which have been exposed to high heat flux for a certain time was investigated experimentally, the post-fire compressive strength, modulus and failure mode were determined. The integrity of the same column under constant compressive mechanical loading combined with heat flux exposure was examined using a specially designed mechanical loading fixture that mounted directly below a cone calorimeter. All specimens in the experiments exhibited compressive instability. The experimental results show a thermal bending moment exists and has a significant influence on the structural behavior, which verified the thermal buckling model. The trend of response between the deflection of the column and exposure time is similar to that predicted by the model. A new apparatus was developed to study the monotonic shear and cyclic-shear behavior of sandwich structures. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed using PVC foam core polymeric sandwich materials. Shear failure occurred by the extension of cracks parallel to the face-sheet/core interface, the shear modulus degraded with the growth of fatigue damage. Finite element analysis was conducted to determine stress distribution in the proposed specimen geometry used in the new technique. Details for a novel apparatus used for the fatigue testing of thin

  7. The role of electron interfacial transfer in mesoporous nano-TiO2 photocatalysis: a combined study of in situ photoconductivity and numerical kinetic simulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoshun; Yang, Jingjing; Zhao, Xiujian; Yu, Jiaguo

    2017-03-29

    In this research, a combination of in situ photoconductivity (σ) and kinetic simulations was used to study the role of electron interfacial transfer (IT) in the gaseous photocatalysis of formic acid by mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2. The effects of light intensity, initial formic acid concentrations, oxygen amounts, and temperature on the in situ σ and the photocatalytic courses were studied in detail. The temperature dependence of in situ σ clearly shows that the electron transfer is determined by the IT of electrons to O2 rather than by the transport. It was seen that the electron IT limits the photocatalysis by correlating with the recombination and the hole IT via the dynamic change in electron densities. The numerical simulation of in situ σ shows that the IT of electrons belongs to a thermally activated process that presents a thermal barrier of 0.5 eV. It is considered that this high thermal barrier limits the IT of electrons. It was also seen that the thermal activation of photocatalysis does not relate to that of the electron IT, although the overall photocatalysis is limited by the IT of electrons. Our finding shows that it is an effective way to increase the photocatalytic activity by reducing the thermal barrier of electron IT.

  8. Environmental durability of electroplated black chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the durability of nickel-black chromium plated aluminum in an outdoor rural industrial, and seacoast environment. Test panels were exposed to these environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. The results of this study showed that no significant optical degradation occurred from exposure to either of these environments, although a considerable amount of corrosion occurred on the panels exposed to the seacoast environment. The rural and industrial atmosphere produced only a slight amount of corrosion on test panels.

  9. Study of interfacial charge-transfer complex on TiO{sub 2} particles in aqueous suspension by second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Dadap, J.I.; Zimdars, D.; Eisenthal, K.B.

    1999-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is a wide band-gap semiconductor having two common crystal forms: rutile and anatase. Due to its high physical and chemical stability, it is extensively studied as a photocatalyst for photolysis of water, and for oxidative photomineralization of organic pollutants in wastewater, aimed at harvesting solar energy. The authors report the first direct observation of an interfacial charge-transfer complex using second-harmonic spectroscopy. The second-harmonic spectrum of catechol adsorbed on 0.4 micron-sized TiO{sub 2} (anatase) colloidal particles in aqueous suspension reveals a charge-transfer band centered at 2.72 eV (456 nm). In addition, the adsorption isotherm of catechol on the colloidal TiO{sub 2} suspension was obtained and gave an excellent fit to the Langmuir adsorption model. From this, the authors infer the free energy of the adsorption to be {Delta}G{degree} = {minus}6.8 kcal/mol.

  10. Interfacial Shear Strength of Oxide Scale and SS 441 Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments on decreasing the operating temperature for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) have enabled the use of high temperature ferritic alloys as interconnect materials. Oxide scale will inevitably grow on the ferritic interconnects in a high temperature oxidation environment of SOFCs. The growth of the oxide scale induces growth stresses in the scale layer and on the scale/substrate interface. These growth stresses combined with the thermal stresses induced upon stacking cooling by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the oxide scale and the substrate may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation, which may lead to serious cell performance degradation. Hence the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of the metallic interconnect in SOFC operating environments. In this paper, we applied an integrated experimental/modeling methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the SS 441 metallic interconnect. The predicted interfacial strength is discussed in details.

  11. Control of Metal/graphite Interfacial Energy Through the Interfacial Segregation of Alloying Additions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Utpal

    Equilibrium segregation of Ni to the interface of a solid Pb/graphite and Au/graphite was studied using a solid state wetting approach and the crater edge profiling technique on a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM). All experiments were performed under ultra high vacuum (UHV) to reduce the effects due to surface adsorption of impurities. For the Pb/graphite system, increasing amounts of Ni ranging from 0 to 0.2wt% Ni added to Pb were found to systematically lower the contact angle for samples equilibrated at 285 ^circC. No significant surface segregation of Ni was observed at the Pb surface. The reduction of the contact angle was therefore attributed entirely to the lowering of the interfacial energy by interfacial adsorption of Ni. The interfacial energy and interfacial Ni concentration were obtained as a function of bulk Ni content. The presence of excess Ni at the interface was also determined using the crater edge profiling technique on the SAM for various bulk concentrations of Ni in Pb. The temperature dependence of the segregation process was also studied using the solid state wetting approach. The contact angle of Pb(Ni)/graphite was found to vary as a function of temperature for a given Ni content. No temperature dependence was observed in the case of pure Pb/graphite. The change in interfacial energy and the interfacial Ni concentration were obtained as a function of temperature from thermodynamic considerations, and from that the enthalpy and the entropy of interfacial segregation were determined. For the Au/graphite system at 850^circC, addition of 15at%Ni to Au caused a reduction of contact angle by 7.8^circ with accompanying reduction in interfacial energy. Ni was found to segregate to both the free Au surface as well as to the Au/graphite interface. In addition C was also found to segregate to the Au surface thus lowering the surface energy. The modified surface energy was considered in the determination of the interfacial energy and interfacial Ni

  12. Durable antistatic coating for polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadek, V.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A durable antistatic coating is achieved on polymethylmethacrylate plastic without affecting its optical clarity by applying to the surface of the plastic a low molecular weight solvent having a high electron affinity and a high dipole moment, such as acentonitrile or nitromethane alone or in the presence of photopolymerizable monomer. The treated polymethylmethacrylate plastic dissipates most of the induced electrostatic charge and retains its optical clarity. The antistatic behavior persists after washing, rubbing and vacuum treatment.

  13. Medicare and durable medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Medicare coverage of wheelchairs, hospital beds and other durable medical equipment (DME) is a major source of confusion for people with Medicare, their families and the professionals who work with them. Yet, consumer publications rarely touch on it. In this brief we offer an overview of DME coverage issues and payment policies, including potential costs for consumers and their rights to appeal denials of payment.

  14. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  15. Interfacial micromechanics in fibrous composites: design, evaluation, and models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given.

  16. Final Project Report for "Interfacial Thermal Resistance of Carbon Nanotubes”

    SciTech Connect

    Cumings, John

    2016-04-15

    This report describes an ongoing project to comprehensively study the interfacial thermal boundary resistance (Kapitza resistance) of carbon nanotubes. It includes a list of publications, personnel supported, the overall approach, accomplishments and future plans.

  17. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  18. Computation of Anisotropic Bi-Material Interfacial Fracture Parameters and Delamination Creteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, W-T.; Wang, L.; Atluri, S. N.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the recent developments in methodologies for the evaluation of the integrity and durability of composite structures, including i) the establishment of a stress-intensity-factor based fracture criterion for bimaterial interfacial cracks in anisotropic materials (see Sec. 2); ii) the development of a virtual crack closure integral method for the evaluation of the mixed-mode stress intensity factors for a bimaterial interfacial crack (see Sec. 3). Analytical and numerical results show that the proposed fracture criterion is a better fracture criterion than the total energy release rate criterion in the characterization of the bimaterial interfacial cracks. The proposed virtual crack closure integral method is an efficient and accurate numerical method for the evaluation of mixed-mode stress intensity factors.

  19. Adhesion Characteristics on Anodized Titanium and its Durability Under Aggressive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sabbir; Chakrabarty, Debabrata; Mukherjee, Subroto; Bhowmik, Shantanu

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, an attempt has been made to improve the interfacial adhesion characteristics of titanium (Ti) surface at elevated temperature and in aqueous salt solution. In order to ensure the presence of titanium oxide coating on the surface of titanium, anodization on titanium was carried out by sodium hydroxide. This oxide coating etches the surfaces of titanium. These etching surfaces of titanium increase the surface energy and surface roughness of the titanium. Physicochemical characteristics of surface modified titanium were carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study and the results reveal that there is a significant increase in oxygen functionalities due to anodization. The oxide etching on the surface of anodized titanium is further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study. The contact angle and surface energy are measured by the use of two liquids namely water and glycerol. It is observed that the formation of oxide not only improves the surface energy of titanium but also protects the surface of titanium when exposed to aggressive environments. The lap-shear tensile strengths of two anodized titanium surfaces were fabricated by adhesive. There has been significant improvement in the adhesive bond strength, and subsequently in the durability of adhesive bonded joint, of titanium when exposed to aggressive environments.

  20. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume II. Chapters 6-10)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  1. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  2. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  3. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  4. Evolution of CH3NO2/Si interfacial chemistry under reaction conditions: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Wang, Chen-Guang; Ji, Wei; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2017-02-15

    Dissociative adsorption of CH3NO2 onto a Si(100)-2 × 1 surface is studied using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The unprecedented scission of the C-N bond in CH3NO2 and the formation of a Si-CH3 surface species are observed at elevated CH3NO2 pressure (0.5 mbar) and temperature (>573 K).

  5. Fast test for the durability of PEM fuel cell catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Kou, Rong; Wang, Jun; Kwak, Ja Hun; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-10-12

    ETek Pt/C catalyst was used as standard materials to develop a new test protocol for fast screening durable catalyst for PEM fuel cells. Potential step (Pstep) method with the upper potential of 1.4V and the potential-static (Pstat) holding at 1.4 V or 1.2V are used to degrade the catalyst. The degradation in the electrochemical surface area (ESA) for Pt/C under Pstep conditions is greatly accelerated as compared with other conditions. The durability of Pt/Vulcan and Pt/CNT were studied using the new protocol with the electrochemical stressing of Pstep(1.4V/0.6V), which provided the same results as those tested using conventional protocols: Pt/CNT is more durable than Pt/Vulcan. This confirms that the new protocol works well in screening catalyst in terms of durability. The new protocol can differentiate the durability of electrocatalysts by shortening the test time to several hours. It is reliable and time-efficient.

  6. Relative sliding durability of candidate high temperature fiber seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    The relative sliding durability behavior of six candidate ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is reviewed and compared. Pin on disk tests were used to evaluate potential seal materials by sliding a tow or bundle of the candidate ceramic fiber against a superalloy test disk. Tests were conducted in air under a 2.65 N load, at a sliding velocity of 0.025 m/sec and at temperatures from 25 to 900 C. Friction was measured during the tests and fiber wear, indicated by the extent of fibers broken in the tow or bundle, was measured at the end of each test. For most of the fibers, friction and wear increase with test temperature. The relative fiber durability ranking correlates with tensile strength, indicating that tensile data, which is more readily available than sliding durability data, may be useful in predicting fiber wear behavior under various conditions. A dimensional analysis of the wear data shows that the fiber durability is related to a dimensionless durability ratio which represents the ratio of the fiber strength to the fiber stresses imposed by sliding. The analysis is applicable to fibers with similar diameters and elastic moduli. Based upon the results of the research program, three fiber candidates are recommended for further study as potential seal materials. They are a silicon based complex carbide-oxide fiber, an alumina-boria-silica and an aluminosilicate fiber.

  7. Bases for extrapolating materials durability in fuel storage pools

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    A major body of evidence indicates that zirconium alloys have the most consistent and reliable durability in wet storage, justifying projections of safe wet storage greater than 50 y. Aluminum alloys have the widest range of durabilities in wet storage; systematic control and monitoring of water chemistry have resulted in low corrosion rates for more than two decades on some fuels and components. However, cladding failures have occurred in a few months when important parameters were not controlled. Stainless steel is extremely durable when stress, metallurgical and water chemistry factors are controlled. LWR SS cladding has survived for 25 y in wet storage. However, sensitized, stressed SS fuels and components have seriously degraded in fuel storage pools (FSPs) at {approximately} 30 C. Satisfactory durability of fuel assembly and FSP component materials in extended wet storage requires investments in water quality management and surveillance, including chemical and biological factors. The key aspect of the study is to provide storage facility operators and other decision makers a basis to judge the durability of a given fuel type in wet storage as a prelude to basing other fuel management plans (e.g. dry storage) if wet storage will not be satisfactory through the expected period of interim storage.

  8. Evaluation of models of waste glass durability

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, A.

    1995-08-01

    The main variable under the control of the waste glass producer is the composition of the glass; thus a need exists to establish functional relationships between the composition of a waste glass and measures of processability, product consistency, and durability. Many years of research show that the structure and properties of a glass depend on its composition, so it seems reasonable to assume that there also is relationship between the composition of a waste glass and its resistance to attack by an aqueous solution. Several models have been developed to describe this dependence, and an evaluation their predictive capabilities is the subject of this paper. The objective is to determine whether any of these models describe the ``correct`` functional relationship between composition and corrosion rate. A more thorough treatment of the relationships between glass composition and durability has been presented elsewhere, and the reader is encouraged to consult it for a more detailed discussion. The models examined in this study are the free energy of hydration model, developed at the Savannah River Laboratory, the structural bond strength model, developed at the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America, and the Composition Variation Study, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  9. Simulation study of the effect of molar mass dispersity on domain interfacial roughness in lamellae forming block copolymers for directed self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andrew J.; Lawson, Richard A.; Nation, Benjamin D.; Ludovice, Peter J.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2015-09-01

    A coarse-grained molecular dynamics model was used to study the thin film self-assembly and resulting pattern properties of block copolymer (BCP) systems with various molar mass dispersities. Diblock copolymers (i.e. A-b-B type) were simulated in an aligned lamellar state, which is one of the most common patterns of potential use for integrated circuit fabrication via directed self-assembly of BCPs. Effects of the molar mass dispersity (Ð) on feature pitch and interfacial roughness, which are critical lithographic parameters that have a direct impact on integrated circuit performance, were simulated. It was found that for a realistic distribution of polymer molecular weights, modeled by a Wesslau distribution, both line edge roughness (LER) and line width roughness (LWR) increase approximately linearly with increasing Ð, up to ˜45% of the monodisperse value at Ð = 1.5. Mechanisms of compensation for increased A-A and B-B roughness were considered. It was found that long and short chain positions were not correlated, and that long chains were significantly deformed in shape. The increase in LWR was due to the increase in LER and a constant correlation between the line edges. Unaligned systems show a correlation between domain width and local molecular weight, while systems aligned on an alternating pattern of A and B lines did not show any correlation. When the volume fraction of individual chains was allowed to vary, similar results were found when considering the Ð of the block as opposed to the Ð of the entire system.

  10. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  11. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Junwei

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  12. Systematic study of interfacial reactions induced by metal electrodes in high-k/InGaAs gate stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Lin, D.; Vais, A.; Alian, A.; Franco, J.; El Kazzi, S.; Mols, Y.; Miyanami, Y.; Nakazawa, M.; Collaert, N.; Watanabe, H.; Thean, A.

    2016-10-01

    We systematically studied the effects of metal electrodes on high-k/InGaAs gate stacks and observed that the remote reactions—both oxidation and reduction—at the interface between the high-k dielectrics and InGaAs were thermodynamically initiated by the metal electrodes. Metal electrodes with negative Gibbs free energies (e.g., Pd) resulted in the oxidation of the InGaAs surface during the forming-gas annealing. In contrast, with TiN electrodes, which have a positive Gibbs free energy, the native III-V oxides underwent the reduction between the high-k dielectrics and InGaAs. We demonstrated that the reduction of native III-V oxides by metal electrodes improved the interface quality of the high-k/InGaAs gate stacks and produced an interface trap density (Dit) at the mid-gap with a value as low as 5.2 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1 with a scaled capacitance-equivalent thickness.

  13. Interfacial patterns in magnetorheological fluids: Azimuthal field-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Eduardo O.; Lira, Sérgio A.; Miranda, José A.

    2015-08-01

    Despite their practical and academic relevance, studies of interfacial pattern formation in confined magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been largely overlooked in the literature. In this work, we present a contribution to this soft matter research topic and investigate the emergence of interfacial instabilities when an inviscid, initially circular bubble of a Newtonian fluid is surrounded by a MR fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell apparatus. An externally applied, in-plane azimuthal magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire induces interfacial disturbances at the two-fluid interface, and pattern-forming structures arise. Linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theory, and a vortex sheet approach are used to access early linear and intermediate nonlinear time regimes, as well as to determine stationary interfacial shapes at fully nonlinear stages.

  14. Liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl by an amide ligand: interfacial features studied by MD and PMF simulations.

    PubMed

    Benay, G; Wipff, G

    2013-06-20

    We report a molecular dynamics study of biphasic systems involved in the liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl nitrate by a monoamide ligand (L = N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide, DEHiBA) to hexane, from pH neutral or acidic (3 M nitric acid) aqueous solutions. We first describe the neat interfaces simulated with three electrostatic models, one of which including atomic polarizabilities. The free energy profiles for crossing the water/hexane interface by L or its UO2(NO3)2L2 complex are then investigated by PMF (potential of mean force) calculations. They indicate that the free ligand and its complex are surface active. With the polarizable force field, however, the complexes have a lower affinity for the interface than without polarization. When DEHiBA gets more concentrated and in acidic conditions, their surface activity diminishes. Surface activity of UO2(NO3)2L2 complexes is further demonstrated by demixing simulations of randomly mixed DEHiBA, hexane, and neutral or acidic water. Furthermore, demixing of randomly mixed solvents, L molecules, UO2(NO3)2 salts, and nitric acid shows in some cases complexation of L to form UO2(NO3)2L2 and UO2(NO3)2L complexes that adsorb at the aqueous interfaces. These features suggest that uranyl complexation by amide ligands occurs "right at the interface", displaying marked analogies with the liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl by TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate). Regarding the positive effect of nitric acid on extraction, the simulations point to several facets involving enhanced ion pairing of uranyl nitrate, decreased affinity of the complex for the interface, and finally, stabilization of the complex in the organic phase.

  15. Effect of cation dopants in zirconia on interfacial properties in nickel/zirconia systems: an atomistic modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandarov, Albert M.; Ding, Yingna; Umeno, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-01

    Cation doping is often used to stabilize the cubic or tetragonal phase of zirconia for enhanced thermomechanical and electrochemical properties. In the present paper we report a combined density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics study of the effect of Sc, Y, and Ce dopants on properties of Ni/\\text{Zr}{{\\text{O}}2} interfaces and nickel sintering. First, we develop an MD model that is based on DFT data for various nickel/zirconia interfaces. Then, we employ the model to simulate Ni nanoparticles coalescing on a zirconia surface. The results show the possibility of particle migration by means of fast sliding over the surface when the work of separation is small (<1.0\\text{J} {{\\text{m}}-2} ). The sliding observed for the O-terminated Ni(1 1 1)/\\text{Zr}{{\\text{O}}2} (1 1 1) interface is not affected by dopants in zirconia because the work of separation of the doped interface stays small. The most pronounced effect of the dopants is observed for the Zr-terminated Ni(1 1 1)/\\text{Zr}{{\\text{O}}2} (1 1 1) interface, which possesses a large work of separation (4.4\\text{J} {{\\text{m}}-2} ) and thus restricts the sliding mechanism of Ni nanoparticle migration. DFT calculations for the interface revealed that dopants with a smaller covalent radius result in a larger energy barriers for Ni diffusion. We analyze this effect and discuss how it can be used to suppress nickel sintering by using the dopant selection.

  16. Dilution method study on the interfacial composition, thermodynamic properties and structural parameters of W/O microemulsions stabilized by 1-pentanol and surfactants in absence and presence of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bidyut K; Nandy, Debdurlav

    2007-12-15

    The phase behaviors, interfacial composition, thermodynamic properties and structural characteristics of water-in-oil microemulsions under varied molar ratio of water to surfactant (omega) at 303 K and also by varying temperatures at a fixed omega(=40) by mixing with 1-pentanol and decane or dodecane in absence and presence of sodium chloride have been studied by the method of dilution. The surfactants used were cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether (Brij-35). The compositions of 1-pentanol and the surfactant at the interfacial region, the distribution of 1-pentanol between the interfacial region and the continuous oil phase, and the effective packing parameter (P(eff)) at the threshold level of stability have been estimated. The thermodynamics of transfer of 1-pentanol from the continuous oil phase to the interface have been evaluated. The structural parameters viz. radii of the droplet (R(e)) and the waterpool (R(w)), effective thickness of the interfacial layer (d(I)), average aggregation numbers of surfactants (N (s)) and the cosurfactant (1-pentanol) (N (a)) and the number of droplets (N(d)) have also been estimated. The prospect of using these w/o microemulsions for the synthesis of nanoparticles with small size, have been discussed in the light of the radii of the droplet, and waterpool, the extent of variation of effective thickness of the droplet under varied molar ratio of water to surfactant and temperature. An attempt has been made to rationalize the results in a comprehensive manner.

  17. Concrete Durability: A Multibillion-Dollar Opportunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    1985. Durability of building materials: Durability research in the United States and the influence of RILEM on durability research. Materiaux et...the porosity, microstructure. and permeability of the final concrete and, to a large * extent, its resistance to environmental attack. This is well...to resist dilation induced by freezing. Large-sized aggregate pieces are far more susceptible than small-sized pieces of aggregate of the same type and

  18. Interfacial Instabilities on a Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Mehravaran, Kian

    2013-11-01

    The fragmentation of droplets is an essential stage of several natural and industrial applications such as fuel atomization and rain phenomena. In spite of its relatively long history, the mechanism of fragmentation is not clear yet. This is mainly due to small length and time scales as well as the non-linearity of the process. In the present study, two and three-dimensional numerical simulations have been performed to understand the early stages of the fragmentation of an initially spherical droplet. Simulations are performed for high Reynolds and a range of relatively high Weber numbers (shear breakup). To resolve the small-scale instabilities generated over the droplet, a second-order adaptive finite volume/volume of fluids (FV/VOF) method is employed, where the grid resolution is increased with the curvature of the gas-liquid interface as well as the vorticity magnitude. The study is focused on the onset and growth of interfacial instabilities. The role of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (in surface wave formation) and Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in azimuthal transverse modulation) are shown and the obtained results are compared with the linear instability theories for zero and non-zero vorticity layers. Moreover, the analogy between the fragmentation of a single drop and a co-axial liquid jet is discussed. The current results can be used for the further development of the current secondary atomization models.

  19. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  20. Electrochemical, interfacial, and surface studies of the conversion of carbon dioxide to liquid fuels on tin electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingjie

    The electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) into liquid fuels especially coupling with the intermittent renewable electricity offers a promising means of storing electricity in chemical form, which reduces the dependence on fossil fuels and mitigates the negative impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the planet. Although converting CO2 to fuels is not in itself a new concept, the field has not substantially advanced in the last 30 years primarily because of the challenge of discovery of structural electrocatalysts and the development of membrane architectures for efficient collection of reactants and separation of products. An efficient catalyst for the electrochemical conversion of CO2 to fuels must be capable of mediating a proton-coupled electron transfer reaction at low overpotentials, reducing CO2 in the presence of water, selectively converting CO 2 to desirable chemicals, and sustaining long-term operations (Chapter 1). My Ph.D. research was an investigation of the electroreduction of CO2 on tin-based electrodes and development of an electrochemical cell to convert CO2 to liquid fuels. The initial study focused on understanding the CO2 reduction reaction chemistry in the electrical double layer with an emphasis on the effects of electrostatic adsorption of cations, specific adsorption of anion and electrolyte concentration on the potential and proton concentration at outer Helmholtz plane at which reduction reaction occurs. The variation of potential and proton concentration at outer Helmholtz plane accounts for the difference in activity and selectivity towards CO2 reduction when using different electrolytes (Chapter 2). Central to the highly efficient CO2 reduction is an optimum microstructure of catalyst layer in the Sn gas diffusion electrode (GDE) consisting of 100 nm Sn nanoparticles to facilitate gas diffusion and charge transfer. This microstructure in terms of the proton conductor fraction and catalyst layer thickness was optimized to

  1. Neutron Depth Profiling benchmarking and analysis of applications to lithium ion cell electrode and interfacial studies research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Scott M.

    The role of the lithium ion cell is increasing with great intensity due to global concerns for the decreased use of fossil fuels as well as the growing popularity of portable electronics. With the dramatic increase in demand for these cells follows an outbreak of research to optimize the lithium ion cells in terms of safety, cost, and also performance. The work shown in this dissertation sets out to distinguish the role of Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) in the expanding research of lithium ion cells. Lithium ions play the primary role in the performance of lithium ion batteries. Moving from anode to cathode, and cathode to anode, the lithium ions are constantly being disturbed during the cell's operation. The ability to accurately determine the lithium's behavior within the electrodes of the cell after different operating conditions is a powerful tool to better understand the faults and advantages of particular electrode compositions and cell designs. NDP has this ability through the profiling of 6Li. This research first validates the ability of The University of Texas NDP (UT-NDP) facility to accurately profile operated lithium ion cell electrodes to a precision within 2% over 10 mum for concentration values, and with a precision for depth measurements within 77 nm. The validation of the UT-NDP system is performed by comparing UT-NDP profiles to those from the NIST-NDP system, from the Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) technique, and also from Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNPX) code simulations. All of the comparisons confirmed that the UT-NDP facility is fully capable of providing accurate depth profiles of lithium ion cell electrodes in terms of depth, shape of distribution, and concentration. Following the validation studies, this research investigates three different areas of lithium ion cell research and provides analysis based on NDP results. The three areas of investigation include storage of cells at temperature, cycling of cells, and the charging of cells

  2. Durable Nanocomposites for Superhydrophobicity and Superoleophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Adam

    Anti-wetting surfaces and materials have the potential for dramatic performance improvements such as drag reduction on marine vehicles and fluid power systems as well as anti-fouling on aircraft and wind turbines. Although a wide variety of synthetic superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed and investigated, several critical obstacles remain before industrial application can be realized, including: (1) large surface area application, (2) multi-liquid anti-wetting, (3) environmentally friendly compositions, (4) mechanical durability and adhesion, and (5) long-term performance. In this dissertation, nanocomposite coatings have been investigated to generate high performance anti-wetting surfaces that address these obstacles which may enable application on wind turbine blades. Solution processable materials were used which self-assemble to create anti-wetting nanocomposite surfaces upon spray coating and curing. As a result, the first superoleophobic nanocomposite, the first environmentally friendly superhydrophobic compositions, and the first highly durable superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings were created. Furthermore, the mechanisms leading to this improved performance were studied.

  3. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  4. Magnetism by interfacial hybridization and p-type doping of MoS(2) in Fe(4)N/MoS(2) superlattices: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Nan; Mi, Wenbo; Cheng, Yingchun; Guo, Zaibing; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Bai, Haili

    2014-03-26

    Magnetic and electronic properties of Fe4N(111)/MoS2(√3 × √3) superlattices are investigated by first-principles calculations, considering two models: (I) Fe(I)Fe(II)-S and (II) N-S interfaces, each with six stacking configurations. In model I, strong interfacial hybridization between Fe(I)/Fe(II) and S results in magnetism of monolayer MoS2, with a magnetic moment of 0.33 μB for Mo located on top of Fe(I). For model II, no magnetism is induced due to weak N-S interfacial bonding, and the semiconducting nature of monolayer MoS2 is preserved. Charge transfer between MoS2 and N results in p-type MoS2 with Schottky barrier heights of 0.5-0.6 eV. Our results demonstrate that the interfacial geometry and hybridization can be used to tune the magnetism and doping in Fe4N(111)/MoS2(√3 × √3) superlattices.

  5. Scanning microbeam small-angle X-ray diffraction study of interfacial heterogeneous crystallization of fat crystals in oil-in-water emulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Arima, S; Ueno, S; Ogawa, A; Sato, K

    2009-09-01

    We performed scanning microbeam small-angle X-ray diffraction (micro-SAXD) experiments, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, and optical microscopic observation of palm mid fraction (PMF) crystals in oil-in-water emulsion droplets. The scanning micro-SAXD experiment was performed by irradiating a synchrotron radiation X-ray microbeam having an area of 5 x 5 microm(2) onto different positions on a 50 microm diameter emulsion droplet after the crystallization of PMF by chilling the emulsion at 5 degrees C. The micro-SAXD patterns were recorded with a two-dimensional (2D) detector, which enabled spatial analysis of polymorphic structures and the orientation of lamella planes of PMF crystals at different positions inside the emulsion droplet. Particular attention was paid to compare the crystallization of PMF in two types of emulsion droplets, hydrophilic polyoxyethylene sorbitan mono-oleate (Tween 80) alone (Tween 80 emulsion) and Tween 80 and hydrophobic sucrose palmitic acid oligoester (P-170) (Tween 80+P-170 emulsion). The DSC study revealed that the PMF crystallization temperature in the Tween 80+P-170 emulsion droplets increased by 3 degrees C compared to that of the Tween 80 emulsion because of the effects of the P-170 additive in promoting PMF crystallization. The micro-SAXD studies revealed the following results. (1) The lamella planes of PMF crystals near the outer edges of the droplet in the Tween 80+P-170 emulsion were mostly parallel to an oil-water interface, whereas the lamella planes of PMF crystals were not always aligned with the oil-water interface in the Tween 80 emulsion droplet. (2) The degree of orientation of the lamellar planes of PMF crystals, which was evaluated from the values of full width at half-maximum of 2D micro-SAXD patterns with respect to azimuthal angle extension, was remarkably higher in the Tween 80+P-170 emulsion than in the Tween 80 emulsion. (3) Polymorphic transformation of PMF from alpha to beta' in the Tween 80

  6. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  7. Durable Solutions for Developing Country Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Barry N.

    1986-01-01

    There are only three durable solutions to the refugee problem--voluntary repatriation, local settlement, and third-country resettlement--and all depend on political will, diplomacy, and statesmanship. It is important to remember, however, that humanitarian concerns must outweigh costs consciousness when durable solutions are sought. (Author/GC)

  8. Environmental Durability of Electroplated Black Chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes tests of durability of electroplated black chromium coatings on solar-collector panels in rural, industrial, and seacoast environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. Black-chromium coating showed exceptionally-good optical durability in all three environments.

  9. An observational study of material durability of three World Health Organization-recommended long-lasting insecticidal nets in eastern Chad.

    PubMed

    Allan, Richard; O'Reilly, Laura; Gilbos, Valery; Kilian, Albert

    2012-09-01

    A total of 876 nets (229 Interceptor(®), 363 Olyset(®), and 284 PermaNet(®)) were collected 14 months post-distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) from 811 households of internally displaced and host communities in Dar Sila District in eastern Chad to examine their physical condition. Holes were recorded by using three hole categories (average diameter = 2, 3.5, and 15 cm) and a Proportionate Hole Index (pHI). A total of 69.5% were in poor or very poor condition. There was no significant difference in the performance between the polyester 75 denier LLINs, but they had 4.22 times the odds of having a pHI ≥ 175 (poor or very poor condition) than polyethylene 150 denier LLINs; and 39.2% were unserviceable (pHI ≥ 300) compared with only 7.7% of the polyethylene LLINs. These results provide the first comparative data on LLIN material durability to guide procurement and replacement practice, and to inform urgently needed changes in LLIN international minimum specifications and product standards.

  10. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W.; Weber, W.J.

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  11. An Investigation of the Influence of Chain Length on the Interfacial Ordering of L-Lysine and L-Proline and Their Homopeptides at Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interfaces Studied by Sum Frequency Generation and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    York, R.L.; Holinga, G.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-02-23

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) are employed to study the interfacial structure and adsorbed amount of the amino acids l-lysine and l-proline and their corresponding homopeptides, poly-l-lysine and poly-l-proline, at two liquid-solid interfaces. SFG and QCM-D experiments of these molecules are carried out at the interface between phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4 (PBS) and the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d{sub 8}-PS) surface as well as the interface between PBS and hydrophilic fused silica (SiO{sub 2}). The SFG spectra of the amino acids studied here are qualitatively similar to their corresponding homopeptides; however, the SFG signal from amino acids at the solid/PBS interface is smaller in magnitude relative to their more massive homopeptides at the concentrations studied here. Substantial differences are observed in SFG spectra for each species between the hydrophobic d{sub 8}-PS and the hydrophilic SiO{sub 2} liquid-solid interfaces, suggesting surface-dependent interfacial ordering of the biomolecules. Over the range of concentrations used in this study, QCM-D measurements also indicate that on both surfaces poly-l-lysine adsorbs to a greater extent than its constituent amino acid l-lysine. The opposite trend is demonstrated by poly-l-proline which sticks to both surfaces less extensively than its corresponding amino acid, l-proline. Lastly, we find that the adsorption of the molecules studied here can have a strong influence on interfacial water structure as detected in the SFG spectra.

  12. Ancient analogues concerning stability and durability of cementitious wasteform

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Roy, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    The history of cementitious materials goes back to ancient times. The Greeks and Romans used calcined limestone and later developed pozzolanic cement by grinding together lime and volcanic ash called {open_quotes}pozzolan{close_quotes} which was first found near Port Pozzuoli, Italy. The ancient Chinese used lime-pozzolanic mixes to build the Great Wall. The ancient Egyptians used calcined impure gypsum to build the Great Pyramid of Cheops. The extraordinary stability and durability of these materials has impressed us, when so much dramatically damaged infrastructure restored by using modern portland cement now requires rebuilding. Stability and durability of cementitious materials have attracted intensive research interest and contractors` concerns, as does immobilization of radioactive and hazardous industrial waste in cementitious materials. Nuclear waste pollution of the environment and an acceptable solution for waste management and disposal constitute among the most important public concerns. The analogy of ancient cementitious materials to modern Portland cement could give us some clues to study their stability and durability. This present study examines selected results of studies of ancient building materials from France, Italy, China, and Egypt, combined with knowledge obtained from the behavior of modern portland cement to evaluate the potential for stability and durability of such materials in nuclear waste forms.

  13. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples: COMPARISON OF FLUID-FLUID INTERFACIAL AREAS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ~5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  14. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  15. Study of Fused Thiophene Based Organic Semiconductors and Interfacial Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) for Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Jangdae

    In this thesis, the molecular packing motifs of our newly designed fused thiophenes, benzo[d,d]thieno[3,2-b;4,5-b]dithiophene (BTDT) derivatives, were studied by utilizing grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS). Considering the potential of fused thiophene molecules as an environmentally stable, high performance semiconductor building block, it must be an important groundwork to investigate their thin film structures in relation to molecular structures, single crystal structures, and organic thin-film transistors (OTFT) performances. OTFT device performance is not only determined by semiconductor materials, but also influenced by the interfacial properties. Since there are three major components in TFT structures---electrodes, semiconductors, and dielectrics, two types of major interfaces exist. One is the semiconductor-electrode interface, and the other is the semiconductor-dielectric interface. Both of these interfaces have critical roles for TFT operation. For example, the semiconductor-electrode interface determines the charge injection barrier. Before charge carriers go through the electrode (source)-semiconductor-electrode (drain) pathways, the energy gaps between the work function of the electrodes and the HOMO energy of the semiconductor materials must be overcome for hole injection, or the energy gap between the metal work function of the electrodes and the LUMO energy of the semiconductor materials must be overcome for electron injection. These charge injection barriers are largely determined by the energetic structure of the semiconductor material and work function of the electrode. However, the size of energy gap can be modified by introducing an organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the surface of metal electrode. In addition, the structure of semiconductor films, especially within several monolayers right above the electrode, is greatly influenced by the SAM, and it changes charge injection property of OTFT devices. In this thesis

  16. Capillary, wettability and interfacial dynamics in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P

    2009-01-01

    In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for different applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance/durability limitation in the PEFC arises from liquid water transport, perceived as the Holy Grail in PEFC operation. The porous catalyst layer (CL), fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) and flow channels play a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance due to the transport limitation in the presence of liquid water and flooding phenomena. Although significant research, both theoretical and experimental, has been performed, there is serious paucity of fundamental understanding regarding the underlying structure-transport-performance interplay in the PEFC. The inherent complex morphologies, micro-scale transport physics involving coupled multiphase, multicomponent, electrochemically reactive phenomena and interfacial interactions in the constituent components pose a formidable challenge. In this paper, the impact of capillary transport, wetting characteristics and interfacial dynamics on liquid water transport is presented based on a comprehensive mesoscopic modeling framework with the objective to gain insight into the underlying electrodynamics, two-phase dynamics and the intricate structure-transport-interface interactions in the PEFC.

  17. The effect of chain rigidity on the interfacial layer thickness and dynamics of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Carroll, Bobby; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    There are growing experimental evidences showing the existence of an interfacial layer that has a finite thickness with slowing down dynamics in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Moreover, it is believed that the interfacial layer plays a significant role on various macroscopic properties of PNCs. A thicker interfacial layer is found to have more pronounced effect on the macroscopic properties such as the mechanical enhancement. However, it is not clear what molecular parameter controls the interfacial layer thickness. Inspired by our recent computer simulations that showed the chain rigidity correlated well with the interfacial layer thickness, we performed systematic experimental studies on different polymer nanocomposites by varying the chain stiffness. Combining small-angle X-ray scattering, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry, we find a good correlation between the polymer Kuhn length and the thickness of the interfacial layer, confirming the earlier computer simulations results. Our findings provide a direct guidance for the design of new PNCs with desired properties.

  18. Comparison of the Absorbable Polymer Sirolimus-Eluting Stent (MiStent) to the Durable Polymer Everolimus-Eluting Stent (Xience) (from the DESSOLVE I/II and ISAR-TEST-4 Studies).

    PubMed

    Lansky, Alexandra J; Kastrati, Adnan; Edelman, Elazer R; Parise, Helen; Ng, Vivian G; Ormiston, John; Wijns, William; Byrne, Robert A

    2016-02-15

    We compared the outcomes of a novel, thin-strut, cobalt-chromium, absorbable, polymer sirolimus-eluting stent (APSES; MiStent) to the durable polymer cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stent (EES; Xience). A propensity-matched analysis was performed comparing data from the DES With Sirolimus and a Bioabsorbable Polymer for the Treatment of Patients With De Novo Lesions in the Native Coronary Arteries (DESSOLVE) I and II studies, evaluating the APSES to the EES arm of the Intracoronary Stenting and Angiographic Results: Test Efficacy of 3 Limus-Eluting Stents-4 study. Target lesion failure (TLF) and its components were evaluated at 12 months and annually to 3 years; 805 patients (APSES = 153; EES = 652) were included with propensity matching in 204 patients (APSES = 102; EES = 102). APSES compared with EES had lower TLF at 1 year (3.0% vs 8.0%, p = 0.12) driven by a difference in target lesion revascularization (TLR; 1% vs 6%, p = 0.05), with no difference in target vessel myocardial infarction (p = 0.56) or stent thrombosis (p = 0.31). At 3 years, TLF (5.0% vs 12.5%, p = 0.07) and TLR (2.0% vs 8.4%, p = 0.04) remained lower with APSES. By landmark analysis, there was no significant difference in TLF between 1 and 3 years (p = 0.36). In conclusion, in a propensity-matched analysis, the APSES demonstrated reduced clinically indicated TLR rates at 1 and 3 years compared with the durable polymer EES, with minimal accrual of events between 1 and 3 years.

  19. High kappa Dielectrics on InGaAs and GaN: Growth, Interfacial Structural Studies, and Surface Fermi Level Unpinning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-24

    MOSFETs and GaN MOSFETs without employing interfacial layers and surface chemical pre-treatments. We have achieved many firsts and made great impacts...hold world record high dc performances of InGaAs MOSFETs , including the drain current, peak transconductance, and peak electron mobility in the self...aligned inversion-channel In0.75Ga0.25As and In0.2Ga0.8As MOSFETs using both in-situ MBE-Al2O3/GGO and ex-situ ALD-Al2O3 gate dielectrics. The high

  20. New analysis and design procedures for ensuring gas turbine blades and adhesive bonded joints structural integrity and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hsin-Yi

    Most load-carrying structural systems under severe operating conditions such as gas turbine engines usually demand durability, high reliability, light weight, and high performance. In turn, as it has been reported, a number of structural failures have occurred in aircraft engines during development testing and operational service. In order to prevent failures of turbine engines, the turbine blade vibration must be attenuated to an acceptable level. To achieve this goal, the blade has to be provided with higher damping, either externally or internally. The objective of this study is to explore the feasibility of using a stress dependent magnetomechanical surface coating material for enhancing high damping capacity on turbine blades. The results show that a 2% or 4% of blade thickness free surface magnetomechanical coating layer has a significant contribution to the damping enhancement and the reduction of vibratory stresses at various low and high frequency vibration modes under either non-rotating or rotating conditions. Similar to the blade failure, the structural reliability and safety of the adhesive bonded joint, one of the most commonly used structural joint designs in the aerospace industry, is also a serious concern of the aircraft design community. Adhesive joints easily become weaker due to environmental degradation and/or improper manufacturing procedures. This often reduces structural durability and reliability significantly. This motivates us to develop a new finite element tool/procedure for assessing the interfacial disbonding mechanics of the single-lap joint with various imperfectly-bonded conditions in order to predict the adhesive bonded joint's strength more precisely during its service period. According to these conclusions, a new three-dimensional graphic mesh has been created to display the maximum stress variations under different amounts and sizes of disbonded area. This new procedure can be used as a basis for the development of a bonded

  1. New analysis and design procedures for ensuring gas turbine blades' and adhesive-bonded joints' structural integrity and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hsin-Yi

    Most load-carrying structural systems under severe operating conditions such as gas turbine engines usually demand durability, high reliability, light weight, and high performance. In turn, as it has been reported, a number of structural failures have occurred in aircraft engines during development testing and operational service. In order to prevent failures of turbine engines, the turbine blade vibration must be attenuated to an acceptable level. To achieve this goal, the blade has to be provided with higher damping, either externally or internally. The objective of this study is to explore the feasibility of using a stress dependent magnetomechanical surface coating material for enhancing high damping capacity on turbine blades. The results show that a 2% or 4% of blade thickness free surface magnetomechanical coating layer has a significant contribution to the damping enhancement and the reduction of vibratory stresses at various low and high frequency vibration modes under either non-rotating or rotating conditions. Similar to the blade failure, the structural reliability and safety of the adhesive bonded joint, one of the most commonly used structural joint designs in the aerospace industry, is also a serious concern of the aircraft design community. Adhesive joints easily become weaker due to environmental degradation and/or improper manufacturing procedures. This often reduces structural durability and reliability significantly. This motivates us to develop a new finite element tool/procedure for assessing the interfacial disbonding mechanics of the single-lap joint with various imperfectly-bonded conditions in order to predict the adhesive bonded joint's strength more precisely during its service period. According to these conclusions, a new three-dimensional graphic mesh has been created to display the maximum stress variations under different amounts and sizes of disbonded area. This new procedure can be used as a basis for the development of a bonded

  2. Highly Dispersed Alloy Catalyst for Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek S. Murthi; Izzo, Elise; Bi, Wu; Guerrero, Sandra; Protsailo, Lesia

    2013-01-08

    Achieving DOE's stated 5000-hr durability goal for light-duty vehicles by 2015 will require MEAs with characteristics that are beyond the current state of the art. Significant effort was placed on developing advanced durable cathode catalysts to arrive at the best possible electrode for high performance and durability, as well as developing manufacturing processes that yield significant cost benefit. Accordingly, the overall goal of this project was to develop and construct advanced MEAs that will improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of PEMFC stacks. The project, led by UTC Power, focused on developing new catalysts/supports and integrating them with existing materials (membranes and gas diffusion layers (GDLs)) using state-of-the-art fabrication methods capable of meeting the durability requirements essential for automotive applications. Specifically, the project work aimed to lower platinum group metals (PGM) loading while increasing performance and durability. Appropriate catalysts and MEA configuration were down-selected that protects the membrane, and the layers were tailored to optimize the movements of reactants and product water through the cell to maximize performance while maintaining durability.

  3. Durability of an inorganic polymer concrete coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Kenneth

    The objective of the research program reported in this thesis is to evaluate the durability of an inorganic polymer composite coating exposed to freeze/thaw cycling and wet-dry cycling. Freeze/thaw cycling is performed following ASTM D6944-09 Standard Practice for Resistance of Cured Coatings to Thermal Cycling and wet/dry cycling is performed following guidelines set forth in a thesis written by Ronald Garon at Rutgers University. For both sets of experiments, four coating mixture proportions were evaluated. The variables were: silica/alumina ratio, mixing protocol using high shear and normal shear mixing, curing temperatures of 70 and 120 degrees Fahrenheit and use of nano size constituent materials. The mix with highest silica/alumina ratio was designated as Mix 1 and mixes with lower ratios were designated as Mix 2 and Mix 3. Mix 4 had nano silica particles. Four prisms were used for each variable including control that had no coating. The performance of the coating was evaluated using adhesion strength measured using: ASTM D7234 Test Method for Pull-Off Strength of Coatings on Concrete Using Portable Adhesion Testers. Tests were performed after every five consecutive cycles of thermal conditioning and six consecutive cycles of wet-dry exposure. Results from the thermal cycling and wet-dry testing demonstrate that all coating formulations are durable. The minimum adhesion strength was 300 psi even though a relatively weak base concrete surface was chosen for the study. The weak surface was chosen to simulate aged concrete surfaces present in actual field conditions. Due to the inherent nature of the test procedure the variation in test results is high. However, based on the test results, high shear mixer and high temperature curing are not recommended. As expected nano size constituent materials provide better performance.

  4. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ˜5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  5. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  6. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 - 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a clean, controlled ISS environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 - 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 - 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of ISS-based tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected at periodic intervals throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the development of improved cycle model tables. This paper provides a

  7. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the

  8. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-10-01

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) investigated methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbents. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For this program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation. Two base case sorbents, a spherical pellet and a cylindrical extrude used in related METC-sponsored projects, were used to provide a basis for the aimed enhancement in durability and reactivity. Sorbent performance was judged on the basis of physical properties, single particle kinetic studies based on thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques, and multicycle bench-scale testing of sorbents. A sorbent grading system was utilized to quantify the characteristics of the new sorbents prepared during the program. Significant enhancements in both reactivity and durability were achieved for the spherical pellet shape over the base case formulation. Overall improvements to reactivity and durability were also made to the cylindrical extrude shape. The primary variables which were investigated during the program included iron oxide type, zinc oxide:iron oxide ratio, inorganic binder concentration, organic binder concentration, and induration conditions. The effects of some variables were small or inconclusive. Based on TGA studies and bench-scale tests, induration conditions were found to be very significant.

  9. A study of the dispersed flow interfacial heat transfer model of RELAP5/MOD2.5 and RELAP5/MOD3

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, M.; Analytis, G.T.; Aksan, S.N.

    1995-09-01

    The model of interfacial heat transfer for the dispersed flow regime used in the RELAP5 computer codes is investigated in the present paper. Short-transient calculations of two low flooding rate tube reflooding experiments have been performed, where the hydraulic conditions and the heat input to the vapour in the post-dryout region were controlled for the predetermined position of the quench front. Both RELAP5/MOD2.5 and RELAP5/MOD3 substantially underpredicted the exit vapour temperature. The mass flow rate and quality, however, were correct and the heat input to the vapour was larger than the actual one. As the vapour superheat at the tube exit depends on the balance between the heat input from the wall and the heat exchange with the droplets, the discrepancy between the calculated and the measured exit vapour temperature suggested that the inability of both codes to predict the vapour superheat in the dispersed flow region is due to the overprediction of the interfacial heat transfer rate.

  10. Comparison Studies of Interfacial Electronic and Energetic Properties of LaAlO3/TiO2 and TiO2/LaAlO3 Heterostructures from First-Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianli; Luo, Jian; Yang, Kesong

    2017-03-01

    By using first-principles electronic structure calculations, we studied electronic and energetic properties of perovskite oxide heterostructures with different epitaxial growth order between anatase TiO2 and LaAlO3. Two types of heterostructures, i.e., TiO2 film grown on LaAlO3 substrate (TiO2/LaAlO3) and LaAlO3 film grown on TiO2 substrate (LaAlO3/TiO2), were modeled. The TiO2/LaAlO3 model is intrinsically metallic and thus does not exhibit an insulator-to-metal transition as TiO2 film thickness increases; in contrast, the LaAlO3/TiO2 model shows an insulator-to-metal transition as the LaAlO3 film thickness increases up to 4 unit cells. The former model has a larger interfacial charge carrier density (n ∼ 10(14) cm(-2)) and smaller electron effective mass (0.47me) than the later one (n ∼ 10(13) cm(-2), and 0.70me). The interfacial energetics calculations indicate that the TiO2/LaAlO3 model is energetically more favorable than the LaAlO3/TiO2 model, and the former has a stronger interface cohesion than the later model. This research provides fundamental insights into the different interfacial electronic and energetic properties of TiO2/LaAlO3 and LaAlO3/TiO2 heterostructures.

  11. Some Aspects of Interfacial Phenomena in Steelmaking and Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. J.; Viswanathan, N. N.; Muhmood, L.; Kapilashrami, E.; Seetharaman, S.

    2016-08-01

    Unique experiments were designed to study the surface phenomena in steelmaking reactions. The concept of surface sulfide capacities and an understanding of the surface accumulation of surface-active species, based on experimental results, are presented. In order to understand the flow phenomenon at slag/metal interface, experiments were designed to measure the interfacial velocity of S on the surface of an iron drop immersed in an aluminosilicate slag using the X-ray sessile drop method. The oscillation of the iron drop in the slag due to the change in the surface concentration of sulfur at the slag-metal interface was monitored by X-ray imaging. From the observations, the interfacial velocity of sulfur was evaluated. Similar experiments were performed to measure the interfacial velocity of oxygen at the interface as well as the impact of oxygen potential on the interfacial velocity of sulfur. The interfacial shear viscosity and the dilatational modulus were also evaluated. In a study of the wetting of alumina base by iron drop at constant oxygen pressure under isothermal condition, the contact angle was found to be decreased with the progress of the reaction leading to the formation of hercynite as an intermediate layer creating non-wetting conditions. In the case of silica substrate, an intermediate liquid fayalite layer was formed.

  12. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  13. Elastocapillary-mediated interfacial assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Particles confined to an interface are present in a large number of industrial applications and ubiquitous in cellular biophysics. Interactions mediated by the interface, such as capillary effects in the presence of surface tension, give rise to rafts and aggregates whose structure is ultimately determined by geometric characteristics of these adsorbed particles. A common strategy for assembling interfacial structures relies on exploiting these interactions by tuning particle anisotropy, either by constructing rigid particles with heterogeneous wetting properties or fabricating particles that have a naturally anisotropic shape. Less explored, however, is the scenario where the interface causes the particles to deform. In this talk I will discuss the implications for interfacial assembly using elastocapillary-mediated interactions. The competition between surface energy and elasticity can wrinkle and buckle adsorbed soft particles, leading to complicated (but programmable) aggregates.

  14. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  15. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  16. Simultaneous interfacial rheology and microstructure measurement of densely aggregated particle laden interfaces using a modified double wall ring interfacial rheometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sourav; Christopher, Gordon F

    2014-08-19

    The study of particle laden interfaces has increased significantly due to the increasing industrial use of particle stabilized foams and Pickering emulsions, whose bulk rheology and stability are highly dependent on particle laden interface's interfacial rheology, which is a function of interfacial microstructure. To understand the physical mechanisms that dictate interfacial rheology of particle laden interfaces requires correlating rheology to microstructure. To achieve this goal, a double wall ring interfacial rheometer has been modified to allow real time, simultaneous interfacial visualization and shear rheology measurements. The development of this tool is outlined, and its ability to provide novel and unique measurements is demonstrated on a sample system. This tool has been used to examine the role of microstructure on the steady shear rheology of densely packed, aggregated particle laden interfaces at three surface concentrations. Through examination of the rheology and analysis of interfacial microstructure response to shear, a transition from shear thinning due to aggregated cluster breakup to yielding at a slip plane within the interface has been identified. Interestingly, it is found that aggregated interfaces transition to yielding well before they reached a jammed state. Furthermore, these systems undergo significant shear induced order when densely packed. These results indicate that the mechanics of these interfaces are not simply jammed or unjammed and that the interfacial rheology relationship with microstructure can give us significant insight into understanding how to engineer particle laden interfaces in the future. By examining both rheology and microstructure, the mechanisms that dictate observed rheology are now understood and can be used to predict and control the rheology of the interface.

  17. 40 CFR 1065.415 - Durability demonstration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1065.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065.415 Durability.... Perform emission tests to determine deterioration factors consistent with good engineering...

  18. Interfacial properties of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Borodin, Oleg; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2008-06-01

    The liquid-vapor interfacial properties of semifluorinated linear alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1(CH2)m-1CH3 are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical composition and the conformation of the molecules at the interface are identified and correlated with the interfacial energies. A modified form of the Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom (OPLS-AA) force field of Jorgensen and co-workers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106, 6638 (1984); 118, 11225 (1996); J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 4118 (2001)], which includes specific dihedral terms for H-F blocks-and corrections to the H-F nonbonded interaction, is used together with a new version of the exp-6 force field developed in this work. Both force fields yield good agreement with the available experimental liquid density and surface tension data as well as each other over significant temperature ranges and for a variety of chain lengths and compositions. The interfacial regions of semifluorinated alkanes are found to be rich in fluorinated groups compared to hydrogenated groups, an effect that decreases with increasing temperature but is independent of the fractional length of the fluorinated segments. The proliferation of fluorine at the surface substantially lowers the surface tension of the diblock copolymers, yielding values near those of perfluorinated alkanes and distinct from those of protonated alkanes of the same chain length. With decreasing temperatures within the liquid state, chains are found to preferentially align perpendicular to the interface, as previously seen.

  19. Interfacial and emulsifying properties of designed β-strand peptides.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Annette F

    2010-12-07

    The structural and surfactant properties of a series of amphipathic β-strand peptides have been studied as a function of pH. Each nine-residue peptide has a framework of hydrophobic proline and phenylalanine amino acid residues, alternating with acidic or basic amino acids to give a sequence closely related to known β-sheet formers. Surface activity, interfacial mechanical properties, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), droplet sizing and zeta potential measurements were used to gain an overview of the peptide behavior as the molecular charge varied from ±4 to 0 with pH. ECD data suggest that the peptides form polyproline-type helices in bulk aqueous solution when highly charged, but may fold to β-hairpins rather than β-sheets when uncharged. In the uncharged state, the peptides adsorb readily at a macroscopic fluid interface to form mechanically strong interfacial films, but tend to give large droplet sizes on emulsification, apparently due to flocculation at a low droplet zeta potential. In contrast, highly charged peptide states gave a low interfacial coverage, but retained good emulsifying activity as judged by droplet size. Best emulsification was generally seen for intermediate charged states of the peptides, possibly representing a compromise between droplet zeta potential and interfacial binding affinity. The emulsifying properties of β-strand peptides have not been previously reported. Understanding the interfacial properties of such peptides is important to their potential development as biosurfactants.

  20. Durability of Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    Michigan State University Composite Materials and Structures Center 2100 Engineering Building , East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 6.1 Objectives The...DATES COVERED (From - To) February 7, 2005 - January 31. 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES 5a...Manager: Dr. Yapa D.S. Rajapakse Office of Naval Research 875 N. Randolph Street Arlington, VA 22203-1995 DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

  1. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  2. Atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 and HfO2 on InAlAs: A comparative study of interfacial and electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Fan; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Lv, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Yi-Men

    2016-10-01

    Al2O3 and HfO2 thin films are separately deposited on n-type InAlAs epitaxial layers by using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The interfacial properties are revealed by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS). It is demonstrated that the Al2O3 layer can reduce interfacial oxidation and trap charge formation. The gate leakage current densities are 1.37 × 10-6 A/cm2 and 3.22 × 10-6 A/cm2 at +1 V for the Al2O3/InAlAs and HfO2/InAlAs MOS capacitors respectively. Compared with the HfO2/InAlAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor, the Al2O3/InAlAs MOS capacitor exhibits good electrical properties in reducing gate leakage current, narrowing down the hysteresis loop, shrinking stretch-out of the C-V characteristics, and significantly reducing the oxide trapped charge (Q ot) value and the interface state density (D it). Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB327505), the Advanced Research Foundation of China (Grant No. 914xxx803-051xxx111), the National Defense Advance Research Project, China (Grant No. 513xxxxx306), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51302215), the Scientific Research Program Funded by Shaanxi Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 14JK1656), and the Science and Technology Project of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2016KRM029).

  3. The influence of surface properties on carbon fiber/epoxy matrix interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, H.; Wightman, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    In recent years, as composites become increasingly sophisticated to meet ever-increasing performance requirements, it has become more important to control the interaction between the reinforcing fibers and matrix materials. The major challenge here is the lack of fundamental understanding and knowledge about the reinforcement/matrix system which contribute to the establishment of the interphase. It has been recognized that the state of the fiber surface substantially effects the quality of interfacial adhesion. However, basic and specific correlation is still incomplete. The possible mechanisms by which the fiber surface parameters contribute to the constitution of the fiber/matrix interface include the interfacial chemical and physical interactions caused by fiber surface functionality and surface energy, the mechanical interlocking due to fiber surface irregularity, and, the interfacial wetting based on fiber surface energy. It was the objective of this work to explore the effects of physical and chemical aspects of fiber surfaces on the durability of interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

  4. Effect of Powder Injection on the Interfacial Fracture Toughness of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okajima, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Adhesive strength of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating is one of the most important parameters which influence their durability and reliability during service. While many methods exist to measure the adhesive strength, in general, they require cumbersome and time-consuming specimen preparation. Furthermore, considerations of the adhesion strength from the point-of-view of fracture toughness or for that matter, their systematic correlation to both processing variances are limited. Consequently, there is an opportunity to both simplify the measurement procedure and establish correlations among methods and linkages between processing parameters and interfacial fracture toughness. In this paper, we report results on adhesion strength of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating on aluminum substrates based on both interfacial indentation test (to measure interfacial fracture toughness) and the modified tensile adhesive test. Carrier gas flow for powder injection into the plasma torch was systematically varied to introduce variances in particle melting with concomitant impact on the measured adhesive strength. The results indicate the correlation between the particle melting index and the measured interfacial fracture toughness.

  5. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  6. Fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion in natural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, L. Q. N.; Yuan, X. W.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Fuentes, C.; van Vuure, A. W.; Verpoest, I.

    2015-04-01

    The interface between natural fibers and thermoplastic matrices is studied, in which fiber-matrix wetting analysis and interfacial adhesion are investigated to obtain a systematic understanding of the interface. In wetting analysis, the surface energies of the fibers and the matrices are estimated using their contact angles in test liquids. Work of adhesion is calculated for each composite system. For the interface tests, transverse three point bending tests (3PBT) on unidirectional (UD) composites are performed to measure interfacial strength. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization on the fibers is also carried out to obtain more information about the surface chemistry of the fibers. UD composites are examined to explore the correlation between the fiber-matrix interface and the final properties of the composites. The results suggest that the higher interfacial adhesion of the treated fiber composites compared to untreated fiber composites can be attributed to higher fiber-matrix physico-chemical interaction corresponding with the work of adhesion.

  7. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  8. Preparation of durable hydrophobic cellulose fabric from water glass and mixed organosilanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Song-Min; Li, Zhengxiong; Xing, Yanjun; Xin, John H.; Tao, Xiao-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Durable superhydrophobic cellulose fabric was prepared from water glass and n-octadecyltriethoxysilane (ODTES) with 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) as crosslinker by sol-gel method. The result showed that the addition of GPTMS could result in a better fixation of silica coating from water glass on cellulose fabric. The silanization of hydrolyzed ODTES at different temperatures and times was studied and optimized. The results showed that silanization time was more important than temperature in forming durable hydrophobic surface. The durability of superhydrophobicity treatment was analyzed by XPS. As a result, the superhydrophobic cotton treated under the optimal condition still remained hydrophobic properties after 50 washing cycles.

  9. Preparation, structure, and in vitro chemical durability of yttrium phosphate microspheres for intra-arterial radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsui, Naoko; Li, Zhixia; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu

    2011-10-01

    Chemically durable microspheres containing yttrium and/or phosphorus are useful for intra-arterial radiotherapy. In this study, we attempted to prepare yttrium phosphate (YPO₄) microspheres with high chemical durability. YPO₄ microspheres with smooth surfaces and diameters of around 25 μm were successfully obtained when gelatin droplets containing yttrium and phosphate ions were cooled and solidified in a water-in-oil emulsion and then heat-treated at 1100°C. The chemical durability of the heat-treated microspheres in a simulated body fluid at pH = 6 and 7 was high enough for clinical application of intra-arterial radiotherapy.

  10. Durability of success after rectocele repair.

    PubMed

    López, A; Anzén, B; Bremmer, S; Mellgren, A; Nilsson, B Y; Zetterström, J; Holmström, B

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the durability of success after rectocele repair and to evaluate parameters that might influence long-term results. Twenty-five patients with rectocele were prospectively evaluated both clinically and physiologically. Follow-up was performed twice, at 1 and 5.1 years postoperatively. Twenty-four patients had a long-term follow-up; 21/23 patients (91%) with preoperative symptoms of rectal emptying difficulty reported improvement of their symptoms and 9 of 12 (75%) with preoperative symptoms of pelvic heaviness reported relief at long-term follow-up. All 5 patients with preoperative pathologic transit study had various degrees of rectal emptying difficulty at long-term follow-up. Three of 5 patients with preoperative paradoxical sphincter reaction (PSR) at electromyography (EMG) reported improvement of the symptoms of rectal emptying difficulty at long-term follow-up. Surgery for rectocele is associated with improved symptoms in a majority of patients which are sustained long term. Patients with pathologic transit study may have a less favorable symptomatic outcome. The clinical significance of PSR needs further study.

  11. Nitrogen and carbon doped titanium oxide as an alternative and durable electrocatalyst support in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanasekaran, P.; Vinod Selvaganesh, S.; Bhat, Santoshkumar D.

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen and carbon doped titanium oxide as an alternative and ultra-stable support to platinum catalysts is prepared and its efficiency is determined by polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Nitrogen and carbon doped titanium oxide is prepared by varying the melamine ratio followed by calcination at 900 °C. Platinum nanoparticles are deposited onto doped and undoped titanium oxide by colloidal method. The doping effect, surface morphology, chemical oxidation state and metal/metal oxide interfacial contact are studied by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy. The nitrogen and carbon doping changes both electronic and structural properties of titanium oxide resulting in enhanced oxygen reduction reaction activity. The platinum deposited on optimum level of nitrogen and carbon doped titanium oxide exhibits improved cell performance in relation to platinum on titanium oxide electrocatalysts. The effect of metal loading on cathode electrocatalyst is investigated by steady-state cell polarization. Accelerated durability test over 50,000 cycles for these electrocatalysts suggested the improved interaction between platinum and nitrogen and carbon doped titanium oxide, retaining the electrochemical surface area and oxygen reduction performance as comparable to platinum on carbon support.

  12. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  13. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.

    1991-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures are outlined.

  14. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures is outlined.

  15. Unanticipated Effects of New Drug Availability on Antiretroviral Durability: Implications for Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Ellen F; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Burkholder, Greer A; Willig, James H; Saag, Michael S; Mugavero, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Background.  Durability of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy is associated with improved human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) outcomes. Data on ARV regimen durability in recent years and clinical settings are lacking. Methods.  This retrospective follow-up study included treatment-naive HIV-infected patients initiating ARV therapy between January 2007 and December 2012 in a university-affiliated HIV clinic in the Southeastern United States. Outcome of interest was durability (time to discontinuation) of the initial regimen. Durability was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Cox proportional hazard analyses was used to evaluate the association among durability and sociodemographic, clinical, and regimen-level factors. Results.  Overall, 546 patients were analyzed. Median durability of all regimens was 39.5 months (95% confidence interval, 34.1-44.4). Commonly prescribed regimens were emtricitabine and tenofovir with efavirenz (51%; median duration = 40.1 months) and with raltegravir (14%; 47.8 months). Overall, 67% of patients had an undetectable viral load at the time of regimen cessation. Discontinuation was less likely with an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (adjusted hazards ratio [aHR] = 0.35, P = .001) or protease inhibitor-based regimen (aHR = 0.45, P = .006) and more likely with a higher pill burden (aHR = 2.25, P = .003) and a later treatment era (aHR = 1.64, P < .001). Conclusions.  Initial ARV regimen longevity declined in recent years contemporaneous with the availability of several new ARV drugs and combinations. Reduced durability mostly results from a preference for newly approved regimens rather than indicating failing therapy, as indicated by viral suppression observed in a majority of patients (67%) prior to regimen cessation. Durability is influenced by extrinsic factors including new drug availability and provider preference. Medication durability must be interpreted carefully in the context of a dynamic treatment landscape.

  16. Model colloid system for interfacial sorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salipante, Paul; Hudson, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption kinetics of nanometer scale molecules, such as proteins at interfaces, is usually determined through measurements of surface coverage. Their small size limits the ability to directly observe individual molecule behavior. To better understand the behavior of nanometer size molecules and the effect on interfacial kinetics, we use micron size colloids with a weak interfacial interaction potential as a model system. Thus, the interaction strength is comparable to many nanoscale systems (less than 10 kBT). The colloid-interface interaction potential is tuned using a combination of depletion, electrostatic, and gravitational forces. The colloids transition between an entropically trapped adsorbed state and a desorbed state through Brownian motion. Observations are made using an LED-based Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (TIRM) setup. The observed adsorption and desorption rates are compared theoretical predictions based on the measured interaction potential and near wall particle diffusivity. This experimental system also allows for the study of more complex dynamics such as nonspherical colloids and collective effects at higher concentrations.

  17. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  18. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    DOE PAGES

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; ...

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured propertiesmore » is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.« less

  19. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured properties is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.

  20. Formation of Lamellar Pores for Splats via Interfacial or Sub-interfacial Delamination at Chemically Bonded Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2017-02-01

    To comprehensively understand the formation mechanism of lamellar pores in splats, the delamination morphologies and crack patterns of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and lanthanum zirconia splats were examined. Results showed that both types of splats grew epitaxially on well-polished YSZ substrates, evidently confirming the formation of chemical bonding between splats and substrate. However, the interfacial or sub-interfacial delamination was observed in all kinds of splats in this study. Residual vertical cracks passing through delaminated domains (on bare substrate) were also observed, which clearly indicated that transverse delamination followed vertical cracking. Mechanical analysis about delamination was addressed, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  1. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Coherent phonon study of (GeTe){sub l}(Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub m} interfacial phase change memory materials

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, Kotaro Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2014-10-13

    The time-resolved reflectivity measurements were carried out on the interfacial phase change memory (iPCM) materials ([(GeTe){sub 2}(Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sub 8} and [(GeTe){sub 2}(Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 1}]{sub 20}) as well as conventional Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} alloy at room temperature and above the RESET-SET phase transition temperature. In the high-temperature phase, coherent phonons were clearly observed in the iPCM samples while drastic attenuation of coherent phonons was induced in the alloy. This difference strongly suggests the atomic rearrangement during the phase transition in iPCMs is much smaller than that in the alloy. These results are consistent with the unique phase transition model in which a quasi-one-dimensional displacement of Ge atoms occurs for iPCMs and a conventional amorphous-crystalline phase transition takes place for the alloy.

  3. Use of self assembled monolayers at variable coverage to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture: Pure shear loading

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; NELSON,GERALD C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-05-16

    The relationships between fundamental interfacial interactions, energy dissipation mechanisms, and fracture stress or fracture toughness in a glassy thermoset/inorganic solid joint are not well understood. This subject is addressed with a model system involving an epoxy adhesive on a polished silicon wafer containing its native oxide. The proportions of physical and chemical interactions at the interface, and the in-plane distribution, are varied using self-assembling monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS). The epoxy interacts strongly with the bare silicon oxide surface, but forms only a very weak interface with the methylated tails of the ODTS monolayer. The fracture stress is examined as a function of ODTS coverage in the napkin-ring (pure shear) loading geometry. The relationship between fracture stress and ODTS coverage is catastrophic, with a large change in fracture stress occurring over a narrow range of ODTS coverage. This transition in fracture stress does not correspond to a wetting transition of the epoxy. Rather, the transition in fracture stress corresponds to the onset of deformation in the epoxy, or the transition from brittle to ductile fracture. The authors postulate that the transition in fracture stress occurs when the local stress that the interface can support becomes comparable to the yield stress of the epoxy. The fracture results are independent of whether the ODTS deposition occurs by island growth (T{sub dep} = 10 C) or by homogeneous growth (T{sub dep} = 24 C).

  4. Test Plans. Lightweight Durable TPS: Tasks 1,2,4,5, and 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.; Tu, Tina

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this task is to develop the fluted core flexible blankets, also referred to as the Tailorable Advanced Blanket Insulation (TABI), to a technology readiness level (TRL) of 6. This task is one of the six tasks under TA 3, Lightweight Durable TPS study, of the Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) program. The purpose of this task is to develop a durable and low maintenance flexible TPS blanket material to be implemented on the SSTO vehicle.

  5. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  6. The durability of silicone versus latex mock arteries.

    PubMed

    Conti, J C; Strope, E R; Goldenberg, L M; Price, K S

    2001-01-01

    Latex mock arteries used in medical device testing allow researchers to evaluate mechanical characteristics of intravascular medical products without using animal or human clinical studies for this data. Such intravascular situations include determining properties such as drag and steerability of catheters, recoil of vascular stents, and clinician training. In fatigue testing, the latex mock arteries are used to receive deployed products and are then repeatedly pressurized at biologically relevant pressures to determine the long term durability of the product. By matching dimensions and pressure-volume relationships (compliance) of these latex tubes, researchers have a reliable means to evaluate and predict product lifetimes. The problem with latex mock arteries is two-fold: First, they are opaque so the product inside the artery cannot be seen during evaluation of the integrity of the product or during clinical training sessions. Second, latex tubes fatigue; therefore, the loading that they place on the internalized products varies with time. During long term durability studies, latex tubes may have to be replaced as often as every 100 million cycles. This can be problematic with products that are difficult to redeploy. We have developed a clear silicone mock artery system that allows us to fabricate three-dimensional objects, including tubes with precise geometric and mechanical properties. Our evaluations show that the mock arteries can be stressed up to 400 million cycles with little or no change in mechanical properties. We are in the process of continuing evaluations to determine long term durability.

  7. Freeze-Thaw Durability of Air-Entrained Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua

    2013-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles). The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss) and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity). The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to “the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete” GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results. PMID:23576906

  8. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    PubMed

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  9. A generalized definition for waste form durability.

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Bauer, T. H.; Morris, E. E.; Wigeland, R. A.

    2002-06-26

    When evaluating waste form performance, the term ''durability'' often appears in casual discourse, but in the technical literature, the focus is often on waste form ''degradation'' in terms of mass lost per unit area per unit time. Waste form degradation plays a key role in developing models of the long-term performance in a repository environment, but other factors also influence waste form performance. These include waste form geometry; density, porosity, and cracking; the presence of cladding; in-package chemistry feedback; etc. The paper proposes a formal definition of waste form ''durability'' which accounts for these effects. Examples from simple systems as well as from complex models used in the Total System Performance Assessment of Yucca Mountain are provided. The application of ''durability'' in the selection of bounding models is also discussed.

  10. Biomineralization mechanisms: a kinetics and interfacial energy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nancollas, George H.; Wu, Wenju

    2000-04-01

    The calcium phosphates and oxalates are among the most frequently encountered biomineral phases and numerous kinetics studies have been made of their crystallization and dissolution in supersaturated and undersaturated solutions, respectively. These have focused mainly on parameters such as solution composition, ionic strength, pH, temperature, and solid surface characteristics. There is considerable interest in extending such studies to solutions more closely simulating the biological milieu. The constant composition method is especially useful for investigating the mechanisms of these reactions, and in the present work, the interfacial tensions between water and each of these surfaces have been calculated from measured contact angles using surface tension component theory. Values for the calcium phosphate phases such as dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), hydroxyapatite (HAP), and fluorapatite (FAP) may be compared with data calculated from dissolution kinetics experiments invoking different reaction mechanisms. Agreement between the directly measured interfacial energies and those calculated from the kinetics experiments provides valuable corroborative information about individual growth and dissolution mechanisms. For the calcium phosphates, the much smaller interfacial tensions of OCP and DCPD in contact with water as compared with those of HAP and FAP support the suggestion that the former phases are precursors in HAP and FAP biomineralization. The ability of a surface to nucleate mineral phases is closely related to the magnitude of the interfacial energies. Constant composition studies have also shown that HAP is an effective nucleator of calcium oxalate monohydrate, both of which are frequently observed in renal stones.

  11. Electronic structures of TiO2-TCNE, -TCNQ, and -2,6-TCNAQ surface complexes studied by ionization potential measurements and DFT calculations: Mechanism of the shift of interfacial charge-transfer bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions between inorganic semiconductors and π-conjugated molecules allow direct charge separation without loss of energy. This feature is potentially useful for efficient photovoltaic conversions. Charge-transferred complexes of TiO2 nanoparticles with 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and its analogues (TCNX) show strong ICT absorption in the visible region. The ICT band was reported to be significantly red-shifted with extension of the π-conjugated system of TCNX. In order to clarify the mechanism of the red-shift, in this work, we systematically study electronic structures of the TiO2-TCNX surface complexes (TCNX; TCNE, TCNQ, 2,6-TCNAQ) by ionization potential measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  12. Interfacial Tension Effect on Cell Partition in Aqueous Two-Phase Systems.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Ehsan; Joshi, Ramila; Mann, Jay Adin; Tavana, Hossein

    2015-09-30

    Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) provide a mild environment for the partition and separation of cells. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the effect of interfacial tension of polymeric ATPS on the partitioning of cells between two phases and their interface. Two-phase systems are generated using polyethylene glycol and dextran of specific properties as phase-forming polymers and culture media as the solvent component. Ultralow interfacial tensions of the solutions are precisely measured using an axisymmetric drop shape analysis method. Partition experiments show that two-phase systems with an interfacial tension of 30 μJ/m(2) result in distribution of majority of cells to the bottom dextran phase. An increase in the interfacial tension results in a distribution of cells toward the interface. An independent cancer cell spheroid formation assay confirms these observations: a drop of the dextran phase containing cancer cells is dispensed into the immersion polyethylene glycol phase to form a cell-containing drop. Only at very small interfacial tensions do cells remain within the drop to aggregate into a spheroid. We perform a thermodynamic modeling of cell partition to determine variations of free energy associated with displacement of cells in ATPS with respect to the ultralow interfacial tensions. This modeling corroborates with the experimental results and demonstrates that at the smallest interfacial tension of 30 μJ/m(2), the free energy is a minimum with cells in the bottom phase. Increasing the interfacial tension shifts the minimum energy and partition of cells toward the interfacial region of the two aqueous phases. Examining differences in the partition behavior and minimum free energy modeling of A431.H9 cancer cells and mouse embryonic stem cells shows that the surface properties of cells further modulate partition in ATPS. This combined approach provides a fundamental understanding of interfacial tension role on cell partition in

  13. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  14. Use of recycled fine aggregate in concretes with durable requirements.

    PubMed

    Zega, Claudio Javier; Di Maio, Angel Antonio

    2011-11-01

    The use of construction waste materials as aggregates for concrete production is highly attractive compared to the use of non-renewable natural resources, promoting environmental protection and allowing the development of a new raw material. Several countries have recommendations for the use of recycled coarse aggregate in structural concrete, whereas the use of the fine fraction is limited because it may produce significant changes in some properties of concrete. However, during the last decade the use of recycled fine aggregates (RFA) has achieved a great international interest, mainly because of economic implications related to the shortage of natural sands suitable for the production of concrete, besides to allow an integral use of this type of waste. In this study, the durable behaviour of structural concretes made with different percentage of RFA (0%, 20%, and 30%) is evaluated. Different properties related to the durability of concretes such as absorption, sorptivity, water penetration under pressure, and carbonation are determined. In addition, the results of compressive strength, static modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage are presented. The obtained results indicate that the recycled concretes have a suitable resistant and durable behaviour, according to the limits indicated by different international codes for structural concrete.

  15. Durability of organobentonite-amended liner for decelerating chloroform transport.

    PubMed

    He, Shichong; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-04-01

    Chloroform is added to landfill for suppressing methane generation, which however may transport through landfill liners and lead to contamination of groundwater. To decelerate chloroform transport, the enhanced sorption ability of clay liners following organobentonite addition was tested. In this study, we used batch sorption to evaluate sorption capacity of chloroform to organobentonite, followed by column tests and model simulations for assessing durability of different liners. Results show that adding 10% CTMAB-bentonite (organobentonite synthesized using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) increased the duration of a bentonite liner by 88.5%. CTMAB-bentonite consistently showed the highest sorption capacity (Qm) among six typical organobentonites under various environmental conditions. The removal rate of chloroform by CTMAB-bentonite was 3.6-23 times higher than that by natural soils. According to the results derived by model simulation, a 70-cm 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibited much better durability than a 100-cm compact clay liner (CCL) and natural bentonite liner evidenced by the delayed and lower peak of eluent concentration. A minimum thickness of 65.8 cm of the 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner could completely sorb the chloroform in a 100-m-high landfill. The 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibiting much better durability has the promise for reducing environmental risk of chloroform in landfill.

  16. Permanence and durability of digital prints on paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černič, M.; Dolenc, J.; Scheicher, L.

    2006-06-01

    The paper used as a printing substrate in electro photographical techniques should achieve appropriate structure, surface and optical properties as well as thermal stability. Printing products are often exposed to negative influence from external climate conditions. Surface treatment with varnishing and lamination is a common solution for protecting the final products against light, higher temperatures and elevated relative humidity. In the context of the applied research done in cooperation with the printing industry we studied permanence and durability of paper, image of prints and final printed product. We were also examining the influence of accelerated artificial ageing of paper and colour prints in electro photographic printing technique (Xeikon), with two types of surface treatment on the quality of the printed products. Determination of basic physical, chemical and surface characteristics (mechanical strength, optical and colorimetric characteristics of paper) as well as the evaluation of permanence according to EN ISO 9706 (∞) have shown unsuitable optical and colorimetric properties of paper. The evaluation of durability of paper and prints after accelerated artificial ageing according to the EN ISO 5630-3 standard indicates unsuitable optical and colorimetric properties, which consequently cause low optical and colorimetric stability. Colour prints with a surface protection of polymer varnish or foil protection are very unstable, causing deterioration of colour, contrasts and colour balance. The results of research work are very useful for the evaluation of durable printing paper used for various new digital printing systems and for evaluation of printing material of permanent quality.

  17. Thermodynamics of interfacial changes in a protein-protein complex.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-03-04

    Recent experiments with biomacromolecular complexes suggest that structural modifications at the interfaces are vital for stability of the complexes and the functions of the biomacromolecules. Although several qualitative aspects about such interfaces are known from structural data, quantification of the interfacial changes is lacking. In this work, we study the thermodynamic changes at the interface in the complex between an enzyme, Nuclease A (NucA), and a specific inhibitor protein, NuiA. We calculate the conformational free energy and conformational entropy costs from histograms of the dihedral angles generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the complex and the free proteins. We extract the conformational thermodynamic parameters for changes in the tertiary structure of NuiA. We show that the binding is dominated by the interfacial changes, where the basic residues of NucA and acidic residues of NuiA are highly ordered and stabilized via strong electrostatic interactions. Our results correlate well with known information from structural studies. The tight interfacial structure is reflected in the significant changes in the structure and dynamics of the water molecules at the enzyme-inhibitor interface. The interfacial water molecules contribute significantly to the entropy loss for the overall complexation.

  18. Measurement of Interfacial Area Production and Permeability within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the pore-level interactions that affect multi-phase flow in porous media is important in many subsurface engineering applications, including enhanced oil recovery, remediation of dense non-aqueous liquid contaminated sites, and geologic CO2 sequestration. Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to have several shortcomings, which might partially be overcome using a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles that includes interfacial area as an additional parameter. A few static experimental studies have been previously performed, which allowed the determination of static parameters of the model, but no information exists concerning the interfacial area dynamic parameters. A new experimental porous flow cell that was constructed using stereolithography for two-phase gas-liquid flow studies was used in conjunction with an in-house analysis code to provide information on dynamic evolution of both fluid phases and gas-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the new generalized model of two-phase flow model and describe how the stereolithography flow cell experimental setup was used to obtain the dynamic parameters for the interfacial area numerical model. In particular, the methods used to determine the interfacial area permeability and production terms are shown.

  19. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  20. An interfacial stress sensor for biomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundara-Rajan, K.; Bestick, A.; Rowe, G. I.; Klute, G. K.; Ledoux, W. R.; Wang, H. C.; Mamishev, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor that measures interfacial forces in prostheses and is promising for other biomedical applications. These sensors can be integrated into prosthetic devices to measure both normal and shear stress simultaneously, allowing for the study of prosthetic limb fit, and ultimately for the ability to better adapt prosthetics to individual users. A sensing cell with a 1.0 cm2 spatial resolution and a measurement range of 0-220 kPa of shear and 0-2 MPa of pressure was constructed. The cell was load tested and found to be capable of isolating the applied shear and pressure forces. This paper discusses the construction of the prototype, the mechanical and electrode design, fabrication and characterization. The work presented is aimed at creating a class of adaptive prosthetic interfaces using a capacitive sensor.

  1. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  2. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  3. Development of a numerical workflow based on μ-CT imaging for the determination of capillary pressure-saturation-specific interfacial area relationship in 2-phase flow pore-scale porous-media systems: a case study on Heletz sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peche, Aaron; Halisch, Matthias; Bogdan Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this case study, we present the implementation of a finite element method (FEM)-based numerical pore-scale model that is able to track and quantify the propagating fluid-fluid interfacial area on highly complex micro-computed tomography (μ-CT)-obtained geometries. Special focus is drawn to the relationship between reservoir-specific capillary pressure (pc), wetting phase saturation (Sw) and interfacial area (awn). The basis of this approach is high-resolution μ-CT images representing the geometrical characteristics of a georeservoir sample. The successfully validated 2-phase flow model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations, including the surface tension force, in order to consider capillary effects for the computation of flow and the phase-field method for the emulation of a sharp fluid-fluid interface. In combination with specialized software packages, a complex high-resolution modelling domain can be obtained. A numerical workflow based on representative elementary volume (REV)-scale pore-size distributions is introduced. This workflow aims at the successive modification of model and model set-up for simulating, such as a type of 2-phase problem on asymmetric μ-CT-based model domains. The geometrical complexity is gradually increased, starting from idealized pore geometries until complex μ-CT-based pore network domains, whereas all domains represent geostatistics of the REV-scale core sample pore-size distribution. Finally, the model can be applied to a complex μ-CT-based model domain and the pc-Sw-awn relationship can be computed.

  4. The Hydrophobic Effect in Solute Partitioning and Interfacial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the partitioning of hydrophobic solutes between water and nonpolar solvents provide estimates for the energy cost of creating hydrophobic-water contacts. This energy is a factor of three lower than the work of adhesion derived from interfacial tension measurements. This discrepancy noted by Tanford in 1979 is widely viewed as a serious challenge to our understanding of hydrophobic interactions. However, the interfacial energy of a water-alkane interface depends on chain length. A simple analysis of published data shows that the loss of rotational freedom of an alkane chain at an interface accounts quantitatively for the length-dependent contribution to interfacial tension, leaving a length-independent contribution very close to the free energy of transfer per unit of solvent accessible surface area. This analysis thus clarifies the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and interfacial tension measurements of hydrophobic interaction energy. Alkanes do not loose rotational freedom when transferred between two different liquid phases but they do at an interface. This reconciles the difference between microscopic and macroscopic measurements. Like the partitioning free energy, the work of adhesion also has a large entropy and small enthalpy at 20 oC.

  5. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  6. Advanced Durability Analysis. Volume 1. Analytical Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-31

    for microstruc .- tural behavior . This approach for representing the IFQ, when properly used, can provide reasonable durability analysis rt,- sults for...equivalent initial flaw size distribution (EIFSD) function. Engineering principles rather than mechanistic-based theories for microstructural behavior are...accurate EIFS distribution and a service crack growth behavior . The determinations of EIFS distribution have been described in detail previously. In this

  7. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  8. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  9. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  10. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  11. 14 CFR 33.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.19 Durability. (a) Engine design and... design of the compressor and turbine rotor cases must provide for the containment of damage from rotor blade failure. Energy levels and trajectories of fragments resulting from rotor blade failure that...

  12. Machine tests crease durability of sheet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. K.; Stanford, H. B.

    1964-01-01

    To test the crease resistance of sheet materials, the mid-section is folded over crease-control blades. One end is clamped to a motor-driven eccentric, the other to a spring, and durability is measured by the cycles required to produce failure.

  13. 14 CFR 35.19 - Durability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.19 Durability. Each part of the propeller must be designed and constructed to minimize the development of any unsafe condition of the propeller...

  14. Facile preparation of super durable superhydrophobic materials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Junping; Li, Bucheng; Fan, Ling; Li, Lingxiao; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-10-15

    The low stability, complicated and expensive fabrication procedures seriously hinder practical applications of superhydrophobic materials. Here we report an extremely simple method for preparing super durable superhydrophobic materials, e.g., textiles and sponges, by dip coating in fluoropolymers (FPs). The morphology, surface chemical composition, mechanical, chemical and environmental stabilities of the superhydrophobic textiles were investigated. The results show how simple the preparation of super durable superhydrophobic textiles can be! The superhydrophobic textiles outperform their natural counterparts and most of the state-of-the-art synthetic superhydrophobic materials in stability. The intensive mechanical abrasion, long time immersion in various liquids and repeated washing have no obvious influence on the superhydrophobicity. Water drops are spherical in shape on the samples and could easily roll off after these harsh stability tests. In addition, this simple dip coating approach is applicable to various synthetic and natural textiles and can be easily scaled up. Furthermore, the results prove that a two-tier roughness is helpful but not essential with regard to the creation of super durable superhydrophobic textiles. The combination of microscale roughness of textiles and materials with very low surface tension is enough to form super durable superhydrophobic textiles. According to the same procedure, superhydrophobic polyurethane sponges can be prepared, which show high oil absorbency, oil/water separation efficiency and stability.

  15. Your Medicare Coverage: Durable Medical Equipment (DME) Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Medicare.gov for covered items Durable medical equipment (DME) coverage How often is it covered? Medicare ... B (Medical Insurance) covers medically necessary durable medical equipment (DME) that your doctor prescribes for use in ...

  16. Effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yakang; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Zilong; Lu, Shuangfang; Xue, Qingzhong

    2016-04-01

    A novel interfacial model was proposed to understand water flow mechanism in nanochannels. Based on our pore-throat nanochannel model, the effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels was quantitatively studied using Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that both the permeability of nanochannel and water velocity in the nanochannel dramatically decrease with increasing the thickness of interfacial layer. The permeability of nanochannel with pore radius of 10 nm decreases by about three orders of magnitude when the thickness of interfacial layer is changed from 0 nm to 3 nm gradually. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the cross-section shape has a great effect on the water flow inside nanochannel and the effect of interfacial layer on the permeability of nanochannel has a close relationship with cross-section shape when the pore size is smaller than 12 nm. Besides, both pore-throat ratio and throat length can greatly affect water flow in nanochannels, and the influence of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels becomes more evident with increasing pore-throat ratio and throat length. Our theoretical results provide a simple and effective method to study the flow phenomena in nano-porous media, particularly to quantitatively study the interfacial layer effect in nano-porous media.

  17. Modeling the Rate-Dependent Durability of Reduced-Ag SAC Interconnects for Area Array Packages Under Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Vikram; Menon, Sandeep; Osterman, Michael; Pecht, Michael G.

    2013-08-01

    Solder durability models frequently focus on the applied strain range; however, the rate of applied loading, or strain rate, is also important. In this study, an approach to incorporate strain rate dependency into durability estimation for solder interconnects is examined. Failure data were collected for SAC105 solder ball grid arrays assembled with SAC305 solder that were subjected to displacement-controlled torsion loads. Strain-rate-dependent (Johnson-Cook model) and strain-rate-independent elastic-plastic properties were used to model the solders in finite-element simulation. Test data were then used to extract damage model constants for the reduced-Ag SAC solder. A generalized Coffin-Manson damage model was used to estimate the durability. The mechanical fatigue durability curve for reduced-silver SAC solder was generated and compared with durability curves for SAC305 and Sn-Pb from the literature.

  18. Cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Critical studies in materials and durability. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the structural and morphological features of CdS and (CdZn)S layers and their heterojunctions with Cu/sub 2/S is presented. The growth of the Cu/sub 2/S layer has been studied as a function of time for both the solution and solid state process using transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary observations have also been made on vapor and sputter deposited Cu/sub 2/S layers. The effect of oxidation and reduction heat treatments on the optical properties of Cu/sub 2/S are reported. Changes of cell performance with time for cells loaded to various points in the power quadrant are described.

  19. Coating-Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    Technical Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coating - Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Tresa Pollock 3...Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils Final Report ONRGrant#N00014-l 1-1-0616 Technical Contact (Principal Investigator) Tresa M. Pollock Materials...Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils 1. Summary In the severe operating environments encountered in Naval ship

  20. Development of highly durable deep-ultraviolet AlGaN-based LED multichip array with hemispherical encapsulated structures using a selected resin through a detailed feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Shoko; Yamada, Kiho; Hirano, Akira; Ippommatsu, Masamichi; Ito, Masahiro; Morishima, Naoki; Aosaki, Ko; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-08-01

    To replace mercury lamps with AlGaN-based deep-ultraviolet (DUV) LEDs, a simple and low-cost package with increased light extraction efficiency (LEE) is indispensable. Therefore, resin encapsulation is considered to be a key technology. However, the photochemical reactions induced by DUV light cause serious problems, and conventional resins cannot be used. In the former part of this study, a comparison of a silicone resin and fluorine polymers was carried out in terms of their suitability for encapsulation, and we concluded that only one of the fluorine polymers can be used for encapsulation. In the latter part, the endurance of encapsulation using the selected fluorine polymer was investigated, and we confirmed that the selected fluorine polymer can guarantee a lifetime of over 6,000 h at a wavelength of 265 nm. Furthermore, a 3 × 4 array module of encapsulated dies on a simple AlN submount was fabricated, demonstrating the possibility of W/cm2-class lighting.

  1. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  2. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Tabai, Elaheh; Mohammadi Basir, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and microleakage during six months of water storage. Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP), Single Bond (SB), Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB), and All-Bond SE (ABSE). After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05). Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage. Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. PMID:27123015

  3. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 >= 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  4. Correlation between ferromagnetism and the concentration of interfacial defects in multiferroic Bi7Fe2.75Co0.25Ti3O21 studied by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, W. N.; Li, X. N.; Xu, J. P.; Huang, S. J.; Liu, J. D.; Zhu, Z.; Fu, Z. P.; Lu, Y. L.; Ye, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigated the effect of the annealing temperature on the interfacial defects and the magnetization of a single-phase multiferroic Bi7Fe2.75Co0.25Ti3O21. With the increase of annealing temperature, the average thickness of the nonaplates increased from 80 to 180 nm. But the magnetic property measurement shows that the saturation magnetization gradually decreases with the increase of the annealing temperature correspondingly. Positron annihilation measurements reveal that the interfacial defects disappear obviously when the annealing temperature increased, which is found to agree well with the variation of saturation magnetization. The results suggest that with the higher concentration of interfacial defects may bring about higher saturation magnetization for the Aurivillius phase material, opening a window to improve the magnetic performance through controlling the concentration of interfacial defects.

  5. Effect of ZnO nanoparticle and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide on the dynamic and equilibrium oil-water interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Tahereh Fereidooni; Azizian, Saeid

    2014-02-13

    The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on the dynamic and equilibrium interfacial tension in the presence and absence of cationic surfactant CTAB was investigated. The results show that nanoparticles solely have no effect on interfacial tension. However, in the presence of CTAB, both particles and surfactants are adsorbed at the interface, and by a synergistic effect decrease the interfacial tension more. The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on the contact angle and stability of emulsions was studied too. The dynamic interfacial tension data were fitted with two different models. The results show that the adsorption mechanism of surfactant from bulk to interface was controlled by the mixed diffusion-kinetic model.

  6. Interfacial optimization of fiber-reinforced hydrogel composites for soft fibrous tissue applications.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Julianne L; Lowman, Anthony M; VanLandingham, Mark R; Palmese, Giuseppe R

    2014-08-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body, yet the current treatment of choice is a partial meniscectomy, which is known to lead to joint degeneration and osteoarthritis. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring function to the meniscus following an injury. Fiber-reinforced hydrogel composites are particularly suited for replicating the mechanical function of native fibrous tissues due to their ability to mimic the native anisotropic property distribution present. A critical issue with these materials, however, is the potential for the fiber-matrix interfacial properties to severely limit composite performance. In this work, the interfacial properties of an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel are studied. A novel chemical grafting technique, confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, is used to improve UHMWPE-PVA interfacial adhesion. Interfacial shear strength is quantified using fiber pull-out tests. Results indicate significantly improved fiber-hydrogel interfacial adhesion after chemical grafting, where chemically grafted samples have an interfacial shear strength of 256.4±64.3kPa compared to 11.5±2.9kPa for untreated samples. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy of fiber surfaces after fiber pull-out reveal cohesive failure within the hydrogel matrix for treated fiber samples, indicating that the UHMWPE-PVA interface has been successfully optimized. Lastly, inter-fiber spacing is observed to have a significant effect on interfacial adhesion. Fibers spaced further apart have significantly higher interfacial shear strengths, which is critical to consider when optimizing composite design. The results in this study are applicable in developing similar chemical grafting techniques and optimizing fiber-matrix interfacial properties for other hydrogel-based composite systems.

  7. Ultralow interfacial tensions of aqueous two-phase systems measured using drop shape.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Ehsan; Mann, J Adin; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-08-19

    Aqueous solutions of different polymers can separate and form aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). ATPS provide an aqueous, biocompatible, and mild environment for separation and fractionation of biomolecules. The interfacial tension between the two aqueous phases plays a major role in ATPS-mediated partition of biomolecules. Because of the structure of the two aqueous phases, the interfacial tensions between the phases can be 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller than conventional fluid-liquid systems: ∼1-100 μJ/m(2) for ATPS compared to ∼72 mJ/m(2) for the water-vapor interface. This poses a major challenge for the experimental measurements of reproducible interfacial tension data for these systems. We address the need for precise determination of ultralow interfacial tensions by systematically studying a series of polymeric ATPS comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran (DEX) as the phase-forming polymers. Sessile and pendant drops of the denser DEX phase are formed within the immersion PEG phase. An axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) is used to determine interfacial tensions of eight different ATPS. Specific criteria are used to reproducibly determine ultralow interfacial tensions of the ATPS from pendant and sessile drops. Importantly, for a given ATPS, pendant drop and sessile drop experiments return values within 0.001 mJ/m(2) indicating reliability of our measurements. Then, the pendant drop technique is used to measure interfacial tensions of all eight ATPS. Our measured values range from 0.012 ± 0.001 mJ/m(2) to 0.381 ± 0.006 mJ/m(2) and vary with the concentration of polymers in equilibrated phases of ATPS. Measurements of ultralow interfacial tensions with such reproducibility will broadly benefit studies involving partition of different biomolecules in ATPS and elucidate the critical effect of interfacial tension.

  8. Insights into the role of protein molecule size and structure on interfacial properties using designed sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Mirjana Dimitrijev; He, Lizhong; James, Michael; Nelson, Andrew; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of a large, structured protein with a smaller, unstructured component are inherently complex and hard to characterize at interfaces, leading to difficulties in understanding their interfacial behaviours and, therefore, formulation optimization. Here, we investigated interfacial properties of such a mixed system. Simplicity was achieved using designed sequences in which chemical differences had been eliminated to isolate the effect of molecular size and structure, namely a short unstructured peptide (DAMP1) and its longer structured protein concatamer (DAMP4). Interfacial tension measurements suggested that the size and bulk structuring of the larger molecule led to much slower adsorption kinetics. Neutron reflectometry at equilibrium revealed that both molecules adsorbed as a monolayer to the air–water interface (indicating unfolding of DAMP4 to give a chain of four connected DAMP1 molecules), with a concentration ratio equal to that in the bulk. This suggests the overall free energy of adsorption is equal despite differences in size and bulk structure. At small interfacial extensional strains, only molecule packing influenced the stress response. At larger strains, the effect of size became apparent, with DAMP4 registering a higher stress response and interfacial elasticity. When both components were present at the interface, most stress-dissipating movement was achieved by DAMP1. This work thus provides insights into the role of proteins' molecular size and structure on their interfacial properties, and the designed sequences introduced here can serve as effective tools for interfacial studies of proteins and polymers. PMID:23303222

  9. Effects of crystal-melt interfacial energy anisotropy on dendritic morphology and growth kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.

    1989-01-01

    Morphological and kinetic studies of succinonitrile, a BCC crystal with a low (0.5 percent) anisotropy and pivalic acid, and FCC crystal with relatively large (5 percent) anisotropy in solid-liquid interfacial energy, show clearly that anisotropy in the solid-liquid interfacial energy does not affect the tip radius-velocity relationship, but has a profound influence on the tip region and the rate of amplification of branching waves. Anisotropy of the solid-liquid interfacial energy may be one of the key factors by which the microstructural characteristics of cast structures reflect individual material behavior, especially crystal symmetry.

  10. Effect of interfacial oxide layers on the current-voltage characteristics of Al-Si contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Parker, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Aluminum-silicon contacts with very thin interfacial oxide layers and various surface impurity concentrations are studied for both n and p-type silicon. To determine the surface impurity concentrations on p(+)-p and n(+)-n structures, a modified C-V technique was utilized. Effects of interfacial oxide layers and surface impurity concentrations on current-voltage characteristics are discussed based on the energy band diagrams from the conductance-voltage plots. The interfacial oxide and aluminum layer causes image contrasts on X-ray topographs.

  11. Comparison of Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test and X-ray Microtomography Measurements of Immiscible Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas within the Identical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, K. C.; McDonald, K.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial area between immiscible fluids in porous media has been demonstrated to be a critical entity for improved understanding, characterization, and simulation of multiphase flow and mass transport in the subsurface. Two general methods are available for measuring interfacial areas for 3-D porous-media systems, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Each method has their associated advantages and disadvantages. A few prior research efforts have conducted comparative analyses of the two methods, which have generally indicated disparities in measured values for natural geomedia. For these studies, however, interfacial areas were measured for separate samples with each method due to method restrictions. Thus, to date, there has been no comparative analysis conducted wherein the two measurement methods were applied to the exact same sample. To address this issue, trichloroethene-water interfacial areas were measured for a system comprising a well-sorted, natural sand (median grain diameter of 0.323 mm) using both X-ray microtomography and IPTTs. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns used to conduct the IPTTs. Columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate potential impacts of the tracer tests on fluid configuration. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT were 4-6 times larger than the microtomography results, which is consistent with previous work. This disparity was attributed to the inability of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness. The results indicate that both methods provide useful measures of interfacial area as long as their limitations are recognized.

  12. Tuning the Interfacial Thermal Conductance between Polystyrene and Sapphire by Controlling the Interfacial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Sun, Fangyuan; Tian, Xia; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yongmei; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Fosong

    2015-10-28

    In polymer-based electric microdevices, thermal transport across polymer/ceramic interface is essential for heat dissipation, which limits the improvement of the device performance and lifetime. In this work, four sets of polystyrene (PS) thin films/sapphire samples were prepared with different interface adhesion values, which was achieved by changing the rotation speeds in the spin-coating process. The interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) between the PS films and the sapphire were measured by time domain thermoreflectance method, and the interfacial adhesion between the PS films and the sapphire, as measured by a scratch tester, was found to increase with the rotation speed from 2000 to 8000 rpm. The ITC shows a similar dependence on the rotation speed, increasing up to a 3-fold from 7.0 ± 1.4 to 21.0 ± 4.2 MW/(m(2) K). This study demonstrates the role of spin-coating rotation speed in thermal transport across the polymer/ceramic interfaces, evoking a much simpler mechanical method for tuning this type of ITC. The findings of enhancement of the ITC of polymer/ceramic interface can shed some light on the thermal management and reliability of macro- and microelectronics, where polymeric and hybrid organic-inorganic nano films are employed.

  13. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  14. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  15. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent. PMID:27656691

  16. Nanomechanical Sensing of Biological Interfacial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wenjian

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. Cellulase is an enzyme capable of converting insoluble cellulose into soluble sugars. Cellulosic biofuel produced from such fermentable simple sugars is a promising substitute as an energy source. However, its economic feasibility is limited by the low efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase. Cellulose is insoluble and resistant to enzymatic degradation, not only because the beta-1,4-glycosidic bonds are strong covalent bonds, but also because cellulose microfibrils are packed into tightly bound, crystalline lattices. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase involves three steps--initial binding, decrystallization, and hydrolytic cleavage. Currently, the mechanism for the decrystallization has not yet been elucidated, though it is speculated to be the rate-limiting step of the overall enzymatic activity. The major technical challenge limiting the understanding of the decrystallization is the lack of an effective experimental approach capable of examining the decrystallization, an interfacial enzymatic activity on solid substrates. The work presented develops a nanomechanical sensing approach to investigate both the decrystallization and enzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cellulose. The first experimental evidence of the decrystallization is obtained by comparing the results from native cellulase and non-hydrolytic cellulase. Surface topography has been applied to examine the activities of native cellulase and non-hydrolytic cellulase on cellulose substrate. The study demonstrates additional experimental evidence of the decrystallization in the hydrolysis of cellulose. By combining simulation and monitoring technology, the current study also investigates the structural changes of cellulose at a molecular level. In particular, the study employs cellulose nanoparticles with a bilayer structure on mica sheets. By comparing results from a molecular dynamic simulation and the distance

  17. Durability Testing of Commercial Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schienle, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Technical efforts by AlliedSignal Engines in DOE/NASA-funded project from February, 1978 through December, 1995 are reported in the fields ceramic materials for gas turbine engines and cyclic thermal durability testing. A total of 29 materials were evaluated in 40 cyclic oxidation exposure durability tests. Ceramic test bars were cyclically thermally exposed to a hot combustion environment at temperatures up to 1371 C (2500 F) for periods of up to 3500 hours, simulating conditions typically encountered by hot flowpath components in an automotive gas turbine engine. Before and after exposure, quarter-point flexure strength tests were performed on the specimens, and fractography examinations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to determine failure origins.

  18. Chemo-Marangoni convection driven by an interfacial reaction: pattern formation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Eckert, K; Acker, M; Tadmouri, R; Pimienta, V

    2012-09-01

    A combined study devoted to chemo-Marangoni convection and the underlying kinetics is presented for a biphasic system in which surfactants are produced in situ by an interfacial reaction. The pattern formation studied in a Hele-Shaw cell in both microgravity and terrestrial environments initially shows an ensemble of chemo-Marangoni cells along a nearly planar interface. Soon, a crossover occurs to periodic large-scale interfacial deformations which coexist with the Marangoni cells. This crossover can be correlated with the autocatalytic nature of the interfacial reaction identified in the kinetic studies. The drastic increase in the product concentration is associated with an enhanced aggregate-assisted transfer after the critical micellar concentration is approached. In this context, it was possible to conclusively explain the changes in the periodicity of the interfacial deformations depending on the reactant concentration ratio.

  19. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  20. (Durability of building materials and components)

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.

    1990-11-27

    The traveler participated in the fourth meeting of RILEM 100-TSL, Techniques for Service Life Prediction,'' and The Fifth International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components.'' In addition, the traveler met with staff members at Taywood Engineering Ltd., Electricite de France, and AEA Technology. The meeting pertained to performance of concrete materials in nuclear power plant structures, time variation of concrete material properties, methods for evaluating concrete structures, and modeling to predict the effects of degradation factors on concrete materials. As many of the concrete structures in general civil engineering applications as well as nuclear power plant applications in Europe are aging, there is increasing emphasis on assessing the durability of these structures. Information was provided of direct application to the Structural Aging Program which would not have been available without these visits. Of equal, or possibly more importance, was the individual contacts established at the organizations visited. Each organization was extremely interested in both the approach and scope of the Structural Aging Program and requested that they be informed of progress. The initial steps were taken to cooperate with several of these researchers and this should help the Structural Aging Program keep abreast of related European activities. In summary, information obtained during this trip will benefit the ongoing Structural Aging Program by informing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) of the extensive European research programs addressing the durability of concrete structures, and also by forming and strengthening acquaintances with counterparts in other countries, thus enhancing the basis for possible international cooperation.

  1. Durability Evaluation of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoyu Zhang; James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Gregory K. Housley

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus for single cell and small stack tests has been developed for this purpose. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  2. Air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated soils: Evaluation of interfacial domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2002-10-01

    A gas-phase miscible-displacement method, using decane as an interfacial tracer, was used to measure air-water interfacial areas for a sand with water contents ranging from ˜2% to 20%. The expected trend of decreasing interfacial areas with increasing water contents was observed. The maximum estimated interfacial area of 19,500 cm-1 appears reasonable given it is smaller than the measured surface area of the porous medium (60,888 cm-1). Comparison of the experimental data presented herein with literature data provided further insight into the characterization of the air-water interface in unsaturated porous media. Specifically, comparison of interfacial areas measured using gas-phase versus aqueous-phase methods indicates that the gas-phase method generally yields larger interfacial areas than the aqueous-phase methods, even when accounting for differences in water content and physical properties of the porous media. The observations are consistent with proposed differences in interfacial accessibility of the aqueous- and gas-phase tracers. Evaluation of the data in light of functional interfacial domains, described herein, yields the hypothesis that aqueous interfacial tracers measure primarily air-water interfaces formed by "capillary water," while gas-phase tracers measure air-water interfaces formed by both capillary and surface-adsorbed (film) water. The gas- and aqueous-phase methods may each provide interfacial area information that is more relevant to specific problems of interest. For example, gas-phase interfacial area measurements may be most relevant to contaminant transport in unsaturated systems, where retention at the air-water interface may be significant. Conversely, the aqueous-phase methods may yield information with direct bearing on multiphase flow processes that are dominated by capillary-phase behavior.

  3. Polylactic Acid-Based Polymer Blends for Durable Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finniss, Adam

    was fully protected by the more stable phase. Lastly, molded parts of differing thicknesses were hydrolytically degraded to examine the effects of diffusion resistance on the mechanical properties of untreated PC/PLA blends. It was determined that, similar to the droplet morphology study, the effect of PC content was the most dominating factor in the durability of the formulations. In fact, if molded parts reach a critical thickness, a transition from ductile to brittle failure modes can be observed. The rate of diffusion through the materials was also determined to be much faster than the rate of PLA hydrolysis. It is concluded that the most effective way to create a durable material containing a significant bio-based content is to completely encapsulate PLA polymer with the more stable polycarbonate phase. Materials containing up to about 30% PLA at maximum were shown to be sufficiently durable so that they may be employed in similar automotive and electrical applications as for pure polycarbonate. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Actuation of interfacial waves in oil-water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyeong; Weheliye, Weheliye; Chinaud, Maxime; Angeli, Panagiota; James Percival Collaboration; Omar. K. Matar Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Droplet detachment from interfacial waves in two-phase flows has pulled in noteworthy exploration interest. In order to examine this phenomenon experimentally and empower quantitative estimation, it is important to spatially confine the drop formation. In the present study, a cylinder, located close to the inlet of the test section and perpendicular to the direction of the flow, is placed in a two-phase stratified oil-water pipe flow. The introduction of this cylinder actuated interfacial waves and move from stratified to dispersed flow pattern. High speed visualisation and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurement are utilized to investigate the flow pattern maps of the two-phase flow and the velocity fields in the wake of the cylinder, respectively. These results will be compared with previous experimental studies. Department of Chemical Engineering South Kensington Campus Imperial College London SW7 2AZ.

  5. Interfacial Properties of Bilayer and Trilayer Graphene on Metal Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Yangyang; Wang, Lu; Quhe, Ruge; Ni, Zeyuan; Mei, Wai-Ning; Gao, Zhengxiang; Yu, Dapeng; Shi, Junjie; Lu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    One popular approach to prepare graphene is to grow them on transition metal substrates via chemical vapor deposition. By using the density functional theory with dispersion correction, we systematically investigate for the first time the interfacial properties of bilayer (BLG) and trilayer graphene (TLG) on metal substrates. Three categories of interfacial structures are revealed. The adsorption of B(T)LG on Al, Ag, Cu, Au, and Pt substrates is a weak physisorption, but a band gap can be opened. The adsorption of B(T)LG on Ti, Ni, and Co substrates is a strong chemisorption, and a stacking-insensitive band gap is opened for the two uncontacted layers of TLG. The adsorption of B(T)LG on Pd substrate is a weaker chemisorption, with a band gap opened for the uncontacted layers. This fundamental study also helps for B(T)LG device study due to inevitable graphene/metal contact. PMID:23803738

  6. DURABILITY EVALUATION AND PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED AGGREGATES FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    M. M. Wu

    2005-02-01

    Under the cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Energy (CONSOL R&D), teamed with Universal Aggregates, LLC, to conduct a systematic study of the durability of aggregates manufactured using a variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD), fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and fly ash specimens with different chemical and physical properties and under different freeze/thaw, wet/dry and long-term natural weathering conditions. The objectives of the study are to establish the relationships among the durability and characteristics of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and to identify the causes of durability problems, and, ultimately, to increase the utilization of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash as a construction material. Manufactured aggregates made from FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and products made from those manufactured aggregates were used in the study. The project is divided into the following activities: sample collection and characterization; characterization and preparation of manufactured aggregates; determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregates; preparation and determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregate products; and data evaluation and reporting.

  7. The effect of composition and thermodynamics on the surface morphology of durable superhydrophobic polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Tehila; Dodiuk, Hanna; Kenig, Samuel; Panwar, Artee; Barry, Carol; Mead, Joey

    2017-01-01

    Durable superhydrophobic coatings were synthesized using a system of silica nanoparticles (NPs) to provide nanoscale roughness, fluorosilane to give hydrophobic chemistry, and three different polymer binders: urethane acrylate, ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate, and epoxy. Coatings composed of different binders incorporating NPs in various concentrations exhibited different superhydrophobic attributes when applied on polycarbonate (PC) and glass substrates and as a function of coating composition. It was found that the substrate surface characteristics and wettability affected the superhydrophobic characteristics of the coatings. Interfacial tension and spreading coefficient parameters (thermodynamics) of the coating components were used to predict the localization of the NPs for the different binders' concentrations. The thermodynamic analysis of the NPs localization was in good agreement with the experimental observations. On the basis of the thermodynamic analysis and the experimental scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy results, it was concluded that localization of the NPs on the surface was critical to provide the necessary roughness and resulting superhydrophobicity. The durability evaluated by tape testing of the epoxy formulations was the best on both glass and PC. Several coating compositions retained their superhydrophobicity after the tape test. In summary, it was concluded that thermodynamic analysis is a powerful tool to predict the roughness of the coating due to the location of NPs on the surface, and hence can be used in the design of superhydrophobic coatings.

  8. The effect of composition and thermodynamics on the surface morphology of durable superhydrophobic polymer coatings

    PubMed Central

    Nahum, Tehila; Dodiuk, Hanna; Kenig, Samuel; Panwar, Artee; Barry, Carol; Mead, Joey

    2017-01-01

    Durable superhydrophobic coatings were synthesized using a system of silica nanoparticles (NPs) to provide nanoscale roughness, fluorosilane to give hydrophobic chemistry, and three different polymer binders: urethane acrylate, ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate, and epoxy. Coatings composed of different binders incorporating NPs in various concentrations exhibited different superhydrophobic attributes when applied on polycarbonate (PC) and glass substrates and as a function of coating composition. It was found that the substrate surface characteristics and wettability affected the superhydrophobic characteristics of the coatings. Interfacial tension and spreading coefficient parameters (thermodynamics) of the coating components were used to predict the localization of the NPs for the different binders’ concentrations. The thermodynamic analysis of the NPs localization was in good agreement with the experimental observations. On the basis of the thermodynamic analysis and the experimental scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy results, it was concluded that localization of the NPs on the surface was critical to provide the necessary roughness and resulting superhydrophobicity. The durability evaluated by tape testing of the epoxy formulations was the best on both glass and PC. Several coating compositions retained their superhydrophobicity after the tape test. In summary, it was concluded that thermodynamic analysis is a powerful tool to predict the roughness of the coating due to the location of NPs on the surface, and hence can be used in the design of superhydrophobic coatings. PMID:28243071

  9. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-07-03

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds.

  10. Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Biju, Vasudevan P.; Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Lu, H. Peter

    2004-08-04

    We report on single molecule studies of photosensitized interfacial electron transfer (ET) processes in Coumarin 343 (C343)-TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) and Cresyl Violet (CV+)-TiO2 NP systems, using time-correlated single photon counting coupled with scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence intensity trajectories of individual dye molecules adsorbed on a semiconductor NP surface showed fluorescence fluctuations and blinking, with time constrants distributed from sub-milliseconds to several seconds.

  11. Laboratory Evaluations of Durability of Southern Pine Pressure Treated With Extractives From Durable Wood Species.

    PubMed

    Kirker, G T; Bishell, A B; Lebow, P K

    2016-02-01

    Extracts from sawdust of four naturally durable wood species [Alaskan yellow cedar, AYC, Cupressus nootkanansis D. Don 1824; eastern red cedar, ERC, Juniperus virginiana L.; honey mesquite, HM, Prosopis glandulosa Torr.; and black locust, BL, Robinia pseudoacacia L.] were used to treat southern pine, Pt, Pinus taeda L. sapwood blocks. Extractive treated blocks were evaluated for decay resistance in standard soil bottle fungal assays challenged with brown and white rot decay fungi. Results showed that extractives did impart some improvement to decay resistance of Pt blocks. BL- and HM-treated Pt blocks were also used in choice and no-choice assays to determine feeding preference and damage by eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes) Kollar. Minimal feeding on treated blocks was seen in both choice and no-choice assays. In choice assays, there was similar mortality between HM and BL arenas; however, in no-choice assays, complete mortality was recorded for HM-treated Pt and high mortality was seen with BL-treated Pt. Subsequent dose mortality termite assays showed HM to be effective in killing R. flavipes at low concentrations. Both HM and BL show promise as deterrents or termiticidal protectants and will be further evaluated in field studies.

  12. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  13. Interfacial trapping in an aged discotic liquid crystal semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Nathan J.; Patrick, Michael S.; Paul, Sanjoy; Ellman, Brett; Semyonov, Alexander; Twieg, Robert J.; Matthews, Rachael; Pentzer, Emily; Singer, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on time-of-flight (TOF) hole mobility measurements in aged 2,3,6,7,10,11-Hexakis(pentyloxy)triphenylene columnar liquid crystals. In contrast to the original samples reported in 2006, homeotropically aligned samples yielded TOF transients with an extended non-exponential rise. The experimental data were fit to a simple model that accurately reproduces the TOF transients assuming delayed charge release from traps near the optically excited electrode. While interfacial trapping appears only in the aged materials, the bulk mobility is similar to the pristine material. The model addresses dispersive transport in quasi-one-dimensional materials, determines the charge carrier mobility in systems with interfacial traps, and provides a method for characterizing the traps.

  14. Modeling Interfacial Adsorption of Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Xin

    2014-11-01

    Numerous natural and industrial processes demand advances in our fundamental understanding of colloidal adsorption at liquid interfaces. Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we model the interfacial adsorption of core-shell nanoparticles at the water-oil interface. The solid core of the nanoparticle encompasses beads arranged in an fcc lattice structure and its surface is uniformly grafted with polymer chains. The nanoparticles bind to the interface from either phase to minimize total surface energy. With a single nanoparticle, we demonstrate detailed kinetics of different stages in the adsorption process. Prominent effect of grafted polymer chains is characterized by varying molecular weight and polydispersity of the chains. We also preload nanoparticles straddling the interface to reveal the influence of nanoparticle surface density on further adsorption. Importantly, these studies show how surface-grafted polymer chains can alter the interfacial behavior of colloidal particles and provide guidelines for designing on-demand Pickering emulsion.

  15. Simulation of thin film membranes formed by interfacial polymerization.

    PubMed

    Oizerovich-Honig, Rachel; Raim, Vladimir; Srebnik, Simcha

    2010-01-05

    Interfacial polymerization is widely used today for the production of ultrathin films for encapsulation, chemical separations, and desalination. Polyamide films, in particular, are employed in manufacturing of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes. While these materials show excellent salt rejection, they have rather low water permeability, both properties that apparently stem from the rigid cross-linked structure. An increasing amount of experimental research on membranes of different chemistries and membrane characterization suggests the importance of other factors (such as unreacted functional groups and surface roughness) in determining membrane performance. We developed a molecular simulation model to qualitatively study the effects of various synthesis conditions on membrane performance, in terms of its estimated porosity and permeability. The model is of an interfacial aggregation process of two types of functional monomers. Film growth with time and structural characteristics of the final film are compared with predictions of existing theories and experimental observations.

  16. Interfacial Reactivity of Radionuclides: Emerging Paradigms from Molecular Level Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-15

    Over the past few decades use of an increasing array of molecular-level analytical probes has provided new detailed insight into mineral and radionuclide interfacial reactivity in subsurface environments. This capability has not only helped change the way mineral surface reactivity is studied but also how field-scale contaminant migration problems are addressed and ultimately resolved. Here we overview examples of relatively new interfacial reactivity paradigms with implications for future research directions. Specific examples include understanding: the role of site-to-site electron conduction at mineral surfaces and through bulk mineral phases, effects of local chemical environment on the stability of intermediate species in oxidation/reduction reactions, and the importance of mechanistic reaction pathway for defining possible reaction products and thermodynamic driving force. The discussion also includes examples of how detailed molecular/microscopic characterization of field samples has changed the way complex contaminant migration problems were conceptualized and modeled.

  17. Organic photovoltaic devices with the bilayer cathode interfacial structure of pyromellitic dianhydride and lithium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Eunkyoung; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Chae, Heeyeop; Yi, Junsin

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we fabricated and characterized an organic photovoltaic (OPV) device with a pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA)/lithium fluoride (LiF) cathode interfacial layer between poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)(P3HT)+[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and Al. Compared to the OPV device with a LiF-only cathode interfacial layer having a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.7%, the OPV device with the bilayer cathode interfacial structure [PMDA (0.3 nm)/LiF (0.7 nm)] exhibited a reduced resistance and a PCE value enhanced to 3.9% under an illumination condition of 100 mW cm-2 (AM1.5). The observed improvement of the OPV characteristics was attributed to the reduced leakage current of the device by the bilayer cathode interfacial layer.

  18. Interfacial Friction in Gas-Liquid Annular Flow: Analogies to Full and Transition Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.C.; Beus, S.G.; Fore, L.B.

    1999-03-01

    New film thickness and pressure gradient data were obtained in a 5.08 by 101.6 mm duct for nitrogen and water in annular flow. Pressures of 3.4 and 17 atm and temperatures of 38 and 93 C were used to vary the gas density and liquid viscosity. These data are used to compute interfacial shear stresses and interfacial friction factors for comparison with several accepted literature correlations. These comparisons are reasonable for small values of the relative film thickness. However, the new data cover conditions not approached by the data used to construct those correlations. By combining the current data with the results of two other comprehensive modern experimental studies, a new correlation for the interfacial friction factor has been developed. This correlation adds elements of transition roughness to Wallis' fully-rough analogy to better predict interfacial friction factors over a wide range of gas Reynolds numbers and liquid film thicknesses.

  19. Gas-liquid phase separation in oppositely charged colloids: stability and interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Andrea; Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2006-09-07

    We study the phase behavior and the interfacial tension of the screened Coulomb (Yukawa) restricted primitive model (YRPM) of oppositely charged hard spheres with diameter sigma using Monte Carlo simulations. We determine the gas-liquid and gas-solid phase transitions using free energy calculations and grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations for varying inverse Debye screening length kappa. We find that the gas-liquid phase separation is stable for kappasigmainterfacial tension using grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The interfacial tension decreases upon increasing the range of the interaction. In particular, we find that simple scaling can be used to relate the interfacial tension of the YRPM to that of the restricted primitive model, where particles interact with bare Coulomb interactions.

  20. Sound-induced Interfacial Dynamics in a Microfluidic Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2014-11-01

    Retrieving sound wave by a fluidic means is challenging due to the difficulty in visualizing the very minute sound-induced fluid motion. This work studies the interfacial response of multiphase systems towards fluctuation in the flow. We demonstrate a direct visualization of music in the form of ripples at a microfluidic aqueous-aqueous interface with an ultra-low interfacial tension. The interface shows a passive response to sound of different frequencies with sufficiently precise time resolution, enabling the recording of musical notes and even subsequent reconstruction with high fidelity. This suggests that sensing and transmitting vibrations as tiny as those induced by sound could be realized in low interfacial tension systems. The robust control of the interfacial dynamics could be adopted for droplet and complex-fiber generation.

  1. Wettability controls slow immiscible displacement through local interfacial instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Michael; Brinkmann, Martin; Seemann, Ralf; Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    Immiscible fluid displacement with average front velocities in the capillary-dominated regime is studied in a transparent Hele-Shaw cell with cylindrical posts. Employing various combinations of fluids and wall materials allows us to cover a range of advancing contact angles 46∘≤θa≤180∘ of the invading fluid in our experiments. In parallel, we study the displacement process in particle-based simulations that account for wall wettability. Considering the same arrangement of posts in experiments and simulation, we find a consistent crossover between stable interfacial displacement at θa≲80∘ and capillary fingering at high contact angles θa≳120∘ . The position of the crossover is quantified through the evolution of the interface length and the final saturation of the displaced fluid. A statistical analysis of the local displacement processes demonstrates that the shape evolution of the fluid front is governed by local instabilities as proposed by Cieplak and Robbins for a quasistatic interfacial displacement [Cieplak and Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2042 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.60.2042]. The regime of stable front advances coincides with a corresponding region of contact angles where cooperative interfacial instabilities prevail. Capillary fingering, however, is observed only for large θa, where noncooperative instabilities dominate the invasion process.

  2. Lipases at interfaces: unique interfacial properties as globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Reis, P; Miller, R; Krägel, J; Leser, M; Fainerman, V B; Watzke, H; Holmberg, K

    2008-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of two globular proteins, lipase from Rhizomucor miehei and beta-lactoglobulin, at inert oil/water and air/water interfaces was studied by the pendant drop technique. The kinetics and adsorption isotherms were interpreted for both proteins in different environments. It was found that the adopted mathematical models well describe the adsorption behavior of the proteins at the studied interfaces. One of the main findings is that unique interfacial properties were observed for lipase as compared to the reference beta-lactoglobulin. A folded drop with a "skinlike" film was formed for the two proteins after aging followed by compression. This behavior is normally associated with protein unfolding and covalent cross-linking at the interface. Despite this, the lipase activity was not suppressed. By highlighting the unique interfacial properties of lipases, we believe that the presented work contributes to a better understanding of lipase interfacial activation and the mechanisms regulating lipolysis. The results indicate that the understanding of the physical properties of lipases can lead to novel approaches to regulate their activity.

  3. Dynamic film and interfacial tensions in emulsion and foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.H.; Koczo, K.; Wasan, D.T.

    1997-03-01

    In concentrated fluid dispersions the liquid films are under dynamic conditions during film rupture or drainage. Aqueous foam films stabilized with sodium decylsulfonate and aqueous emulsion films stabilized with the nonionic Brij 58 surfactant were formed at the tip of a capillary and the film tension was measured under static and dynamic conditions. In the stress relaxation experiments the response of the film tension to a sudden film area expansion was studied. These experiments also allowed the direct measurement of the Gibbs film elasticity. In the dynamic film tension experiments, the film area was continuously increased by a constant rate and the dynamic film tension was monitored. The measured film tensions were compared with the interfacial tensions of the respective single air/water and oil/water interfaces, which were measured using the same radius of curvature, relative expansion, and expansion rate as in the film studies. It was found that under dynamic conditions the film tension is higher than twice the single interfacial tension (IFT) and a mechanism was suggested to explain the difference. When the film, initially at equilibrium, is expanded and the interfacial area increases, a substantial surfactant depletion occurs inside the film. As a result, the surfactant can be supplied only from the adjoining meniscus (Plateau border) by surface diffusion, and the film tension is controlled by the diffusion and adsorption of surfactant in the meniscus. The results have important implications for the stability and rheology of foams and emulsions with high dispersed phase ratios (polyhedral structure).

  4. A review of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell durability test protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Li, Hui; Zhang, Shengsheng; Martin, Jonathan; Wang, Haijiang

    Durability is one of the major barriers to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) being accepted as a commercially viable product. It is therefore important to understand their degradation phenomena and analyze degradation mechanisms from the component level to the cell and stack level so that novel component materials can be developed and novel designs for cells/stacks can be achieved to mitigate insufficient fuel cell durability. It is generally impractical and costly to operate a fuel cell under its normal conditions for several thousand hours, so accelerated test methods are preferred to facilitate rapid learning about key durability issues. Based on the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Fuel Cell Council (USFCC) accelerated test protocols, as well as degradation tests performed by researchers and published in the literature, we review degradation test protocols at both component and cell/stack levels (driving cycles), aiming to gather the available information on accelerated test methods and degradation test protocols for PEMFCs, and thereby provide practitioners with a useful toolbox to study durability issues. These protocols help prevent the prolonged test periods and high costs associated with real lifetime tests, assess the performance and durability of PEMFC components, and ensure that the generated data can be compared.

  5. Combining Selective Pressures to Enhance the Durability of Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bourguet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of disease resistance genes in plants decreases over time because of the selection of virulent pathogen genotypes. A key goal of crop protection programs is to increase the durability of the resistance conferred by these genes. The spatial and temporal deployment of plant disease resistance genes is considered to be a major factor determining their durability. In the literature, four principal strategies combining resistance genes over time and space have been considered to delay the evolution of virulent pathogen genotypes. We reviewed this literature with the aim of determining which deployment strategy results in the greatest durability of resistance genes. Although theoretical and empirical studies comparing deployment strategies of more than one resistance gene are very scarce, they suggest that the overall durability of disease resistance genes can be increased by combining their presence in the same plant (pyramiding). Retrospective analyses of field monitoring data also suggest that the pyramiding of disease resistance genes within a plant is the most durable strategy. By extension, we suggest that the combination of disease resistance genes with other practices for pathogen control (pesticides, farming practices) may be a relevant management strategy to slow down the evolution of virulent pathogen genotypes. PMID:28066472

  6. On the hierarchy of interfacial dislocation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Olson, G. B.

    1985-04-01

    Many different types of dislocations have been defined in dislocation models for grain boundaries and interphase boundaries. It is emphasized that there is no unique dislocation model for a boundary, and that the formal dislocation content depends upon the choice of the lattice correspondence relating the adjoining lattices. However, it is concluded that no problems of real physical significance arise from this lack of uniqueness. “Best≓, or most useful, descriptions often exist, and these are discussed. A hierarchy consisting of four different types of interfacial dislocations may be distinguished, which is useful in describing the dislocation content of interfaces. These entities are termed: (1) primary interfacial dislocations; (2) secondary interfacial dislocations; (3) coherency interfacial dislocations; and (4) translational interfacial dislocations. While there may be a lack of agreement on terminology in the literature, it is believed that these dislocation types are distinguishable and play unique roles in useful dislocation models for interfaces. Detailed descriptions of these dislocation types are given, and actual examples in real interfaces are presented. It is concluded that dislocation descriptions of interface structures become of purely formal significance in the limit of fully incoherent interfaces since the cores are then delocalized. The utility of various dislocation descriptions therefore depends on the degree to which various types of local coherency exist.

  7. Glass-water interaction: Effect of high-valence cations on glass structure and chemical durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, J.; Kerisit, S. N.; Angeli, F.; Charpentier, T.; Icenhower, J. P.; McGrail, B. P.; Windisch, C. F.; Burton, S. D.; Pierce, E. M.

    2016-05-01

    Borosilicate glass is a durable solid, but it dissolves when in contact with aqueous fluids. The dissolution mechanism, which involves a variety of sequential reactions that occur at the solid-fluid interface, has important implications for the corrosion resistance of industrial and nuclear waste glasses. In this study, spectroscopic measurements, dissolution experiments, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the effect of high-valence cations (HVC) on the mechanisms of glass dissolution under dilute and near-saturated conditions. Raman and NMR spectroscopy were used to determine the structural changes that occur in glass, specifically network formers (e.g., Al, Si, and B), with the addition of the HVC element hafnium in the Na2O-Al2O3-B2O3-HfO2-SiO2 system (e.g., Na/[Al + B] = 1.0 and HfO2/SiO2 from 0.0 to 0.42). Spectroscopic measurements revealed that increasing hafnium content decreases N4 (tetrahedral boron/total boron) and increases the amount of Si-O-Hf moieties in the glass. Results from flow-through experiments conducted under dilute and near-saturated conditions show a decrease of approximately 100× or more in the dissolution rate over the series from 0 to 20 mol% HfO2. Comparing the average steady-state rates obtained under dilute conditions to the rates obtained for near-saturated conditions reveals a divergence in the magnitude between the average steady state rates measured in these different conditions. The reason for this divergence was investigated more thoroughly using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations indicate that the divergence in glass dissolution behavior under dilute and near-saturated conditions result from the stronger binding of Si sites that deposit on the surface from the influent when Hf is present in the glass. As a result, the residence time at the glass surface of these newly-formed Si sites is longer in the presence of Hf, which increases the density of anchor sites from which altered layers with higher Si

  8. Long-term durability of resin dentin interface: nanoleakage vs. microtensile bond strength.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mamiko; Pereira, Patricia N R; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Tagami, Junji; Pashley, David H

    2002-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that long-term durability of resin bonds to dentin is directly related to the nanoleakage of dentin bonding systems. Extracted human third molars were ground flat with 600-grit SiC paper under running water to expose middle dentin. Clearfil Liner Bond 2V (LB2V) or Fluoro Bond (FB) was applied to dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions. A crown was built-up with Clearfil AP-X resin composite, and the specimens were stored in water for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. The bonded assemblies were vertically sectioned into approximately 0.7 mm thick slabs and trimmed for microtensile bond test. All slabs were immersed in individual bottles of water at 37 degrees C, which was changed every day. Specimens were incubated for one day, and three, six, and nine months, and at the specified time period, they were randomly divided to two subgroups: 50% AgNO3 and the control. In the 50% AgNO3 subgroup, the slabs were immersed for one hour in 50% AgNO3, followed by exposure in a photo-developing solution for 12 hours just prior to debonding. The specimens in the control subgroup were soaked in water until debonding. Then, all specimens were subjected to microtensile bond testing. The debonded specimens of the AgNO3 subgroup had micrographs subjected to image analysis by NIH Image PC (Scion, Fredrick, MD, USA), and the area of silver penetration was quantitated. The bond strength data and silver penetration areas were subjected to two- and three-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test at the 95% level of confidence. Regression analysis was used to test the relationship between bond strengths and the silver penetration area at each time period. For both adhesive systems, the bond strengths gradually decreased over time, although there were no statistically significant differences in the FB bond strength among the four time periods tested (p>0.05). Silver penetration in specimens bonded with LB2V and FB gradually increased over time

  9. Glass–water interaction: Effect of high-valence cations on glass structure and chemical durability

    SciTech Connect

    Hopf, J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Angeli, F.; Charpentier, Thibault M.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, Bernard P.; Windisch, Charles F.; Burton, Sarah D.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2016-05-15

    Borosilicate glass is a durable solid, but it dissolves when in contact with aqueous fluids. The dissolution mechanism, which involves a variety of sequential reactions that occur at the solid-fluid interface, has important implications for the corrosion resistance of industrial and nuclear waste glasses. In this study, spectroscopic measurements, dissolution experiments, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the effect of high–valence cations (HVC) on the mechanisms of glass dissolution under dilute and near-saturated conditions. Raman and NMR spectroscopy were used to determine the structural changes that occur in glass, specifically network formers (e.g., Al, Si, and B), with the addition of the HVC element hafnium in the Na2O–Al2O3–B2O3–HfO2–SiO2 system (e.g., Na/[Al+B] = 1.0 and HfO2/SiO2 from 0.0 to 0.42). Spectroscopic measurements revealed that increasing hafnium content decreases N4 (tetrahedral boron/total boron) and increases the amount of Si—O—Hf moieties in the glass. Results from flow–through experiments conducted under dilute and near–saturated conditions show a decrease of approximately 100× or more in the dissolution rate over the series from 0 to 20 mol% HfO2. Comparing the average steady-state rates obtained under dilute conditions to the rates obtained for near-saturated conditions reveals a divergence in the magnitude between the average steady state rates measured in these different conditions. The reason for this divergence was investigated more thoroughly using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations indicate that the divergence in glass dissolution behavior under dilute and near-saturated conditions result from the stronger binding of Si sites that deposit on the surface from the influent when Hf is present in the glass. As a result, the residence time at the glass surface of these newly-formed Si sites is longer in the presence of Hf, which increases the density of anchor sites from which altered layers

  10. Chemical durability and degradation mechanisms of HT9 based alloy waste forms with variable Zr content

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L. N.

    2015-10-30

    In Corrosion studies were undertaken on alloy waste forms that can result from advanced electrometallurgical processing techniques to better classify their durability and degradation mechanisms. The waste forms were based on the RAW3-(URe) composition, consisting primarily of HT9 steel and other elemental additions to simulate nuclear fuel reprocessing byproducts. The solution conditions of the corrosion studies were taken from an electrochemical testing protocol, and meant to simulate conditions in a repository. The alloys durability was examined in alkaline and acidic brines.

  11. Interfacial phenomena in hard-rod fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shundyak, K. Y.

    2004-05-01

    This thesis addresses questions of interfacial ordering in hard-rod fluids at coexistence of the isotropic and nematic phases and in their contact with simple model substrates. It is organized as follows. Chapter II provides some background information about the relation between the statistical mechanical and thermodynamical level of descriptions of bulk hard-rod fluids, as well as introduces the asymptotically exact Onsager model, and some basic facts of interfacial thermodynamics. Chapter III represents studies of the simplest free IN interface in a fluid of monodisperse Onsager hard rods. For the analysis of this system we develop an efficient perturbative method to determine the (biaxial) one-particle distribution function in inhomogeneous systems. Studies of the free planar isotropic-nematic interfaces are continued in Chapter IV, where they are considered in binary mixtures of hard rods. For sufficiently different particle shapes the bulk phase diagrams of these mixtures exhibit a triple point, where an isotropic (I) phase coexists with two nematic phases (N1 and N2) of different composition. For all explored mixtures we find that upon approach of the triple point the IN2 interface shows complete wetting by an intervening N1 film. We compute the surface tension of isotropic-nematic interfaces, and find a remarkable increase with fractionation. These studies are complemented by an analysis of bulk phase behavior and interfacial properties of nonadditive binary mixtures of thin and thick hard rods in Chapter V. The formulation of this model was motivated by recent experiments in the group of Fraden, who explored the phase behavior of a mixture of viruses with different effective diameters. In our model, species of the same types are considered as interacting with the hard-core repulsive potential, whereas the excluded volume for dissimilar rods is taken to be larger (smaller) then for the pure hard rods. Such a nonadditivity enhances (reduces) fractionation at

  12. Durable fear memories require PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Paul J.; Pinard, Courtney R.; Camp, Marguerite C.; Feyder, Michael; Sah, Anupam; Bergstrom, Hadley; Graybeal, Carolyn; Liu, Yan; Schlüter, Oliver; Grant, Seth G.N.; Singewald, Nicolas; Xu, Weifeng; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. While overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a synaptic protein regulating glutamate receptor anchoring, synaptic stability and certain types of memory. Employing a loss-of-function mutant mouse lacking the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95GK), we analyzed the contribution of PSD-95 to fear memory formation and retrieval, and sought to identify the neural basis of PSD-95-mediated memory maintenance using ex vivo immediate-early gene mapping, in vivo neuronal recordings and viral-mediated knockdown approaches. We show that PSD-95 is dispensable for the formation and expression of recent fear memories, but essential for the formation of precise and flexible fear memories and for the maintenance of memories at remote time points. The failure of PSD-95GK mice to retrieve remote cued fear memories was associated with hypoactivation of the infralimbic cortex (IL) (not anterior cingulate (ACC) or prelimbic cortex), reduced IL single-unit firing and bursting, and attenuated IL gamma and theta oscillations. Adeno-associated PSD-95 virus-mediated knockdown in the IL, not ACC, was sufficient to impair recent fear extinction and remote fear memory, and remodel IL dendritic spines. Collectively, these data identify PSD-95 in the IL as a critical mechanism supporting the durability of fear memories over time. These preclinical findings have implications for developing novel approaches to treating trauma-based anxiety disorders that target the weakening of overly persistent fear memories. PMID:25510511

  13. Durable fear memories require PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, P J; Pinard, C R; Camp, M C; Feyder, M; Sah, A; Bergstrom, H C; Graybeal, C; Liu, Y; Schlüter, O M; Grant, S G; Singewald, N; Xu, W; Holmes, A

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. Although overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a synaptic protein regulating glutamate receptor anchoring, synaptic stability and certain types of memory. Using a loss-of-function mutant mouse lacking the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95(GK)), we analyzed the contribution of PSD-95 to fear memory formation and retrieval, and sought to identify the neural basis of PSD-95-mediated memory maintenance using ex vivo immediate-early gene mapping, in vivo neuronal recordings and viral-mediated knockdown (KD) approaches. We show that PSD-95 is dispensable for the formation and expression of recent fear memories, but essential for the formation of precise and flexible fear memories and for the maintenance of memories at remote time points. The failure of PSD-95(GK) mice to retrieve remote cued fear memory was associated with hypoactivation of the infralimbic (IL) cortex (but not the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) or prelimbic cortex), reduced IL single-unit firing and bursting, and attenuated IL gamma and theta oscillations. Adeno-associated virus-mediated PSD-95 KD in the IL, but not the ACC, was sufficient to impair recent fear extinction and remote fear memory, and remodel IL dendritic spines. Collectively, these data identify PSD-95 in the IL as a critical mechanism supporting the durability of fear memories over time. These preclinical findings have implications for developing novel approaches to treating trauma-based anxiety disorders that target the weakening of overly persistent fear memories.

  14. Durability of polymers for containment barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.; Milian, L.; Clinton, J.; Colombo, P.

    1994-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in several tasks to develop, demonstrate, and implement advanced polymer materials for use in subsurface barriers throughout the US Department of Energy complex. Binders investigated as barrier composites include polyester styrenes, vinylester styrenes, high-molecular-weight acrylics, sulfur polymer cement, bitumen, and a furfuryl-alcohol-based furan polymer. These materials have been extensively used in many commercial applications, e.g., in sewage and brine handling systems and electrolytic baths. They have also been used by the US Army Corps of Engineers to repair dams and canal locks, and by the Federal highway Administration for bridge deck and highway repairs. Their impermeability to gases and liquids, combined with resistance to radiation and to acidic and alkaline environments, make polymer grouts candidates for high-quality, durable barriers. Laboratory testing and evaluation of polymer composites has been ongoing since early 1992. A series of resistance tests were used to determine the performance and durability characteristics of a variety of polymer composites. This paper details the results of this characterization that pertain to the Hanford Site underground storage tanks. Testing includes wet-dry cycling, chemical resistivity to ground water, base, solvent and a surrogate nitrate tank brine, resistance to irradiation, and hydraulic conductivity. Performance values indicate that polymers can meet the requirements for containment barriers for underground storage tanks at the Hanford tank farm, including the high-heat tanks. Appropriate choices of binder and aggregate, followed by appropriate, site-specific compatibility testing will result in a durable, high-strength, low-permeability barrier.

  15. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    The intense research interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is largely fueled by the unique properties of nanoscale materials. In this dissertation, the research efforts are focused on surface functionalization and interfacial engineering of functional nanoparticles in the preparation of patchy nanoparticles (e.g., Janus nanoparticles and Neapolitan nanoparticles) such that the nanoparticle structures and properties may be manipulated to an unprecedented level of sophistication. Experimentally, Janus nanoparticles were prepared by an interfacial engineering method where one hemisphere of the originally hydrophobic nanoparticles was replaced with hydrophilic ligands at the air|liquid or solid|liquid interface. The amphiphilic surface characters of the Janus nanoparticles were verified by contact angle measurements, as compared to those of the bulk-exchange counterparts where the two types of ligands were distributed rather homogeneously on the nanoparticle surface. In a further study, a mercapto derivative of diacetylene was used as the hydrophilic ligands to prepare Janus nanoparticles by using hydrophobic hexanethiolate-protected gold nanoparticles as the starting materials. Exposure to UV irradiation led to effective covalent cross-linking between the diacetylene moieties of neighboring ligands and hence marked enhancement of the structural integrity of the Janus nanoparticles, which was attributable to the impeded surface diffusion of the thiol ligands on the nanoparticle surface, as manifested in fluorescence measurements of aged nanoparticles. More complicated bimetallic AgAu Janus nanoparticles were prepared by interfacial galvanic exchange reactions of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer of 1-hexanethiolate-passivated silver nanoparticles on a glass slide with gold(I)-mercaptopropanediol complex in a water/ethanol solution. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution not only of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface but

  16. Interfacial properties of stanene-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Pan, Feng; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Han; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two-dimensional buckled honeycomb stanene has been manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Free-standing stanene is predicted to have a sizable opened band gap of 100 meV at the Dirac point due to spin-orbit coupling (SOC), resulting in many fascinating properties such as quantum spin Hall effect, quantum anomalous Hall effect, and quantum valley Hall effect. In the first time, we systematically study the interfacial properties of stanene-metal interfaces (metals = Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pd, Pt, Ir, and Ni) by using ab initio electronic structure calculations considering the SOC effects. The honeycomb structure of stanene is preserved on the metal supports, but the buckling height is changed. The buckling of stanene on the Au, Al, Ag, and Cu metal supports is higher than that of free-standing stanene. By contrast, a planar graphene-like structure is stabilized for stanene on the Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ni metal supports. The band structure of stanene is destroyed on all the metal supports, accompanied by a metallization of stanene because the covalent bonds between stanene and the metal supports are formed and the structure of stanene is distorted. Besides, no tunneling barrier exists between stanene and the metal supports. Therefore, stanene and the eight metals form a good vertical Ohmic contact.

  17. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  18. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  19. Durable, Low-Surface-Energy Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Mcelroy, Paul M.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical treatment for creation of durable, low-surface-energy coatings for glass, ceramics and other protonated surfaces easily applied, and creates very thin semipermanent film with extremely low surface tension. Exhibits excellent stability; surfaces retreated if coating becomes damaged or eroded. Uses include water-repellent surfaces, oil-repellent surfaces, antimigration barriers, corrosion barriers, mold-release agents, and self-cleaning surfaces. Film resists wetting by water, alcohols, hydrocarbon solvents, and silicone oil. Has moderate resistance to abrasion, such as rubbing with cloths, and compression molding to polymers and composite materials.

  20. Chemistry of Durable and Regenerable Biocidal Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Worley, S. Dave

    2005-01-01

    Unlike the widely used slow-releasing biocidal mechanism now employed in biocidal textiles, a novel regenerable process, based on a regeneration principle and halamine chemistry, has been developed in antimicrobial finishing of textiles. Halamine-modified textile materials demonstrate durable and regenerable antimicrobial functions and execute rapid inactivation of a broad spectrum of microorganisms by contact without yielding drug resistance. The unique properties of the products render them useful materials for medical-use and hygienic textiles. The chemistry of the biocidal materials is be discussed. See Featured Molecules .

  1. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  2. Interfacial thermal conductance of thiolate-protected gold nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Kelsey M.; Neidhart, Suzanne M.; Gezelter, J. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of thiolate-protected and solvated gold nanoparticles were carried out in the presence of a non-equilibrium heat flux between the solvent and the core of the particle. The interfacial thermal conductance (G) was computed for these interfaces, and the behavior of the thermal conductance was studied as a function of particle size, ligand flexibility, and ligand chain length. In all cases, thermal conductance of the ligand-protected particles was higher than the bare metal-solvent interface. A number of mechanisms for the enhanced conductance were investigated, including thiolate-driven corrugation of the metal surface, solvent ordering at the interface, solvent-ligand interpenetration, and ligand ordering relative to the particle surface. Only the smallest particles exhibited significant corrugation. All ligands permitted substantial solvent-ligand interpenetration, and ligand chain length has a significant influence on the orientational ordering of interfacial solvent. Solvent-ligand vibrational overlap, particularly in the low frequency range (<80 cm-1), was significantly altered by ligand rigidity, and had direct influence on the interfacial thermal conductance.

  3. Interfacial structures and acidity of edge surfaces of ferruginous smectites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiandong; Cheng, Jun; Sprik, Michiel; Lu, Xiancai; Wang, Rucheng

    2015-11-01

    We report an FPMD (first-principles molecular dynamics) study of the interfacial structures and acidity constants of the edge surfaces of ferruginous smectites. To understand the effects of Fe oxidation states on the interfacial properties, we investigated both the oxidized and reduced states of the (0 1 0)-type edges of two clay models with different Fe contents. The coordination states of edge Fe atoms are determined from the free energy curves for the desorption of the H2O ligands. The results of both clay models show that for Fe(III), only the 6-coordinate states are stable, whereas for Fe(II), both the 6- and 5-coordinate states are stable. Using the FPMD-based vertical energy gap technique, the pKa values of the edge sites are evaluated for both oxidation states. The results indicate that for both clay models, both the octahedral and tetrahedral sites become much less acidic upon Fe reduction. Therefore, the comparison reveals that the interfacial structures and protonation states are strongly dependent on the Fe oxidation states. Using the calculated results, we have derived the pH-dependent surface complexing mechanisms of ferruginous smectites.

  4. Tailored interfacial rheology for gastric stable adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Scheuble, N; Geue, T; Windhab, E J; Fischer, P

    2014-08-11

    Human lipid digestion begins at the interface of oil and water by interfacial adsorption of lipases. Tailoring the available surface area for lipase activity can lead to specific lipid sensing in the body, thus, tailored satiety hormone release. In this study we present biopolymer layers at the MCT-oil/water interface with different stabilities under human gastric environment (37 °C, pH 2, pepsin). Physicochemical changes and enzymatic degradation of interfacial layers were monitored online by interfacial shear rheology. We show the weakening of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) layers at body temperature and acidification and their hydrolysis by pepsin. If sufficient concentrations of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) are given to an existing β-lg layer, this weakening is buffered and the proteolysis delayed. A synergistic, composite layer is formed by adding methylated NCC to the β-lg layer. This layer thermogels at body temperature and resists hydrolysis by pepsin. Coexistence of these two emulsifiers at the air/water interface is evidenced by neutron reflectometry measurements, where morphological information are extracted. The utilized layers and their analysis provide knowledge of physicochemical changes during in vitro digestion of interfaces, which promote functional food formulations.

  5. Probing Interfacial Processes on Graphene Surface by Mass Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2013-03-01

    In this work we studied the mass density of graphene, probed interfacial processes on graphene surface and examined the formation of graphene oxide by mass detection. The graphene layers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method on copper foils and transfer-printed on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The mass density of single layer graphene was measured by investigating the mechanical resonance of the QCM. Moreover, we extended the developed technique to probe the binding dynamics of proteins on the surface of graphene, were able to obtain nonspecific binding constant of BSA protein of graphene surface in aqueous solution. The time trace of resonance signal showed that the BSA molecules rapidly saturated by filling the available binding sites on graphene surface. Furthermore, we monitored oxidation of graphene surface under oxygen plasma by tracing the changes of interfacial mass of the graphene controlled by the shifts in Raman spectra. Three regimes were observed the formation of graphene oxide which increases the interfacial mass, the release of carbon dioxide and the removal of small graphene/graphene oxide flakes. Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) grant no. 110T304, 109T209, Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (IRG) grant no 256458, Turkish Academy of Science (TUBA-Gebip).

  6. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O(2-) migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm(-2) at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  7. Interfacial Shear Rheology of Coffee Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läuger, Jörg; Heyer, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    Both oscillatory and rotational measurements on the film formation process and on interfacial rheological properties of the final film of coffee samples with different concentrations are presented. As higher the concentration as faster the film formation process is, whereas the concentration does not have a large effect on the visco-elastic properties of the final films. Two geometries, a biconical geometry and a Du Noüy ring have been employed. The presented results show that interfacial shear rheology allows detailed investigations on coffee films. Although with a Du Noüy ring it is possible to measure the qualitative behavior and relative differences only the biconical geometry is sensitive enough to test weak films and to reveal real absolute values for the interfacial shear rheological quantities.

  8. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  9. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Xiaohong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-01-01

    Low-cost graphite submicronparticles (GSP) are employed as a possible catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Platinum nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black (XC-72), carbon nanotubes (CNT), and GSP via ethylene glycol (EG) reduction method. The morphologies and the crystallinity of Pt/XC-72, Pt/CNT, and Pt/GSP are characterized with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, which shows that Pt nanoparticles (~ 3.5 nm) are uniformly dispersed on GSP support. Pt/GSP exhibits the highest activity towards oxygen reduction reactions. The durability study indicates that Pt/GSP is 2 ~ 3 times durable than Pt/CNT and Pt/XC-72. The enhanced durability of Pt/GSP catalyst is attributed to the higher corrosion resistance of graphite submicronparticles, which results from higher graphitization degree of GSP support. Considering its low production cost, graphite submicronparticles are promising electrocatalyst support for fuel cells.

  10. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: Graphite submicronparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Xiaohong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    Low-cost graphite submicronparticles (GSP) are employed as a possible catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Platinum nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black (XC-72), carbon nanotubes (CNT), and GSP via ethylene glycol (EG) reduction method. The morphologies and the crystallinity of Pt/XC-72, Pt/CNT, and Pt/GSP are characterized with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, which shows that Pt nanoparticles (∼3.5 nm) are uniformly dispersed on supports. Pt/GSP exhibits the highest activity towards oxygen-reduction reactions. The durability study indicates that Pt/GSP is 2-3 times durable than Pt/CNT and Pt/XC-72. The enhanced durability of Pt/GSP catalyst is attributed to the higher corrosion resistance of graphite submicronparticles, which results from higher graphitization degree of GSP support. Considering its low production cost, graphite submicronparticles are promising electrocatalyst support for fuel cells.

  11. Fatigue behaviour analysis for the durability prequalification of strengthening mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocca, P.; Grazzini, A.; Masera, D.

    2011-07-01

    An innovative laboratory procedure used as a preliminary design stage for the pre-qualification of strengthening mortars applied to historical masonry buildings is described. In the analysis of the behaviour of masonry structures and their constituent materials, increasing importance has been assumed by the study of the long-term evolution of deformation and mechanical characteristics, which may be affected by both loading and environmental conditions. Through static and fatigue tests on mixed specimens historical brick-reinforced mortar it has been possible to investigate the durability of strengthening materials, in order to select, from a range of alternatives, the most suitable for the historical masonry. Cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of the historical brick-strengthening mortar system under static long-time loading. This methodology has proved useful in avoiding the errors associated with materials that are not mechanically compatible and guarantees the durability of strengthening work. The experimental procedure has been used effectively in the biggest restoration building site in Europe, the Royal Palace of Venaria, and it is in progress of carrying out at the Special Natural Reserve of the Sacro Monte di Varallo, in Piedmont (Italy).

  12. Tungsten materials as durable catalyst supports for fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchthaler, M.; Ossiander, T.; Juhart, V.; Mitzel, J.; Heinzl, C.; Scheu, C.; Hacker, V.

    2013-12-01

    Durable platinum catalyst support materials, e.g. tungsten carbide (WC), tungsten oxide (WOx) and self-synthesized tungsten oxide (WOxs) were evaluated for the use in High-Temperature Proton Exchange Fuel Cells (HT-PEM) based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole as electrolyte. The support materials and the catalyst loaded support materials were characterized ex-situ by cyclic voltammetry in HClO4, potential cycling, CO-stripping, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. The tungsten oxide and tungsten carbide based supported catalysts were compared to High Surface Area Carbon (HSAC), each coated with platinum via the same in-house manufacturing procedures. The in-house manufacturing procedures resulted in catalyst particle sizes on HSAC of 3-4 nm with a uniform distribution. The in-situ Potential Cycling experiments of WOx or WOxs supported catalysts showed much lower degradation rates compared to High Surface Area Carbons. The formation of WOx species on WC was proven by ex- and in-situ cyclic voltammetric studies and thermogravimetric analyses. X-ray diffraction, ex-situ cyclic voltammetry and in-situ cyclic voltammetry showed that WOx is formed from WC as starting material under oxidizing conditions. Finally a 1000 h durability test with WOx as catalyst support material on the anode was done in a HT-PEM fuel cell with reformed methanol on the anode.

  13. Durability of conventional concretes containing black rice husk ash.

    PubMed

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2011-01-01

    In this study, black rice husk ash (BRHA) from a rice mill in Thailand was ground and used as a partial cement replacement. The durability of conventional concretes with high water-binder ratios was investigated including drying shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, depth of carbonation, and weight loss of concretes exposed to hydrochloric (HCl) and sulfuric (H(2)SO(4)) acid attacks. Two different replacement percentages of cement by BRHA, 20% and 40%, and three different water-binder ratios (0.6, 0.7 and 0.8) were used. The ratios of paste volume to void content of the compacted aggregate (γ) were 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6. As a result, when increasing the percentage replacement of BRHA, the drying shrinkage and depth of carbonation reaction of concretes increased. However, the BRHA provides a positive effect on the autogenous shrinkage and weight loss of concretes exposed to hydrochloric and sulfuric acid attacks. In addition, the resistance to acid attack was directly varied with the (SiO(2) + Al(2)O(3) + Fe(2)O(3))/CaO ratio. Results show that ground BRHA can be applied as a pozzolanic material and also improve the durability of concrete.

  14. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  15. Combined Hydrophobicity and Mechanical Durability through Surface Nanoengineering

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; Furrer, David U.; Burlatsky, Sergei F.; Filburn, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability. PMID:25851026

  16. Combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through surface nanoengineering

    DOE PAGES

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen; ...

    2015-04-08

    This paper reports combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability through the nanoscale engineering of surfaces in the form of nanorod-polymer composites. Specifically, the hydrophobicity derives from nanoscale features of mechanically hard ZnO nanorods and the mechanical durability derives from the composite structure of a hard ZnO nanorod core and soft polymer shell. Experimental characterization correlates the morphology of the nanoengineered surfaces with the combined hydrophobicity and mechanical durability, and reveals the responsible mechanisms. Such surfaces may find use in applications, such as boat hulls, that benefit from hydrophobicity and require mechanical durability.

  17. Ordered mesoporous silica prepared by quiescent interfacial growth method - effects of reaction chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acidic interfacial growth can provide a number of industrially important mesoporous silica morphologies including fibers, spheres, and other rich shapes. Studying the reaction chemistry under quiescent (no mixing) conditions is important for understanding and for the production of the desired shapes. The focus of this work is to understand the effect of a number of previously untested conditions: acid type (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4), acid content, silica precursor type (TBOS and TEOS), and surfactant type (CTAB, Tween 20, and Tween 80) on the shape and structure of products formed under quiescent two-phase interfacial configuration. Results show that the quiescent growth is typically slow due to the absence of mixing. The whole process of product formation and pore structuring becomes limited by the slow interfacial diffusion of silica source. TBOS-CTAB-HCl was the typical combination to produce fibers with high order in the interfacial region. The use of other acids (HNO3 and H2SO4), a less hydrophobic silica source (TEOS), and/or a neutral surfactant (Tweens) facilitate diffusion and homogenous supply of silica source into the bulk phase and give spheres and gyroids with low mesoporous order. The results suggest two distinct regions for silica growth (interfacial region and bulk region) in which the rate of solvent evaporation and local concentration affect the speed and dimension of growth. A combined mechanism for the interfacial bulk growth of mesoporous silica under quiescent conditions is proposed. PMID:24237719

  18. Measurement and Estimation of Organic-Liquid/Water Interfacial Areas for Several Natural Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M.L.; Narter, M.; Schnaar, G.; Marble, J.

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterize the impact of porous-medium texture on interfacial area between immiscible organic liquid and water residing within natural porous media. Synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to obtain high-resolution, three-dimensional images of solid and liquid phases in packed columns. The image data were processed to generate quantitative measurements of organic-liquid/water interfacial area and of organic-liquid blob sizes. Ten porous media, comprising a range of median grain sizes, grain-size distributions, and geochemical properties, were used to evaluate the impact of porous-medium texture on interfacial area. The results show that fluid-normalized specific interfacial area (A{sub f}) and maximum specific interfacial area (A{sub m}) correlate very well to inverse median grain diameter. These functionalities were shown to result from a linear relationship between effective organic-liquid blob diameter and median grain diameter. These results provide the basis for a simple method for estimating specific organic-liquid/water interfacial area as a function of fluid saturation for a given porous medium. The availability of a method for which the only parameter needed is the simple-to-measure median grain diameter should be of great utility for a variety of applications.

  19. Ordered mesoporous silica prepared by quiescent interfacial growth method - effects of reaction chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsyouri, Hatem M.; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba A.; Alassali, Ayah; Lin, Jerry YS

    2013-11-01

    Acidic interfacial growth can provide a number of industrially important mesoporous silica morphologies including fibers, spheres, and other rich shapes. Studying the reaction chemistry under quiescent (no mixing) conditions is important for understanding and for the production of the desired shapes. The focus of this work is to understand the effect of a number of previously untested conditions: acid type (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4), acid content, silica precursor type (TBOS and TEOS), and surfactant type (CTAB, Tween 20, and Tween 80) on the shape and structure of products formed under quiescent two-phase interfacial configuration. Results show that the quiescent growth is typically slow due to the absence of mixing. The whole process of product formation and pore structuring becomes limited by the slow interfacial diffusion of silica source. TBOS-CTAB-HCl was the typical combination to produce fibers with high order in the interfacial region. The use of other acids (HNO3 and H2SO4), a less hydrophobic silica source (TEOS), and/or a neutral surfactant (Tweens) facilitate diffusion and homogenous supply of silica source into the bulk phase and give spheres and gyroids with low mesoporous order. The results suggest two distinct regions for silica growth (interfacial region and bulk region) in which the rate of solvent evaporation and local concentration affect the speed and dimension of growth. A combined mechanism for the interfacial bulk growth of mesoporous silica under quiescent conditions is proposed.

  20. A comparative study on the effects of ultrathin luminescent graphene oxide quantum dot (GOQD) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets on the interfacial interactions and mechanical properties of an epoxy composite.

    PubMed

    Karimi, B; Ramezanzadeh, B

    2017-05-01

    The reinforcement effect of graphene oxide nanosheets on the mechanical properties of an epoxy coating has been extensively studied. However, the effect of graphene oxide quantum dot (GOQD) as a new unique carbon based nanomaterial (with lateral dimension of 5-6nm and thickness of one carbon atom) on the mechanical properties of epoxy coating has not been reported and compared with GO yet. So this study aims at fabrication of a high-performance polymer composite with unique mechanical properties using GOQD nanosheets. GO and GOQD were obtained through two different strategies of "top-down" synthesis from an expandable graphite by a modified Hummers' method and an easy "bottom-up" method by carbonizing citric acid, respectively. The morphology, size distribution, microstructure and chemistry of the GO and GOQD were compared by utilizing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), high resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results obtained from these analyses confirmed successful synthesize of GOQD and GO nanosheets. The reinforcement effect of GO and GOQD nanosheets on the mechanical properties of the epoxy coating was studied by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and tensile test. It was found that the GOQD could remarkably enhance the energy of break, Young's modulus, tensile stress and interfacial interactions compared to the neat epoxy and the one reinforced with GO nanosheets. GOQD improved the fracture toughness by factor of 175% and 700% compared to the GO/Epoxy and neat epoxy, respectively.

  1. Direct, Dynamic Measurement of Interfacial Area within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  2. INTERFACIAL AREA TRANSPORT AND REGIME TRANSITION IN COMBINATORIAL CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Seugjin Kim

    2011-01-28

    . This study investigates the geometric effects of 90-degree vertical elbows and flow configurations in two-phase flow. The study shows that the elbows make a significant effect on the transport characteristics of two-phase flow, which includes the changes in interfacial structures, bubble interaction mechanisms and flow regime transition. The effect of the elbows is characterized for global and local two-phase flow parameters. The global two-phase flow parameters include two-phase pressure, interfacial structures and flow regime transition. In order to characterize the frictional pressure drop and minor loss across the vertical elbows, pressure measurements are obtained across the test section over a wide range of flow conditions in both single-phase and two-phase flow conditions. A two-phase pressure drop correlation analogous to Lockhart-Martinelli correlation is proposed to predict the minor loss across the elbows. A high speed camera is employed to perform extensive flow visualization studies across the elbows in vertical upward, horizontal and vertical downward sections and modified flow regime maps are proposed. It is found that modified flow regime maps immediately downstream of the vertical upward elbow deviate significantly from the conventional flow regime map. A qualitative assessment of the counter-current flow limitation characteristics specific to the current experimental facility is performed. A multi-sensor conductivity probe is used to measure local two-phase flow parameters such as: void fraction, bubble velocity, interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency. The local measurements are obtained for six different flow conditions at ten measurement locations along axial direction of the test section. Both the vertical-upward and vertical-downward elbows have a significant impact on bubble distribution, resulting in, a bimodal distribution along the horizontal radius of the tube cross-section and migration of bubbles towards the inside of the

  3. Sulfate impurities from deicing salt and durability of Portland cement mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Schluter, M.C.

    1987-06-01

    This thesis reports research on the effects of calcium sulfate in halite on Portland cement durability. Much has been published about sulfate ions causing expansion reactions in Portland cement concrete, on scaling caused by sodium chloride, and the participation of magnesium sulfate in seawater attack. However, little work has been done on the influence of sodium chloride and calcium sulfate solutions as they are found combined in natural halite. Durability studies were conducted using brines containing different amounts of gypsum as an impurity. Damage mechanisms, reaction products and pore structure changes were evaluated. 16 refs., 27 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Durability and degradation of HT9 based alloy waste forms with variable Ni and Cr content

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L.

    2016-12-31

    Short-term electrochemical and long-term hybrid electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on alloy waste forms in reference aqueous solutions that bound postulated repository conditions. The alloy waste forms investigated represent candidate formulations that can be produced with advanced electrochemical treatment of used nuclear fuel. The studies helped to better understand the alloy waste form durability with differing concentrations of nickel and chromium, species that can be added to alloy waste forms to potentially increase their durability and decrease radionuclide release into the environment.

  5. Mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces prepared by abrading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fajun; Yu, Shan; Ou, Junfei; Xue, Mingshan; Li, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with both excellent mechanical durability and easy reparability based on polytetrafluoroethylene/room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (PTFE/RTVSR) composites were prepared by a simple abrading method. The surface energy of RTVSR matrix decreased with the increasing volume fraction of PTFE particles, and the surface rough microstructures of the composites were created by abrading. A water droplet on the surface exhibited a contact angle of about 165° ± 3.4° and a sliding angle of about 7.3° ± 1.9°. Such superhydrophobic surfaces showed strong mechanical durability against sandpaper because the surfaces were prepared in the way of mechanical abrasion, and the fresh exposed surfaces were still superhydrophobic. In addition, the micro-structures on the elastic surface of the composite will be compressed by elastic deformation to avoid being broken during the friction cycles when cotton fabric was used as an abrasion surface. The deformation will rebound to renew the original surface structures when the load is withdrawn. Therefore, the elastic PTFE/RTVSR composites are of advantage to construct superhydrophobic surfaces with better abrasion resistance. More importantly, such superhydrophobicity can be repaired by a simple abrading regeneration process within a few minutes when the surface is damaged or polluted by organic contaminant.

  6. Converting mixed waste into durable glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ruller, J.A.; Greenman, W.G.

    1994-12-31

    Radioactive, hazardous and mixed contamination of soils and sediments within the Weapons Complex is widespread and estimated to total billions of cubic meters. The cost to remediate this contamination, as well as the contaminated surface and groundwaters, buildings and facilities has been estimated to be up to $300 billion over the next 30 years and up to $30 billion over the next five years. Progress towards cleaning the Weapons Complex depends upon the development of new remediation technologies. The remediation of contaminated soils and sludges ultimately rests on the immobilization of radioactive and hazardous contaminants into a solid wasteform that is leach resistant to aqueous corrosion and other forms of degradation (such as thermal cycling and biological attack) and is highly durable. In addition, the process to immobilize the contaminants should concentrate the contaminants into the smallest volume to reduce disposal/storage and transportation costs. GTS Duratek and the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America have successfully demonstrated that several different waste streams can be converted into a durable, leach-resistant glass that will also lower waste volumes. In this paper, the authors discuss these successes for soils and sludges from three separate US Department of Energy sites. The sites are: the K-25 facility; the Weldon Spring site; and Fernald, Ohio.

  7. CHP Fuel Cell Durability Demonstration - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher J

    2014-07-21

    Plug Power has managed a demonstration project that has tested multiple units of its high-temperature, PEM fuel cell system in micro-combined heat and power (μ-CHP) applications in California. The specific objective of the demonstration project was to substantiate the durability of GenSys Blue, and, thereby, verify its technology and commercial readiness for the marketplace. In the demonstration project, Plug Power, in partnership with the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and Sempra, will execute two major tasks: • Task 1: Internal durability/reliability fleet testing. Six GenSys Blue units will be built and will undergo an internal test regimen to estimate failure rates. This task was modified to include 3 GenSys Blue units installed in a lab at UCI. • Task 2: External customer testing. Combined heat and power units will be installed and tested in real-world residential and/or light commercial end user locations in California.

  8. Durability Assessment of TiAl Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    The durability of TiAl is a prime concern for the implementation of TiAl into aerospace engines. Two durability issues, the effect of high temperature exposure on mechanical properties and impact resistance, have been investigated and the results are summarized in this paper. Exposure to elevated temperatures has been shown to be detrimental to the room temperature ductility of gamma alloys with the most likely mechanisms being the ingress of interstitials from the surface. Fluorine ion implantation has been shown to improve the oxidation resistance of gamma alloys, and ideally it could also improve the environmental embrittlement of high Nb content TiAl alloys. The effect of F ion implantation on the surface oxidation and embrittlement of a third generation, high Nb content TiAl alloy (Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C) were investigated. Additionally, the ballistic impact resistance of a variety of gamma alloys, including Ti-48Al-2Cr- 2Nb, Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb, ABB-2, ABB-23, NCG359E, 95A and Ti-45Al-5Nb-B-C was accessed. Differences in the ballistic impact properties of the various alloys will be discussed, particularly with respect to their manufacturing process, microstructure, and tensile properties.

  9. The interfacial chemistry of organic materials on commercial glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Joy

    The hydrolytic stability of glass is dependent on its composition. Glasses are exposed to water during their processing and in many applications; therefore, their surface or interface with other materials must withstand hydrolytic attack. Multi-component silicate glasses are widely used but have been the least studied. In coatings-based applications, these glasses come in contact with organosilanes and organic molecules where the adsorption may be affected by surface water. For example, the influence of glass composition on the wet strength of a glass/polymer composite material is unclear, but it is presumed to be driven by the hydrolytic stability of the interfacial chemistry. Organosilanes are critical for increasing the performance of composite materials in humid environments but the precise manner by which the improvement occurs has not been verified. The current school of thought is that the application of silane coatings on a multi-component glass surface transforms the chemically heterogeneous surface into a homogenous and hydrolytically stable surface. In this study, multi-component silicate glass surfaces were silanized by both aqueous and non-aqueous methods. The effect of glass composition and surface hydration on silane coverage was quantified by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The monolayer-level adsorption results showed that the low-sodium content glasses had greater coverage than a high-sodium content glass in dry conditions in contrast to an equivalent coverage in wet conditions. The hydrolytically-stable coverage on multi-component silicate glass surfaces by both silanization methods was found to be sub-monolayer. A thin film model in conjunction with XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy was used to probe the interfacial region of a fiberglass insulation material containing a sodium-rich multi-component silicate glass and an acrylate resin binder. Upon the application of the aqueous binder, the leaching of sodium from the glass promoted

  10. New Ru(II)/Os(II)-polypyridyl complexes for coupling to TiO2 surfaces through acetylacetone functionality and studies on interfacial electron-transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanmay; Biswas, Abul Kalam; Sahu, Tuhin Subhra; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Das, Amitava; Ghosh, Hirendra Nath

    2014-09-28

    New Ru(ii)- and Os(ii)-polypyridyl complexes have been synthesized with pendant acetylacetone (acac) functionality for anchoring on nanoparticulate TiO2 surfaces with a goal of developing an alternate sensitizer that could be utilized for designing an efficient dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopic studies in the femtosecond time domain have been carried out. The charge recombination rates are observed to be very slow, compared with those for strongly coupled dye molecules having catechol as the anchoring functionality. The results of such studies reveal that electron-injection rates from the metal complex-based LUMO to the conduction band of TiO2 are faster than one would expect for an analogous complex in which the chromophoric core and the anchoring moiety are separated with multiple saturated C-C linkages. Such an observation is rationalized based on computational studies, and a relatively smaller spatial distance between the dye LUMO and the TiO2 surface accounted for this. Results of this study are compared with those for analogous complexes having a gem-dicarboxy group as the anchoring functionality for covalent binding to the TiO2 surface to compare the role of binding functionalities on electron-transfer dynamics.

  11. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-03-03

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  12. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-02-20

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  13. Final Report - MEA and Stack Durability for PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yandrasits, Michael A.

    2008-02-15

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are expected to change the landscape of power generation over the next ten years. For this to be realized one of the most significant challenges to be met for stationary systems is lifetime, where 40,000 hours of operation with less than 10% decay is desired. This project conducted fundamental studies on the durability of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and fuel cell stack systems with the expectation that knowledge gained from this project will be applied toward the design and manufacture of MEAs and stack systems to meet DOE’s 2010 stationary fuel cell stack systems targets. The focus of this project was PEM fuel cell durability – understanding the issues that limit MEA and fuel cell system lifetime, developing mitigation strategies to address the lifetime issues and demonstration of the effectiveness of the mitigation strategies by system testing. To that end, several discoveries were made that contributed to the fundamental understanding of MEA degradation mechanisms. (1) The classically held belief that membrane degradation is solely due to end-group “unzipping” is incorrect; there are other functional groups present in the ionomer that are susceptible to chemical attack. (2) The rate of membrane degradation can be greatly slowed or possibly eliminated through the use of additives that scavenge peroxide or peroxyl radicals. (3) Characterization of GDL using dry gases is incorrect due to the fact that fuel cells operate utilizing humidified gases. The proper characterization method involves using wet gas streams and measuring capillary pressure as demonstrated in this project. (4) Not all Platinum on carbon catalysts are created equally – the major factor impacting catalyst durability is the type of carbon used as the support. (5) System operating conditions have a significant impact of lifetime – the lifetime was increased by an order of magnitude by changing the load profile while all other variables remain

  14. Durable resistance: A key to sustainable management of pathogens and pests

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    This review briefly addresses what has been learned about resistance durability in recent years, as well as the questions that still remain. Molecular analyses of major gene interactions have potential to contribute to both breeding for resistance and improved understanding of virulence impacts on pathogen fitness. Though the molecular basis of quantitative resistance is less clear substantial evidence has accumulated for the relative simplicity of inheritance. There is increasing evidence for specific interactions with quantitative resistance, though implications o this for durability are still unknown. Mechanisms by which resistance gene pyramids contribute to durability remain elusive, though ideas have been generated for identifying gene combinations that may be more durable. Though cultivar mixtures and related approaches have been used successfully, identifying the diseases and conditions that are most conducive to the use of diversity has been surprisingly difficult, and the selective influence of diversity on pathogen populations is complex. The importance of considering resistance durability in a landscape context has received increasing emphasis and is an important future area of research. Experimental systems are being developed to test resistance gene deployment strategies that previously could be addressed only with logic and observation. The value of molecular markers for identifying and pyramiding major genes is quite clear, but the successful use of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for marker-assisted selection of quantitative resistance will depend greatly on the degree to which the identified QTL are expressed in different genetic backgrounds. Transgenic approaches will likely provide opportunities for control of some recalcitrant pathogens, though issues of durability for transgenes are likely to be no different than other genes for resistance. The need for high quality phenotypic analysis and screening methodologies is a priority, and field

  15. Solid solution directionally solidified eutectics: Model systems for structure-property relationships in interfacial fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Luke Nathaniel

    The next generation of high temperature materials for application in aerospace and power generation systems will be required to withstand temperatures well in excess of 1200°C, often in oxidizing atmospheres. Oxide-oxide directionally solidified eutectics (DSE's) have shown promise as high temperature ceramic materials, only to be limited by their lack of fracture toughness at room temperature. In the case of DSE oxide materials, the interfacial fracture behavior has been blamed for the poor performance in the past and is the subject of interest in this work. In this thesis, the solid solution, directionally solidified quaternary eutectic (SS-DSE), Co1-xNixO/ZrO2(CaO), is developed as a model system for the study of interfacial fracture in oxide-oxide DSE's. A variety of structural and mechanical characterization techniques are applied to investigate structure-property relationships for interfacial fracture behavior. The optical floating zone technique was employed for growing both the eutectic crystals and their single crystal counterparts, Co1-x NixO. Co1-xNixO/ZrO2(CaO) was shown to possess the necessary structural elements to serve as a model system for interfacial fracture. Lamellar microstructures were observed for all compositions. The crystallographic relationships between phases evolved as a model solid solution. Interdiffusion of chemical species was minimal, allowing the layers to treated independently. The core of this thesis is dedicated to studying the nature of interfacial fracture behavior in oxide eutectics. This study is motivated by the novel observation of extensive interfacial delamination for the system CoO/ZrO 2(CaO). A transition from interfacial delamination to interfacial penetration is observed for compositions of Co1-xNixO/ZrO 2(CaO) with x > 0.2. The residual stress state in these materials was investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction-based techniques. The role of plasticity in interfacial fracture was explored using a

  16. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  17. The study of origin of interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in ultra-thin CoFeB layer on the top of MgO based magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Peng; Li, Shaoping; Zheng, Yuankai; Fang, Jason; Chen, Lifan; Hong, Liang; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive microstructure study has been conducted experimentally for identifying the origin or mechanism of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the ultra-thin (10 Å) CoFeB layer on the top of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). The high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the feature of crystal structure in 10 Å-CoFeB layer is localized in nature at the CoFeB-MgO interface. On the other hand, the strain-relaxed crystalline structure is observed in the thick CoFeB (20 Å) layer at the CoFeB-MgO interface, associated with a series of dislocation formations. The electron energy loss spectroscopy further suggests that the local chemical stoichiometry of the ultra-thin 10 Å-CoFeB layer is notably changed at the CoFeB-MgO interface, compared with an atomic stoichiometry in a thick 20 Å-CoFeB layer. The origin of PMA mechanism is therefore identified experimentally as an interface effect, which can be attributed to a change of local atom bonding or lattice constant of the transition metal at the CoFeB-MgO based MTJ interface. Furthermore, such a local interfacial atom bonding change is seemly induced by the localized anisotropic strain and consistent with previous theoretical speculations and calculations. The observed experimental findings provide some perspective on microstructure and chemistry on PMA in ultra-thin CoFeB film at the MTJ interface, then deepening our understanding of the mechanism of PMA within MTJ stack and thus facilitating advancement for emerging spintronics technology.

  18. Interfacial Properties and Iron Binding to Bacterial Proteins That Promote the Growth of Magnetite Nanocrystals: X-ray Reflectivity and Surface Spectroscopy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenjie; Bu, Wei; Wang, Lijun; Palo, Pierre E.; Mallapragada, Surya; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Vaknin, David

    2012-04-30

    Surface sensitive X-ray scattering and spectroscopic studies have been conducted to determine structural properties of Mms6, the protein in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 that is implicated as promoter of magnetite nanocrystals growth. Surface pressure versus molecular area isotherms indicate Mms6 forms stable monolayers at the aqueous/vapor interface that are strongly affected by ionic conditions of the subphase. Analysis of X-ray reflectivity from the monolayers shows that the protein conformation at the interface depends on surface pressure and on the presence of ions in the solutions, in particular of iron ions and its complexes. X-ray fluorescence at grazing angles of incidence from the same monolayers allows quantitative determination of surface bound ions to the protein showing that ferric iron binds to Mms6 at higher densities compared to other ions such as Fe{sup 2+} or La{sup 3+} under similar buffer conditions.

  19. Interfacial magnetism of Ce/Fe and CeH ˜2/Fe multilayers studied by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Ph.; Klose, F.; Schulte, O.; Felsch, W.

    1994-11-01

    The distribution of the magnetic hyperfine fields and the magnetic anisotropy of Ce/Fe and CeH ˜2/Fe multilayers have been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy between 4.2 and 300 K. The extension of the Ce-Fe interaction defining a 'magnetic interface' exceeds the structural extension of the interface and is more than two times larger at the Ce/Fe than at the CeH ˜2/Fe interface. This is proposed to be a consequence of a strong hybridization between the Ce-5d and Fe-3d states that is suppressed by hydrogenation. From the relative intensity of the Mössbauer lines we show that for the CeH ˜2/Fe system with sufficiently thin Fe layers the orientation of the spontaneous magnetization is perpendicular to the film plane at low temperatures and switches to a parallel alignment at higher temperatures in a sharp transition. In contrast, the Ce/Fe system is spontaneously magnetized in the film plane.

  20. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Durability data engine selection. 94... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.219 Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall...

  1. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.219 Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall...

  2. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.219 Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall...

  3. 40 CFR 94.219 - Durability data engine selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Durability data engine selection. 94... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.219 Durability data engine selection. (a) For Category 1 and Category 2 engines, the manufacturer shall...

  4. Effect of Unprofessional Supervision on Durability of Buildings.

    PubMed

    Yahaghi, Javad

    2017-02-02

    The durability of buildings which depends on the nature of the supervisory system used in their construction is an important feature of the construction industry. This article tries to draw the readers' attention to the effect of untrained and unprofessional building supervisors and their unethical performance on the durability of buildings.

  5. Optimizing Schedules of Retrieval Practice for Durable and Efficient Learning: How Much Is Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.; Dunlosky, John

    2011-01-01

    The literature on testing effects is vast but supports surprisingly few prescriptive conclusions for how to schedule practice to achieve both durable and efficient learning. Key limitations are that few studies have examined the effects of initial learning criterion or the effects of relearning, and no prior research has examined the combined…

  6. Revision Cycles for Economics Textbooks: An Application of the Theory of Durable Goods Monopoly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation, I study economics textbook markets as an example of durable goods monopoly. Textbooks are protected by copyrights, and from a student's point of view, different textbooks are not good substitutes because students wish to use the textbook adopted by their instructors. Therefore sellers have market power. Textbooks can be…

  7. Residual stresses and durability in cold drawn eutectoid steel wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atienza, J. M.; Elices, M.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Caballero, L.; Valiente, A.

    2007-04-01

    Prestressing steel wires have excellent mechanical properties but there is a need to improve their durability in aggressive environments. In this work, the influence of residual stresses on the environmentally assisted cracking of these wires is studied. A good correlation has been found between residual stresses at the surface of the wires and the time to rupture during stress corrosion test proposed by the International Federation of Prestressing. Wires with the same microstructure, surface quality and mechanical properties show very different behaviour in aggressive environments depending on their residual stress state. Research shows that environmentally assisted cracking can be improved significantly by acting on the surface residual stresses produced by wire drawing. In addition, in this study a post-drawing treatment to generate compressive residual stresses at the surface of the wires is proposed.

  8. Nanometre-scale evidence for interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation control of silicate glass corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Roland; Cotte, Stéphane; Cadel, Emmanuel; Malladi, Sairam; Karlsson, Lisa S.; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Cabié, Martiane; Seyeux, Antoine

    2015-03-01

    Silicate glasses are durable solids, and yet they are chemically unstable in contact with aqueous fluids—this has important implications for numerous industrial applications related to the corrosion resistance of glasses, or the biogeochemical weathering of volcanic glasses in seawater. The aqueous dissolution of synthetic and natural glasses results in the formation of a hydrated, cation-depleted near-surface alteration zone and, depending on alteration conditions, secondary crystalline phases on the surface. The long-standing accepted model of glass corrosion is based on diffusion-coupled hydration and selective cation release, producing a surface-altered zone. However, using a combination of advanced atomic-resolution analytical techniques, our data for the first time reveal that the structural and chemical interface between the pristine glass and altered zone is always extremely sharp, with gradients in the nanometre to sub-nanometre range. These findings support a new corrosion mechanism, interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation. Moreover, they also highlight the importance of using analytical methods with very high spatial and mass resolution for deciphering the nanometre-scale processes controlling corrosion. Our findings provide evidence that interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation may be a universal reaction mechanism that controls both silicate glass corrosion and mineral weathering.

  9. Nanometre-scale evidence for interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation control of silicate glass corrosion.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Roland; Cotte, Stéphane; Cadel, Emmanuel; Malladi, Sairam; Karlsson, Lisa S; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Cabié, Martiane; Seyeux, Antoine

    2015-03-01

    Silicate glasses are durable solids, and yet they are chemically unstable in contact with aqueous fluids-this has important implications for numerous industrial applications related to the corrosion resistance of glasses, or the biogeochemical weathering of volcanic glasses in seawater. The aqueous dissolution of synthetic and natural glasses results in the formation of a hydrated, cation-depleted near-surface alteration zone and, depending on alteration conditions, secondary crystalline phases on the surface. The long-standing accepted model of glass corrosion is based on diffusion-coupled hydration and selective cation release, producing a surface-altered zone. However, using a combination of advanced atomic-resolution analytical techniques, our data for the first time reveal that the structural and chemical interface between the pristine glass and altered zone is always extremely sharp, with gradients in the nanometre to sub-nanometre range. These findings support a new corrosion mechanism, interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation. Moreover, they also highlight the importance of using analytical methods with very high spatial and mass resolution for deciphering the nanometre-scale processes controlling corrosion. Our findings provide evidence that interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation may be a universal reaction mechanism that controls both silicate glass corrosion and mineral weathering.

  10. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  11. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

    2013-05-21

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  12. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Baker, Frederick S.; Armstrong, Beth L.

    2011-09-13

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  13. Thermal fatigue durability for advanced propulsion materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of thermal and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) crack initiation life prediction and cyclic constitutive modeling efforts sponsored recently by the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of advanced aeronautical propulsion research. A brief description is provided of the more significant material durability models that were created to describe TMF fatigue resistance of both isotropic and anisotropic superalloys, with and without oxidation resistant coatings. The two most significant crack initiation models are the cyclic damage accumulation model and the total strain version of strainrange partitioning. Unified viscoplastic cyclic constitutive models are also described. A troika of industry, university, and government research organizations contributed to the generation of these analytic models. Based upon current capabilities and established requirements, an attempt is made to project which TMF research activities most likely will impact future generation propulsion systems.

  14. DROP: Durable Reconnaissance and Observation Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; McKenzie, Clifford F.

    2012-01-01

    Robots have been a valuable tool for providing a remote presence in areas that are either inaccessible or too dangerous for humans. Having a robot with a high degree of adaptability becomes crucial during such events. The adaptability that comes from high mobility and high durability greatly increases the potential uses of a robot in these situations, and therefore greatly increases its usefulness to humans. DROP is a lightweight robot that addresses these challenges with the capability to survive large impacts, carry a usable payload, and traverse a variety of surfaces, including climbing vertical surfaces like wood, stone, and concrete. The platform is crash-proof, allowing it to be deployed in ways including being dropped from an unmanned aerial vehicle or thrown from a large MSL-class (Mars Science Laboratory) rover.

  15. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.

  16. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  17. Moisture Durability Assessment of Selected Well-insulated Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pallin, Simon B.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Kehrer, Manfred; Hun, Diana E.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2015-12-01

    This report presents the results from studying the hygrothermal performance of two well-insulated wall assemblies, both complying with and exceeding international building codes (IECC 2015 2014, IRC 2015). The hygrothermal performance of walls is affected by a large number of influential parameters (e.g., outdoor and indoor climates, workmanship, material properties). This study was based on a probabilistic risk assessment in which a number of these influential parameters were simulated with their natural variability. The purpose of this approach was to generate simulation results based on laboratory chamber measurements that represent a variety of performances and thus better mimic realistic conditions. In total, laboratory measurements and 6,000 simulations were completed for five different US climate zones. A mold growth indicator (MGI) was used to estimate the risk of mold which potentially can cause moisture durability problems in the selected wall assemblies. Analyzing the possible impact on the indoor climate due to mold was not part of this study. The following conclusions can be reached from analyzing the simulation results. In a hot-humid climate, a higher R-value increases the importance of the airtightness because interior wall materials are at lower temperatures. In a cold climate, indoor humidity levels increase with increased airtightness. Air leakage must be considered in a hygrothermal risk assessment, since air efficiently brings moisture into buildings from either the interior or exterior environment. The sensitivity analysis of this study identifies mitigation strategies. Again, it is important to remark that MGI is an indicator of mold, not an indicator of indoor air quality and that mold is the most conservative indicator for moisture durability issues.

  18. Two-Fluid Models and Interfacial Area Transport in Microgravity Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Vasavada, Shilp

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop a two-fluid model formulation with interfacial area transport equation applicable for microgravity conditions. The new model is expected to make a leapfrog improvement by furnishing the constitutive relations for the interfacial interaction terms with the interfacial area transport equation, which can dynamically model the changes of the interfacial structures. In the first year of this three-year project supported by the U.S. NASA, Office of Biological and Physics Research, the primary focus is to design and construct a ground-based, microgravity two-phase flow simulation facility, in which two immiscible fluids with close density will be used. In predicting the two-phase flow behaviors in any two-phase flow system, the interfacial transfer terms are among the most essential factors in the modeling. These interfacial transfer terms in a two-fluid model specify the rate of phase change, momentum exchange, and energy transfer at the interface between the two phases. For the two-phase flow under the microgravity condition, the stability of the fluid particle interface and the interfacial structures are quite different from those under normal gravity condition. The flow structure may not reach an equilibrium condition and the two fluids may be loosely coupled such that the inertia terms of each fluid should be considered separately by use of the two-fluid model. Previous studies indicated that, unless phase-interaction terms are accurately modeled in the two-fluid model, the complex modeling does not necessarily warrant an accurate solution.

  19. Surface and interfacial chemistry of high-k dielectric and interconnect materials on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, Paul Daniel

    Surfaces and interfaces play a critical role in the manufacture and function of silicon based integrated circuits. It is therefore reasonable to study the chemistries at these surfaces and interfaces to improve existing processes and to develop new ones. Model barium strontium titanate high-k dielectric systems have been deposited on ultrathin silicon oxynitride in ultrahigh vacuum. The resulting nanostructures are characterized with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An interfacial reaction between Ba and Sr atoms and SiOxNy was found to create silicates, BaSixOy or SrSi xOy. Inclusion of N in the interfacial oxide decreased silicate formation in both Ba and Sr systems. Furthermore, inclusion of N in the interfacial oxide decreased the penetration of Ba and Sr containing species, such as silicides and silicates. Sputter deposited HfO2 was studied on nitrided and unnitrided Si(100) surfaces. XPS and SIMS were used to verify the presence of interfacial HfSixOy and estimate its relative amount on both nitrided and unnitrided samples. More HfSixOy formed without the SiNx interfacial layer. These interfacial chemistry results are then used to explain the electrical measurements obtained from metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. MOS capacitors with interfacial SiNx exhibit reduced leakage current and increased capacitance. Lastly, surface science techniques were used to develop a processing technique for reducing thin films of copper (II) and copper (I) oxide to copper. Deuterium atoms (D*) and methyl radicals (CH3*) were shown to reduce Cu 2+ and/or Cu1+ to Cu0 within 30 min at a surface temperature of 400 K under a flux of 1 x 1015 atoms/cm2s. Temperature programmed desorption experiments suggest that oxygen leaves the surface as D2O and CO2 for the D* and CH3* treated surfaces, respectively.

  20. Surface Interaction of Water-in-Oil Emulsion Droplets with Interfacially Active Asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Zhang, Ling; Xie, Lei; Lu, Xi; Liu, Qingxia; He, Jiajun; Mantilla, Cesar A; Van den Berg, Frans G A; Zeng, Hongbo

    2017-02-07

    Adsorption of interfacially active components at the water/oil interface plays critical roles in determining the properties and behaviors of emulsion droplets. In this study, the droplet probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique was applied, for the first time, to quantitatively study the interaction mechanism between water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion droplets with interfacially adsorbed asphaltenes. The behaviors and stability of W/O emulsion droplets were demonstrated to be significantly influenced by the asphaltene concentration of organic solution where the emulsions were aged, aging time, force load, contact time, and solvent type. Bare water droplets could readily coalesce with each other in oil (i.e., toluene), while interfacially adsorbed asphaltenes could sterically inhibit droplet coalescence and induce interfacial adhesion during separation of the water droplets. For low asphaltene concentration cases, the adhesion increased with increasing asphaltene concentration (≤100 mg/L), but it significantly decreased at relatively high asphaltene concentration (e.g., 500 mg/L). Experiments in Heptol (i.e., mixture of toluene and heptane) showed that the addition of a poor solvent for asphaltenes (e.g., heptane) could enhance the interfacial adhesion between emulsion droplets at relatively low asphaltene concentration but could weaken the adhesion at relatively high asphaltene concentration. This work has quantified the interactions between W/O emulsion droplets with interfacially adsorbed asphaltenes, and the results provide useful implications into the stabilization mechanisms of W/O emulsions in oil production. The methodology in this work can be readily extended to other W/O emulsion systems with interfacially active components.