Science.gov

Sample records for interfacial tryptophan residues

  1. Ionization, partitioning, and dynamics of tryptophan octyl ester: implications for membrane-bound tryptophan residues.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, A; Mukherjee, S; Rukmini, R; Rawat, S S; Sudha, S

    1997-01-01

    The presence of tryptophan residues as intrinsic fluorophores in most proteins makes them an obvious choice for fluorescence spectroscopic analyses of such proteins. Membrane proteins have been reported to have a significantly higher tryptophan content than soluble proteins. The role of tryptophan residues in the structure and function of membrane proteins has attracted a lot of attention. Tryptophan residues in membrane proteins and peptides are believed to be distributed asymmetrically toward the interfacial region. Tryptophan octyl ester (TOE) is an important model for membrane-bound tryptophan residues. We have characterized this molecule as a fluorescent membrane probe in terms of its ionization, partitioning, and motional characteristics in unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. The ionization property of this molecule in model membranes has been studied by utilizing its pH-dependent fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of pH-dependent fluorescence intensity and emission maximum shows that deprotonation of the alpha-amino group of TOE occurs with an apparent pKa of approximately 7.5 in the membrane. The fluorescence lifetime of membrane-bound TOE also shows pH dependence. The fluorescence lifetimes of TOE have been interpreted by using the rotamer model for the fluorescence decay of tryptophan. Membrane/water partition coefficients of TOE were measured in both its protonated and deprotonated forms. No appreciable difference was found in its partitioning behavior with ionization. Analysis of fluorescence polarization of TOE as a function of pH showed that there is a decrease in polarization with increasing pH, implying more rotational freedom on deprotonation. This is further supported by pH-dependent red edge excitation shift and the apparent rotational correlation time of membrane-bound TOE. TOE should prove useful in monitoring the organization and dynamics of tryptophan residues incorporated into membranes. PMID:9251800

  2. Development of indole chemistry to label tryptophan residues in protein for determination of tryptophan surface accessibility.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Carol L; Turner, Raymond J; Edwards, Robert A

    2007-06-01

    Solvent accessibility can be used to evaluate protein structural models, identify binding sites, and characterize protein conformational changes. The differential modification of amino acids at specific sites enables the accessible surface residues to be identified by mass spectrometry. Tryptophan residues within proteins can be differentially labeled with halocompounds by a photochemical reaction. In this study, tryptophan residues of carbonic anhydrase are reacted with chloroform, 2,2,2-trichloroethanol (TCE), 2,2,2-trichloroacetate (TCA), or 3-bromo-1-propanol (BP) under UV irradiation at 280 nm. The light-driven reactions with chloroform, TCE, TCA, and BP attach a formyl, hydroxyethanone, carboxylic acid, and propanol group, respectively, onto the indole ring of tryptophan. Trypsin and chymotrypsin digests of the modified carbonic anhydrase are used to map accessible tryptophan residues using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Tryptophan reactivity is determined by identifying peptides with tryptophan residues modified with the appropriate label. The reactivity is calculated from the frequency that the modification is identified and a semiquantitative measure of the amount of products formed. Both of these measures of tryptophan reactivity correlate significantly with the accessible surface area of tryptophan residues in carbonic anhydrase determined from the X-ray crystal structure. Therefore the photochemical reaction of halocompounds with tryptophan residues in carbonic anhydrase indicates the degree of solvent accessibility of these residues. PMID:17525468

  3. Gramicidin channels that have no tryptophan residues.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, V; Daumas, P; Ranjalahy-Rasoloarijao, L; Heitz, F; Lazaro, R; Trudelle, Y; Andersen, O S

    1992-06-16

    In order to understand how aromatic residues modulate the function of membrane-spanning proteins, we examined the role of the four tryptophans in gramicidin A (gA) in determining the average duration and permeability characteristics of membrane-spanning gramicidin channels; the tryptophan residues were replaced by tyrosine (gramicidin T, gT), tyrosine O-benzyl ether [gramicidin T(Bzl), gT(Bzl)], naphthylalanine (gramicidin N, gN), and phenylalanine (gramicidin M enantiomer, gM-). These analogues form channels with durations and conductances that differ some 10- and 16-fold, respectively. The single-channel conductance was invariably decreased by the Trp----Yyy replacement, and the relative conductance alterations were similar in phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) and monoglyceride (GMO) bilayers. The duration variations exhibited a more complex pattern, which was quite different in the two membrane environments: in DPhPC bilayers, gN channels have an average duration that is approximately 2-fold longer than that of gA channels; in GMO bilayers, the average duration of gN channels is about one-tenth that of gA channels. The sequence-dependent alterations in channel function do not result from alterations in the channels' peptide backbone structure, because heterodimers can form between the different analogues and gramicidine A, and there is no energetic cost associated with heterodimer formation [cf. Durkin, J. T., Koeppe, R. E., II, & Andersen, O. S. (1990) J. Mol. Biol. 211, 221]. The alterations in permeability properties are consistent with the notion that Trp residues alter the energy profile for ion permeation through long-range electrostatic interactions.

  4. Identification of Two Novel Modifications at Tryptophan Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shuzhen; Zhang, Kai; Tian, Shanshan; He, Xiwen; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-08-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in cellular physiology. Mass spectrometry (MS) has been developed into a powerful tool to identify all possible protein modifications. Herein, we describe our efforts to deduce the structures of two unknown modifications at tryptophan (Trp) residues (W + 92 Da and W + 108 Da). The two modifications were further confirmed by aligning the MS/MS fragmentation of synthetic peptide with in-vivo peptide identified. Finally, the mimic experiment elucidated how two Trp modifications occur. This study, therefore, expands current knowledge of Trp modifications.

  5. Tryptophan

    MedlinePlus

    The body uses tryptophan to help make niacin and serotonin. Serotonin is thought to produce healthy sleep and a stable mood. In order for tryptophan in the diet to be changed into niacin, the body needs to have enough: Iron Riboflavin Vitamin B6

  6. Decomposition of protein tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components. III. Correlation between fluorescence and microenvironment parameters of individual tryptophan residues.

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Y K; Koshevnik, Y; Burstein, E A

    2001-01-01

    In our previous paper (Reshetnyak, Ya. K., and E. A. Burstein. 2001. Biophys. J. 81:1710-1734) we confirmed the existence of five statistically discrete classes of emitting tryptophan fluorophores in proteins. The differences in fluorescence properties of tryptophan residues of these five classes reflect differences in interactions of excited states of tryptophan fluorophores with their microenvironment in proteins. Here we present a system of describing physical and structural parameters of microenvironments of tryptophan residues based on analysis of atomic crystal structures of proteins. The application of multidimensional statistical methods of cluster and discriminant analyses for the set of microenvironment parameters of 137 tryptophan residues of 48 proteins with known three-dimensional structures allowed us to 1) demonstrate the discrete nature of ensembles of structural parameters of tryptophan residues in proteins; 2) assign spectral components obtained after decomposition of tryptophan fluorescence spectra to individual tryptophan residues; 3) find a correlation between spectroscopic and physico-structural features of the microenvironment; and 4) reveal differences in structural and physical parameters of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues belonging to various spectral classes. PMID:11509384

  7. Membrane organization and dynamics of "inner pair" and "outer pair" tryptophan residues in gramicidin channels.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sourav; Chaudhuri, Arunima; Gu, Hong; Koeppe, Roger E; Kombrabail, Mamata; Krishnamoorthy, G; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2012-09-13

    The linear ion channel peptide gramicidin serves as an excellent prototype for monitoring the organization, dynamics, and function of membrane-spanning channels. The tryptophan residues in gramicidin channels are crucial for establishing and maintaining the structure and function of the channel in the membrane bilayer. In order to address the basis of differential importance of tryptophan residues in the gramicidin channel, we monitored the effects of pairwise substitution of two of the four gramicidin tryptophans, the inner pair (Trp-9 and -11) and the outer pair (Trp-13 and -15), using a combination of steady state and time-resolved fluorescence approaches and circular dichroism spectroscopy. We show here that these double tryptophan gramicidin analogues adopt different conformations in membranes, suggesting that the conformational preference of double tryptophan gramicidin analogues is dictated by the positions of the tryptophans in the sequence. These results assume significance in the context of recent observations that the inner pair of tryptophans (Trp-9 and -11) is more important for gramicidin channel formation and channel conductance. These results could be potentially useful in analyzing the effect of tryptophan substitution on the functioning of ion channels and membrane proteins.

  8. The functions of tryptophan residues in membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, M.; Chang, C.H.; Stevens, F.J.

    1994-08-01

    Membrane proteins in general have a significantly higher Trp content than do soluble proteins. This is especially true for the M and L subunits of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria. The Trp residues are located mostly in the segments that connect the transmembrane helices. Further, they are concentrated at the periplasmic side of the complex. Within the protein subunits, many form hydrogen bonds with carbonyl oxygens of the main chain, thereby stabilizing the protein. On the surface of the molecule, they are correctly positioned to form hydrogen bonds with the lipid head groups while their hydrophobic rings are immersed in the lipid part of the bilayer. We suggest that Trp residues are involved in the translocation of protein through the membrane and that following translocation, Trp residues serve as anchors on the periplasmic side of the membrane.

  9. Tripping up Trp: Modification of protein tryptophan residues by reactive oxygen species, modes of detection, and biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Deterding, Leesa J; Mason, Ronald P

    2015-12-01

    Proteins comprise a majority of the dry weight of a cell, rendering them a major target for oxidative modification. Oxidation of proteins can result in significant alterations in protein molecular mass such as breakage of the polypeptide backbone and/or polymerization of monomers into dimers, multimers, and sometimes insoluble aggregates. Protein oxidation can also result in structural changes to amino acid residue side chains, conversions that have only a modest effect on protein size but can have widespread consequences for protein function. There are a wide range of rate constants for amino acid reactivity, with cysteine, methionine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan having the highest rate constants with commonly encountered biological oxidants. Free tryptophan and tryptophan protein residues react at a diffusion-limited rate with hydroxyl radical and also have high rate constants for reactions with singlet oxygen and ozone. Although oxidation of proteins in general and tryptophan residues specifically can have effects detrimental to the health of cells and organisms, some modifications are neutral, whereas others contribute to the function of the protein in question or may act as a signal that damaged proteins need to be replaced. This review provides a brief overview of the chemical mechanisms by which tryptophan residues become oxidized, presents both the strengths and the weaknesses of some of the techniques used to detect these oxidative interactions, and discusses selected examples of the biological consequences of tryptophan oxidation in proteins from animals, plants, and microbes. PMID:26393422

  10. The effects of biological environments on the electron-relay functionality of tryptophan residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Dai, Hongjing; Li, Jilai; Huang, Xuri; Wei, Zidong

    2012-01-16

    Clarifying the contribution of tryptophan (Trp) to electron-transfer (ET) processes in different protein surroundings can help to understand the effective pathway of ET in proteins. Interactions between Trp residues and protein microsurroundings involve intermolecular H-bonds, cation and π-electron clouds of aromatic rings, the secondary structure and π orbital of aromatic rings, and so on. Detailed analyses reveal that the microsurroundings play an important role in modulating the electron-relay function of Trp in proteins. Generally, microsurroundings with strong Lewis acidity inhibit electron hole transport through Trp residues. Systems with weak Lewis acidity finely tune the electron-relay ability of Trp in proteins, while those with strong Lewis basicity strongly enhance the electron-relay ability of Trp residues.

  11. Impact of interfacial tension on residual CO2 clusters in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We develop a numerical simulation that uses the lattice Boltzmann method to directly calculate the characteristics of residual nonwetting-phase clusters to quantify capillary trapping mechanisms in real sandstone. For this purpose, a digital-rock-pore model reconstructed from micro-CT-scanned images of Berea sandstone is filtered and segmented into a binary file. The residual-cluster distribution is generated following simulation of the drainage and imbibition processes. The characteristics of the residual cluster in terms of size distribution, major length, interfacial area, and sphericity are investigated under conditions of different interfacial tension (IFT). Our results indicate that high interfacial tension increases the residual saturation and leads to a large size distribution of residual clusters. However, low interfacial tension results in a larger interfacial area, which is beneficial for dissolution and reaction processes during geological carbon storage. Analysis of the force balance acting on the residual clusters demonstrates that trapping stability is higher in high interfacial tension case, and the interfacial tension should be a controlling factor for the trapping stability in addition to the pore geometry and connectivity. The proposed numerical method can handle the complex displacement of multicomponent systems in porous media. By using this method, we can obtain residual-cluster distributions under different conditions for optimizing the storage capacity of carbon-storage projects.

  12. Tryptophan and tyrosine to terbium fluorescence resonance energy transfer as a method to 'map' aromatic residues and monitor docking

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, John E.; McLendon, George L. . E-mail: george.mclendon@duke.edu

    2006-11-03

    Fluorescent lanthanide ions, with large Stokes shifts and narrow emission bands, are excellent tools for the development of FRET-based assays. In this work, a terbium ion is tethered to a peptide which binds to the BIR3 domain of XIAP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Excitation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the BIR3 domain causes the peptide bound terbium ion to fluoresce relative to its distance from these aromatic residues. By developing ligands with terbium ions tethered at different residues, the relative terbium emission can be used to 'map' the aromatic residues within the ligand binding pocket.

  13. Resolution of fluorescence intensity decays of the two tryptophan residues in glutamine-binding protein from Escherichia coli using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G; Cottam, P F; Ho, C

    1991-01-01

    Time correlated single photon counting measurements of tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence intensity decay and other spectroscopic studies were performed on glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP) from Escherichia coli. Using site-specifically mutated forms of the protein in which tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe) substitute for the Trp residues at positions 32 and 220, we have examined whether wild-type (Wtyp) intensity decay components may be assigned to specific Trp residues. Results indicate that: (a) two exponential intensity decay components are recovered from the Wtyp protein (6.16 ns, 0.46 ns); (b) the long decay component arises from Trp-220 and comprises greater than 90% of the total fluorescence emission; (c) the short component arises from Trp-32 and is highly quenched; (d) all four single-Trp mutants exhibit multiexponential intensity decays, yet equimolar mixtures of two single-Trp mutants yield only two decay components which are virtually indistinguishable from the Wtyp protein; (e) the recovery of additional components in protein mixtures is obscured by statistical noise inherent in the technique of photon counting; (f) various spectroscopic measurements suggest that Trp-Trp interactions occur in the Wtyp protein, but the Wtyp intensity decay may be closely approximated by a linear combination of intensity decays from single-Trp mutants; and (g) inferences derived independently from fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy which pertain to the presence of Trp-Trp interactions and the relative solvent exposure of the two Trp residues are in agreement. PMID:1932553

  14. Gramicidin conformational changes during riboflavin photosensitized oxidation in solution and the effect of N-methylation of tryptophan residues.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Denis; López, Jhon J; Palominos, Marco; Salas, Cristian O; Soto-Arriaza, Marco A

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, we evaluated the role of gramicidin conformation in its photosensitized oxidation in organic solvents when irradiated in the presence of riboflavin. Gramicidin conformation has been described as monomeric in trifluoroethanol and as an intertwined dimer in methanol. Gramicidin showed extensive photo-oxidation upon irradiation in the presence of riboflavin in both solvents, and tryptophan residues were identified to be involved. We synthesized a gramicidin derivative methylated at position 1 of the indole ring of tryptophan to assess its effect on gramicidin conformation and photo-oxidation. Methylated gramicidin showed very similar absorption and emission spectra to gramicidin, but different conformations were identified by circular dichroism spectra. Upon irradiation, N-methylated tryptophan residues in the gramicidin derivative were not easily photo-oxidized by riboflavin compared to gramicidin. Circular dichroism spectra for gramicidin in methanol changed significantly upon irradiation in the presence of riboflavin indicating a change in conformation, while in trifluoroethanol no such changes were observed. Time-resolved fluorescence and anisotropy studies showed that oxidized gramicidin in methanol had shorter fluorescence lifetimes and a shorter rotational correlation time compared to non-irradiated gramicidin. Additionally, SDS-PAGE analysis showed a marked change in the electrophoretic pattern, whereas the high-molecular-weight bands disappeared upon irradiation. We interpret all these results in terms of a riboflavin photosensitized shift in gramicidin conformation from intertwined to monomeric.

  15. Mechanistic Examination of Cβ–Cγ Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan Residues during Dissociations of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K.; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [GnW]•+ (n = 2-4) and [GXW]•+ (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO2]•+) can generate [M - CO2 - 116]+, [M - CO2 - 117]•+, and [1H-indole]•+ (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO2 - 116]+ and [1H-indole]•+ systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2--the decarboxylated species that is active against Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage -can efficiently isomerize to form a more-stable -radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WGnR]•+ (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M-116]+ product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol -1 lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  16. Selective Oxidation of Methionine and Tryptophan Residues in a Therapeutic IgG1 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Folzer, Emilien; Diepold, Katharina; Bomans, Katrin; Finkler, Christof; Schmidt, Roland; Bulau, Patrick; Huwyler, Jörg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Koulov, Atanas V

    2015-09-01

    Oxidation of methionine and tryptophan are common degradation pathways for monoclonal antibodies and present major analytical challenges in biotechnology. Generally, protein oxidation is detectable in stability and/or stressed samples (e.g., exposed to hydrogen peroxide, UV light, or metal ions). The induced chemical modifications may impact the biological activity of antibodies and may have biological consequences. However, these effects and the contribution of individual protein modifications are difficult to delineate as different amino acids are often oxidized simultaneously and accompanied by other degradants such as aggregates, especially in forced degradation studies. Here, we report a new method to obtain selective oxidation of methionine or tryptophan by using oxidation reagents combined with large excess of free tryptophan or methionine, correspondingly. More specifically, using hydrogen peroxide or tert-butyl hydroperoxide in combination with addition of free tryptophan allowed for selective oxidation of methionine. Conversely, the use of 2,2-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in combination with free methionine resulted in selective tryptophan oxidation, whereas methionine oxidation was not significantly altered. This novel stress model system may prove to be valuable tool in future mechanistic studies of oxidative degradation of protein therapeutics.

  17. Luffa acutangula agglutinin: Primary structure determination and identification of a tryptophan residue involved in its carbohydrate-binding activity using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gnanesh; Mishra, Padmanabh; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-12-01

    A lectin from phloem exudates of Luffa acutangula (ridge gourd) was purified on chitin affinity chromatography and characterized for its amino acid sequence and to study the role of tryptophan in its activity. The purified lectin was subjected to various proteolytic digestions, and the resulting peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometer. The peptide precursor ions were fragmented by collision-induced dissociation or electron transfer dissociation experiments, and a manual interpretation of MS/MS was performed to deduce amino acid sequence. This gave rise to almost complete sequence coverage of the lectin which showed high-sequence similarity with deduced sequences of phloem lectins present in the database. Chemical modification of lysine, tyrosine, histidine, arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid residues did not inhibit the hemagglutinating activity. However, the modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide showed the loss of hemagglutinating activity. Additionally, the mapping of tryptophan residues was performed to determine the extent and number of residues modified, which revealed that six residues per molecule were oxidized suggesting their accessibility. The retention of the lectin activity was seen when the modifications were performed in the presence of chitooligosaccharides due to protection of a tryptophan residue (W102) in the protein. These studies taken together have led to the identification of a particular tryptophan residue (W102) in the activity of the lectin. PMID:26597132

  18. Role of tryptophan residues of Erv1: Trp95 and Trp183 are important for its folding and oxidase function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Ang, Swee Kim; Ceh-Pavia, Efrain; Pang, Jiayun; Lu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Erv1 is an FAD-dependent thiol oxidase of the ERV (essential for respiration and viability)/ALR (augmenter of liver regeneration) sub-family and an essential component of the mitochondrial import and assembly pathway. Erv1 contains six tryptophan residues, which are all located in the highly conserved C-terminal FAD-binding domain. Though important structural roles were predicted for the invariable Trp95, no experimental study has been reported. In the present study, we investigated the structural and functional roles of individual tryptophan residues of Erv1. Six single tryptophan-to-phenylalanine yeast mutant strains were generated and their effects on cell viability were tested at various temperatures. Then, the mutants were purified from Escherichia coli. Their effects on folding, FAD-binding and Erv1 activity were characterized. Our results showed that Erv1W95F has the strongest effect on the stability and function of Erv1 and followed by Erv1W183F. Erv1W95F results in a decrease in the Tm of Erv1 by 23°C, a significant loss of the oxidase activity and thus causing cell growth defects at both 30°C and 37°C. Erv1W183F induces changes in the oligomerization state of Erv1, along with a pronounced effect on the stability of Erv1 and its function at 37°C, whereas the other mutants had no clear effect on the function of Erv1 including the highly conserved Trp157 mutant. Finally, computational analysis indicates that Trp95 plays a key role in stabilizing the isoalloxazine ring to interact with Cys133. Taken together, the present study provided important insights into the molecular mechanism of how thiol oxidases use FAD in catalysing disulfide bond formation. PMID:26221027

  19. Analysis of the Role of the Active Site Residue Arg98 in the Flavoprotein Tryptophan 2-Monooxygenase, a Member of the l-Amino Oxidase Family†

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    The flavoprotein tryptophan 2-monooxygenase catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of tryptophan to indoleacetamide. We have previously identified tryptophan 2-monooxygenase as a homologue of l-amino acid oxidase [Sobrado, P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2002) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 402, 24–30]. On the basis of the sequence comparisons of the different LAAO family members, Arg98 of tryptophan 2-monooxygenase can be identified as an active site residue which interacts with the carboxylate of the amino acid substrate. The catalytic properties of R98K and R98A tryptophan 2-monooxygenase have been characterized to evaluate the role of this residue. Mutation of Arg98 to lysine decreases the first-order rate constant for flavin reduction by 180-fold and the second-order rate constant for flavin oxidation by 26-fold, has no significant effect on the Kd value for tryptophan or the Ki value for the competitive inhibitor indoleacetamide, and increases the Ki value for indolepyruvate less than 2-fold. Mutation of this residue to alanine decreases the rate constants for reduction and oxidation an additional 5- and 2-fold, respectively, and increases the Kd value for tryptophan and the Ki value for indolepyruvate by 31- and 17-fold, respectively, while having an only 2-fold effect on the Ki value for indoleacetamide. Both mutations increase the value of the primary deuterium isotope effect with tryptophan as a substrate, consistent with a later transition state. Both mutant enzymes catalyze a simple oxidase reaction, producing indolepyruvate and hydrogen peroxide. The pH dependences of the V/Ktrp values for the mutant enzymes show that the anionic form of the substrate is preferred but that the zwitterionic form is a substrate. The results are consistent with the interaction between Arg98 and the carboxylate of the amino acid substrate being critical for correct positioning of the substrate in the active site for efficient catalysis. PMID:14636049

  20. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's through the variation of interfacial layer architectures and processing parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was the development of efficient, user-friendly computer codes for optimizing fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites through the use of homogeneous and heterogeneous interfacial layer architectures and processing parameter variation. To satisfy this objective, three major computer codes have been developed and delivered to the NASA-Lewis Research Center, namely MCCM, OPTCOMP, and OPTCOMP2. MCCM is a general research-oriented code for investigating the effects of microstructural details, such as layered morphology of SCS-6 SiC fibers and multiple homogeneous interfacial layers, on the inelastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composites under axisymmetric thermomechanical loading. OPTCOMP and OPTCOMP2 combine the major analysis module resident in MCCM with a commercially-available optimization algorithm and are driven by user-friendly interfaces which facilitate input data construction and program execution. OPTCOMP enables the user to identify those dimensions, geometric arrangements and thermoelastoplastic properties of homogeneous interfacial layers that minimize thermal residual stresses for the specified set of constraints. OPTCOMP2 provides additional flexibility in the residual stress optimization through variation of the processing parameters (time, temperature, external pressure and axial load) as well as the microstructure of the interfacial region which is treated as a heterogeneous two-phase composite. Overviews of the capabilities of these codes are provided together with a summary of results that addresses the effects of various microstructural details of the fiber, interfacial layers and matrix region on the optimization of fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites.

  1. Conserved residues Asp16 and Pro24 of TnaC-tRNAPro participate in tryptophan induction of Tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yanofsky, Charles

    2008-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the nascent TnaC-tRNA(Pro) peptidyl-tRNA and the translating ribosome create a tryptophan binding site in the ribosome where bound tryptophan inhibits TnaC-tRNA(Pro) cleavage. This inhibition delays ribosome release, thereby inhibiting Rho factor binding and action, resulting in increased tna operon transcription. Replacing Trp12 of TnaC with any other amino acid residue was previously shown to prevent tryptophan binding and induction of tna operon expression. Genome-wide comparisons of TnaC amino acid sequences identify Asp16 and Pro24, as well as Trp12, as highly conserved TnaC residues. Replacing these residues with other residues was previously shown to influence tryptophan induction of tna operon expression. In this study, in vitro analyses were performed to examine the potential roles of Asp16 and Pro24 in tna operon induction. Replacing Asp16 or Pro24 of TnaC of E. coli with other amino acids established that these residues are essential for free tryptophan binding and inhibition of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) cleavage at the peptidyl transferase center. Asp16 and Pro24 are in fact located in spatial positions corresponding to critical residues of AAP, another ribosome regulatory peptide. Sparsomycin-methylation protection studies further suggested that segments of 23S RNA were arranged differently in ribosomes bearing TnaCs with either the Asp16Ala or the Pro24Ala change. Thus, features of the amino acid sequence of TnaC of the nascent TnaC-tRNA(Pro) peptidyl-tRNA, in addition to the presence of Trp12, are necessary for the nascent peptide to create a tryptophan binding/inhibition site in the translating ribosome. PMID:18424524

  2. Probing alkali metal-pi interactions with the side chain residue of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiaxin; Barbour, Leonard J; Gokel, George W

    2002-04-16

    Feeble forces play a significant role in the organization of proteins. These include hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, salt bridge formation, and steric interactions. The alkali metal cation-pi interaction is a force of potentially profound importance but its consideration in biology has been limited by the lack of experimental evidence. Our previous studies of cation-pi interactions with Na(+) and K(+) involved the side arms of tryptophan (indole), tyrosine (phenol), and phenylalanine (benzene) as the arene donors. The receptor system possesses limiting steric constraints. In this report, we show that direct interactions between alkali metals and arenes occur at or within the van der Waals contact distance.

  3. Probing alkali metal–π interactions with the side chain residue of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiaxin; Barbour, Leonard J.; Gokel, George W.

    2002-01-01

    Feeble forces play a significant role in the organization of proteins. These include hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, salt bridge formation, and steric interactions. The alkali metal cation-π interaction is a force of potentially profound importance but its consideration in biology has been limited by the lack of experimental evidence. Our previous studies of cation–π interactions with Na+ and K+ involved the side arms of tryptophan (indole), tyrosine (phenol), and phenylalanine (benzene) as the arene donors. The receptor system possesses limiting steric constraints. In this report, we show that direct interactions between alkali metals and arenes occur at or within the van der Waals contact distance. PMID:11943874

  4. Contributions of residues of pancreatic phospholipase A2 to interfacial binding, catalysis, and activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, B Z; Rogers, J; Tsai, M D; Pidgeon, C; Jain, M K

    1999-04-13

    Primary rate and equilibrium parameters for 60 site-directed mutants of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) are analyzed so incremental contributions of the substitution of specific residues can be evaluated. The magnitude of the change is evaluated so a functional role in the context of the N- and C-domains of PLA2 can be assigned, and their relationship to the catalytic residues and to the i-face that makes contact with the interface. The effect of substitutions and interfacial charge is characterized by the equilibrium dissociation constant for dissociation of the bound enzyme from the interface (Kd), the dissociation constant for dissociation of a substrate mimic from the active site of the bound enzyme (KL), and the interfacial Michaelis constants, KM and kcat. Activity is lost (>99.9%) on the substitution of H48 and D49, the catalytic residues. A more than 95% decrease in kcat is seen with the substitution of F5, I9, D99, A102, or F106, which form the substrate binding pocket. Certain residues, which are not part of the catalytic site or the substrate binding pocket, also modulate kcat. Interfacial anionic charge lowers Kd, and induces kcat activation through K56, K53, K119, or K120. Significant changes in KL are seen by the substitution of N6, I9, F22, Y52, K53, N71, Y73, A102, or A103. Changes in KM [=(k2+k-1)/k1] are attributed to kcat (=k2) and KL (=k-1/k1). Some substitutions change more than one parameter, implying an allosteric effect of the binding to the interface on KS, and the effect of the interfacial anionic charge on kcat. Interpreted in the context of the overall structure, results provide insights into the role of segments and domains in the microscopic events of catalytic turnover and processivity, and their allosteric regulation. We suggest that the interfacial recognition region (i-face) of PLA2, due to the plasticity of certain segments and domains, exercises an allosteric control on the substrate binding and chemical step.

  5. Role of lysine and tryptophan residues in the biological activity of toxin VII (Ts gamma) from the scorpion Tityus serrulatus.

    PubMed

    Hassani, O; Mansuelle, P; Cestèle, S; Bourdeaux, M; Rochat, H; Sampieri, F

    1999-02-01

    Toxin VII (TsVII), also known as Ts gamma, is the most potent neurotoxin in the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus. It has been purified to homogeneity using a new fast and efficient method. Chemical modification of TsVII with the tryptophan-specific reagent o-nitrophenylsulfenyl chloride yielded three modified derivatives (residues Trp39, Trp50 and Trp54). Acetylation of TsVII mostly generated the monoacetylated Lys12 derivative. No side reactions were detected, as indicated by endoproteinase Lys-C peptide mapping, Edman degradation and electrospray mass spectrometry. Circular dichroism and fluorimetric measurements showed that none of the chemical modifications altered the overall structure of the derivatives. The acetylation of Lys12 or the sulfenylation of Trp39 or Trp54 led to a loss of both toxicity in mice and apparent binding affinity for rat brain and cockroach synaptosomal preparations. Sulfenylation of Trp50, however, moderately affected the toxicity of TsVII in mice and had almost no effect on its binding properties. A 3-dimensional model of TsVII was constructed by homology modeling. It suggests that the most reactive residues (Lys12 and Trp39 and Trp54) are all important in the functional disruption of neuronal sodium channels by TsVII, and are close to each other in the hydrophobic conserved region.

  6. Recombinant expression, antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action of tritrpticin analogs containing fluoro-tryptophan residues.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Hoffarth, Elesha R; Ishida, Hiroaki; Aramini, James M; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections has prompted significant academic research into new therapeutic agents targeted against these pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear as promising candidates, due their potent antimicrobial activity and their ubiquitous presence in almost all organisms. Tritrpticin is a member of this family of peptides and has been shown to exert a strong antimicrobial activity against several bacterial strains. Tritrpticin's main structural characteristic is the presence of three consecutive Trp residues at the center of the peptide. These residues play an important role in the activity of tritrpticin against Escherichia coli. In this work, a recombinant version of tritrpticin was produced in E. coli using calmodulin as a fusion protein expression tag to overcome the toxicity of the peptide. When used in combination with glyphosate, an inhibitor of the endogenous synthesis of aromatic amino acids, this expression system allowed for the incorporation of fluorinated Trp analogs at very high levels (>90%). The antimicrobial activity of the 4-, 5- and 6-fluoro-Trp-containing tritrpticins against E. coli was as strong as the activity of the native peptide. Similarly, the tritrpticin analogs exhibited comparable abilities to perturb and permeabilize synthetic lipid bilayers as well as the outer and inner membrane of E. coli. Furthermore, the use of 19F NMR spectroscopy established that each individual fluoro-Trp residue interacts differently with SDS micelles, supporting the idea that each Trp in the original tritrpticin plays a different role in the perturbing/permeabilizing activity of the peptide. Moreover, our work demonstrates that the use of fluoro-Trp in solvent perturbation 19F NMR experiments provides detailed site-specific information on the insertion of the Trp residues in biological membrane mimetics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai

  7. Role of interfacial amino acid residues in assembly, stability, and conformation of a spherical virus capsid

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Juan; Carreira, Aura; Riolobos, Laura; Almendral, José María; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-eight amino acid residues involved in most noncovalent interactions between trimeric protein subunits in the capsid of the parvovirus minute virus of mice were truncated individually to alanine, and the effects on capsid assembly, thermostability, and conformation were analyzed. Only seven side chains were essential for protein subunit recognition. These side chains virtually corresponded with those that either buried a large hydrophobic surface on trimer association or formed buried intertrimer hydrogen bonds or salt bridges. The seven residues are evolutionarily conserved, and they define regularly spaced spots on a thin equatorial belt surrounding each trimer. Truncation of the many side chains that were dispensable for assembly, including those participating in solvent-accessible polar interactions, did not substantially affect capsid thermostability either. However, the interfacial residues located at the base of the pores delineating the capsid five-fold axes participated in a heat-induced conformational rearrangement associated with externalization of the capsid protein N terminus, and they were needed for infectivity. Thus, at the subunit interfaces of this model virus capsid, only key residues involved in the strongest interactions are critical for assembly and stability, but additional residues fulfill other important biological roles. PMID:14981262

  8. Chemical modification of tryptophan residues in alpha-neurotoxins from Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) venom.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Lin, P M; Chang, L S; Kuo, K W

    1995-02-01

    Two alpha-neurotoxins, Oh-4 and Oh-7, from the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom were subjected to Trp modification with 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl chloride (NPS-Cl). One major NPS derivative was isolated from the modified mixtures of Oh-4 and two from Oh-7 by HPLC. Amino acid analysis and sequence determination revealed that Trp-27 in Oh-4, and Trp-30 and Trp-26 and 30 in the two Oh-7 derivatives, were modified, respectively. Sulfenylation of Trp-27 in Oh-4 caused about 70% drop in lethal toxicity and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-binding activity. Modification of Trp-30 in Oh-7 resulted in the decrease of lethal toxicity by 36% and binding activity by 61%. The activities were further lost when the conserved Trp-26 in Oh-7 was modified. Sulfenylation of the Trp residues did not significantly affect the secondary structure of the toxins as revealed by the CD spectra. These results indicate that the Trp residues in these two long alpha-neurotoxins may be involved in the receptor binding.

  9. Role of conserved residues in structure and stability: Tryptophans of human serum retinol-binding protein, a model for the lipocalin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lesley H.; Chrysina, Evangelia D.; Irons, Laurence I.; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Brew, Keith

    2001-01-01

    Serum retinol binding protein (RBP) is a member of the lipocalin family, proteins with up-and-down β-barrel folds, low levels of sequence identity, and diverse functions. Although tryptophan 24 of RBP is highly conserved among lipocalins, it does not play a direct role in activity. To determine if Trp24 and other conserved residues have roles in stability and/or folding, we investigated the effects of conservative substitutions for the four tryptophans and some adjacent residues on the structure, stability, and spectroscopic properties of apo-RBP. Crystal structures of recombinant human apo-RBP and of a mutant with substitutions for tryptophans 67 and 91 at 1.7 Å and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively, as well as stability measurements, indicate that these relatively exposed tryptophans have little influence on structure or stability. Although Trp105 is largely buried in the wall of the β-barrel, it can be replaced with minor effects on stability to thermal and chemical unfolding. In contrast, substitutions of three different amino acids for Trp24 or replacement of Arg139, a conserved residue that interacts with Trp24, lead to similar large losses in stability and lower yields of native protein generated by in vitro folding. The results and the coordinated nature of natural substitutions at these sites support the idea that conserved residues in functionally divergent homologs have roles in stabilizing the native relative to misfolded structures. They also establish conditions for studies of the kinetics of folding and unfolding by ideying spectroscopic signals for monitoring the formation of different substructures. PMID:11604536

  10. Understanding the roles of strictly conserved tryptophan residues in O2 producing chlorite dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Beatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorite dismutases (Clds) degrade ClO2− to O2 and Cl− in perchlorate respiring bacteria, and they serve still poorly defined cellular roles in other diverse microbes. These proteins share 3 highly conserved Trp residues, W155, W156, and W227, on the proximal side of the heme. The Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) has been shown to form protein-based radicals in its reactions with ClO2− and peracetic acid. The roles of the conserved Trp residues in radical generation and in enzymatic function were assessed via spectroscopic and kinetic analysis of their Phe mutants. The W155F mutant was the most dramatically affected, appearing to lose the characteristic pentameric oligomerization state, secondary structure, and heme binding properties of the WT protein. The W156F mutant initially retains many features of the WT protein but over time acquires many of the features of W155F. Conversion to an inactive, heme-free form is accelerated by dilution, suggesting loss of the protein’s pentameric state. Hence, both W155 and W156 are important for heme binding and maintenance of the protein’s reactive pentameric structure. W227F by contrast retains many properties of the WT protein. Important differences are noted in the transient kinetic reactions with peracetic acid (PAA), where W227F appears to form an [Fe(IV)=O]-containing intermediate, which subsequently converts to an uncoupled [Fe(IV)=O + AA+.] system in a [PAA]-dependent manner. This is in contrast to the peroxidase-like formation of [Fe(IV)=O] coupled to a porphyrin π-cation radical in the WT protein, which decays in a [PAA]-independent manner. These observations and the lack of redox protection for the heme in any of the Trp mutants suggests a tendency for protein radical formation in DaCld that is independent of any of these conserved active site residues. PMID:23241559

  11. Tryptophan probes reveal residue-specific phospholipid interactions of apolipoprotein C-III.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M; Walker, Robert L; He, Yi; Gruschus, James M; Lee, Jennifer C

    2015-11-01

    Apolipoproteins are essential human proteins for lipid metabolism. Together with phospholipids, they constitute lipoproteins, nm to μm sized particles responsible for transporting cholesterol and triglycerides throughout the body. To investigate specific protein-lipid interactions, we produced and characterized three single-Trp containing apolipoprotein C-III (ApoCIII) variants (W42 (W54F/W65F), W54 (W42F/W65F), W65 (W42F/W54F)). Upon binding to phospholipid vesicles, wild-type ApoCIII adopts an α-helical conformation (50% helicity) as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy with an approximate apparent partition constant of 3×10(4) M(-1). Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements reveal distinct residue-specific behaviors with W54 experiencing the most hydrophobic environment followed by W42 and W65. Interestingly, time-resolved anisotropy measurements show a converse trend for relative Trp mobility with position 54 being the least immobile. To determine the relative insertion depths of W42, W54, and W65 in the bilayer, fluorescence quenching experiments were performed using three different brominated lipids. W65 had a clear preference for residing near the headgroup while W54 and W42 sample the range of depths ~8-11 Å from the bilayer center. On average, W54 is slightly more embedded than W42. Based on Trp spectral differences between ApoCIII binding to phospholipid vesicles and sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, we suggest that ApoCIII adopts an alternate helical conformation on the bilayer which could have functional implications.

  12. Interfacial partitioning of a loop hinge residue contributes to diacylglycerol affinity of conserved region 1 domains.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mikaela D; Cole, Taylor R; Igumenova, Tatyana I

    2014-10-01

    Conventional and novel isoenzymes of PKC are activated by the membrane-embedded second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) through its interactions with the C1 regulatory domain. The affinity of C1 domains to DAG varies considerably among PKCs. To gain insight into the origin of differential DAG affinities, we conducted high-resolution NMR studies of C1B domain from PKCδ (C1Bδ) and its W252Y variant. The W252Y mutation was previously shown to render C1Bδ less responsive to DAG (Dries, D. R., Gallegos, L. L., and Newton, A. C. (2007) A single residue in the C1 domain sensitizes novel protein kinase C isoforms to cellular diacylglycerol production. J. Biol. Chem. 282, 826-830) and thereby emulate the behavior of C1B domains from conventional PKCs that have a conserved Tyr at the equivalent position. Our data revealed that W252Y mutation did not perturb the conformation of C1Bδ in solution but significantly reduced its propensity to partition into a membrane-mimicking environment in the absence of DAG. Using detergent micelles doped with a paramagnetic lipid, we determined that both the residue identity at position 252 and complexation with diacylglycerol influence the geometry of C1Bδ-micelle interactions. In addition, we identified the C-terminal helix α1 of C1Bδ as an interaction site with the head groups of phosphatidylserine, a known activator of PKCδ. Taken together, our studies (i) reveal the identities of C1Bδ residues involved in interactions with membrane-mimicking environment, DAG, and phosphatidylserine, as well as the affinities associated with each event and (ii) suggest that the initial ligand-independent membrane recruitment of C1B domains, which is greatly facilitated by the interfacial partitioning of Trp-252, is responsible, at least in part, for the differential DAG affinities.

  13. The three-dimensional structure of AKR11B4, a glycerol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans, reveals a tryptophan residue as an accelerator of reaction turnover.

    PubMed

    Richter, Nina; Breicha, Klaus; Hummel, Werner; Niefind, Karsten

    2010-12-01

    The NADP-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.72) from Gluconobacter oxydans is a member of family 11 of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) enzyme superfamily; according to the systematic nomenclature within the AKR superfamily, the term AKR11B4 has been assigned to the enzyme. AKR11B4 is a biotechnologically attractive enzyme because of its broad substrate spectrum, combined with its distinctive regioselectivity and stereoselectivity. These features can be partially rationalized based on a 2-Å crystal structure of apo-AKR11B4, which we describe and interpret here against the functional complex structures of other members of family 11 of the AKR superfamily. The structure of AKR11B4 shows the AKR-typical (β/α)(8) TIM-barrel fold, with three loops and the C-terminal tail determining the particular enzymatic properties. In comparison to AKR11B1 (its closest AKR relative), AKR11B4 has a relatively broad binding cleft for the cosubstrate NADP/NADPH. In the crystalline environment, it is completely blocked by the C-terminal segment of a neighboring protomer. The structure reveals a conspicuous tryptophan residue (Trp23) that has to adopt an unconventional and strained side-chain conformation to permit cosubstrate binding. We predict and confirm by site-directed mutagenesis that Trp23 is an accelerator of (co)substrate turnover. Furthermore, we show that, simultaneously, this tryptophan residue is a critical determinant for substrate binding by the enzyme, while enantioselectivity is probably governed by a methionine residue within the C-terminal tail. We present structural reasons for these notions based on ternary complex models of AKR11B4, NADP, and either octanal, d-glyceraldehyde, or l-glyceraldehyde.

  14. Chemical modification of a xylanase from a thermotolerant Streptomyces. Evidence for essential tryptophan and cysteine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Keskar, S S; Srinivasan, M C; Deshpande, V V

    1989-07-01

    Extracellular xylanase produced in submerged culture by a thermotolerant Streptomyces T7 growing at 37-50 degrees C was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-50. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 20,463 and a pI of 7.8. The pH and temperature optima for the activity were 4.5-5.5 and 60 degrees C respectively. The enzyme retained 100% of its original activity on incubation at pH 5.0 for 6 days at 50 degrees C and for 11 days at 37 degrees C. The Km and Vmax. values, as determined with soluble larch-wood xylan, were 10 mg/ml and 7.6 x 10(3) mumol/min per mg of enzyme respectively. The xylanase was devoid of cellulase activity. It was completely inhibited by Hg2+ (2 x 10(-6) M). The enzyme degraded xylan, producing xylobiose, xylo-oligosaccharides and a small amount of xylose as end products, indicating that it is an endoxylanase. Chemical modification of xylanase with N-bromosuccinimide, 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (PHMB) revealed that 1 mol each of tryptophan and cysteine per mol of enzyme were essential for the activity. Xylan completely protected the enzyme from inactivation by the above reagents, suggesting the presence of tryptophan and cysteine at the substrate-binding site. Inactivation of xylanase by PHMB could be restored by cysteine.

  15. Inactivation of influenza virus haemagglutinin by chlorine dioxide: oxidation of the conserved tryptophan 153 residue in the receptor-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2012-12-01

    Airborne influenza virus infection of mice can be prevented by gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). This study demonstrated that ClO(2) abolished the function of the haemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (H1N1) in a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent manner. The IC(50) during a 2 min reaction with ClO(2) at 25 °C was 13.7 µM, and the half-life time of HA with 100 µM ClO(2) at 25 °C was 19.5 s. Peptides generated from a tryptic digest of ClO(2)-treated virus were analysed by mass spectrometry. An HA fragment, (150)NLLWLTGK(157) was identified in which the tryptophan residue (W153) was 32 mass units greater than expected. The W153 residue of this peptide, which is derived from the central region of the receptor-binding site of HA, is highly conserved. It was shown that W153 was oxidized to N-formylkynurenine in ClO(2)-treated virus. It was concluded that the inactivation of influenza virus by ClO(2) is caused by oxidation of W153 in HA, thereby abolishing its receptor-binding ability.

  16. Comparisons of Interfacial Phe, Tyr, and Trp Residues as Determinants of Orientation and Dynamics for GWALP Transmembrane Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic amino acids often flank the transmembrane alpha helices of integral membrane proteins. By favoring locations within the membrane–water interface of the lipid bilayer, aromatic residues Trp, Tyr, and sometimes Phe may serve as anchors to help stabilize a transmembrane orientation. In this work, we compare the influence of interfacial Trp, Tyr, or Phe residues upon the properties of tilted helical transmembrane peptides. For such comparisons, it has been critical to start with no more than one interfacial aromatic residue near each end of a transmembrane helix, for example, that of GWALP23 (acetyl-GGALW5(LA)6LW19LAGA-[ethanol]amide). To this end, we have employed 2H-labeled alanines and solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the consequences of moving or replacing W5 or W19 in GWALP23 with selected Tyr, Phe, or Trp residues at the same or proximate locations. We find that GWALP23 peptides having F5, Y5, or W5 exhibit essentially the same average tilt and similar dynamics in bilayer membranes of 1,2-dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) or 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC). When double Tyr anchors are present, in Y4,5GWALP23 the NMR observables are markedly more subject to dynamic averaging and at the same time are less responsive to the bilayer thickness. Decreased dynamics are nevertheless observed when ring hydrogen bonding is removed, such that F4,5GWALP23 exhibits a similar extent of low dynamic averaging as GWALP23 itself. When F5 is the sole aromatic group in the N-interfacial region, the dynamic averaging is (only) slightly more extensive than with W5, Y5, or Y4 alone or with F4,5, yet it is much less than that observed for Y4,5GWALP23. Interestingly, moving Y5 to Y4 or W19 to W18, while retaining only one hydrogen-bond-capable aromatic ring at each interface, maintains the low level of dynamic averaging but alters the helix azimuthal rotation. The rotation change is about 40° for Y4 regardless of whether the host lipid bilayer is DLPC or

  17. Comparisons of interfacial Phe, Tyr, and Trp residues as determinants of orientation and dynamics for GWALP transmembrane peptides.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Kelsey A; Gleason, Nicholas J; Gist, Renetra; Langston, Rebekah; Greathouse, Denise V; Koeppe, Roger E

    2014-06-10

    Aromatic amino acids often flank the transmembrane alpha helices of integral membrane proteins. By favoring locations within the membrane-water interface of the lipid bilayer, aromatic residues Trp, Tyr, and sometimes Phe may serve as anchors to help stabilize a transmembrane orientation. In this work, we compare the influence of interfacial Trp, Tyr, or Phe residues upon the properties of tilted helical transmembrane peptides. For such comparisons, it has been critical to start with no more than one interfacial aromatic residue near each end of a transmembrane helix, for example, that of GWALP23 (acetyl-GGALW(5)(LA)6LW(19)LAGA-[ethanol]amide). To this end, we have employed (2)H-labeled alanines and solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the consequences of moving or replacing W5 or W19 in GWALP23 with selected Tyr, Phe, or Trp residues at the same or proximate locations. We find that GWALP23 peptides having F5, Y5, or W5 exhibit essentially the same average tilt and similar dynamics in bilayer membranes of 1,2-dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) or 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC). When double Tyr anchors are present, in Y(4,5)GWALP23 the NMR observables are markedly more subject to dynamic averaging and at the same time are less responsive to the bilayer thickness. Decreased dynamics are nevertheless observed when ring hydrogen bonding is removed, such that F(4,5)GWALP23 exhibits a similar extent of low dynamic averaging as GWALP23 itself. When F5 is the sole aromatic group in the N-interfacial region, the dynamic averaging is (only) slightly more extensive than with W5, Y5, or Y4 alone or with F4,5, yet it is much less than that observed for Y(4,5)GWALP23. Interestingly, moving Y5 to Y4 or W19 to W18, while retaining only one hydrogen-bond-capable aromatic ring at each interface, maintains the low level of dynamic averaging but alters the helix azimuthal rotation. The rotation change is about 40° for Y4 regardless of whether the host lipid bilayer is

  18. Structural Analysis of the Streptomyces avermitilis CYP107W1-Oligomycin A Complex and Role of the Tryptophan 178 Residue

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Cha, Gun-Su; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2016-01-01

    CYP107W1 from Streptomyces avermitilis is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of macrolide oligomycin A. A previous study reported that CYP107W1 regioselectively hydroxylated C12 of oligomycin C to produce oligomycin A, and the crystal structure of ligand free CYP107W1 was determined. Here, we analyzed the structural properties of the CYP107W1-oligomycin A complex and characterized the functional role of the Trp178 residue in CYP107W1. The crystal structure of the CYP107W1 complex with oligomycin A was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Oligomycin A is bound in the substrate access channel on the upper side of the prosthetic heme mainly by hydrophobic interactions. In particular, the Trp178 residue in the active site intercalates into the large macrolide ring, thereby guiding the substrate into the correct binding orientation for a productive P450 reaction. A Trp178 to Gly mutation resulted in the distortion of binding titration spectra with oligomycin A, whereas binding spectra with azoles were not affected. The Gly178 mutant’s catalytic turnover number for the 12-hydroxylation reaction of oligomycin C was highly reduced. These results indicate that Trp178, located in the open pocket of the active site, may be a critical residue for the productive binding conformation of large macrolide substrates. PMID:26883908

  19. Photooxidation of Tryptophan and Tyrosine Residues in Human Serum Albumin Sensitized by Pterin: A Model for Globular Protein Photodamage in Skin.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lara O; Roman, Ernesto A; Thomas, Andrés H; Dántola, M Laura

    2016-08-30

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in the circulatory system. Oxidized albumin was identified in the skin of patients suffering from vitiligo, a depigmentation disorder in which the protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation fails because of the lack of melanin. Oxidized pterins, efficient photosensitizers under UV-A irradiation, accumulate in the skin affected by vitiligo. In this work, we have investigated the ability of pterin (Ptr), the parent compound of oxidized pterins, to induce structural and chemical changes in HSA under UV-A irradiation. Our results showed that Ptr is able to photoinduce oxidation of the protein in at least two amino acid residues: tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr). HSA undergoes oligomerization, yielding protein structures whose molecular weight increases with irradiation time. The protein cross-linking, due to the formation of dimers of Tyr, does not significantly affect the secondary and tertiary structures of HSA. Trp is consumed in the photosensitized process, and N-formylkynurenine was identified as one of its oxidation products. The photosensitization of HSA takes place via a purely dynamic process, which involves the triplet excited state of Ptr. The results presented in this work suggest that protein photodamage mediated by endogenous photosensitizers can significantly contribute to the harmful effects of UV-A radiation on the human skin. PMID:27500308

  20. Homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities based on quenching fluorescence of tyrosine/tryptophan residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanling; Yang, Xiaolan; Pu, Jun; Zhao, Yunsheng; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Guoming; Zheng, Jun; Yuan, Huidong; Liao, Fei

    2010-11-01

    A new homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities was proposed based on quenching the fluorescence of tryptophan/tyrosine residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer using a fluorescent reference ligand as the acceptor. Under excitation around 280 nm, the fluorescence of a protein or a bound acceptor was monitored upon competitive binding against a nonfluorescent candidate ligand. Chemometrics for deriving the binding ratio of the acceptor with either fluorescence signal was discussed; the dissociation constant ( Kd) of a nonfluorescent candidate ligand was calculated from its concentration to displace 50% binding of the acceptor. N-biotinyl-N'-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine (BNEDA) and N-biotinyl-N'-dansyl-ethylenediamine (BDEDA) were used as the reference ligands and acceptors to streptavidin to test this new homogeneous competitive assay. Upon binding of an acceptor to streptavidin, there were the quench of streptavidin fluorescence at 340 nm and the characteristic fluorescence at 430 nm for BNEDA or at 525 nm for BDEDA. Kd of BNEDA and BDEDA was obtained via competitive binding against biotin. By quantifying BNEDA fluorescence, Kd of each tested nonfluorescent biotin derivative was consistent with that by quantifying streptavidin fluorescence using BNEDA or BDEDA as the acceptor. The overall coefficients of variation were about 10%. Therefore, this homogeneous competitive assay was effective and promising to high-throughput-screening.

  1. Mechanical and interfacial properties of poly(vinyl chloride) based composites reinforced by cassava stillage residue with different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjuan; Gan, Tao; Li, Qian; Su, Jianmei; Lin, Ye; Wei, Yongzuo; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei

    2014-09-01

    Cassava stillage residue (CSR), a kind of agro-industrial plant fiber, was modified by coupling agent (CA), mechanical activation (MA), and MA-assisted CA (MACA) surface treatments, respectively. The untreated and different surface treated CSRs were used to prepare plant fibers/polymer composites (PFPC) with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) as polymer matrix, and the properties of these CSR/PVC composites were compared. Surface treated CSR/PVC composites possessed better mechanical properties, water resistance and dimensional stability compared with the untreated CSR/PVC composite, attributing to the improvement of interfacial properties between CSR and PVC matrix. MACA-treated CSR was the best reinforcement among four types of CSRs (untreated, MA-treated, CA-treated, and MACA-treated CSRs) because MACA treatment led to the significant improvement of dispersion, interfacial adhesion and compatibility between CSR and PVC. MACA treatment could be considered as an effective and green method for enhancing reinforcement efficiency of plant fibers and the properties of PFPC.

  2. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions.

  3. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  4. Optimization of Residual Stresses in MMC's Using Compensating/Compliant Interfacial Layers. Part 2: OPTCOMP User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1994-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program OPTCOMP is presented in this report. This program provides a capability to optimize the fabrication or service-induced residual stresses in uni-directional metal matrix composites subjected to combined thermo-mechanical axisymmetric loading using compensating or compliant layers at the fiber/matrix interface. The user specifies the architecture and the initial material parameters of the interfacial region, which can be either elastic or elastoplastic, and defines the design variables, together with the objective function, the associated constraints and the loading history through a user-friendly data input interface. The optimization procedure is based on an efficient solution methodology for the elastoplastic response of an arbitrarily layered multiple concentric cylinder model that is coupled to the commercial optimization package DOT. The solution methodology for the arbitrarily layered cylinder is based on the local-global stiffness matrix formulation and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions developed for elastoplastic boundary-value problems. The optimization algorithm employed in DOT is based on the method of feasible directions.

  5. Ultraviolet resonance Raman studies reveal the environment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the native and partially folded states of the E colicin-binding immunity protein Im7.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mendieta, Iñigo R; Spence, Graham R; Gell, Christopher; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2005-03-01

    Understanding the nature of partially folded proteins is a challenging task that is best accomplished when several techniques are applied in combination. Here we present ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy studies of the E colicin-binding immunity proteins, Im7* and Im9*, together with a series of variants of Im7* that are designed to trap a partially folded state at equilibrium. We show that the environments of the tryptophan and tyrosine residues in native wild-type Im7* and Im9* are indistinguishable, in contrast with models for their structures based on X-ray and NMR methods. In addition, we show that there is a general increase in the hydrophobicity in the environment of Trp75 in all of the variants compared with wild-type Im7*. These data suggest that a significant rearrangement of the tryptophan pocket occurs in the variants, which, together with an overall decrease in solvent accessibility of Trp75 as judged by time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements and fluorescence quenching experiments, rationalize the unusual fluorescence properties of the variants reported previously. The data highlight the power of UVRR in analyzing the structural properties of different conformational states of the same protein and reveal new information about the structural rearrangements occurring during Im7* folding, not possible using other spectroscopic methods alone. Finally, we describe a previously unreported dependence of the tryptophan Fermi doublet on excitation wavelength in the ultraviolet region revealed by these protein spectra. We corroborated this observation using tryptophan-containing model compounds and conclude that the conventional interpretation of this UVRR feature at these wavelengths is unreliable.

  6. Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLO™ fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Bhamji, I.; Withers, P. J.; Wolfe, D. E.; Motta, A. T.; Preuss, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the residual stresses and interfacial shear strength of a TiAlN coating on Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe alloy (ZIRLO™) substrate designed to improve corrosion resistance of fuel cladding used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, both during normal and exceptional conditions, e.g. a loss of coolant event (LOCA). The distribution and maximum value of the interfacial shear strength has been estimated using a modified shear-lag model. The parameters critical to this analysis were determined experimentally. From these input parameters the interfacial shear strength between the TiAlN coating and ZIRLO™ substrate was inferred to be around 120 MPa. It is worth noting that the apparent strength of the coating is high (∼3.4 GPa). However, this is predominantly due to the large compressive residuals stress (3 GPa in compression), which must be overcome for the coating to fail in tension, which happens at a load just 150 MPa in excess of this.

  7. Tryptophan orientations in membrane-bound gramicidin and melittin-a comparative linear dichroism study on transmembrane and surface-bound peptides.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Frida R; Lincoln, Per; Nordén, Bengt; Esbjörner, Elin K

    2011-01-01

    In the search for methods to study structure and function of membrane-associated proteins and peptides flow linear dichroism, LD, spectroscopy has emerged as a promising technique. Using shear-aligned lipid vesicles, conformations and binding geometries of membrane-bound bio-macromolecules can be assessed. Here we investigate anchoring properties and specific orientations of tryptophan relative to the peptide backbone and to the membrane normal for the model peptides gramicidin and melittin. We have monitored the conformational change associated with the refolding of non-channel gramicidin into its channel form, and quantitatively determined the average orientations of its tryptophan transition moments, suggesting that these residues adopt a well-defined orientation at the membrane interface. An important conclusion regards the structural variation of gramicidin between these two distinct transmembrane forms. Whilst circular dichroism (CD) spectra, as has been reported before, vary strongly between the two forms suggesting their structures might be quite different, the LD results clearly evidence both the peptide backbone orientation and tryptophan side-chain positioning to be very similar. The latter are oriented in accord with what is expected from their role to anchor peptide termini to the membrane surface. The variations in CD could be due to, the in LD observed, minor shifts in mutual orientation and distance between neighbouring tryptophans sensitively determining their exciton interactions. Our data dispute that the non-channel form of membrane-bound gramicidin would be any of the intertwined forms often observed in crystal as the positioning of tryptophans along the peptide axis would not be compatible with the strong interfacial positioning observed here. The general role of tryptophans as interfacial anchors is further assessed for melittin whose conformation shows considerable angular spread, consistent with a carpet model of its mechanism for induced

  8. Dimer Structure of an Interfacially Impaired Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Pholpholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao,C.; Shi, X.; Wehbi, H.; Zambonelli, C.; Head, J.; Seaton, B.; Roberts, M,.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the W47A/W242A mutant of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis has been solved to 1.8{angstrom} resolution. The W47A/W242A mutant is an interfacially challenged enzyme, and it has been proposed that one or both tryptophan side chains serve as membrane interfacial anchors (Feng, J., Wehbi, H., and Roberts, M. F. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 19867-19875). The crystal structure supports this hypothesis. Relative to the crystal structure of the closely related (97% identity) wild-type PI-PLC from Bacillus cereus, significant conformational differences occur at the membrane-binding interfacial region rather than the active site. The Trp {yields} Ala mutations not only remove the membrane-partitioning aromatic side chains but also perturb the conformations of the so-called helix B and rim loop regions, both of which are implicated in interfacial binding. The crystal structure also reveals a homodimer, the first such observation for a bacterial PI-PLC, with pseudo-2-fold symmetry. The symmetric dimer interface is stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, contributed primarily by a central swath of aromatic residues arranged in a quasiherringbone pattern. Evidence that interfacially active wild-type PI-PLC enzymes may dimerize in the presence of phosphatidylcholine vesicles is provided by fluorescence quenching of PI-PLC mutants with pyrene-labeled cysteine residues. The combined data suggest that wild-type PI-PLC can form similar homodimers, anchored to the interface by the tryptophan and neighboring membrane-partitioning residues.

  9. L-tryptophan

    MedlinePlus

    L-tryptophan is an amino acid, a protein building block that can be found in many plant and animal proteins. L-tryptophan is called an “essential” amino acid because the body can’t make it. It ...

  10. Ultrafast Hydration Dynamics Probed by Tryptophan at Protein Surface and Protein-DNA Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangzhong

    As we all live in a special water planet Earth, the significance of water to life has been universally recognized. The reason why water is so important to life has intrigued many researchers. This dissertation will focus on the ultrafast dynamics of protein surface water and protein-DNA interfacial water which have direct importance to the protein structure and function. Using tryptophan as an intrinsic fluorescence probe, combined with site-directed mutagenesis and ultrafast fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we can achieve single residue spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. We can also precisely determine the local hydration water dynamics by monitoring the Stokes shift of tryptophan one at a time. Previously, the protein surface hydration has been extensively studied by our group. In this thesis, we will provide more details on the methods we are using to extract the hydration dynamics, and also validate our methods from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. To further interrogate the interfacial water hydration dynamics relative to the protein surface hydration, we studied two DNA polymerases: DNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4) and DNA Polymerase Beta (Pol beta). Both proteins show typical surface hydration pattern with three distinct time components including: (i) the ultrafast sub-picosecond component reflects the bulk type water motion; (ii) a few picoseconds component shows the inner water relaxation mainly corresponding to the local libration and reorientation; (iii) the tens to hundred picoseconds component represents the water-protein coupled motion involving the whole water network reorganization. Dpo4, a loosely DNA binding protein, exhibits very flexible interfacial water which resembles its surface water yet with a significantly reduced ultrafast component. Such dynamic interfacial water not only maintains interfacial flexibility, but also contributes to the low fidelity of the protein. In contrast to the Dpo4, pol beta

  11. Tryptophan promotes morphological and physiological differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Palazzotto, Emilia; Renzone, Giovanni; Fontana, Pietro; Botta, Luigi; Scaloni, Andrea; Puglia, Anna Maria; Gallo, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating tryptophan biosynthesis in actinomycetes are poorly understood; similarly, the possible roles of tryptophan in the differentiation program of microorganism life-cycle are still underexplored. To unveil the possible regulatory effect of this amino acid on gene expression, an integrated study based on quantitative teverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and proteomic approaches was performed on the actinomycete model Streptomyces coelicolor. Comparative analyses on the microorganism growth in a minimal medium with or without tryptophan supplementation showed that biosynthetic trp gene expression in S. coelicolor is not subjected to a negative regulation by the presence of the end product. Conversely, tryptophan specifically induces the transcription of trp genes present in the biosynthetic gene cluster of the calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA), a lipopeptide containing D- and L-tryptophan residues. In addition, tryptophan stimulates the transcription of the CDA gene cluster regulator cdaR and, coherently, CDA production. Surprisingly, tryptophan also promotes the production of actinorhodin, another antibiotic that does not contain this amino acid in its structure. Combined 2D-DIGE and nano liquid chromatography electrospray linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-LIT-MS/MS) analyses revealed that tryptophan exerts a growth-stage-dependent global effect on S. coelicolor proteome, stimulating anabolic pathways and promoting the accumulation of key factors associated with morphological and physiological differentiation at the late growth stages. Phenotypic observations by scanning electron microscopy and spore production assays demonstrated an increased sporulation in the presence of tryptophan. Transcriptional analysis of catabolic genes kynA and kynB suggested that the actinomycete also uses tryptophan as a carbon and nitrogen source. In conclusion, this study originally provides the molecular basis underlying the stimulatory

  12. Inequivalent Contribution of the Five Tryptophan Residues in the C-lobe of Human Serum Transferrin to the Fluorescence Increase when Iron is Released

    PubMed Central

    James, Nicholas G.; Byrne, Shaina L.; Steere, Ashley N.; Smith, Valerie C.; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.; Mason, Anne B.

    2009-01-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTF), with two Fe3+ binding lobes transports iron into cells. Diferric hTF preferentially binds to a specific receptor (TFR) on the surface of cells and the complex undergoes clathrin dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis. The clathrin-coated vesicle fuses with an endosome where the pH is lowered, facilitating iron release from hTF. On a biologically relevant timescale (2-3 min), the factors critical to iron release include pH, anions, a chelator and the interaction of hTF with the TFR. Previous work, in which the increase in the intrinsic fluorescence signal was used to monitor iron release from the hTF/TFR complex, established that the TFR significantly enhances the rate of iron release from the C-lobe of hTF. In the current study, the role of the five C-lobe Trp residues in reporting the fluorescence change has been evaluated (± sTFR). Only four of the five recombinant Trp→ Phe mutants produced well. A single slow rate constant for iron release is found for the monoferric C-lobe (FeC hTF) and the four Trp mutants in the FeC hTF background. The three Trp residues equivalent to those in the N-lobe differed from the N-lobe and each other in their contributions to the fluorescent signal. Two rate constants are observed for the FeC hTF control and the four Trp mutants in complex with the TFR: kobsC1 reports conformational change(s) in the C-lobe initiated by the TFR and kobsC2 is ascribed to iron release. Excitation at 295 nm (Trp only) and at 280 nm (Trp and Tyr) reveals interesting and significant differences in the rate constants for the complex. PMID:19281173

  13. Red-edge excitation fluorescence measurements of several two-tryptophan-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Wasylewski, Z; Kołoczek, H; Waśniowska, A; Slizowska, K

    1992-05-15

    The dependence of the fluorescence emission maximum of the tryptophan residues in several two-tryptophan-containing proteins (horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, yeast 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, Staphylococcus aureus metalloprotease and bee venom phospholipase A2) on the excitation wavelengths has been studied. Using fluorescence-resolved spectroscopy, we have dissected the contributions of particular tryptophan residues located in different parts of the protein molecule. The results demonstrate that dipolar structural relaxation can occur in the environment of tryptophan residues buried within protein molecules. The observed spectral shifts upon red-edge excitation of these residues can depend on temperature or ligand binding, as demonstrated in case of metalloprotease and alcohol dehydrogenase. No spectral shifts upon red-edge excitation have been observed for tryptophan residues totally exposed to the rapidly relaxing aqueous solvent.

  14. Liquid chromatography-fluorescence and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection of tryptophan degradation products of a recombinant monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Christine; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana; Neill, Alyssa; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-01

    Light exposure is one of several conditions used to study the degradation pathways of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Tryptophan is of particular interest among the 20 amino acids because it is the most photosensitive. Tryptophan degradation forms several products, including an even stronger photosensitizer and several reactive oxygen species. The current study reports a specific peptide mapping procedure to monitor tryptophan degradation. Instead of monitoring peptides using UV 214 nm, fluorescence detection with an excitation wavelength of 295 nm and an emission wavelength of 350 nm was used to enable specific detection of tryptophan-containing peptides. Peaks that decreased in area over time are likely to contain susceptible tryptophan residues. This observation can allow further liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis to focus only on those peaks to confirm tryptophan degradation products. After confirmation of tryptophan degradation, susceptibility of tryptophan residues can be compared based on the peak area decrease. PMID:26717898

  15. Distribution of distances between the tryptophan and the N-terminal residue of melittin in its complex with calmodulin, troponin C, and phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, J. R.; Gryczynski, I.; Laczko, G.; Wiczk, W.; Johnson, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    We used frequency-domain measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer to measure the distribution of distances between Trp-19 of melittin and a 1-dimethylamino-5-sulfonylnaphthalene (dansyl) residue on the N-terminal-alpha-amino group. Distance distributions were obtained for melittin free in solution and when complexed with calmodulin (CaM), troponin C (TnC), or palmitoyloleoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) vesicles. A wide range of donor (Trp-19)-to-acceptor (dansyl) distances was found for free melittin, which is consistent with that expected for the random coil state, characterized by a Gaussian width (full width at half maxima) of 28.2 A. In contrast, narrow distance distributions were found for melittin complexed with CaM, 8.2 A, or with POPC vesicles, 4.9 A. A somewhat wider distribution was found for the melittin complex with TnC, 12.8 A, suggesting the presence of heterogeneity in the mode of binding between melittin and TnC. For all the complexes the mean Trp-19 to dansyl distance was near 20 A. This value is somewhat smaller than expected for the free alpha-helical state of melittin, suggesting that binding with CaM or TnC results in a modest decrease in the length of the melittin molecule. PMID:8003981

  16. Optimization of Residual Stresses in MMC's through Process Parameter Control and the use of Heterogeneous Compensating/Compliant Interfacial Layers. OPTCOMP2 User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program OPTCOMP2 is presented in this report. This program provides a capability to optimize the fabrication or service-induced residual stresses in unidirectional metal matrix composites subjected to combined thermomechanical axisymmetric loading by altering the processing history, as well as through the microstructural design of interfacial fiber coatings. The user specifies the initial architecture of the composite and the load history, with the constituent materials being elastic, plastic, viscoplastic, or as defined by the 'user-defined' constitutive model, in addition to the objective function and constraints, through a user-friendly data input interface. The optimization procedure is based on an efficient solution methodology for the inelastic response of a fiber/interface layer(s)/matrix concentric cylinder model where the interface layers can be either homogeneous or heterogeneous. The response of heterogeneous layers is modeled using Aboudi's three-dimensional method of cells micromechanics model. The commercial optimization package DOT is used for the nonlinear optimization problem. The solution methodology for the arbitrarily layered cylinder is based on the local-global stiffness matrix formulation and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions developed for elastoplastic boundary-value problems. The optimization algorithm employed in DOT is based on the method of feasible directions.

  17. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M Eugenia; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, Josè L

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the (14)N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O-H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N-H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  18. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  19. Rotational Spectrum of Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia; Cabezas, Carlos; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed using a recently constructed LA-MB-FTMW spectrometer, specifically designed to optimize the detection of heavier molecules at a lower frequency range. Independent analyses of the rotational spectra of individual conformers have conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The experimental values of the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been found capital in the discrimination of the conformers. Both observed conformers are stabilized by a O-H\\cdotsN hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N-H\\cdotsπ interaction forming a chain that reinforces the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  20. Micro-environmental influences on the fluorescence of tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Feng; Zong, Wansong; Liu, Rutao; Chai, Jun; Liu, Ying

    2010-07-01

    The fluorescence characteristics of protein molecules are mainly due to their tryptophan (Trp), tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe) residues, among which tryptophan is the most important. Studying the influence of the micro-environment on tryptophan fluorescence can give us direct and convincing evidence for changes of protein structure and function. In this paper, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to evaluate the changes of tryptophan fluorescence under a variety of micro-environmental conditions (temperature, pH, polarity, presence of surfactants and oxidants) and the mechanisms responsible. This study not only presents more direct evidence to explain how and why the protein fluorescence spectra change, but also provides a new method for analyzing the effect of environmental changes on protein function.

  1. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on interfacial shear strength and post-peak residual strength of a PLGA fiber-reinforced brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Maenz, Stefan; Hennig, Max; Mühlstädt, Mike; Kunisch, Elke; Bungartz, Matthias; Brinkmann, Olaf; Bossert, Jörg; Kinne, Raimund W; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are promising materials for minimally invasive treatment of bone defects. However, CPCs have low mechanical strength and fracture toughness. One approach to overcome these limitations is the modification of the CPC with reinforcing fibers. The matrix-fiber interfacial shear strength (ISS) is pivotal for the biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs. The aim of the current study was to control the ISS between a brushite-forming CPC and degradable PLGA fibers by oxygen plasma treatment and to analyze the impact of the ISS alterations on its bulk mechanical properties. The ISS between CPC matrix and PLGA fibers, tested in a single-fiber pull-out test, increased up to 2.3-fold to max. 3.22±0.92MPa after fiber oxygen plasma treatment (100-300W, 1-10min), likely due to altered surface chemistry and morphology of the fibers. This ISS increase led to more efficient crack bridging and a subsequent increase of the post-peak residual strength at biomechanically relevant, moderate strains (up to 1%). At the same time, the work of fracture significantly decreased, possibly due to an increased proportion of fractured fibers unable to further absorb energy by frictional sliding. Flexural strength and flexural modulus were not affected by the oxygen plasma treatment. This study shows for the first time that the matrix-fiber ISS and some of the resulting mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs can be improved by chemical modifications such as oxygen plasma treatment, generating the possibility of avoiding catastrophic failures at the implant site and thus enhancing the applicability of biodegradable CPCs for the treatment of (load-bearing) bone defects. PMID:26875148

  2. Tryptophan catabolism in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Bouknight, R R; Sadoff, H L

    1975-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium grows in a medium containing L-tryptophan as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Kynurenine, anthranilic acid, and catechol are metabolic intermediates, suggesting that this organism used the anthranilic acid pathway for tryptophan degradation. Cells that grow on L-tryptophan oxidize kynurenine, alanine, and anthranilic acid and the presence of tryptophan oxygenase (EC 1.13.1.12), kynureninase (EC 3.7.1.3), and catechol oxygenase (EC 1.13.1.1) in cell extracts provide additional evidence for the degradative pathway in B. megaterium. Tryptophan oxygenase is inhibited by sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and hydroxylamine, indicating that the enzyme has a functional heme group. D-Tryptophan is not a substrate for tryptophan oxygenase, and the D-isomer does not inhibit this enzyme. Formamidase (EC 3.5.1.9) and anthranilate hydroxylase are not detectable in extracts. Tryptophan catabolism is inducible in B megaterium and is subject to catabolite repression by glucose and glutamate. Arginine does not cause repression, and kynurenine induces both tryptophan oxygenase and kynureninase. PMID:803956

  3. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  4. Consumption of peptide-included and free tryptophan induced by peroxyl radicals: A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, E; López-Alarcón, C

    2014-10-01

    It is well-known that tryptophan residues are efficiently oxidized by peroxyl radicals, generating kynurenine, and N-formyl kynurenine as well as hydroperoxide derivatives as products. In the present work we studied the kinetic of such reaction employing free and peptide-included tryptophan. Two azocompounds were used to produce peroxyl radicals: AAPH (2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride) and ABCVA (4,4'-Azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid)), which generate cationic and anionic peroxyl radicals, respectively. Tryptophan consumption was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy and the reactions were carried out in phosphate buffer (75mM, pH 7.4) at 45°C. Only a slight effect of the peroxyl radical charge was evidenced on the consumption of free tryptophan and the dipeptide Gly-Trp. Employing AAPH as peroxyl radical source, at low free tryptophan concentrations (1-10µM) near 0.3 mol of tryptophan were consumed per each mol of peroxyl radicals introduced into the system. However, at high free tryptophan concentrations (100µM-1mM) such stoichiometry increased in a tryptophan concentration-way. At 1mM three moles of tryptophan were consumed per mol of AAPH-derived peroxyl radicals, evidencing the presence of chain reactions. A similar behavior was observed when di and tri-peptides (Gly-Trp, Trp-Gly, Gly-Trp-Gly, Trp-Ala, Ala-Trp-Ala) were studied. Nonetheless, at low initial concentration (5µM), the initial consumption rate of tryptophan included in the peptides was two times higher than free tryptophan. In contrast, at high concentration (1mM) free and peptide-included tryptophan showed similar initial consumption rates. These results could be explained considering a disproportionation process of tryptophanyl radicals at low free tryptophan concentrations, a process that would be inhibited when tryptophan is included in peptides.

  5. Structural consequences of two methyl additions in the E. coli trp repressor L-tryptophan binding pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    The flexibility and specificity of the L-tryptophan corepressor binding pocket of E coli trp repressor are being investigated by high-resolution crystallographic examination of aporepressor/corepressor analog complexes. While addition of a methyl group on the corepressor indole (5-methyl-tryptophan) results in a small but measurable shift in the position of that functional group introduction of a methyl group on a nearby residue in the binding pocket (Val 58 {yields} Ile) leaves the indole position of L-tryptophan essentially unchanged. Careful alignment of these structures with aporepressor/L-tryptophan/operator-DNA complexes reveal why 5-methyltryptophan is a better corepressor than L-tryptophan.

  6. Regulation of Tryptophan Operon Expression in the Archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunwei; Reeve, John N.

    2005-01-01

    Conserved trp genes encode enzymes that catalyze tryptophan biosynthesis in all three biological domains, and studies of their expression in Bacteria and eukaryotes have revealed a variety of different regulatory mechanisms. The results reported here provide the first detailed description of an archaeal trp gene regulatory system. We have established that the trpEGCFBAD operon in Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus is transcribed divergently from a gene (designated trpY) that encodes a tryptophan-sensitive transcription regulator. TrpY binds to TRP box sequences (consensus, TGTACA) located in the overlapping promoter regions between trpY and trpE, inhibiting trpY transcription in the absence of tryptophan and both trpY and trpEGCFBAD transcription in the presence of tryptophan. TrpY apparently inhibits trpY transcription by blocking RNA polymerase access to the site of trpY transcription initiation and represses trpEGCFBAD transcription by preventing TATA box binding protein (TBP) binding to the TATA box sequence. Given that residue 2 (W2) is the only tryptophan in TrpY and in TrpY homologues in other Euryarchaea and that there is only one tryptophan codon in the entire trpEGCFBAD operon (trpB encodes W175), expression of the trp operon may also be regulated in vivo by the supply of charged tRNATrp available to translate the second codon of the trpY mRNA. PMID:16159776

  7. Regulation of tryptophan operon expression in the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yunwei; Reeve, John N

    2005-09-01

    Conserved trp genes encode enzymes that catalyze tryptophan biosynthesis in all three biological domains, and studies of their expression in Bacteria and eukaryotes have revealed a variety of different regulatory mechanisms. The results reported here provide the first detailed description of an archaeal trp gene regulatory system. We have established that the trpEGCFBAD operon in Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus is transcribed divergently from a gene (designated trpY) that encodes a tryptophan-sensitive transcription regulator. TrpY binds to TRP box sequences (consensus, TGTACA) located in the overlapping promoter regions between trpY and trpE, inhibiting trpY transcription in the absence of tryptophan and both trpY and trpEGCFBAD transcription in the presence of tryptophan. TrpY apparently inhibits trpY transcription by blocking RNA polymerase access to the site of trpY transcription initiation and represses trpEGCFBAD transcription by preventing TATA box binding protein (TBP) binding to the TATA box sequence. Given that residue 2 (W2) is the only tryptophan in TrpY and in TrpY homologues in other Euryarchaea and that there is only one tryptophan codon in the entire trpEGCFBAD operon (trpB encodes W175), expression of the trp operon may also be regulated in vivo by the supply of charged tRNA(Trp) available to translate the second codon of the trpY mRNA. PMID:16159776

  8. Tryptophan promotes charitable donating

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    The link between serotonin (5-HT) and one of the most important elements of prosocial behavior, charity, has remained largely uninvestigated. In the present study, we tested whether charitable donating can be promoted by administering the food supplement L-Tryptophan (TRP), the biochemical precursor of 5-HT. Participants were compared with respect to the amount of money they donated when given the opportunity to make a charitable donation. As expected, compared to a neutral placebo, TRP appears to increase the participants’ willingness to donate money to a charity. This result supports the idea that the food we eat may act as a cognitive enhancer modulating the way we think and perceive the world and others. PMID:25566132

  9. Fluorescence and energy transfer of tryptophans in Aplysia myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Janes, S M; Holtom, G; Ascenzi, P; Brunori, M; Hochstrasser, R M

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence decay of tryptophan residues in apo and met Aplysia limacina myoglobin and sperm whale myoglobin were measured in aqueous solution at 10 degrees-15 degrees C. In all species, multiexponential behavior was observed in which the individual components displayed unique frequency-dependent emission characteristics. The results suggest that the tryptophan fluorescence in all met samples are quenched by rapid Forster energy transfer to the heme as predicted from the crystal geometry. Fluorescence from the apo protein is similar to that in solutions of free tryptophans. In addition, the fluorescence properties of the reversible thermal denaturation of Aplysia limacina met myoglobin was investigated between 25 degrees and 75 degrees C. PMID:3580491

  10. Identification of tryptophan oxidation products in bovine alpha-crystallin.

    PubMed Central

    Finley, E. L.; Dillon, J.; Crouch, R. K.; Schey, K. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidation is known to affect the structure, activity, and rate of degradation of proteins, and is believed to contribute to a variety of pathological conditions. Metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) is a primary oxidizing system in many cell types. In this study, the oxidative effects of a MCO system (the Fenton reaction) on the structure of the tryptophan residues of alpha-crystallin were determined. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was utilized to identify specific tryptophan and methionine oxidation products in the bovine alpha-crystallin sequence. After oxidative exposure, alpha-crystallin was digested with trypsin, and the resulting peptides were fractionated by reverse-phase HPLC. Structural analysis by mass spectrometry revealed that tryptophan 9 of alphaA- and tryptophan 60 of alphaB-crystallin were each converted into hydroxytryptophans (HTRP), N-formylkynurenine (NFK), and kynurenine (KYN). However, only HTRP and KYN formation were detected at residue 9 of alphaB-crystallin. Oxidation of methionine 1 of alphaA- and methionine 1 and 68 of alphaB-crystallin was also detected. The products NFK and KYN are of particular importance in the lens, as they themselves are photosensitizers that can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon UV light absorption. The unambiguous identification of HTRP, NFK, and KYN in intact alpha-crystallin represents the first structural proof of the formation of these products in an intact protein, and provides a basis for detailed structural analysis of oxidized proteins generated in numerous pathological conditions. PMID:9828005

  11. Incorporation of tryptophan analogues into the lantibiotic nisin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Shao, Jinfeng; Li, Qian; van Heel, Auke J; de Vries, Marcel P; Broos, Jaap; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-05-01

    Lantibiotics are posttranslationally modified peptides with efficient inhibitory activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the original modifications, incorporation of non-canonical amino acids can render new properties and functions to lantibiotics. Nisin is the most studied lantibiotic and contains no tryptophan residues. In this study, a system was constructed to incorporate tryptophan analogues into nisin, which included the modification machinery (NisBTC) and the overexpression of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS). Tryptophan and three different tryptophan analogues (5-fluoroTrp (5FW), 5-hydroxyTrp (5HW) and 5-methylTrp (5MeW)) were successfully incorporated at four different positions of nisin (I1W, I4W, M17W and V32W). The incorporation efficiency of tryptophan analogues into mutants I1W, M17W and V32W was over 97 %, while the mutant I4W showed relatively low incorporation efficiency (69-93 %). The variants with 5FW showed relatively higher production yield, while 5MeW-containing variants showed the lowest yield. The dehydration efficiency of serines or threonines was affected by the tryptophan mutants of I4W and V32W. The affinity of the peptides for the cation-ion exchange and reverse phase chromatography columns was significantly reduced when 5HW was incorporated. The antimicrobial activity of IIW and its 5FW analogue both decreased two times compared to that of nisin, while that of its 5HW analogue decreased four times. The 5FW analogue of I4W also showed two times decreased activity than nisin. However, the mutant M17W and its 5HW analogue both showed 32 times reduced activity relative to that of nisin.

  12. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-10-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies.

  13. Effect of Interfacial Roughness of Bond Coat on the Residual Adhesion Strength of a Plasma Sprayed TBC System after Thermal Cycle Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Ohno, Naoyuki

    The effect of the bond coat on residual adhesion strength after thermal cycle fatigue was investigated in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBC). This study used CoNiCrAlY powder with two different particle sizes for spraying bond coat material to examine the effect of interface roughness between the bond coat and top coat. In addition, the bond coat was sprayed on either by a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) or a low pressure plasma spray (LPPS). The residual adhesion strength of the TBC top coat was evaluated as a function of the number of thermal cycles by the modified 4-point bending test. In addition, SEM observations of thermal fatigue cracking morphologies and measurements of the residual stress in the ceramic top coat were carried out. The experimental results indicated that, after thermal cycle fatigue, microcracks were generated in the ceramic top coat; however, they were moderated in a rough interface TBC compared to a smooth interface TBC. In addition, the bond coat sprayed by the HVOF method showed a higher resistance to microcracking than the coat sprayed using the LPPS. Residual stress in the ceramic top coat is almost zero at 0 thermal cycles. After thermal cycle fatigue, it becomes compressional stress; however, it is independent of the bond coat. There was little difference in the adhesion strength by bond coat in as-sprayed conditions. On the other hand, the specimen with a rough interface exhibited higher residual adhesion strength after thermal cycle fatigue compared with the specimens with a relatively smooth interface. In addition, if the bond coat is sprayed by HVOF, the residual adhesion strength increases. It was revealed that the difference in residual adhesion strength by bond coat is related to the distribution morphology of thermal fatigue microcracks.

  14. The stability of tryptophan, 5-methyl-tryptophan and α-methyl-tryptophan during NaOH hydrolysis of selected foods.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd, Shane M; Richardson, Russell K; Moughan, Paul J

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the use of 5-methyl-tryptophan, α-methyl-tryptophan or synthetic tryptophan to correct for the losses of protein-bound tryptophan in foods during NaOH hydrolysis. Synthetic tryptophan and each protein source was incubated in 4.5M NaOH containing 5-methyl-tryptophan and α-methyl-tryptophan in nitrogen gas-sparged Teflon vials for 0-144 h at 110 °C. The hydrolysis and loss rates of protein-bound tryptophan, 5-methyl-tryptophan, α-methyl-tryptophan and synthetic tryptophan were predicted using least-squares nonlinear regression. Using 5-methyl-tryptophan or synthetic tryptophan to correct for hydrolytic losses of tryptophan overestimated the tryptophan content by 8.2-19% and -0.3-8.8% respectively, while correction using α-methyl-tryptophan underestimated tryptophan by between 0.2% and 8.1% across the protein sources. Correction using α-methyl-tryptophan or synthetic tryptophan was more accurate than using 5-methyl-tryptophan, but when highly accurate tryptophan composition data are required, least-squares nonlinear regression is the best approach as it removes the need for a hydrolysis correction factor.

  15. The Conversion of d-Tryptophan to l-Tryptophan in Cell Cultures of Tobacco 1

    PubMed Central

    Miura, George A.; Mills, Stanley E.

    1971-01-01

    d-Tryptophan was converted to l-tryptophan in tissue cultures of tobacco, in whole cells treated with dimethylsulfoxide, and in cell-free extracts treated by Sephadex G-25 filtration. Evidence was obtained that tryptophanase, tryptophan pyrrolase, and transaminase activities were not involved. The data were best explained by the presence of a tryptophan racemase as the enzyme catalyzing the reaction. The possible role of d-tryptophan in the biosynthesis of indoleacetic acid is discussed. PMID:16657646

  16. Tryptophan as a probe of photosystem I electron transfer reactions: a UV resonance Raman study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Bender, Shana L; Keough, James M; Barry, Bridgette A

    2009-08-20

    Photosystem I (PSI) is one of the two membrane-associated reaction centers involved in oxygenic photosynthesis. In photosynthesis, solar energy is converted to chemical energy in the form of a transmembrane charge separation. PSI oxidizes cytochrome c(6) or plastocyanin and reduces ferredoxin. In cyanobacterial PSI, there are 10 tryptophan residues with indole side chains located less than 10 A from the electron transfer cofactors. In this study, we apply pump-probe difference UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the spectrum of aromatic amino acids in cyanobacterial PSI. This UVRR technique allows the use of the tryptophan vibrational spectrum as a reporter for structural changes, which are linked to PSI electron transfer reactions. Our results show that photo-oxidation of the chlorophyll a/a' heterodimer, P(700), causes shifts in the vibrational frequencies of two or more tryptophan residues. Similar perturbations of tryptophan are observed when P(700) is chemically oxidized. The observed spectral frequencies suggest that the perturbed tryptophan side chains are only weakly or not hydrogen bonded and are located in an environment in which there is steric repulsion. The direction of the spectral shifts is consistent with an oxidation-induced increase in dielectric constant or a change in hydrogen bonding. To explain our results, the perturbation of tryptophan residues must be linked to a PSI conformational change, which is, in turn, driven by P(700) oxidation.

  17. Second harmonic generation from tryptophan-rich short peptides: W(n)K(m) and gramicidin A.

    PubMed

    Duboisset, J; Matar, G; Besson, F; Ficheux, D; Benichou, E; Russier-Antoine, I; Jonin, Ch; Brevet, P F

    2014-09-01

    We report the first hyperpolarizability of a series of tryptophan-rich short peptides with the respective sequence KWK, KWWK, KWWWK, KWWKWWK, where W and K stand for tryptophan and lysine. The measurements were performed with the technique of hyper-Rayleigh scattering in the bulk of an aqueous Tris buffer solution at a pH of 8.5 and a salt concentration of 150 mM at the non-resonant fundamental wavelength of 784 nm. The first hyperpolarizability of the different peptides follows a simple additive model scaling with the number of tryptophan residues contained in the peptide. However, it appears that the first hyperpolarizability response of a single tryptophan residue in the peptide strongly differs from that of an isolated tryptophan. Hence, it is therefore demonstrated that the local environment of the tryptophan residues within the peptide strongly influences its nonlinear optical response. A comparison with the first hyperpolarizability of the natural peptide gramicidin A measured in trifluoroethanol (TFE) further confirms the key role of the local environment on the first hyperpolarizability of tryptophan residues in peptides.

  18. Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Proctor, A R; Kloos, W E

    1973-04-01

    Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes were assayed in various tryptophan mutants of Staphylococcus aureus strain 655 and the wild-type parent. All mutants, except trpB mutants, lacked only the activity corresponding to the particular biosynthetic block, as suggested previously by analysis of accumulated intermediates and auxonography. Tryptophan synthetase A was not detected in extracts of either trpA or trpB mutants but appeared normal in other mutants. Mutants in certain other classes exhibited partial loss of another particular tryptophan enzyme activity. Tryptophan synthetase B activity was not detected in cell extract preparations but was detected in whole cells. The original map order proposed for the S. aureus tryptophan gene cluster was clarified by the definition of trpD (phosphoribosyl transferase(-)) and trpF (phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase(-)) mutants. These mutants were previously unresolved and designated as trp(DF) mutants (anthranilate accumulators). Phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase enzymes were separable by molecular sieve chromatography, suggesting that these functions are coded by separate loci. Molecular sieve chromatography failed to reveal aggregates involving anthranilate synthetase, phosphoribosyl transferase, phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase, and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase, and this procedure provided an estimate of the molecular weights of these enzymes. Tryptophan was shown to repress synthesis of all six tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes, and derepression of all six activities was incident upon tryptophan starvation. Tryptophan inhibited the activity of anthranilate synthetase, the first enzyme of the pathway. PMID:4698207

  19. Nitric oxide rapidly scavenges tyrosine and tryptophan radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Eiserich, J P; Butler, J; van der Vliet, A; Cross, C E; Halliwell, B

    1995-01-01

    By utilizing a pulse-radiolytic technique, we demonstrate for the first time that the rate constant for the reaction of nitric oxide (.NO) with biologically relevant tyrosine and tryptophan radicals (Tyr. and Trp. respectively) in amino acids, peptides and proteins is of the order of (1-2) x 10(9) M-1.s-1. We also show that .NO effectively interferes with electron-transfer processes between tryptophan and tyrosine residues in proteins subjected to pulse radiolysis. The near diffusion-controlled rates of these reactions, coupled with the increasingly recognized role of protein radicals in enzyme catalysis and oxidative damage, suggest that Tyr. and Trp. are likely and important targets for .NO generated in vivo. PMID:7575405

  20. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide. PMID:19767424

  1. Fragmentation of peptide radical cations containing a tyrosine or tryptophan residue: structural features that favor formation of [x(n-1) + H]˙⁺ and [z(n-1) + H]˙⁺ ions.

    PubMed

    Mädler, Stefanie; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Williams, Declan; Wang, Yating; Saminathan, Irine S; Zhao, Junfang; Siu, K W Michael; Hopkinson, Alan C

    2014-06-12

    Peptide radical cations A(n)Y(•+) (where n = 3, 4, or 5) and A5W(•+) have been generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of [Cu(II)(tpy)(peptide)](•2+) complexes. Apart from the charge-driven fragmentation at the N-Cα bond of the hetero residue producing either [c + 2H](+) or [z - H](•+) ions and radical-driven fragmentation at the Cα-C bond to give a(+) ions, unusual product ions [x + H](•+) and [z + H](•+) are abundant in the CID spectra of the peptides with the hetero residue in the second or third position of the chain. The formation of these ions requires that both the charge and radical be located on the peptide backbone. Energy-resolved spectra established that the [z + H](•+) ion can be produced either directly from the peptide radical cation or via the fragment ion [x + H](•+). Additionally, backbone dissociation by loss of the C-terminal amino acid giving [b(n-1) - H](•+) increases in abundance with the length of the peptides. Mechanisms by which peptide radical cations dissociate have been modeled using density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31++G** level) on tetrapeptides AYAG(•+), AAYG(•+), and AWAG(•+).

  2. Both carboxy-terminus NES motif and mutated tryptophan(s) are crucial for aberrant nuclear export of nucleophosmin leukemic mutants in NPMc+ AML.

    PubMed

    Falini, Brunangelo; Bolli, Niccolò; Shan, Jing; Martelli, Maria Paola; Liso, Arcangelo; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Bigerna, Barbara; Pasqualucci, Laura; Mannucci, Roberta; Rosati, Roberto; Gorello, Paolo; Diverio, Daniela; Roti, Giovanni; Tiacci, Enrico; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Schnittger, Suzanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Martelli, Massimo F; Gu, Wei; Mecucci, Cristina; Nicoletti, Ildo

    2006-06-01

    We recently identified aberrant cytoplasmic expression of nucleophosmin (NPM) as the immunohistochemical marker of a large subgroup of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (about one-third of adult AML) that is characterized by normal karyotype and mutations occurring at the exon-12 of the NPM gene. In this paper, we have elucidated the molecular mechanism underlying the abnormal cytoplasmic localization of NPM. All 29 AML-associated mutated NPM alleles so far identified encode abnormal proteins which have acquired at the C-terminus a nuclear export signal (NES) motif and lost both tryptophan residues 288 and 290 (or only the residue 290) which determine nucleolar localization. We show for the first time that both alterations are crucial for NPM mutant export from nucleus to cytoplasm. In fact, the cytoplasmic accumulation of NPM is blocked by leptomycin-B and ratjadones, specific exportin-1/Crm1-inhibitors, and by reinsertion of tryptophan residues 288 and 290, which respectively relocate NPM mutants in the nucleoplasm and nucleoli. NPM leukemic mutants in turn recruit the wild-type NPM from nucleoli to nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. These findings indicate that potential therapeutic strategies aimed to retarget NPM to its physiological sites will have to overcome 2 obstacles, the new NES motif and the mutated tryptophan(s) at the NPM mutant C-terminus.

  3. Novel Cβ-Cγ bond cleavages of tryptophan-containing peptide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Hao, Qiang; Law, Chun-Hin; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we observed unprecedented cleavages of the C(β)-C(γ) bonds of tryptophan residue side chains in a series of hydrogen-deficient tryptophan-containing peptide radical cations (M(•+)) during low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). We used CID experiments and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the mechanism of this bond cleavage, which forms [M - 116](+) ions. The formation of an α-carbon radical intermediate at the tryptophan residue for the subsequent C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage is analogous to that occurring at leucine residues, producing the same product ions; this hypothesis was supported by the identical product ion spectra of [LGGGH - 43](+) and [WGGGH - 116](+), obtained from the CID of [LGGGH](•+) and [WGGGH](•+), respectively. Elimination of the neutral 116-Da radical requires inevitable dehydrogenation of the indole nitrogen atom, leaving the radical centered formally on the indole nitrogen atom ([Ind](•)-2), in agreement with the CID data for [WGGGH](•+) and [W(1-CH3)GGGH](•+); replacing the tryptophan residue with a 1-methyltryptophan residue results in a change of the base peak from that arising from a neutral radical loss (116 Da) to that arising from a molecule loss (131 Da), both originating from C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage. Hydrogen atom transfer or proton transfer to the γ-carbon atom of the tryptophan residue weakens the C(β)-C(γ) bond and, therefore, decreases the dissociation energy barrier dramatically. PMID:22135037

  4. Decomposition of protein tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components. II. The statistical proof of discreteness of tryptophan classes in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Y K; Burstein, E A

    2001-01-01

    The physical causes for wide variation of Stokes shift values in emission spectra of tryptophan fluorophores in proteins have been proposed in the model of discrete states (Burstein, E. A., N. S. Vedenkina, and M. N. Ivkova. 1973. Photochem. Photobiol. 18:263-279; Burstein, E. A. 1977a. Intrinsic Protein Luminescence (The Nature and Application). In Advances in Science and Technology (Itogi Nauki i Tekhniki), Biophysics Vol. 7. VINITI, Moscow [In Russian]; Burstein, E. A. 1983. Molecular Biology (Moscow) 17:455-467 [In Russian; English translation]). It was assumed that the existence of the five most probable spectral classes of emitting tryptophan residues and differences among the classes were analyzed in terms of various combinations of specific and universal interactions of excited fluorophores with their environment. The development of stable algorithms of decomposition of tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components gave us an opportunity to apply two mathematically different algorithms, SImple fitting with Mean-Square criterion (SIMS) and PHase-plot-based REsolving with Quenchers (PHREQ) for the decomposition of a representative set of emission spectra of proteins. Here we present the results of decomposition of tryptophan emission spectra of >100 different proteins, some in various structural states (native and denatured, in complexes with ions or organic ligands, in various pH-induced conformations, etc.). Analysis of the histograms of occurrence of >300 spectral log-normal components with various maximum positions confirmed the statistical discreteness of several states of emitting tryptophan fluorophores in proteins. PMID:11509383

  5. Applications of room-temperature tryptophan phosphorescence to the study of protein structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersol, Joseph V.; Gershenson, Anne; Steel, Duncan G.; Gafni, Ari

    1992-04-01

    Most proteins are capable of emitting tryptophan phosphorescence at room temperature in deoxygenated aqueous solutions. Like fluorescence, phosphorescence intensities and lifetimes are useful for studying protein structure. Phosphorescence differs from fluorescence, however, in several ways. Phosphorescence occurs on a time-scale of msec-sec, while fluorescence decays in nanoseconds. Second, the phosphorescence decay of a single tryptophan is nearly monoexponential, making assignments of decay components to individual residues possible. Finally, phosphorescence is a more sensitive probe of the local tryptophan environment, as the lifetime can change by orders of magnitude depending on site rigidity and other factors. The authors describe applications of phosphorescence spectroscopy for protein study. In particular, tryptophan phosphorescence quenching by resonance energy transfer to freely diffusing acceptors was used to show that Trp 109 is the origin of phosphorescence in E. coli alkaline phosphatase (AP). By following changes in the emissive lifetime of this deeply buried residue, the presence of an enzymatically active but structurally modified intermediate state is detected in the unfolding of AP in high concentrations of Guanidine:HCl, and followed the kinetics of the decline in activity upon further unfolding. In addition to the new understanding of AP, the results of these experiments show that room temperature tryptophan phosphorescence is a powerful tool for the study of proteins.

  6. Specific Sequence Motifs Direct the Oxygenation and Chlorination of Tryptophan by Myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yi; Kao, Jeffery; Irwin, Angela; d’Avignon, André; Mecham, Robert P.; Parks, William C.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2008-01-01

    Most studies of protein oxidation have typically focused on the reactivity of single amino acid side chains while ignoring the potential importance of adjacent sequences in directing the reaction pathway. We previously showed that hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a specific product of myeloperoxidase, inactivates matrilysin by modifying adjacent tryptophan and glycine (WG) residues in the catalytic domain. Here, we use model peptides that mimic the region of matrilysin involved in this reaction, VVWGTA, VVWATA and the library VVWXTA, to determine whether specific sequence motifs are targeted for chlorination or oxygenation by myeloperoxidase. Our results demonstrate that HOCl generated by myeloperoxidase or activated neutrophils converts the peptide VVWGTA to a chlorinated product, WG+32(Cl). Tandem mass spectrometry in concert with high resolution 1H and two-dimensional NMR analysis revealed that the modification required cross-linking of the tryptophan to the amide of glycine followed by chlorination of the indole ring of tryptophan. In contrast, when glycine in the peptide was replaced with alanine, the major products were mono- and di-oxygenated tryptophan residues. When the peptide library VVWXTA (where X represents all 20 common amino acids) was exposed to HOCl, only WG produced a high yield of the chloroindolenine derivative. However, when glycine was replaced by other amino acids, oxygenated tryptophan derivatives were the major products. Our observations indicate that WG may represent a specific sequence motif in proteins that is targeted for chlorination by myeloperoxidase. PMID:16548523

  7. Thermodynamics of tryptophan-mediated activation of the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Craig A; Manfredo, Amanda; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2006-06-27

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) functions in many bacilli to control the expression of the tryptophan biosynthesis genes. Transcription of the trp operon is controlled by TRAP through an attenuation mechanism, in which competition between two alternative secondary-structural elements in the 5' leader sequence of the nascent mRNA is influenced by tryptophan-dependent binding of TRAP to the RNA. Previously, NMR studies of the undecamer (11-mer) suggested that tryptophan-dependent control of RNA binding by TRAP is accomplished through ligand-induced changes in protein dynamics. We now present further insights into this ligand-coupled event from hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Scanning calorimetry showed tryptophan dissociation to be independent of global protein unfolding, while analysis of the temperature dependence of the binding enthalpy by ITC revealed a negative heat capacity change larger than expected from surface burial, a hallmark of binding-coupled processes. Analysis of this excess heat capacity change using parameters derived from protein folding studies corresponds to the ordering of 17-24 residues per monomer of TRAP upon tryptophan binding. This result is in agreement with qualitative analysis of residue-specific broadening observed in TROSY NMR spectra of the 91 kDa oligomer. Implications for the mechanism of ligand-mediated TRAP activation through a shift in a preexisting conformational equilibrium and an induced-fit conformational change are discussed. PMID:16784236

  8. Quenching of Tryptophan Fluorescence in Unfolded Cytochrome "c": A Biophysics Experiment for Physical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Kats, Dina I.; Kim, Judy E.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments that focus on protein folding provide excellent opportunities for undergraduate students to learn important topics in the expanding interdisciplinary field of biophysics. Here, we describe the use of Stern-Volmer plots to determine the extent of solvent accessibility of the single tryptophan residue (trp-59) in unfolded and…

  9. Molecular docking of bacosides with tryptophan hydroxylase: a model to understand the bacosides mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rajathei, David Mary; Preethi, Jayakumar; Singh, Hemant K; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2014-08-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyses l-tryptophan into 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan, which is the first and rate-limiting step of serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis. Earlier, we found that TPH2 up-regulated in the hippocampus of postnatal rats after the oral treatment of Bacopa monniera leaf extract containing the active compound bacosides. However, the knowledge about the interactions between bacosides with TPH is limited. In this study, we take advantage of in silico approach to understand the interaction of bacoside-TPH complex using three different docking algorithms such as HexDock, PatchDock and AutoDock. All these three algorithms showed that bacoside A and A3 well fit into the cavity consists of active sites. Further, our analysis revealed that major active compounds bacoside A3 and A interact with different residues of TPH through hydrogen bond. Interestingly, Tyr235, Thr265 and Glu317 are the key residues among them, but none of them are either at tryptophan or BH4 binding region. However, its note worthy to mention that Tyr 235 is a catalytic sensitive residue, Thr265 is present in the flexible loop region and Glu317 is known to interacts with Fe. Interactions with these residues may critically regulate TPH function and thus serotonin synthesis. Our study suggested that the interaction of bacosides (A3/A) with TPH might up-regulate its activity to elevate the biosynthesis of 5-HT, thereby enhances learning and memory formation.

  10. Molecular docking of bacosides with tryptophan hydroxylase: a model to understand the bacosides mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rajathei, David Mary; Preethi, Jayakumar; Singh, Hemant K; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2014-08-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyses l-tryptophan into 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan, which is the first and rate-limiting step of serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis. Earlier, we found that TPH2 up-regulated in the hippocampus of postnatal rats after the oral treatment of Bacopa monniera leaf extract containing the active compound bacosides. However, the knowledge about the interactions between bacosides with TPH is limited. In this study, we take advantage of in silico approach to understand the interaction of bacoside-TPH complex using three different docking algorithms such as HexDock, PatchDock and AutoDock. All these three algorithms showed that bacoside A and A3 well fit into the cavity consists of active sites. Further, our analysis revealed that major active compounds bacoside A3 and A interact with different residues of TPH through hydrogen bond. Interestingly, Tyr235, Thr265 and Glu317 are the key residues among them, but none of them are either at tryptophan or BH4 binding region. However, its note worthy to mention that Tyr 235 is a catalytic sensitive residue, Thr265 is present in the flexible loop region and Glu317 is known to interacts with Fe. Interactions with these residues may critically regulate TPH function and thus serotonin synthesis. Our study suggested that the interaction of bacosides (A3/A) with TPH might up-regulate its activity to elevate the biosynthesis of 5-HT, thereby enhances learning and memory formation. PMID:25089244

  11. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32.

  12. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  13. Tryptophan in human hair: correlation with pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bertazzo, A; Biasiolo, M; Costa, C V; Cardin de Stefani, E; Allegri, G

    2000-08-01

    The distribution of tryptophan content in human hair of various colours was evaluated, in order to study the accumulation of this amino acid, precursor of serotonin, melatonin and niacin, in hair and the influence on hair pigmentation. Pigmentation is an important factor in determining drug incorporation into hair. Results from 1211 samples of hair from healthy subjects (577 men and 634 women) show that tryptophan levels are significantly higher in males (37.83 +/- 3.45 microg/g dry hair) than in females (26.62 +/- 2.40 microg/g hair). Besides sex, age also influences the distribution of tryptophan in human hair, the highest levels being found in both sexes in the first few years of life, probably due to the influence of milk, and in aging subjects in the groups of 61-80 and > 80 years. In order to investigate the influence of hair colour, hair samples were subdivided according to colour into blond, dark blond, red, light brown, brown, black, grey and white. The hair contents of tryptophan in both sexes was higher in brown and black hair than in blond hair, but in grey and white hair concentrations were the highest, demonstrating that tryptophan accumulates among hair fibres with age. Grouping subjects by age in relation to hair colour, we observed that at ages 1-5 and 6-12 years, colour did not influence tryptophan contents, but at ages 13-19 and 20-40 years tryptophan content increased significantly from blond to brown at 13-19 years and from blond to black at 20-40 years in both sexes. Therefore, variations in tryptophan levels of human hair appear to be correlated with differences in hair colour in both sexes. Tryptophan also accumulates in hair during keratinization, as shown by the presence of high levels of this amino acid in grey and white hair. PMID:11132729

  14. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Nikita; Wales, Thomas E; Joseph, Raji E; Boyken, Scott E; Engen, John R; Jernigan, Robert L; Andreotti, Amy H

    2016-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site. PMID:27010561

  15. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Nikita; Wales, Thomas E.; Joseph, Raji E.; Boyken, Scott E.; Engen, John R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Andreotti, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site. PMID:27010561

  16. Problem-solving test: Tryptophan operon mutants.

    PubMed

    Szeberényi, József

    2010-09-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: tryptophan, operon, operator, repressor, inducer, corepressor, promoter, RNA polymerase, chromosome-polysome complex, regulatory gene, cis-acting element, trans-acting element, plasmid, transformation. PMID:21567855

  17. Ultrafast tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in myoglobins revealed by UV 2D spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Consani, Cristina; Auböck, Gerald; van Mourik, Frank; Chergui, Majed

    2013-03-29

    Tryptophan is commonly used to study protein structure and dynamics, such as protein folding, as a donor in fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) studies. By using ultra-broadband ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy in the ultraviolet (UV) and transient absorption in the visible range, we have disentangled the excited state decay pathways of the tryptophan amino acid residues in ferric myoglobins (MbCN and metMb). Whereas the more distant tryptophan (Trp(7)) relaxes by energy transfer to the heme, Trp(14) excitation predominantly decays by electron transfer to the heme. The excited Trp(14)→heme electron transfer occurs in <40 picoseconds with a quantum yield of more than 60%, over an edge-to-edge distance below ~10 angstroms, outcompeting the FRET process. Our results raise the question of whether such electron transfer pathways occur in a larger class of proteins.

  18. Effects of feeding tryptophan-limiting diets on the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Shimada, H; Kondo, T

    1996-10-01

    We investigated the effects of feeding various types of nicotinic acid-free, tryptophan-limiting diets on the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin in rats. Various tryptophan-limiting diets were made by adding zein, gelatin, glycine, threonine, methionine, or glycine + threonine + methionine to a nicotinic acid-free, 9% casein diet. When the rats were fed with the tryptophan-limiting diets, the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin was markedly decreased. However, the ratio recovered after the addition of tryptophan to the tryptophan-limiting diets. These results clearly prove that the conversion was lowest when the rats were fed with the tryptophan-limiting diets. Therefore, we think that the pellagragenic factor of corn is simply due to a low content of tryptophan, but the adverse effect is due to a low conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin.

  19. Energetics of Photoinduced Charge Migration within the Tryptophan Tetrad of an Animal (6-4) Photolyase.

    PubMed

    Cailliez, Fabien; Müller, Pavel; Firmino, Thiago; Pernot, Pascal; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2016-02-17

    Cryptochromes and photolyases are flavoproteins that undergo cascades of electron/hole transfers after excitation of the flavin cofactor. It was recently discovered that animal (6-4) photolyases, as well as animal cryptochromes, feature a chain of four tryptophan residues, while other members of the family contain merely a tryptophan triad. Transient absorption spectroscopy measurements on Xenopus laevis (6-4) photolyase have shown that the fourth residue is effectively involved in photoreduction but at the same time could not unequivocally ascertain the final redox state of this residue. In this article, polarizable molecular dynamics simulations and constrained density functional theory calculations are carried out to reveal the energetics of charge migration along the tryptophan tetrad. Migration toward the fourth tryptophan is found to be thermodynamically favorable. Electron transfer mechanisms are sought either through an incoherent hopping mechanism or through a multiple sites tunneling process. The Jortner-Bixon formulation of electron transfer (ET) theory is employed to characterize the hopping mechanism. The interplay between electron transfer and relaxation of protein and solvent is analyzed in detail. Our simulations confirm that ET in (6-4) photolyase proceeds out of equilibrium. Multiple site tunneling is modeled with the recently proposed flickering resonance mechanism. Given the position of energy levels and the distribution of electronic coupling values, tunneling over three tryptophan residues may become competitive in some cases, although a hopping mechanism is likely to be the dominant channel. For both reactive channels, computed rates are very sensitive to the starting protein configuration, suggesting that both can take place and eventually be mixed, depending on the state of the system when photoexcitation takes place.

  20. Study of the tryptophan-terbium FRET pair coupled to silver nanoprisms for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    di Gennaro, Ane K; Gurevich, Leonid; Skovsen, Esben; Overgaard, Michael T; Fojan, Peter

    2013-06-14

    Plasmonic coupling between fluorophores and metal surfaces has become a focal point of optical research during the last two decades, however, the interactions of FRET couples with metal surfaces remain relatively unexplored. In this study, interactions of the tryptophan-Tb(3+) FRET pair with silver nanoprisms for potential biosensor development have been investigated. For this purpose an engineered lanthanide binding peptide (LBTtrp) containing tryptophan as the sensitizer for bound lanthanide ions (Tb(3+)) as well as a trypsin cleavage site was synthesized. The modified LBTtrp peptide contained two N-terminal cysteine residues to provide a stronger coupling to the silver nanoprisms (~6 nm high, ~50 nm wide). This study investigated the interaction between tryptophan, chelated Tb(3+) ions, and silver nanoprisms in solution using fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopy. We have found that Tb(3+) luminescence decreases upon binding of the LBTtrp-Tb(3+) to silver nanoprisms and increases upon trypsin cleavage. The transient absorption spectroscopy measurements showed a significant decrease in the lifetime of the excited singlet state of tryptophan upon Tb(3+) chelation, while coupling to the silver nanoprisms did not show a significant effect on tryptophan. The results obtained in this work demonstrate a first proof of concept for a new sensitive optical biosensor in solution.

  1. Tryptophan auxotrophs were obtained by random transposon insertions in the Methanococcus maripaludis tryptophan operon.

    PubMed

    Porat, Iris; Whitman, William B

    2009-08-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis is an anaerobic, methane-producing archaeon that utilizes H(2) or formate for the reduction of CO(2) to methane. Tryptophan auxotrophs were constructed by in vitro insertions of the Tn5 transposon into the tryptophan operon, followed by transformation into M. maripaludis. This method could serve for rapid insertions into large cloned DNA regions. PMID:19566682

  2. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-01

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  3. Copper(I) stabilization by cysteine/tryptophan motif in the extracellular domain of Ctr4.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mariko; Miura, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Copper transporter Ctr4 of fission yeast has a quasi-palindromic sequence rich in cysteine and aromatic amino acid residues, CX4YWNWYX4C (where X represents any amino acid), in the N-terminal extracellular domain. A 24-mer peptide comprising this sequence is bound to Cu(I) through the cysteine thiolate coordination. Luminescence, UV absorption and resonance Raman spectra of the Cu(I)-peptide complex show that at least one of the two tryptophan side chains is located in close proximity to the thiolate-Cu(I) center and interacts with the Cu(I) ion via π-electrons of the indole ring. Although the thiolates and Cu(I) are oxidized to disulfide and Cu(II), respectively, only very slowly in air-saturated solutions, replacements of the tryptophan residues to phenylalanine significantly accelerate the oxidation reactions. The results obtained indicate that the interaction between Cu(I) and tryptophan via π-electrons plays a significant role in protecting the thiolate-Cu(I) center against the oxidation. The cysteine- and tryptophan-rich quasi-palindromic sequence may be a metal binding motif that stabilizes Cu(I) in the oxidizing extracellular environment. PMID:26908286

  4. Tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes - party of three.

    PubMed

    Ball, Helen J; Jusof, Felicita F; Bakmiwewa, Supun M; Hunt, Nicholas H; Yuasa, Hajime J

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP). The depletion of tryptophan and formation of KP metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive, and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties, and biological functions. This review analyzes the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system. PMID:25346733

  5. Tryptophan exposure and accessibility in the chitooligosaccharide-specific phloem exudate lectin from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). A fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Swamy, Musti J

    2009-10-01

    The exposure and accessibility of the tryptophan residues in the chitooligosaccharide-specific pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin (PPL) have been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission lambda(max) of native PPL, seen at 338nm was red-shifted to 348nm upon denaturation by 6M Gdn.HCl in the presence of 10mM beta-mercaptoethanol, indicating near complete exposure of the tryptophan residues to the aqueous medium, whereas a blue-shift to 335nm was observed in the presence of saturating concentrations of chitotriose, suggesting that ligand binding leads to a decrease in the solvent exposure of the tryptophan residues. The extent of quenching was maximum with the neutral molecule, acrylamide whereas the ionic species, iodide and Cs(+) led to significantly lower quenching, which could be attributed to the presence of charged amino acid residues in close proximity to some of the tryptophan residues. The Stern-Volmer plot for acrylamide was linear for native PPL and upon ligand binding, but became upward curving upon denaturation, indicating that the quenching occurs via a combination of static and dynamic mechanisms. In time-resolved fluorescence experiments, the decay curves could be best fit to biexponential patterns, for native protein, in the presence of ligand and upon denaturation. In each case both lifetimes systematically decreased with increasing acrylamide concentrations, indicating that quenching occurs predominantly via a dynamic process.

  6. Reorientation of the helix of the tryptophan-rich gp41W peptide from HIV-1 at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Gladys; Benichou, Emmanuel; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Harfouch, Yara El; Brevet, Pierre-François; Besson, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp41 from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has an amino acid sequence enriched in tryptophan residues, the so-called gp41W peptide (i.e., KWASLWNWFNITNWLWYIK) and plays a crucial role in HIV-1 host cell infection. Using the coupling of Second Harmonic Generation targeting the tryptophan residues with lateral surface tension measurements, we investigate the interaction of gp41W with a neat air/water and a lipid/water interfaces. At the air/water interface, gp41W presents a well-defined orientation and this orientation is strongly modified at the lipid/water interface, depending on the surface pressure. These results show that this strategy is well suited to monitor tryptophan containing α-helices orientation at lipid/water interfaces.

  7. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies. PMID:27748381

  8. Correlation of tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay parameters with sup 1 H NMR-determined rotamer conformations: (tryptophan sup 2 )oxytocin

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.B.A.; Schwartz, G.P.; Laws, W.R. ); Wyssbrod, H.R.; Porter, R.A. ); Michaels, C.A. )

    1992-02-18

    While the fluorescence decay kinetics of tyrosine model compounds can be explained in terms of heterogeneity derived from the three ground-state {chi}{sup 1} rotamers, a similar correlation has yet to be directly observed for a tryptophan residue. In addition, the asymmetric indole ring might also lead to heterogeneity from {chi}{sup 2} rotations. In this paper, the time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence properties of (tryptophan{sup 2})oxytocin at pH 3 are presented and compared with {sup 1}H NMR results. According to the unrestricted analyses of individual fluorescence decay curves taken as a function of emission wavelength-independent decay constants, only three exponential terms are required. In addition, the preexponential weighting factors (amplitudes) have the same relative relationship (weights) as the {sup 1}H NMR-determined {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations of the indole side chain. {sup 15}N was used in heteronuclear coupling experiments to confirm the rotamer assignments. Inclusion of a linked function restricting the decay amplitudes to the {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations in the individual decay curve analyses and in the global analysis confirms this correlation. According to qualitative nuclear Overhauser data, there are two {chi}{sup 2} populations.

  9. Rotational Spectra of Phenylalanine, Tirosine and Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, S.; Perez, C.; Sanz, M. E.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    The rotational spectra of the aromatic natural amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan have been investigated by Laser Ablation Molecular Beam Fourier transform Microwave Spectroscopy LA-MB-FTMW. The spectra of two rotamers of phenylalanine have been detected in the supersonic expansion. Both forms are stabilized by a chain of intramolecular hydrogen bonds O-H\\cdotsN-H\\cdots{π}, being the carboxylic group incis configuration. One conformer of tyrosine, which only differs from phenylalanine in a -OH group inpara position, has been also characterized. Preliminary results on the rotational spectrum of tryptophan are presented.

  10. The Roles of Tryptophans in Primer Synthesis by the DNA Primase of Bacteriophage T7*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huidong; Lee, Seung-Joo; Richardson, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Prokaryotic primases consist of a zinc-binding domain (ZBD) necessary for recognition of a specific template sequence and a catalytic RNA polymerase domain. Interactions of both domains with the DNA template and ribonucleotides are required for primer synthesis. Five tryptophan residues are dispersed in the primase of bacteriophage T7: Trp-42 in the ZBD and Trp-69, -97, -147, and -255 in the RNA polymerase domain. Previous studies showed that replacement of Trp-42 with alanine in the ZBD decreases primer synthesis, whereas substitution of non-aromatic residues for Trp-69 impairs both primer synthesis and delivery. However, the roles of tryptophan at position 97, 147, or 255 remain elusive. To investigate the essential roles of these residues, we replaced each tryptophan with the structurally similar tyrosine and examined the effect of this subtle alteration on primer synthesis. The substitution at position 42, 97, or 147 reduced primer synthesis, whereas substitution at position 69 or 255 did not. The functions of the tryptophans were further examined at each step of primer synthesis. Alteration of residue 42 disturbed the conformation of the ZBD and resulted in partial loss of the zinc ion, impairing binding to the ssDNA template. Replacement of Trp-97 with tyrosine reduced the binding affinity to NTP and the catalysis step. The replacement of Trp-147 with tyrosine also impaired the catalytic step. Therefore, Trp-42 is important in maintaining the conformation of the ZBD for template binding; Trp-97 contributes to NTP binding and the catalysis step; and Trp-147 maintains the catalysis step. PMID:22605336

  11. 21 CFR 582.5915 - Tryptophane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tryptophane. 582.5915 Section 582.5915 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5915 - Tryptophane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tryptophane. 582.5915 Section 582.5915 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5915 - Tryptophane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tryptophane. 582.5915 Section 582.5915 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  14. Tryptophan and kynurenines: continuing to court controversy.

    PubMed

    Stone, Trevor W

    2016-08-01

    The role of the amino acid tryptophan in the generation of 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) has been expanded over the past 30 years with recognition that its oxidation by indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) results in the formation of kynurenine and metabolites which regulate neuronal excitability, psychiatric status, immune cell activity and balance, and probably implantation and the development of embryos. While the amount of work on this kynurenine pathway continues to accelerate, it is important that disagreements about results, differences of interpretation or problems with technical issues are presented openly and discussed thoroughly so that new research is not mis-led in ways that could have been foreseen. In this issue of Clinical Science, Badawy et al. discuss in depth two opposing views of how changes in tryptophan availability or utilisation bring about their effects on cell function. The original concept that local depletion of tryptophan is responsible seems to be less attractive than the view that kynurenine and its metabolites have direct, potent actions on cells. This conclusion not only clarifies our understanding of the importance of tryptophan metabolism to kynurenine but also raises the possibility that the actions of those metabolites could be novel targets for the development of agonists and antagonists with a range of medical implications. PMID:27358029

  15. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  16. Characterization of the degradation products of a color-changed monoclonal antibody: tryptophan-derived chromophores.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Polozova, Alla; Gruia, Flaviu; Feng, Jinhua

    2014-07-15

    We describe the characterization of degradation products responsible for color change in near UV-visible light-irradiated and heat-stressed monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug product in liquid formulation. The treated samples were characterized using reversed-phase HPLC and size-exclusion HPLC with absorption spectroscopy. Both methods showed color change was due to chromophores formed on the mAb but not associated with the formulation excipients in both light-irradiated and heat-stressed mAb samples. These chromophores were further located by a new peptide mapping methodology with a combination of mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Mass spectrometry identified the major tryptophan oxidation products as kynurenine (Kyn), N-formylkynurenine (NFK), and hydroxytryptophan (OH-Trp). The absorption spectra showed that each of the tryptophan oxidation products exhibited a distinct absorption band above 280 nm shifted to the longer wavelengths in the order of OH-Trp < NFK < Kyn. The Kyn-containing peptide was detected by absorption at 420 nm. No new absorption bands were observed for either methionine or histidine oxidation products. This confirmed that tryptophan oxidation products, but not methionine and histidine oxidation products, were responsible for the color change. It is worth noting that a new oxidation product with the loss of hydrogen (2 Da mass decrease) for Trp-107 of the heavy chain was identified in the heat-stressed mAb sample. This oxidized tryptophan residue exhibited a distinct absorption band at the maximum absorbance wavelength 335 nm, which is responsible for the color change to yellow. This study showed that the new peptide mapping methodology with a combination of mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy is useful to identify tryptophan oxidation products as chromophores responsible for color change in stressed mAb drug product.

  17. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  18. Fluorescence Quenching of (Dimethylamino)naphthalene Dyes Badan and Prodan by Tryptophan in Cytochromes P450 and Micelles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence of 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-propionylnaphthalene dyes Badan and Prodan is quenched by tryptophan in Brij 58 micelles as well as in two cytochrome P450 proteins (CYP102, CYP119) with Badan covalently attached to a cysteine residue. Formation of nonemissive complexes between a dye molecule and tryptophan accounts for about 76% of the fluorescence intensity quenching in micelles, the rest is due to diffusive encounters. In the absence of tryptophan, fluorescence of Badan-labeled cytochromes decays with triexponential kinetics characterized by lifetimes of about 100 ps, 700–800 ps, and 3 ns. Site mutation of a histidine residue in the vicinity of the Badan label by tryptophan results in shortening of all three decay lifetimes. The relative amplitude of the fastest component increases at the expense of the two slower ones. The average quenching rate constants are 4.5 × 108 s–1 (CYP102) and 3.7 × 108 s–1 (CYP119), at 288 K. Cyclic voltammetry of Prodan in MeCN shows a reversible reduction peak at −1.85 V vs NHE that becomes chemically irreversible and shifts positively upon addition of water. A quasireversible reduction at −0.88 V was observed in an aqueous buffer (pH 7.3). The excited-state reduction potential of Prodan (and Badan) is estimated to vary from about +0.6 V (vs NHE) in polar aprotic media (MeCN) to approximately +1.6 V in water. Tryptophan quenching of Badan/Prodan fluorescence in CYPs and Brij 58 micelles is exergonic by ≤0.5 V and involves tryptophan oxidation by excited Badan/Prodan, coupled with a fast reaction between the reduced dye and water. Photoreduction is a new quenching mechanism for 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-propionylnaphthalene dyes that are often used as solvatochromic polarity probes, FRET donors and acceptors, as well as reporters of solvation dynamics. PMID:25079965

  19. Tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in ferrous myoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Monni, Roberto; Al Haddad, André; van Mourik, Frank; Auböck, Gerald; Chergui, Majed

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that in ferric myoglobins (Mb) the fluorescence quenching of the photoexcited tryptophan 14 (*Trp14) residue is in part due to an electron transfer to the heme porphyrin (porph), turning it to the ferrous state. However, the invariance of *Trp decay times in ferric and ferrous Mbs raises the question as to whether electron transfer may also be operative in the latter. Using UV pump/visible probe transient absorption, we show that this is indeed the case for deoxy-Mb. We observe that the reduction generates (with a yield of about 30%) a low-valence Fe–porphyrin π [FeII(porph●−)] -anion radical, which we observe for the first time to our knowledge under physiological conditions. We suggest that the pathway for the electron transfer proceeds via the leucine 69 (Leu69) and valine 68 (Val68) residues. The results on ferric Mbs and the present ones highlight the generality of Trp–porphyrin electron transfer in heme proteins. PMID:25902517

  20. Universal nanopatternable interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Garland, Shaun; Howland, Michael; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-12-01

    A nanopatternable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oligomer layer is demonstrated as an interfacial adhesive for its intrinsic transferability and universal adhesiveness. Utilizing the well-established surface modification and bonding techniques of PDMS surfaces, irreversible bonding is formed (up to 400 kPa) between a wide range of substrate pairs, representing ones within and across different materials categories, including metals, ceramics, thermoset, and thermoplastic polymers.

  1. Catalytic Roles of βLys87 in Tryptophan Synthase: 15N Solid State NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Bethany G.; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4′ for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-15N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. PMID:25688830

  2. Tandem transcription and translation regulatory sensing of uncharged tryptophan tRNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangnan; Yanofsky, Charles

    2003-07-11

    The Bacillus subtilis AT (anti-TRAP) protein inhibits the regulatory protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein), thereby eliminating transcription termination in the leader region of the trp operon. Transcription of the AT operon is activated by uncharged tryptophan transfer RNA (tRNATrp). Here we show that translation of AT also is regulated by uncharged tRNATrp. A 10-residue coding region containing three consecutive tryptophan codons is located immediately preceding the AT structural gene. Completion of translation of this coding region inhibits AT synthesis, whereas incomplete translation increases AT production. Tandem sensing of uncharged tRNATrp therefore regulates synthesis of AT, which in turn regulates TRAP's ability to inhibit trp operon expression. PMID:12855807

  3. Tryptophan dendrimers that inhibit HIV replication, prevent virus entry and bind to the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Colomer, Ignacio; Quesada, Ernesto; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Camarasa, María-José; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Balzarini, Jan; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Dendrimers containing from 9 to 18 tryptophan residues at the peryphery have been efficiently synthesized and tested against HIV replication. These compounds inhibit an early step of the replicative cycle of HIV, presumably virus entry into its target cell. Our data suggest that HIV inhibition can be achieved by the preferred interaction of the compounds herein described with glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of the HIV envelope preventing interaction between HIV and the (co)receptors present on the host cells. The results obtained so far indicate that 9 tryptophan residues on the periphery are sufficient for efficient gp120/gp41 binding and anti-HIV activity.

  4. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  5. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  6. Bioavailability of tryptophan in selected foods by rat growth assay.

    PubMed

    McDonough, F E; Bodwell, C E; Wells, P A; Kamalu, J A

    1989-01-01

    Tryptophan bioavailabilities were estimated in 16 protein sources using 10 day rat growth assays with casein as the reference protein. Growth responses of rats fed test food diets were compared to growth responses of rats fed basal diets with graded levels of tryptophan ranging from 50 to 100 mg of tryptophan/100 g diet. Estimates of tryptophan availabilities were 85-100% for all products except whole wheat cereal (73%) and pinto beans (59%). Results of a previous study on lysine availability indicated that poor response to pinto beans was due either to poor digestibility or to the presence of some unidentified growth inhibitor. PMID:2710755

  7. Tryptophan Metabolism and White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Postolache, Teodor T; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Shukla, Dinesh K; Tagamets, Malle; Du, Xiaoming; Savransky, Anya; Lowry, Christopher A; Can, Adem; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities in the structure and functioning of white matter, but the underlying neuropathology is unclear. We hypothesized that increased tryptophan degradation in the kynurenine pathway could be associated with white matter microstructure and biochemistry, potentially contributing to white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. To test this, fasting plasma samples were obtained from 37 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls and levels of total tryptophan and its metabolite kynurenine were assessed. The ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan was used as an index of tryptophan catabolic activity in this pathway. White matter structure and function were assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Tryptophan levels were significantly lower (p<0.001), and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios were correspondingly higher (p=0.018) in patients compared with controls. In patients, lower plasma tryptophan levels corresponded to lower structural integrity (DTI fractional anisotropy) (r=0.347, p=0.038). In both patients and controls, the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio was inversely correlated with frontal white matter glutamate level (r=-0.391 and -0.350 respectively, p=0.024 and 0.036). These results provide initial evidence implicating abnormal tryptophan/kynurenine pathway activity in changes to white matter integrity and white matter glutamate in schizophrenia.

  8. Reaction of singlet oxygen with tryptophan in proteins: a pronounced effect of the local environment on the reaction rate.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Rasmus Lybech; Arnbjerg, Jacob; Ogilby, Peter R

    2012-06-13

    Singlet molecular oxygen, O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)), can influence many processes pertinent to the function of biological systems, including events that result in cell death. Many of these processes involve a reaction between singlet oxygen and a given amino acid in a protein. As a result, the behavior of that protein can change, either because of a structural alteration and/or a direct modification of an active site. Surprisingly, however, little is known about rate constants for reactions between singlet oxygen and amino acids when the latter are in a protein. In this report, we demonstrate using five separate proteins, each containing only a single tryptophan residue, that the rate constant for singlet oxygen reaction with tryptophan depends significantly on the position of this amino acid in the protein. Most importantly, the reaction rate constant depends not only on the accessibility of the tryptophan residue to oxygen, but also on factors that characterize the local molecular environment of the tryptophan in the protein. The fact that the local protein environment can either appreciably inhibit or accelerate the reaction of singlet oxygen with a given amino acid can have significant ramifications for singlet-oxygen-mediated events that perturb cell function.

  9. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  10. Electron-impact-induced tryptophan molecule fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila G.; Vukstich, Vasyl S.; Papp, Alexander V.; Snegursky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of a gas-phase tryptophan molecule by a low-energy (<70 eV) electron impact was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Various positively charged fragments were observed and analyzed. A special attention was paid to the energy characteristics of the ionic fragment yield. The geometrical parameters of the initial molecule rearrangement were also analyzed. The fragmentation observed was due to either a simple bond cleavage or more complex reactions involving molecular rearrangements. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Stefan Matejcik, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  11. Interfacial bonding and friction in SiC fiber/{beta}` SiAlON composites

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Zhu, D.; Xu, D.

    1994-12-31

    Interfacial mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced, combustion synthesized {beta}`-SiAlON composites were studied by a fiber push-out technique. Interfacial debonding and parameters were studied in terms of embedded fiber length. Stable, progressive interfacial debonding prior to fiber frictional sliding was observed in specimens with large embedded fiber lengths. Linear, shear-lag and progressive debonding models were used in the analysis of interfacial parameters. The coefficient of friction and the residual radial stress estimated from the progressive debonding model was 0.25 and 158 MPa, respectively, as compared to 0.26 and 102 MPa, respectively obtained from the shear-lag model. The radial residual stress extracted from either model was reasonably close to that (125 MPa) calculated from the thermal expansion mismatch and cooling temperature range. An axial residual load (8.7 N) extracted from the progressive debonding model was compared well with that (6.7 N) obtained from a calculation based on thermal expansion mismatch. The interfacial fracture toughness was calculated to be 0.5 J/m{sup 2}. TEM interfacial characterization correlated with SEM observation of the interfacial debonding site, revealed that interfacial debonding was attributed to the weak physical bonding between the outermost carbon-rich layer of the SiC fiber and the matrix.

  12. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  13. Tryptophan degradation increases with stage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schroecksnadel, Katharina; Winkler, Christiana; Duftner, Christian; Wirleitner, Barbara; Schirmer, Michael; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2006-05-01

    Immune system activation is known to be involved in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma in various cells, including monocytes, induces the enzyme indoleamine (2,3)-dioxygenase (IDO), which converts tryptophan to kynurenine. In sera of 22 patients (17 women and 5 men) with RA stages 1 to 4 according to Steinbrocker, the concentrations of tryptophan and kynurenine were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. To estimate IDO activity, the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (kyn/trp) was calculated. In parallel, concentrations of the macrophage activation marker neopterin were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tryptophan concentrations were lower in patients with RA, and the decrease in serum tryptophan correlated with increase in stage (p<0.05). Kyn/trp correlated well with neopterin concentrations, which were elevated in most patients. Whereas higher C-reactive protein concentrations and erythrocyte sedimentation rates were observed in patients with greater disease activity, tryptophan and neopterin concentrations did not differ between patients with different subjective disease activity graded by the physician. Deficiency of the essential amino acid tryptophan in patients with RA most likely results from immune activation involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. It could also be relevant for the mood of patients, as tryptophan is the precursor of serotonin. PMID:16261283

  14. Production L-tryptophan by Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Bang, W G; Lang, S; Sahm, H; Wagner, F

    1983-04-01

    Whole cells of Escherichia coli B 10 having high tryptophan synthetase activity were used directly as an enzyme source to produce L-tryptophan from indole and L- or D,L-serine. This strain is tryptophan auxotrophic, which is tryptophanase negative and, in addition, L- and D-serine deaminase negative under production conditions. To avoid inhibition of tryptophan synthetase by a high concentration of indole, nonaqueous organic solvents, Amberlite XAD-2 adsorbent, and nonionic detergents were used as reservoirs of indole in the reaction mixture for the production of L-tryptophan. As a result, different effects were observed on the production of L-tryptophan. Particularly, among the nonionic detergents, Triton X-100 was very efficient. Using Triton X-100 for production of L-tryptophan from indole and L- or D,L-serine by whole cells of Escherichia coli B 10, 14.14 g/100 mL and 14.2 g/100 mL of L-tryptophan were produced at 37 degrees C for 60 h.

  15. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  16. Spectral contribution of the individual tryptophan of alphaB-crystallin: a study by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J. J.; Sun, T. X.; Akhtar, N. J.

    1999-01-01

    There are two tryptophan residues in the lens alphaB-crystallin, Trp9 and Trp60. We prepared two Trp --> Phe substituted mutants, W9F and W60F, for use in a spectroscopic study. The two tryptophan residues contribute to Trp fluorescence and near-ultraviolet circular dichroism (UV CD) differently. The major difference in the near-UV CD is the contribution of 1La of Trp: it is positive in W60F but becomes negative in W9F. Further analysis of the near-UV CD shows an increased intensity in the region of 270-280 nm for W60F, suggesting that the Tyr48 is affected by the W60F mutation. It appears that Trp60 is located in a more rigid environment than Trp9, which agrees with a recent structural model in which Trp60 is in a beta-strand. PMID:10631993

  17. 2-Methyl-L-tryptophan is a substrate of tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Faleev, N G; Gogoleva, O I; Dementieva, I S; Zakomirdina, L N; Belikov, V M

    1995-04-01

    Tryptophanase was generally considered to be inactive towards tryptophan derivatives substituted at 2-position of the indole ring. We have shown that cells containing tryptophanase catalyze the formation of 2-methyl-L-tryptophan from 2-methylindole and L-serine, and from 2-methylindole, pyruvate and ammonium ion. The kinetics of pyruvate formation from 2-methyl-L-tryptophan and its alpha-deuterated analogue catalyzed by homogeneous tryptophanase were examined. The primary deuterium isotope effect (kH/kD = 4.0) as well as the absorption spectrum of tryptophanase complex with 2-methyl-L-tryptophan indicate that the rate of enzymatic reaction of 2-methyl-L-tryptophan is in a considerable degree determined by the stage of removal of alpha-proton.

  18. Tryptophan probes at the α-synuclein and membrane interface

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how environmental factors affect the conformational dynamics of α-synuclein (α-syn) is of great importance because the accumulation and deposit of aggregated α-syn in the brain are intimately connected to Parkinson’s disease etiology. Measurements of steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence of single tryptophan-containing α-syn variants have revealed distinct phospholipid vesicle and micelle interactions at residues 4, 39, 94, and 125. Our circular dichroism (CD) data confirm that Trp mutations do not affect α-syn membrane binding properties (apparent association constant Kaapp∼1×107M−1 for all synucleins) saturating at an estimated lipid-to-protein molar ratio of 380 or approximately 120 proteins covering ~7% of the surface area of an 80 nm diameter vesicle. Fluorophores at positions 4 and 94 are the most sensitive to the lipid bilayer with pronounced spectral blue-shifts (W4: Δλmax ~23 nm; W94: Δλmax ~10 nm) and quantum yield increases (W4, W94: ~3 fold) while W39 and W125 remain primarily water-exposed. Time-resolved fluorescence data show that all sites (except W125) have subpopulations that interact with the membrane. PMID:20229987

  19. Dose-dependent effects of tryptophan on learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Huma; Mushtaq, Foqia; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2014-09-01

    The concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, Serotonin) varies as a result of physiological changes in the availability of its precursor tryptophan to the serotonergic neurons in the brain. Increase in brain tryptophan occurs following an increase in plasma tryptophan concentration. Tryptophan intake increases brain serotonin metabolism and enhances memory. The Present study was designed to investigate the effects of oral administration of tryptophan (TRP) at different doses (100, 300 and 500mg/kg) for two weeks on learning and memory functions and Neurochemical changes in rats. Control rats were given drinking water. Assessment of memory in rats was done by using the water Maze. on the 14th day trail training of water Maze was given to rats and after 1h of this 2nd trial of these rats were done. On the next day (After 24h of trail) long-term memories of these rats were monitored. After 1 hour of this all rats were killed by decapitation using guillotine. Brain and blood was collected and stored at -70°C. Neurochemical estimations of Plasma and brain tryptophan, 5-HT and 5-HIAA in brain were made by HPLC-EC. Result showed that administration of tryptophan enhanced performance on water Maze test. Tryptophan treated animals exhibited higher level of Plasma as well as brain tryptophan. 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels were also increased in tryptophan treated rats. Findings are discussed in context with the role of 5-HT metabolism in learning and memory process in rats. Results may help to understand the 5-HT changes following long term TRP administration in a dose dependent manner and will help to suggest the use of TRP in serotonin related illnesses.

  20. Specific [(3)H]tryptophan binding sites in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wong, P T; Lee, H S; Tan, C H; Teo, W L

    1989-01-01

    [(3)H]Tryptophan binds to a single population of sites in the rat cortical synaptosomal membranes. The binding is reversible and follows the law of mass action. By saturation studies using increasing concentration of [(3)H]tryptophan with decreasing specific radioactivity, the apparent K(d) obtained was approx. 0.8 ?M and the B(max) 110 pmol/mg protein. However, the IC(50) obtained for unlabelled tryptophan in displacing [(3)H]tryptophan binding (3.5 nM) was 0.26 ?M. All six naturally occurring aromatic amino acids studied displaced [(3)H]tryptophan binding with tryptophan and phenylalanine showing higher apparent affinity than histidine, tyrosine, dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan. These binding sites are proteins in nature as they are sensitive to trypsin and ?-chymotrypsin. It is observed that about 37% of the sites seem to be protected from the proteolytic enzymes by the membrane structure. Furthermore, they are extremely sensitive to phospholipase A(2) presumably because altered membrane phospholipids conduce a conformational change in the binding protein. A considerable degree of stereospecificity was demonstrated with the affinity for l-tryptophan about 90 times higher than that for d-tryptophan. The affinity for l-phenylalanine was 8 times higher than that for d-phenylalanine. Ligand specificity for the aromatic amino acids is remarkable as hydrocinnamic acid, 2-phenylethylamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, histamine, dopamine, ?-aminobutyric acid, glutamic acid and taurine did not displace [(3)H]tryptophan binding. Therefore, these sites are termed aromatic amino acid binding sites (AABS). Whether or not AABS are involved in neuromodulation at the synapse awaits clarification. If so, the endogenous ligand for the AABS may well be tryptophan.

  1. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-19

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. PMID:27545849

  2. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies.

  3. Biosynthesis of Violacein, Structure and Function of l-Tryptophan Oxidase VioA from Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Füller, Janis J; Röpke, René; Krausze, Joern; Rennhack, Kim E; Daniel, Nils P; Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Schulz, Stefan; Jahn, Dieter; Moser, Jürgen

    2016-09-16

    Violacein is a natural purple pigment of Chromobacterium violaceum with potential medical applications as antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer drugs. The initial step of violacein biosynthesis is the oxidative conversion of l-tryptophan into the corresponding α-imine catalyzed by the flavoenzyme l-tryptophan oxidase (VioA). A substrate-related (3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-2-methylpropanoic acid) and a product-related (2-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)prop-2-enoic acid) competitive VioA inhibitor was synthesized for subsequent kinetic and x-ray crystallographic investigations. Structures of the binary VioA·FADH2 and of the ternary VioA·FADH2·2-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)prop-2-enoic acid complex were resolved. VioA forms a "loosely associated" homodimer as indicated by small-angle x-ray scattering experiments. VioA belongs to the glutathione reductase family 2 of FAD-dependent oxidoreductases according to the structurally conserved cofactor binding domain. The substrate-binding domain of VioA is mainly responsible for the specific recognition of l-tryptophan. Other canonical amino acids were efficiently discriminated with a minor conversion of l-phenylalanine. Furthermore, 7-aza-tryptophan, 1-methyl-tryptophan, 5-methyl-tryptophan, and 5-fluoro-tryptophan were efficient substrates of VioA. The ternary product-related VioA structure indicated involvement of protein domain movement during enzyme catalysis. Extensive structure-based mutagenesis in combination with enzyme kinetics (using l-tryptophan and substrate analogs) identified Arg(64), Lys(269), and Tyr(309) as key catalytic residues of VioA. An increased enzyme activity of protein variant H163A in the presence of l-phenylalanine indicated a functional role of His(163) in substrate binding. The combined structural and mutational analyses lead to the detailed understanding of VioA substrate recognition. Related strategies for the in vivo synthesis of novel violacein derivatives are discussed. PMID:27466367

  4. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  5. Tryptophan and tryptophan-like substances in cloud water: Occurrence and photochemical fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Deguillaume, Laurent; Mailhot, Gilles; Brigante, Marcello

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates the occurrence and photochemical behaviour of tryptophan (TRP) in the cloud aqueous phase. The concentrations of tryptophan, TRYptophan LIke Substances (TRYLIS) and HUmic LIke Substances (HULIS) in real cloud water, collected between October 2013 and November 2014 at the top of the puy de Dôme station, were determined using the Excitation-Emission-Matrix (EEM) technique. The amount of free and complexed tryptophan (TRP) up to 10-7 M in cloud aqueous phase was quantified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence analysis, and its photoreactivity under sun-simulated conditions was investigated in synthetic water samples mimicking cloud aqueous phase compositions (oceanic and continental origins). TRP undergoes direct photolysis, and its degradation is enhanced in the presence of naturally occurring species able to photo-generate hydroxyl radicals (HOrad). The polychromatic quantum yield of TRP (ϕ290-340 nm TRP) is estimated to be 8.37 × 10-4 between 290 and 340 nm, corresponding to the degradation rate (RTRPd) of 1.29 × 10-11 M s-1 under our irradiation conditions. The degradation is accelerated up to 3.65 × 10-10 and 8.26 × 10-10 M s-1 in synthetic oceanic and continental cloud water samples doped with 100 μM hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Hydroxyl radical-mediated transformation leads to the generation of different functionalized and oxidized products, as well as small carboxylic acids, such as formate and acetate. Moreover, fluorescent signals of irradiated solutions indicate the formation of HULIS.

  6. Plant phenolics affect oxidation of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Heinonen, Marina

    2008-08-27

    The effect of berry phenolics such as anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins from raspberry (Rubus idaeus), black currant (Ribes nigrum), and cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and byproducts of deoiling processes rich in phenolics such as rapeseed (Brassica rapa L.), camelina (Camelina sativa), and soy (Glycine max L.) as well as scots pine bark (Pinus sylvestris) was investigated in an H2O2-oxidized tryptophan (Trp) solution. The oxidation of Trp was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography using both fluorescence and diode array detection of Trp and its oxidation products. Mechanisms of antioxidative action of the phenolic compounds toward the oxidation of Trp were different as the pattern of Trp oxidation products varied with different phenolic compounds. The antioxidant protection toward oxidation of Trp was best provided with pine bark phenolics, black currant anthocyanins, and camelina meal phenolics as well as cranberry proanthocyanidins.

  7. Plant phenolics affect oxidation of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Heinonen, Marina

    2008-08-27

    The effect of berry phenolics such as anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins from raspberry (Rubus idaeus), black currant (Ribes nigrum), and cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and byproducts of deoiling processes rich in phenolics such as rapeseed (Brassica rapa L.), camelina (Camelina sativa), and soy (Glycine max L.) as well as scots pine bark (Pinus sylvestris) was investigated in an H2O2-oxidized tryptophan (Trp) solution. The oxidation of Trp was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography using both fluorescence and diode array detection of Trp and its oxidation products. Mechanisms of antioxidative action of the phenolic compounds toward the oxidation of Trp were different as the pattern of Trp oxidation products varied with different phenolic compounds. The antioxidant protection toward oxidation of Trp was best provided with pine bark phenolics, black currant anthocyanins, and camelina meal phenolics as well as cranberry proanthocyanidins. PMID:18646765

  8. Assessment of measurement techniques to determine the interfacial properties of bilayer dental ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anunmana, Chuchai

    The clinical success of all-ceramic dental restorations depends on the quality of interfacial bonding between ceramic layers. In addition, the residual stress in the structure that developed during ceramic processing is one of the important factors that contributes to the quality of the bond. Because all-ceramic restorations are usually fabricated as bilayer or trilayer structures and failures of all-ceramic restorations have been frequently reported as chipping or delamination of the veneer layers, the interfacial quality of bilayer dental ceramic restorations was investigated. However, most of the published bond test data reflect strength values that are inversely related to cross-sectional areas and failure locations are frequently disregarded or bond strength values are misinterpreted. In addition, residual tensile stresses that develop in the structures because of thermal expansion/contraction mismatches may also adversely affect interfacial fracture resistance. The first objective of this study was to determine the interfacial toughness of bonded bilayer ceramics using two different approaches. The results indicate that the short-bar chevron-notch test and a controlled-flaw microtensile test can induce interfacial failure that represents true bonding quality. The second objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that residual stresses estimated from an indentation technique are not significantly different from residual stresses that are calculated based on fractography and flexural strength. The indentation technique may be useful as a simplified method to determine residual stresses in bilayer dental ceramics. The results of this study demonstrate that there is no significant difference in mean residual stresses determined from the two techniques. Because of relationship between residual stresses and apparent interfacial toughness, estimates of residual stresses can now be estimated more rapidly by measuring the apparent interfacial toughness of

  9. Mutagenesis of tryptophan199 suggests that hopping is required for MauG-dependent tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tarboush, Nafez Abu; Jensen, Lyndal M.R.; Yukl, Erik T.; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Wilmot, Carrie M.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2011-12-07

    The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes the posttranslational modification of the precursor protein of methylamine dehydrogenase (preMADH) to complete biosynthesis of its protein-derived tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor. Catalysis proceeds through a high valent bis-Fe(IV) redox state and requires long-range electron transfer (ET), as the distance between the modified residues of preMADH and the nearest heme iron of MauG is 19.4 {angstrom}. Trp199 of MauG resides at the MauG-preMADH interface, positioned midway between the residues that are modified and the nearest heme. W199F and W199K mutations did not affect the spectroscopic and redox properties of MauG, or its ability to stabilize the bis-Fe(IV) state. Crystal structures of complexes of W199F/K MauG with preMADH showed no significant perturbation of the MauG-preMADH structure or protein interface. However, neither MauG variant was able to synthesize TTQ from preMADH. In contrast, an ET reaction from diferrous MauG to quinone MADH, which does not require the bis-Fe(IV) intermediate, was minimally affected by the W199F/K mutations. W199F/K MauGs were able to oxidize quinol MADH to form TTQ, the putative final two-electron oxidation of the biosynthetic process, but with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values approximately 10% that of wild-type MauG. The differential effects of the W199F/K mutations on these three different reactions are explained by a critical role for Trp199 in mediating multistep hopping from preMADH to bis-Fe(IV) MauG during the long-range ET that is required for TTQ biosynthesis.

  10. Probing the roles of two tryptophans surrounding the unique zinc coordination site in lipase family I.5.

    PubMed

    Timucin, Emel; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Sezerman, Osman Ugur

    2016-01-01

    A unique zinc domain found in all of the identified members of the lipase family I.5 is surrounded by two conserved tryptophans (W61 and W212). In this study, we investigated the role of these hydrophobic residues in thermostability and thermoactivity of the lipase from Bacillus thermocatenulatus (BTL2) taken as the representative of the family. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of BTL2 is conserved by the tryptophan mutations (W61A, W212A, and W61A/W212A), and that W61 is located in a more rigid and less solvent exposed region than is W212. Thermal denaturation and optimal activity analyses pointed out that zinc induces thermostability and thermoactivity of BTL2, in which both tryptophans W61 and W212 play contributing roles. Molecular explanations describing the roles of these tryptophans were pursued by X-ray crystallography of the open form of the W61A mutant and molecular dynamics simulations which highlighted a critical function for W212 in zinc binding to the coordination site. This study reflects the potential use of hydrophobic amino acids in vicinity of metal coordination sites in lipase biocatalysts design.

  11. More About Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Del Signore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional discussion of technique for measuring interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Technique described in "Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids" (LEW-15855).

  12. IDO induces expression of a novel tryptophan transporter in mouse and human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Silk, Jonathan D; Lakhal, Samira; Laynes, Robert; Vallius, Laura; Karydis, Ioannis; Marcea, Cornelius; Boyd, C A Richard; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2011-08-15

    IDO is the rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, catabolizing tryptophan to kynurenine. Tryptophan depletion by IDO-expressing tumors is a common mechanism of immune evasion inducing regulatory T cells and inhibiting effector T cells. Because mammalian cells cannot synthesize tryptophan, it remains unclear how IDO(+) tumor cells overcome the detrimental effects of local tryptophan depletion. We demonstrate that IDO(+) tumor cells express a novel amino acid transporter, which accounts for ∼50% of the tryptophan uptake. The induced transporter is biochemically distinguished from the constitutively expressed tryptophan transporter System L by increased resistance to inhibitors of System L, resistance to inhibition by high concentrations of most amino acids tested, and high substrate specificity for tryptophan. Under conditions of low extracellular tryptophan, expression of this novel transporter significantly increases tryptophan entry into IDO(+) tumors relative to tryptophan uptake through the low-affinity System L alone, and further decreases tryptophan levels in the microenvironment. Targeting this additional tryptophan transporter could be a way of pharmacological inhibition of IDO-mediated tumor escape. These findings highlight the ability of IDO-expressing tumor cells to thrive in a tryptophan-depleted microenvironment by expressing a novel, highly tryptophan-specific transporter, which is resistant to inhibition by most other amino acids. The additional transporter allows tumor cells to strike the ideal balance between supply of tryptophan essential for their own proliferation and survival, and depleting the extracellular milieu of tryptophan to inhibit T cell proliferation.

  13. Influences of Various Amino Acids on Tryptophan-Mediated Control of the Tryptophan Biosynthetic Enzymes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, John D.; Stubbs, E. Ann

    1971-01-01

    Lysates of Escherichia coli Ymel obtained from cultures grown in the absence of tryptophan in minimal medium supplemented with 0.1% casein hydrolysate show an approximate fivefold increase in steady-state specific activity of both anthranilate synthetase and tryptophan synthetase A protein relative to cultures grown in nonsupplemented medium. In the presence of repressing levels of exogenous tryptophan, growth of cultures in casein hydrolysate-supplemented medium results in a noncoordinate enhancement of repression of 10-fold for anthranilate synthetase and twofold for tryptophan synthetase A protein. Similar, but less pronounced, effects are shown for strain W3110. Strains possessing tryptophan regulator gene mutations do not exhibit this first effect, but do yield an approximate twofold decrease in specific activity of both enzymes when grown in medium supplemented with tryptophan and casein hydrolysate. A stimulation of derepression of both enzymes in strain Ymel equivalent to that induced by casein hydrolysate can be reproduced by growth in minimal medium supplemented with threonine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, serine, glutamic acid, and glutamine. Doubling time in this medium is not significantly different from that in minimal medium. An enhancement of repression which partially mimics that observed on growth in medium supplemented with tryptophan plus casein hydrolysate is obtained when Ymel is grown on medium supplemented with tryptophan plus methionine. Threonine or phenylalanine plus tyrosine as separate medium supplements are independently capable of producing a 1.4-fold or 3.4-fold stimulation, respectively, but in combination only the phenylalanine plus tyrosine effect is manifested unless serine and glutamic acid or glutamine are included. Our data show that expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes can be significantly influenced in vivo as a result of growth in medium supplemented with a variety of amino acids. PMID:4945190

  14. Regulation of Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Mode of Action of 5-Methyl-Tryptophan and 5-Methyl-Tryptophan-Sensitive Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, A.; Miozzari, J.; Hütter, R.

    1974-01-01

    In a wild-type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae the tryptophan analogue dl-5-methyl-tryptophan (5MT) causes only a slight reduction of the growth rate. Uptake experiments indicate that the limited inhibition is partly due to low levels of 5MT inside the cell. On the other hand, this low concentration of 5MT leads to an increase in the activity of the tryptophan-biosynthetic enzymes. Evidence is presented that suggests that 5MT acts primarily through feedback inhibition of anthranilate synthase, the first enzyme of the pathway. A number of 5MT-sensitive mutants have been isolated, characterized, and assigned to one of the following three classes: class I, strains with altered activity and/or feedback sensitivity of anthranilate synthase; class II, strains with elevated uptake of 5MT; class III, mutants with altered regulation of the tryptophan-biosynthetic enzymes, which do not exhibit increases in activity in the presence of 5MT. This failure to exhibit increased enzyme activities in mutants of class III can also be observed after tryptophan starvation. Two mutants of class III show high sensitivity towards 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. They can not exhibit derepression of some histidine- and arginine-biosynthetic enzymes under conditions that lead to an increase in these same enzymes in the wild-type strain. PMID:4360539

  15. Tryptophan degradation in women with breast cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Altered tryptophan metabolism and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity are linked to cancer development and progression. In addition, these biological factors have been associated with the development and severity of neuropsychiatric syndromes, including major depressive disorder. However, this biological mechanism associated with both poor disease outcomes and adverse neuropsychiatric symptoms has received little attention in women with breast cancer. Therefore, a pilot study was undertaken to compare levels of tryptophan and other proteins involved in tryptophan degradation in women with breast cancer to women without cancer, and secondarily, to examine levels in women with breast caner over the course of chemotherapy. Findings Blood samples were collected from women with a recent diagnosis of breast cancer (n = 33) before their first cycle of chemotherapy and after their last cycle of chemotherapy. The comparison group (n = 24) provided a blood sample prior to breast biopsy. Plasma concentrations of tryptophan, kynurenine, and tyrosine were determined. The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (KYN/TRP) was used to estimate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. On average, the women with breast cancer had lower levels of tryptophan, elevated levels of kynurenine and tyrosine and an increased KYN/TRP ratio compared to women without breast cancer. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the KYN/TRP ratio (p = 0.036), which remained elevated in women with breast cancer throughout the treatment trajectory. Conclusions The findings of this pilot study suggest that increased tryptophan degradation may occur in women with early-stage breast cancer. Given the multifactorial consequences of increased tryptophan degradation in cancer outcomes and neuropsychiatric symptom manifestation, this biological mechanism deserves broader attention in women with breast cancer. PMID:21615916

  16. Characterization of binding and structural properties of rat liver fatty-acid-binding protein using tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Thumser, A E; Wilton, D C

    1994-01-01

    Rat liver fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) does not contain tryptophan. Three mutant proteins have been produced in which a single tryptophan residue has been inserted by site-directed mutagenesis at positions 3 (F3W), 18 (F18W) and 69 (C69W). These tryptophans have been strategically located in order to provide fluorescent reporter groups to study the binding and structural characteristics of rat liver FABP. Two fluorescent fatty acid analogues, DAUDA (11-[(5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1- sulphonyl)amino]undecanoic acid) and 3-[p-(6-phenyl)-hexa-1,3,5-trienyl]phenylpropionic acid, showed no significant difference in binding affinities for the different mutant proteins, although maximum fluorescence values were decreased for F3W and increased for C69W. These findings were confirmed by studies of DAUDA displacement by oleate. Protein-denaturation studies in the presence of urea indicated subtle differences for the three mutants which could be explained by multiple unfolding pathways. Fatty acid binding increased tryptophan fluorescence emission in the case of the F18W protein, but had no effect on the F3W and C69W proteins. Fluorescence quenching studies with 2-bromopalmitate showed that a fatty acid carboxylate is close to the tryptophan in the F18W protein. Energy-transfer studies showed that the fluorescent moiety of DAUDA is equidistant from the three mutated amino acids and is bound within the beta-clam solvent cavity of liver FABP. This interpretation of the fluorescence quenching and energy-transfer data supports the difference in ligand orientation between intestinal and liver FABP observed in previous studies. PMID:8010966

  17. Characterization of tryptophan and coenzyme luminescence in tryptophan synthase from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Strambini, G B; Cioni, P; Peracchi, A; Mozzarelli, A

    1992-08-25

    Tryptophan synthase from Salmonella typhimurium is a bifunctional alpha 2 beta 2 complex that catalyzes the formation of L-tryptophan. We have characterized over the temperature range from 160 to 293 K the fluorescence and phosphorescence properties of the single tryptophan present at position 177 of the beta-subunit and of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate bound through a Schiff's base in the beta-active site. The comparison between the fluorescence of the pyridoxal phosphate bound either to the protein or to valine free in solution indicates substantial protection for the coenzyme against thermal quenching and a greater intensity of the ketoenamine tautomer band. Trp-177 is highly luminescent, and its proximity to the pyridoxal moiety leads to an over 50% quenching of its fluorescence with both reduced and native coenzyme. The Trp phosphorescence spectrum possesses a narrow, well-defined, 0-0 vibrational band centered at 418.5 nm, a wavelength that indicates strong polar interactions with neighboring charges. The observation of delayed fluorescence in the native complex implies that the excited triplet state is involved in a process of triplet-singlet energy transfer to the ketoenamine tautomer. The rate of energy transfer, heterogeneous in low-temperature glasses with rate constants of 2.26 and 0.07 s-1, becomes homogeneous in fluid solutions as the coenzyme tautomer interconversion is likely faster than the phosphorescence decay. In both apo- and holo-alpha 2 beta 2, the phosphorescence from Trp-177 is long-lived even at ambient temperature.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Complexity in regulation of tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Paul; Babitzke, Paul; Antson, Alfred; Yanofsky, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis uses novel regulatory mechanisms in controlling expression of its genes of tryptophan synthesis and transport. These mechanisms respond to changes in the intracellular concentrations of free tryptophan and uncharged tRNA(Trp). The major B. subtilis protein that regulates tryptophan biosynthesis is the tryptophan-activated RNA-binding attenuation protein, TRAP. TRAP is a ring-shaped molecule composed of 11 identical subunits. Active TRAP binds to unique RNA segments containing multiple trinucleotide (NAG) repeats. Binding regulates both transcription termination and translation in the trp operon, and translation of other coding regions relevant to tryptophan metabolism. When there is a deficiency of charged tRNA(Trp), B. subtilis forms an anti-TRAP protein, AT. AT antagonizes TRAP function, thereby increasing expression of all the genes regulated by TRAP. Thus B. subtilis and Escherichia coli respond to identical regulatory signals, tryptophan and uncharged tRNA(Trp), yet they employ different mechanisms in regulating trp gene expression. PMID:16285852

  19. Spectral and metal-binding properties of three single-point tryptophan mutants of the human transferrin N-lobe.

    PubMed Central

    He, Q Y; Mason, A B; Lyons, B A; Tam, B M; Nguyen, V; MacGillivray, R T; Woodworth, R C

    2001-01-01

    Human serum transferrin N-lobe (hTF/2N) contains three conserved tryptophan residues, Trp(8), Trp(128) and Trp(264), located in three different environments. The present report addresses the different contributions of the three tryptophan residues to the UV-visible, fluorescence and NMR spectra of hTF/2N and the effect of the mutations at each tryptophan residue on the iron-binding properties of the protein. Trp(8) resides in a hydrophobic box containing a cluster of three phenylalanine side chains and is H bonded through the indole N to an adjacent water cluster lying between two beta-sheets containing Trp(8) and Lys(296) respectively. The fluorescence of Trp(8) may be quenched by the benzene rings. The apparent increase in the rate of iron release from the Trp(8)-->Tyr mutant could be due to the interference of the mutation with the H-bond linkage resulting in an effect on the second shell network. The partial quenching in the fluorescence of Trp(128) results from the nearby His(119) residue. Difference-fluorescence spectra reveal that any protein containing Trp(128) shows a blue shift upon binding metal ion, and the NMR signal of Trp(128) broadens out and disappears upon the binding of paramagnetic metals to the protein. These data imply that Trp(128) is a major fluorescent and NMR reporter group for metal binding, and possibly for cleft closure in hTF/2N. Trp(264) is located on the surface of the protein and does not connect to any functional residues. This explains the facts that Trp(264) is the major contributor to both the absorbance and fluorescence spectra, has a strong NMR signal and the mutation at Trp(264) has little effect on the iron-binding and release behaviours of the protein. PMID:11171122

  20. Saturation mutagenesis on Arg244 of the tryptophan C4-prenyltransferase FgaPT2 leads to enhanced catalytic ability and different preferences for tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aili; Li, Shu-Ming

    2016-06-01

    FgaPT2 from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyzes a Friedel-Crafts alkylation at C-4 of L-tryptophan and is involved in the biosynthesis of the ergot alkaloids fumigaclavines. Several tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides had also been prenylated by FgaPT2, but the turnover rate (k cat) was low. Here, we report the generation of FgaPT2 mutants by saturation mutagenesis at the amino acid residue Arg244 to improve its catalytic efficiency toward cyclic dipeptides. Thirteen mutated enzymes demonstrated up to 76-fold higher turnover number toward seven cyclic dipeptides than the non-mutated FgaPT2. More importantly, the mutated enzymes exhibited different preferences toward these substrates. This study provides a convenient approach for creation of new biocatalysts for production of C4-prenylated cyclic dipeptides. PMID:26875876

  1. Guanidinium chloride and urea denaturations of beta-lactoglobulin A at pH 2.0 and 25 degrees C: the equilibrium intermediate contains non-native structures (helix, tryptophan and hydrophobic patches).

    PubMed

    Dar, Tanveer Ali; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar; Islam, Asimul; Anjum, Farah; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ahmad, Faizan

    2007-05-01

    We have carried out guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and urea denaturations of bovine beta-lactoglobulin A (beta-lgA) at pH 2.0 and 25 degrees C, using far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism, near-UV absorption and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopies. The stable intermediate state that occurs during GdmCl denaturation has been characterized by the far- and near-UV circular dichroism, tryptophan difference absorption, tryptophan fluorescence and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulphonic acid binding measurements. Following conclusions have been reached. (a) Urea-induced denaturation is not a two-state process. (b) GdmCl-induced denaturation is composed of two distinct two-state processes. (c) alpha-Helical content, burial of tryptophan residues and burial of hydrophobic surface area are more in the GdmCl-induced stable intermediate than those originally present in the native protein.

  2. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  3. Fluorescence studies with malate dehydrogenase from rhizobium japonicum 3I1B-143 bacteroids: a two-tryptophan containing protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiron, Camillo A.; Eftink, Maurice R.; Waters, James K.; Emerich, David W.

    1990-05-01

    A number of fluorescence studies, both of trp residues and bound NADH, have been reported for porcine MDH. The large number of trp residues (6) complicates the interpretation of some studies. To circumvent this we have performed studies with a two tryptophan (per subunit) MDH from Rhizobium japonicum 311B-143 bacteroids. We have performed phase/modulation fluorescence lifetime measurements, as a function of temperature and added quencher KI, in order to resolved the 1.3 ns (blue) and 6.6 ns (red) contributions from the two classes of trp residues. Anisotropy decay studies have also been performed. The binding of NADH dynamically quenches the fluorescence of both tip residues, but, unlike mammalian cytoplasmic and mitochondrial MDH, there is not a large enhancement in fluorescence of bound NADH upon forming a ternary complex with either tartronic acid or D-malonate.

  4. Environments of the four tryptophans in the extracellular domain of human tissue factor: comparison of results from absorption and fluorescence difference spectra of tryptophan replacement mutants with the crystal structure of the wild-type protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselbacher, C A; Rusinova, E; Waxman, E; Rusinova, R; Kohanski, R A; Lam, W; Guha, A; Du, J; Lin, T C; Polikarpov, I

    1995-01-01

    The local environments of the four tryptophan residues of the extracellular domain of human tissue factor (sTF) were assessed from difference absorption and fluorescence spectra. The difference spectra were derived by subtracting spectra from single Trp-to-Phe or Trp-to-Tyr replacement mutants from the corresponding spectrum of the wild-type protein. Each of the mutants was capable of enhancing the proteolytic activity of factor VIIa showing that the mutations did not introduce major structural changes, although the mutants were more susceptible to denaturation by guanidinium chloride. The difference spectra indicate that the Trp residues are buried to different extents within the protein matrix. This evaluation was compared with the x-ray crystal structure of sTF. There is excellent agreement between predictions from the difference spectra and the environments of the Trp residues observed in the x-ray crystal structure, demonstrating that difference absorption and particularly fluorescence spectra derived from functional single-Trp replacement mutants can be used to obtain information about the local environments of individual Trp residues in multi-tryptophan proteins. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7669897

  5. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  6. Tryptophan metabolism, disposition and utilization in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) requirements in pregnancy are several-fold: (1) the need for increased protein synthesis by mother and for fetal growth and development; (2) serotonin (5-HT) for signalling pathways; (3) kynurenic acid (KA) for neuronal protection; (4) quinolinic acid (QA) for NAD+ synthesis (5) other kynurenines (Ks) for suppressing fetal rejection. These goals could not be achieved if maternal plasma [Trp] is depleted. Although plasma total (free + albumin-bound) Trp is decreased in pregnancy, free Trp is elevated. The above requirements are best expressed in terms of a Trp utilization concept. Briefly, Trp is utilized as follows: (1) In early and mid-pregnancy, emphasis is on increased maternal Trp availability to meet the demand for protein synthesis and fetal development, most probably mediated by maternal liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition by progesterone and oestrogens. (2) In mid- and late pregnancy, Trp availability is maintained and enhanced by the release of albumin-bound Trp by albumin depletion and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) elevation, leading to increased flux of Trp down the K pathway to elevate immunosuppressive Ks. An excessive release of free Trp could undermine pregnancy by abolishing T-cell suppression by Ks. Detailed assessment of parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related measures (free and total Trp, albumin, NEFA, K and its metabolites and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in maternal blood and, where appropriate, placental and fetal material) in normal and abnormal pregnancies may establish missing gaps in our knowledge of the Trp status in pregnancy and help identify appropriate intervention strategies. PMID:26381576

  7. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP

    PubMed Central

    Suckling, Richard J.; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M.; Majoul, Irina V.; Hughson, Frederick M.; Evans, Philip R.; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ’ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1–6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing. PMID:26578768

  8. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Richard J; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M; Majoul, Irina V; Hughson, Frederick M; Evans, Philip R; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J

    2015-11-17

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ'ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1-6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing.

  9. Generic inhibition of amyloidogenic proteins by two naphthoquinone-tryptophan hybrid molecules.

    PubMed

    Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Shaltiel-Karyo, Ronit; Adalist, Yonatan H; Segal, Daniel; Gazit, Ehud

    2012-08-01

    Amyloid formation is associated with several human diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and so forth, no disease modifying therapeutics are available for them. Because of the structural similarities between the amyloid species characterizing these diseases, (despite the lack of amino acid homology) it is believed that there might be a common mechanism of toxicity for these conditions. Thus, inhibition of amyloid formation could be a promising disease-modifying therapeutic strategy for them. Aromatic residues have been identified as crucial in formation and stabilization of amyloid structures. This finding was corroborated by high-resolution structural studies, theoretical analysis, and molecular dynamics simulations. Amongst the aromatic entities, tryptophan was found to possess the most amyloidogenic potential. We therefore postulate that targeting aromatic recognition interfaces by tryptophan could be a useful approach for inhibiting the formation of amyloids. Quinones are known as inhibitors of cellular metabolic pathways, to have anti- cancer, anti-viral and anti-bacterial properties and were shown to inhibit aggregation of several amyloidogenic proteins in vitro. We have previously described two quinone-tryptophan hybrids which are capable of inhibiting amyloid-beta, the protein associated with AD pathology, both in vitro and in vivo. Here we tested their generic properties and their ability to inhibit other amyloidogenic proteins including α-synuclein, islet amyloid polypeptide, lysozyme, calcitonin, and insulin. Both compounds showed efficient inhibition of all five proteins examined both by ThT fluorescence analysis and by electron microscope imaging. If verified in vivo, these small molecules could serve as leads for developing generic anti-amyloid drugs.

  10. Tryptophan-Catabolizing Enzymes – Party of Three

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Helen J.; Jusof, Felicita F.; Bakmiwewa, Supun M.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Yuasa, Hajime J.

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP). The depletion of tryptophan and formation of KP metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive, and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties, and biological functions. This review analyzes the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system. PMID:25346733

  11. Chemically defined media modifications to lower tryptophan oxidation of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hazeltine, Laurie B; Knueven, Kristine M; Zhang, Yan; Lian, Zhirui; Olson, Donald J; Ouyang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of biopharmaceuticals is a major product quality issue with potential impacts on activity and immunogenicity. At Eli Lilly and Company, high tryptophan oxidation was observed for two biopharmaceuticals in development produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. A switch from historical hydrolysate-containing media to chemically defined media with a reformulated basal powder was thought to be responsible, so mitigation efforts focused on media modification. Shake flask studies identified that increasing tryptophan, copper, and manganese and decreasing cysteine concentrations were individual approaches to lower tryptophan oxidation. When amino acid and metal changes were combined, the modified formulation had a synergistic impact that led to substantially less tryptophan oxidation for both biopharmaceuticals. Similar results were achieved in shake flasks and benchtop bioreactors, demonstrating the potential to implement these modifications at manufacturing scale. The modified formulation did not negatively impact cell growth and viability, product titer, purity, charge variants, or glycan profile. A potential mechanism of action is presented for each amino acid or metal factor based on its role in oxidation chemistry. This work served not only to mitigate the tryptophan oxidation issue in two Lilly biopharmaceuticals in development, but also to increase our knowledge and appreciation for the impact of media components on product quality. PMID:26560440

  12. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 in seasonal affective disorder: underestimated perspectives?

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Popova, Nina K

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by recurrent depression occurring generally in fall/winter. Numerous pieces of evidence indicate the association of SAD with decreased brain neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) system functioning. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) is the key and rate-limiting enzyme in 5-HT synthesis in the brain. This paper concentrates on the relationship between TPH2 activity and mood disturbances, the association between human TPH2 gene expression and the risk of affective disorder, application of tryptophan to SAD treatment and the animal models of SAD. The main conclusions of this review are as follows: (i) the brain 5-HT deficiency contributes to the mechanism underlying SAD, (ii) TPH2 is involved in the regulation of some kinds of genetically defined affective disorders and (iii) the activation of 5-HT synthesis with exogenous l-tryptophan alone or in combination with light therapy could be effective in SAD treatment. The synergic effect of these combined treatments will have several advantages compared to light or tryptophan therapy alone. First, it is effective in the treatment of patients resistant to light therapy. Secondly, l-tryptophan treatment prolongs the antidepressant effect of light therapy.

  13. Chemically defined media modifications to lower tryptophan oxidation of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hazeltine, Laurie B; Knueven, Kristine M; Zhang, Yan; Lian, Zhirui; Olson, Donald J; Ouyang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of biopharmaceuticals is a major product quality issue with potential impacts on activity and immunogenicity. At Eli Lilly and Company, high tryptophan oxidation was observed for two biopharmaceuticals in development produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. A switch from historical hydrolysate-containing media to chemically defined media with a reformulated basal powder was thought to be responsible, so mitigation efforts focused on media modification. Shake flask studies identified that increasing tryptophan, copper, and manganese and decreasing cysteine concentrations were individual approaches to lower tryptophan oxidation. When amino acid and metal changes were combined, the modified formulation had a synergistic impact that led to substantially less tryptophan oxidation for both biopharmaceuticals. Similar results were achieved in shake flasks and benchtop bioreactors, demonstrating the potential to implement these modifications at manufacturing scale. The modified formulation did not negatively impact cell growth and viability, product titer, purity, charge variants, or glycan profile. A potential mechanism of action is presented for each amino acid or metal factor based on its role in oxidation chemistry. This work served not only to mitigate the tryptophan oxidation issue in two Lilly biopharmaceuticals in development, but also to increase our knowledge and appreciation for the impact of media components on product quality.

  14. Charged Surfaces and Interfacial Ions.

    PubMed

    Kallay; Zalac

    2000-10-01

    Interfacial charge in a solid/liquid system is due to interactions of ions with surface sites affected by the electrostatic potential that is a consequence of their accumulation. The present theoretical approach is based on the so-called Surface Complexation Model that has several modifications known as either the 1-pK, the 2-pK, or the "MUSIC" model. These models assume different surface reactions and their equilibrium constants, taking into account electrostatic interactions. For that purpose the relationships between potentials affecting the state of interfacial ions and their surface densities need to be known, so that a certain model of the electrical interfacial layer should be introduced. The complexity of the problem results in the use of a variety of different theoretical approaches that cannot be distinguished experimentally. This article discusses several aspects of the problem, such as counterion association, structure of the electrical interfacial layer, potential-charge relationships, surface potentials, the zero charge condition, enthalpy of surface reactions, and the influence of the interfacial ionic equilibrium on the colloid stability. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998282

  15. A Structure‐Guided Switch in the Regioselectivity of a Tryptophan Halogenase

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Sarah A.; Menon, Binuraj R. K.; Fisk, Heidi; Struck, Anna‐Winona; Levy, Colin; Leys, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Flavin‐dependent halogenases are potentially useful biocatalysts for the regioselective halogenation of aromatic compounds. Haloaromatic compounds can be utilised in the synthesis and biosynthesis of pharmaceuticals and other valuable products. Here we report the first X‐ray crystal structure of a tryptophan 6‐halogenase (SttH), which enabled key residues that contribute to the regioselectivity in tryptophan halogenases to be identified. Structure‐guided mutagenesis resulted in a triple mutant (L460F/P461E/P462T) that exhibited a complete switch in regioselectivity; with the substrate 3‐indolepropionate 75 % 5‐chlorination was observed with the mutant in comparison to 90 % 6‐chlorination for the wild‐type SttH. This is the first clear example of how regiocomplementary halogenases can be created from a single parent enzyme. The biocatalytic repertoire of SttH was also expanded to include a range of indolic and non‐indolic substrates. PMID:26840773

  16. [Spatial structure and mechanism of tyrosine phenol-lyase and tryptophan indole-lyase].

    PubMed

    Demidkina, T V; Anston, A A; Faleev, N G; Phillips, R S; Zakomyrdina, L N

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial tyrosine phenol-lyase (EC 4.1.99.2) and tryptoptophan indole-lyase (EC 4.1.99.1) belong to pyridoxal-5'-phosphate dependent beta-eliminating lyases, catalysing the reversible decomposition of L-tyrosine and L-tryptophan to pyruvate, ammonia, and phenol or indole correspondingly. Data on the three dimentional structures of the holoenzymes of tyrosine phenol-lyase and tryptophan indole-lyase and several enzyme-inhibitor complexes, modeling distinct reaction stages of the beta-elimination of L-tyrosine are described in the paper and structural bases of monovalent cations influence of activity of the enzymes are discussed. The spectral and catalytic properties of the mutant enzymes were studied. The data thus obtained have allowed us to elucidate the catalytic functions of a number of amino acid residues and conclude that the acid-base properties of the catalytic groups of the enzymes under the optimal for the catalysis conditions in hydrophobic active sites of tyrosine phenol-lyase and tryptoptophan indol-lyase are different from those in water solutions. Study of the mechanisms of labilization of Calpha-proton of the bound amino acids and activation of the leaving groups of the substrates during the catalytic process has demonstrated that in certain cases concerted reaction pathways are realized instead of stepwise ones. PMID:19425498

  17. Catalytic roles of βLys87 in tryptophan synthase: (15)N solid state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Caulkins, Bethany G; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F; Mueller, Leonard J

    2015-09-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4' for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-¹⁵N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using ¹⁵N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. Guest Editors: Andrea Mozzarelli and Loredano Pollegioni.

  18. Evidence of Energy Transfer from Tryptophan to BSA/HSA Protected Gold Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Butler, Susan; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the chromophores interactions within protein-protected gold nanoclusters. We conducted spectroscopic studies of fluorescence emissions originated from gold nanoclusters and intrinsic tryptophan (Trp) in BSA or HSA proteins. Both, steady state fluorescence and lifetime measurements show a significant Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Trp to the gold nanocluster. Tryptophan lifetimes in the case of protein-protected gold nanoclusters are 2.6ns and 2.3ns for BSA and HSA Au clusters while 5.8ns for native BSA and 5.6 for native HSA. The apparent distances from Trp to gold nanocluster emission center, we estimated as 24.75A0 for BSA and 23.80A0 for HSA. We also studied a potassium iodide (KI) quenching of protein-protected gold nanoclusters and compared with the quenching of BSA and HAS alone. The rates of Trp quenching were smaller in BSA-Au and HSA-Au nanoclusters than in the case of free proteins, which is consistent with shorter lifetime of quenched Trp(s) and lower accessibility for KI. While Trp residues were quenched by KI, the emissions originated from nanoclusters were practically unquenched. In summary, for BSA and HSA Au clusters, we found 55% and 59% energy transfer efficiency respectively from tryoptophan to gold clusters. We believe this interaction can be used to our advantage in terms of developing resonance energy transfer based sensing applications. PMID:26767113

  19. Evidence of energy transfer from tryptophan to BSA/HSA protected gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Butler, Susan; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2014-09-01

    This work reports on the chromophores interactions within protein-protected gold nanoclusters. We conducted spectroscopic studies of fluorescence emissions originated from gold nanoclusters and intrinsic tryptophan (Trp) in BSA or HSA proteins. Both steady state fluorescence and lifetime measurements showed a significant Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from Trp to the gold nanocluster. Tryptophan lifetimes in the case of protein-protected gold nanoclusters are 2.6 ns and 2.3 ns for BSA and HSA Au clusters while 5.8 ns for native BSA and 5.6 for native HSA. The apparent distances from Trp to gold nanocluster emission center, we estimated as 24.75 Å for BSA and 23.80 Å for HSA. We also studied a potassium iodide (KI) quenching of protein-protected gold nanoclusters and compared with the quenching of BSA and HSA alone. The rates of Trp quenching were smaller in BSA-Au and HSA-Au nanoclusters than in the case of free proteins, which is consistent with shorter lifetime of quenched Trp(s) and lower accessibility for KI. While Trp residues were quenched by KI, the emissions originated from nanoclusters were practically unquenched. In summary, for BSA and HSA Au clusters, we found 55% and 59% energy transfer efficiency respectively from tryoptophan to gold clusters. We believe this interaction can be used to our advantage in terms of developing resonance energy transfer based sensing applications.

  20. Fluorescent proteins as biosensors by quenching resonance energy transfer from endogenous tryptophan: detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Alexa; Sarette, Joseph; Shawler, Evan; Lee, Taeyoung; Freund, Steve; Holwitt, Eric; Hicks, Barry W

    2013-10-15

    Ensuring domestic safety from terrorist attack is a daunting challenge because of the wide array of chemical agents that must be screened. A panel of purified fluorescent protein isoforms (FPs) was screened for the ability to detect various explosives, explosive simulants, and toxic agents. In addition to their commonly used visible excitation wavelengths, essentially all FPs can be excited by UV light at 280 nm. Ultraviolet illumination excites electrons in endogenous tryptophan (W) residues, which then relax by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to the chromophore of the FP, and thus the FPs emit with their typical visible spectra. Taking advantage of the fact that tryptophan excitation can be quenched by numerous agents, including nitroaromatics like TNT and nitramines like RDX, it is demonstrated that quenching of visible fluorescence from UV illumination of FPs can be used as the basis for detecting these explosives and explosive degradation products. This work provides the foundation for production of an array of genetically-modified FPs for in vitro biosensors capable of rapid, simultaneous, sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of explosive or toxic agents.

  1. Variable electron transfer pathways in an amphibian cryptochrome: tryptophan versus tyrosine-based radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Biskup, Till; Paulus, Bernd; Okafuji, Asako; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2013-03-29

    Electron transfer reactions play vital roles in many biological processes. Very often the transfer of charge(s) proceeds stepwise over large distances involving several amino acid residues. By using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy, we have studied the mechanism of light-induced reduction of the FAD cofactor of cryptochrome/photolyase family proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that electron abstraction from a nearby amino acid by the excited FAD triggers further electron transfer steps even if the conserved chain of three tryptophans, known to be an effective electron transfer pathway in these proteins, is blocked. Furthermore, we were able to characterize this secondary electron transfer pathway and identify the amino acid partner of the resulting flavin-amino acid radical pair as a tyrosine located at the protein surface. This alternative electron transfer pathway could explain why interrupting the conserved tryptophan triad does not necessarily alter photoreactions of cryptochromes in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that light-induced electron transfer is a robust property of cryptochromes and more intricate than commonly anticipated.

  2. Determination of tryptophan and tryptophan metabolites in grape must and wine.

    PubMed

    Hoenicke, K; Simat, T J; Steinhart, H; Christoph, N; Köhler, H J; Schwab, A

    1999-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) and its metabolites, especially indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), are considered as potential precursors of 2-aminoacetophenone (AAP), an aroma compound which causes the "untypical aging off-flavor" (UTA) in Vitis vinifera white wines. In this study RP-HPLC with fluorescence detection was used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of Trp and Trp-metabolites in 39 grapes, 22 grape musts and 16 wines, to which different viticultural conditions (ripeness, pruning, strip of leaves, soil condition) have been applied. A sensitive and selective determination was achieved after solid phase extraction using an anion exchange material. Only traces of Trp-metabolites could be determined in the examined grapes and grape musts, but their amounts increased significantly during fermentation, whereas the amount of Trp decreased. Different viticultural measures, besides the time of grape harvest, showed no significant influences on the amount of Trp and Trp-metabolites.

  3. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 regulates immune tolerance and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Elizabeth C; de Vries, Victor C; Wasiuk, Anna; Ahonen, Cory; Bennett, Kathryn A; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Ha, Dae-Gon; Noelle, Randolph J

    2012-10-22

    Nutrient deprivation based on the loss of essential amino acids by catabolic enzymes in the microenvironment is a critical means to control inflammatory responses and immune tolerance. Here we report the novel finding that Tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase-1), a synthase which catalyses the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin and exhausts tryptophan, is a potent regulator of immunity. In models of skin allograft tolerance, tumor growth, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Tph-1 deficiency breaks allograft tolerance, induces tumor remission, and intensifies neuroinflammation, respectively. All of these effects of Tph-1 deficiency are independent of its downstream product serotonin. Because mast cells (MCs) appear to be the major source of Tph-1 and restoration of Tph-1 in the MC compartment in vivo compensates for the defect, these experiments introduce a fundamentally new mechanism of MC-mediated immune suppression that broadly impacts multiple arms of immunity. PMID:23008335

  4. Tryptophan Supplementation and Postoperative Delirium – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Thomas N.; Dunn, Christina L.; Adams, Jill C.; Hawkins, Carrie L.; Tran, Zung V.; Raeburn, Christopher D.; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Tryptophan deficiency has been associated with increased incidence of postoperative delirium. Therefore, we hypothesized that the post-operative administration of tryptophan would be beneficial for elderly surgical patients who are at higher risk of developing post-operative delirium. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Setting: Participants A total of 325 individuals aged 60 years and older undergoing major elective operations requiring a postoperative intensive care unit admission. Intervention L-tryptophan, 1 gram orally, three times daily or placebo was started following the operation and continued for up to three days postoperatively. Measurements Delirium and its motor subtypes were measured using the Confusion Assessment Method-ICU and the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale. The primary outcome for between groups comparison was the incidence of excitatory (mixed and hyperactive) postoperative delirium. The secondary outcomes for comparison were the incidence and duration of overall postoperative delirium. Results The overall incidence of postoperative delirium was 39% (116) (95% confidence interval 34% to 44%). The percentages of patients with excitatory delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups were 17% and 9% (p=0.176), and the duration of excitatory delirium was 3.3±1.7 and 3.1±1.9 days (p=0.741). The percentage of patients with overall delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups was 40% and 37% (p=0.597), and the duration of overall delirium was 2.9±1.8 and 2.4±1.6 days (p=0.167). Conclusion Postoperative tryptophan supplementation in older adults undergoing major elective operations requiring postoperative intensive care unit admission demonstrated no efficacy in reducing the incidence of postoperative excitatory delirium or overall delirium, and the duration of excitatory or overall delirium. PMID:25112175

  5. Maintenance valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan requirements for poultry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M B; Sakomura, N K; Dorigam, J C P; da Silva, E P; Ferreira, N T; Fernandes, J B K

    2016-04-01

    Poultry maintenance requirements for valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan were measured by nitrogen balance using different unit systems. The nitrogen balance trial lasted 5 d with 48 h of fasting (with roosters receiving only water+sucrose) and the last 72 h for feeding and excreta collection. Forty grams of each diet first-limiting in valine, isoleucine, or tryptophan was fed by tube each day (3 d) to give a range of intakes from 0 to 101, 0 to 119, and 0 to 34 mg/kg BW d of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan, respectively. A nitrogen-free diet containing energy, vitamins, and minerals, meeting the rooster requirements, was offered ad libitum during these three d. To confirm that the amino acids studied were limiting, a treatment was added with a control diet formulated by adding 0.24 g/kg of L-valine, 0.21 g/kg of L-isoleucine, and 0.10 g/kg of L-tryptophan to the diets with lower amino acid level. Excreta were collected during the last 3 d of the balance period and the nitrogen content of the excreta was analyzed. For each amino acid, a linear regression between nitrogen retention (NR) and amino acid intake was performed. The equations from linear regression were: NR=-98.6 (±10.1)+2.4 (±0.2)×Val, NR=-46.9 (±7.1)+2.3 (±0.1)×Ile, NR=-39.5 (±7.7)+7.3 (±0.4)×Trp; where Val, Ile, and Trp are the intakes of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan in mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. The valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required to maintain the body at zero NR were calculated to be 41, 20, and 5 mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. For the system unit mg per kg of metabolic weight, the intake of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was 59, 32, and 9, respectively. Considering the degree of maturity of the animal and body protein content (BPm (0.73)×u), the amounts of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required for maintenance were calculated to be 247, 134, and 37 mg per unit of maintenance protein (BPm (0.73)×u) per d. Maintenance requirement is more

  6. Heme-containing dioxygenases involved in tryptophan oxidation.

    PubMed

    Millett, Elizabeth S; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Handa, Sandeep; Mowat, Christopher G; Raven, Emma Lloyd

    2012-04-01

    Heme iron is often used in biology for activation of oxygen. The mechanisms of oxygen activation by heme-containing monooxygenases (the cytochrome P450s) are well known, and involve formation of a Compound I species, but information on the heme-containing dioxygenase enzymes involved in tryptophan oxidation lags far behind. In this review, we gather together information emerging recently from structural, mechanistic, spectroscopic, and computational approaches on the heme dioxygenase enzymes involved in tryptophan oxidation. We explore the subtleties that differentiate various heme enzymes from each other, and use this to piece together a developing picture for oxygen activation in this particular class of heme-containing dioxygenases.

  7. Dynamic behavior in mathematical models of the tryptophan operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    This paper surveys the general theory of operon regulation as first formulated by Goodwin and Griffith, and then goes on to consider in detail models of regulation of tryptophan production by Bliss, Sinha, and Santillán and Mackey, and the interrelationships between them. We further give a linear stability analysis of the Santillán and Mackey model for wild type E. coli as well as three different mutant strains that have been previously studied in the literature. This stability analysis indicates that the tryptophan production systems should be stable, which is in accord with our numerical results.

  8. Maintenance valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan requirements for poultry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M B; Sakomura, N K; Dorigam, J C P; da Silva, E P; Ferreira, N T; Fernandes, J B K

    2016-04-01

    Poultry maintenance requirements for valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan were measured by nitrogen balance using different unit systems. The nitrogen balance trial lasted 5 d with 48 h of fasting (with roosters receiving only water+sucrose) and the last 72 h for feeding and excreta collection. Forty grams of each diet first-limiting in valine, isoleucine, or tryptophan was fed by tube each day (3 d) to give a range of intakes from 0 to 101, 0 to 119, and 0 to 34 mg/kg BW d of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan, respectively. A nitrogen-free diet containing energy, vitamins, and minerals, meeting the rooster requirements, was offered ad libitum during these three d. To confirm that the amino acids studied were limiting, a treatment was added with a control diet formulated by adding 0.24 g/kg of L-valine, 0.21 g/kg of L-isoleucine, and 0.10 g/kg of L-tryptophan to the diets with lower amino acid level. Excreta were collected during the last 3 d of the balance period and the nitrogen content of the excreta was analyzed. For each amino acid, a linear regression between nitrogen retention (NR) and amino acid intake was performed. The equations from linear regression were: NR=-98.6 (±10.1)+2.4 (±0.2)×Val, NR=-46.9 (±7.1)+2.3 (±0.1)×Ile, NR=-39.5 (±7.7)+7.3 (±0.4)×Trp; where Val, Ile, and Trp are the intakes of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan in mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. The valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required to maintain the body at zero NR were calculated to be 41, 20, and 5 mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. For the system unit mg per kg of metabolic weight, the intake of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was 59, 32, and 9, respectively. Considering the degree of maturity of the animal and body protein content (BPm (0.73)×u), the amounts of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required for maintenance were calculated to be 247, 134, and 37 mg per unit of maintenance protein (BPm (0.73)×u) per d. Maintenance requirement is more

  9. Molecular basis of alpha-methyltryptophan resistance in amt-1, a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, J A; Ponappa, T; Dong, W; Town, C D

    1996-01-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, amt-1, was previously selected for resistance to growth inhibition by the tryptophan analog alpha-methyltryptophan. This mutant had elevated tryptophan levels and exhibited higher anthranilate synthase (AS) activity that showed increased resistance to feedback inhibition by tryptophan. In this study, extracts of the mutant callus exhibited higher AS activity than wild-type callus when assayed with either glutamine or ammonium sulfate as amino donor, thus suggesting that elevated AS activity in the mutant was due to an alteration in the alpha subunit of the enzyme. The mutant also showed cross-resistance to 5-methylanthranilate and 6-methylanthranilate and mapped to chromosome V at or close to ASA1 (a gene encoding the AS alpha subunit). ASA1 mRNA and protein levels were similar in mutant and wild-type leaf extracts. Levels of ASA1 mRNA and protein were also similar in callus cultures of mutant and wild type, although the levels in callus were higher than in leaf tissue. Sequencing of the ASA1 gene from amt-1 revealed a G to A transition relative to the wild-type gene that would result in the substitution of an asparagine residue in place of aspartic acid at position 341 in the predicted amino acid sequence of the ASA1 protein. The mutant allele in strain amt-1 has been renamed trp5-1. PMID:8934623

  10. Molecular basis for catalysis and substrate-mediated cellular stabilization of human tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Forouhar, Farhad; Kim, Sung-Mi; Lew, Scott; Wang, YongQiang; Karkashon, Shay; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Hussain, Munif; Correia, Maria Almira; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) play a central role in tryptophan metabolism and are involved in many cellular and disease processes. Here we report the crystal structure of human TDO (hTDO) in a ternary complex with the substrates L-Trp and O2 and in a binary complex with the product N-formylkynurenine (NFK), defining for the first time the binding modes of both substrates and the product of this enzyme. The structure indicates that the dioxygenation reaction is initiated by a direct attack of O2 on the C2 atom of the L-Trp indole ring. The structure also reveals an exo binding site for L-Trp, located ~42 Å from the active site and formed by residues conserved among tryptophan-auxotrophic TDOs. Biochemical and cellular studies indicate that Trp binding at this exo site does not affect enzyme catalysis but instead it retards the degradation of hTDO through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal pathway. This exo site may therefore provide a novel L-Trp-mediated regulation mechanism for cellular degradation of hTDO, which may have important implications in human diseases. PMID:27762317

  11. Physiological studies of tryptophan transport and tryptophanase operon induction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yanofsky, C; Horn, V; Gollnick, P

    1991-10-01

    Escherichia coli forms three permeases that can transport the amino acid tryptophan: Mtr, AroP, and TnaB. The structural genes for these permeases reside in separate operons that are subject to different mechanisms of regulation. We have exploited the fact that the tryptophanase (tna) operon is induced by tryptophan to infer how tryptophan transport is influenced by the growth medium and by mutations that inactivate each of the permease proteins. In an acid-hydrolyzed casein medium, high levels of tryptophan are ordinarily required to obtain maximum tna operon induction. High levels are necessary because much of the added tryptophan is degraded by tryptophanase. An alternate inducer that is poorly cleaved by tryptophanase, 1-methyltryptophan, induces efficiently at low concentrations in both tna+ strains and tna mutants. In an acid-hydrolyzed casein medium, the TnaB permease is most critical for tryptophan uptake; i.e., only mutations in tnaB reduce tryptophanase induction. However, when 1-methyltryptophan replaces tryptophan as the inducer in this medium, mutations in both mtr and tnaB are required to prevent maximum induction. In this medium, AroP does not contribute to tryptophan uptake. However, in a medium lacking phenylalanine and tyrosine the AroP permease is active in tryptophan transport; under these conditions it is necessary to inactivate the three permeases to eliminate tna operon induction. The Mtr permease is principally responsible for transporting indole, the degradation product of tryptophan produced by tryptophanase action. The TnaB permease is essential for growth on tryptophan as the sole carbon source. When cells with high levels of tryptophanase are transferred to tryptophan-free growth medium, the expression of the tryptophan (trp) operon is elevated. This observation suggests that the tryptophanase present in these cells degrades some of the synthesized tryptophan, thereby creating a mild tryptophan deficiency. Our studies assign roles to

  12. Tryptophan boost caused by senescence occurred independently of cytoplasmic glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kang, Kiyoon; Kim, Young Soon; Lee, Sungbeom; Kweon, Soon-Jong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2010-01-01

    We examined to determine whether senescence-induced tryptophan levels are positively associated with levels of glutamine synthetase (GS1), the initial enzyme in tryptophan biosynthesis. We generated transgenic rice plants in which GS1 was suppressed by RNA interference technology. The transgenic line showed a dramatic decrease in GS1 protein and glutamine content, but the levels of tryptophan and mRNA of the key tryptophan biosynthetic genes upon senescence were comparable to those of the wild type.

  13. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  14. A Unique Tryptophan C-Prenyltransferase from the Kawaguchipeptin Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Anirudra; Kwak, Daniel H; Dalponte, Luca; Leikoski, Niina; Galica, Tomas; Umeobika, Ugochukwu; Trembleau, Laurent; Bent, Andrew; Sivonen, Kaarina; Wahlsten, Matti; Wang, Hao; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Naismith, James; Jaspars, Marcel; Liu, Xinyu; Houssen, Wael; Fewer, David Peter

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobactins are a rapidly growing family of linear and cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Kawaguchipeptins A and B, two macrocyclic undecapeptides reported earlier from Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-88, are shown to be products of the cyanobactin biosynthetic pathway. The 9 kb kawaguchipeptin (kgp) gene cluster was identified in a 5.26 Mb draft genome of Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-88. We verified that this gene cluster is responsible for the production of the kawaguchipeptins through heterologous expression of the kgp gene cluster in Escherichia coli. The KgpF prenyltransferase was overexpressed and was shown to prenylate C-3 of Trp residues in both linear and cyclic peptides in vitro. Our findings serve to further enhance the structural diversity of cyanobactins to include tryptophan-prenylated cyclic peptides. PMID:26846478

  15. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with (/sup 3/H)-NaBH/sub 4/, and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P.

  16. Interfacial rheology in complex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Hudson, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Multiphase liquid systems are omnipresent in and essential to everyday life, e.g. foods, pharmaceutics, cosmetics, paints, oil recovery, etc. The morphology and stability of such systems depend on dynamic interfacial properties and processes. Typical methods utilized to measure such interfacial properties often employ drops that are much larger and flows that are much simpler than those encountered in typical processing applications. A microfluidic approach is utilized to measure dynamic structure and kinetics in multiphase systems with drop sizes comparable to those encountered in applications and flow complexity that is easily adjustable. The internal circulation and deformation of an aqueous droplet in clear mineral oil is measured using particle tracers and a detailed shape analysis, which is capable of measuring sub-micron deviations in drop shape. Deformation dynamics, detailed drop shape, interfacial tension, and internal circulation patterns and velocities are measured in Poiseuille and transient elongational flows. Flow kinematics are adjusted by varying the microchannel geometry, relative drop size, and drop height. The effects of confinement on interfacial dynamics and circulation patterns and velocities are also explored.

  17. Evaluation of the interfacial mechanical properties in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Wereszczak, A.A.; Riester, L.; Lowden, R.A.; Chawla, K.K.

    1993-06-01

    The present study examined the application of a micro-indentation technique to the measurement of interfacial properties in fiber reinforced ceramic composites. Specific fiber/matrix systems included SiC/glass, SiC/macro-defect-free (MDF) cement, SiC/SiC, and mullite/glass. The effect of fiber coatings upon the interfacial properties was also investigated. These properties, which included the debond strength, interfacial shear stress, and residual axial fiber stress, were evaluated by measuring the force-displacement curves generated during load-unload cycles. Estimates of these three stress values were obtained by matching the experimental force-displacement curves with data predicted from an existing model. In general the SiC/glass composites exhibited the lowest values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses. The sliding characteristics of the SiC/MDF cement and SiC/SiC composites were strongly influenced by the residual axial stress and the nature of the fiber coating. In the case of the mullite/glass composite, the high values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses reduced the measurement sensitivity, thereby increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of the interfacial properties. 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab.

  18. Application of Time-Resolved Tryptophan Phosphorescence Spectroscopy to Protein Folding Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vinod

    This thesis presents studies of the protein folding problem, one of the most significant questions in contemporary biophysics. Sensitive biophysical techniques, including room temperature tryptophan phosphorescence, which reports on the local environment of the residue, and the lability of proteins to denaturation, a global parameter, were used to assess the validity of the traditional assumption that the biologically active state of a protein is the 'native' state, and to determine whether the pathways of folding in vitro lead to the folded state achieved in vivo. Phosphorescence techniques have also been extended to study, for the first time, emission from tryptophan residues engineered into specific positions as reporters of protein structure. During in vitro refolding of E. coli alkaline phosphatase and bovine 13-lactoglobulin, significant differences were found between the refolded proteins and the native conformations, which have no apparent effect on the biological functions. Slow conformational transitions, termed 'annealing,' that occur long after the return of enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase are manifested in the retarded recovery of phosphorescence intensity, lifetime, and protein lability. While 'annealing' is not observed for beta -lactoglobulin, both phosphorescence and lability experiments reveal changes in the structure of the refolded protein, even though its biological activity, retinol binding, is fully recovered. This result suggests that the pathways of folding in vitro need not lead to the structure formed in vivo. We have used phosphorescence techniques to study the refolding of ribonuclease T1, which exhibits slow kinetics characteristic of proline isomerization. Furthermore, the ability to extract structural information from phosphorescent tryptophan probes engineered into selected regions represents an important advance in studying protein structure; we have reported the first such results from a mutant staphylococcal nuclease. The

  19. Could supplementary dietary tryptophan and taurine prevent epileptic seizures?

    PubMed

    Maurizi, C P

    1985-12-01

    Roles for melatonin, taurine, and the pineal gland in epilepsy are examined. Cerebrospinal fluid melatonin and taurine may be natural anticonvulsants. The flow of cerebrospinal fluid may bathe the medial and lateral geniculate ganglia and the superior and inferior colliculli with these anticonvulsant substances. Supplemental dietary taurine and tryptophan could be of value in the treatment and prevention of seizures.

  20. Modeling operon dynamics: the tryptophan and lactose operons as paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Michael C; Santillán, Moisés; Yildirim, Necmettin

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the regulation of gene control networks and their ensuing dynamics will be a critical component in the understanding of the mountain of genomic data being currently collected. This paper reviews recent mathematical modeling work on the tryptophan and lactose operons which are, respectively, the classical paradigms for repressible and inducible operons. PMID:15127892

  1. Association between Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Polymorphism and Completed Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fudalej, Sylwia; Ilgen, Mark; Fudalej, Marcin; Kostrzewa, Grazyna; Barry, Kristen; Wojnar, Marcin; Krajewski, Pawel; Blow, Frederic; Ploski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    The association between suicide and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1386483) was examined in the recently identified tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene. Blood samples of 143 suicide victims and 162 age- and sex-matched controls were examined. The frequency of the TT genotype in the TPH2 polymorphism was higher in suicide victims than in…

  2. Elevated tryptophan levels in post-withdrawal alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Farren, C K; Dinan, T G

    1996-12-01

    Changes in serotonin function and disturbances in tryptophan availability have been implicated in many psychiatric disorders, including alcoholism. In the present study we took serum free tryptophan samples from 31 healthy volunteer controls and from 42 DSM-III-R alcohol-dependent subjects who had abstained from alcohol for at least 2.5 weeks (range 2.5-104 weeks). We also measured the basal serum cortisol level at 09.00 hours for the same subjects and controls. There was a significant increase in the serum tryptophan level of the alcoholic subjects, by 43.7 mumol l-1 (range 29-63 mumol l-1), regardless of age of onset of alcoholism, family history of alcoholism or sociopathic traits, compared to the controls (33.0 mumol l-1, range 19-60 mumol l-1). There was also an increase in the basal serum cortisol level in the alcoholic subjects compared to the controls, but this was not related to the increase in tryptophan levels. These findings indicate a disturbance in serotonin precursor availability in post-withdrawal alcoholics, and contribute to the evidence for involvement of the serotonin system in alcoholism. PMID:9021001

  3. L-tryptophan in neuropsychiatric disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1992-01-01

    Animal data indicate that serotonin (5-HT) is a major neurotransmitter involved in the control of numerous central nervous system functions including mood, aggression, pain, anxiety, sleep, memory, eating behavior, addictive behavior, temperature control, endocrine regulation, and motor behavior. Moreover, there is evidence that abnormalities of 5-HT functions are related to the pathophysiology of diverse neurological conditions including Parkinson's disease, tardive dyskinesia, akathisia, dystonia, Huntington's disease, familial tremor, restless legs syndrome, myoclonus, Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome, multiple sclerosis, sleep disorders, and dementia. The psychiatric disorders of schizophrenia, mania, depression, aggressive and self-injurious behavior, obsessive compulsive disorder, seasonal affective disorder, substance abuse, hypersexuality, anxiety disorders, bulimia, childhood hyperactivity, and behavioral disorders in geriatric patients have been linked to impaired central 5-HT functions. Tryptophan, the natural amino acid precursor in 5-HT biosynthesis, increases 5-HT synthesis in the brain and, therefore, may stimulate 5-HT release and function. Since it is a natural constituent of the diet, tryptophan should have low toxicity and produce few side effects. Based on these advantages, dietary tryptophan supplementation has been used in the management of neuropsychiatric disorders with variable success. This review summarizes current clinical use of tryptophan supplementation in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Optimal Dynamic Discrimination in Tryptophan-Containing Dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonina, S.; Nenadl, O.; Rondi, A.; Kiselev, D.; Extermann, J.; Bonacina, L.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2013-03-01

    Optimal Dynamic Discrimination based on the phase-shaping of deep ultraviolet femtosecond pulses was applied to selectively modulate the time-resolved fluorescence depletion of pairs of tryptophan-containing dipeptides. Our results indicate that phase-sensitive excitation allows their differential identification, beyond the limits of linear and time-resolved spectroscopy.

  5. Formation and Characterization of Marigranules from Tryptophan and Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Yoko

    1984-12-01

    We found that molecular oxygen and aromatic amino acids such as tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine were essential for the formation of marigranules. Among aromatic amino acids, tryptophan gave the best yield of marigranules. Among indole derivatives, kynurenine gave the best yield of marigranules. Large marigranules (0.3 3 μm in diameter) were formed from tryptophan in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+, and small marigranules (0.2 0.6 μm in diameter) were produced in the absence of such divalent metal ions. Marigranules formed from tryptophan were partially solubilized with methanol and completely solubilized with dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl-formamide. The solubilized marigranules consisted of polymers with molecular weights of 2×103 and 105 107 daltons. The methanol-soluble fraction provided well-defined vesicles upon sonication. Marigranule-like particles were formed from D,L-glyceraldehyde, D-erythrose and D-ribose but they were not formed from glycolaldehyde, L-arabinose and D-glucose. Among sugars, D-erythrose gave the best yield of the particles.

  6. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  7. The tryptophan repressor sequence is highly conserved among the Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, D N; Arvidson, C G; Lawson, C L; Miner, J; Adams, C; Youderian, P

    1994-01-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is regulated by the product of the trpR gene, the tryptophan (Trp) repressor. Trp aporepressor binds the corepressor, L-tryptophan, to form a holorepressor complex, which binds trp operator DNA tightly, and inhibits transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon. The conservation of trp operator sequences among enteric Gram-negative bacteria suggests that trpR genes from other bacterial species can be cloned by complementation in E. coli. To clone trpR homologues, a deletion of the E. coli trpR gene, delta trpR504, was made on a plasmid by site-directed mutagenesis, then crossed onto the E. coli genome. Plasmid clones of the trpR genes of Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated by complementation of the delta trpR504 allele, scored as the ability to repress beta-galactosidase synthesis from a prophage-borne trpE-lacZ gene fusion. The predicted amino acid sequences of four enteric TrpR proteins show differences, clustered on the backside of the folded repressor, opposite the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix substructures. These differences are predicted to have little effect on the interactions of the aporepressor with tryptophan, holorepressor with operator DNA, or tandemly bound holorepressor dimers with one another. Although there is some variation observed at the dimer interface, interactions predicted to stabilize the interface are conserved. The phylogenetic relationships revealed by the TrpR amino acid sequence alignment agree with the results of others. PMID:8208606

  8. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  9. Xanthine oxidase-mediated denitrosation of N-nitroso-tryptophan by superoxide and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Viles, Kimberley; Mathai, Clinton; Jourd'heuil, Frances L; Jourd'heuil, David

    2013-01-15

    Recent studies indicate the formation of protein nitrosamines in vivo and tryptophan residues in proteins might represent important targets of nitrosative and oxidative stress. In the present work, we examined the mechanism by which xanthine oxidase (XO) denitrosates N-nitroso Trp residues and determined the applicability of the reactions involved to the detection of nitrosated Trp residues by tri-iodide-based chemiluminescence. We found that - in addition to superoxide - denitrosation of N-acetyl-nitroso Trp (NANT) by hypoxanthine and XO occurred via the intermediacy of uric acid. Zero-order dependence of NANT decay rate with uric acid was achieved with increasing concentrations of uric acid (k(0)∼6.0×10(-4)s(-1)) and generated nitric oxide. In contrast, S-nitrosoglutathione and nitrosyl-myoglobin were stable in the presence of uric acid. NANT decomposition by uric acid could be reproducibly measured using the tri-iodide-based chemiluminescence assay in the presence of excess nitrite upon pre-treatment with acidified sulfanilamide. N-nitrosated albumin was sensitive to uric acid-induced decomposition only after proteolytic degradation. In conclusion, XO decomposes nitrosated Trp through superoxide and uric acid pathways and in the case of uric acid generates free nitric oxide. Site-specificity of this reaction may possibly be used in combination with the tri-iodide-based chemiluminescence assay to discern between nitrosated Trp, S-nitrosothiols, and nitrosylated heme proteins. PMID:23099296

  10. Hole hopping through tyrosine/tryptophan chains protects proteins from oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms have adapted to atmospheric dioxygen by exploiting its oxidizing power while protecting themselves against toxic side effects. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formed during oxidative stress, as well as high-potential reactive intermediates formed during enzymatic catalysis, could rapidly and irreversibly damage polypeptides were protective mechanisms not available. Chains of redox-active tyrosine and tryptophan residues can transport potentially damaging oxidizing equivalents (holes) away from fragile active sites and toward protein surfaces where they can be scavenged by cellular reductants. Precise positioning of these chains is required to provide effective protection without inhibiting normal function. A search of the structural database reveals that about one third of all proteins contain Tyr/Trp chains composed of three or more residues. Although these chains are distributed among all enzyme classes, they appear with greatest frequency in the oxidoreductases and hydrolases. Consistent with a redox-protective role, approximately half of the dioxygen-using oxidoreductases have Tyr/Trp chain lengths ≥3 residues. Among the hydrolases, long Tyr/Trp chains appear almost exclusively in the glycoside hydrolases. These chains likely are important for substrate binding and positioning, but a secondary redox role also is a possibility. PMID:26195784

  11. Inhibition of Escherichia coli tryptophan indole-lyase by tryptophan homologues.

    PubMed

    Do, Quang T; Nguyen, Giang T; Celis, Victor; Phillips, Robert S

    2014-10-15

    We have designed, synthesized and evaluated homotryptophan analogues as possible mechanism-based inhibitors for Escherichia coli tryptophan indole-lyase (tryptophanase, TIL, E.C. 4.1.99.1). As a quinonoid structure is an intermediate in the reaction mechanism of TIL, we anticipated that homologation of the physiological substrate, L-Trp would provide analogues resembling the transition state for β-elimination, and potentially inhibit TIL. Our results demonstrate that L-homotryptophan (1a) is a moderate competitive inhibitor of TIL, with Ki=67 μM, whereas L-bishomotryptophan (1b) displays more potent inhibition, with Ki=4.7 μM. Pre-steady-state kinetics indicated the formation of an external aldimine and quinonoid with 1a, but only the formation of an external aldimine for 1b, suggesting differences in the inhibition mechanism. These results demonstrate that formation of a quinonoid complex is not required for strong inhibition. In addition, the Trp analogues were evaluated as inhibitors of Salmonella typhimurium Trp synthase. Our results indicate that compound 1b is at least 25-fold more selective toward TIL than Trp synthase. We report that compound 1b is comparable to the most potent inhibitor previously reported, while displaying high selectivity for TIL. Thus, 1b is a potential lead for the development of novel antibacterials.

  12. Tryptophan Metabolism in Rat Liver After Administration of Tryptophan, Kynurenine Metabolites, and Kynureninase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.; Bano, Samina

    2016-01-01

    Rat liver tryptophan (Trp), kynurenine pathway metabolites, and enzymes deduced from product/substrate ratios were assessed following acute and/or chronic administration of kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA), Trp, and the kynureni-nase inhibitors benserazide (BSZ) and carbidopa (CBD). KA activated Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), possibly by increasing liver 3-HAA, but inhibited kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) and kynureninase activities with 3-HK as substrate. 3-HK inhibited kynureninase activity from 3-HK. 3-HAA stimulated TDO, but inhibited kynureninase activity from K and 3-HK. Trp (50 mg/kg) increased kynurenine metabolite concentrations and KAT from K, and exerted a temporary stimulation of TDO. The kynureninase inhibitors BSZ and CBD also inhibited KAT, but stimulated TDO. BSZ abolished or strongly inhibited the Trp-induced increases in liver Trp and kynurenine metabolites. The potential effects of these changes in conditions of immune activation, schizophrenia, and other disease states are discussed. PMID:27547037

  13. L-Tryptophan prevents Escherichia coli biofilm formation and triggers biofilm degradation.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Junji; Furukawa, Soichi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2012-03-23

    The effect of deletion of trp operon and tna operon on the Escherichia coli biofilm formation was investigated in order to elucidate the role of L-tryptophan metabolism in biofilm formation. trp operon deletion mutants ΔtrpC, ΔtrpD and ΔtrpE deficient in L-tryptophan biosynthesis showed higher biofilm formation. In addition, ΔtnaC with increased L-tryptophan degradation activity showed higher biofilm formation. On the contrary, ΔtnaA deletion mutant which lost L-tryptophan degradation activity showed low biofilm formation. From these results, it was suggested that decrease of intracellular L-tryptophan level induced biofilm formation and increase of L-tryptophan repressed biofilm formation. So the effect of the addition of L-tryptophan to the medium on the E. coli biofilm formation was investigated. L-Tryptophan addition at starting culture decreased biofilm formation and furthermore L-tryptophan addition after 16 h culture induced the degradation of preformed biofilm. From the above results, it was suggested that maintenance of high intracellular L-tryptophan concentration prevents E. coli biofilm formation and elevation of intracellular L-tryptophan concentration triggers degradation of matured biofilm. PMID:22386992

  14. Solvent effects on thiamin-enzyme model interactions. I. Interactions with tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Farzami, B; Mariam, Y H; Jordan, F

    1977-03-22

    The solvent polarity dependence of the interaction between thiamin and tryptophan was studied by spectrophotometric methods. The ultraviolet (UV) data clearly indicate that the interaction is weakened when the complex is transferred from water to aqueous ethanol or aqueous dioxane. The interaction of thiamin and tryptophan could also be detected by fluorescence-quenching studies (excitation of tryptophan at 287 nm, maximum emission at 348 nm). Appropriate treatment of the quenching data allowed dissection into static and dynamic contributions. A pyrimidine derivative related to thiamin, both in its neutral and protonated states, was shown to interact with tryptophan by fluorescence techniques, but not by UV. A thiazolium model was shown to interact with tryptophan by UV but was an inefficient quencher of the tryptophan fluorescence. Theoretical models are presented to explain the solvent dielectric constant dependence of the association constant between tryptophan and thiamin. Both electrostatic and dispersion forces are found to contribute to the stability of the complex.

  15. Characterization of cyclo-Acetoacetyl-L-Tryptophan Dimethylallyltransferase in Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis: Substrate Promiscuity and Site Directed Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2009-01-01

    The fungal neurotoxin α-cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a nanomolar inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase with a unique pentacyclic indole tetramic acid scaffold is assembled by a three enzyme pathway CpaS, CpaD and CpaO in Aspergillus sp. We recently characterized the first pathway-specific enzyme CpaS, a hybrid two module polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) that generates cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan (cAATrp). Here we report the characterization of the second pathway-specific enzyme CpaD that regiospecifically dimethylallylates cAATrp to form β-cyclopiazonic acid. By exploring the tryptophan and tetramate moieties of cAATrp, we demonstrate that CpaD discriminates against free Trp but accepts tryptophan-containing thiohydantoins, diketopiperazines and linear peptides as substrates for C4-prenylation and also acts as regiospecific O-dimethylallyltransferase (DMAT) on a tyrosine-derived tetramic acid. Comparative evaluation of CpaDs from A. oryzae RIB40 and A. flavus NRRL3357 indicated the importance of the N-terminal region for its activity. Sequence alignment of CpaD with eleven homologous fungal Trp-DMATs revealed five regions of conservation suggesting the presense of critical motifs that could be diagonostic for discovering additional Trp-DMATs. Subsequent site-directed mutagenesis studies identified five polar/charged residues and five tyrosine residues within these motifs that are critical for CpaD activity. This motif characerization will enable a gene probe-based approach to discover additional biosynthetic Trp-DMATs. PMID:19877600

  16. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  17. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  18. Increased serum free tryptophan in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christmas, David M; Badawy, Abdulla A-B; Hince, Dana; Davies, Simon J C; Probert, Christopher; Creed, Tom; Smithson, John; Afzal, Muhammad; Nutt, David J; Potokar, John P

    2010-10-01

    Irregularities of serotonin function in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be due to changes in the metabolism of the serotonin precursor l-tryptophan. Dietary alteration of tryptophan intake may impact upon the mood and bowel symptoms of IBS. We hypothesized that diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (d-IBS) patients would exhibit an increase in plasma tryptophan due to alterations in tryptophan metabolism. We also hypothesized that a diet low in tryptophan would reverse this change and reduce symptoms. Thirteen patients with d-IBS had fasting serum free and total tryptophan, large neutral amino acids, and 6 kynurenine metabolites measured before and after 2 weeks of a strict dairy-free diet. Baseline tryptophan parameters were compared with an age- and sex-matched control group. Changes in the specific tryptophan parameters before and after dairy-free diet were correlated with symptoms of IBS and mood. Compared with the control group, d-IBS patients at baseline exhibited significantly higher free serum tryptophan (10.5 ± 4.35 vs 4.75 ± 2.43 μmol/L [means ± standard deviation], P = .006) and significantly lower tryptophan dioxygenase and total tryptophan oxidation as measured by the kynurenine to free tryptophan and total kynurenines to free tryptophan ratios (23.37 ± 10.12 vs 55.33 ± 16.02, P < .001 and 49.34 ± 17.84 vs 258.46 ± 98.67, P < .001, respectively). Dairy-free diet did not modulate metabolites of the kynurenine pathway or symptoms. Tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway is inhibited in d-IBS, and a dairy-free diet does not alter this. Our findings are consistent with possible enhanced serotonin activity in d-IBS.

  19. Interfacial sliding stress in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN fibrous monoliths.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Goretta, K. C.; Richardson,, J. W., Jr.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Energy Technology; Univ. de Sevilla

    2002-05-24

    Pushout tests of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cells in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN fibrous monoliths yielded values for debond and sliding stresses of 45{+-}8 and 25{+-}7 MPa, respectively. The sliding stress was consistent with estimates of residual stresses and the interfacial friction coefficient.

  20. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Scot P; Rueden, Kelsey J; Rucks, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. PMID:27400720

  1. Probing the role of water in the tryptophan repressor-operator complex.

    PubMed

    Brown, M P; Grillo, A O; Boyer, M; Royer, C A

    1999-06-01

    The Escherichia coli tryptophan repressor protein (TR) represses the transcription of several genes in response to the concentration of tryptophan in the environment. In the co-crystal structure of TR bound to a DNA fragment containing its target very few direct contacts between TR and the DNA were observed. In contrast, a number of solvent mediated contacts were apparent. NMR solution structures, however, did not resolve any solvent mediated bonds at the complex interface. To probe for the role of water in TR operator recognition, the effect of osmolytes on the interactions between TR and a target oligonucleotide bearing the operator site was examined. In the absence of specific solvent mediated hydrogen bonding interactions between the protein and the DNA, increasing osmolyte concentration is expected to strongly stabilize the TR operator interaction due to the large amount of macromolecular surface area buried upon complexation. The results of our studies indicate that xylose did not alter the binding affinity significantly, while glycerol and PEG had a small stabilizing effect. A study of binding as a function of betaine concentration revealed that this osmolyte at low concentration results in a stabilization of the 1:1 TR/operator complex, but at higher concentrations leads to a switching between binding modes to favor tandem binding. Analysis of the effects of betaine on the 1:1 complex suggest that this osmolyte has about 78% of the expected effect. If one accepts the analysis in terms of the number of water molecules excluded upon complexation, these results suggest that about 75 water molecules remain at the interface of the 1:1 dimer/DNA complex. This value is consistent with the number of water molecules found at the interface in the crystallographically determined structure and supports the notion that interfacial waters play an important thermodynamic role in the specific complexation of one TR dimer with its target DNA. However, the complexity of the

  2. Structure of the flavoprotein tryptophan 2-monooxygenase, a key enzyme in the formation of galls in plants.

    PubMed

    Gaweska, Helena M; Taylor, Alexander B; Hart, P John; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-04-16

    The flavoprotein tryptophan 2-monooxygenase catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of tryptophan to yield indole-3-acetamide. This is the initial step in the biosynthesis of the plant growth hormone indole-acetic acid by bacterial pathogens that cause crown gall and related diseases. The structure of the enzyme from Pseudomonas savastanoi has been determined by X-ray diffraction methods to a resolution of 1.95 Å. The overall structure of the protein shows that it has the same fold as members of the monoamine oxidase family of flavoproteins, with the greatest similarities to the l-amino acid oxidases. The location of bound indole-3-acetamide in the active site allows identification of residues responsible for substrate binding and specificity. Two residues in the enzyme are conserved in all members of the monoamine oxidase family, Lys365 and Trp466. The K365M mutation decreases the kcat and kcat/KTrp values by 60000- and 2 million-fold, respectively. The deuterium kinetic isotope effect increases to 3.2, consistent with carbon-hydrogen bond cleavage becoming rate-limiting in the mutant enzyme. The W466F mutation decreases the kcat value <2-fold and the kcat/KTrp value only 5-fold, while the W466M mutation results in an enzyme lacking flavin and detectable activity. This is consistent with a role for Trp466 in maintaining the structure of the flavin-binding site in the more conserved FAD domain. PMID:23521653

  3. Photodissociation dynamics of tryptophan and the implication of asymmetric photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Chien-Ming; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Huang, Huai Ching; Huang, Kuan Yu; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung; Chiang, Su-Yu

    2010-08-21

    Photodissociation of amino acid tryptophan in a molecular beam at wavelengths of 212.8 and 193 nm, corresponding to excitation to the second and third absorption bands, was investigated using multimass ion imaging techniques. The respective wavelengths also represent excitation to the edge of a positive circular dichroism band and the center of a negative circular dichroism band of L-tryptophan. Only one dissociation channel was observed at both photolysis wavelengths: C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}CHNH{sub 2}COOH{yields}C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}+CHNH{sub 2}COOH. Dissociation rates were found to be 1.3x10{sup 6} and 5x10{sup 6} s{sup -1} at the respective wavelengths. Comparison to theoretical calculation indicates that dissociation occurs on the ground state after internal conversion. Implication of asymmetric photolysis is discussed.

  4. Tryptophan contributions to the unusual circular dichroism of fd bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Arnold, G E; Day, L A; Dunker, A K

    1992-09-01

    The circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of fd bacteriophage has a deep minimum at 222 nm characteristic of highly alpha-helical protein, but there is a shoulder at 208 nm rather than a minimum, with a 222/208-nm amplitude ratio near 1.5 rather than near 1. Oxidation of fd phage with the tryptophan reagent N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) changes the ratio. In this report, the NBS titration of fd is followed by CD and three other spectroscopies, the results of which yield an explanation of the unusual CD spectrum. Absorbance, fluorescence, and Raman data show the oxidation to have two phases, the first of which involves the destruction of tryptophan and the second, tryptophan and tyrosine. Raman spectra reveal the invariance of an environmentally-sensitive tyrosine Fermi resonance doublet during the first oxidative phase. Raman spectra also show that little or no change of alpha-helicity occurs in the first or second oxidation phase, although very slight changes in the helix parameters might be occurring. Concurrent with the destruction of tryptophan during the first phase is the appearance in CD difference spectra ([theta]NBS-treated fd - [theta]native fd) of positive maxima at 208-210 nm and negative maxima at 224 nm, with crossovers at 217 nm. Enormous difference ellipticities, per oxidized subunit of 50 amino acids, of +490,000 +/- 80,000 deg cm2 dmol-1 at 208 nm and -520,000 +/- 110,000 deg cm2 dmol-1 at 224 nm have been derived from the data.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Tryptophan Synthase Quinonoid Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Barends,T.; Domratcheva, T.; Kulik, V.; Blumenstein, L.; Niks, D.; Dunn, M.; Schlichting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Quinonoid intermediates play a key role in the catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Whereas structures of other PLP-bound reaction intermediates have been determined, a high-quality structure of a quinonoid species has not been reported. We present the crystal structure of the indoline quinonoid intermediate of tryptophan synthase (see figure) and discuss its implications for the enzymatic mechanism and allosteric regulation.

  6. A thermodynamic investigation of reactions catalyzed by tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Kishore, N; Tewari, Y B; Akers, D L; Goldberg, R N; Miles, E W

    1998-07-27

    Microcalorimetry and high-performance liquid chromatography have been used to conduct a thermodynamic investigation of the following reactions catalyzed by the tryptophan synthase alpha 2 beta 2 complex (EC 4.2.1.20) and its subunits: indole(aq) + L-serine(aq) = L-tryptophan(aq) + H2O(1); L-serine(aq) = pyruvate(aq) + ammonia(aq); indole(aq) + D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate(aq) = 1-(indol-3-yl)glycerol 3-phosphate(aq); L-serine(aq) + 1-(indol-3-yl)glycerol 3-phosphate(aq) = L-tryptophan(aq) + D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate(aq) + H2O(1). The calorimetric measurements led to standard molar enthalpy changes for all four of these reactions. Direct measurements yielded an apparent equilibrium constant for the third reaction; equilibrium constants for the remaining three reactions were obtained by using thermochemical cycle calculations. The results of the calorimetric and equilibrium measurements were analyzed in terms of a chemical equilibrium model that accounted for the multiplicity of the ionic states of the reactants and products. Thermodynamic quantities for chemical reference reactions involving specific ionic forms have been obtained. These quantities permit the calculation of the position of equilibrium of the above four reactions as a function of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Values of the apparent equilibrium constants and standard transformed Gibbs free energy changes delta r G'(m) degree under approximately physiological conditions are given. Le Châtelier's principle provides an explanation as to why, in the metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of L-tryptophan, the third reaction proceeds in the direction of formation of indole and D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate even though the apparent equilibrium constant greatly favors the formation of 1-(indol-3-yl)glycerol 3-phosphate. PMID:9700925

  7. Cyclization increases the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of arginine- and tryptophan-containing hexapeptides.

    PubMed

    Dathe, Margitta; Nikolenko, Heike; Klose, Jana; Bienert, Michael

    2004-07-20

    Arginine- and tryptophan-rich motifs have been identified in antimicrobial peptides with various secondary structures. We synthesized a set of linear hexapeptides derived from the sequence AcRRWWRF-NH(2) by substitution of tryptophan (W) by tyrosine (Y) or naphthylalanine (Nal) and by replacement of arginine (R) by lysine (K) to investigate the role of cationic charge and aromatic residues in membrane activity and selectivity. A second set of corresponding head-to-tail cyclic analogues was prepared to analyze the role of conformational constraints. The biological activity of the linear peptides followed the order Nal- > W- > Y-containing compounds and slightly decreased upon R-K substitution. A pronounced activity-improving and bacterial selectivity-enhancing effect was found upon cyclization of the R- and W-bearing parent peptide, whereas the activity-modifying effect of cyclization of Y- and Nal-containing peptides was low. The analysis of the driving forces of peptide interaction with model membranes showed that the activities correlated with the partition coefficients and the depths of peptide insertion into neutral and negatively charged lipid bilayers. Spectroscopic studies, RP-HPLC, and titration calorimetry implied that the combination of cationic and aromatic amino acid composition and conformational rigidity afforded a membrane-active, amphipathic structure with a highly charged face opposed by a cluster of aromatic side chains. However, threshold values of low and high hydrophobicity seemed to exist beyond which the activity-enhancing effect of cyclization was negligible. The results suggest that cyclization of small peptides of an appropriate amino acid composition may serve as a promising strategy in the design of antimicrobial peptides.

  8. Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies the Molecular Determinants of Distinct Barttin Functions.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Daniel; Fischer, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-07-24

    CLC-K chloride channels are expressed in the kidney and in the inner ear and require the accessory subunit barttin for proper function and membrane insertion. Barttin exerts multiple functions on CLC-proteins: it modifies protein stability and intracellular trafficking as well as channel activity, ion conduction, and gating. So far, the molecular determinants of these distinct barttin functions have remained elusive. Here we performed serial perturbation mutagenesis to identify the sequence determinants of barttin function. Barttin consists of two transmembrane helices followed by a long intracellular carboxyl terminus, and earlier work demonstrated that the transmembrane core of barttin suffices for most effects on the α-subunit. We individually substituted every amino acid of the predicted transmembrane core (amino acids 9-26 and 35-55) with tryptophan, co-expressed mutant barttin with hClC-Ka or V166E rClC-K1, and characterized CLC-K/barttin channels by patch clamp techniques, biochemistry, and confocal microscopy. The majority of mutations left the chaperone function of barttin, i.e. the effects on endoplasmic reticulum exit and surface membrane insertion, unaffected. In contrast, tryptophan insertion at multiple positions resulted in impaired activity of hClC-Ka/barttin and changes in gating of V166E rClC-K1/barttin. These results demonstrate that mutations in a cluster of hydrophobic residues within transmembrane domain 1 affect barttin-CLC-K interaction and impair gating modification by the accessory subunit. Whereas tight interaction is necessary for functional modification, even impaired association of barttin and CLC-K suffices for normal intracellular trafficking. Our findings allow definition of a likely interaction surface and clarify the mechanisms underlying CLC-K channel modification by barttin. PMID:26063802

  9. The In Situ Tryptophan Analogue Probes the Conformational Dynamics in Asparaginase Isozymes.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Shen, Jiun-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Han; Lan, Yi-Kang; Yuan, Jui-Hung; Lin, Li-Ju; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Wee, Kevin; Chen, You-Hua; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-04-26

    Dynamic water solvation is crucial to protein conformational reorganization and hence to protein structure and functionality. We report here the characterization of water dynamics on the L-asparaginase structural homology isozymes L-asparaginases I (AnsA) and II (AnsB), which are shown via fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamics in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to have distinct catalytic activity. By use of the tryptophan (Trp) analog probe 2,7-diaza-tryptophan ((2,7-aza)Trp), which exhibits unique water-catalyzed proton-transfer properties, AnsA and AnsB are shown to have drastically different local water environments surrounding the single Trp. In AnsA, (2,7-aza)Trp exhibits prominent green N(7)-H emission resulting from water-catalyzed excited-state proton transfer. In stark contrast, the N(7)-H emission is virtually absent in AnsB, which supports a water-accessible and a water-scant environment in the proximity of Trp for AnsA and AnsB, respectively. In addition, careful analysis of the emission spectra and corresponding relaxation dynamics, together with the results of molecular dynamics simulations, led us to propose two structural states associated with the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network in the vicinity of Trp for the two Ans. The water molecules revealed in the proximity of the Trp residue have semiquantitative correlation with the observed emission spectral variations of (2,7-aza)Trp between AnsA and AnsB. Titration of aspartate, a competitive inhibitor of Ans, revealed an increase in N(7)-H emission intensity in AnsA but no obvious spectral changes in AnsB. The changes in the emission profiles reflect the modulation of structural states by locally confined environment and trapped-water collective motions. PMID:27119634

  10. Salinity Influence on Interfacial Area, Wettability, and NAPL Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Valenta, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    Wettability, the tendency of rock or sediment particle surfaces to be preferentially wet by one fluid phase, has a strong influence on the distribution and flow of immiscible fluids in oil reservoirs or aquifers. The efficiency of oil and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) recovery processes and the displacement and production of oil/NAPL by fluids injected into the reservoir or aquifer depend on the wetting properties of the rock/sediment particle surfaces. Effects of salinity on wettability and residual oil saturation during water flooding are of particular interest in the petroleum industry with some reservoirs. It was indicated that the residual oil saturation may be reduced significantly by flooding with low salinity water instead of seawater or brine. This observation may be also true in NAPL recovery from contaminated aquifers. NAPL recovery enhancement may be achieved by manipulating the salinity of the remedial fluid. Two sets of 8 core-flooding column experiments have been completed, using decane and Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude oil as surrogate NAPLs. Unconsolidated sand packs were used as representative porous media. NAPL removal was conducted by flushing column at residual NAPL saturation using water with salinity ranging from 0% to 8% wt of NaCl. The NAPL-water interfacial area (anw, cm-1) was measured and used as an indicator for the wettability characteristics of the packed sand. Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonate (SDBS) was used as an interfacial partitioning tracer and Pentafluoro Benzoic acid (PFBA) was used as a non-reactive and non-partitioning tracer. NAPL was imbibed into an initially water saturated column, using positive displacement methods. NAPL was then flushed out using water at certain salinity. When the column attained a residual NAPL saturation after each water flushing displacement, the partitioning and conservative tracer experiments were conducted separately, to characterize the specific NAPL-water interfacial areas, and the

  11. Nanosensor Detection of an Immunoregulatory Tryptophan Influx/Kynurenine Efflux Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, Thijs; Looger, Loren L; Takanaga, Hitomi; Platten, Michael; Steinman, Lawrence; Frommer, Wolf B

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells rely on cellular uptake of the essential amino acid tryptophan. Tryptophan sequestration by up-regulation of the key enzyme for tryptophan degradation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), e.g., in cancer and inflammation, is thought to suppress the immune response via T cell starvation. Additionally, the excreted tryptophan catabolites (kynurenines) induce apoptosis of lymphocytes. Whereas tryptophan transport systems have been identified, the molecular nature of kynurenine export remains unknown. To measure cytosolic tryptophan steady-state levels and flux in real time, we developed genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer nanosensors (FLIPW). The transport properties detected by FLIPW in KB cells, a human oral cancer cell line, and COS-7 cells implicate LAT1, a transporter that is present in proliferative tissues like cancer, in tryptophan uptake. Importantly, we found that this transport system mediates tryptophan/kynurenine exchange. The tryptophan influx/kynurenine efflux cycle couples tryptophan starvation to elevation of kynurenine serum levels, providing a two-pronged induction of apoptosis in neighboring cells. The strict coupling protects cells that overproduce IDO from kynurenine accumulation. Consequently, this mechanism may contribute to immunosuppression involved in autoimmunity and tumor immune escape. PMID:17896864

  12. A Jerte Valley Cherry-Based Product as a Supply of Tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, María; Espino, Javier; Toribio-Delgado, Antonio F.; Cubero, Javier; Maynar-Mariño, Juan I.; Barriga, Carmen; Paredes, Sergio D.; Rodríguez, Ana B.

    2012-01-01

    L-Tryptophan (tryptophan) is an essential amino acid in humans. It has important roles as a precursor of different bioactive compounds. Based on previous studies in which tryptophan has been shown to be present in fresh cherries, the aim of the present work was to analyze the tryptophan content of a Jerte Valley cherry-based product. A previously optimized method of analysis of tryptophan was used, ie, high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FL). As expected, HPLC/FL technique permitted to detect and quantify the tryptophan content in a different matrix rather than fresh cherries. In fact, the Jerte Valley cherry-based product contained 69.54 ± 10.64 ppm of tryptophan, thereby showing that this product is a good source of tryptophan. In summary, it has been proven that the Jerte Valley cherry-based product is rich in tryptophan and may be indicated as a supply of this essential amino acid as well as having potential health benefits for conditions where tryptophan is necessary. PMID:22553424

  13. Tryptophan synthase: a multienzyme complex with an intramolecular tunnel.

    PubMed

    Miles, E W

    2001-01-01

    Tryptophan synthase is a classic enzyme that channels a metabolic intermediate, indole. The crystal structure of the tryptophan synthase alpha2beta2 complex from Salmonella typhimurium revealed for the first time the architecture of a multienzyme complex and the presence of an intramolecular tunnel. This remarkable hydrophobic tunnel provides a likely passageway for indole from the active site of the alpha subunit, where it is produced, to the active site of the beta subunit, where it reacts with L-serine to form L-tryptophan in a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent reaction. Rapid kinetic studies of the wild type enzyme and of channel-impaired mutant enzymes provide strong evidence for the proposed channeling mechanism. Structures of a series of enzyme-substrate intermediates at the alpha and beta active sites are elucidating enzyme mechanisms and dynamics. These structural results are providing a fascinating picture of loops opening and closing, of domain movements, and of conformational changes in the indole tunnel. Solution studies provide further evidence for ligand-induced conformational changes that send signals between the alpha and beta subunits. The combined results show that the switching of the enzyme between open and closed conformations couples the catalytic reactions at the alpha and beta active sites and prevents the escape of indole.

  14. Increase in conversion of tryptophan to niacin in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Murakami, Mayumi; Sasaki, Ryuzo

    2003-01-01

    There is the report that the deaths by pellagra in women is approximately twofold excess that in men. In the present experiment, in order to clarify a factor in the etiology of pellagra in female and to get basic information how much niacin should be supplemented in pregnant state, we investigated the effects of pregnant on the metabolism of tryptophan to niacin in rats. The daily urine samples were collected from day -17 and day +6 (the delivery day was designated as day 0) and the intermediates of tryptophan to niacin were measured. The metabolites such as kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, anthranilic acid, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, quinolinic acid, N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide were increased with progress in pregnant and returned to normal levels after the delivery. The catabolism of tryptophan is accelerated during pregnancy, indicataing that pregnancy would not be an etiology of pellagra and no niacin supplement needs but tryptohan supplement would need.

  15. Concurrent quantification of tryptophan and its major metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Wojciech G; Jyoti, Amar; Mishra, Manoj K; Louissaint, Nicolette; Romero, Roberto; Chugani, Diane C; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2013-12-15

    An imbalance in tryptophan (TRP) metabolites is associated with several neurological and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, analytical methods allowing for simultaneous quantification of TRP and its major metabolites would be highly desirable, and may be valuable as potential biomarkers. We have developed a HPLC method for concurrent quantitative determination of tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid in tissue and fluids. The method utilizes the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of TRP and its metabolites that enable UV absorbance and fluorescence detection by HPLC, without additional labeling. The origin of the peaks related to analytes of interest was confirmed by UV-Vis spectral patterns using a PDA detector and mass spectrometry. The developed methods were validated in rabbit fetal brain and amniotic fluid at gestational day 29. Results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature for the same regions. This method allows for rapid quantification of tryptophan and four of its major metabolites concurrently. A change in the relative ratios of these metabolites can provide important insights in predicting the presence and progression of neuroinflammation in disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24036037

  16. Tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan in gastroesophageal malignancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Tom; Kumar, Sacheen; Markar, Sheraz R; Antonowicz, Stefan; Hanna, George B

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal cancer has a rapidly increasing incidence worldwide and reliable biomarkers are urgently required to facilitate earlier diagnosis and improve survival. The aromatic amino acids tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan represent potential biomarkers and their relation to gastroesophageal cancer will be evaluated in this review. An electronic literature search was performed to identify all published research relating to the measurement of tyrosine, phenylalanine, or tryptophan in the biofluids or tissues of patients with gastroesophageal cancer. Sixteen studies were included in this systematic review. Six studies investigated serum concentrations, which all found decreased concentrations of these aromatic amino acids, except one study that found increased phenylalanine. Five studies reported increased concentrations within gastric content of these patients and two reported increased urinary concentrations. Tissue concentrations of these aromatic amino acids were increased in three studies. Tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan represent potential biomarkers of gastroesophageal cancer, and further research is necessary to definitively establish the mechanism responsible for altered concentrations of these compounds in patients with gastroesophageal cancer.

  17. [Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.

    1993-09-01

    A joint research program funded by the DOE/BES at Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has been underway. The main efforts of the Purdue program were concentrated on the following tasks. Development of Four Sensor Measurement Method; Experimental Study of Axial Changes of Transverse Void and Interfacial Area Profiles in Bubbly Flow; Modeling of the Probe-Particle Interaction Using Monte Carlo Numerical Simulation; and Experimental Study of the Stability of Interface of Very Large Bubbles. Highlights of these research results are reported.

  18. Interfacial thiol-ene photoclick reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-03-13

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a noncleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible-light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photorheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to reinitiate the thiol-ene photoclick reaction, even after light exposure. Because of its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from preformed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible-light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  19. Exploration of Interfacial Hydration Networks of Target-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jeszenői, Norbert; Bálint, Mónika; Horváth, István; van der Spoel, David; Hetényi, Csaba

    2016-01-25

    Interfacial hydration strongly influences interactions between biomolecules. For example, drug-target complexes are often stabilized by hydration networks formed between hydrophilic residues and water molecules at the interface. Exhaustive exploration of hydration networks is challenging for experimental as well as theoretical methods due to high mobility of participating water molecules. In the present study, we introduced a tool for determination of the complete, void-free hydration structures of molecular interfaces. The tool was applied to 31 complexes including histone proteins, a HIV-1 protease, a G-protein-signaling modulator, and peptide ligands of various lengths. The complexes contained 344 experimentally determined water positions used for validation, and excellent agreement with these was obtained. High-level cooperation between interfacial water molecules was detected by a new approach based on the decomposition of hydration networks into static and dynamic network regions (subnets). Besides providing hydration structures at the atomic level, our results uncovered hitherto hidden networking fundaments of integrity and stability of complex biomolecular interfaces filling an important gap in the toolkit of drug design and structural biochemistry. The presence of continuous, static regions of the interfacial hydration network was found necessary also for stable complexes of histone proteins participating in chromatin assembly and epigenetic regulation.

  20. Interfacial thiol-ene photoclick reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-03-13

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a noncleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible-light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photorheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to reinitiate the thiol-ene photoclick reaction, even after light exposure. Because of its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from preformed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible-light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration.

  1. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis of Anti-TRAP (AT) Reveals Residues Involved in Binding to TRAP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free L-tryptophan in many gram positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT3) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT12) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the “top” region of AT3, which are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation. PMID:18334255

  2. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  3. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I.

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  4. Tryptophan biosynthesis protects mycobacteria from CD4 T cell-mediated killing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjia J.; Reddy, Manchi C.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Rothchild, Alissa C.; Dartois, Veronique; Schuster, Brian M.; Trauner, Andrej; Wallis, Deeann; Galaviz, Stacy; Huttenhower, Curtis; Sacchettini, James C.; Behar, Samuel M.; Rubin, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacteria that cause disease rely on their ability to counteract and overcome host defenses. Here we present a genome-scale study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that uncovers the bacterial determinants of surviving host immunity, sets of genes we term “counteractomes.” Through this, we find that CD4 T cells attempt to starve Mtb of tryptophan through a mechanism that limits Chlamydia and Leishmania infections. In those cases, tryptophan starvation works well, since those pathogens are natural tryptophan auxotrophs. Mtb, however, can synthesize tryptophan, and thus starvation fails as an Mtb-killing mechanism. We then describe a small molecule inhibitor of Mtb tryptophan synthesis, which turns Mtb into a tryptophan auxotroph and restores the efficacy of a failed host defense. Together, our findings demonstrate that the Mtb determinants for surviving host immunity—Mtb’s immune counteractomes—serve as probes of host immunity, uncovering immune-mediated stresses that can be leveraged for therapeutic discovery. PMID:24315099

  5. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  6. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J; Kresin, Vitaly V

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N-H···N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  7. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  8. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  9. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Tryptophan catabolism via kynurenine production in Streptomyces coelicolor: identification of three genes coding for the enzymes of tryptophan to anthranilate pathway.

    PubMed

    Zummo, F P; Marineo, S; Pace, A; Civiletti, F; Giardina, A; Puglia, A M

    2012-05-01

    Most enzymes involved in tryptophan catabolism via kynurenine formation are highly conserved in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. In humans, alterations of this pathway have been related to different pathologies mainly involving the central nervous system. In Bacteria, tryptophan and some of its derivates are important antibiotic precursors. Tryptophan degradation via kynurenine formation involves two different pathways: the eukaryotic kynurenine pathway, also recently found in some bacteria, and the tryptophan-to-anthranilate pathway, which is widespread in microorganisms. The latter produces anthranilate using three enzymes also involved in the kynurenine pathway: tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), kynureninase (KYN), and kynurenine formamidase (KFA). In Streptomyces coelicolor, where it had not been demonstrated which genes code for these enzymes, tryptophan seems to be important for the calcium- dependent antibiotic (CDA) production. In this study, we describe three adjacent genes of S. coelicolor (SCO3644, SCO3645, and SCO3646), demonstrating their involvement in the tryptophan-to-anthranilate pathway: SCO3644 codes for a KFA, SCO3645 for a KYN and SCO3646 for a TDO. Therefore, these genes can be considered as homologous respectively to kynB, kynU, and kynA of other microorganisms and belong to a constitutive catabolic pathway in S. coelicolor, which expression increases during the stationary phase of a culture grown in the presence of tryptophan. Moreover, the S. coelicolor ΔkynU strain, in which SCO3645 gene is deleted, produces higher amounts of CDA compared to the wild-type strain. Overall, these results describe a pathway, which is used by S. coelicolor to catabolize tryptophan and that could be inactivated to increase antibiotic production.

  11. Time-resolved room temperature protein phosphorescence: nonexponential decay from single emitting tryptophans.

    PubMed

    Schlyer, B D; Schauerte, J A; Steel, D G; Gafni, A

    1994-09-01

    The single room temperature phosphorescent (RTP) residue of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). Trp-314, and of alkaline phosphatase (AP), Trp-109, show nonexponential phosphorescence decays when the data are collected to a high degree of precision. Using the maximum entropy method (MEM) for the analysis of these decays, it is shown that AP phosphorescence decay is dominated by a single Gaussian distribution, whereas for LADH the data reveal two amplitude packets. The lifetime-normalized width of the MEM distribution for both proteins is larger than that obtained for model monoexponential chromophores (e.g., terbium in water and pyrene in cyclohexane). Experiments show that the nonexponential decay is fundamental; i.e., an intrinsic property of the pure protein. Because phosphorescence reports on the state of the emitting chromophore, such nonexponential behavior could be caused by the presence of excited state reactions. However, it is also well known that the phosphorescence lifetime of a tryptophan residue is strongly dependent on the local flexibility around the indole moiety. Hence, the nonexponential phosphorescence decay may also be caused by the presence of at least two states of different local rigidity (in the vicinity of the phosphorescing tryptophan) corresponding to different ground state conformers. The observation that in the chemically homogeneous LADH sample the phosphorescence decay kinetics depends on the excitation wavelength further supports this latter interpretation. This dependence is caused by the wavelength-selective excitation of Trp-314 in a subensemble of LADH molecules with differing hydrophobic and rigid environments. With this interpretation, the data show that interconversion of these states occurs on a time scale long compared with the phosphorescence decay (0.1-1.0 s). Further experiments reveal that with increasing temperature the distributed phosphorescence decay rates for both AP and LADH broaden, thus indicating that

  12. NMR crystallography of enzyme active sites: probing chemically detailed, three-dimensional structure in tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F

    2013-09-17

    NMR crystallography--the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry--offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically detailed structure. Initially, researchers used NMR crystallography to refine diffraction data from organic and inorganic solids. Now we are applying this technique to explore active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate. Researchers cannot achieve this level of detail from X-ray, NMR,or computational methodologies in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5-2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate but do not directly identify the protonation states. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but they rely on researcher-specified chemical details. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which scientists can develop models of the active site using computational chemistry; they can then distinguish these models by comparing calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at the highest possible resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of

  13. Time-resolved room temperature protein phosphorescence: nonexponential decay from single emitting tryptophans.

    PubMed Central

    Schlyer, B D; Schauerte, J A; Steel, D G; Gafni, A

    1994-01-01

    The single room temperature phosphorescent (RTP) residue of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). Trp-314, and of alkaline phosphatase (AP), Trp-109, show nonexponential phosphorescence decays when the data are collected to a high degree of precision. Using the maximum entropy method (MEM) for the analysis of these decays, it is shown that AP phosphorescence decay is dominated by a single Gaussian distribution, whereas for LADH the data reveal two amplitude packets. The lifetime-normalized width of the MEM distribution for both proteins is larger than that obtained for model monoexponential chromophores (e.g., terbium in water and pyrene in cyclohexane). Experiments show that the nonexponential decay is fundamental; i.e., an intrinsic property of the pure protein. Because phosphorescence reports on the state of the emitting chromophore, such nonexponential behavior could be caused by the presence of excited state reactions. However, it is also well known that the phosphorescence lifetime of a tryptophan residue is strongly dependent on the local flexibility around the indole moiety. Hence, the nonexponential phosphorescence decay may also be caused by the presence of at least two states of different local rigidity (in the vicinity of the phosphorescing tryptophan) corresponding to different ground state conformers. The observation that in the chemically homogeneous LADH sample the phosphorescence decay kinetics depends on the excitation wavelength further supports this latter interpretation. This dependence is caused by the wavelength-selective excitation of Trp-314 in a subensemble of LADH molecules with differing hydrophobic and rigid environments. With this interpretation, the data show that interconversion of these states occurs on a time scale long compared with the phosphorescence decay (0.1-1.0 s). Further experiments reveal that with increasing temperature the distributed phosphorescence decay rates for both AP and LADH broaden, thus indicating that

  14. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  15. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  16. Interfacial behaviours of smart composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Chi-Kin

    The success of conventional fiber reinforced composites (FRC) relies on the quality of bonding between fibers and matrix. A review of literatures shows that there is a lack of theoretical models and experimental findings on the interfacial behaviours of the SMA-composites. In the past, the operation limit as well as the ideal actuation condition of SMA inclusions could not be predicted accurately during the design stage and the SMA-composite structures may therefore suffer a potential risk of sudden failure due to overloading or over-actuation. The theoretical models developed in this research provide a study basis for the prediction of internal stresses and interfacial strength of the SMA-composites. Martensite volume fraction is considered as a critical parameter which determines the material properties and shape memory effect (SME) of the SMA inclusions. The proposed model reproduce the SMA behaviour inside a substrate, evolutions of martensite volume fraction and elastic modulus of SMA, and the internal stresses along the embedded length in different loading and actuation scenarios. The concepts of 'constant martensite volume fraction region (CMR)' and 'constant axial stress region (CASR)' are proposed to justify the desired SMA actuation. In addition, substantial improvement of the initial debond stress is predicted with the increase of the actuation temperature. The 'Optimum Actuation Condition (OAC)' that ensures the reinforcement of SMA composite but avoids the failure of composite interface due to over-actuation is also defined to optimize the application of SME in the composite structure within a safety actuation limit. A simplified OAC (SOAC) is also developed to provide an analytical solution of OAC and thus the ideal actuation temperature for achieving such specific actuation condition can be estimated more easily. Single fiber pullout test and finite element analysis (FEA) are employed to evaluate the interfacial behaviours and analyze the stress

  17. Gallium uptake in tryptophan-related pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Patel, R. )

    1991-02-01

    We describe a patient who developed fever, fatigue, muscle weakness, dyspnea, skin rash, and eosinophilia after taking high doses of tryptophan for insomnia for two years. A gallium-67 scan revealed diffuse increased uptake in the lung and no abnormal uptake in the muscular distribution. Bronchoscopy and biopsy confirmed inflammatory reactions with infiltration by eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes. CT scan showed an interstitial alveolar pattern without fibrosis. EMG demonstrated diffuse myopathy. Muscle biopsy from the right thigh showed an inflammatory myositis with eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltrations.

  18. Involvement of tryptophan metabolism in the body color of crustacea.

    PubMed

    Negishi, S; Hasegawa, Y; Naito, J; Nagamura, Y; Ishiguro, I

    1999-01-01

    The terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare is usually grey or black in color, however, red ones are occasionally found in the field. This is caused by the mutation of the ommochrome genesis in the integument. We focused our experiments on the mechanism of pigment genesis in which tryptophan metabolism had been expected to be different from the grey or black wild types. We obtained the result that 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid content was significantly higher in the red phenotype than in the wild type, and kynureninase activity was also higher in the red phenotype. PMID:10721114

  19. Myoclonus and ocular oscillations induced by L-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Baloh, R W; Dietz, J; Spooner, J W

    1982-01-01

    A patient with chronic manic-depressive illness developed generalized myoclonus and spontaneous ocular oscillations after a single 2 gm dose of L-tryptophan. She had been pretreated with both a tricyclic antidepressant and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. The involuntary movements gradually disappeared within 24 hours after the drugs were discontinued. Electrooculographic recording 7 hours after onset of the abnormal eye movements revealed square-wave jerks and hypometric voluntary saccades. Pursuit as well as optokinetic and vestibular slow phases were normal except for superimposition of the square-wave jerks. Repeat recording 24 hours later was entirely normal.

  20. Theoretical Study on the UVR8 Photoreceptor: Sensing Ultraviolet-B by Tryptophan and Dissociation of Homodimer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Chung, Lung Wa; Morokuma, Keiji; Li, Guohui

    2014-08-12

    By the irradiation of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light, UVR8 photoreceptor can undergo dissociation of the protein homodimer and regulate gene expression in plants. We have carried out high-level quantum mechanics (QM) and ONIOM(QM:MM) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study spectra of key tryptophan residues in UVR8 homodimer and to clarify the key role of important charged residues and their salt bridges as well as the feasible dissociation mechanism. First, benchmark calculations on the absorption and emission of 3-methylindole in the gas phase have been performed by different QM methods (TD-DFT, CASSCF, MS-CASPT2, and SAC-CI). Twenty different DFT functionals, including double hybrid and Minnesota functionals, were tested, but all these functionals failed to give satisfactory description of two key transitions. In comparison, SAC-CI and CASPT2 methods can give reliable transition energies and a correct order of (1)La and (1)Lb excited states. Furthermore, the vertical absorption and emission energies of tryptophan in UVR8 have been investigated by the ONIOM method. The present results suggest that W285 is the major chromophore of UVR8, while W233 can also sense the UV-B light and may be responsible for exciton coupling. Geometrical effects as well as electrostatic and polarization interactions with the protein matrix were found to influence optical properties of these tryptophan residues in UVR8. At the homodimeric interface, R286-D107 and R338-D44 salt bridges are suggested to play a crucial role for the UVR8 monomerization. In addition, the UV-B induced dissociation mechanism of the UVR8 homodimer has been proposed. The electrostatic repulsion between the partially negatively charged benzene ring of W285 in the (1)La excited state and the negatively charged D44/D107, along with electron and/or proton transfers among W285, R286 (or R338), W233 and D129, was suggested to result in the breakage of the key salt bridges, and destabilization as well

  1. A tyrosine-tryptophan dyad and radical-based charge transfer in a ribonucleotide reductase-inspired maquette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; McCaslin, Tyler G.; Veglia, Gianluigi; Porcelli, Fernando; Yohannan, Jiby; Guo, Zhanjun; McDaniel, Miranda; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2015-12-01

    In class 1a ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a substrate-based radical is generated in the α2 subunit by long-distance electron transfer involving an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O.) in the β2 subunit. The conserved W48 β2 is ~10 Å from Y122OH; mutations at W48 inactivate RNR. Here, we design a beta hairpin peptide, which contains such an interacting tyrosine-tryptophan dyad. The NMR structure of the peptide establishes that there is no direct hydrogen bond between the phenol and the indole rings. However, electronic coupling between the tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in the peptide. In addition, downshifted ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) frequencies are observed for the radical state, reproducing spectral downshifts observed for β2. The frequency downshifts of the ring and CO bands are consistent with charge transfer from YO. to W or another residue. Such a charge transfer mechanism implies a role for the β2 Y-W dyad in electron transfer.

  2. A tyrosine-tryptophan dyad and radical-based charge transfer in a ribonucleotide reductase-inspired maquette.

    PubMed

    Pagba, Cynthia V; McCaslin, Tyler G; Veglia, Gianluigi; Porcelli, Fernando; Yohannan, Jiby; Guo, Zhanjun; McDaniel, Miranda; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-12-02

    In class 1a ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a substrate-based radical is generated in the α2 subunit by long-distance electron transfer involving an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O·) in the β2 subunit. The conserved W48 β2 is ∼10 Å from Y122OH; mutations at W48 inactivate RNR. Here, we design a beta hairpin peptide, which contains such an interacting tyrosine-tryptophan dyad. The NMR structure of the peptide establishes that there is no direct hydrogen bond between the phenol and the indole rings. However, electronic coupling between the tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in the peptide. In addition, downshifted ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) frequencies are observed for the radical state, reproducing spectral downshifts observed for β2. The frequency downshifts of the ring and CO bands are consistent with charge transfer from YO· to W or another residue. Such a charge transfer mechanism implies a role for the β2 Y-W dyad in electron transfer.

  3. A tyrosine–tryptophan dyad and radical-based charge transfer in a ribonucleotide reductase-inspired maquette

    PubMed Central

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; McCaslin, Tyler G.; Veglia, Gianluigi; Porcelli, Fernando; Yohannan, Jiby; Guo, Zhanjun; McDaniel, Miranda; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2015-01-01

    In class 1a ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a substrate-based radical is generated in the α2 subunit by long-distance electron transfer involving an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O·) in the β2 subunit. The conserved W48 β2 is ∼10 Å from Y122OH; mutations at W48 inactivate RNR. Here, we design a beta hairpin peptide, which contains such an interacting tyrosine–tryptophan dyad. The NMR structure of the peptide establishes that there is no direct hydrogen bond between the phenol and the indole rings. However, electronic coupling between the tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in the peptide. In addition, downshifted ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) frequencies are observed for the radical state, reproducing spectral downshifts observed for β2. The frequency downshifts of the ring and CO bands are consistent with charge transfer from YO· to W or another residue. Such a charge transfer mechanism implies a role for the β2 Y-W dyad in electron transfer. PMID:26627888

  4. Interfacial adhesion of zirconia/veneer bilayers with different thermal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Freifrau Von Maltzahn, Nadine; Kleibe, Martin; Stiesch, Meike; Hübsch, Christoph; Kohorst, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how changes in the thermal characteristics of veneer ceramics with almost identical chemical and mechanical properties but with different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) can modify their interfacial adhesion to zirconia. 48 bilayers made of one Y-TZP ceramic and four veneer ceramics were fabricated (n=12). Thermal residual stresses were calculated on the basis of the CTE and glass transition temperatures. After defined notching all specimens were loaded in a four-point bending test and the critical loads were recorded which induced stable crack extension at the adhesion interface. The strain energy release rate (G, J/m(2)) was calculated and was taken as a measure of interfacial adhesion. The CTE of the veneer ceramics were significantly correlated with their adhesion to Y-TZP (p<0.001). Interfacial adhesion in zirconia/veneer bilayers is predominantly affected by the thermal characteristics of the veneer ceramic. PMID:24786347

  5. Hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

    PubMed

    Abel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles such as hydrated ions and transient hydrated electrons, the simplest anionic reducing agents in water, and the special hydronium and hydroxide ions at water interfaces play an important role in many fields of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, radiation chemistry, and biology, as well as biochemistry. This article focuses on these species near hydrophobic interfaces of water, such as the air or vacuum interface of water or water protein/membrane interfaces. Ions at interfaces as well as solvated electrons have been reviewed frequently during the past decade. Although all species have been known for some time with seemingly familiar features, recently the picture in all cases became increasingly diffuse rather than clearer. The current account gives a critical state-of-the art overview of what is known and what remains to be understood and investigated about hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

  6. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  7. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  8. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  9. Interfacial Bioorthogonal Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is interfacial bioorthogonal cross-linking, the use of bioorthogonal chemistry to create and pattern biomaterials through diffusion-controlled gelation at the liquid-gel interface. The basis is a rapid (k2 284000 M–1 s–1) reaction between strained trans-cyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine (Tz) derivatives. Syringe delivery of Tz-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-Tz) to a bath of bis-TCO cross-linker instantly creates microspheres with a cross-linked shell through which bis-TCO diffuses freely to introduce further cross-linking at the interface. Tags can be introduced with 3D resolution without external triggers or templates. Water-filled hydrogel channels were prepared by simply reversing the order of addition. Prostate cancer cells encapsulated in the microspheres have 99% viability, proliferate readily, and form aggregated clusters. This process is projected to be useful in the fabrication of cell-instructive matrices for in vitro tissue models. PMID:25177528

  10. Redesign of cytochrome c peroxidase into a manganese peroxidase: role of tryptophans in peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Gengenbach, A; Syn, S; Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-08-31

    Trp191Phe and Trp51Phe mutations have been introduced into an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) containing a Mn(II)-binding site reported previously (MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K.-S., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 5, 215-221). The goal of the present study is to elucidate the role of tryptophans in peroxidase activity since CcP contains both Trp51 and Trp191 while manganese peroxidase (MnP) contains phenylalanine residues at the corresponding positions. The presence of Trp191 in CcP allows formation of a unique high-valent intermediate containing a ferryl oxo and tryptophan radical called compound I'. The absence of a tryptophan residue at this position in MnP is the main reason for the formation of an intermediate called compound I which contains a ferryl oxo and porphyrin pi-cation radical. In this study, we showed that introduction of the Trp191Phe mutation to MnCcP did not improve MnP activity (specific activity: MnCcP, 0.750 micromol min-1 mg-1; MnCcP(W191F), 0.560 micromol min-1 mg-1. k(cat)/K(m): MnCcP, 0.0517 s-1 mM-1; MnCcP(W191F), 0.0568 s-1 mM-1) despite the fact that introduction of the same mutation to WTCcP caused the formation of a transient compound I (decay rate, 60 s-1). However, introducing both the Trp191Phe and Trp51Phe mutations not only resulted in a longer lived compound I in WTCcP (decay rate, 18 s-1), but also significantly improved MnP activity in MnCcP (MnCcP(W51F, W191F): specific activity, 8.0 micromol min-1 mg-1; k(cat)/K(m), 0. 599 s-1 mM-1). The increase in activity can be attributed to the Trp51Phe mutation since MnCcP(W51F) showed significantly increased MnP activity relative to MnCcP (specific activity, 3.2 micromol min-1 mg-1; k(cat)/K(m), 0.325 s-1 mM-1). As with MnP, the activity of MnCcP(W51F, W191F) was found to increase with decreasing pH. Our results demonstrate that, while the Trp191Phe and Trp51Phe mutations both play important roles in stabilizing compound I, only the Trp51Phe mutation contributes significantly to

  11. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  12. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  13. Tryptophan catabolism in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulcev, Makedonka; Reilly, Cavan; Griffin, Timothy J; Broeckling, Corey D; Sandri, Brian J; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Hodgson, Shane W; Woodruff, Prescott G; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exacerbations are a leading cause of morbidity in COPD. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD). Methods We measured metabolites via mass spectrometry (MS) in plasma drawn within 24 hours of admission to the hospital for 33 patients with an AECOPD (day 0) and 30 days later and for 65 matched controls. Individual metabolites were measured via selective reaction monitoring with mass spectrometry. We used a mixed-effect model to compare metabolite levels in cases compared to controls and a paired t-test to test for differences between days 0 and 30 in the AECOPD group. Results We identified 377 analytes at a false discovery rate of 5% that differed between cases (day 0) and controls, and 31 analytes that differed in the AECOPD cases between day 0 and day 30 (false discovery rate: 5%). Tryptophan was decreased at day 0 of AECOPD compared to controls corresponding to an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. Conclusion Patients with AECOPD have a unique metabolomic signature that includes a decrease in tryptophan levels consistent with an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. PMID:27729784

  14. A model for multiexponential tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins is modeled by multiexponential functions characterized by lifetimes and preexponential factors. Commonly, multiple conformations of the protein are invoked to explain the recovery of two or more lifetimes from the experimental data. However, in many proteins the structure seems to preclude the possibility of multiple conformers sufficiently different from one another to justify such an inference. We present here another plausible multiexponential model based on the assumption that an energetically excited donor surrounded by N acceptor molecules decays by specific radiative and radiationless relaxation processes, and by transferring its energy to acceptors present in or close to the protein matrix. If interactions between the acceptors themselves and back energy transfer are neglected, we show that the intensity decay function contain 2N exponential components characterized by the unperturbed donor lifetime, by energy transfer rates and a probability of occurrence for the corresponding process. We applied this model to the fluorescence decay of holo- and apoazurin, ribonuclease T1, and the reduced single tryptophan mutant (W28F) of thioredoxin. Use of a multiexponential model for the analysis of the fluorescence intensity decay can therefore be justified, without invoking multiple protein conformations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312471

  15. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  16. Tryptophan Biochemistry: Structural, Nutritional, Metabolic, and Medical Aspects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Rossi, Alessandra; Giannaccini, Gino

    2016-01-01

    L-Tryptophan is the unique protein amino acid (AA) bearing an indole ring: its biotransformation in living organisms contributes either to keeping this chemical group in cells and tissues or to breaking it, by generating in both cases a variety of bioactive molecules. Investigations on the biology of Trp highlight the pleiotropic effects of its small derivatives on homeostasis processes. In addition to protein turn-over, in humans the pathways of Trp indole derivatives cover the synthesis of the neurotransmitter/hormone serotonin (5-HT), the pineal gland melatonin (MLT), and the trace amine tryptamine. The breakdown of the Trp indole ring defines instead the “kynurenine shunt” which produces cell-response adapters as L-kynurenine, kynurenic and quinolinic acids, or the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). This review aims therefore at tracing a “map” of the main molecular effectors in human tryptophan (Trp) research, starting from the chemistry of this AA, dealing then with its biosphere distribution and nutritional value for humans, also focusing on some proteins responsible for its tissue-dependent uptake and biotransformation. We will thus underscore the role of Trp biochemistry in the pathogenesis of human complex diseases/syndromes primarily involving the gut, neuroimmunoendocrine/stress responses, and the CNS, supporting the use of -Omics approaches in this field. PMID:26881063

  17. Interfacial tension of aluminum in cryolite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utigard, T.; Toguri, J. M.

    1985-06-01

    The interfacial tension between aluminum and cryolite melts containing different salt additions has been measured based on a combination of the sessile drop and X-ray radiographie technique. A computer program was used to calculate the interfacial tension from approximately twenty randomly measured coordinate points of the drop profile. Aluminum and salt mixtures containing different amounts of Na3AlF6, A1F3, NaF, A12O3, CaF2, KF, LiF, and NaCl were melted in a graphite or alumina crucible in a graphite resistor furnace under an argon atmosphere. The interfacial tension was found to be strongly dependent on the NaF/AlF3 ratio. At the cryolite composition the interfacial tension was 481 mN/m at 1304 K, while it was 650 mN/m when the NaF/AlF3 ratio was equal to 1.5. The change in interfacial tension with composition is explained by sodium enrichment of the Al/melt interface. Additions of A12O3 increased the interfacial tension for a given NaF/AlF3 ratio. KF was found to be surface active, while CaF2, LiF, and NaCl slightly increased the interfacial tension by decreasing the sodium activity.

  18. Self-assembling tryptophan-based designer peptides as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ishanki; Jha, Divya; Admane, Prasad; Panda, Amulya K; Haridas, V

    2016-01-15

    A series of tryptophan-based peptides W1a, b-W4a, b, with diverse architectures were designed and synthesized. These tryptophan containing peptides can self-assemble to spherical particle. This self-assembled system was demonstrated to encapsulate rhodamine B and penetrate the cell membrane.

  19. Tryptophan content for monitoring breast cancer cell aggressiveness by native fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Pu, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Xu, Baogang; Achilefu, Samuel; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    This study shows tryptophan as the key native marker in cells to determine the level of aggressive cancer in breast cell lines using native fluorescence spectroscopy. An algorithm based on the ratio of tryptophan fluorescence intensity at 340 nm to intensity at 460 nm is associated with aggressiveness of the cancer cells. The higher the ratio is, the more aggressive the tumor towards metastasis.

  20. Tryptophan fortification of adapted formula increases plasma tryptophan concentrations to levels not different from those found in breast-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Fazzolari-Nesci, A; Domianello, D; Sotera, V; Räihä, N C

    1992-05-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated significantly lower plasma total tryptophan concentrations in formula-fed than in breast-fed infants. We have measured preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations in infants breast-fed or fed a formula with a protein concentration of 1.57 g/dl and with a whey/casein ratio of 60:40 or a formula with a protein concentration of 1.37 g/dl and a whey/casein ratio of 40:60 and fortified with 10 mg/dl (15 mg/100 kcal) of tryptophan. Healthy term infants (10 per group) were either breast-fed from birth or randomly assigned to one of the two study formulas. At 4 and 12 weeks of age, anthropometric measurements were performed and blood samples were obtained. During the study period of 12 weeks, all infants showed normal growth (weight, length, and head circumference) and there were no statistically significant differences between the groups. The plasma concentrations of the essential amino acids phenylalanine, threonine, valine, and lysine were significantly lower in the breast-fed group than in both formula-fed groups. For tyrosine, methionine, leucine, histidine, isoleucine, and arginine, no significant differences could be found between the feeding groups. Concentration of total plasma tryptophan was significantly higher in the breast-fed group than in the group fed the tryptophan-unfortified formula, but no statistically significant difference could be found between the plasma tryptophan concentration in the breast-fed group versus the group fed the tryptophan-fortified formula. The results indicate that tryptophan fortification of adapted formula is necessary to achieve plasma total tryptophan concentrations similar to those found in breast-fed infants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1517950

  1. Anthranilate synthase from Ruta graveolens. Duplicated AS alpha genes encode tryptophan-sensitive and tryptophan-insensitive isoenzymes specific to amino acid and alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bohlmann, J; Lins, T; Martin, W; Eilert, U

    1996-01-01

    Anthranilate synthase (AS, EC 4.1.3.27) catalyzes the conversion of chorismate into anthranilate, the biosynthetic precursor of both tryptophan and numerous secondary metabolites, including inducible plant defense compounds. The higher plant Ruta graveolens produces tryptophan and elicitor-inducible, anthranilate-derived alkaloids by means of two differentially expressed nuclear genes for chloroplast-localized AS alpha subunits, AS alpha 1 and AS alpha 2. Mechanisms that partition chorismate between tryptophan and inducible alkaloids thus do not entail chloroplast/cytosol separation of AS isoenzymes and yet might involve differential feedback regulation of pathway-specific AS alpha subunits. The two AS alpha isoenzymes of R. graveolens were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins in Escherichia coli deletion mutants defective in AS activity and were purified to homogeneity. Differential sensitivity of the transformed E. coli strains toward 5-methyltryptophan, a false-feedback inhibitor of AS, was demonstrated. Characterization of affinity-purified AS alpha isoenzymes revealed that the noninducible AS alpha 2 of R. graveolens is strongly feedback inhibited by 10 microns tryptophan. In contrast, the elicitor-inducible AS alpha 1 isoenzyme is only slightly affected even by tryptophan concentrations 10-fold higher than those observed in planta. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that chorismate flux into biosynthesis of tryptophan and defense-related alkaloid biosynthesis in R. graveolens is regulated at the site of AS alpha isoenzymes at both genetic and enzymatic levels. PMID:8787026

  2. Raman microbeam spectrometer noninvasively measures biomoelcules to monitor the tryptophan metabolic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Gregory; Bigelow, Alan W.; Harden, Jamie; Krueger, James G.; Gareau, Daniel S.

    2014-03-01

    Toward improving early detection of melanoma by accurate diagnosis and avoidance of unnecessary surgical excisions of common moles, we are developing noninvasive quantitative spectral fingerprinting of protein expression using Raman spectroscopy within confocally gated volumes of tissue. Our first target is the L-tryptophan catabolism pathway, which is unregulated in the tumor micro-environment and inhibits the immune response that usually is tumor suppressive. The tryptophan pathway is therefore worthy of diagnostic measurement and finding the ratio of L-tryptophan to its metabolites may aid a melanoma diagnosis. We report the intensity of the Raman signal from L-tryptophan and quinolinic acid, which are found during different stages of the tryptophan metabolic pathway.

  3. Tryptophan-functionalized gold nanoparticles for deep UV imaging of microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Pajović, Jelena D; Dojčilović, Radovan; Božanić, Dušan K; Kaščáková, Slavka; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Dimitrijević-Branković, Suzana; Vodnik, Vesna V; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Luyt, Adriaan S; Djoković, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible fluorescent nanostructures were prepared by a functionalization of gold nanoparticles with the amino acid tryptophan. The gold-tryptophan bioconjugates were investigated by TEM and HRTEM and various spectroscopy methods (XPS, FTIR, UV-vis and photoluminescence). It was found that the gold nanoparticles, initially 8 nm in diameter, aggregate in the presence of the amino acid. From the XPS and FTIR spectroscopy results, it was concluded that the tryptophan gold interactions mainly take place via indole and carboxyl groups. Although the indole group is involved in the interaction with the gold surfaces, the tryptophan-gold hybrids showed strong fluorescence due to the presence of multilayers of tryptophan. Deep ultra violet (DUV) imaging performed at the SOLEIL synchrotron showed that it is possible to detect these hybrid nanostructures within Escherichia coli cells.

  4. Tryptophan fluorescence reveals induced folding of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein upon interaction with partner enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huansheng; Murphy, Peter W; Langille, Gavin M; Minielly, Sarah J; Murphy, Anne; McMaster, Christopher R; Byers, David M

    2008-11-01

    We have introduced tryptophan as a local fluorescent probe to monitor the conformation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small flexible protein that is unfolded at neutral pH but must undergo reversible conformational change during the synthesis and delivery of bacterial fatty acids. Consistent with known 3D structures of ACP, steady-state fluorescence and quenching experiments indicated that Trp at positions 46, 50, and 72 are buried in the hydrophobic core upon Mg(2+)-induced ACP folding, whereas residues 25 and 45 remain in a hydrophilic environment on the protein surface. Attachment of fatty acids to the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group progressively stabilized the folded conformation of all Trp-substituted ACPs, but longer chains (14:0) were less effective than medium chains (8:0) in shielding Trp from acrylamide quenching in the L46W protein. Interaction with ACP-dependent enzymes LpxA and holo-ACP synthase also caused folding of L46W; fluorescence quenching indicated proximity of Trp-45 in helix II of ACP in LpxA binding. Our results suggest that divalent cations and fatty acylation produce differing environments in the ACP core and also reveal enzyme partner-induced folding of ACP, a key feature of "natively unfolded" proteins.

  5. Starvation Induces Vacuolar Targeting and Degradation of the Tryptophan Permease in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Thomas; Schmidt, Anja; Hall, Michael N.

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, amino acid permeases are divided into two classes. One class, represented by the general amino acid permease GAP1, contains permeases regulated in response to the nitrogen source. The other class, including the high affinity tryptophan permease, TAT2, consists of the so-called constitutive permeases. We show that TAT2 is regulated at the level of protein stability. In exponentially growing cells, TAT2 is in the plasma membrane and also accumulates in internal compartments of the secretory pathway. Upon nutrient deprivation or rapamycin treatment, TAT2 is transported to and degraded in the vacuole. The ubiquitination machinery and lysine residues within the NH2-terminal 31 amino acids of TAT2 mediate ubiquitination and degradation of the permease. Starvation-induced degradation of internal TAT2 is blocked in sec18, sec23, pep12, and vps27 mutants, but not in sec4, end4, and apg1 mutants, suggesting that, upon nutrient limitation, internal TAT2 is diverted from the late secretory pathway to the vacuolar pathway. Furthermore, our results suggest that TAT2 stability and sorting are controlled by the TOR signaling pathway, and regulated inversely to that of GAP1. PMID:10491387

  6. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A.

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  7. Estimation of tryptophyl and tyrosyl exposure in tryptophan-rich proteins by ultraviolet difference spectrophotometry. Lysozyme and Chymotrypsinogen.

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Inoue, H

    1976-06-01

    Ultraviolet difference absorption spectra produced by ethylene glycol were measured for hen lysozyme [EC 3.2.1.17] and bovine chymotrypsinogen. N-Acetyl-L-tryptophanamide and N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide were employed as model compounds for tryptophyl and tyrosyl residues, respectively, and their ultraviolet difference spectra were also measured as a function of ethylene glycol concentration. By comparison of the slopes of plots of molar difference extinction coefficients (delta epsilon) versus ethylene glycol concentration for the proteins with those of the model compounds at peak positions (291-293 and 284-287 nm) in the difference spectra, the average number of tyrosyl as well as tryptophyl residues in exposed states could be estimated. The results gave 2.7 tryptophyl and 1.9 tyrosyl residues exposed for lysozyme at pH 2.1 and 2.6 tryptophyl and 3.4 tyrosyl residues exposed for chymotrypsinogen at pH 5.4. The somewhat higher tyrosyl exposure of chymotrypsinogen, compared with the findings from spectrophotometric titration and chemical modification, was not unexpected, because delta epsilon285 was larger than delta epsilon292, and the situation is discussed with reference to preferential interaction of ethylene glycol with the tyrosyl residues and/or side chains in the vicinity of the chromophore in the protein. The procedure employed in the present work seems to be suitable for estimation of the average number of exposed tryptophyl and tyrosyl residues in tryptophan-rich proteins. The effects of ethylene glycol on the circular dichroism spectra of lysozyme at pH 2.1 and chymotrypsinogen at pH 5.4 were also investigated. At high ethylene glycol concentrations, both proteins were found to undergo conformational changes in the direction of more ordered structures, presumably more helical for lysozyme and more beta-structured for chymotrypsinogen.

  8. Shear-lag analysis of fiber push-out (indentation) tests for estimating interfacial friction stress in ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, D.K.

    1988-02-01

    A shear-lag analysis is presented for estimating sliding friction stress at fiber-matrix interfaces in ceramic-matrix composites using the single-fiber push-out test. The analysis includes an approximate correction for the increased interfacial compression and, therefore, the interfacial friction stress arising from the transverse (Poisson) expansion of the fibers subjected to the compressive load. An exponential decrease of the interfacial shear stress along the fiber length is predicted. This result is similar to the results of a finite-element analysis reported in the literature. The analysis also provides a basis for the experimental determination of a coefficient of interfacial friction (..mu..) and a residual interfacial compression (sigma/sub O/). It is shown that the sliding friction stress (tau/sub f/=..mu..sigma/sub O/) can be overestimated if the transverse expansion of the fibers is not taken into account.

  9. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  10. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  11. Interfacial fracture toughness of alumina/niobium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G. ); O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F. . Div. of Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial fracture toughness of an alumina/niobium composite has been measured as a function of phase angle. The interface was formed by solid-state bonding bulk Coor's AD-999 fine-grain alumina with a commercial purity niobium at 1600{degrees}C for 0.5 hr under a pressure of 10.5 MPa. The alumina/niobium system has a number of features which makes it ideal for an investigation of interfacial fracture toughness. From HREM data we estimate that the width of the interface is no more than 10 atomic planes. Furthermore the thermal expansion coefficients of the two materials differ by less than 5% so residual stresses due to the bonding process are small. Using symmetric and asymmetric four point bend specimens we have measured the fracture toughness of homogenous alumina and that of the alumina/niobium bimaterial in combinations of in-plane shear and tension. The fracture toughness of the homogenous alumina is relatively insensitive to the loading phase. The measured fracture toughness K{sub c} of the interface, however, depended strongly on phase angle. We were unable to obtain valid alumina/niobium interfacial toughness data at negative phase angles as the fracture initiates in the alumina and not at the interface. In symmetric bending at a phase angle {approx}5{degrees}, we measured a nominal interface toughness of 4.0 MPa{radical}m, comparable to the homogeneous alumina. We found that the toughness increased with loading phase angle to a value of K{sub c} {approx} 9 MPa{radical}m at a phase between 25{degrees} and 40{degrees}. Preliminary calculations and experiments suggest that this effect is due to an asymmetric stress distribution, with respect to the interface, and plastic deformation in the niobium. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  13. Interfacial adsorption in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Cruz, M.O. de la; Voorhees, P.W.

    1999-11-26

    Interfaces of A-B-C ternary alloys decomposed into two and three phases are studied. The effect of the gradient energy coefficients {bar {kappa}}{sub II}, I = A, B, C, on the interface composition profiles of ternary alloys is examined. The adsorption of component C in ternary alloys is obtained numerically by finding steady-state solutions of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations and by solving the two Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from minimizing the interfacial energy, and analytically near the critical point. It is found that the solutions from both numerical methods are identical for a two-phase system. In symmetric ternary systems (equal interaction energy between each pair of components) with a minority component C, the gradient energy coefficient of C, {bar {kappa}}{sub CC}, can have a very strong influence on the degree of adsorption. In the {alpha} and {beta} two-phase regions, where {alpha} and {beta} are the phases rich in the majority components A and B, respectively, as {bar {kappa}}{sub CC} increases, the adsorption of the minority component C in the {alpha} and {beta} interfaces decreases. Near a critical point, however, the degree of adsorption of minority component C is independent of the gradient energy coefficient.

  14. Interfacial engineering for silica nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, David; Hui, Yue; Middelberg, Anton P J; Zhao, Chun-Xia

    2016-10-01

    Silica nanocapsules have attracted significant interest due to their core-shell hierarchical structure. The core domain allows the encapsulation of various functional components such as drugs, fluorescent and magnetic nanoparticles for applications in drug delivery, imaging and sensing, and the silica shell with its unique properties including biocompatibility, chemical and physical stability, and surface-chemistry tailorability provides a protection layer for the encapsulated cargo. Therefore, significant effort has been directed to synthesize silica nanocapsules with engineered properties, including size, composition and surface functionality, for various applications. This review provides a comprehensive overview of emerging methods for the manufacture of silica nanocapsules, with a special emphasis on different interfacial engineering strategies. The review starts with an introduction of various manufacturing approaches of silica nanocapsules highlighting surface engineering of the core template nanomaterials (solid nanoparticles, liquid droplets, and gas bubbles) using chemicals or biomolecules which are able to direct nucleation and growth of silica at the boundary of two-phase interfaces (solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and gas-liquid). Next, surface functionalization of silica nanocapsules is presented. Furthermore, strategies and challenges of encapsulating active molecules (pre-loading and post-loading approaches) in these capsular systems are critically discussed. Finally, applications of silica nanocapsules in controlled release, imaging, and theranostics are reviewed. PMID:27522646

  15. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  16. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  17. Structure and Activity of Tryptophan-rich TSPO Translocator Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youzhong; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Ginter, Christopher; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    TSPO translocator proteins bind steroids and porphyrins, and they are implicated in many human diseases, for which they serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. TSPOs have tryptophan-rich sequences that are fhighly conserved from bacteria to mammals. We report crystal structures for Bacillus cereus TSPO (BcTSPO) down to 1.7Å resolution, including a complex with the benzodiazepine-like inhibitor PK11195. We also describe BcTSPO-mediated protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) reactions, including catalytic degradation to a previously undescribed heme derivative. We used structure-inspired mutations to investigate reaction mechanisms, and we showed that TSPOs from Xenopus and man have similar PpIX-directed activities. Although TSPOs have been regarded as transporters, the catalytic activity in PpIX degradation suggests physiological importance for TSPOs in protection against oxidative stress. PMID:25635100

  18. Transition Metal-Free Tryptophan-Selective Bioconjugation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yohei; Ishiyama, Takashi; Sasaki, Daisuke; Abe, Junpei; Sohma, Youhei; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-08-31

    Chemical modifications of native proteins can facilitate production of supernatural protein functions that are not easily accessible by complementary methods relying on genetic manipulations. However, accomplishing precise control over selectivity while maintaining structural integrity and homogeneity still represents a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a transition metal-free method for tryptophan-selective bioconjugation of proteins that is based on an organoradical and operates under ambient conditions. This method exhibits low levels of cross-reactivity and leaves higher-order structures of the protein and various functional groups therein unaffected. The strategy to target less abundant amino acids contributes to the formation of structurally homogeneous conjugates, which may even be suitable for protein crystallography. The absence of toxic metals and biochemically incompatible conditions allows a rapid functional modulation of native proteins such as antibodies and pathogenic aggregative proteins, and this method may thus easily find therapeutic applications. PMID:27534812

  19. Biochemistry of primary headaches: role of tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, G; Cevoli, S; Colavito, D; Leon, A

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of migraine as well as cluster headache (CH) is yet a debated question. In this review, we discuss the possible role of the of tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism in the pathogenesis of these primary headaches. These include the abnormalities in the synthesis of neurotransmitters: high level of DA, low level of NE and very elevated levels of octopamine and synephrine (neuromodulators) in plasma of episodic migraine without aura and CH patients. We hypothesize that the imbalance between the levels of neurotransmitters and elusive amines synthesis is due to a metabolic shift directing tyrosine toward an increased decarboxylase and reduced hydroxylase enzyme activities. The metabolic shift of the tyrosine is favored by a state of neuronal hyperexcitability and a reduced mitochondrial activity present in migraine. In addition we present biochemical studies performed in chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache patients to verify if the same anomalies of the tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism are present in these primary headaches and, if so, their possible role in the chronicity process of CM and CTTH. The results show that important abnormalities of tyrosine metabolism are present only in CM patients (very high plasma levels of DA, NE and tryptamine). Tryptamine plasma levels were found significantly lower in both CM and CTTH patients. In view of this, we propose that migraine and, possibly, CH attacks derive from neurotransmitter and neuromodulator metabolic abnormalities in a hyperexcitable and hypoenergetic brain that spread from the frontal lobe, downstream, resulting in abnormally activated nuclei of the pain matrix. The low tryptamine plasma levels found in CM and CTTH patients suggest that these two primary chronic headaches are characterized by a common insufficient serotoninergic control of the pain threshold.

  20. Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, S M; Clarke, G; Borre, Y E; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-01-15

    The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is becoming clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is also substantial overlap between behaviours influenced by the gut microbiota and those which rely on intact serotonergic neurotransmission. The developing serotonergic system may be vulnerable to differential microbial colonisation patterns prior to the emergence of a stable adult-like gut microbiota. At the other extreme of life, the decreased diversity and stability of the gut microbiota may dictate serotonin-related health problems in the elderly. The mechanisms underpinning this crosstalk require further elaboration but may be related to the ability of the gut microbiota to control host tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway, thereby simultaneously reducing the fraction available for serotonin synthesis and increasing the production of neuroactive metabolites. The enzymes of this pathway are immune and stress-responsive, both systems which buttress the brain-gut axis. In addition, there are neural processes in the gastrointestinal tract which can be influenced by local alterations in serotonin concentrations with subsequent relay of signals along the scaffolding of the brain-gut axis to influence CNS neurotransmission. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota might be a viable treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders.

  1. Was the Chlamydial Adaptative Strategy to Tryptophan Starvation an Early Determinant of Plastid Endosymbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Ugo; Ducatez, Mathieu; Kadouche, Derifa; Colleoni, Christophe; Ball, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiales were recently proposed to have sheltered the future cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids in a common inclusion. The intracellular pathogens are thought to have donated those critical transporters that triggered the efflux of photosynthetic carbon and the consequent onset of symbiosis. Chlamydiales are also suspected to have encoded glycogen metabolism TTS (Type Three Secretion) effectors responsible for photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the eukaryotic cytosol. We now review the reasons underlying other chlamydial lateral gene transfers evidenced in the descendants of plastid endosymbiosis. In particular we show that half of the genes encoding enzymes of tryptophan synthesis in Archaeplastida are of chlamydial origin. Tryptophan concentration is an essential cue triggering two alternative modes of replication in Chlamydiales. In addition, sophisticated tryptophan starvation mechanisms are known to act as antibacterial defenses in animal hosts. We propose that Chlamydiales have donated their tryptophan operon to the emerging plastid to ensure increased synthesis of tryptophan by the plastid ancestor. This would have allowed massive expression of the tryptophan rich chlamydial transporters responsible for symbiosis. It would also have allowed possible export of this valuable amino-acid in the inclusion of the tryptophan hungry pathogens. Free-living single cell cyanobacteria are devoid of proteins able to transport this amino-acid. We therefore investigated the phylogeny of the Tyr/Trp transporters homologous to E. coli TyrP/Mre and found yet another LGT from Chlamydiales to Archaeplastida thereby considerably strengthening our proposal. PMID:27446814

  2. In vivo function of tryptophans in the Arabidopsis UV-B photoreceptor UVR8.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Andrew; Jenkins, Gareth I

    2012-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) is a photoreceptor specifically for UV-B light that initiates photomorphogenic responses in plants. UV-B exposure causes rapid conversion of UVR8 from dimer to monomer, accumulation in the nucleus, and interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), which functions with UVR8 in UV-B responses. Studies in yeast and with purified UVR8 implicate several tryptophan amino acids in UV-B photoreception. However, their roles in UV-B responses in plants, and the functional significance of all 14 UVR8 tryptophans, are not known. Here we report the functions of the UVR8 tryptophans in vivo. Three tryptophans in the β-propeller core are important in maintaining structural stability and function of UVR8. However, mutation of three other core tryptophans and four at the dimeric interface has no apparent effect on function in vivo. Mutation of three tryptophans implicated in UV-B photoreception, W233, W285, and W337, impairs photomorphogenic responses to different extents. W285 is essential for UVR8 function in plants, whereas W233 is important but not essential for function, and W337 has a lesser role. Ala mutants of these tryptophans appear monomeric and constitutively bind COP1 in plants, but their responses indicate that monomer formation and COP1 binding are not sufficient for UVR8 function.

  3. Weighing graphene with QCM to monitor interfacial mass changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Balci, Osman; Salihoglu, Omer; Hur, Seung Hyun; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we experimentally determined the mass density of graphene using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a mechanical resonator. We developed a transfer printing technique to integrate large area single-layer graphene on QCM. By monitoring the resonant frequency of an oscillating quartz crystal loaded with graphene, we were able to measure the mass density of graphene as ˜118 ng/cm2, which is significantly larger than the ideal graphene (˜76 ng/cm2) mainly due to the presence of wrinkles and organic/inorganic residues on graphene sheets. High sensitivity of the quartz crystal resonator allowed us to determine the number of graphene layers in a particular sample. Additionally, we extended our technique to probe interfacial mass variation during adsorption of biomolecules on graphene surface and plasma-assisted oxidation of graphene.

  4. Calmatives for the excitable horse: a review of L-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Grimmett, A; Sillence, M N

    2005-07-01

    Preparations that contain tryptophan are marketed world wide as calmative agents to treat excitable horses. Tryptophan is the amino acid precursor for serotonin, a neurotransmitter implicated in sedation, inhibition of aggression, fear and stress, in various animal species and humans. Experiments have shown that tryptophan supplementation decreases aggression in humans, dogs, pigs, poultry, and fish, and that it may reduce fearfulness and stress in calves, vixens and poultry. However, behavioural characteristics more closely linked to excitement, such as hyperactivity in dogs, are not modified by tryptophan supplementation. Research using a variety of animals other than horses, has shown that the behavioural response to tryptophan supplementation varies with age, breed and gender, and can be modified by diet, exercise, social status, and level of arousal. Significantly, the response is species-dependent, and there are no scientific publications that confirm the efficacy of tryptophan as a calmative in excitable horses. The few studies where tryptophan has been administered to horses suggest that low doses (relative to those contained in commercial preparations) cause mild excitement, whereas high doses reduce endurance capacity, and cause acute haemolytic anaemia if given orally, due to a toxic hindgut metabolite. As tryptophan continues to be used as an equine calmative, there is an urgent need for research to confirm its efficacy in horses, and to establish a safe therapeutic dose range. In the meantime, available data suggest that it would be imprudent to rely on tryptophan to calm the excitable horse, and instead, that a greater effort should be made to identify the underlying causes of excitability, and to explore more appropriate non-pharmacological remedies. PMID:15993787

  5. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2002-03-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  6. RNAi-induced silencing of embryonic tryptophan oxygenase in the Pyralid moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Kanost, Michael R; Baker, James E

    2004-01-01

    Gene silencing through the introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNA interference, RNAi) provides a powerful tool for the elucidation of gene function in many systems, including those where genomics and proteomics are incomplete. The use of RNAi technology for gene silencing in Lepidoptera has lacked significant attention compared to other systems. To demonstrate that RNAi can be utilized in the lepidopteran, Plodia interpunctella, we cloned a cDNA for tryptophan oxygenase, and showed that silencing of tryptophan oxygenase through RNAi during embryonic development resulted in loss of eye-color pigmentation. The complete amino acid sequence of Plodia tryptophan oxygenase can be accessed through NCBI Protein Database.

  7. Effects of dietary pyrazinamide, an antituberculosis agent, on the metabolism of tryptophan to niacin and of tryptophan to serotonin in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Fukuwatari, T; Sugimoto, E

    2001-06-01

    The effects of pyrazinamide on the metabolism of tryptophan to niacin and of tryptophan to serotonin were investigated to elucidate the mechanism for pyrazinamide action against tuberculosis. Weanling rats were fed with a diet with or without 0.25% pyrazinamide for 61 days. Urine samples were periodically collected for measuring the tryptophan metabolites. The administration of pyrazinamide significantly increased the metabolites, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and beyond, especially quinolinic acid, nicotinamide, N'-methylnicotinamide, and N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and therefore significantly increased the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin and the blood NAD level . However, no difference in the upper metabolites of the tryptophan to niacin pathway such as anthranilic acid, kynurenic acid and xanthurenic acid was apparent between the two groups. No difference in the concentrations of trytptophan and serotonin in the blood were apparent either. It is suggested from these results that the action of pyrazinamide against tuberculosis is linked to the increase in turnover of NAD and to the increased content of NAD in the host cells.

  8. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  9. Fluid displacement fronts in porous media: pore scale interfacial jumps, pressure bursts and acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps and pressure bursts that involve intense interfacial energy release in the form of acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and transport properties behind the front. We present experimental studies using acoustic emission technique (AE), rapid imaging, and liquid pressure measurements to characterize these processes during drainage and imbibition in simple porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (AE amplitudes obey a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion reflecting fluid redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Imaging revealed that the velocity of interfacial jumps often exceeds front velocity by more than 50 fold and is highly inertial component (Re>1000). Pore invasion volumes reduced deduced from pressure fluctuations waiting times (for constant withdrawal rates) show remarkable agreement with geometrically-deduced pore volumes. Discrepancies between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to constraints on evacuation opportunity times and simultaneous invasion events. A mechanistic model for interfacial motions in a pore-throat network was developed to investigate interfacial dynamics focusing on the role of inertia. Results suggest that while pore scale dynamics were sensitive to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerted only a minor effect on phase entrapment. The study on pore scale invasion events paints a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provides new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts that are essential for improved macroscopic description of multiphase flows in porous media.

  10. The role of tryptophan 97 of cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium in catalytic function. Evidence against the 'covalent switching' hypothesis of P-450 electron transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, A W; Malarkey, K; McKnight, J; Thomson, A J; Kelly, S M; Price, N C; Lindsay, J G; Coggins, J R; Miles, J S

    1994-01-01

    The 'Covalent Switching' hypothesis suggests that a strongly conserved tryptophan residue acts as a mediator of electron-transfer flow between redox partners in cytochrome P-450 systems [Baldwin, Morris and Richards (1991) Proc. R. Soc. London B 245, 43-51]. We have investigated the effect of alteration of the conserved tryptophan (Trp-97) in cytochrome P-450 BM3 (P-450 102) from Bacillus megaterium. Replacement of Trp-97 with Ala, Phe or Tyr results in a decrease in the natural haem content and alters the resting spin state of the remaining haem in the purified mutant enzymes. However, kinetic analyses indicate that the mutant enzymes retain high levels of catalytic activity. C.d. and e.p.r. spectroscopy also reveal little alteration in secondary structure or change in the pattern of haem ligation. These findings cast doubt on the covalent switching mechanism of intermolecular electron flow in the P-450s, but indicate that this residue plays a role in the association of the haem prosthetic group. PMID:7980400

  11. Synthesis of indoles and tryptophan derivatives via photoinduced nitrene C-H insertion.

    PubMed

    Junk, Lukas; Kazmaier, Uli

    2016-03-14

    Functionalized indoles and tryptophans can be obtained from stannylated alkenes and o-iodoanilines via Stille coupling. Subsequent azidation and photochemical nitrene generation results in the formation of the heterocyclic ring systems via C-H insertion. PMID:26869211

  12. The structure of tryptophan 7-halogenase (PrnA) suggests a mechanism for regioselective chlorination

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Changjiang; Flecks, Silvana; Unversucht, Susanne; Haupt, Caroline; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H

    2012-01-01

    Chlorinated natural products include vancomycin and cryptophycin A. Their biosyntheses involves regioselective chlorination by flavin-dependent halogenases. We report the structural characterization of tryptophan 7-halogenase (PrnA), which regioselectively chlorinates tryptophan. Tryptophan and FAD are separated by a 10Å-long tunnel and bound by distinct enzyme modules. The FAD module is conserved in halogenases and is related to flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Based on biochemical studies, crystal structures and by analogy with monooxygenases, we predict FADH2 reacts with O2 making peroxy-flavin which is decomposed by Cl−. The resulting HOCl is guided through the tunnel, to tryptophan, where it is activated to participate in electrophilic aromatic substitution. PMID:16195462

  13. Microfluidic ultralow interfacial tensiometry with magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Scott S H; Wexler, Jason S; Wan, Jiandi; Stone, Howard A

    2013-01-01

    We describe a technique that measures ultralow interfacial tensions using paramagnetic spheres in a co-flow microfluidic device designed with a magnetic section. Our method involves tuning the distance between the co-flowing interface and the magnet's center, and observing the behavior of the spheres as they approach the liquid-liquid interface-the particles either pass through or are trapped by the interface. Using threshold values of the magnet-to-interface distance, we make estimates of the two-fluid interfacial tension. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique for measuring very low interfacial tensions, O(10(-6)-10(-5)) N m(-1), by testing solutions of different surfactant concentrations, and we show that our results are comparable with measurements made using a spinning drop tensiometer. PMID:23154819

  14. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  15. Influence of acute tryptophan depletion on mood and immune measures in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, A V; Griffiths, J; Merali, Z; Knott, V J; Anisman, H

    1999-01-01

    Depressive illness has been associated with variations of several aspects of immune functioning, as well as alterations of cytokine production in stimulated lymphocytes. In the present investigation we sought to determine whether pharmacologically-induced reductions of mood in healthy, male subjects would be associated with alterations in the levels of circulating IL-1 beta or IL-6 or to in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to T cell mitogens, PHA and Con A. Lowering tryptophan levels by means of a tryptophan-deficient amino acid mixture, which reduced plasma tryptophan and serotonin (5-HT) levels, produced a lowering of mood in a subset of male subjects (that had no personal or family history of depression) relative to subjects that received a balanced amino acid mixture. Correlational analyses revealed that the change of mood (particularly depression and anger) in subjects that received the tryptophan-free mixture was related to the extent of the tryptophan or 5-HT reductions. However, while fenfluramine administration resulted in recovery of tryptophan and 5-HT levels, this was not accompanied by recovery of mood. Furthermore, it was observed that the lowering of tryptophan levels and the reduced mood were not accompanied by variations of the cytokine levels or cell proliferation. Evidently, transient and modest alterations of 5-HT or mood induced by a tryptophan-free amino acid mixture were insufficient to promote variations of immune activity or circulating IL-1 beta or IL-6 levels. Even if depression were related to immune disturbances, the mood and 5-HT alterations associated with this type of manipulation may be too brief to promote immune changes comparable with those ordinarily associated with severe or chronic depressive illness. PMID:10098222

  16. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  17. Interfacial bonding and friction in silicon carbide (filament)-reinforced ceramic- and glass-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.; Shetty, D.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Griffin, C.W.; Limaye, S.Y. )

    1989-10-01

    This paper reports interfacial shear strength and interfacial sliding friction stress assessed in unidirectional SiC-filament-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and borosilicate glass composites and 0/90 cross-ply reinforced borosilicate glass composite using a fiber pushout test technique. The interface debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load were measured for varying lengths of the embedded fibers by continuously monitoring the load during debonding and pushout of single fibers in finite-thickness specimens. The dependences of the debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load on the initial embedded lengths of the fibers were in agreement with nonlinear shear-lag models. An iterative regression procedure was used to evaluate the interfacial properties, shear debond strength ({tau}{sub d}), and sliding friction stress ({tau}{sub f}), from the embedded fiber length dependences of the debonding load and the maximum frictional sliding load, respectively. The shear-lag model and the analysis of sliding friction permit explicit evaluation of a coefficient of sliding friction ({mu}) and a residual compressive stress on the interface ({sigma}{sub 0}). The cross-ply composite showed a significantly higher coefficient of interfacial friction as compared to the unidirectional composites.

  18. Carbon Fiber—Vinyl Ester Interfacial Adhesion Improvement by the Use of an Epoxy Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, Frederic; Xu, Lanhong; Drzal, Lawrence T.

    With the use of composites expanding into larger structural applications, vinyl ester matrices which are not dependent on an autoclave cure and are more environmentally resistant to water absorption are being investigated. The degree of adhesion between the fiber and matrix has been recognized to be a critical factor in determining the performance of fiber-reinforced composites. The mechanical properties of carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites are low compared to carbon fiber-epoxy composites, partly because of lower interfacial adhesion. The origins of this limitation were investigated. The influence of preferential adsorption of the matrix constituents on the interfacial adhesion was not significant. However, the high cure volume shrinkage was found to be an important factor. An engineered interphase consisting of a partially cross-linked epoxy sizing that could chemically bond to the carbon fiber and form an interpenetrating network with the vinyl ester matrix was found to sharply improve the interfacial adhesion. The mechanisms involved in that improvement were investigated. The diffusion of styrene in the epoxy coating decreased the residual stress induced by the volume shrinkage of the vinyl ester matrix. The optimal value of the thickness was found to be a dominant factor in increasing the value of the interfacial shear strength according to a 2D non-linear finite element model.

  19. Novel methods for measuring air-water interfacial area in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; El Ouni, Asma; Araujo, Juliana B; Zhong, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented. PMID:25732632

  20. Novel methods for measuring air-water interfacial area in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; El Ouni, Asma; Araujo, Juliana B; Zhong, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented.

  1. L-Tryptophan Production in Escherichia coli Improved by Weakening the Pta-AckA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Acetate accumulation during the fermentation process of Escherichia coli FB-04, an L-tryptophan production strain, is detrimental to L-tryptophan production. In an initial attempt to reduce acetate formation, the phosphate acetyltransferase gene (pta) from E. coli FB-04 was deleted, forming strain FB-04(Δpta). Unfortunately, FB-04(Δpta) exhibited a growth defect. Therefore, pta was replaced with a pta variant (pta1) from E. coli CCTCC M 2016009, forming strain FB-04(pta1). Pta1 exhibits lower catalytic capacity and substrate affinity than Pta because of a single amino acid substitution (Pro69Leu). FB-04(pta1) lacked the growth defect of FB-04(Δpta) and showed improved fermentation performance. Strain FB-04(pta1) showed a 91% increase in L-tryptophan yield in flask fermentation experiments, while acetate production decreased by 35%, compared with its parent FB-04. Throughout the fed-batch fermentation process, acetate accumulation by FB-04(pta1) was slower than that by FB-04. The final L-tryptophan titer of FB-04(pta1) reached 44.0 g/L, representing a 15% increase over that of FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the pta1 genomic substitution slightly decreased carbon flux through glycolysis and significantly increased carbon fluxes through the pentose phosphate and common aromatic pathways. These results indicate that this strategy enhances L-tryptophan production and decreases acetate accumulation during the L-tryptophan fermentation process. PMID:27348810

  2. Flexible enantioselectivity of tryptophanase attributable to benzene ring in heterocyclic moiety of d-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    The invariance principle of enzyme enantioselectivity must be absolute because it is absolutely essential to the homochiral biological world. Most enzymes are strictly enantioselective, and tryptophanase is one of the enzymes with extreme absolute enantioselectivity for L-tryptophan. Contrary to conventional knowledge about the principle, tryptophanase becomes flexible to catalyze D-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Since D-amino acids are ordinarily inert or function as inhibitors even though they are bound to the active site, the inhibition behavior of D-tryptophan and several inhibitors involved in this process was examined in terms of kinetics to explain the reason for this flexible enantioselectivity in the presence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Diammonium hydrogenphosphate gave tryptophanase a small conformational change so that D-tryptophan could work as a substrate. As opposed to other D-amino acids, D-tryptophan is a very bulky amino acid with a benzene ring in its heterocyclic moiety, and so we suggest that this structural feature makes the catalysis of D-tryptophan degradation possible, consequently leading to the flexible enantioselectivity. The present results not only help to understand the mechanism of enzyme enantioselectivity, but also shed light on the origin of homochirality.

  3. Efficient isotopic tryptophan labeling of membrane proteins by an indole controlled process conduct.

    PubMed

    Berger, Christian; Berndt, Sandra; Pichert, Annelie; Theisgen, Stephan; Huster, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    A protocol for the efficient isotopic labeling of large G protein-coupled receptors with tryptophan in Escherichia coli as expression host was developed that sufficiently suppressed the naturally occurring L-tryptophan indole lyase, which cleaves tryptophan into indole, pyruvate, and ammonia resulting in scrambling of the isotopic label in the protein. Indole produced by the tryptophanase is naturally used as messenger for cell-cell communication. Detailed analysis of different process conducts led to the optimal expression strategy, which mimicked cell-cell communication by the addition of indole during expression. Discrete concentrations of indole and (15) N2 -L-tryptophan at dedicated time points in the fermentation drastically increased the isotopic labeling efficiency. Isotope scrambling was only observed in glutamine, asparagine, and arginine side chains but not in the backbone. This strategy allows producing specifically tryptophan labeled membrane proteins at high concentrations avoiding the disadvantages of the often low yields of auxotrophic E. coli strains. In the fermentation process carried out according to this protocol, we produced ∼15 mg of tryptophan labeled neuropeptide Y receptor type 2 per liter medium.

  4. L-Tryptophan Production in Escherichia coli Improved by Weakening the Pta-AckA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Acetate accumulation during the fermentation process of Escherichia coli FB-04, an L-tryptophan production strain, is detrimental to L-tryptophan production. In an initial attempt to reduce acetate formation, the phosphate acetyltransferase gene (pta) from E. coli FB-04 was deleted, forming strain FB-04(Δpta). Unfortunately, FB-04(Δpta) exhibited a growth defect. Therefore, pta was replaced with a pta variant (pta1) from E. coli CCTCC M 2016009, forming strain FB-04(pta1). Pta1 exhibits lower catalytic capacity and substrate affinity than Pta because of a single amino acid substitution (Pro69Leu). FB-04(pta1) lacked the growth defect of FB-04(Δpta) and showed improved fermentation performance. Strain FB-04(pta1) showed a 91% increase in L-tryptophan yield in flask fermentation experiments, while acetate production decreased by 35%, compared with its parent FB-04. Throughout the fed-batch fermentation process, acetate accumulation by FB-04(pta1) was slower than that by FB-04. The final L-tryptophan titer of FB-04(pta1) reached 44.0 g/L, representing a 15% increase over that of FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the pta1 genomic substitution slightly decreased carbon flux through glycolysis and significantly increased carbon fluxes through the pentose phosphate and common aromatic pathways. These results indicate that this strategy enhances L-tryptophan production and decreases acetate accumulation during the L-tryptophan fermentation process. PMID:27348810

  5. 5-Fluoroindole Resistance Identifies Tryptophan Synthase Beta Subunit Mutants in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Barczak, A. J.; Zhao, J.; Pruitt, K. D.; Last, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the biochemical genetics of the Arabidopsis thaliana tryptophan synthase beta subunit was initiated by characterization of mutants resistant to the inhibitor 5-fluoroindole. Thirteen recessive mutations were recovered that are allelic to trp2-1, a mutation in the more highly expressed of duplicate tryptophan synthase beta subunit genes (TSB1). Ten of these mutations (trp2-2 through trp2-11) cause a tryptophan requirement (auxotrophs), whereas three (trp2-100 through trp2-102) remain tryptophan prototrophs. The mutations cause a variety of changes in tryptophan synthase beta expression. For example, two mutations (trp2-5 and trp2-8) cause dramatically reduced accumulation of TSB mRNA and immunologically detectable protein, whereas trp2-10 is associated with increased mRNA and protein. A correlation exists between the quantity of mutant beta and wild-type alpha subunit levels in the trp2 mutant plants, suggesting that the synthesis of these proteins is coordinated or that the quantity or structure of the beta subunit influences the stability of the alpha protein. The level of immunologically detectable anthranilate synthase alpha subunit protein is increased in the trp2 mutants, suggesting the possibility of regulation of anthranilate synthase levels in response to tryptophan limitation. PMID:7635295

  6. L-Tryptophan's effects on brain chemistry and sleep in cats and rats: a review.

    PubMed

    Radulovacki, M

    1982-01-01

    In this review I shall discuss published and unpublished work from my laboratory dealing with L-tryptophan's effects on brain monoamines and sleep in cats and rats. From our work it appears that normal animals may not be suitable subjects for testing sleep-inducing effect of tryptophan since their slow-wave sleep (SWS) latency is relatively short. In polyphasic sleepers like cats, we did not observe tryptophan's hypnotic effect with any dosage used (10, 30 or 135 mg/kg). However, we found small, but statistically significant, sleep-inducing effect of tryptophan (30 mg/kg, IP) in normal rats. We have tried, therefore, to create insomniac cats with long sleep latencies by using methysergide, a serotonin receptor blocker. The results show that in insomniac cats hypnotic effect of tryptophan, a precursor to brain serotonin, was observed. It involved not only reduction of sleep latencies but also an increase in SWS. It seems likely that tryptophan's partial reversal of methysergide's effect in cats occurred via a dual mechanism of serotonergic activation and catecholaminergic deactivation, while its sleep-inducing effect in normal rats may have been due to the attenuation of the activity of brain catecholamines. PMID:6184659

  7. Delaying aging and the aging-associated decline in protein homeostasis by inhibition of tryptophan degradation

    PubMed Central

    van der Goot, Annemieke T.; Zhu, Wentao; Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Seinstra, Renée I.; Dettmer, Katja; Michels, Helen; Farina, Francesca; Krijnen, Jasper; Melki, Ronald; Buijsman, Rogier C.; Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Thijssen, Karen L.; Kema, Ido P.; Neri, Christian; Oefner, Peter J.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins is thought to play an important role in aging and age-related neurological diseases like Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases. Here, we identify tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (tdo-2), the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, as a metabolic regulator of age-related α-synuclein toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Depletion of tdo-2 also suppresses toxicity of other heterologous aggregation-prone proteins, including amyloid-β and polyglutamine proteins, and endogenous metastable proteins that are sensors of normal protein homeostasis. This finding suggests that tdo-2 functions as a general regulator of protein homeostasis. Analysis of metabolite levels in C. elegans strains with mutations in enzymes that act downstream of tdo-2 indicates that this suppression of toxicity is independent of downstream metabolites in the kynurenine pathway. Depletion of tdo-2 increases tryptophan levels, and feeding worms with extra l-tryptophan also suppresses toxicity, suggesting that tdo-2 regulates proteotoxicity through tryptophan. Depletion of tdo-2 extends lifespan in these worms. Together, these results implicate tdo-2 as a metabolic switch of age-related protein homeostasis and lifespan. With TDO and Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as evolutionarily conserved human orthologs of TDO-2, intervening with tryptophan metabolism may offer avenues to reducing proteotoxicity in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:22927396

  8. L-Tryptophan Production in Escherichia coli Improved by Weakening the Pta-AckA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Acetate accumulation during the fermentation process of Escherichia coli FB-04, an L-tryptophan production strain, is detrimental to L-tryptophan production. In an initial attempt to reduce acetate formation, the phosphate acetyltransferase gene (pta) from E. coli FB-04 was deleted, forming strain FB-04(Δpta). Unfortunately, FB-04(Δpta) exhibited a growth defect. Therefore, pta was replaced with a pta variant (pta1) from E. coli CCTCC M 2016009, forming strain FB-04(pta1). Pta1 exhibits lower catalytic capacity and substrate affinity than Pta because of a single amino acid substitution (Pro69Leu). FB-04(pta1) lacked the growth defect of FB-04(Δpta) and showed improved fermentation performance. Strain FB-04(pta1) showed a 91% increase in L-tryptophan yield in flask fermentation experiments, while acetate production decreased by 35%, compared with its parent FB-04. Throughout the fed-batch fermentation process, acetate accumulation by FB-04(pta1) was slower than that by FB-04. The final L-tryptophan titer of FB-04(pta1) reached 44.0 g/L, representing a 15% increase over that of FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the pta1 genomic substitution slightly decreased carbon flux through glycolysis and significantly increased carbon fluxes through the pentose phosphate and common aromatic pathways. These results indicate that this strategy enhances L-tryptophan production and decreases acetate accumulation during the L-tryptophan fermentation process.

  9. A swarm of Stokeslets with interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Ludwig C.; Schaflinger, Uwe

    2001-06-01

    A formal analogy between sedimenting drops in Stokes flow and a swarm of Stokeslets [Machu et al., J. Fluid Mech. (in press)] is extended to include interfacial tension. Using a cohesive potential, mean curvature is extended as a meaningful quantity off the interface, allowing the boundary-integral formulation to be rewritten in volumetric form. A prescription for assigning forces to the Stokeslets comprising the swarm incorporates the action of interfacial tension without having to identify a boundary surface. Numerical simulations agree with linear small-deformation theory, and reproduce the spontaneous coalescense of two touching drops.

  10. Monitoring of interfacial tensions by drop counting

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Boring, C.P.; McLaughlin, J.F.; Harless, D.P.

    1988-11-01

    A capillary tube device was shown to provide a rapid means of measuring the interfacial tension between water and Freon-113. The measurement technique is based on counting the number of drops that form when a fixed volume of water passes through the capillary tube into the bulk Freon. The interfacial tension is predicted to be proportional to the number of drops to the negative 2/3 power. Calibration curves were obtained for Freon-water samples containing known concentrations of a surfactant. A standard Gibbs adsorption curve was obtained. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The nucleotide sequence of spinach chloroplast tryptophan transfer RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Canaday, J; Guillemaut, P; Gloeckler, R; Weil, J H

    1981-01-01

    Spinach chloroplast tRNATrp, purified by column chromatography and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, has been sequenced using in vitro labeling techniques. The sequence is : pG-C-G-C-U-C-U-U-A-G-U-U-C-A-G-U-U-C-Gm-G-D-A-G-A-A-C-m2G-psi-G-G-G-psi-C-U-C-A-A*-A-A-C-C-C-G-A-U-G-N-C-G-U-A-G-G-T-psi-C-A-A-G-U-C-C-U-A-C-A-G-A-G-C-G-U-G -C-C-AOH. Like the E. coli suppressor tRNA psu+UGA which translates both the opal terminator codon U-G-A and the tryptophan codon U-G-G, spinach chloroplast tRNATrp has C-C-A as an anticodon and contains an A-U pair in the D-stem. Images PMID:6907845

  12. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •∼2800 National Cancer Institute USA compounds have been screened as potential inhibitors of TDO and/or IDO. •Seven compounds with anti-tumour properties have been identified as potent inhibitors. •NSC 36398 (taxifolin, dihydroquercetin) is selective for TDO with a K{sub i} of 16 M. •This may help further our understanding of the role of TDO in cancer. -- Abstract: The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ∼2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ∼16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported.

  13. Tryptophan Catabolism in Chronic Viral Infections: Handling Uninvited Guests

    PubMed Central

    Mehraj, Vikram; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    l-Tryptophan (l-Trp) is an essential amino acid that possesses diverse metabolic, neurological, and immunological roles spanning from the synthesis of proteins, neurotransmitter serotonin, and neurohormone melatonin, to its degradation into immunosuppressive catabolites by indoleamine-2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) in the kynurenine pathway (KP). Trp catabolites, by activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), play an important role in antimicrobial defense and immune regulation. IDO/AhR acts as a double-edged sword by both depleting l-Trp to starve the invaders and by contributing to the state of immunosuppression with microorganisms that were not cleared during acute infection. Pathogens experiencing Trp deprivation by IDO-mediated degradation include certain bacteria, parasites, and less likely viruses. However, chronic viral infections highjack the host immune response to create a state of disease tolerance via kynurenine catabolites. This review covers the latest data involving chronic viral infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) and their cellular interplay with Trp catabolites. Strategies developed by viruses to escape immune control also represent new avenues for therapeutic interventions based on Trp metabolism. PMID:26309411

  14. Tryptophan switch for a photoactivated platinum anticancer complex.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jennifer S; Woods, Julie A; Farrer, Nicola J; Newton, Mark E; Sadler, Peter J

    2012-10-10

    The octahedral Pt(IV) complex trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N(3))(2)(OH)(2)(py)(2)] (1) is potently cytotoxic to cancer cells when irradiated with visible (blue) light. We show that the acute photocytotoxicity can be switched off by low doses (500 μM) of the amino acid l-tryptophan. EPR and NMR spectroscopic experiments using spin traps show that l-Trp quenches the formation of azidyl radicals, probably by acting as an electron donor. l-Trp is well-known as a mediator of electron transfer between distant electron acceptor/donor centers in proteins, and such properties may make the free amino acid clinically useful for controlling the activity of photochemotherapeutic azido Pt(IV) drugs. Since previous work has demonstrated the ability of photoactivated 1 to platinate DNA, this suggests that the high potency of such photoactive platinum complexes is related to their dual attack on cancer cells by radicals and Pt(II) photoproducts. PMID:22991971

  15. L-tryptophan supplementation does not improve running performance.

    PubMed

    Stensrud, T; Ingjer, F; Holm, H; Strømme, S B

    1992-08-01

    In 1988 Segura and Ventura (14) reported that 1.2 g of L-Tryptophan (L-TRY) supplementation increased total exercise time by 49.4% when the subjects were running at 80% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). In human performance research, acute improvements of that category are rather uncommon. Both for this reason and because ingestion of purified L-TRY may have adverse effects, it seemed pertinent to repeat the investigation of Segura and Ventura. Forty-nine well-trained male runners, aged 18-44, with an average maximal aerobic power of 66 (57-78) ml.kg-1.min-1, participated in a randomized double blind placebo (P) study. Each subject underwent four trials on the treadmill. The first two served as learning experience, including measurement of VO2max and anaerobic threshold. During the last two trials the subjects ran until exhaustion at a speed corresponding to 100% of their VO2max-first an initial trial and then after receiving a total of 1.2 g L-TRY or P over a 24 hour period prior to the run. No significant difference between the improvements in the L-TRY and P group could be demonstrated. It is concluded that oral L-TRY supplementation does not enhance running performance. PMID:1428380

  16. Hydration of protonated aromatic amino acids: phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bing; Wyttenbach, Thomas; Bowers, Michael T

    2009-04-01

    The first steps of hydration of the protonated aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine were studied experimentally employing a mass spectrometer equipped with a drift cell to examine the sequential addition of individual water molecules in equilibrium experiments and theoretically by a combination of molecular mechanics and electronic structure calculations (B3LYP/6-311++G**) on the three amino acid systems including up to five water molecules. It is found that both the ammonium and carboxyl groups offer good water binding sites with binding energies of the order of 13 kcal/mol for the first water molecule. Subsequent water molecules bind less strongly, in the range of 7-11 kcal/mol for the second through fifth water molecules. The ammonium group is able to host up to three water molecules and the carboxyl group one water molecule before additional water molecules bind either to the amino acid side chain as in tyrosine or to already-bound water in a second solvation shell around the ammonium group. Reasons for the surprisingly high water affinity of the neutral carboxyl group, comparable to that of the charge-carrying ammonium group, are found to be high intrinsic hydrophilicity, favorable charge-dipole alignment, and--for the case of multiply hydrated species--favorable dipole-dipole interaction among water molecules and the lack of alternative fully exposed hydration sites.

  17. Acute Tryptophan Depletion and Sweet Food Consumption by Overweight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pagoto, Sherry L.; Spring, Bonnie; McChargue, Dennis; Hitsman, Brian; Smith, Malaina; Appelhans, Bradley; Hedeker, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Serotonergic involvement has been implicated in preferential consumption of treat foods. We tested the effect of acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) on food consumption by overweight and lean adults with and without a history of recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD). ATD and taste-matched placebo challenges were administered double-blind in counter-balanced order. Participants were classified as lean (n = 36) or overweight (n=19) on the basis of body mass index (BMI). Total calorie, carbohydrate, protein, and sweet food consumption were assessed via a test meal 8-hours following ATD. Four food items of comparable palatability were offered as a part of the test: two sweet (one carbohydrate-rich, and one protein-rich) and two non-sweet (one carbohydrate-rich, and one protein-rich). As compared to the placebo challenge, ATD significantly increased sweet calorie intake among overweight participants and increased their propensity to consume sweet food first before any other type of food. Lean participants’ sweet calorie intake and food preference were unaffected by ATD. Findings suggest serotonergic involvement in the sweet food consumption by overweight individuals. PMID:19171315

  18. Benzimidazole analogs of (L)-tryptophan are substrates and inhibitors of tryptophan indole lyase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Harris, Austin P; Phillips, Robert S

    2013-04-01

    Tryptophan indole lyase (TIL), an enzyme found in Escherichia coli and related enterobacteria, produces indole from l-tryptophan (l-Trp). Indole is a signaling molecule in bacteria, affecting biofilm formation, pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance. β-(Benzimidazol-1-yl)-l-alanine (BZI-Ala), 2-amino-4-(benzimidazol-1-yl)butyric acid (homo-BZI-Ala) and 2-amino-5-(benzimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid (bishomo-BZI-Ala) were synthesized and tested as substrates and inhibitors of TIL. BZI-Ala is a good substrate of TIL, with Km = 300 μm, kcat = 5.6 s(-1) and kcat /Km = 1.9 × 10(4) , similar to l-Trp. BZI-Ala is also a good substrate for H463F mutant TIL, which has very low activity with l-Trp. In contrast, homo-BZI-Ala was found to be a potent competitive inhibitor of TIL, with a Ki of 13.4 μm. However, the higher homolog, bishomo-BZI-Ala, was inactive as an inhibitor of TIL at a concentration of 600 μm, and is thus a much weaker inhibitor. The reaction of TIL with BZI-Ala was too fast to be observed in the stopped-flow spectrophotometer, and shows an aldimine intermediate in the steady state. However, H463F TIL shows equilibrating mixtures of aldimine and quinonoid complexes in the steady state. The spectra of the reaction of TIL with homo-BZI-Ala show a rapidly formed intermediate absorbing at 340 nm, probably a gem-diamine, that decays slowly to form a quinonoid complex absorbing at 494 nm. The potent binding of homo-BZI-Ala may be due to it being a 'bi-product' analog of the indole-α-aminoacrylate complex. These results demonstrate that an amino acid substrate may be converted to a potent inhibitor of TIL simply by homologation, which may be useful in the design of other potent TIL inhibitors.

  19. The role of tryptophans in the UV-B absorption of a UVR8 photoreceptor--a computational study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Huang, Bolong; Niehaus, T A; Yang, Xiaojing; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2015-04-28

    Arabidopsis thaliana UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) has been identified as a photoreceptor for ultraviolet-B (UV-B). Tryptophan (Trp) residues have been shown to play a critical role in the response to UV-B irradiation in UVR8. In this work, we explore the spectroscopic behaviors of Trps in different protein environments of the UVR8 structure using the time-dependent density functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme. We show that W233 exhibits the longest absorption wavelength, highlighting its potential as a terminal Trp chromophore in the UV-B harvesting antenna. Our electronic and optical property analyses using various amino acid models support the important roles of W285 and W233 in sensing UV-B light at longer absorption wavelengths (∼290 nm). We also provide evidence for the specific function of W94 in absorption at the longest wavelengths (305.8 nm in cluster II and 304.5 nm in cluster III). To these findings, we also add information about the influence of the arginine and aspartic acid residues surrounding the Trp pyramid on the particular absorption bands (280-300 nm) that are characteristic of the UV-B photoreceptor.

  20. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  1. Interfacial closure of contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, F.; Rauer, C.; Moriceau, H.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the contact between solid surfaces is a long-standing problem which has a strong impact on the physics of many processes such as adhesion, friction, lubrication and wear. Experimentally, the investigation of solid/solid interfaces remains challenging today, due to the lack of experimental techniques able to provide sub-nanometer scale information on interfaces buried between millimeters of materials. Yet, a strong interest exists improving the modeling of contact mechanics of materials in order to adjust their interface properties (e.g., thermal transport, friction). We show here that the essential features of the residual gap between contacting surfaces can be measured using high energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity. The presence of this nano-gap is general to the contact of solids. In some special case however, it can be removed when attractive forces take over repulsive contributions, depending on both height and wavelength of asperity distributions (roughness). A criterion for this instability is established in the standard case of van der Waals attractive forces and elastic asperity compression repulsive forces (Hertz model). This collapse instability is confirmed experimentally in the case of silicon direct bonding, using high-energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity and adhesion energy measurements. The possibility to achieve fully closed interfaces at room temperature opens interesting perspectives to build stronger assemblies with smaller thermal budgets.

  2. Tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Noriko, Fujii

    2009-06-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a beta-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the d-tryptophan degradation reaction also occurs in tryptophan synthesis from d-serine. Tryptophanase became active to d-serine to synthesize l-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate. This reaction has never been reported before. d-serine seems to undergo beta-replacement via an enzyme-bonded alpha-aminoacylate intermediate to yield l-tryptophan.

  3. Occurrence of N-Formylkynurenine in Extracts of Neurospora crassa: Evidence for the Activity of Tryptophan Pyrrolase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, James; Matchett, William H.

    1974-01-01

    N-formylkynurenine and kynurenine have been detected in extracts of tryptophan-grown Neurospora crassa. When the mycelia were grown in medium supplemented with l-[2-14C]tryptophan, the radioactivity was detected in N-formylkynurenine and N-formylanthranilic acid; with l-[β-14C]tryptophan, radioactivity was detected in N-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and xanthurenic acid. The occurrence of N-formylkynurenine in extracts of tryptophan-grown Neurospora is interpreted as direct evidence for the activity of tryptophan pyrrolase in this organism. The presence of this enzyme was expected on the basis of several earlier studies, but its activity in vitro has so far escaped detection. The in vivo evidence presented here suggests its presence and contributes importantly to our understanding of the tryptophan-anthranilic acid cycle. PMID:4275312

  4. 13C-tryptophan breath test detects increased catabolic turnover of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Sasayama, Daimei; Matsuo, Junko; Ogawa, Shintaro; Ota, Miho; Hattori, Kotaro; Kajiwara, Masahiro; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Altered tryptophan–kynurenine (KYN) metabolism has been implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). The l-[1-13C]tryptophan breath test (13C-TBT) is a noninvasive, stable-isotope tracer method in which exhaled 13CO2 is attributable to tryptophan catabolism via the KYN pathway. We included 18 patients with MDD (DSM-IV) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. 13C-tryptophan (150 mg) was orally administered and the 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in the breath was monitored for 180 min. The cumulative recovery rate during the 180-min test (CRR0–180; %), area under the Δ13CO2-time curve (AUC; %*min), and the maximal Δ13CO2 (Cmax; %) were significantly higher in patients with MDD than in the controls (p = 0.004, p = 0.008, and p = 0.002, respectively). Plasma tryptophan concentrations correlated negatively with Cmax in both the patients and controls (p = 0.020 and p = 0.034, respectively). Our results suggest that the 13C-TBT could be a novel biomarker for detecting a subgroup of MDD with increased tryptophan–KYN metabolism. PMID:26524975

  5. Structure of the green fluorescent protein NowGFP with an anionic tryptophan-based chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Pletnev, Vladimir Z.; Pletneva, Nadya V.; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Goryacheva, Ekaterina A.; Ziganshin, Rustam H.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    A green-emitting fluorescent variant, NowGFP, with a tryptophan-based chromophore (Thr65-Trp66-Gly67) was recently developed from the cyan mCerulean by introducing 18 point mutations. NowGFP is characterized by bright green fluorescence at physiological and higher pH and by weak cyan fluorescence at low pH. Illumination with blue light induces irreversible photoconversion of NowGFP from a green-emitting to a cyan-emitting form. Here, the X-ray structures of intact NowGFP at pH 9.0 and pH 4.8 and of its photoconverted variant, NowGFP_conv, are reported at 1.35, 1.18 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. The structure of NowGFP at pH 9.0 suggests the anionic state of Trp66 of the chromophore to be the primary cause of its green fluorescence. At both examined pH values Trp66 predominantly adopted a cis conformation; only ∼20% of the trans conformation was observed at pH 4.8. It was shown that Lys61, which adopts two distinct pH-dependent conformations, is a key residue playing a central role in chromophore ionization. At high pH the side chain of Lys61 forms two hydrogen bonds, one to the indole N atom of Trp66 and the other to the carboxyl group of the catalytic Glu222, enabling an indirect noncovalent connection between them that in turn promotes Trp66 deprotonation. At low pH, the side chain of Lys61 is directed away from Trp66 and forms a hydrogen bond to Gln207. It has been shown that photoconversion of NowGFP is accompanied by decomposition of Lys61, with a predominant cleavage of its side chain at the Cγ—Cδ bond. Lys61, Glu222, Thr203 and Ser205 form a local hydrogen-bond network connected to the indole ring of the chromophore Trp66; mutation of any of these residues dramatically affects the spectral properties of NowGFP. On the other hand, an Ala150Val replacement in the vicinity of the chromophore indole ring resulted in a new advanced variant with a 2.5-fold improved photostability. PMID:26249350

  6. Structure of the green fluorescent protein NowGFP with an anionic tryptophan-based chromophore.

    PubMed

    Pletnev, Vladimir Z; Pletneva, Nadya V; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Goryacheva, Ekaterina A; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2015-08-01

    A green-emitting fluorescent variant, NowGFP, with a tryptophan-based chromophore (Thr65-Trp66-Gly67) was recently developed from the cyan mCerulean by introducing 18 point mutations. NowGFP is characterized by bright green fluorescence at physiological and higher pH and by weak cyan fluorescence at low pH. Illumination with blue light induces irreversible photoconversion of NowGFP from a green-emitting to a cyan-emitting form. Here, the X-ray structures of intact NowGFP at pH 9.0 and pH 4.8 and of its photoconverted variant, NowGFP_conv, are reported at 1.35, 1.18 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. The structure of NowGFP at pH 9.0 suggests the anionic state of Trp66 of the chromophore to be the primary cause of its green fluorescence. At both examined pH values Trp66 predominantly adopted a cis conformation; only ∼ 20% of the trans conformation was observed at pH 4.8. It was shown that Lys61, which adopts two distinct pH-dependent conformations, is a key residue playing a central role in chromophore ionization. At high pH the side chain of Lys61 forms two hydrogen bonds, one to the indole N atom of Trp66 and the other to the carboxyl group of the catalytic Glu222, enabling an indirect noncovalent connection between them that in turn promotes Trp66 deprotonation. At low pH, the side chain of Lys61 is directed away from Trp66 and forms a hydrogen bond to Gln207. It has been shown that photoconversion of NowGFP is accompanied by decomposition of Lys61, with a predominant cleavage of its side chain at the C(γ)-C(δ) bond. Lys61, Glu222, Thr203 and Ser205 form a local hydrogen-bond network connected to the indole ring of the chromophore Trp66; mutation of any of these residues dramatically affects the spectral properties of NowGFP. On the other hand, an Ala150Val replacement in the vicinity of the chromophore indole ring resulted in a new advanced variant with a 2.5-fold improved photostability.

  7. Lack of evidence for reduced prefrontal cortical serotonin and dopamine efflux after acute tryptophan depletion

    PubMed Central

    Meerkerk, Dorie (T). J.; Lieben, Cindy K. J.; Blokland, Arjan; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is a widely used method to study the role of serotonin (5-HT) in affect and cognition. ATD results in a strong but transient decrease in plasma tryptophan and central 5-HT synthesis and availability. Although its use is widespread, the evidence that the numerous functional effects of ATD are caused by actual changes in 5-HT neuronal release is not very strong. Thus far, decreases in 5-HT efflux (thought to reflect synaptic release) were only reported after chronic tryptophan depletion or when ATD was combined with blockade of 5-HT reuptake. Objective With the current experiment, we aimed to study the validity of the method of ATD by measuring the extent to which it reduces the efflux of 5-HT (and dopamine) in the prefrontal cortex in the absence of reuptake blockage. Materials and methods We simultaneously measured in freely moving animals plasma tryptophan via a catheter in the jugular vein and 5-HT and DA efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex through microdialysis after ATD treatment. Results ATD reduced plasma tryptophan to less than 30% of control, without affecting 5-HT or DA efflux in the prefrontal cortex, indicating that even strong reductions of plasma tryptophan do not necessarily result in decreases in central 5-HT efflux. Conclusion The present experiment showed that reductions in plasma tryptophan, similar to values associated with behavioural effects, do not necessarily reduce 5-HT efflux and suggest that the cognitive and behavioural effects of ATD may not be (exclusively) due to alterations in 5-HT release. PMID:17713760

  8. Compositional Effects on Interfacial Properties in Contaminated Systems: Implications for Organic Liquid Migration and Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Abriola, Linda M.; Demond, Avery H.; Hsu, Hsin-lan; O'Carroll, Denis M.; Phelan, Thoams, J.; Polityka, Catherine A.; Ryder, Jodi L.

    2003-03-27

    An understanding of the transport behavior of dense non-aqueous phase organic liquids (DNAPLs) is a prerequisite for the accurate assessment of chemical exposure and the design of effective subsurface remediation strategies. This paper highlights results of an ongoing EMSP research project designed to explore the influence of solid and organic phase composition on DNAPL migration, entrapment and recovery from contaminated aquifers. The integrated research program includes small-scale laboratory investigations to examine the dependence of organic contaminant constitutive relationships (e.g., capillary pressure-saturation, relative permeability, residual saturation and interphase mass transfer rates) on interfacial properties. Models developed from these observations are being incorporated into a compositional multiphase simulator to facilitate prediction of DNAPL behavior under conditions representative of field sites. Two-dimensional sand box experiments are also being undertaken to validate the modeling approach. Results from this research demonstrate the dramatic influence of interfacial property variation on DNAPL migration and retention.

  9. IDO inhibits a tryptophan sufficiency signal that stimulates mTOR: A novel IDO effector pathway targeted by D-1-methyl-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Metz, Richard; Rust, Sonja; Duhadaway, James B; Mautino, Mario R; Munn, David H; Vahanian, Nicholas N; Link, Charles J; Prendergast, George C

    2012-12-01

    Tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) alters inflammation and favors T-cell tolerance in cancer, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The integrated stress response kinase GCN2, a sensor of uncharged tRNA that is activated by amino acid deprivation, is recognized as an important effector of the IDO pathway. However, in a mouse model of inflammatory carcinogenesis, ablation of Gcn2 did not promote resistance against tumor development like the absence of IDO does, implying the existence of additional cancer-relevant pathways that operate downstream of IDO. Addressing this gap in knowledge, we report that the IDO-mediated catabolism of tryptophan also inhibits the immunoregulatory kinases mTOR and PKC-Θ, along with the induction of autophagy. These effects were relieved specifically by tryptophan but also by the experimental agent 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (D-1MT, also known as NLG8189), the latter of which reversed the inhibitory signals generated by IDO with higher potency. Taken together, our results implicate mTOR and PKC-Θ in IDO-mediated immunosuppressive signaling, and they provide timely insights into the unique mechanism of action of D-1MT as compared with traditional biochemical inhibitors of IDO. These findings are important translationally, because they suggest broader clinical uses for D-1MT against cancers that overexpress any tryptophan catabolic enzyme (IDO, IDO2 or TDO). Moreover, they define mTOR and PKC-Θ as candidate pharmacodynamic markers for D-1MT responses in patients recruited to ongoing phase IB/II cancer trials, addressing a current clinical need.

  10. Plasma Tryptophan and the Kynurenine–Tryptophan Ratio Are Associated with the Acquisition of Statural Growth Deficits and Oral Vaccine Underperformance in Populations with Environmental Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret N.; Mduma, Estomih; Kosek, Peter S.; Lee, Gwenyth O.; Svensen, Erling; Pan, William K. Y.; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Bream, Jay H.; Patil, Crystal; Asayag, Cesar Ramal; Sanchez, Graciela Meza; Caulfield, Laura E.; Gratz, Jean; Yori, Pablo Peñataro

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood enteric infections have adverse impacts on child growth and can inhibit normal mucosal responses to oral vaccines, two critical components of environmental enteropathy. To evaluate the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity and its relationship with these outcomes, we measured tryptophan and the kynurenine–tryptophan ratio (KTR) in two longitudinal birth cohorts with a high prevalence of stunting. Children in rural Peru and Tanzania (N = 494) contributed 1,251 plasma samples at 3, 7, 15, and 24 months of age and monthly anthropometrics from 0 to 36 months of age. Tryptophan concentrations were directly associated with linear growth from 1 to 8 months after biomarker assessment. A 1-SD increase in tryptophan concentration was associated with a gain in length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) of 0.17 over the next 6 months in Peru (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.23, P < 0.001) and a gain in LAZ of 0.13 Z-scores in Tanzania (95% CI = 0.03–0.22, P = 0.009). Vaccine responsiveness data were available for Peru only. An increase in kynurenine by 1 μM was associated with a 1.63 (95% CI = 1.13–2.34) increase in the odds of failure to poliovirus type 1, but there was no association with tetanus vaccine response. A KTR of 52 was 76% sensitive and 50% specific in predicting failure of response to serotype 1 of the oral polio vaccine. KTR was associated with systemic markers of inflammation, but also interleukin-10, supporting the association between IDO1 activity and immunotolerance. These results strongly suggest that the activity of IDO1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of environmental enteropathy, and demonstrates the utility of tryptophan and kynurenine as biomarkers for this syndrome, particularly in identifying those at risk for hyporesponsivity to oral vaccines. PMID:27503512

  11. Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2: An Emerging Therapeutic Target for Stress Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo-Lin; Miller, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been long recognized to modulate the stress response, and dysfunction of 5-HT has been implicated in numerous stress disorders. Accordingly, the 5-HT system has been targeted for the treatment of stress disorders. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in 5-HT synthesis, and the recent identification of a second, neuron-specific TPH isoform (TPH2) opened up a new area of research. With a decade of extensive investigation, it is now recognized that: 1) TPH2 exhibits a highly flexible gene expression that is modulated by an increasing number of internal and external environmental factors including the biological clock, stressors, endogenous hormones, and antidepressant therapies; and 2) genetically determined TPH2 activity is linked to a growing body of stress-related neuronal correlates and behavioral traits. These findings reveal an active role of TPH2 in the stress response and provide new insights into the long recognized but not yet fully understood 5-HT-stress interaction. As a major modulator of 5-HT neurotransmission and the stress response, TPH2 is of both pathophysiological and pharmacological significance, and is emerging as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of stress disorders. Given that numerous antidepressant therapies influence TPH2 gene expression, TPH2 is already inadvertently targeted for the treatment of stress disorders. With increased understanding of the regulation of TPH2 activity we can now purposely utilize TPH2 as a target to develop new or optimize current therapies, which are expected to greatly improve the prevention and treatment of a wide variety of stress disorders. PMID:23435356

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of interaction of ligands with Streptococcus faecium dihydrofolate reductase labeled with (. gamma. -/sup 13/C)tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.E.; Groff, J.P.; Cocco, L.; Blakley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Streptococcus faecium has been labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 13/C)tryptophan. We have determined changes occurring in the chemical shifts and line widths of the four resonances of the /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of the labeled enzyme, due to its interaction with various ligands. These include the coenzyme, NPDPH and related nucleotides, folate and its polyglutamate derivatives, and many inhibitors including methotrexate and trimethoprim. In addition, paramagnetic relaxation effects produced by a bound spin-labeled analogue of 2'-phosphoadenosine-5'-diphosphoribose on the tryptophan C/sup ..gamma../ carbons have been measured. Distances calculated from the relaxation data have been compared with corresponding distances in the crystallographic model of the NADPH-methotrexate ternary complex of Lactobacillus casei reductase. The paramagnetic relaxation data indicate that the two downfield resonances (1 and 2) correspond to tryptophans (W/sub A/ and W/sub B/) that are more remote from the catalytic site, and from the crystallographic model these are seen to be Trp-115 and Trp-160. The upfield resonances (3 and 4) that show broadening due to chemical exchange correspond to closer residues (W/sub C/ and W/sub D/), and these are identified with Trp-6 and Trp-22. However, the relaxation data do not permit specific assignments within the nearer and farther pairs. Although resonance 3, which is split due to chemical exchange, was formerly assigned to Trp-6, data obtained for the enzyme in the presence of various ligands are better interpreted if resonance 3 is assigned to Trp-22, which is located on a loop that joins elements of secondary structure and forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity.

  13. The first step of the dioxygenation reaction carried out by tryptophan dioxygenase and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as revealed by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical studies

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Di Russo, Natali; Estrin, Dario A.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) and indole-amine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) are two heme-containing enzymes which catalyze the conversion of L-tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). In mammals, TDO is mostly expressed in liver and is involved in controlling homeostatic serum tryptophan concentrations, whereas IDO is ubiquitous and is involved in modulating immune responses. Previous studies suggested that the first step of the dioxygenase reaction involves the deprotonation of the indoleamine group of the substrate by an evolutionarily conserved distal histidine residue in TDO and the heme-bound dioxygen in IDO. Here, we used classical molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods to evaluate the base-catalyzed mechanism. Our data suggest that the deprotonation of the indoleamine group of the substrate by either histidine in TDO or heme-bound dioxygen in IDO is not energetically favorable. Instead, the dioxygenase reaction can be initiated by a direct attack of heme-bound dioxygen on the C2=C3 bond of the indole ring, leading to a protein-stabilized 2,3-alkylperoxide transition state and a ferryl epoxide intermediate, which subsequently recombine to generate NFK. The novel sequential two-step oxygen addition mechanism is fully supported by our recent resonance Raman data that allowed identification of the ferryl intermediate (Lewis-Ballester et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106:17371–17376, 2009). The results reveal the subtle differences between the TDO and IDO reactions and highlight the importance of protein matrix in modulating stereoelectronic factors for oxygen activation and the stabilization of both transition and intermediate states. PMID:20361220

  14. Reaction pathway of tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2011-11-01

    Tryptophanase, L-tryptophan indole-lyase with extremely absolute stereospecificity, can change the stereospecificity in concentrated diammonium hydrogenphosphate solution. While tryptophanase is not inert to D-serine in the absence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate, it can undergo L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine along with indole in the presence of it. It has been well known that tryptophanase synthesizes L-tryptophan from L-serine through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type. However, a metabolic pathway of L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine has remained unclear. The present study aims to elucidate it. Diammonium hydrogenphosphate plays a role in the emergence of catalytic activity on D-serine. The salt gives tryptophanase a small conformational change, which makes it possible to catalyze D-serine. Tryptophanase-bound D-serine produces L-tryptophan synthesis by β-replacement reaction via the enzyme-bound aminoacrylate intermediate. Our result will be valuable in studying the origin of homochirality.

  15. Model of Tryptophan Metabolism, Readily Scalable Using Tissue-specific Gene Expression Data*

    PubMed Central

    Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Heiland, Ines; Schuster, Stefan; Puntervoll, Pål; Ziegler, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan is utilized in various metabolic routes including protein synthesis, serotonin, and melatonin synthesis and the kynurenine pathway. Perturbations in these pathways have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Here we present a comprehensive kinetic model of the complex network of human tryptophan metabolism based upon existing kinetic data for all enzymatic conversions and transporters. By integrating tissue-specific expression data, modeling tryptophan metabolism in liver and brain returned intermediate metabolite concentrations in the physiological range. Sensitivity and metabolic control analyses identified expected key enzymes to govern fluxes in the branches of the network. Combining tissue-specific models revealed a considerable impact of the kynurenine pathway in liver on the concentrations of neuroactive derivatives in the brain. Moreover, using expression data from a cancer study predicted metabolite changes that resembled the experimental observations. We conclude that the combination of the kinetic model with expression data represents a powerful diagnostic tool to predict alterations in tryptophan metabolism. The model is readily scalable to include more tissues, thereby enabling assessment of organismal tryptophan metabolism in health and disease. PMID:24129579

  16. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5 μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4 μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200 μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  17. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides.

  18. Double Tryptophan Exciton Probe to Gauge Proximal Side Chains in Proteins- Augmentation at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2015-01-01

    The circular dichroic (CD) exciton couplet between tryptophans and/or tyrosines offers the potential to probe distances within 10Å in proteins. The exciton effect has been used with native chromophores in critical positions in a few proteins. Here, site-directed mutagenesis created double tryptophan probes for key sites of a protein (tear lipocalin). For tear lipocalin the crystal and solution structures are concordant in both apo- and holo-forms. Double tryptophan substitutions were performed at sites that could probe conformation and were likely within 10 Å. Far-UV CD spectra of double Trp mutants were performed with controls that had non-interacting substituted tryptophans. Low temperature (77K) was tested for augmentation of the exciton signal. Exciton coupling appeared with tryptophan substitutions at positions within loop A-B (28 and 31, 33), between loop A-B (28) and strand G (103 and 105), as well as between the strands B (35) and C (56). The CD exciton couplet signals were amplified 3–5 fold at 77K. The results were concordant with close distances in crystal and solution structures. The exciton couplets had functional significance and correctly assigned the holo-conformation. The methodology creates an effective probe to identify proximal amino acids in a variety of motifs. PMID:25693116

  19. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-10-15

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown.

  20. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-10-15

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  1. Glycine as a regulator of tryptophan-dependent pigment synthesis in Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Barchmann, Thorsten; Hort, Wiebke; Krämer, Hans-Joachim; Mayser, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the addition of different amino nitrogens on growth, morphology and secondary metabolism of Malassezia furfur were investigated. After primary culture on Dixon agar, M. furfur CBS 1878 was transferred into a fluid medium together with the nitrogen sources, glycine (Gly) or tryptophan (Trp), or a combination of both. Growth was measured by means of a direct cell counting method and pigment synthesis was photometrically assessed. Addition of glycine resulted in an exponential increase in biomass, but not in pigment production. Tryptophan as the sole nitrogen source caused distinct brown staining of the medium, without increasing biomass. Simultaneous equimolar addition of both amino acids resulted in an initial increase in biomass as a sign of preferential metabolism of glycine, followed by a growth plateau and pigment production which, caused by higher biomass, occurred more rapidly than after addition of tryptophan alone. The yeast-cell morphology changed from round to oval. Addition of glycine to the tryptophan-containing liquid culture stopped pigment formation with simultaneous growth induction. These in vitro on-off phenomena depending on the nitrogen source might be significant in the pathogenesis of pityriasis versicolor: hyperhidrosis followed by preferential consumption of individual nitrogen sources such as glycine with exponential growth and thereafter transamination of tryptophan and TRP-dependent pigment synthesis. PMID:19702622

  2. The effect of L-tryptophane on yield of field bean and activity of soil microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kucharski, J; Nowak, G

    1994-01-01

    The pot trial was performed to study the effect of L-tryptophane (as an auxin precursor) applied in the amount 0.3 and 3.0 mg per 1 kg of the soil on yield and the chemical composition of field bean. The effects of this compound on dehydrogenases activity in the cells Rhizobium leguminosarum isolated from root nodules, soil dehydrogenases activity and number of microorganisms from different systematic or physiological groups were also studied. The effects of L-tryptophane were compared to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) after application to soil in the rate 0.2 mg per 1 kg of the soil of foliar spraying in the rate 20 mg Din 1 dm3 of distilled water. Studies were carried out in three experimental series: without microorganisms or with addition of Azotobacter sp. or Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar. viciae to the soil. It was found that L-tryptophane and IAA did not affect the yield of above ground part and roots of field bean and their effects on macronutrients concentration were not direct and dependent on the nutrient and experimental series. L-tryptophane and auxine increased the dehydrogenases activity in the cells of Rhizobium leguminosarum isolated from root nodules and the effect on the activity of soil dehydrogenases and urease was dependent on the rate of L-tryptophane. This chemical adversely affected the numbers of some microorganisms groups.

  3. Judgment of pure fermented soy sauce by fluorescence resonance energy transfer of OPA-tryptophan adduct.

    PubMed

    Gao, You-Syuan; Hsieh, Bo-Chuan; Cheng, Tzong-Jih; Chen, Richie L C

    2015-07-01

    Tryptophan was detected with a flow-injection manifold after reacting with mM order of fluorogenic o-phthalaldehyde (OPA)/thiol reagent (pH 10.0) in the carrier stream (0.63 mL/min). Based on the intra-molecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer of OPA-tryptophan adduct, the difference in fluorescence intensity obtained at 280 and 300 nm excitation was used to detect tryptophan content with satisfactory precision (CV<6.5% for concentration higher than 0.5 μM), linearity (0.1-10 μM, R(2)=0.9893) and sensitivity (≈10 nM). Since tryptophan will decompose during manufacturing non-fermented soy sauce by acid-hydrolysis procedure, the method was used to discriminate pure fermented soy sauces, adulterated soy sauces and chemical soy sauces in less than 5 min. The ratio of tryptophan to total amino acid content served as the index for the judgment, and the results were validated by capillary electrophoresis.

  4. Coordinate regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and indolic phytoalexin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Last, R L

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms that couple regulation of secondary metabolic pathways to the synthesis of primary metabolic precursors. Camalexin, an indolic secondary metabolite, appears to be the major phytoalexin in Arabidopsis. It was previously shown that camalexin accumulation is caused by infection with plant pathogens, by abiotic elicitors, and in spontaneous lesions in the accelerated cell death mutant acd2. We demonstrate that the accumulation of this phytoalexin is accompanied by the induction of the mRNAs and proteins for all of the tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes tested. A strong correlation was observed between the magnitude of camalexin accumulation and the induction of tryptophan biosynthetic proteins, indicating coordinate regulation of these processes. Production of disease symptoms is not sufficient for the response because systemic infection with cauliflower mosaic virus or cucumber mosaic virus did not induce the tryptophan pathway enzymes or camalexin accumulation. Salicylic acid appears to be required, but unlike other documented pathogenesis-related proteins, it is not sufficient for the coordinate induction. Results with trp mutants suggest that the tryptophan pathway is not rate limiting for camalexin accumulation. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the regulation of the tryptophan pathway in plants responds to needs for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:8989880

  5. The improved L-tryptophan production in recombinant Escherichia coli by expressing the polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pengfei; Kang, Junhua; Yang, Fan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2013-05-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), the best known polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) has been believed to change intracellular metabolic flow and oxidation/reduction state, as well as enhance stress resistance of the host. In this study, a PHB biosynthesis pathway, which contains phaCAB operon genes from Ralstonia eutropha, was introduced into an L-tryptophan producing Escherichia coli strain GPT1002. The expression of the PHB biosynthesis genes resulted in PHB accumulation inside the cells and improved the L-tryptophan production. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the transcription of tryptophan operon genes in GPT2000 increased by 1.9 to 4.3 times compared with the control, indicating that PHB biosynthesis in engineered E. coli changed the physiological state of the host. Xylose was added into the medium as co-substrate to enhance the precursor supply for PHB biosynthesis. The addition of xylose improved both extracellular L-tryptophan production and intracellular PHB accumulation. Moreover, we obtained 14.4 g l(-1) L-tryptophan production and 9.7 % PHB (w/w) accumulation in GPT2000 via fed-batch cultivation. PMID:23321909

  6. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides. PMID:27621456

  7. Coordinate regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and indolic phytoalexin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Last, R L

    1996-12-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms that couple regulation of secondary metabolic pathways to the synthesis of primary metabolic precursors. Camalexin, an indolic secondary metabolite, appears to be the major phytoalexin in Arabidopsis. It was previously shown that camalexin accumulation is caused by infection with plant pathogens, by abiotic elicitors, and in spontaneous lesions in the accelerated cell death mutant acd2. We demonstrate that the accumulation of this phytoalexin is accompanied by the induction of the mRNAs and proteins for all of the tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes tested. A strong correlation was observed between the magnitude of camalexin accumulation and the induction of tryptophan biosynthetic proteins, indicating coordinate regulation of these processes. Production of disease symptoms is not sufficient for the response because systemic infection with cauliflower mosaic virus or cucumber mosaic virus did not induce the tryptophan pathway enzymes or camalexin accumulation. Salicylic acid appears to be required, but unlike other documented pathogenesis-related proteins, it is not sufficient for the coordinate induction. Results with trp mutants suggest that the tryptophan pathway is not rate limiting for camalexin accumulation. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the regulation of the tryptophan pathway in plants responds to needs for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.

  8. Ordered mesoporous materials based on interfacial assembly and engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-01

    Ordered mesoporous materials have inspired prominent research interest due to their unique properties and functionalities and potential applications in adsorption, separation, catalysis, sensors, drug delivery, energy conversion and storage, and so on. Thanks to continuous efforts over the past two decades, great achievements have been made in the synthesis and structural characterization of mesoporous materials. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in preparing ordered mesoporous materials from the viewpoint of interfacial assembly and engineering. Five interfacial assembly and synthesis are comprehensively highlighted, including liquid-solid interfacial assembly, gas-liquid interfacial assembly, liquid-liquid interfacial assembly, gas-solid interfacial synthesis, and solid-solid interfacial synthesis, basics about their synthesis pathways, princples and interface engineering strategies.

  9. Mechanistic Insights into Radical-Mediated Oxidation of Tryptophan from ab Initio Quantum Chemistry Calculations and QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wood, Geoffrey P F; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Moore, Jamie M; Wang, John; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2016-05-12

    An assessment of the mechanisms of (•)OH and (•)OOH radical-mediated oxidation of tryptophan was performed using density functional theory calculations and ab initio plane-wave Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored site with a barrierless reaction in the gas phase. The subsequent degradation of this adduct through a H atom transfer to water was intermittently observed in aqueous-phase molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OOH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored pathway, in contrast to the situation in the model system ethylene, where concerted addition to the double bond is preferred. From the (•)OOH position 2 adduct QM/MM simulations show that formation of oxy-3-indolanaline occurs readily in an aqueous environment. The observed transformation starts from an initial rupture of the O-O bond followed by a H atom transfer with the accompanying loss of an (•)OH radical to solution. Finally, classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to equate observed differential oxidation rates of various tryptophan residues in monoclonal antibody fragments. It was found that simple parameters derived from simulation correlate well with the experimental data. PMID:27082439

  10. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Shashank, Priya

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  11. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  12. Frontiers of interfacial water research :workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2005-10-01

    Water is the critical natural resource of the new century. Significant improvements in traditional water treatment processes require novel approaches based on a fundamental understanding of nanoscale and atomic interactions at interfaces between aqueous solution and materials. To better understand these critical issues and to promote an open dialog among leading international experts in water-related specialties, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored a workshop on April 24-26, 2005 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The ''Frontiers of Interfacial Water Research Workshop'' provided attendees with a critical review of water technologies and emphasized the new advances in surface and interfacial microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and computer simulation needed for the development of new materials for water treatment.

  13. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  14. Interfacial transport in lithium-ion conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaofei, Wang; Liquan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Physical models of ion diffusion at different interfaces are reviewed. The use of impedance spectroscopy (IS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques are also discussed. The diffusion of ions is fundamental to the operation of lithium-ion batteries, taking place not only within the grains but also across different interfaces. Interfacial ion transport usually contributes to the majority of the resistance in lithium-ion batteries. A greater understanding of the interfacial diffusion of ions is crucial to improving battery performance. Project supported by the Beijing S&T Project, China (Grant No. Z13111000340000), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51325206 and 11234013) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB932900).

  15. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  16. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  17. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, C. A. F.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.; Ismail-Beigi, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  18. Interfacial microfluidic transport on micropatterned superhydrophobic textile.

    PubMed

    Xing, Siyuan; Jiang, Jia; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-05-21

    Textile-enabled interfacial microfluidics, utilizing fibrous hydrophilic yarns (e.g., cotton) to guide biological reagent flows, has been extended to various biochemical analyses recently. The restricted capillary-driving mechanism, however, persists as a major challenge for continuous and facilitated biofluidic transport. In this paper, we have first introduced a novel interfacial microfluidic transport principle to drive three-dimensional liquid flows on a micropatterned superhydrophobic textile (MST) platform in a more autonomous and controllable manner. Specifically, the MST system utilizes the surface tension-induced Laplace pressure to facilitate the liquid motion along the hydrophilic yarn, in addition to the capillarity present in the fibrous structure. The fabrication of MST is simply accomplished by stitching hydrophilic cotton yarn into a superhydrophobic fabric substrate (contact angle 140 ± 3°), from which well-controlled wetting patterns are established for interfacial microfluidic operations. The geometric configurations of the stitched micropatterns, e.g., the lengths and diameters of the yarn and bundled arrangement, can all influence the transport process, which is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Two operation modes, discrete and continuous transport, are also presented in detail. In addition, the gravitational effect as well as the droplet removal process have been also considered and quantitatively analysed during the transport process. As a demonstration, an MST design has been implemented on an artificial skin surface to collect and remove sweat in a highly efficient and facilitated means. The results have illustrated that the novel interfacial transport on the textile platform can be potentially extended to a variety of biofluidic collection and removal applications.

  19. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Microstructural Evolution Based on Fundamental Interfacial Properties

    SciTech Connect

    A. D. Rollett; D. J. Srolovitz; A. Karma

    2003-07-11

    This first CMSN project has been operating since the summer of 1999. The main achievement of the project was to bring together a community of materials scientists, physicists and mathematicians who share a common interest in the properties of interfaces and the impact of those properties on microstructural evolution. Six full workshops were held at Carnegie Mellon (CMU), Northwestern (NWU), Santa Fe, Northeastern University (NEU), National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), Ames Laboratory, and at the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) respectively. Substantial scientific results were obtained through the sustained contact between the members of the project. A recent issue of Interface Science (volume 10, issue 2/3, July 2002) was dedicated to the output of the project. The results include: the development of methods for extracting anisotropic boundary energy and mobility from molecular dynamics simulations of solid/liquid interfaces in nickel; the extraction of anisotropic energies and mobilities in aluminum from similar MD simulations; the application of parallel computation to the calculation of interfacial properties; the development of a method to extract interfacial properties from the fluctuations in interface position through consideration of interfacial stiffness; the use of anisotropic interface properties in studies of abnormal grain growth; the discovery of abnormal grain growth from random distributions of orientation in subgrain networks; the direct comparison at the scale of individual grains between experimentally observed grain growth and simulations, which confirmed the importance of including anisotropic interfacial properties in the simulations; the classification of a rich variety of dendritic morphologies based on slight variations in the anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface; development of phase field methods that permit both solidification and grain growth to be simulated within the same framework.

  1. RNAi-induced silencing of embryonic tryptophan oxygenase in the Pyralid moth, Plodia interpunctella

    PubMed Central

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Kanost, Michael R.; Baker, James E.

    2004-01-01

    Gene silencing through the introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNA interference, RNAi) provides a powerful tool for the elucidation of gene function in many systems, including those where genomics and proteomics are incomplete. The use of RNAi technology for gene silencing in Lepidoptera has lacked significant attention compared to other systems. To demonstrate that RNAi can be utilized in the lepidopteran, Plodia interpunctella, we cloned a cDNA for tryptophan oxygenase, and showed that silencing of tryptophan oxygenase through RNAi during embryonic development resulted in loss of eye-color pigmentation. The complete amino acid sequence of Plodia tryptophan oxygenase can be accessed through NCBI Protein Database under NCBI Accession # AY427951. Abbreviation RNAi RNA interference PCR polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR reverse transcription-PCR PMID:15861231

  2. GPR142 Controls Tryptophan-Induced Insulin and Incretin Hormone Secretion to Improve Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Efanov, Alexander M.; Fang, Xiankang; Beavers, Lisa S.; Wang, Xuesong; Wang, Jingru; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Ma, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    GPR142, a putative amino acid receptor, is expressed in pancreatic islets and the gastrointestinal tract, but the ligand affinity and physiological role of this receptor remain obscure. In this study, we show that in addition to L-Tryptophan, GPR142 signaling is also activated by L-Phenylalanine but not by other naturally occurring amino acids. Furthermore, we show that Tryptophan and a synthetic GPR142 agonist increase insulin and incretin hormones and improve glucose disposal in mice in a GPR142-dependent manner. In contrast, Phenylalanine improves in vivo glucose disposal independently of GPR142. Noteworthy, refeeding-induced elevations in insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide are blunted in Gpr142 null mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate GPR142 is a Tryptophan receptor critically required for insulin and incretin hormone regulation and suggest GPR142 agonists may be effective therapies that leverage amino acid sensing pathways for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27322810

  3. Dosimetry of D- and L-enantiomers of /sup 11/C-labeled tryptophan and valine

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, L.C.; Byrd, B.L.; Sun, T.T.; Crook, J.E.; Hubner, K.F.; Coffey, J.L.; Watson, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    We have previously reported the radiation dosimetry of /sup 11/C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine, as well as clinical pancreatic imaging studies with these agents. Because of significant uptake in both normal pancreas and in pancreatic tumors (thought to be due to the presence of the D-enantiomer), differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma was not feasible. High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods were developed for rapid resolution of /sup 11/C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine. Radiation dose estimates to the various organs in man were calculated for the D- and L-enantiomers of /sup 11/C-labeled tryptophan and valine, based on tissue distribution data in rats. The dose estimates were sufficiently low that 20-mCi doses of each of the enantiomeric amino acids were approved by the FDA for intravenous administration to humans. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Alexander; Borchers, Julie; Kirby, Brian; He, Chunyong; Arenholz, Elke; Vailionis, Arturas; Flint, Charles; Suzuki, Yuri

    Atomically precise complex oxide heterostructures provide model systems for the discovery of new emergent phenomena since their magnetism, structure and electronic properties are strongly coupled. Octahedral tilts and rotations have been shown to alter the magnetic properties of complex oxide heterostructures, but typically induce small, gradual magnetic changes. Here, we demonstrate sharp switching between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order at the emergent ferromagnetic interfaces of CaRuO3/CaMnO3 superlattices. Through synchrotron X-ray diffraction and neutron reflectometry, we show that octahedral distortions in superlattices with an odd number of CaMnO3 unit cells in each layer are symmetry mismatched across the interface. In this case, the rotation symmetry switches across the interface, reducing orbital overlap, suppressing charge transfer from Ru to Mn, and disrupting the interfacial double exchange. This disruption switches half of the interfaces from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic and lowers the saturation magnetic of the superlattice from 1.0 to 0.5 μB/interfacial Mn. By targeting a purely interfacial emergent magnetic system, we achieve drastic alterations to the magnetic ground state with extremely small changes in layer thickness.

  5. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  6. Investigation of interfacial rheology & foam stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn M.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-05-01

    The rheology at gas-liquid interfaces strongly influences the stability and dynamics of foams and emulsions. Several experimental techniques are employed to characterize the rheology at liquid-gas interfaces with an emphasis on the non-Newtonian behavior of surfactant-laden interfaces. The focus is to relate the interfacial rheology to the foamability and foam stability of various aqueous systems. An interfacial stress rheometer (ISR) is used to measure the steady and dynamic rheology by applying an external magnetic field to actuate a magnetic needle suspended at the interface. Results are compared with those from a double wall ring attachment to a rotational rheometer (TA Instruments AR-G2). Micro-interfacial rheology (MIR) is also performed using optical tweezers to manipulate suspended microparticle probes at the interface to investigate the steady and dynamic rheology. Additionally, a surface dilatational rheometer (SDR) is used to periodically oscillate the volume of a pendant drop or buoyant bubble. Applying the Young-Laplace equation to the drop shape, a time-dependent surface tension can be calculated and used to determine the effective dilatational viscosity of an interface. Using the ISR, double wall ring, SDR, and MIR, a wide range of sensitivity in surface forces (fN to nN) can be explored as each experimental method has different sensitivities. Measurements will be compared to foam stability.

  7. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  8. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  9. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam® 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure® 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure® 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure® 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure® 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam® 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure® 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  10. Pigment Production on L-Tryptophan Medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  11. Pigment production on L-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  12. Hydrogen exchange kinetics and the mechanism of reaction B of yeast tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Turner, P D; Loughrey, H C; Bailey, C J

    1985-12-20

    It has been shown that yeast tryptophan synthase (L-serine hydro-lyase (adding indoleglycerol-phosphate) EC 4.2.1.20) catalyses tritium exchange reactions between protons on the alpha-carbon of L-serine of L-tryptophan, and water. The absolute rates of these reactions and indole-serine condensation (reaction B), all of which are pyridoxal phosphate-dependent, were measured. L-Serine exchange was resolved into two components, a high-affinity, slow, Michaelian reaction (KmS,H = 0.06 mM, kcats,H 3 X 10(-3) s-1) and a faster reaction (kcat greater than 2.5 S-1) which was not saturated even at 100 mM L-serine. Hydrogen exchange by tryptophan was a Michaelian process (KmT,H = 2.9 mM; kcatT,H = 0.6 s-1). Indole did not inhibit either exchange reaction. A plausible explanation of the results, that reaction B has a ping-pong mechanism with serine as first substrate and water and L-tryptophan as first and second products, respectively, was inadequate because of the observations that L-tryptophan is as first and second products, respectively, was inadequate because of the observations that L-tryptophan is synthesised with less than 1 mol of exchanged proton per mol amino acid, and that the ratio kcat/Km for serine changes between enzyme reactions. A branched modification with two enzyme-serine complexes, only one of which will exchange protons with water, will fit all the results. PMID:3935173

  13. Lysergic acid diethylamide: role in conversion of plasma tryptophan to brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine).

    PubMed

    Lin, R C; Ngai, S H; Costa, E

    1969-10-10

    Injections of D-lysergic acid diethylamide decrease the turnover rate of 5-hydroxytryptamine of rat brain, as measured from the conversion of (14)C-tryptophan into (14)C-5-hydroxytryptamine. The 2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide given in doses fivefold greater than those of lysergic acid diethylamide fails to change the rate of (14)C-tryptophan conversion into (14)C-5-hydroxytryptamine. The effect of D-lysergic acid diethylamide is discussed with regard to its action on brain serotonergic neurons and its psychotomimetic effects.

  14. Determination of Tyrosine and Tryptophan Metabolites in Body Ruids Using Electrochemical Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Gregory C.; Koch, David D.; Kissinger, Peter T.; Bruntlett, Craig S.; Shoup, Ronald E.

    The amino acids tyrosine and tryptophan are precursors for a number of important physiological compounds. The catecholamines, which are metabolites of tyrosine, serve as neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Serotonin, a major metabolite of tryptophan, is a potent neurotransmitter and vasoconstrictor. Without doubt, these compounds have been some of the most intensely studied molecules in the last twenty years. One of the benefits that often accrues from basic biochemical research is clinical data of diagnostic and prognostic significance. In this case, however, the results have been disappointing. In only a few instances has the measurement of metabolites of these two amino acids been shown to have real clinical significance.

  15. Comparison of tryptophan biosynthetic operon regulation in different Gram-positive bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Preciado, Ana; Yanofsky, Charles; Merino, Enrique

    2007-09-01

    The tryptophan biosynthetic operon has been widely used as a model system for studying transcription regulation. In Bacillus subtilis, the trp operon is primarily regulated by a tryptophan-activated RNA-binding protein, TRAP. Here we show that in many other Gram-positive species the trp operon is regulated differently, by tRNA(Trp) sensing by the RNA-based T-box mechanism, with T-boxes arranged in tandem. Our analyses reveal an apparent relationship between trp operon organization and the specific regulatory mechanism(s) used. PMID:17555843

  16. Tryptophan-ethylester, the false (unveiled) melatonin isomer in red wine.

    PubMed

    Iriti, Marcello; Vigentini, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Among the food plants, the presence of melatonin in grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) deserves particular attention because of the production of wine, an alcoholic beverage of economic relevance and with putative healthy effects. Furthermore, melatonin isomers have been detected in wine too. Recently, one of these isomers has been identified as tryptophan-ethylester, a compound with the same molecular weight of melatonin. In this Commentary, we briefly comment the source(s) of tryptophan-ethylester in wine and the putative nutritional role(s). PMID:25922582

  17. Fluorescent differentiation and quantificational detection of free tryptophan in serum within a confined metal-organic tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    He, Cheng; Wang, Jian; Wu, Pengyan; Jia, Lingyun; Bai, Ying; Zhang, Zhichao; Duan, Chunying

    2012-12-18

    A metal-organic cerium tetrahedron having size constraints and cooperated interactions within its cavity was used to selectively recognize tryptophan over other natural amino acids and Trp-containing peptides. It was applied in quantificational detection of free tryptophan in serum.

  18. Regulation of Enzymes Involved in the Conversion of Tryptophan to Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide in a Colorless Strain of Xanthomonas pruni1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Albert T.; Wagner, Conrad

    1970-01-01

    A colorless strain of Xanthomonas pruni was isolated which is capable of converting tryptophan to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). The enzymes responsible for the conversion of tryptophan to quinolinic acid were shown to be present. Nicotinic acid-requiring mutants were isolated, and it was found that the growth of these mutants can be supported by various intermediates on the pathway from tryptophan to NAD. The first three enzymes on this pathway are induced coordinately by l-tryptophan. Gratuitous inducers of these enzymes include d-tryptophan, α-methyl-dl-tryptophan, and 4-methyl-dl-tryptophan; formyl-l-kynurenine and l-kynurenine were not effective as inducers. These data suggest that at least the first three enzymes in the pathway from tryptophan to NAD are under common regulatory control. PMID:4313053

  19. Interfacial fracture between highly crosslinked polymer networks and a solid surface: Effect of interfacial bond density

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-03-23

    For highly crosslinked, polymer networks bonded to a solid surface, the effect of interfacial bond density as well as system size on interfacial fracture is studied molecular dynamics simulations. The correspondence between the stress-strain curve and the sequence of molecular deformations is obtained. The failure strain for a fully bonded surface is equal to the strain necessary to make taut the average minimal path through the network from the bottom solid surface to the top surface. At bond coverages less than full, nanometer scale cavities form at the surface yielding an inhomogeneous strain profile. The failure strain and stress are linearly proportional to the number of bonds at the interface unless the number of bonds is so few that van der Waals interactions dominate. The failure is always interfacial due to fewer bonds at the interface than in the bulk.

  20. The tryptophan hydroxylase activation inhibitor, AGN-2979, decreases regional 5-HT synthesis in the rat brain measured with alpha-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Shu; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Gittos, Maurice; Diksic, Mirko

    2005-10-15

    Many experimental conditions are stressful for animals. It is well known that stress induces tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activation, resulting in increased serotonin (5-HT) synthesis. In our experimental procedure to measure 5-HT synthesis using alpha-[(14)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (alpha-MTrp) autoradiographic method, the hind limbs of animals are restrained using a loose-fitted plaster cast such that the forelimbs of the animal remain free. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the changes, if any, in 5-HT synthesis, after injecting these restrained rats with the TPH activation inhibitor AGN-2979. The effect on regional 5-HT synthesis was studied using the alpha-MTrp autoradiographic method. The hypothesis was that the TPH activation inhibitor would reduce 5-HT synthesis, if TPH activation was induced by this restraint. The rats received injection of AGN-2979 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or distilled water vehicle (1 mL/kg, i.p.) 1 h prior to tracer administration. The free- and total tryptophan concentrations were not significantly different between the treatment and control groups. The results demonstrate that 5-HT synthesis in AGN-2979 treated rats is significantly decreased (-12 to -35%) in both the raphe nuclei and their terminal areas when compared to the control rats. These findings suggest that restrained conditions, such as those used in our experimental protocol, induce TPH activation resulting in an increased 5-HT synthesis throughout the brain. The reduction in 5-HT synthesis in the AGN-2979 group is not related to a change in the plasma tryptophan. Because there was no activation in the pineal body, the structure having a different isoform of TPH, we can propose that it is only the brain TPH that becomes activated with this specific restraint.

  1. Role of Lipid Composition on the Interaction between a Tryptophan-Rich Protein and Model Bacterial Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Michael R; Clifton, Luke A; Frazier, Richard A; Green, Rebecca J

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between tryptophan-rich puroindoline proteins and model bacterial membranes at the air-liquid interface has been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy, surface pressure measurements, and Brewster angle microscopy. The role of different lipid constituents on the interactions between lipid membrane and protein was studied using wild type (Pin-b) and mutant (Trp44 to Arg44 mutant, Pin-bs) puroindoline proteins. The results show differences in the lipid selectivity of the two proteins in terms of preferential binding to specific lipid head groups in mixed lipid systems. Pin-b wild type was able to penetrate mixed layers of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) head groups more deeply compared to the mutant Pin-bs. Increasing saturation of the lipid tails increased penetration and adsorption of Pin-b wild type, but again the response of the mutant form differed. The results provide insight as to the role of membrane architecture, lipid composition, and fluidity on antimicrobial activity of proteins. Data show distinct differences in the lipid binding behavior of Pin-b as a result of a single residue mutation, highlighting the importance of hydrophobic and charged amino acids in antimicrobial protein and peptide activity. PMID:26813886

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence of thioredoxin single-tryptophan mutants: modeling experimental results with minimum perturbation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Norberto D., Jr.; Haydock, Christopher; Prendergast, Franklyn G.

    1994-08-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence decay of single tryptophan (Trp) proteins is typically described using either a distribution of lifetimes or a sum of two or more exponential terms. A possible interpretation for this fluorescence decay heterogeneity is the existence of different isomeric conformations of Trp about its (chi) +1) and (chi) +2) dihedral angles. Are multiple Trp conformations compatible with the remainder of the protein in its crystallographic configuration or do they require repacking of neighbor side chains? It is conceivable that isomers of the neighbor side chains interconvert slowly on the fluorescence timescale and contribute additional lifetime components to the fluorescence intensity. We have explored this possibility by performing minimum perturbation mapping simulations of Trp 28 and Trp 31 in thioredoxin (TRX) using CHARMm 22. Mappings of Trp 29 and Trp 31 give the TRX Trp residue energy landscape as a function of (chi) +1) and (chi) +2) dihedral angles. Time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay of mutant TRX (W28F and W31F) are measured and interpreted in light of the above simulations. Relevant observables, like order parameters and isomerization rates, can be derived from the minimum perturbation maps and compared with experiment.

  3. Conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin in Japanese women fed a purified diet conforming to the Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes.

    PubMed

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Ohta, Mari; Kimtjra, Naoko; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Shibata, Katsumi

    2004-12-01

    In order to establish the human requirements of niacin, it is first important to know how much tryptophan is converted to niacin in the human body. In a general, 60 mg of tryptophan is equivalent to 1 mg of niacin, whereas the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin is yet to be confirmed. The aim of this study was to know the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin in Japanese females fed a purified diet, which followed the Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes. Ten young Japanese females were housed in the same facility and given the same daily living activity schedule for 7 d. The composition of their purified diet was conformed to the Dietary Reference Intakes in Japan. The diet was niacin free. In order to investigate the conversion ratio, daily urinary outputs were collected. Tryptophan-niacin metabolites in the urine were measured and the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin calculated. The conversion ratio was calculated by comparing the dietary intake of tryptophan and the sum of the niacin catabolites such as N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, and N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, which were derived only from the dietary intake of tryptophan. The ratio was calculated as 1.5 +/- 0.1 (mean +/-SE for 10 women; in molar basis) on the last day of the experiment. It was calculated that if the excretory percentage of niacin metabolites in the urine were 60%, of the tryptophan ingested, the conversion factor would be a value of 67, meaning that is 67 mg of tryptophan is equal to 1 mg of niacin.

  4. Interfacial thiol-ene photo-click reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photo-click reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a non-cleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photo-rheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using UV/Vis spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to re-initiate thiol-ene photo-click reaction even after light exposure. Due to its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from pre-formed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  5. Electrostatic control of the tryptophan radical in cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Tiffany P; Bhaskar, B; Poulos, Thomas L

    2004-07-13

    Previously a K(+)-binding site, analogous to that found in ascorbate peroxidase (APX), was engineered into cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) to test the hypothesis that the bound K(+) influences the stability of the Trp191 cation radical formed during the CcP catalytic cycle (Bonagura et al., (1996) Biochemistry 35, 6107 and Bonagura et al., (1999) Biochemistry 38, 5528). Characterization of this mutant, designated CcPK2, showed that the stability of the Trp191 cation radical is dependent on the occupancy of the engineered K(+) site and that the Trp191 radical was much less stable in this mutant than in wild-type CcP. The mutations Met230Leu, Met231Gln, and Met172Ser have now been constructed on the CcPK2 mutant template to test if the Met residues also contribute to the stabilization of the Trp191 cation radical. Crystal structures show that the mutations affect only the local structure near the sites of mutation. Removal of these electronegative residues located less than 8 A from the Trp radical results in a further destabilization of the Trp radical. The characteristic EPR signal associated with the Trp radical is significantly narrowed and is characteristic of a tyrosine radical signal. Double-mixing stopped-flow experiments, where the delay time between the formation of CcP compound I and its mixing with horse heart ferrocytochrome c is varied, show that the stability of the Trp radical decreases as the Met residues are removed from the proximal cavity. When taken together, these results demonstrate a strong correlation between the experimentally determined stability of the Trp191 radical, the enzyme activity, and the calculated electrostatic stabilization of the Trp191 radical. PMID:15236591

  6. Nitration of tyrosyl residues in human alpha-lactalbumin. Effect on lactose synthase specifier activity.

    PubMed

    Prieels, J P; Dolmans, M; Leonis, J; Brew, K

    1975-12-15

    Alpha-Lactalbumin isolated from human milk was reacted with tetranitromethane in molar excess of 8-32 mol/mol of tyrosine. After gel filtration on Sephadex G-75, followed by chromatographic fractionation using DEAE-Sephadex A-25, three main components were separated, which differed from one another in the extent of nitration. These protein fractions were found to contain, respectively, one and two nitrotyrosine residues, or two nitrotyrosine residues together with one nitrotryptophan. The lactose synthase specifier activity of each of these components was measured and compared with that of unsubstituted alpha-lactalbumin. Comparison of kinetic parameters showed the chemically modified proteins to be only slightly less active when tyrosines were the sole residues modified. In sharp contrast the additional nitration of a single tryptophan residue totally abolished the specifying activity of alpha-lactalbumin. Circular dichroism spectra of the tryptophan derivative revealed some structural alteration when compared with the other two and with the native protein. The conclusion could also be confirmed by using a double-immunodiffusion technique. After hydrolysis of the derivatives with thermolysin, it was possible to localize the substituted residues in the known sequence of human alpha-lactalbumin. Tyrosine-103 was found to be more easily nitrated than tyrosine-18. These two residues seem, therefore, to be on the outer surface of the molecule and more exposed than tyrosine-36 and tyrosine-50. Some precautions are indicated in the use of tetranitromethane as a nitrating agent on the basis of complex products observed in the nitration of the free amino acids tyrosine and tryptophan and their derivatives. PMID:812700

  7. The impact of interfacial tension on multiphase flow in the CO2-brine-sandstone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.; Blunt, M. J.; Krevor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Two dominant controls on continuum scale multiphase flow properties are interfacial tension (IFT) and wetting. In hydrocarbon-brine systems, relative permeability is known to increase with decreasing IFT, while residual trapping is controlled by the wetting properties of a permeable rock and the hysteresis between drainage and imbibtion (Amaefule & Handy, 1982; Bardon & Longeron, 1980; Juanes et al., 2006). Fluid properties of the CO2-brine system, such as viscosity, density and interfacial tension, are well characterised and have known dependencies on temperature, pressure and brine salinity. Interest in this particular fluid system is motivated by CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery. Despite increased interest in CO2 storage, the response of the CO2-brine relative permeability to varying IFT has yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Additionally the wide range of thermophysical properties (density, viscosity etc.) that exist across a relatively small range of pressures and temperatures makes it an ideal system with which to investigate the physics of multiphase flow in general. This is the first systematic study to investigate the impact of IFT on drainage and imbibition relative permeability for the CO2-brine-sandstone system. The experimental design has been adapted from a traditional steady state core flood in two ways. First, while conditions may be easily selected to obtain a range of interfacial tensions, isolating the independent impact of interfacial tension on relative permeability is less simple. Thus experimental conditions are selected so as to vary interfacial tension, while minimising the variation in viscosity ratio between CO2 and brine. Second, in order to attribute the impacts of changing conditions, it is necessary to have precise results such that small shifts in observations can be identified. Multiphase flow theory is used to both design the conditions of the test and interpret the observations, leading to a much higher precision in

  8. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; Wang, Lumin

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  9. Functionalization enhancement on interfacial shear strength between graphene and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yikuang; Duan, Fangli; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-11-01

    Pull-out processes were simulated to investigate the interfacial mechanical properties between the functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) and polyethylene (PE) matrix by using molecular dynamics simulation with ReaxFF reactive force field. The interfacial structure of polymer and the interfacial interaction in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems were also analyzed to reveal the enhancement mechanism of interfacial shear strength. We observed the insertion of functional groups into polymer layer in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems. During the pull-out process, some interfacial chains were attached on the FGS and pulled out from the polymer matrix. The behavior of these pulled out chains was further analyzed to clarify the different traction action of functional groups applied on them. The results show that the traction effect of functional groups on the pulled-out chains is agreement with their enhancement influence on the interfacial shear strength of the FGS/PE systems. They both are basically dominated by the size of functional groups, suggesting the enhancement mechanism of mechanical interlocking. However, interfacial binding strength also exhibits an obvious influence on the interfacial shear properties of the hybrid system. Our simulation show that geometric constrains at the interface is the principal contributor to the enhancement of interfacial shear strength in the FGS/PE systems, which could be further strengthened by the wrinkled morphology of graphene in experiments.

  10. Problem-Solving Test: Attenuation--A Mechanism to Regulate Bacterial Tryptophan Biosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: tryptophan, transcription unit, operon, "trp" repressor, corepressor, operator, promoter, palindrome, initiation, elongation, and termination of transcription, open reading frame, coupled transcription/translation, chromosome-polysome complex. (Contains 2 figures and 1 footnote.)

  11. Monitoring of tryptophan as a biomarker for cancerous cells in Terahertz (THz) sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan, Hakan; Simsek Ozek, Nihal; Gok, Seher; Ozyurt, Ipek; Severcan, Feride

    2016-03-01

    Tryptophan is an extremely important amino acid for a variety of biological functions in living organisms. Changes in the concentration of this amino acid can point to identification of cancerous tissues or even confirm symptoms of depression in patients. Therefore it is extremely important to identify and quantify tryptophan concentrations in human blood as well as in in-vivo diagnostic studies. Here a reflection based terahertz pulsed spectroscopy system was used to study the interaction of THz pulses with cancerous cells to gauge the possibility of using L-tryptophan as a biomarker for THz sensing of diseases. Initial measurements were performed on human colon adenocarcinoma cells and human breast cancer cells cultivated on glass slides. The glass slides utilized in the growth process limited the measurements not only to reflection based geometries but also limited the analysis of the samples in the frequency domain due to the highly absorbing nature of glass in the THz region. The useful bandwidth was limited to frequencies below 0.6THz which prohibited us from investigating the effects of L-tryptophan in these samples. Even with the limited frequency range the measurements show that there are slight differences in the transmission of the THz pulse through different samples.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of NADH and tryptophan in intact ischemic, intact rabbit myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, Adrian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Sommers, Keith

    1999-07-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of early dysfunction following transplantation. Currently, there are no techniques available to accurately measure ischemic changes during organ storage. Therefore, the interest exists in developing non-invasive monitoring techniques. We used NADH and tryptophan as fluorescent markers, since both are intrinsic fluorophores and excellent indicators for levels of hypoxia and protein denaturation, respectively.

  13. Rapid Phytotransformation of Benzotriazole Generates Synthetic Tryptophan and Auxin Analogs in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    LeFevre, Gregory H; Müller, Claudia E; Li, Russell Jingxian; Luthy, Richard G; Sattely, Elizabeth S

    2015-09-15

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) are xenobiotic contaminants widely distributed in aquatic environments and of emerging concern due to their polarity, recalcitrance, and common use. During some water reclamation activities, such as stormwater bioretention or crop irrigation with recycled water, BTs come in contact with vegetation, presenting a potential exposure route to consumers. We discovered that BT in hydroponic systems was rapidly (approximately 1-log per day) assimilated by Arabidopsis plants and metabolized to novel BT metabolites structurally resembling tryptophan and auxin plant hormones; <1% remained as parent compound. Using LC-QTOF-MS untargeted metabolomics, we identified two major types of BT transformation products: glycosylation and incorporation into the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. BT amino acid metabolites are structurally analogous to tryptophan and the storage forms of auxin plant hormones. Critical intermediates were synthesized (authenticated by (1)H/(13)C NMR) for product verification. In a multiple-exposure temporal mass balance, three major metabolites accounted for >60% of BT. Glycosylated BT was excreted by the plants into the hydroponic medium, a phenomenon not observed previously. The observed amino acid metabolites are likely formed when tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes substitute synthetic BT for native indolic molecules, generating potential phytohormone mimics. These results suggest that BT metabolism by plants could mask the presence of BT contamination in the environment. Furthermore, BT-derived metabolites are structurally related to plant auxin hormones and should be evaluated for undesirable biological effects. PMID:26301449

  14. Rapid Phytotransformation of Benzotriazole Generates Synthetic Tryptophan and Auxin Analogs in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    LeFevre, Gregory H; Müller, Claudia E; Li, Russell Jingxian; Luthy, Richard G; Sattely, Elizabeth S

    2015-09-15

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) are xenobiotic contaminants widely distributed in aquatic environments and of emerging concern due to their polarity, recalcitrance, and common use. During some water reclamation activities, such as stormwater bioretention or crop irrigation with recycled water, BTs come in contact with vegetation, presenting a potential exposure route to consumers. We discovered that BT in hydroponic systems was rapidly (approximately 1-log per day) assimilated by Arabidopsis plants and metabolized to novel BT metabolites structurally resembling tryptophan and auxin plant hormones; <1% remained as parent compound. Using LC-QTOF-MS untargeted metabolomics, we identified two major types of BT transformation products: glycosylation and incorporation into the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. BT amino acid metabolites are structurally analogous to tryptophan and the storage forms of auxin plant hormones. Critical intermediates were synthesized (authenticated by (1)H/(13)C NMR) for product verification. In a multiple-exposure temporal mass balance, three major metabolites accounted for >60% of BT. Glycosylated BT was excreted by the plants into the hydroponic medium, a phenomenon not observed previously. The observed amino acid metabolites are likely formed when tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes substitute synthetic BT for native indolic molecules, generating potential phytohormone mimics. These results suggest that BT metabolism by plants could mask the presence of BT contamination in the environment. Furthermore, BT-derived metabolites are structurally related to plant auxin hormones and should be evaluated for undesirable biological effects.

  15. Adipogenesis and aldosterone: a study in lean tryptophan-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Pokusa, Michal; Hlavacova, Natasa; Csanova, Agnesa; Franklin, Michael; Zorad, Stefan; Jezova, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    Next to epithelial tissues, mineralocorticoid receptors are also expressed in adipose tissue and are involved in the process of adipogenesis. Mineralocorticoid receptors in adipose tissue are likely to be activated mainly by glucocorticoids. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the processes related to adipogenesis are modified under the conditions associated with high circulating aldosterone. We have made advantage of a model of depression based on tryptophan depletion in which we have previously demonstrated that the elevation of serum aldosterone precedes that of corticosterone. Sixty adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a low tryptophan diet or control diet for 4 (elevation of aldosterone only), 7 and 14 days (broader neuroendocrine activation) respectively. Gene expression of several adipogenic factors, CD31, interleukin-6, adiponectin, resistin and leptin were evaluated. Levels of mRNAs coding for adipogenic, angiogenic and inflammatory factors in adipose tissue were elevated at 4 and 7 days of tryptophan depletion. Additionally, gene expression of aldosterone sensing 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 and mineralocorticoid receptors were elevated. All changes disappeared at 14 days of tryptophan depletion. Synchronously an increase of adipose tissue mass was observed. Although direct evidence is not provided, observed changes in gene expression may be related to the action of aldosterone on mineralocorticoid receptors. Our findings represent the first data on any changes in gene expression in adipose tissue in animal models of depression. PMID:27253873

  16. Problem-solving test: Attenuation: a mechanism to regulate bacterial tryptophan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Szeberényi, József

    2010-11-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: tryptophan, transcription unit, operon, trp repressor, corepressor, operator, promoter, palindrome, initiation, elongation, and termination of transcription, open reading frame, coupled transcription/translation, chromosome-polysome complex. PMID:21567872

  17. Synthesis of 2-substituted tryptophans via a C3- to C2-alkyl migration.

    PubMed

    Mari, Michele; Lucarini, Simone; Bartoccini, Francesca; Piersanti, Giovanni; Spadoni, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of 3-substituted indoles with dehydroalanine (Dha) derivatives under Lewis acid-mediated conditions has been investigated. The formation of 2-substituted tryptophans is proposed to occur through a selective alkylative dearomatization-cyclization followed by C3- to C2-alkyl migration and rearomatization. PMID:25246958

  18. Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-11

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.

  19. Study of Interaction Between Tryptophan, Tyrosine, and Phenylalanine Separately with Silver Nanoparticles by Fluorescence Quenching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Das, T. K.

    2015-09-01

    Using the spectroscopic method, the individual interaction of the three biochemically important amino acids, which are constituents of protein, namely, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine with biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The obtained UV-Vis spectra show the formation of ground-state complexes between tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine with silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles possess the ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of the aforesaid amino acids by a dynamic quenching process. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (Δ H, Δ S, and Δ G) based on the interaction system were calculated for 293, 303, and 313 K. In the case of tryptophan and phenylalanine, with increase in temperature, the binding constant K was found to decrease; conversely, it was found to increase with increase in temperature in the case of tyrosine. The thermodynamic results revealed that the binding process was spontaneous; hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interaction were the predominant forces responsible for the complex stabilization in the case of tryptophan and phenylalanine, respectively, whereas in the case of tyrosine, hydrophobic interaction was the sole force conferring stability. Moreover, the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory has been applied to calculate the average binding distance among the above amino acids and silver nanoparticles. The results show a binding distance of <7 nm, which ensures that energy transfer does occur between the said amino acids and silver nanoparticles.

  20. Interfacial welding of dynamic covalent network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Shi, Qian; Li, Hao; Jabour, John; Yang, Hua; Dunn, Martin L.; Wang, Tiejun; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic covalent network (or covalent adaptable network) polymers can rearrange their macromolecular chain network by bond exchange reactions (BERs) where an active unit replaces a unit in an existing bond to form a new bond. Such macromolecular events, when they occur in large amounts, can attribute to unusual properties that are not seen in conventional covalent network polymers, such as shape reforming and surface welding; the latter further enables the important attributes of material malleability and powder-based reprocessing. In this paper, a multiscale modeling framework is developed to study the surface welding of thermally induced dynamic covalent network polymers. At the macromolecular network level, a lattice model is developed to describe the chain density evolution across the interface and its connection to bulk stress relaxation due to BERs. The chain density evolution rule is then fed into a continuum level interfacial model that takes into account surface roughness and applied pressure to predict the effective elastic modulus and interfacial fracture energy of welded polymers. The model yields particularly accessible results where the moduli and interfacial strength of the welded samples as a function of temperature and pressure can be predicted with four parameters, three of which can be measured directly. The model identifies the dependency of surface welding efficiency on the applied thermal and mechanical fields: the pressure will affect the real contact area under the consideration of surface roughness of dynamic covalent network polymers; the chain density increment on the real contact area of interface is only dependent on the welding time and temperature. The modeling approach shows good agreement with experiments and can be extended to other types of dynamic covalent network polymers using different stimuli for BERs, such as light and moisture etc.

  1. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  2. Rheology of interfacial protein-polysaccharide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.

    2013-05-01

    The morphology and mechanical properties of protein adsorption layers can significantly be altered by the presence of surfactants, lipids, particles, other proteins, and polysaccharides. In food emulsions, polysaccharides are primarily considered as bulk thickener but can under appropriate environmental conditions stabilize or destabilize the protein adsorption layer and, thus, the entire emulsion system. Despite their ubiquitous usage as stabilization agent, relatively few investigations focus on the interfacial rheology of composite protein/polysaccharide adsorption layers. The manuscript provides a brief review on both main stabilization mechanisms, thermodynamic phase separation and electrostatic interaction and discusses the rheological response in light of the environmental conditions such as ionic strength and pH.

  3. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  4. Interfacial force microscopy: Application to polymer surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    HOUSTON,JACK E.; WINTER,R.M.

    2000-05-16

    Scanning-probe microscopies (SPM) are presently widely used in remarkably diverse applications and, as evidenced by this symposium these techniques are rapidly expanding into the important areas of polymer surfaces and interfaces. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM's range of application suffers from an inherent mechanical instability in its deflection force sensor. The instability problem has been overcome by the development of the Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM), which utilizes a force-feedback sensor concept. In the following, the authors present several examples of polymer applications to illustrate the utility of the IFM sensor concept.

  5. Interfacial models of nerve fiber cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Malev, V V; Gromov, D B; Komissarchik YaYu; Brudnaya, M S

    1992-01-01

    A new approach, basing on a resemblance between cytoskeleton structures associated with plasma membranes and interfacial layers of coexisting phases, is proposed. In particular, a lattice model, similar to those of the theory of surface properties of pure liquids and nonelectrolyte solutions (Ono, S., and S. Kondo. 1960. Handbuch der Physik.), has been developed to describe nerve fiber cytoskeleton. The preliminary consideration of the model shows the existence of submembrane cytoskeleton having increased peripheral densities of microtubules (compared with the bulk density) which is in qualitative agreement with the data in literature. Some additional possibilities of the approach proposed are briefly discussed. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420929

  6. Key amino acid residues for the endo-processive activity of GH74 xyloglucanase.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Saito, Yuji; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2014-05-01

    Unlike endo-dissociative-xyloglucanases, Paenibacillus XEG74 is an endo-processive xyloglucanase that contains four unique tryptophan residues in the negative subsites (W61 and W64) and the positive subsites (W318 and W319), as indicated by three-dimensional homology modelling. Selective replacement of the positive subsite residues with alanine mutations reduced the degree of processive activity and resulted in the more endo-dissociative-activity. The results showed that W318 and W319, which are found in the positive subsites, are essential for processive degradation and are responsible for maintaining binding interactions with xyloglucan polysaccharide through a stacking effect. PMID:24657616

  7. The two-phase flow IPTT method for measurement of nonwetting-wetting liquid interfacial areas at higher nonwetting saturations in natural porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hua; El Ouni, Asma; Lin, Dan; Wang, Bingguo; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial areas between nonwetting-wetting (NW-W) liquids in natural porous media were measured using a modified version of the interfacial partitioning tracer test (IPTT) method that employed simultaneous two-phase flow conditions, which allowed measurement at NW saturations higher than trapped residual saturation. Measurements were conducted over a range of saturations for a well-sorted quartz sand under three wetting scenarios of primary drainage (PD), secondary imbibition (SI), and secondary drainage (SD). Limited sets of experiments were also conducted for a model glass-bead medium and for a soil. The measured interfacial areas were compared to interfacial areas measured using the standard IPTT method for liquid-liquid systems, which employs residual NW saturations. In addition, the theoretical maximum interfacial areas estimated from the measured data are compared to specific solid surface areas measured with the N2/BET method and estimated based on geometrical calculations for smooth spheres. Interfacial areas increase linearly with decreasing W-phase (water) saturation over the range of saturations employed. The maximum interfacial areas determined for the glass beads, which have no surface roughness, are 32 ± 4 and 36 ± 5 cm-1 for PD and SI cycles, respectively. The values are similar to the geometric specific solid surface area (31 ± 2 cm-1) and the N2/BET solid surface area (28 ± 2 cm-1). The maximum interfacial areas are 274 ± 38, 235 ± 27, and 581 ± 160 cm-1 for the sand for PD, SI, and SD cycles, respectively, and ˜7625 cm-1 for the soil for PD and SI. The maximum interfacial areas for the sand and soil are significantly larger than the estimated smooth-sphere specific solid surface areas (107 ± 8 cm-1 and 152 ± 8 cm-1, respectively), but much smaller than the N2/BET solid surface area (1387 ± 92 cm-1 and 55224 cm-1, respectively). The NW-W interfacial areas measured with the two-phase flow method compare well to values measured using the

  8. Quantifying the photothermal efficiency of gold nanoparticles using tryptophan as an in situ fluorescent thermometer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming-Jui; Chu, Li-Kang

    2015-07-14

    The photothermal efficiencies, denoting the efficiency of transducing incident light to heat, of gold nanoparticles of different diameters (∅ = 22-86 nm) were quantified upon exposure at 532 nm. The fluorescence of tryptophan at 300-450 nm upon 280 nm excitation serves as an in situ fluorescent thermometer to illustrate the evolution of the average temperature change in the heating volume of the nanoparticle solution. The fluorescence intensity decreases as the temperature increases, having a linear gradient of 2.05% fluorescence decrease per degree Celsius increment from 20 to 45 °C. The presence of gold nanoparticles at the nM level does not perturb the temperature-dependent fluorescence of tryptophan in terms of fluorescence contour and temperature response. The heating volume was defined by overlapping the collimated 532 nm laser (∅ = 0.83 mm) for exciting the nanoparticles and the 280 nm continuous-wave beam (∅ = 0.81 mm) for exciting tryptophan in a 2 mm × 2 mm square tube, and the fluorescence was collected perpendicularly to the collinear alignment. This method has satisfactory reproducibility and a sufficient temperature detectivity of 0.2 °C. The profiles of the average temperature evolution of the mixtures containing nanoparticles and tryptophan were derived from the evolution of fluorescence and analyzed using collective energy balancing. The relative photothermal efficiencies for different sizes of gold nanoparticles with respect to the 22 nm nanoparticle agree with those predicted using Mie theory. The employment of tryptophan as a fluorescent thermometer not only provides an in situ tool to monitor the photothermal effect of nanostructures but is also applicable to thermal imaging in biological applications.

  9. Tryptophan for the sleeping disorder and mental symptom of new-type drug dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongming; Li, Wenzhen; Xiao, Yang; He, Wulong; Wei, Weiquan; Yang, Longyu; Yu, Jincong; Song, Fujian; Wang, Zengzhen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: New-type drugs are popular with adolescents and could lead to psychiatry disorders, but no medications have been proven to be effective for these disorders of new-type drug dependence. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of tryptophan on sleeping disorders and mental symptoms in detoxified individuals with new-type drug dependence. Methods: This randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 80 detoxified individuals with new-type drug dependence, recruited successively from a Compulsory Residential Drug Abstinence Institution in Wuhan, China, from April 2012 to November 2012. Eligible participants were randomly allocated to be treated with tryptophan (1000 mg/d, n = 40) or placebo (n = 40) for 2 weeks. The sleeping disorders and mental symptoms were assessed using Athens Insomnia Scale and Symptom Check-List-90 at baseline and 2 weeks. Results were analyzed according to the “intention-to-treat” approach. Results: Forty-five participants completed the 2-week study, 24 in the tryptophan group and 21 in the placebo group. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between groups and the treatment adherence was similar between groups. The reduction in the Athens Insomnia Scale score in the tryptophan group was significantly greater than that in the placebo group (P = 0.017). However, no significant differences were found in Symptom Check-List-90 scores (either by individual dimension or the overall score) between groups (all P > 0.05). The frequency of adverse events was similar and no serious adverse events were reported during the study. Conclusion: Tryptophan was unlikely to be effective for mental symptoms, but could alleviate sleep disorders in short term among detoxified individuals with new-type drug dependence. Future large-scale trials are required to confirm findings from this study. PMID:27428201

  10. Tryptophan depletion as a mechanism of gamma interferon-mediated chlamydial persistence.

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, W L; Belanger, T A; Desai, A A; Morrison, R P; Byrne, G I

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the immune-regulated cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) activates host cells to restrict intracellular growth of the bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis by induction of the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Recently, subinhibitory levels of IFN-gamma were used to generate an in vitro persistent chlamydial infection characterized by large aberrant, noninfectious reticulate bodies from which infectious progeny could be recovered following the removal of IFN-gamma. Studies were done to determine if the mechanism functioning to induce chlamydiae to enter a persistent state in the presence of low levels of IFN-gamma was similar to that reported to inhibit chlamydial growth. Host cells treated with levels of IFN-gamma required to induce persistence were assessed for IDO activity by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of tryptophan and its catabolic products. Substantial tryptophan catabolism was detected in acid-soluble cellular pools, indicating that the intracellular availability of this essential amino acid was limited under these conditions. In addition, a mutant cell line responsive to IFN-gamma but deficient in IDO activity was shown to support C. trachomatis growth, but aberrant organisms were not induced in response to IFN-gamma treatment. Analyses of infected cells cultured in medium with incremental levels of exogenous tryptophan indicated that persistent growth was induced by reducing the amount of this essential amino acid. These studies confirmed that nutrient deprivation by IDO-mediated tryptophan catabolism was the mechanism by which IFN-gamma mediates persistent growth of C. trachomatis. Images PMID:8063385

  11. Fluorescence imaging of tryptophan and collagen cross-links to evaluate wound closure ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Farinelli, Bill; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2016-02-01

    Wound size is a key parameter in monitoring healing. Current methods to measure wound size are often subjective, time-consuming and marginally invasive. Recently, we developed a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds. This method exploits the fluorescence of native molecules to tissue as functional and structural markers. The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using variations in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan and cross-links of collagen to evaluate proliferation of keratinocyte cells and quantitate size of wound during healing, respectively. Circular dermal wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and cultured in different media. Two serial fluorescence images of tryptophan and collagen cross-links were acquired every two days. Histology and immunohistology were used to validate correlation between fluorescence and epithelialization. Images of collagen cross-links show fluorescence of the exposed dermis and, hence, are a measure of wound area. Images of tryptophan show higher fluorescence intensity of proliferating keratinocytes forming new epithelium, as compared to surrounding keratinocytes not involved in epithelialization. These images are complementary since collagen cross-links report on structure while tryptophan reports on function. HE and immunohistology show that tryptophan fluorescence correlates with newly formed epidermis. We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes during wound healing in a skin organ culture model, our approach has the potential to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, quick, objective and direct method for quantitative measurements in wound healing in vivo.

  12. Metabolomic analysis of amino acid and fat metabolism in rats with L-tryptophan supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zheng; Yang, Yuhui; Wen, Yanmei; Zhou, Yan; Fu, Xiaofang; Ding, Sheng; Liu, Gang; Yao, Kang; Wu, Xin; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2014-12-01

    Tryptophan (TRP) is an important precursor for several neurotransmitters and metabolic regulators, which play a vital role in regulating nutrient metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tryptophan supplementation on the biochemical profiles, intestinal structure, liver structure and serum metabolome in rats. Rats received daily intragastric administration of either tryptophan at doses of 200 mg/kg body weight per day or saline (control group) for 7 days. TRP supplementation had a tendency to decrease the body weight of rats (P > 0.05). The levels of urea and CHO in serum were decreased in the TRP-supplemented group rats compared with control group rats (P < 0.05). TRP supplementation increased the villus height and the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in the jejunum compared to control group rats (P < 0.05). Metabolic effects of tryptophan supplementation include: (1) increases in the serum concentrations of lysine, glycine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, citrulline, methionine, tyrosine, 1-methylhistidine, and albumin, and decreases in the concentrations of serum branched-chain amino acid (isoleucine, valine and leucine); (2) decreases in the serum concentrations of formate and nitrogenous products (trimethylamine, TMAO, methylamine and dimethylamine), and in the contraction of trimethylamine in feces; (3) decreases in serum levels of lipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, together with the elevated ratio of acetoacetate to β-hydroxybutyrate. The results indicate that tryptophan supplementation reduced the catabolism of dietary amino acids and promoted protein synthesis in rats, promoted the oxidation of fatty acid and reduced fat deposition in the body of rats. PMID:25139634

  13. The role of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa anthranilate synthases in tryptophan and quorum signal production

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory C.; Jorth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that causes infections in the lungs of individuals with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Density-dependent production of toxic factors regulated by the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone; PQS) have been proposed to be involved in P. aeruginosa virulence. PQS biosynthesis requires conversion of the central metabolite chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase. This reaction is also the first step in tryptophan biosynthesis. P. aeruginosa possesses two functional anthranilate synthases, TrpEG and PhnAB, and these enzymes are not functionally redundant, as trpEG mutants are tryptophan auxotrophs but produce PQS while mutants in phnAB are tryptophan prototrophs but do not produce PQS in minimal media. The goal of the work described in this paper was to determine the mechanism for this lack of functional complementation of TrpEG and PhnAB. Our results reveal that overexpression of either enzyme compensates for tryptophan auxotrophy and PQS production in the trpEG and phnAB mutants respectively, leading to the hypothesis that differential regulation of these genes is responsible for the lack of functional complementation. In support of this hypothesis, trpEG was shown to be expressed primarily during low-density growth while phnAB was expressed primarily at high density. Furthermore, dysregulation of phnAB expression eliminated tryptophan auxotrophy in the P. aeruginosa trpEG mutant. Based on these data, we propose a model for anthranilate sequestration by differential transcriptional regulation of the two P. aeruginosa anthranilate synthase enzymes. PMID:23449919

  14. Quantifying the photothermal efficiency of gold nanoparticles using tryptophan as an in situ fluorescent thermometer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming-Jui; Chu, Li-Kang

    2015-07-14

    The photothermal efficiencies, denoting the efficiency of transducing incident light to heat, of gold nanoparticles of different diameters (∅ = 22-86 nm) were quantified upon exposure at 532 nm. The fluorescence of tryptophan at 300-450 nm upon 280 nm excitation serves as an in situ fluorescent thermometer to illustrate the evolution of the average temperature change in the heating volume of the nanoparticle solution. The fluorescence intensity decreases as the temperature increases, having a linear gradient of 2.05% fluorescence decrease per degree Celsius increment from 20 to 45 °C. The presence of gold nanoparticles at the nM level does not perturb the temperature-dependent fluorescence of tryptophan in terms of fluorescence contour and temperature response. The heating volume was defined by overlapping the collimated 532 nm laser (∅ = 0.83 mm) for exciting the nanoparticles and the 280 nm continuous-wave beam (∅ = 0.81 mm) for exciting tryptophan in a 2 mm × 2 mm square tube, and the fluorescence was collected perpendicularly to the collinear alignment. This method has satisfactory reproducibility and a sufficient temperature detectivity of 0.2 °C. The profiles of the average temperature evolution of the mixtures containing nanoparticles and tryptophan were derived from the evolution of fluorescence and analyzed using collective energy balancing. The relative photothermal efficiencies for different sizes of gold nanoparticles with respect to the 22 nm nanoparticle agree with those predicted using Mie theory. The employment of tryptophan as a fluorescent thermometer not only provides an in situ tool to monitor the photothermal effect of nanostructures but is also applicable to thermal imaging in biological applications. PMID:26068797

  15. Uptake and incorporation of labeled tryptophan isomers into IAA in the jsR sub 1 mutant of Lemna gibba

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, B.G.; Maher, B.R.; Cohen, J.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Analyses of the IAA-overproducing mutant of Lemna have been initiated in order to study in vivo biosynthesis of IAA. Using radiolabelled tryptophan isomers prepared from commercial sources of {sup 14}C-D,L tryptophan by chiral separation kinetics of uptake of L and D tryptophan were determined for sterile cultures of individual jsR{sub 1} four-frond colonies. Over a 24 h period, about 50% of the radioactivity from {sup 14}C-L-TRP in media, or about 25% from {sup 14}C-D-TRP, was found in the plant tissue. Maximal rates of uptake were seen in the first six hors for both isomers. Endogenous levels of tryptophan determined in jsR{sub 1} as measures of pool sizes in vivo show 5 to 10 ug/g FW total tryptophan with less than 1% in the D isomer form. Information on uptake and endogenous pool sizes of tryptophan isomers is being used for feeding of stable isotope labeled tryptophan ({sup 13}C, {sup 14}N) to jsR{sub 1} at physiological levels. Analyses of incorporation of label into IAA using GC-MS and high resolution mass spectrometry are currently underway.

  16. Effects of sex hormones on the metabolism of tryptophan to niacin and to serotonin in male rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Toda, S

    1997-07-01

    It is known that deaths attributable to pellagra, which is considered to be a disease caused by the disturbance of tryptophan metabolism, have been approximately two-fold higher in women than in men. We investigated the effects of the administration of female and male sex hormones on the contents of tryptophan and such metabolites as serotonin, nicotinamide, N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, and N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and on the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin in male rats. Feeding a diet containing estrone or testosterone had no effect on the concentrations of tryptophan and serotonin in the blood and brain, or on the concentration of 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid in the brain. On the contrary, feeding a diet containing estrone caused to a decrease in the urinary excretion of nicotinamide, N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, and N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and of the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin when compared with the control rats. Feeding a diet containing testosterone had no effect on any parameter. We postulate from these findings that the cause of higher pellagra deaths in women than in men is attributable to the decrease in the formation of niacin from tryptophan, but not in the formation of serotonin by the female hormone. It seems likely that female sex hormones inhibit the synthesis of niacin from tryptophan, and that women, especially during pregnancy, will be more at risk to pellagra than are men.

  17. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  18. Interfacial Nonlinear Dynamics, Phenomena, and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping

    The dynamics of an optical switch based on a dielectric -clad nonlinear film is presented. Two transition processes of the optical switching, from total internal reflection (TIR) to transmission (Tr) and from Tr to TIR, are investigated in theory as well as experiment. Nonlinear dynamic layered transfer matrix theory is developed to study the transition process from TIR to Tr at a nonlinear thin film due to the optically induced refractive index change. A simple theoretical model based on a dynamic nonlinear Fabry-Perot etalon is given for the analysis of the switching process from Tr to TIR. The quantitative analysis can be used for the design and optimization of an optical sensor protector and other devices. Experiments have been done on both the processes of TIR to Tr and Tr to TIR switching for visible as well as infrared wavelengths. A theory for the design of an optimal anti-reflection coating is proposed in order to aid the design and optimization of a nonlinear interfacial switch. Furthermore, a detailed study of the dynamic optical tunneling through the nonlinear interface indicates that the reflected wave would undergo an additional dynamic nonlinear phase shift which is a novel nonlinear interfacial phenomenon, first revealed by this study.

  19. Interferon gamma blocks the growth of Toxoplasma gondii in human fibroblasts by inducing the host cells to degrade tryptophan.

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, E R

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of human fibroblasts with human recombinant gamma interferon blocked the growth of Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. Growth of the parasite was measured by a plaque assay 7 days after infection or by the incorporation of [3H]uracil 1 or 2 days after infection. The antitoxoplasma activity induced in the host cells by gamma interferon was strongly dependent upon the tryptophan concentration of the medium. Progressively higher minimal inhibitory concentrations of gamma interferon were observed as the tryptophan concentration in the culture medium was increased. Treatment with gamma interferon did not make the cells impermeable to tryptophan. The kinetics of [3H]tryptophan uptake into the acid-soluble pools of control and gamma interferon-treated cultures were identical during the first 48 sec. Thereafter uptake of [3H]tryptophan into the acid-soluble pool of control fibroblasts reached the expected plateau after 96 sec. In contrast, uptake of [3H]tryptophan continued for at least 12 min in the gamma interferon-treated cultures. At that time, the acid-soluble pool of the gamma interferon-treated cultures contained 8 times the radioactivity of the control cultures. This continued accumulation was the result of rapid intracellular degradation of [3H]tryptophan into kynurenine and N-formylkynurenine that leaked slowly from the cells. These two metabolites were also recovered from the medium of cultures treated for 1 or 2 days with gamma interferon. Human recombinant alpha and beta interferons, which have no antitoxoplasma activity, did not induce any detectable degradation of tryptophan. Several hypotheses are presented to explain how the intracellular degradation of tryptophan induced by gamma interferon could restrict the growth of an obligate intracellular parasite. Images PMID:6422465

  20. Melatonin and its precursor, L-tryptophan: influence on pancreatic amylase secretion in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Nawrot, Katarzyna; Konturek, Stanisław J; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Thor, Piotr; Pawlik, Wiesław W

    2004-04-01

    Melatonin, considered as a main pineal product, may be also synthetized in the gastrointestinal tract from L-tryptophan. Melatonin has been recently shown to affect insulin release and its receptors have been characterized in the pancreas however, the effects of melatonin on the pancreatic enzyme secretion have not been examined. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin or L-tryptophan on amylase secretion in vivo in anaesthetized rats with pancreato-biliary fistulas, and in vitro using isolated pancreatic acini. Melatonin (1, 5 or 25 mg/kg) or L-tryptophan (10, 50 or 250 mg/kg) given to the rats as a intraperitoneal (i.p.) bolus injection produced significant and dose-dependent increases in pancreatic amylase secretion under basal conditions or following stimulation of enzyme secretion by diversion of bile-pancreatic juice. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent rise in melatonin plasma level. Stimulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion caused by melatonin or L-tryptophan was completely abolished by vagotomy, deactivation of sensory nerves with capsaicin or pretreatment with CCK1 receptor antagonists (tarazepide or L-364,718). Pretreatment with luzindole, an antagonist of melatonin MT(2) receptor failed to affect melatonin- or L-tryptophan-induced amylase secretion. Administration of melatonin (1, 5 or 25 mg/kg i.p.) or L-tryptophan (10, 50 or 250 mg/kg i.p.) to the rats resulted in the dose-dependent increase of cholecystokinin (CCK) plasma immunoreactivity. Enzyme secretion from isolated pancreatic acini was not significantly affected by melatonin or L-tryptophan used at doses of 10(-8) -10(-5) M. We conclude that exogenous melatonin, as well as that produced endogenously from L-tryptophan, stimulates pancreatic enzyme secretion in vivo while increasing CCK release. Stimulatory effect of melatonin or L-tryptophan on the exocrine pancreas involves vagal sensory nerves and the CCK release by these substances.

  1. Possible roles of exceptionally conserved residues around the selectivity filters of sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2011-01-28

    In the absence of x-ray structures of sodium and calcium channels their homology models are used to rationalize experimental data and design new experiments. A challenge is to model the outer-pore region that folds differently from potassium channels. Here we report a new model of the outer-pore region of the NaV1.4 channel, which suggests roles of highly conserved residues around the selectivity filter. The model takes from our previous study (Tikhonov, D. B., and Zhorov, B. S. (2005) Biophys. J. 88, 184-197) the general disposition of the P-helices, selectivity filter residues, and the outer carboxylates, but proposes new intra- and inter-domain contacts that support structural stability of the outer pore. Glycine residues downstream from the selectivity filter are proposed to participate in knob-into-hole contacts with the P-helices and S6s. These contacts explain the adapted tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes that feed on toxic prey through valine substitution of isoleucine in the P-helix of repeat IV. Polar residues five positions upstream from the selectivity filter residues form H-bonds with the ascending-limb backbones. Exceptionally conserved tryptophans are engaged in inter-repeat H-bonds to form a ring whose π-electrons would facilitate passage of ions from the outer carboxylates to the selectivity filter. The outer-pore model of CaV1.2 derived from the NaV1.4 model is also stabilized by the ring of exceptionally conservative tryptophans and H-bonds between the P-helices and ascending limbs. In this model, the exceptionally conserved aspartate downstream from the selectivity-filter glutamate in repeat II facilitates passage of calcium ions to the selectivity-filter ring through the tryptophan ring. Available experimental data are discussed in view of the models.

  2. Preface: Special Topic on Interfacial and Confined Water

    SciTech Connect

    Molinero, Valeria; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-14

    This Special Topic on the Chemical Physics of Interfacial and Confined Water contains a collection of original research papers that showcase recent theoretical and experimental advances in the field. These papers provide a timely discussion of fundamental aspects of interfacial and confined water that are important in both natural environments and engineered applications.

  3. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue.

  4. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue. PMID:10544275

  5. Orientational anisotropy and interfacial transport in polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, M. M.; Rickman, J. M.; Harmer, M. P.; Chan, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    Interfacial diffusion is governed to a large degree by geometric parameters that are determined by crystallographic orientation. In this study, we assess the impact of orientational anisotropy on mass transport at internal interfaces, focusing on the role of preferred crystallographic orientation (i.e., texture) on mass diffusion in a polycrystal. More specifically, we perform both numerical and analytical studies of steady-state diffusion for polycrystals having various grain-orientation distributions. By relating grain misorientation to grain-boundary energies and, via the Borisov relation, to the diffusivity, we link microstructure variability to kinetics. Our aim is to correlate shape features of the orientation distribution, such as the location and shapes of peaks, with the calculated effective diffusivity. Finally, we discuss the role of crystallographic constraints, such as those associated with grain junctions, in determining the effective diffusivity of a polycrystal.

  6. Nucleation and interfacial adsorption in ternary systems.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation is studied in incompressible ternary fluids by examining the topology of the overall landscape of the energy surface. Minimum free energy paths for nucleation (MFEPs) of a single nucleus in an infinite matrix are computed with the string method in the framework of the continuum theory of nucleation for the regular solution. Properties of the critical nucleus are compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. MFEPs are found to exhibit complex nucleation pathways with non-monotonic variations of compositions in the interfacial region, specifically adsorption of a component. In the symmetric regular solution, the minority component is found to segregate at the interface during nucleation with a concomitant depletion of the nucleus core, resulting in unpredicted partition of the non-selective component. Despite increasing the gradient energy, such inhomogeneity in composition is shown to lower the nucleation barrier. PMID:25747088

  7. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  8. Surfactants and interfacial phenomena, 2nd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen

    1989-01-01

    The second edition of this monograph on surfactants has been updated to reflect recent advances in our knowledge of theory and practices. New applications run the gamut from microelectronics and magnetic recording, to biotechnology and nonconventional energy conversion. There is a new chapter on the interactions between surfactants. New sections have been added, and original sections expanded, on such topics as ultralow liquid-liquid interfacial tension; microemulsions, miniemulsions, and multiple emulsions; liquid crystal formation; hydrotropy; and steric forces in the stabilization of dispersions. There is also new material on lime soap dispersing agents; fabric softeners, adsorption and wetting of solid surfaces, both equilibrium and none-equilibrium; the relationship between adsorption and micellation in aqueous solutions and its effect on surface tension reduction; and factors determining micellar structure and shape.

  9. Wear and interfacial transport of material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Bonding across the interface for two solids in contact and the subsequent transfer of material from one surface to another is a direct result of the interfacial bonds being stronger than the cohesive bonds in either of the two solids. Surface tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe are used to examine adhesive contacts and to determine the direction, nature, quantity of material transfer and properties of the solids which effect transfer and wear. The electronic nature, cohesive binding energies, surface structure, lattice disregistry and distribution of species in surface layers are all found to effect adhesion and transfer or transport for clean surfaces in solid state contact. The influence of adsorbed and reacted surface films from fractions of a monolayer to multilayer reactive films are considered. It is shown that even fractions of a monolayer of surface active species such as oxygen and sulfur can markedly inhibit adhesion and transport.

  10. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  11. Interfacial stress transfer in graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheling; Young, Robert J; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-01-23

    Raman spectroscopy has been used for the first time to monitor interfacial stress transfer in poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposites reinforced with graphene oxide (GO). The graphene oxide nanocomposites were prepared by a simple mixing method and casting from aqueous solution. They were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and polarized Raman spectroscopy and their mechanical properties determined by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. It was found that GO was fully exfoliated during the nanocomposite preparation process and that the GO nanoplatelets tended align in the plane of the films. The stiffness and yield stress of the nanocomposites were found to increase with GO loading but the extension to failure decreased. It was shown that the Raman D band at ~1335 cm(-1) downshifted as the nanocomposites were strained as a result of the interfacial stress transfer between the polymer matrix and GO reinforcement. From knowledge of the Grüneisen parameter for graphene, it was possible to estimate the effective Young's modulus of the GO from the Raman D band shift rate per unit strain to be of the order of 120 GPa. A similar value of effective modulus was found from the tensile mechanical data using the "rule of mixtures" that decreased with GO loading. The accepted value of Young's modulus for GO is in excess of 200 GPa and it is suggested that the lower effective Young's modulus values determined may be due to a combination of finite flake dimensions, waviness and wrinkles, aggregation, and misalignment of the GO flakes.

  12. Stokes-Flow Destabilization by Interfacial Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, Alexander; Halpern, David

    2002-11-01

    We consider the infinitesimal-disturbance stability of a plane Couette-Poiseuille flow of two Newtonian fluids with an insoluble surfactant at the interface, with gravity being excluded to isolate the Marangoni effect of the surfactant-dependent surface-tension. The principal result is that, in contrast to the (well-studied) surfactantless cases of such flows, there is instability (for certain ranges of parameters), for which inertia plays no role, but the non-zero shear of basic velocity at (both sides of) the interface is necessary. A quadratic equation is found for the complex wave-speed of the "interfacial" normal modes of disturbances. Hence, the growth-rate is available as an elementary function of five variables--the wavenumber and the four dimensionless parameters of the problem: the Marangoni number, the viscosity ratio, the interfacial shear-rate of basic velocity, and the thickness ratio. The comparative simplicity of the growth-rate function allows for a rather extensive characterization of instability (by asymptotic and numerical means) over the entire parameter space and for all wavenumbers. In particular, it is long-wave in most cases, but has a "mid-wave" character for some ranges of parameters. The growth rate approaches zero at small wavenumbers. It decreases (linearly) toward negative infinity in the limit of infinitly large wavenumbers. The maximum (over all wavenumbers) growth rate approaches zero in both the limits of small and large Marangoni numbers. Among the different asymptotic limits, the only singular one is the zero limit of surface tension at zero surfactant concentration; only in this (probably, non-physical) case, the instability is short-wave. Finally, the critical (instability-onset) hypersurface in the parameter space is ascertained.

  13. Dynamics of deeply supercooled interfacial water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Jan; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the relaxation dynamics of glassy and deeply supercooled water in different types of systems. We compare the dynamics of such interfacial water in ordinary aqueous solutions, hard confinements and biological soft materials. In all these types of systems the dielectric relaxation time of the main water process exhibits a dynamic crossover from a high-temperature non-Arrhenius temperature dependence to a low-temperature Arrhenius behavior. Moreover, at large enough water content the low-temperature process is universal and exhibits the same temperature behavior in all types of systems. However, the physical nature of the dynamic crossover is somewhat different for the different types of systems. In ordinary aqueous solutions it is not even a proper dynamic crossover, since the water relaxation decouples from the cooperative α-relaxation of the solution slightly above the glass transition in the same way as all secondary (β) relaxations of glass-forming materials. In hard confinements, the physical origin of the dynamic crossover is not fully clear, but it seems to occur when the cooperative main relaxation of water at high temperatures reaches a temperature where the volume required for its cooperative motion exceeds the size of the geometrically-confined water cluster. Due to this confinement effect the α-like main relaxation of the confined water seems to transform to a more local β-relaxation with decreasing temperature. Since this low-temperature β-relaxation is universal for all systems at high water content it is possible that it can be considered as an intrinsic β-relaxation of supercooled water, including supercooled bulk water. This possibility, together with other findings for deeply supercooled interfacial water, suggests that the most accepted relaxation scenarios for supercooled bulk water have to be altered.

  14. Differences in fluorescence profiles from breast cancer tissues due to changes in relative tryptophan content via energy transfer: tryptophan content correlates with histologic grade and tumor size but not with lymph node metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-12-01

    The correlation between histologic grade, an increasingly important measure of prognosis for patients with breast cancer, and tryptophan levels from tissues of 15 breast carcinoma patients was investigated. Changes in the relative content of key native organic biomolecule tryptophan were seen from the fluorescence spectra of cancerous and paired normal tissues with excitation wavelengths of 280 and 300 nm. Due to a large spectral overlap and matching excitation-emission spectra, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan-donor to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides-acceptor was noted. We used the ratios of fluorescence intensities at their spectral emission peaks, or spectral fingerprint peaks, at 340, 440, and 460 nm. Higher ratios correlated strongly with high histologic grade, while lower-grade tumors had low ratios. Large tumor size also correlated with high ratios, while the number of lymph node metastases, a major factor in staging, was not correlated with tryptophan levels. High histologic grade correlates strongly with increased content of tryptophan in breast cancer tissues and suggests that measurement of tryptophan content may be useful as a part of the evaluation of these patients.

  15. Fine-tuning of a radical-based reaction by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine tryptophan lyase.

    PubMed

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Zeppieri, Laura; Amara, Patricia; Martin, Lydie; Barra, Anne-Laure; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Gambarelli, Serge; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-03-18

    The radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine tryptophan lyase NosL converts L-tryptophan into 3-methylindolic acid, which is a precursor in the synthesis of the thiopeptide antibiotic nosiheptide. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and multiple L-tryptophan isotopologues, we trapped and characterized radical intermediates that indicate a carboxyl fragment migration mechanism for NosL. This is in contrast to a proposed fragmentation-recombination mechanism that implied Cα-Cβ bond cleavage of L-tryptophan. Although NosL resembles related tyrosine lyases, subtle substrate motions in its active site are responsible for a fine-tuned radical chemistry, which selects the Cα-C bond for disruption. This mechanism highlights evolutionary adaptation to structural constraints in proteins as a route to alternative enzyme function.

  16. The different roles of tryptophan transfer RNA in regulating trp operon expression in E. coli versus B. subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yanofsky, Charles

    2004-08-01

    Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis use different mechanisms of sensing and responding to tryptophan and uncharged tRNA(Trp) as regulatory signals. In E. coli, tryptophan activates a repressor that binds to the trp promoter- operator, inhibiting transcription initiation. In B. subtilis, tryptophan activates an RNA-binding protein, TRAP, which binds to the trp operon leader RNA, causing transcription termination. In E. coli uncharged tRNA(Trp) accumulation stalls the ribosome attempting translation of tandem Trp codons in the leader-peptide coding region of the operon. This stalling permits the formation of an RNA antiterminator structure, preventing transcription termination. In B. subtilis uncharged tRNA(Trp) accumulation activates transcription and translation of the at operon. AT protein inhibits tryptophan-activated TRAP, thereby preventing TRAP-mediated transcription termination. These differences might reflect the unique organizational features of the respective trp operons and their ancestry. PMID:15262409

  17. Robust stability analysis and design under consideration of multiple feedback loops of the tryptophan regulatory network of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Baese, A; Theis, F; Emmett, M R

    2010-01-01

    The tryptophan system present in Escherichia coli represents an important regulatory unit described by multiple feedback loops. The role of these feedback loops is crucial for the analysis of the dynamical behavior of the tryptophan synthesis. We analyze the robust stability of this system which models the dynamics of both fast state, such as transcription and synthesis of free operator, and slow state, such as translation and tryptophan synthesis under consideration of nonlinear uncertainties. In addition, we analyze the role of these feedback loops as key design components of this regulatory unit responsible for its physiological performance. The range of allowed parameter perturbations and the conditions that ensure the existence of asymptotically stable equilibria of the perturbed system are determined. We also analyze two important alternate regulatory designs for the tryptophan synthesis pathway and derive the stability conditions. PMID:20865501

  18. Effects of aspartame ingestion on the carbohydrate-induced rise in tryptophan hydroxylation rate in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D; Fernstrom, M H; Grubb, P E

    1986-08-01

    Effects of aspartame (aspartyl-phenylalanine-methylester) on increases in brain-tryptophan level and hydroxylation rate following a high-carbohydrate, protein-free meal were tested. After an overnight fast, rats consumed a protein-free meal containing one of several levels of aspartame. Blood and brain amino acid levels and the in vivo rate of tryptophan hydroxylation in brain were estimated at intervals thereafter. Ingestion of the meal alone increased brain-tryptophan level and hydroxylation rate. Aspartame did not modify these effects, except at doses of 530 mg/kg body weight or more. Results suggest a threshold dose of aspartame can be identified for the rat in single-meal studies above which suppression of carbohydrate-induced increases in brain-tryptophan level and serotonin synthesis occurs. This dose, however, is large and, when corrected for species differences in metabolic rate, is unlikely to be ingested by a human subject as a single load.

  19. Indole and Tryptophan Metabolism: Endogenous and Dietary Routes to Ah Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy D.; Murray, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor recognized for its role in xenobiotic metabolism. The physiologic function of AHR has expanded to include roles in immune regulation, organogenesis, mucosal barrier function, and the cell cycle. These functions are likely dependent upon ligand-mediated activation of the receptor. High-affinity ligands of AHR have been classically defined as xenobiotics, such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins. Identification of endogenous AHR ligands is key to understanding the physiologic functions of this enigmatic receptor. Metabolic pathways targeting the amino acid tryptophan and indole can lead to a myriad of metabolites, some of which are AHR ligands. Many of these ligands exhibit species selective preferential binding to AHR. The discovery of specific tryptophan metabolites as AHR ligands may provide insight concerning where AHR is activated in an organism, such as at the site of inflammation and within the intestinal tract. PMID:26041783

  20. Bright light exposure during acute tryptophan depletion prevents a lowering of mood in mildly seasonal women.

    PubMed

    aan het Rot, Marije; Benkelfat, Chawki; Boivin, Diane B; Young, Simon N

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the influence of bright light exposure on the mood-lowering effect of acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). Mildly seasonal healthy young women without a personal or family history of psychiatric disorders remained in either dim or bright light during two test days. Tryptophan-deficient and nutritionally balanced amino acid mixtures were administered in counterbalanced order. Mood state was assessed using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). In dim light, ATD decreased POMS scores across most subscales, indicating a worsening of mood. In bright light, mood was unaffected by ATD. Thus, bright light blocked the worsening of mood caused by ATD. This was also observed on the positive mood VAS. These results indicate a direct, immediate interaction between bright light and serotonin function. Bright light might help protect against ATD-induced mood change by increasing serotonin above the threshold level below which there is a lowering of mood.

  1. The effect of acute tryptophan depletion on the neural correlates of emotional processing in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Roiser, Jonathan P; Levy, Jamey; Fromm, Stephen J; Wang, Hongye; Hasler, Gregor; Sahakian, Barbara J; Drevets, Wayne C

    2008-07-01

    The processing of affective material is known to be modulated by serotonin (5-HT), but few studies have used neurophysiological measures to characterize the effect of changes in 5-HT on neural responses to emotional stimuli. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the effect of acute tryptophan depletion, which reduces central 5-HT synthesis, on neural responses to emotionally valenced verbal stimuli. Though no participants experienced significant mood change, emotional information processing was substantially modified following 5-HT depletion. A behavioral bias toward positive stimuli was attenuated following depletion, which was accompanied by increased hemodynamic responses during the processing of emotional words in several subcortical structures. Inter-individual differences in tryptophan depletion-elicited anxiety correlated positively with the caudate bias toward negative stimuli. These data suggest that 5-HT may play an important role in mediating automatic negative attentional biases in major depression, as well as resilience against negative distracting stimuli in never-depressed individuals. PMID:17882232

  2. Interaction of tryptophan and phenylalanine with metal ferrocyanides and its relevance in chemical evolution.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shah Raj; Alam, Tanveer; Kamaluddin

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of two naturally occurring aromatic alpha-amino acids, namely, tryptophan and phenylalanine, with zinc, nickel, cobalt, and copper ferrocyanides has been studied. Both amino acids showed a high adsorption affinity toward metal ferrocyanides at neutral pH (7.0). Adsorption trends followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Values of the Langmuir constants K(L) and X(m) suggest tryptophan is a better adsorbate than phenylalanine. Zinc ferrocyanide showed the highest adsorption, while the minimum adsorption was found in the case of copper ferrocyanide. Infrared spectral studies of adsorbate, adsorbent, and adsorption adducts indicate that adsorption occurs because of the interaction of adsorbate molecules with outer divalent metal ions present in the lattice of metal ferrocyanides. The present investigation supports the hypothesis that metal ferrocyanides might have concentrated the biomonomers on their surface in primeval seas during the course of chemical evolution.

  3. Increased conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin in severe food restriction.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Kondo, T; Miki, A

    1998-03-01

    The effect of food restriction on the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin was investigated, because it is known that the conversion ratio is influenced by nutritional factors. A 20% casein diet was fed to rats ad libitum (control), 1/2 the food of the control. 1/4 the food of the control, or starved for 9 days, and urine samples were collected to measure the urinary excretion of such tryptophan metabolites as kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, and nicotinamide. The conversion ratio in the 1/2, 1/4, or starving group increased at day 1 of the experiment, but returned to the original value from day 2. Only in the starving group did the conversion ratio extremely increase from day 6 to day 9, being about 5-times higher than that of the original value on day 9. The possible mechanism by which the conversion ratio increased during food restriction is discussed.

  4. Inhibiting the photosensitized oxidation of anthracene and tryptophan by means of natural antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenova, N. A.; Vyzhlova, E. N.; Malinovskaya, V. V.; Parfenov, V. V.; Solov'eva, A. B.; Timashev, P. S.

    2013-08-01

    It is shown that model reactions of photosensitized oxidation of anthracene and tryptophan can be used for evaluation and comparison of antioxidant activity of various classes of compounds. Inhibition of the oxidation of substrates in the presence of the familiar antioxidants tocopherol (vitamin E), ascorbic acid (vitamin C), and mixtures of these vitamins with methionine, and in the presence of reputed antioxidants dihydroquercetin and taurine, are considered. It is concluded that all of the above compounds except for taurine have antioxidant properties; i.e., they reduce the rate constants of the photosensitized oxidation of anthracene and tryptophan. It is found that the inhibition of oxidation is associated with the interaction between antioxidants and singlet oxygen. Analysis of the kinetic dependences of the photosensitized oxidation of substrates in the presence of antioxidants reveals that a mixture of vitamins inhibits the process most efficiently, and inhibition occurs at the initial stages due to more active interaction between singlet oxygen and vitamin C

  5. Molecular basis for the ribosome functioning as an L-tryptophan sensor.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Lukas; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland

    2014-10-23

    Elevated levels of the free amino acid L-tryptophan (L-Trp) trigger expression of the tryptophanase tnaCAB operon in E. coli. Activation depends on tryptophan-dependent ribosomal stalling during translation of the upstream TnaC peptide. Here, we present a cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction at 3.8 Å resolution of a ribosome stalled by the TnaC peptide. Unexpectedly, we observe two L-Trp molecules in the ribosomal exit tunnel coordinated within composite hydrophobic pockets formed by the nascent TnaC peptide and the tunnel wall. As a result, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) adopts a distinct conformation that precludes productive accommodation of release factor 2 (RF2), thereby inducing translational stalling. Collectively, our results demonstrate how the translating ribosome can act as a small molecule sensor for gene regulation. PMID:25310980

  6. Optimal performance of the tryptophan operon of E. coli: a stochastic, dynamical, mathematical-modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Cavazos, Emanuel; Santillán, Moisés

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we develop a detailed, stochastic, dynamical model for the tryptophan operon of E. coli, and estimate all of the model parameters from reported experimental data. We further employ the model to study the system performance, considering the amount of biochemical noise in the trp level, the system rise time after a nutritional shift, and the amount of repressor molecules necessary to maintain an adequate level of repression, as indicators of the system performance regime. We demonstrate that the level of cooperativity between repressor molecules bound to the first two operators in the trp promoter affects all of the above enlisted performance characteristics. Moreover, the cooperativity level found in the wild-type bacterial strain optimizes a cost-benefit function involving low biochemical noise in the tryptophan level, short rise time after a nutritional shift, and low number of regulatory molecules. PMID:24307084

  7. Horizontal gene transfer and redundancy of tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes in dinotoms.

    PubMed

    Imanian, Behzad; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-02-01

    A tertiary endosymbiosis between a dinoflagellate host and diatom endosymbiont gave rise to "dinotoms," cells with a unique nuclear and mitochondrial redundancy derived from two evolutionarily distinct eukaryotic lineages. To examine how this unique redundancy might have affected the evolution of metabolic systems, we investigated the transcription of genes involved in biosynthesis of the amino acid tryptophan in three species, Durinskia baltica, Kryptoperidinium foliaceum, and Glenodinium foliaceum. From transcriptome sequence data, we recovered two distinct sets of protein-coding transcripts covering the entire tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. Phylogenetic analyses suggest a diatom origin for one set of the proteins, which we infer to be expressed in the endosymbiont, and that the other arose from multiple horizontal gene transfer events to the dinoflagellate ancestor of the host lineage. This is the first indication that these cells retain redundant sets of transcripts and likely metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of small molecules and extend their redundancy to their two distinct nuclear genomes. PMID:24448981

  8. L-Tryptophan on Cu(111): engineering a molecular labyrinth driven by indole groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yitamben, E. N.; Clayborne, A.; Darling, Seth B.; Guisinger, N. P.

    2015-06-01

    The present article investigates the adsorption and molecular orientation of L-Tryptophan, which is both an essential amino acid important for protein synthesis and of particular interest for the development of chiral molecular electronics and biocompatible processes and devices, on Cu(111) using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at 55 K and at room temperature. The arrangement of chemisorbed L-Tryptophan on the copper surface varies with both temperature and surface coverage. At low coverage, small clusters form on the surface irrespective of temperature, while at high coverage an ordered chain structure emerges at room temperature, and a tightly packed structure forms a molecular labyrinth at low temperature. The dominating superstructure of the adsorbates arises from intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and π-bonding interactions between the indole groups of neighboring molecules and the Cu surface.

  9. The use of Streptococcus zymogenes for estimating tryptophan and methionine bioavailability in 17 foods.

    PubMed

    Wells, P; McDonough, F; Bodwell, C E; Hitchens, A

    1989-01-01

    As part of a cooperative study assessing amino acid bioavailability and/or protein quality, the provisional method of Boyne et al. (Brit J Nutr 21: 181-206) was used to assay 17 protein sources for methionine and tryptophan availability with S. zymogenes. Pronase was used as the predigesting enzyme. Product composition was found to affect reproducibility. The microbial assay results correlated positively with results from rat growth studies on the same foods (p = 0.05), and were generally accurate in identifying products of lower protein quality. Defatting four high-fat products increased microbial values in the methionine assay, but only the chicken franks and the sausage values in the tryptophan assay. Heating non-fat milk increased methionine values slightly. Low values for rolled oats were further reduced by finer grinding.

  10. Photoabsorption and photofragmentation of isolated cationic silver cluster-tryptophan hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitric, Roland; Petersen, Jens; Kulesza, Alexander; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Tabarin, Thibault; Compagnon, Isabelle; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Dugourd, Philippe

    2007-10-07

    We present a theoretical study of the size and structure selective absorption properties of cationic silver cluster-tryptophan Trp-Ag{sub n}{sup +} (n=2-5,9) hybrid systems supported by photofragmentation experiments. Our time-dependent density functional theory calculations provide insight into the nature of excitations in interacting nanoparticle-biomolecule subunits and allow to determine characteristic spectral features as fingerprints of two different classes of structures: charge solvated and zwitterionic. Moreover, different types of charge transfer transitions have been identified. Charge transfer from {pi} system of tryptophan to silver cluster occurs for charge solvated structures while charge transfer from silver to the NH{sub 3}{sup +} group takes place for zwitterionic structures. This has been confirmed by experimentally measured photofragmentation channels and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the structure- and size-dependent mechanism responsible for the enhanced absorption and emission in nanoparticle-biomolecular hybrid systems.

  11. Indole production by the tryptophanase TnaA in Escherichia coli is determined by the amount of exogenous tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Young, Kevin D

    2013-02-01

    The signalling molecule indole occurs in significant amounts in the mammalian intestinal tract and regulates diverse microbial processes, including bacterial motility, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance and host cell invasion. In Escherichia coli, the enzyme tryptophanase (TnaA) produces indole from tryptophan, but it is not clear what determines how much indole E. coli can produce and excrete, making it difficult to interpret experiments that investigate the biological effects of indole at high concentrations. Here, we report that the final yield of indole depends directly, and perhaps solely, on the amount of exogenous tryptophan. When supplied with a range of tryptophan concentrations, E. coli converted this amino acid into an equal amount of indole, up to almost 5 mM, an amount well within the range of the highest concentrations so far examined for their physiological effects. Indole production relied heavily on the tryptophan-specific transporter TnaB, even though the alternative transporters AroP and Mtr could import sufficient tryptophan to induce tnaA expression. This TnaB requirement proceeded via tryptophan transport and was not caused by activation of TnaA itself. Bacterial growth was unaffected by the presence of TnaA in the absence of exogenous tryptophan, suggesting that the enzyme does not hydrolyse significant quantities of the internal anabolic amino acid pool. The results imply that E. coli synthesizes TnaA and TnaB mainly, or solely, for the purpose of converting exogenous tryptophan into indole, under conditions and for signalling purposes that remain to be fully elucidated.

  12. A pilot investigation of the effect of tryptophan manipulation on the affective state of male chronic alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Martin, C R; Bonner, A B

    2000-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to investigate the hypothesis that dietary tryptophan manipulation would influence self-report affective status in alcoholic males. No significant effect of dietary manipulation was observed on the tryptophan/large neutral amino acids ratio or psychological indices of affect. The notion that dietary manipulation may be utilized in improving mood state in alcoholic males was not supported. PMID:10684776

  13. Reversal of Tetracycline Resistance in Escherichia coli by Noncytotoxic bis(Tryptophan)s.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Joseph W; Patel, Mohit B; Garrad, Evan; Stanton, Ryan A; Gokel, George W

    2016-08-24

    Nine bis(tryptophan) derivatives (BTs) and two control compounds were synthesized and tested for antimicrobial activity against two Escherichia coli strains and a Staphylococcus aureus strain. The effects of linker type, shape, and conformational rigidity were manifested in dramatic differences in altering tetracycline potency when coadministered with that antibiotic. A reversal of resistance was observed for an E. coli strain having a TetA efflux pump. Survival of mammalian cells was assayed with good result. PMID:27487320

  14. The structure of flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenase RebH

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Huang, Yu; Bingman, Craig A.; Singh, Shanteri; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-19

    Enzyme catalyzed regio- and stereo-specific halogenations influence the biological activity of a diverse array of therapeutically important natural products, including the antibiotics vancomycin and chloramphenicol as well as the anticancer agents calicheamicin and rebeccamycin. The major class of enzymes responsible for this challenging synthetic reaction, the flavin-dependent halogenases, catalyzes the formation of carbon-halogen bonds using flavin, a halide ion (Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -} or I{sup -}), and O{sub 2}. Recent mechanistic and structural advances achieved with the model flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases PrnA and RebH have greatly enhanced the level of understanding of this unique reaction. According to these studies, the mechanism for tryptophan halogenation proceeds via FAD(C4a)-OOH activation of a chloride ion into the transient chlorinating species HOCl. The key evidence for the requirement of a transient chlorinating species is the discovery that a {approx}10-{angstrom}-long tunnel separates FAD and tryptophan in the ligand-bound form of PrnA. In a recent compelling study to elucidate the strategy by which RebH controls this highly reactive and indiscriminant oxidant, a Lys79-{var_epsilon}NH-Cl chloramine intermediate was implicated as the actual chlorinating species within RebH and a structural investigation of RebH was reported. Here we report our independent structural analysis of Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes RebH (Uni-Prot accession number Q8KHZ8, 530 amino acids) in its apo-form as well as in a complex with both tryptophan and FAD.

  15. A Mild and General Larock Indolization Protocol for the Preparation of Unnatural Tryptophans.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kangway V; Kieffer, Madeleine E; Reisman, Sarah E

    2016-09-16

    A mild and general protocol for the Pd(0)-catalyzed heteroannulation of o-bromoanilines and alkynes is described. Application of a Pd(0)/P((t)Bu)3 catalyst system enables the efficient coupling of o-bromoanilines at 60 °C, mitigating deleterious side reactions and enabling access to a broad range of useful unnatural tryptophans. The utility of this new protocol is demonstrated in the highly convergent total synthesis of the bisindole natural product (-)-aspergilazine A. PMID:27598827

  16. Effects of Acute Tryptophan Depletion on Three Different Types of Behavioral Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Donald M.; Richard, Dawn M.; James, Lisa M.; Mathias, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: While central nervous system serotonin has been implicated in a variety of problematic impulsive behaviors, biological manipulation of brain serotonin using acute tryptophan depletion for studying changes in impulsive behavior has received little attention. Methods: Using identical treatment conditions, we examined the effects of reduced serotonin synthesis for each of three matched groups using acute tryptophan depletion. Thirty healthy men and women (ages 18–45) were assigned to perform one of three tasks assessing different types of behavioral impulsivity: response initiation, response inhibition, and consequence sensitivity (N = 90). Participants completed two experimental days during which each consumed either a tryptophan-depletion or balanced-placebo amino-acid formulation and completed 5 sessions of their respective tasks at 0.25 h before and 1.5, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 h after beverage consumption. Results: During peak effectiveness (5.0 h to 6.0 h following amino-acid consumption), depletion produced selective differences dependent on the type of impulsivity being tested. Specifically, relative to baseline testing (pre-depletion), response initiation impulsivity was significantly increased during the peak effects of depletion. And, when compared to placebo control, both response initiation and consequence sensitivity impulsivity were increased during the peak effects of depletion. Conclusion: Though response initiation and consequence sensitivity impulsivity were affected by tryptophan depletion, response inhibition impulsivity was not, suggesting that other biological processes may underlie this specific component of impulsivity. Future research in other populations or using different pharmacological agents is warranted to further examine the biological processes underlying these components of impulsivity. PMID:22084592

  17. Reengineering a tryptophan halogenase to preferentially chlorinate a direct alkaloid precursor.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Weslee S; Nims, Ezekiel; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2011-12-01

    Installing halogens onto natural products can generate compounds with novel or improved properties. Notably, enzymatic halogenation is now possible as a result of the discovery of several classes of halogenases; however, applications are limited because of the narrow substrate specificity of these enzymes. Here we demonstrate that the flavin-dependent halogenase RebH can be engineered to install chlorine preferentially onto tryptamine rather than the native substrate tryptophan. Tryptamine is a direct precursor to many alkaloid natural products, including approximately 3000 monoterpene indole alkaloids. To validate the function of this engineered enzyme in vivo, we transformed the tryptamine-specific RebH mutant (Y455W) into the alkaloid-producing plant Madagascar periwinkle ( Catharanthus roseus ) and observed the de novo production of the halogenated alkaloid 12-chloro-19,20-dihydroakuammicine. While wild-type (WT) RebH has been integrated into periwinkle metabolism previously, the resulting tissue cultures accumulated substantial levels of 7-chlorotryptophan. Tryptophan decarboxylase, the enzyme that converts tryptophan to tryptamine, accepts 7-chlorotryptophan at only 3% of the efficiency of the native substrate tryptophan, thereby creating a bottleneck. The RebH Y455W mutant circumvents this bottleneck by installing chlorine onto tryptamine, a downstream substrate. In comparison with cultures harboring RebH and WT RebF, tissue cultures containing mutant RebH Y455W and RebF also accumulate microgram per gram fresh-weight quantities of 12-chloro-19,20-dihydroakuammicine but, in contrast, do not accumulate 7-chlorotryptophan, demonstrating the selectivity and potential utility of this mutant in metabolic engineering applications. PMID:22050348

  18. Tryptophan depletion and formation of alpha-aminoadipic and gamma-glutamic semialdehydes in porcine burger patties with added phenolic-rich fruit extracts.

    PubMed

    Ganhão, Rui; Morcuende, David; Estévez, Mario

    2010-03-24

    The effect of added fruit extracts on the oxidation of muscle proteins in porcine burger patties subjected to cooking and chill storage was studied. Extracts from arbutus berries (Arbutus unedo L., AU), common hawthorns (Crataegus monogyna L., CM), dog roses (Rosa canina L., RC), and elm-leaf blackberries (Rubus ulmifolius Schott, RU) were prepared, characterized, added to burger patties (3% of total weight), and evaluated as inhibitors of protein oxidation. Negative (no added extract, C) and positive control (added quercetin, 230 mg/kg, Q) groups were also included in the design. Protein oxidation was assessed by means of tryptophan loss using fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) and formation of the specific protein carbonyls alpha-aminoadipic (AAS) and gamma-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) using liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). Both advanced methodologies (FS and LC-MS) were found to be reliable and specific protein oxidation measurements that allow us to gain chemical insight into protein oxidation. The mechanisms likely involved in the oxidative reactions affecting proteins during cooking and storage of burger patties are profusely discussed. Phenolic-rich fruit extracts protected tryptophan residues against oxidation and inhibited the formation of both semialdehydes in burger patties during cooking and subsequent chill storage. In general, RC, RU, and AU were the most effective inhibitors of protein oxidation, with this effect being more intense than that of pure polyphenols like quercetin. These fruit extracts could be considered functional ingredients as their antioxidant actions contribute to the enhancement of the nutritional value of the meat products. PMID:20170109

  19. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  20. Conversion Percentage of Tryptophan to Nicotinamide is Higher in Rice Protein Diet than in Wheat Protein Diet in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Kawamura, Tomoyo

    2015-01-01

    We reported previously that the pellagragenic property of corn protein is not only low l-tryptophan concentration but also the lower conversion percentage of l-tryptophan to nicotinamide; the amino acid composition greatly affected the conversion percentage. The amino acid value of wheat protein is lower than that of rice protein. In the present study, we compare the conversion percentages of l-tryptophan to nicotinamide between wheat protein and rice protein diets in growing rats. The body weight gain for 28 days in rats fed with a 10% amino acid mixture diet with wheat protein was lower than that of rats fed with a 10% amino acid diet with rice protein (68.1 ± 1.6 g vs 108.4 ± 1.9 g; P < 0.05). The conversion percentage of l-tryptophan to nicotinamide was also lower for the wheat protein diet compared with the rice protein diet (1.44 ± 0.036% vs 2.84 ± 0.19%; P < 0.05). The addition of limiting amino acids (l-isoleucine, l-lysine, l-tryptophan, l-methionine, l-threonine) to the wheat protein diet improved growth and the conversion percentage. In conclusion, our result supports the thinking that the composition of amino acids affects the conversion ratio of l-tryptophan to nicotinamide. PMID:25788834

  1. [Effect of feeding with a poisonous mushroom Clitocybe acromelalga on the metabolism of tryptophan-niacin in rats].

    PubMed

    Fukuwatari, T; Sugimoto, E; Shibata, K

    2001-06-01

    The poisonous mushroom Clitocybe acromelalga contains clitidine, which resembles nicotinic acid mononucleotide, and 4-amino-pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, which resembles quinolinic acid. Both are important intermediates in the tryptophan-niacin pathway. Therefore, we investigated the effect of feeding a niacin-free and tryptophan-limited diet containing the toadstool Clitocybe acromelalga on the metabolism of tryptophan to niacin in rats. The toadstool diet was fed to the rats for only one day (this day was designated day 0). Urinary excretion of intermediates in the tryptophan-niacin pathway, such as anthranilic acid, kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, quinolinic acid, nicotinamide, N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, and N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, was higher in the toadstool group than in the control on day 0-day 1 and day 1-day 2. The blood levels of tryptophan and NAD on day 1 were also higher in the toadstool group. Accordingly, intake of Clitocybe acromelalga appeared to increase the conversion of tryptophan to niacin.

  2. Stable isotope labeling, in vivo, of D- and L-tryptophan pools in lemna gibba and the low incorporation of label into indole-3-acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, B.G. ); Maher, B.R. ); Slovin, J.P.; Cohen, J.D. Univ. of Maryland, College Park )

    1991-04-01

    The authors present evidence that the role of tryptophan and other potential intermediates in the pathways that could lead to indole derivatives needs to be reexamined. Two lines of Lemna gibba were tested for uptake of ({sup 15}N-indole)-labeled tryptophan isomers and incorporation of that label into free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Both lines required levels of L-({sup 15}N)tryptophan 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over endogenous levels in order to obtain measurable incorporation of label into IAA. Labeled L-tryptophan was extractable from plant tissue after feeding and showed no measurable isomerization into D-tryptophan. D-({sup 15}N)trytophan supplied to Lemna at rates of approximately 400 times excess of endogenous D-tryptophan levels (to yield an isotopic enrichment equal to that which allowed detection of the incorporation of L-tryptophan into IAA), did not result in measurable incorporation of label into free IAA. These results demonstrate that L-tryptophan is a more direct precursor to IAA than the D isomer and suggest (a) that the availability of tryptophan in vivo is not a limiting factor in the biosynthesis of IAA, thus implying that other regulatory mechanisms are in operation and (b) that L-tryptophan also may not be a primary precursor to IAA in plants.

  3. Separation of tryptophan enantiomers by ligand-exchange chromatography with novel chiral ionic liquids ligand.

    PubMed

    Qing, Haiqun; Jiang, Xinyu; Yu, Jingang

    2014-03-01

    Chiral ionic liquids (CILs) with amino acids as cations have been applied as novel chiral ligands coordinated with Cu(2+) to separate tryptophan enantiomers in ligand exchange chromatography. Four kinds of amino acid ionic liquids, including [L-Pro][CF3COO], [L-Pro][NO3], [L-Pro]2[SO4], and [L-Phe][CF3COO] were successfully synthesized and used for separation of tryptophan enantiomers. To optimize the separation conditions, [L-Pro][CF3COO] was selected as the model ligand. Some factors influencing the efficiency of chiral separation, such as copper ion concentration, CILs concentration, methanol ratio (methanol/H2O, v/v), and pH, were investigated. The obtained optimal separation conditions were as follows: 8.0 mmol/L Cu(OAc)2, 4.0 mmol/L [L-Pro][CF3COO], and 20% (v/v) methanol at pH 3.6. Under the optimum conditions, acceptable enantioseparation of tryptophan enantiomers could be observed with a resolution of 1.89. The results demonstrate the good applicability of CILs with amino acids as cations for chiral separation. Furthermore, a comparative study was also conducted for exploring the mechanism of the CILs as new ligands in ligand exchange chromatography.

  4. A pilot study on neopterin levels and tryptophan degradation in zinc-exposed galvanization workers.

    PubMed

    Sarac, Elif Seyda; Girgin, Gözde; Palabiyik, S Sezin; Charehsaz, Mohammad; Aydin, Ahmet; Sahin, Gönül; Baydar, Terken

    2013-03-01

    Hot-dip galvanization is a zinc-coating process to protect the metal items from corrosion. Zinc oxide nanoaerosol fume rising from hot metal bath surface in nano dimensions contains the greatest risk for workers in galvanization process. In the present study, it was evaluated whether inhalation of zinc causes any alteration in cellular immunity and tryptophan degradation by measuring neopterin, tryptophan, kynurenine, and zinc levels in 63 male galvanization workers and 23 male office personnel as controls. Serum and urinary zinc levels were found as 102.43 ± 4.74 and 0.66 ± 0.05 μg/dL in workers while 75.45 ± 4.24 and 0.80 ± 0.08 μg/dL [corrected] in controls, respectively (both, p < 0.05). Similarly, the mean urinary neopterin levels and serum neopterin and kynurenine levels were found to be statistically higher in galvanization workers than the controls (all, p < 0.05). Significant correlations were found between urinary neopterin levels and kynurenine to tryptophan ratio or serum zinc levels. The results indicated cellular immune activation by occupational zinc exposure. It was estimated that neopterin, in parallel with kynurenine pathway, could reflect occupational exposure to zinc nanoaerosols and might be useful in early diagnosis of immune alterations due to nano-scale exposures.

  5. Two anthranilate synthase genes in Arabidopsis: defense-related regulation of the tryptophan pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, K K; Fink, G R

    1992-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana has two genes, ASA1 and ASA2, encoding the alpha subunit of anthranilate synthase, the enzyme catalyzing the first reaction in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. As a branchpoint enzyme in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, anthranilate synthase has an important regulatory role. The sequences of the plant genes are homologous to their microbial counterparts. Both predicted proteins have putative chloroplast transit peptides at their amino termini and conserved amino acids involved in feedback inhibition by tryptophan. ASA1 and ASA2 cDNAs complement anthranilate synthase alpha subunit mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Escherichia coli, confirming that both genes encode functional anthranilate synthase proteins. The distributions of ASA1 and ASA2 mRNAs in various parts of Arabidopsis plants are overlapping but nonidentical, and ASA1 mRNA is approximately 10 times more abundant in whole plants. Whereas ASA2 is expressed at a constitutive basal level, ASA1 is induced by wounding and bacterial pathogen infiltration, suggesting a novel role for ASA1 in the production of tryptophan pathway metabolites as part of an Arabidopsis defense response. Regulation of key steps in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis appears to involve differential expression of duplicated genes. PMID:1392592

  6. L-Tryptophan catabolism by Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 occurs through indole 3-pyruvic acid pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumavath, Ranjith N; Ramana, Ch V; Sasikala, Ch

    2010-09-01

    Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 utilizes L: -tryptophan as the sole source of nitrogen for growth, and it has a doubling time of approximately 11 h (compared to 8 h with ammonium chloride). With cell free extracts in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate, indole-3-pyruvic acid, indole-3-acetaldehyde, indole-3-acetic acid, isatin, benzaldehyde, gallic acid and pyrogallol were identified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) analysis. The conversion of L: -tryptophan into indole 3-pyruvic acid and glutamate by an enzyme aminotransferase was confirmed and the catabolism of indole-3-pyruvic acid via side chain oxidation followed by ring oxidation, gallic acid and pyrogallol were confirmed as metabolites. In addition, the proposed pathway sequential conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid to the end product of pyrogallol was identified, including an enzymatic step that would convert isatin to benzaldehyde by an enzyme yet to be identified. At this stage of the study, the enzyme tryptophan aminotransferase in R. benzoatilyticus JA2 was demonstrated.

  7. [L-tryptophan-induced eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome with features of diffuse fasciitis with eosinophilia].

    PubMed

    Senff, H; Köllner, A; Engelmann, L; Woort-Menker, M; Mensing, H; Kunze, J

    1990-10-01

    Two female patients developed localized scleroderma on the trunk and the thighs after oral ingestion of L-tryptophan for some years. Both patients reported acute progressive myalgia and weakness of the proximal parts of the extremities. On laboratory evaluation, the leucocyte count was approximately 20,000/mm3, with 38% blood eosinophils in one patient and 53% in the other. The ESR was slightly elevated; electrophoresis and muscle enzymes were normal. Skin and muscle biopsies revealed characteristic features of diffuse fasciitis with eosinophilia. High-dose glucocorticoid therapy resulted in a rapid normalization of the ESR and blood eosinophilia, whereas the scleroderma showed little improvement. The diffuse edema observed in one patient receded within a few days. A correlation between oral ingestion of L-tryptophan and the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome has been reported recently, and the present case reports must be discussed in the light of this observation. Both patients developed a tryptophan-induced scleroderma-like illness resembling diffuse fasciitis with eosinophilia (Shulman's syndrome).

  8. Tryptophan derivatives regulate the transcription of Oct4 in stem-like cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jie; Li, Wenxin; Kang, Bo; Zhou, Yanwen; Song, Jiasheng; Dan, Songsong; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Jingchao; Yin, Shengyong; Cao, Hongcui; Yao, Hangping; Zhu, Chenggang; Yi, Wen; Zhao, Qingwei; Xu, Xiaowei; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Shusen; Li, Lanjuan; Shen, Binghui; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that responds to environmental toxicants, is increasingly recognized as a key player in embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here we show that a variety of tryptophan derivatives that act as endogenous AhR ligands can affect the transcription level of the master pluripotency factor Oct4. Among them, ITE enhances the binding of the AhR to the promoter of Oct4 and suppresses its transcription. Reduction of endogenous ITE levels in cancer cells by tryptophan deprivation or hypoxia leads to Oct4 elevation, which can be reverted by administration with synthetic ITE. Consequently, synthetic ITE induces the differentiation of stem-like cancer cells and reduces their tumorigenic potential in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft tumour models. Thus, our results reveal a role of tryptophan derivatives and the AhR signalling pathway in regulating cancer cell stemness and open a new therapeutic avenue to target stem-like cancer cells. PMID:26059097

  9. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Guastella, Anthony R.; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Klinger, Neil V.; Kupsky, William J.; Polin, Lisa A.; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway’s (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[11C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. PMID:27151136

  10. Microbiome-Derived Tryptophan Metabolites and Their Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Agonist and Antagonist Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Un-Ho; Lee, Syng-Ook; Sridharan, Gautham; Lee, Kyongbum; Davidson, Laurie A.; Jayaraman, Arul; Chapkin, Robert S.; Alaniz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolites indole, indole-3-acetate, and tryptamine were identified in mouse cecal extracts and fecal pellets by mass spectrometry. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist and antagonist activities of these microbiota-derived compounds were investigated in CaCo-2 intestinal cells as a model for understanding their interactions with colonic tissue, which is highly aryl hydrocarbon (Ah)–responsive. Activation of Ah-responsive genes demonstrated that tryptamine and indole 3-acetate were AHR agonists, whereas indole was an AHR antagonist that inhibited TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin)–induced CYP1A1 expression. In contrast, the tryptophan metabolites exhibited minimal anti-inflammatory activities, whereas TCDD decreased phorbol ester-induced CXCR4 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4] gene expression, and this response was AHR dependent. These results demonstrate that the tryptophan metabolites indole, tryptamine, and indole-3-acetate modulate AHR-mediated responses in CaCo-2 cells, and concentrations of indole that exhibit AHR antagonist activity (100–250 μM) are detected in the intestinal microbiome. PMID:24563545

  11. Effects of vitamin B6 deficiency on the conversion ratio of tryptophan to niacin.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Mushiage, M; Kondo, T; Hayakawa, T; Tsuge, H

    1995-11-01

    To investigate how vitamin B6 (B6) deficiency affects the whole metabolism of tryptophan-niacin, rats were fed for 19 days with each of the following four kinds of diets; a complete 20% casein diet (control diet), the control diet without B6, the control diet without nicotinic acid, and the control diet without nicotinic acid and B6, and the urinary excretion of such tryptophan metabolites as kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, nicotinamide, N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, and N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide each and the enzyme activities involved in tryptophan-niacin pathway were measured. The urinary excretion of kynurenic acid decreased while that of xanthurenic acid increased drastically in the two B6-deficient groups, when compared with the B6-containing groups. These results indicate that the rats fed with the B6-free diets were in the vitamin-deficient state. The conversion ratio was calculated from the ratio of the urinary excretion of sum of nicotinamide, N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, and N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, to the Trp intake. The ratio was statistically lower in the B6-free diet than in the B6-containing diet under the niacin-free conditions.

  12. Effect of prenatal phenytoin administration on brain tryptophan metabolism of rat offspring during the preweaning period.

    PubMed

    Elmazar, M M; Sullivan, F M

    1980-10-01

    Serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations in control rat offspring increased progressively during the preweaning period reaching adult values by day 21. It has been shown the prenatal phenytoin administration (100 mg kg-1 orally, days 7-19 of pregnancy) increased serum tryptophan and brain tryptophan, 5-HT and 5-HIAA of rat offspring at 3 days of age but not at 4, 15 or 21 days of age. The effect of prenatal phenytoin administration on the offspring at 3 days of age was not observed when these pups were cross-fostered to control mothers at 2 days of age suggesting that the alteration in rain tryptophan metabolism during the development of tryptaminergic neurons in rat offspring, as a result of prenatal phenytoin administration is mediated through changes in lactation or nursing ability of the mothers. It is important that such non-specific factors are controlled when studying the effect of prenatally administered drugs on neonatal brain transmitter concentrations.

  13. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Anthony R; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Klinger, Neil V; Kupsky, William J; Polin, Lisa A; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway's (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[(11)C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM.

  14. Perturbations of tyrosine metabolism promote the indolepyruvate pathway via tryptophan in host and microbiome.

    PubMed

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gangoiti, Jon A; Nyhan, William L; Barshop, Bruce A

    2015-03-01

    The drug nitisinone (NTBC) is used to treat tyrosinemia type I, and more recently has been also used for the treatment of another disorder of tyrosine metabolism, alkaptonuria. While studying the dose effects of NTBC treatment on alkaptonuria, untargeted metabolomics revealed perturbations in a completely separate pathway, that of tryptophan metabolism. Significant elevations in several indolic compounds associated with the indolepyruvate pathway of tryptophan metabolism were present in NTBC-treated patient sera and correlated with elevations of an intermediate of tyrosine metabolism. Indolic compounds of this pathway have long been associated with commensal bacterial and plant metabolism. These exogenous sources of indoles have been more recently implicated in affecting mammalian cell function and disease. We studied the correlation of these indolic compounds in other disorders of tyrosine metabolism including tyrosinemia types I and II as well as transient tyrosinemia, and demonstrated that 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (4-HPP) was directly responsible for the promotion of this pathway. We then investigated the regulation of the indolepyruvate pathway and the role of 4-HPP further in both mammalian cells and intestinal microbial cultures. We demonstrated that several of the indolic products, including indolepyruvate and indolelactate, were in fact generated by human cell metabolism, while the downstream indole metabolite, indolecarboxaldehyde, was produced exclusively by microbial cultures of human gut flora. This study describes a symbiotic perturbation in host and microbiome tryptophan metabolism in response to elevations related to defects of tyrosine metabolism and concomitant drug treatment.

  15. The possible crucial role of iron accumulation combined with low tryptophan, zinc and manganese in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2001-11-01

    Iron can react with citric acid, interfering with the Krebs cycle, hence with oxidative phosphorylation. Free iron (Fe) can cause considerable oxidative damage both through Fenton reactions and by activating xanthine oxidase, which produces both superoxide (O(2-)) and uric acid (abundant in many cancers). It can also react with lactic acid, reducing its elimination and increasing the acidity of the cytoplasm. Fe can also wreak havoc by reacting with tryptophan, the least abundant and most delicate essential amino acid, which is necessary for the production of serotonin and other substances required by the immune system to fight cancer. On the other hand, in the presence of iron, the tryptophan metabolite quinolinate causes intense lipid peroxidation. Similarly, several other carcinogenic metabolites of tryptophan are particularly dangerous in the presence of Fe. Excess Fe may also interfere with manganese superoxide dismutase and impair the initiation of apoptosis by the mitochondrion, rendering the cells impervious to all the signals to undergo apoptosis from without and from within the cell. Moreover, Fe may also play a crucial role on telomere repair, by activating telomerase. Therefore, by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing chromosome repair, Fe may bestow immortality upon the cancer cell. Furthermore, Fe is one of the triggers for mitosis. Therefore, increased Fe levels may be essential for the rapid growth characteristic of many malignancies. In turn, the rapid growth further depletes resources from the healthy tissues, exacerbating the deficiencies of the other elements and reducing the ability to fight the malignancy. PMID:11735307

  16. Tryptophan derivatives regulate the transcription of Oct4 in stem-like cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Li, Wenxin; Kang, Bo; Zhou, Yanwen; Song, Jiasheng; Dan, Songsong; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Jingchao; Yin, Shengyong; Cao, Hongcui; Yao, Hangping; Zhu, Chenggang; Yi, Wen; Zhao, Qingwei; Xu, Xiaowei; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Shusen; Li, Lanjuan; Shen, Binghui; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2015-06-10

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that responds to environmental toxicants, is increasingly recognized as a key player in embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here we show that a variety of tryptophan derivatives that act as endogenous AhR ligands can affect the transcription level of the master pluripotency factor Oct4. Among them, ITE enhances the binding of the AhR to the promoter of Oct4 and suppresses its transcription. Reduction of endogenous ITE levels in cancer cells by tryptophan deprivation or hypoxia leads to Oct4 elevation, which can be reverted by administration with synthetic ITE. Consequently, synthetic ITE induces the differentiation of stem-like cancer cells and reduces their tumorigenic potential in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft tumour models. Thus, our results reveal a role of tryptophan derivatives and the AhR signalling pathway in regulating cancer cell stemness and open a new therapeutic avenue to target stem-like cancer cells.

  17. Negative Impact of Hypoxia on Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase Function

    PubMed Central

    Elbers, Frank; Woite, Claudia; Antoni, Valentina; Stein, Sara; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Schares, Gereon; Däubener, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid for hosts and pathogens. The liver enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) provokes, by its ability to degrade tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine, the precursor of the immune-relevant kynurenines, direct and indirect antimicrobial and immunoregulatory states. Up to now these TDO-mediated broad-spectrum effector functions have never been observed under hypoxia in vitro, although physiologic oxygen concentrations in liver tissue are low, especially in case of infection. Here we analysed recombinant expressed human TDO and ex vivo murine TDO functions under different oxygen conditions and show that TDO-induced restrictions of clinically relevant pathogens (bacteria, parasites) and of T cell proliferation are abrogated under hypoxic conditions. We pinpointed the loss of TDO efficiency to the reduction of TDO activity, since cell survival and TDO protein levels were unaffected. In conclusion, the potent antimicrobial as well as immunoregulatory effects of TDO were substantially impaired under hypoxic conditions that pathophysiologically occur in vivo. This might be detrimental for the appropriate host immune response towards relevant pathogens. PMID:27563172

  18. Visualizing the tunnel in tryptophan synthase with crystallography: Insights into a selective filter for accommodating indole and rejecting water.

    PubMed

    Hilario, Eduardo; Caulkins, Bethany G; Huang, Yu-Ming M; You, Wanli; Chang, Chia-En A; Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F; Fan, Li

    2016-03-01

    Four new X-ray structures of tryptophan synthase (TS) crystallized with varying numbers of the amphipathic N-(4'-trifluoromethoxybenzoyl)-2-aminoethyl phosphate (F6) molecule are presented. These structures show one of the F6 ligands threaded into the tunnel from the β-site and reveal a distinct hydrophobic region. Over this expanse, the interactions between F6 and the tunnel are primarily nonpolar, while the F6 phosphoryl group fits into a polar pocket of the β-subunit active site. Further examination of TS structures reveals that one portion of the tunnel (T1) binds clusters of water molecules, whereas waters are not observed in the nonpolar F6 binding region of the tunnel (T2). MD simulation of another TS structure with an unobstructed tunnel also indicates the T2 region of the tunnel excludes water, consistent with a dewetted state that presents a significant barrier to the transfer of water into the closed β-site. We conclude that hydrophobic molecules can freely diffuse between the α- and β-sites via the tunnel, while water does not. We propose that exclusion of water serves to inhibit reaction of water with the α-aminoacrylate intermediate to form ammonium ion and pyruvate, a deleterious side reaction in the αβ-catalytic cycle. Finally, while most TS structures show βPhe280 partially blocking the tunnel between the α- and β-sites, new structures show an open tunnel, suggesting the flexibility of the βPhe280 side chain. Flexible docking studies and MD simulations confirm that the dynamic behavior of βPhe280 allows unhindered transfer of indole through the tunnel, therefore excluding a gating role for this residue.

  19. Visualizing the tunnel in tryptophan synthase with crystallography: Insights into a selective filter for accommodating indole and rejecting water.

    PubMed

    Hilario, Eduardo; Caulkins, Bethany G; Huang, Yu-Ming M; You, Wanli; Chang, Chia-En A; Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F; Fan, Li

    2016-03-01

    Four new X-ray structures of tryptophan synthase (TS) crystallized with varying numbers of the amphipathic N-(4'-trifluoromethoxybenzoyl)-2-aminoethyl phosphate (F6) molecule are presented. These structures show one of the F6 ligands threaded into the tunnel from the β-site and reveal a distinct hydrophobic region. Over this expanse, the interactions between F6 and the tunnel are primarily nonpolar, while the F6 phosphoryl group fits into a polar pocket of the β-subunit active site. Further examination of TS structures reveals that one portion of the tunnel (T1) binds clusters of water molecules, whereas waters are not observed in the nonpolar F6 binding region of the tunnel (T2). MD simulation of another TS structure with an unobstructed tunnel also indicates the T2 region of the tunnel excludes water, consistent with a dewetted state that presents a significant barrier to the transfer of water into the closed β-site. We conclude that hydrophobic molecules can freely diffuse between the α- and β-sites via the tunnel, while water does not. We propose that exclusion of water serves to inhibit reaction of water with the α-aminoacrylate intermediate to form ammonium ion and pyruvate, a deleterious side reaction in the αβ-catalytic cycle. Finally, while most TS structures show βPhe280 partially blocking the tunnel between the α- and β-sites, new structures show an open tunnel, suggesting the flexibility of the βPhe280 side chain. Flexible docking studies and MD simulations confirm that the dynamic behavior of βPhe280 allows unhindered transfer of indole through the tunnel, therefore excluding a gating role for this residue. PMID:26708480

  20. Distance Mapping in Proteins Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy: Tyrosine, like Tryptophan, Quenches Bimane Fluorescence in a Distance-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan-induced quenching of fluorophores (TrIQ) uses intramolecular fluorescence quenching to assess distances in proteins too small (<15 Å) to be easily probed by traditional Forster resonance energy transfer methods. A powerful aspect of TrIQ is its ability to obtain an ultrafast snapshot of a protein conformation, by identifying “static quenching” (contact between the Trp and probe at the moment of light excitation). Here we report new advances in this site-directed fluorescence labeling (SDFL) approach, gleaned from recent studies of T4 lysozyme (T4L). First, we show that like TrIQ, tyrosine-induced quenching (TyrIQ) occurs for the fluorophore bimane in a distance-dependent fashion, although with some key differences. The Tyr “sphere of quenching” for bimane (≤10 Å) is smaller than for Trp (≤15 Å, Cα–Cα distance), and the size difference between the quenching residue (Tyr) and control (Phe) differs by only a hydroxyl group. Second, we show how TrIQ and TyrIQ can be used together to assess the magnitude and energetics of a protein movement. In these studies, we placed a bimane (probe) and Trp or Tyr (quencher) on opposite ends of a “hinge” in T4L and conducted TrIQ and TyrIQ measurements. Our results are consistent with an ∼5 Å change in Cα–Cα distances between these sites upon substrate binding, in agreement with the crystal structures. Subsequent Arrhenius analysis suggests the activation energy barrier (Ea) to this movement is relatively low (∼1.5–2.5 kcal/mol). Together, these results demonstrate that TyrIQ, used together with TrIQ, significantly expands the power of quenching-based distance mapping SDFL studies. PMID:25144569