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Sample records for interfacial tryptophan residues

  1. Ionization, partitioning, and dynamics of tryptophan octyl ester: implications for membrane-bound tryptophan residues.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, A; Mukherjee, S; Rukmini, R; Rawat, S S; Sudha, S

    1997-01-01

    The presence of tryptophan residues as intrinsic fluorophores in most proteins makes them an obvious choice for fluorescence spectroscopic analyses of such proteins. Membrane proteins have been reported to have a significantly higher tryptophan content than soluble proteins. The role of tryptophan residues in the structure and function of membrane proteins has attracted a lot of attention. Tryptophan residues in membrane proteins and peptides are believed to be distributed asymmetrically toward the interfacial region. Tryptophan octyl ester (TOE) is an important model for membrane-bound tryptophan residues. We have characterized this molecule as a fluorescent membrane probe in terms of its ionization, partitioning, and motional characteristics in unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. The ionization property of this molecule in model membranes has been studied by utilizing its pH-dependent fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of pH-dependent fluorescence intensity and emission maximum shows that deprotonation of the alpha-amino group of TOE occurs with an apparent pKa of approximately 7.5 in the membrane. The fluorescence lifetime of membrane-bound TOE also shows pH dependence. The fluorescence lifetimes of TOE have been interpreted by using the rotamer model for the fluorescence decay of tryptophan. Membrane/water partition coefficients of TOE were measured in both its protonated and deprotonated forms. No appreciable difference was found in its partitioning behavior with ionization. Analysis of fluorescence polarization of TOE as a function of pH showed that there is a decrease in polarization with increasing pH, implying more rotational freedom on deprotonation. This is further supported by pH-dependent red edge excitation shift and the apparent rotational correlation time of membrane-bound TOE. TOE should prove useful in monitoring the organization and dynamics of tryptophan residues incorporated into membranes. PMID:9251800

  2. Chemical modification of the tryptophan residue in adrenocorticotropin.

    PubMed

    Canova-Davis, E; Ramachandran, J

    1976-02-24

    The single tryptophan residue in the pituitary hormone adrenocorticotropin was modified selectively by reaction with a variety of substituted o-nitrophenylsulfenyl chlorides. In addition to quantitative modification of the tryptophan residue, the reaction invariably resulted in partial oxidation of the methionine residue to the sulfoxide. The methionine sulfoxide derivative could be separated from the desired product by partition chromatography on Sephadex G-50 in the solvent system 1-butanol-pyridine-0.1% acetic acid (5:3:11). Thus, the 2,4-dinitrophenylsulfenyl, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenylsulfenyl, and 2-nitro-4-carbamidophenylsulfenyl derivatives of adrenocorticotropin were prepared and characterized. Modifications in the isolation of adrenocorticotropin from ovine pituitaries are also described. The melanocyte stimulating activities of the native hormone and the analogues are discussed.

  3. Identification of Two Novel Modifications at Tryptophan Residues.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuzhen; Zhang, Kai; Tian, Shanshan; He, Xiwen; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-10-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in cellular physiology. Mass spectrometry (MS) has been developed into a powerful tool to identify all possible protein modifications. Herein, we describe our efforts to deduce the structures of two unknown modifications at tryptophan (Trp) residues (W + 92 Da and W + 108 Da). The two modifications were further confirmed by aligning the MS/MS fragmentation of synthetic peptide with in-vivo peptide identified. Finally, the mimic experiment elucidated how two Trp modifications occur. This study, therefore, expands current knowledge of Trp modifications.

  4. Radiation induced modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in flavocytochrome b 2 in dilute aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D.; Saha, A.; Mandal, P. C.

    2000-07-01

    Steady state gamma irradiation of an aqueous solution of flavocytochrome b 2 under different conditions led to modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. These aromatic amino acid residues were more susceptible to the attack by OH radicals than H atoms. Unchanged quantum yield values for tryptophan and tyrosine residues and unchanged tryptophan excited state lifetime in the irradiated enzyme suggests that irradiation results in breakage of some non-covalent bonds disrupting the peptide framework partially. It is justified by the circular dichroic studies for the irradiated enzyme which shows a reduced helicity but no evolution towards any other structures.

  5. Decomposition of protein tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components. III. Correlation between fluorescence and microenvironment parameters of individual tryptophan residues.

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Y K; Koshevnik, Y; Burstein, E A

    2001-01-01

    In our previous paper (Reshetnyak, Ya. K., and E. A. Burstein. 2001. Biophys. J. 81:1710-1734) we confirmed the existence of five statistically discrete classes of emitting tryptophan fluorophores in proteins. The differences in fluorescence properties of tryptophan residues of these five classes reflect differences in interactions of excited states of tryptophan fluorophores with their microenvironment in proteins. Here we present a system of describing physical and structural parameters of microenvironments of tryptophan residues based on analysis of atomic crystal structures of proteins. The application of multidimensional statistical methods of cluster and discriminant analyses for the set of microenvironment parameters of 137 tryptophan residues of 48 proteins with known three-dimensional structures allowed us to 1) demonstrate the discrete nature of ensembles of structural parameters of tryptophan residues in proteins; 2) assign spectral components obtained after decomposition of tryptophan fluorescence spectra to individual tryptophan residues; 3) find a correlation between spectroscopic and physico-structural features of the microenvironment; and 4) reveal differences in structural and physical parameters of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues belonging to various spectral classes. PMID:11509384

  6. Microenvironment of tryptophan residues in beta-lactoglobulin derivative polypeptide-sodium dodecyl sulfate complexes.

    PubMed

    Imamura, T; Konishi, K

    1992-06-01

    The changes of microenvironment of tryptophan residues in beta-lactoglobulin A and its cyanogen bromide (CNBr) fragments with the binding of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied with measurements of the rates of N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) modification reactions by stopped-flow photometry. Two tryptophan residues of carboxyamidomethylated (RCM) beta-lactoglobulin A in the states of their complexes with SDS were clearly distinguishable by their differences in NBS modification rates. We confirmed by experiments with CNBr fragments containing trytophan residue. The modification rates of Trp 19 in RCM beta-lactoglobulin A-SDS complexes were about 10-fold smaller than those expected for tryptophan residues exposed entirely to the aqueous solvent. The Trp 61 was hardly changed. The change of rate constants for Trp 19 was virtually consistent with those observed when N-acetyl-L-trytophan ethylester was dissolved in SDS micelles. For various species of polypeptide-SDS complexes, all tryptophan residues were reactive to NBS and also, for some of them, the differences in NBS modification rates were observed between tryptophan residues on a common polypeptide chain. These results suggest micellar and heterogeneous bindings of SDS to polypeptides.

  7. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is believed that these residues are located in the active site of avidin and take part in the binding of biotin. PMID:3355517

  8. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-02-15

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is believed that these residues are located in the active site of avidin and take part in the binding of biotin.

  9. Progesterone binding to the tryptophan residues of human alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2006-11-06

    Binding studies between progesterone and alpha1-acid glycoprotein allowed us to demonstrate that the binding site of progesterone contains one hydrophobic tryptophan residue and that the structure of the protein is not altered upon binding. The data obtained at saturated concentrations of progesterone clearly reveal the type of interaction at physiological levels.

  10. Detection of water proximity to tryptophan residues in proteins by single photon radioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Bicknese, S; Zimet, D; Park, J; van Hoek, A N; Shohet, S B; Verkman, A S

    1995-05-01

    We recently developed a single photon radioluminescence (SPR) technique to measure submicroscopic distances in biological samples [Bicknese et al., and Shahrokh et al., Biophys. J., 63 (1992) 1256-1279]. SPR arises from the excitation of a fluorophore by the energy deposited from a slowing beta decay electron. The purpose of this study was to detect 3H2O molecules near tryptophan residues in proteins by tryptophan SPR. To detect small SPR signals, a sample compartment with reflective ellipsoidal optics was constructed, and amplified signals from a cooled photomultiplier were resolved by pulse-height analysis. A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out to quantify the relationship between SPR signal and 3H2O-tryptophan proximity. Measurements of tryptophan SPR were made on aqueous tryptophan; dissolved melittin (containing a single tryptophan); native and denatured aldolase; dissolved aldolase, monellin, and human serum albumin; and the integral membrane proteins CHIP28 (containing a putative aqueous pore) and MIP26 using 3H2O or the aqueous-phase probe 3H-3-O-methylglucose (OMG). After subtraction of a Bremsstrahlung background signal, the SPR signal from aqueous tryptophan (cps.microCi-1 mumol-1 +/- SE) was 8.6 +/- 0.2 with 3H2O and 7.8 +/- 0.3 with 3HOMG (n = 8). With 3H2O as donor, the SPR signal (cps.microCi-1 mumol-1) was 9.0 +/- 0.3 for monomeric melittin in low salt (trytophan exposed) and 4.6 +/- 0.8 (n = 9) for tetrameric melittin in high salt (tryptophans buried away from aqueous solution). The ratio of SPR signal obtained for aldolase under denaturing conditions of 8 M urea (fluorophores exposed) versus non-denaturing buffer (fluorophores buried) was 1.53 +/- 0.07 (n = 6). Ratios of SPR signals normalized to fluorescence intensities for monellin, aldolase, and human serum albumin, relative to that for d-tryptophan, were 1.42, 1.09, and 1.04, indicating that the cross-section for excitation of fluorophores in proteins is greater than that for tryptophan in

  11. The functions of tryptophan residues in membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, M.; Chang, C.H.; Stevens, F.J.

    1994-08-01

    Membrane proteins in general have a significantly higher Trp content than do soluble proteins. This is especially true for the M and L subunits of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria. The Trp residues are located mostly in the segments that connect the transmembrane helices. Further, they are concentrated at the periplasmic side of the complex. Within the protein subunits, many form hydrogen bonds with carbonyl oxygens of the main chain, thereby stabilizing the protein. On the surface of the molecule, they are correctly positioned to form hydrogen bonds with the lipid head groups while their hydrophobic rings are immersed in the lipid part of the bilayer. We suggest that Trp residues are involved in the translocation of protein through the membrane and that following translocation, Trp residues serve as anchors on the periplasmic side of the membrane.

  12. Tryptophan 19 residue is the origin of bovine β-lactoglobulin fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad René; Vogelaer, Julie; Bretesche, Loïc; Kmiecik, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    β-Lactoglobulin consists of a single polypeptide of 162 amino acid residues with 2 Trp residues, Trp 19 present in a hydrophobic pocket and Trp 61 present at the surface of the protein near the pocket. This study aimed to characterize the respective contribution of the two Trp residues to the overall fluorescence of the protein. We added for that calcofluor white, an extrinsic fluorophore, which, at high concentration compared to that of the protein, quenches completely emission of hydrophobic Trp residue(s). The study was performed at different pHs by recording fluorescence steady state spectra and measuring fluorescence lifetimes of the Trp-residues using Single Time Photon Counting method. Our results indicate that addition of calcofluor white does not induce a red shift of the tryptophan(s) emission peak (332nm) but only a decrease in the fluorescence intensity. This means that Trp 61 residue does not contribute to the protein emission, tryptophan emission occurs from Trp 19 residue only. Also, excitation spectrum peak position (283nm) of β-lactoglobulin is not modified upon calcofluor white binding. These results mean that structural rearrangements within β-lactoglobulin are not occurring upon calcofluor white binding. Energy transfer between Trp 19 residue and calcofluor white occurs with 100% efficiency, i.e. the two fluorophores are very close one to each other (<5Å). This energy transfer is not Forster type. Fluorescence intensity decay of Trp 19 residue occurs with three lifetimes, equal to 0.48, 1.49 and 4.29ns at pH 2 (monomeric state). Very close values were obtained at the different studied pHs (2-12) and where β-lactoglobulin is at different quaternary structure or present in solution in a mixture of dimers and monomers. Our data are interpreted as the results of emission occurring from different substructures of the tryptophan, reached at the excited state. The populations of these substructures characterized by the pre-exponential parameters

  13. Nanosecond segmental mobilities of tryptophan residues in proteins observed by lifetime-resolved fluorescence anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Lakowiz, J.R.; Weber, G.

    1980-10-01

    Steady-state and lifetime-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of protein fluorescence were used to investigate the depolarizing motions of tryptophan residues in proteins. Lifetime resolution was achieved by oxygen quenching. The proteins investigated were carbonic anhydrase, carboxypeptidase A, ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin, trypsin, pepsin, and bovine and human serum albumin. When corrected for overall protein rotation, the steady state anisotropies indicate that, on the average, the tryptophan residues in these proteins rotate 29/sup 0/ +- 6/sup 0/ during the unquenched excited state lifetimes of these proteins, which range from 1.7 to 6.1 ns. The lifetime-resolved anisotropies reveal correlation times for these displacements ranging from 1 to 12 ns. On the average these correlation times are tenfold shorter than that expected for overall protein rotation. We conclude that the tryptophan residues in these proteins display remarkable freedom of motion within the protein matrix, which implies that these matrices are highly flexible on the nanosecond time scale.

  14. Identification of a quorum sensing pheromone posttranslationally farnesylated at the internal tryptophan residue from Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shunsuke; Usami, Syohei; Nakamura, Yuta; Ozaki, Koki; Okada, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto produces poly-γ-glutamic acid under the control of quorum sensing. We identified ComXnatto pheromone as the quorum-sensing pheromone with an amino acid sequence of Lys-Trp-Pro-Pro-Ile-Glu and the tryptophan residue posttranslationally modified by a farnesyl group. ComXnatto pheromone is unique in the sense that the 5th tryptophan residue from the C-terminal is farnesylated.

  15. Sub-structures formed in the excited state are responsible for tryptophan residues fluorescence in β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad-Rene

    2011-07-01

    Origin of tryptophan residues fluorescence in β-lactoglobulin is analyzed. Fluorescence lifetimes and spectra of β-lactoglobulin solution are measured at pH going from 2 to 12 and in 6 M guanidine. Tryptophan residues emit with three lifetimes at all conditions. Two lifetimes (0.4-0.5 ns and 2-4 ns) are in the same range of those measured for tryptophan free in solution. Lifetimes in the denatured states are lower than those measured in the native state. Pre-exponential values are modified with the protein structure. Data are identical to those already obtained for other proteins. Fluorescence lifetimes characterize internal states of the tryptophan residues (Tryptophan sub-structures) independently of the tryptophan environments, the third lifetime results from the interaction that is occurring between the Trp residues and its environment. Pre-exponential values characterize substructures populations. In conclusion, tryptophan mission occurs from substates generated in the excited state. This is in good agreement with the theory we described in recent works.

  16. pH-induced structural change of a multi-tryptophan protein MPT63 with immunoglobulin-like fold: identification of perturbed tryptophan residue/residues.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Manini; Ghosh, Ranendu; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda; Ghosh, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    The structural change of M. tuberculosis MPT63, which is predominantly a β-sheet protein having an immunoglobulin like fold, has been investigated in the pH range 7.5-1.5 using various biophysical techniques along with low-temperature phosphorescence (LTP) spectroscopy. MPT63 contains four Tryptophan (Trp) residues at 26, 48, 82, and 129. Although circular dichroism, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, time-resolved anisotropy, 1-aniline-8-naphthalene sulfonic (ANS) acid binding, and analytical ultracentrifuge depict more open largely unfolded structure of MPT63 at pH 1.5 and also more accessible nature of Trp residues to neutral quencher at pH 1.5, it is, however, not possible to assign the specific Trp residue/residues being perturbed. This problem has been resolved using LTP of MPT63, which shows optically resolved four distinct (0, 0) bands corresponding to four Trp residues in the pH range 7.5-3.0. LTP at pH 1.5 clearly reveals that the solvent-exposed Trp 82 and the almost buried Trp 129 are specifically affected compared with Trp 48 and Trp 26. Lys 8 and Lys 27 are predicted to affect Trp 129. Tyrosine residues are found to be silent even at pH 1.5. This type of specific perturbation in a multi-Trp protein has not been addressed before. LTP further indicates that partially exposed Trp 48 is preferentially quenched by acrylamide compared with other Trp residues at both pH 7.5 and 1.5. The solvent-exposed Trp 82 is surprisingly found to be not quenched by acrylamide at pH 7.5. All the results are obtained using micromolar concentration of protein and without using any Trp-substituted mutant.

  17. Tripping Up Trp: Modification of Protein Tryptophan Residues by Reactive Oxygen Species, Modes of Detection, and Biological Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Deterding, Leesa J.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins comprise a majority of the dry weight of a cell, rendering them a major target for oxidative modification. Oxidation of proteins can result in significant alterations in protein molecular mass such as breakage of the polypeptide backbone, and/or polymerization of monomers into dimers, multimers and sometimes into insoluble aggregates. Protein oxidation can also result in structural changes to amino acid residue side chains, conversions which have only a modest effect on protein size but can have widespread consequences for protein function. There are a wide range of rate constants for amino acid reactivity, with cysteine, methionine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan having the highest rate constants with commonly encountered biological oxidants. Free tryptophan and tryptophan protein residues react at a diffusion limited rate with hydroxyl radical, and also have high rate constants for reactions with singlet oxygen and ozone. Although oxidation of proteins in general and tryptophan residues specifically can have effects detrimental to the health of cells and organisms, some modifications are neutral while others contribute to the function of the protein in question or may act as a signal that damaged proteins need to be replaced. This review provides a brief overview of the chemical mechanisms by which tryptophan residues become oxidized, presents both the strengths and weaknesses of some of the techniques used to detect these oxidative interactions and discusses selected examples of the biological consequences of tryptophan oxidation in proteins from animals, plants and microbes. PMID:26393422

  18. Functional and fluorescence analyses of tryptophan residues in H+-pyrophosphatase of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Wei; Lee, Ching-Hung; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Lin, Shih-Ming; Lo, Yueh-Yu; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Huang, Lin-Kun; Huang, Yu-Fen; Hsu, Yu-Di; Pan, Rong-Long

    2014-04-01

    Homodimeric proton-translocating pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) maintains the cytoplasmic pH homeostasis of many bacteria and higher plants by coupling pyrophosphate (PPi) hydrolysis and proton translocation. H+-PPase accommodates several essential motifs involved in the catalytic mechanism, including the PPi binding motif and Acidic I and II motifs. In this study, 3 intrinsic tryptophan residues, Trp-75, Trp-365, and Trp-602, in H+-PPase from Clostridium tetani were used as internal probes to monitor the local conformational state of the periplasm domain, transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic domain, respectively. Upon binding of the substrate analog Mg-imidodiphosphate (Mg-IDP), local structural changes prevented the modification of tryptophan residues by N-bromosuccinimide (NBS), especially at Trp-602. Following Mg-Pi binding, Trp-75 and Trp-365, but not Trp-602, were slightly protected from structural modifications by NBS. These results reveal the conformation of H+-PPase is distinct in the presence of different ligands. Moreover, analyses of the Stern-Volmer relationship and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy also indicate that the local structure around Trp-602 is more exposed to solvent and varied under different environments. In addition, Trp-602 was identified to be a crucial residue in the H+-PPase that may potentially be involved in stabilizing the structure of the catalytic region by site-directed mutagenesis analysis.

  19. Selective ruthenium labeling of the tryptophan residue in the bee venom Peptide melittin.

    PubMed

    Perekalin, Dmitry S; Novikov, Valentin V; Pavlov, Alexander A; Ivanov, Igor A; Anisimova, Natalia Yu; Kopylov, Alexey N; Volkov, Dmitry S; Seregina, Irina F; Bolshov, Michail A; Kudinov, Alexander R

    2015-03-23

    Melittin is a membrane-active peptide from bee venom with promising antimicrobial and anticancer activity. Herein we report on a simple and selective method for labeling of the tryptophan residue in melittin by the organometallic fragment [(C5 H5 )Ru](+) in aqueous solution and in air. Ruthenium coordination does not disturb the secondary structure of the peptide (as verified by 2D NMR spectroscopy), but changes the pattern of its intermolecular interactions resulting in an 11-fold decrease of hemolytic activity. The high stability of the organometallic conjugate allowed the establishment of the biodistribution of the labeled melittin in mice by inductively coupled plasma MS analysis of ruthenium.

  20. Influence of residual stresses on ceramic-metal interfacial toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Mark Edward

    The critical property determining the extent to which ductile metal reinforcing particles can toughen a brittle ceramic matrix is the toughness of the ceramic-metal interface between particle and matrix. Unfortunately, due to the lack of understanding of the mechanics of bimaterial interfaces in the presence of residual stresses, experimental data on the fracture toughness of ceramic-metal interfaces is scarce. Consequently, the purpose of the present work is to account for the influence of residual stresses on the measured fracture toughness of a representative nickel/alumina system and, in conjunction with a maximum hoop stress criterion, to explain the observed increase in toughness with increasing mixity of loading. A finite element model incorporating the rate-dependent inelastic behavior of nickel at high temperatures was implemented in order to provide a realistic estimate of the residual stresses that develop during the bonding process. The calculated Mises equivalent stresses in the nickel averaged between 110 and 115 MPa, well above the room temperature yield strength of 82 MPa. For the sandwich specimens adopted in the current study, a simple argument yields a critical foil thickness below which residual stress effects are expected to be minimal. The influence of differing foil thicknesses below this threshold is shown to be insignificant. For sandwich specimens a general result is demonstrated: compared to the same loading applied without residual stresses present, the effect of residual stresses is to decrease the magnitude of the phase angle that will develop along the interface. Microprobe measurements verified that by controlling the bonding atmosphere the formation of a reaction product at the interface was prevented, and that the fracture mechanism was pure cleavage of the interface. The measured interfacial toughness values increased from 11 J/sq m at psi-caret approximately equals 0 deg to 22 J/sq m at psi-caret approximately equals +/-23 deg

  1. Introduction of a unique tryptophan residue into various positions of Bacillus licheniformis DnaK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-En; Lin, Min-Guan; Lo, Huei-Fen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Chi, Meng-Chun; Lin, Long-Liu

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis together with biochemical and biophysical techniques were used to probe effects of single-tryptophan-incorporated mutations on a bacterial molecular chaperone, Bacillus licheniformis DnaK (BlDnaK). Specifically, five phenylalanine residues (Phe(120), Phe(174), Phe(186), Phe(378) and Phe(396)) of BlDnaK were individually replaced by single tryptophans, thus creating site-specific probes for the fluorescence analysis of the protein. The steady-state ATPase activity for BlDnaK, F120W, F174W, F186W, F378W, and F396W was determined to be 76.01, 52.82, 25.32, 53.31, 58.84, and 47.53 nmol Pi/min/mg, respectively. Complementation test revealed that the single mutation at codons 120, 186, and 378 of the dnaK gene still allowed an Escherichia coli dnaK756-Ts strain to grow at a stringent temperature of 44°C. Simultaneous addition of co-chaperones and NR-peptide did not synergistically stimulate the ATPase activity of F174W and F396W, and these two proteins were unable to assist the refolding of GdnHCl-denatured luciferase. The heat-induced denaturation of all variants could be fitted adequately to a three-state model, in agreement with the observation for the wild-type protein. By CD spectral analysis, GdnHCl-induced unfolding transition for BlDnaK was 1.51 M corresponding to ΔG(N-U) of 1.69 kcal/mol; however, the transitions for mutant proteins were 1.07-1.55 M equivalent to ΔG(N-U) of 0.94-2.93 kcal/mol. The emission maximum of single-tryptophan-incorporated variants was in the range of 333.2-335.8 nm. Acrylamide quenching analysis showed that the mutant proteins had a dynamic quenching constant of 3.0-4.2 M(-1). Taken together, these results suggest that the molecular properties of BlDnaK have been significantly changed upon the individual replacement of selected phenylalanine residues by tryptophan.

  2. Denaturation of protein by chlorine dioxide: oxidative modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2007-04-24

    Oxychlorine compounds, such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), have potent antimicrobial activity. Although the biochemical mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of HOCl has been extensively investigated, little is known about that of ClO2. Using bovine serum albumin and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model proteins, here I demonstrate that the antimicrobial activity of ClO2 is attributable primarily to its protein-denaturing activity. By solubility analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and measurement of enzymatic activity, I demonstrate that protein is rapidly denatured by ClO2 with a concomitant decrease in the concentration of ClO2 in the reaction mixture. Circular dichroism spectra of the ClO2-treated proteins show a change in ellipticity at 220 nm, indicating a decrease in alpha-helical content. Differential scanning calorimetry shows that transition temperature and endothermic transition enthalpy of heat-induced unfolding decrease in the ClO2-treated protein. The enzymatic activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase decreases to 10% within 15 s of treatment with 10 microM ClO2. Elemental analyses show that oxygen, but not chlorine, atoms are incorporated in the ClO2-treated protein, providing direct evidence that protein is oxidized by ClO2. Furthermore, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show that tryptophan residues become N-formylkynurenine and tyrosine residues become 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine (TOPA) in the ClO2-treated proteins. Taking these results together, I conclude that microbes are inactivated by ClO2 owing to denaturation of constituent proteins critical to their integrity and/or function, and that this denaturation is caused primarily by covalent oxidative modification of their tryptophan and tyrosine residues.

  3. Tryptophan and tyrosine to terbium fluorescence resonance energy transfer as a method to 'map' aromatic residues and monitor docking

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, John E.; McLendon, George L. . E-mail: george.mclendon@duke.edu

    2006-11-03

    Fluorescent lanthanide ions, with large Stokes shifts and narrow emission bands, are excellent tools for the development of FRET-based assays. In this work, a terbium ion is tethered to a peptide which binds to the BIR3 domain of XIAP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Excitation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the BIR3 domain causes the peptide bound terbium ion to fluoresce relative to its distance from these aromatic residues. By developing ligands with terbium ions tethered at different residues, the relative terbium emission can be used to 'map' the aromatic residues within the ligand binding pocket.

  4. Structure-function studies on bacteriorhodopsin. IX. Substitutions of tryptophan residues affect protein-retinal interactions in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Mogi, T.; Marti, T.; Khorana, H.G. )

    1989-08-25

    Bacteriorhodopsin contains 8 tryptophan residues distributed across the membrane-embedded helices. To study their possible functions, we have replaced them one at a time by phenylalanine; in addition, Trp-137 and -138 have been replaced by cysteine. The mutants were prepared by cassette mutagenesis of the synthetic bacterio-opsin gene, expression and purification of the mutant apoproteins, renaturation, and chromophore regeneration. The replacement of Trp-10, Trp-12 (helix A), Trp-80 (helix C), and Trp-138 (helix E) by phenylalanine and of Trp-137 and Trp-138 by cysteine did not significantly alter the absorption spectra or affect their proton pumping. However, substitution of the remaining tryptophans by phenylalanine had the following effects. (1) Substitution of Trp-86 (helix C) and Trp-137 gave chromophores blue-shifted by 20 nm and resulted in reduced proton pumping to about 30%. (2) As also reported previously, substitution of Trp-182 and Trp-189 (helix F) caused large blue shifts (70 and 40 nm, respectively) in the chromophore and affected proton pumping. (3) The substitution of Trp-86 and Trp-182 by phenylalanine conferred acid instability on these mutants. The spectral shifts indicate that Trp-86, Trp-182, Trp-189, and possibly Trp-137 interact with retinal. It is proposed that these tryptophans, probably along with Tyr-57 (helix B) and Tyr-185 (helix F), form a retinal binding pocket. We discuss the role of tryptophan residues that are conserved in bacteriorhodopsin, halorhodopsin, and the related family of opsin proteins.

  5. The geranyl-modified tryptophan residue is crucial for ComXRO-E-2 pheromone biological activity.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Fumitada; Kobayashi, Ko; Okada, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Hisao; Ojika, Makoto; Sakagami, Youji

    2011-07-01

    The ComX pheromone is an isoprenoidal oligopeptide containing a modified tryptophan residue, which stimulates natural genetic competence in gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus. We have reported the structure of the ComX(RO-E-2) pheromone, which is produced by the RO-E-2 strain of Bacillus subtilis. ComX(RO-E-2) analogs with substituted amino acids and isoprenoid modified tryptophan residues (e.g., prenyl, geranyl, and farnesyl), were synthesized and examined for biological activity. These results indicate that Phe-Trp(∗)(Ger)-NH(2) is the minimum pharmacophore of the ComX(RO-E-2) pheromone. Furthermore, the length of the isoprenoid moiety (i.e., modification style), and the presence of double bonds, are crucial for biological activity. The modification style of the ComX pheromone is more important than the peptide sequence with respect to biological activity.

  6. Spectroscopic investigations of the single tryptophan residue and of riboflavin and 7-oxolumazine bound to lumazine apoprotein from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Kulinski, T; Visser, A J; O'Kane, D J; Lee, J

    1987-01-27

    Spectroscopic techniques have been applied to investigate the conformation, local structure, and dynamic properties of the apoprotein of the lumazine protein from Photobacterium leiognathi and the holoprotein reconstituted with either the natural ligand 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine or the closely related analogues riboflavin and 6-methyl-7-oxo-8-ribityllumazine (7-oxolumazine). The analogues are bound similarly to the natural prosthetic group. They exhibit similar shifts on binding in their absorption and fluorescence spectra, single-exponential fluorescence decays, and no independent motion from the protein as evident from a long-lived anisotropy decay (single-exponential phi = 10 ns, 20 degrees C) and high initial anisotropy. Steady-state anisotropy measurements result in similar KD's (40 nM, 20 degrees C, 50 mM inorganic phosphate) for all ligands. Circular dichroism in the far-UV region (190-250 nm) indicates no change in secondary structure on binding to the apoprotein. In the spectral region of 250-310 nm relatively large changes occur, indicating changes in the environment of the tyrosine and tryptophan residues. The single tryptophan residue shows a three-exponential decay of its fluorescence in both the apoprotein and the holoprotein. Radiationless energy transfer also occurs from the tryptophan to the bound ligand, especially evident with 7-oxolumazine. We have designed a new method for evaluation of the rate constant of energy transfer by measuring the (picosecond) rise time of the acceptor fluorescence. The anisotropy decay of the tryptophan residue shows two correlation times, a short one (phi approximately equal to 0.4 ns) representing rapid but restriced oscillation of this residue and a longer one (phi 2 = 5-7 ns, 20 degrees C) representing the motion of a larger segment of the protein.

  7. Antioxidant activity of cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine residues in continuous phase beta-lactoglobulin in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ryan J; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2005-12-28

    Proteins dispersed in the continuous phase of oil-in-water emulsions are capable of inhibiting lipid oxidation reactions. The antioxidant activity of these proteins is thought to encompass both free radical scavenging by amino acid residues and chelation of prooxidative transition metals; however, the precise mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. In this study, the oxidative stability of cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine residues in continuous phase beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) in a Brij-stabilized menhaden oil-in-water emulsion was determined. The presence of low concentrations of continuous phase beta-Lg (250 and 750 microg/mL) significantly inhibited lipid oxidation as determined by lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. It was observed that cysteine oxidized before tryptophan in beta-Lg, and both residues oxidized before lipid oxidation could be detected. No oxidation of the methionine residues of beta-Lg was observed despite its reported high oxidative susceptibility. It is conceivable that surface exposure of amino acid residues greatly affects their oxidation kinetics, which may explain why some residues are preferentially oxidized relative to others. Further elucidation of the mechanisms governing free radical scavenging of amino acids could lead to more effective applications of proteins as antioxidants within oil-in-water food emulsions.

  8. Mass spectrometric identification of oxidative modifications of tryptophan residues in proteins: chemical artifact or post-translational modification?

    PubMed

    Perdivara, Irina; Deterding, Leesa J; Przybylski, Michael; Tomer, Kenneth B

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative modification of tryptophan to kynurenine (KYN) and N-formyl kynurenine (NFK) has been described in mitochondrial proteins associated with redox metabolism, and in human cataract lenses. To a large extent, however, previously reported identifications of these modifications were performed using peptide mass fingerprinting and/or tandem-MS data of proteins separated by gel electrophoresis. To date, it is uncertain whether NFK and KYN may represent sample handling artifacts or exclusively post-translational events. To address the problem of the origin of tryptophan oxidation, we characterized several antibodies by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, with and without the use of electrophoretic separation of heavy and light chains. Antibodies are not normally expected to undergo oxidative modifications, however, several tryptophan (Trp) residues on both heavy and light chains were found extensively modified to both doubly oxidized Trp and KYN following SDS-PAGE separation and in-gel digestion. In contrast, those residues were observed as non-modified upon in-solution digestion. These results indicate that Trp oxidation may occur as an artifact in proteins separated by SDS-PAGE, and their presence should be carefully interpreted, especially when gel electrophoretic separation methods are employed.

  9. Differential tolerance of 'pseudo-pathogenic' tryptophan residues in calcium-binding EGF domains of short fibulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annie; Hulleman, John D

    2015-01-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in the last canonical calcium-binding epidermal growth factor (cbEGF) domain of fibulin-3 (F3) causes the rare macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML). In cell culture studies, this mutation leads to inefficient F3 secretion and higher intracellular steady state levels, likely due to F3 disulfide bonding and/or protein folding problems. However, how the R345W mutation actually causes ML is still largely unknown. Herein we tested whether the introduction of analogous, 'pseudo-pathogenic' tryptophan mutations immediately after the bn cysteine (bn+1) in other cbEGF domains also caused protein folding/secretion challenges. We found that introduction of tryptophan mutations into each of the four other F3 canonical cbEGF domains caused a significant reduction in protein secretion ranging from 2.7 to 56% of wild-type (WT) F3 levels. Surprisingly, an R185W mutation in the first canonical cbEGF domain of F3 yielded the highest amount of secretion among the F3 tryptophan mutants, and its secretion defect could be rescued to near WT levels (95%) after growth temperature reduction. Interestingly, when similarly positioned tryptophan mutations were introduced into any of the canonical cbEGF domains of the highly homologous protein, fibulin-5 (F5), there was no effect on secretion. In an attempt to make F3 tolerant of tryptophan residues (like F5), we genetically engineered F3 to have a higher sequence homology with F5 by deleting three insert regions present in F3, but not F5. However, deletion of one or more of these regions did not have a beneficial effect on R345W F3 secretion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of tryptophan residues at the bn+1 position does not universally disrupt cbEGF domain folding and secretion, but that their effect is context dependent, and in this case, uniquely disrupt the folding of canonical cbEGF domains of F3, but not F5.

  10. DIFFERENTIAL TOLERANCE OF ‘PSEUDO-PATHOGENIC’ TRYPTOPHAN RESIDUES IN CALCIUM-BINDING EGF DOMAINS OF SHORT FIBULIN PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Annie; Hulleman, John D.

    2015-01-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in the last canonical calcium-binding epidermal growth factor (cbEGF) domain of fibulin-3 (F3) causes the rare macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML). In cell culture studies, this mutation leads to inefficient F3 secretion and higher intracellular steady state levels, likely due to F3 disulfide bonding and/or protein folding problems. However, how the R345W mutation actually causes ML is still largely unknown. Herein we tested whether the introduction of analogous, ‘pseudo-pathogenic’ tryptophan mutations immediately after the bn cysteine (bn+1) in other cbEGF domains also caused protein folding/secretion challenges. We found that introduction of tryptophan mutations into each of the four other F3 canonical cbEGF domains caused a significant reduction in protein secretion ranging from 2.7 to 56% of wild-type (WT) F3 levels. Surprisingly, an R185W mutation in the first canonical cbEGF domain of F3 yielded the highest amount of secretion among the F3 tryptophan mutants, and its secretion defect could be rescued to near WT levels (95%) after growth temperature reduction. Interestingly, when similarly positioned tryptophan mutations were introduced into any of the canonical cbEGF domains of the highly homologous protein, fibulin-5 (F5), there was no effect on secretion. In an attempt to make F3 tolerant of tryptophan residues (like F5), we genetically engineered F3 to have a higher sequence homology with F5 by deleting three insert regions present in F3, but not F5. However, deletion of one or more of these regions did not have a beneficial effect on R345W F3 secretion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of tryptophan residues at the bn+1 position does not universally disrupt cbEGF domain folding and secretion, but that their effect is context dependent, and in this case, uniquely disrupt the folding of canonical cbEGF domains of F3, but not F5. PMID:25481286

  11. Mechanistic examination of Cβ-Cγ bond cleavages of tryptophan residues during dissociations of molecular peptide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [G(n)W](•+) (n = 2-4) and [GXW](•+) (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO(2)](•+)) can generate [M - CO(2) - 116](+), [M - CO(2) - 117](•+), and [1H-indole](•+) (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO(2) - 116](+) and [1H-indole](•+) systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2, the decarboxylated species that is active against C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage, can efficiently isomerize to form a more stable π-radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WG(n)R](•+) (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M - 116](+) product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted that the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol(-1) lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  12. Mechanistic Examination of Cβ–Cγ Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan Residues during Dissociations of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K.; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [GnW]•+ (n = 2-4) and [GXW]•+ (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO2]•+) can generate [M - CO2 - 116]+, [M - CO2 - 117]•+, and [1H-indole]•+ (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO2 - 116]+ and [1H-indole]•+ systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2--the decarboxylated species that is active against Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage -can efficiently isomerize to form a more-stable -radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WGnR]•+ (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M-116]+ product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol -1 lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  13. Probing the structure of human tissue factor by site-directed mutagenesis of tryptophan residues and in-vivo incorporation of tryptophan analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselbacher, Carol A.; Rusinova, Elena; Waxman, Evan; Lam, Wan; Guha, Arabinda; Rusinova, Radda; Nemerson, Yale; Ross, J. B. Alexander; Konigsberg, W. H.

    1994-08-01

    Complexation of the extracellular domain of tissue factor to the serine protease factor VIIa is a critical step in the process of blood coagulation following tissue damage. To study the structure and function of the extracellular domain of tissue factor (soluble tissue factor, sTF), we have used site-directed mutagenesis to replace each of sTF's four tryptophans (Trp) with phenylalanine (Phe) or tyrosine (Tyr). Replacement of any one of the four Trps reduced the protein stability against denaturation by guanidinium chloride in a similar manner, indicating that each residue has important structural interactions within the protein. Replacement of Trps 25, 45, and 158 resulted in reduced cofactor activities, indicating that these residues are located in regions important for biological activity. The activities of mutants with Trp 14 or both Trps 14 and 158 replaced were comparable to sTF. From the combination of absorbance and fluorescence spectra of the individual Trps, information is obtained showing that all the Trps are buried in the protein matrix, and Trps 14 and 25 are in highly constrained environments compared to Trps 45 and 158. To directly monitor interactions of sTF with factor VIIa and its substrate factor X, we have undertaken a program to generate spectrally enhanced protein (SEP) analogs of sTF and the sTF Trp mutants by in vivo incorporation of Trp analogs with absorbance and fluorescence distinct from Trp. Attempts to incorporate the Trp analogs 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-OHTrp) and 7-azatryptophan (7- ATrp) into sTF have provided further information on the structural significance of the Trp residues in sTF.

  14. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's through the variation of interfacial layer architectures and processing parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was the development of efficient, user-friendly computer codes for optimizing fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites through the use of homogeneous and heterogeneous interfacial layer architectures and processing parameter variation. To satisfy this objective, three major computer codes have been developed and delivered to the NASA-Lewis Research Center, namely MCCM, OPTCOMP, and OPTCOMP2. MCCM is a general research-oriented code for investigating the effects of microstructural details, such as layered morphology of SCS-6 SiC fibers and multiple homogeneous interfacial layers, on the inelastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composites under axisymmetric thermomechanical loading. OPTCOMP and OPTCOMP2 combine the major analysis module resident in MCCM with a commercially-available optimization algorithm and are driven by user-friendly interfaces which facilitate input data construction and program execution. OPTCOMP enables the user to identify those dimensions, geometric arrangements and thermoelastoplastic properties of homogeneous interfacial layers that minimize thermal residual stresses for the specified set of constraints. OPTCOMP2 provides additional flexibility in the residual stress optimization through variation of the processing parameters (time, temperature, external pressure and axial load) as well as the microstructure of the interfacial region which is treated as a heterogeneous two-phase composite. Overviews of the capabilities of these codes are provided together with a summary of results that addresses the effects of various microstructural details of the fiber, interfacial layers and matrix region on the optimization of fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites.

  15. Two-dimensional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy IV: Resolution of fluorescence of tryptophan residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Hiroaki; Nakashima, Kenichi; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Noda, Isao

    2006-11-01

    Generalized two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy has been used to resolve the fluorescence spectra of two tryptophan (Trp) residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme. In each protein, one Trp residue is buried in a hydrophobic domain of the protein matrix and the other Trp residue is located at a hydrophilic domain close to the protein-water interface. Fluorescence quenching by iodide ion, a hydrophilic quencher, was employed as a perturbation to induce the intensity change in the spectra. The Trp residue which is located at the hydrophilic domain is effectively quenched by the quencher, while the Trp residue located at the hydrophobic domain is protected from the quenching. Therefore, the fluorescence of these two Trp residues have a different sensitivity to the quenching, showing a different response to the concentration of the quencher. Fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues in alcohol dehydrogenase, which are heavily overlapped in conventional one-dimensional spectra, have been successfully resolved by the 2D correlation technique. From the asynchronous correlation map, it was revealed that the quenching of Trp located at the hydrophobic part was brought about after that of Trp located at the hydrophilic part. In contrast, the fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues could not be resolved after the alcohol dehydrogenase was denatured with guanidine hydrochloride. These results are consistent with the well-known structure of alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was elucidated that the present 2D analysis is not interfered by Raman bands of the solvent, which sometimes bring difficulty into the conventional fluorescence analysis. Fluorescence spectra of the Trp residues in lysozyme could not be resolved by the 2D correlation technique. The differences between the two proteins are attributed to the fact that the Trp residue in the hydrophobic site of lysozyme is not sufficiently protected from the quenching.

  16. Tryptophan and cystein residues of the acetylcholine receptors of Torpedo species. Relationship to binding of cholinergic ligands.

    PubMed

    Eldefrawi, M E; Eldefrawi, A T; Wilson, D B

    1975-09-23

    Several methods were used to analyze for tryptophan in the acetylcholine (ACh) receptors purified from the electric organs of the electric rays, Torpedo californica and Torpedo marmorata. The best value of tryptophan was 2.4 mol %. When excited at 290 nm, both receptors fluoresced with a maximum at 336, but there was no change in the fluorescence emission spectra upon binding of carbamylcholine, d-tubocurarine, ACh, or decamethonium. The free SH content of the Torpedo receptors varied in different preparations, and was highest in that purified from fresh T. californica using deaerated solutions and dialysis under nitrogen, and lowest in that prepared from the aged lyophilized membranes of T. marmorata. The maximum free SH content was 20 nmol/mg of protein or 0.22 mol %, equal to at most 18% of the total cysteic acid residues. Reaction of either 33% or of all the SH residues with p-chloromercuribenzoate reduced maximum ACh binding to the pure receptor prepared from fresh T. californica by only 23%.

  17. A 1H NMR spectroscopic study on the tryptophan residues of lysozyme included by glucosyl-β-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuyuki; Kobayashi, Teruya; Yoshikiyo, Keisuke; Matsui, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Aso, Yuji

    2009-02-01

    A 1H NMR spectroscopic study showed that the side chains of Trp residues of chicken egg white lysozyme in an aqueous solution are included by Glucosyl-β-cyclodextrin (G1-β-CD). The 1H NMR signals due to Trp residues shifted with the addition of G1-β-CD. The addition of methyl α- D-glucopyranoside, which has no inclusion ability, gave different effect on the shift of 1H NMR signals. The 1H NMR signals due to Cys64 and Ile98 were also influenced to a considerable extent with the addition of G1-β-CD, suggesting that these hydrophobic amino acid residues are also included by the CD. The chemical shift values of 1H NMR signals, due to indole rings of tryptophan residues, changed more with the addition of G1-β-CD. The magnitudes of the chemical shift change were different depending on their locations in the protein. The chemical shift values of 1H NMR signals, due to those Trp residues in the active site of the lysozyme were smaller than those locating at relatively near the surface of the protein.

  18. Probing alkali metal–π interactions with the side chain residue of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiaxin; Barbour, Leonard J.; Gokel, George W.

    2002-01-01

    Feeble forces play a significant role in the organization of proteins. These include hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, salt bridge formation, and steric interactions. The alkali metal cation-π interaction is a force of potentially profound importance but its consideration in biology has been limited by the lack of experimental evidence. Our previous studies of cation–π interactions with Na+ and K+ involved the side arms of tryptophan (indole), tyrosine (phenol), and phenylalanine (benzene) as the arene donors. The receptor system possesses limiting steric constraints. In this report, we show that direct interactions between alkali metals and arenes occur at or within the van der Waals contact distance. PMID:11943874

  19. Sensitivity of P-glycoprotein tryptophan residues to benzodiazepines and ATP interaction.

    PubMed

    Lima, Sofia A C; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; de Castro, Baltazar; Gameiro, Paula

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane P-glycoprotein is a member of the ATP-binding cassette family of membrane transporters. In the present study tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence was used to understand the P-glycoprotein response to three benzodiazepines (bromazepam, chlordiazepoxide and flurazepam) in the presence and absence of ATP. Fluorescence emission spectra showed a red shift on the maximal emission wavelength upon interaction of P-glycoprotein with all benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepine association with nucleotide-bound P-glycoprotein also showed this trend and the quenching profile was attributed to a sphere-of-action model, for static fluorescence. Furthermore, quenching data of benzodiazepine-bound P-glycoprotein with ATP were concentration dependent and saturable, indicating that nucleotide binds to P-glycoprotein whether drug is present or not. These results seems in agreement with the proposal of the ATP-switch model by Higgins and Linton, where substrate binding to the transporters initiates the transport cycle by increasing the ATP binding affinity.

  20. Role of lysine and tryptophan residues in the biological activity of toxin VII (Ts gamma) from the scorpion Tityus serrulatus.

    PubMed

    Hassani, O; Mansuelle, P; Cestèle, S; Bourdeaux, M; Rochat, H; Sampieri, F

    1999-02-01

    Toxin VII (TsVII), also known as Ts gamma, is the most potent neurotoxin in the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus. It has been purified to homogeneity using a new fast and efficient method. Chemical modification of TsVII with the tryptophan-specific reagent o-nitrophenylsulfenyl chloride yielded three modified derivatives (residues Trp39, Trp50 and Trp54). Acetylation of TsVII mostly generated the monoacetylated Lys12 derivative. No side reactions were detected, as indicated by endoproteinase Lys-C peptide mapping, Edman degradation and electrospray mass spectrometry. Circular dichroism and fluorimetric measurements showed that none of the chemical modifications altered the overall structure of the derivatives. The acetylation of Lys12 or the sulfenylation of Trp39 or Trp54 led to a loss of both toxicity in mice and apparent binding affinity for rat brain and cockroach synaptosomal preparations. Sulfenylation of Trp50, however, moderately affected the toxicity of TsVII in mice and had almost no effect on its binding properties. A 3-dimensional model of TsVII was constructed by homology modeling. It suggests that the most reactive residues (Lys12 and Trp39 and Trp54) are all important in the functional disruption of neuronal sodium channels by TsVII, and are close to each other in the hydrophobic conserved region.

  1. Structural Refinement of a Key Tryptophan Residue in the BLUF Photoreceptor AppA by Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Unno, Masashi; Kikuchi, Sadato; Masuda, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The flavin-adenine-dinucleotide-binding BLUF domain constitutes a new class of blue-light receptors, and the N-terminal domain of AppA is a representative of this family. The BLUF domain is of special interest because it uses a rigid flavin rather than an isomerizable chromophore, such as a rhodopsin or phytochrome, for its light-activation process. Crystal and solution structures of several BLUF domains were recently obtained, and their overall structures are consistent. However, there is a key ambiguity regarding the position of a conserved tryptophan (Trp-104 in AppA), in that this residue was found either close to flavin (Trpin conformation) or exposed to the solvent (Trpout conformation). The location of Trp-104 is a crucial factor in understanding the photocycle mechanism of BLUF domains, because this residue has been shown to play an essential role in the activation of AppA. In this study, we demonstrated a Trpin conformation for the BLUF domain of AppA through direct observation of the vibrational spectrum of Trp-104 by ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy, and also observed light-induced conformational and environmental changes in Trp-104. This study provides a structural basis for future investigations of the photocycle mechanism of BLUF proteins. PMID:20441759

  2. The four terminal components of the complement system are C-mannosylated on multiple tryptophan residues.

    PubMed

    Hofsteenge, J; Blommers, M; Hess, D; Furmanek, A; Miroshnichenko, O

    1999-11-12

    C-Mannosylation is a unique form of protein glycosylation, involving the C-glycosidic attachment of a mannosyl residue to the indole moiety of Trp. In the two examples found so far, human RNase 2 and interleukin-12, only the first Trp in the recognition motif WXXW is specifically C-mannosylated. To establish the generality of protein C-mannosylation, and to learn more about its mechanism, the terminal components of the human complement system (C6, C7, C8,and C9), which contain multiple and complex recognition motifs, were examined. Together with C5b they form the cytolytic agent, the membrane attack complex. These are the first proteins that are C-mannosylated on more than one Trp residue as follows: six in C6, four in C7, C8alpha, and C8beta, and two in C9. Thus, from the 113 Trp residues in the complete membrane attack complex, 50 were found to undergo C-mannosylation. The other important finding is that in C6, C7, C8, and C9 Trp residues without a second Trp (or another aromatic residue) at the +3 position can be C-mannosylated. This shows that they must contain an additional C-mannosylation signal. Whether this is encoded in the primary or tertiary structure is presently unknown. Finally, all modified Trp residues are part of the highly conserved core of the thrombospondin type 1 repeats present in these proteins. Since this module has been found in a large number of other proteins, the results suggest further candidates for C-mannosylation.

  3. Chemical modification of tryptophan residues in alpha-neurotoxins from Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) venom.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Lin, P M; Chang, L S; Kuo, K W

    1995-02-01

    Two alpha-neurotoxins, Oh-4 and Oh-7, from the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom were subjected to Trp modification with 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl chloride (NPS-Cl). One major NPS derivative was isolated from the modified mixtures of Oh-4 and two from Oh-7 by HPLC. Amino acid analysis and sequence determination revealed that Trp-27 in Oh-4, and Trp-30 and Trp-26 and 30 in the two Oh-7 derivatives, were modified, respectively. Sulfenylation of Trp-27 in Oh-4 caused about 70% drop in lethal toxicity and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-binding activity. Modification of Trp-30 in Oh-7 resulted in the decrease of lethal toxicity by 36% and binding activity by 61%. The activities were further lost when the conserved Trp-26 in Oh-7 was modified. Sulfenylation of the Trp residues did not significantly affect the secondary structure of the toxins as revealed by the CD spectra. These results indicate that the Trp residues in these two long alpha-neurotoxins may be involved in the receptor binding.

  4. Understanding the roles of strictly conserved tryptophan residues in O2 producing chlorite dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Beatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorite dismutases (Clds) degrade ClO2− to O2 and Cl− in perchlorate respiring bacteria, and they serve still poorly defined cellular roles in other diverse microbes. These proteins share 3 highly conserved Trp residues, W155, W156, and W227, on the proximal side of the heme. The Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) has been shown to form protein-based radicals in its reactions with ClO2− and peracetic acid. The roles of the conserved Trp residues in radical generation and in enzymatic function were assessed via spectroscopic and kinetic analysis of their Phe mutants. The W155F mutant was the most dramatically affected, appearing to lose the characteristic pentameric oligomerization state, secondary structure, and heme binding properties of the WT protein. The W156F mutant initially retains many features of the WT protein but over time acquires many of the features of W155F. Conversion to an inactive, heme-free form is accelerated by dilution, suggesting loss of the protein’s pentameric state. Hence, both W155 and W156 are important for heme binding and maintenance of the protein’s reactive pentameric structure. W227F by contrast retains many properties of the WT protein. Important differences are noted in the transient kinetic reactions with peracetic acid (PAA), where W227F appears to form an [Fe(IV)=O]-containing intermediate, which subsequently converts to an uncoupled [Fe(IV)=O + AA+.] system in a [PAA]-dependent manner. This is in contrast to the peroxidase-like formation of [Fe(IV)=O] coupled to a porphyrin π-cation radical in the WT protein, which decays in a [PAA]-independent manner. These observations and the lack of redox protection for the heme in any of the Trp mutants suggests a tendency for protein radical formation in DaCld that is independent of any of these conserved active site residues. PMID:23241559

  5. On the tryptophan residue of smooth muscle myosin that responds to binding of nucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hirofumi; Konishi, Kaoru; Fujiwara, Keigi; Hayakawa, Kazuyoshi; Tanokura, Masaru; Martinez, Hugo M.; Morales, Manuel F.

    2000-01-01

    Initially, we asked which (of 10) smooth muscle myosin head residues responds to MgADP or MgATP binding with enhanced fluorescence emission (Trp-441 and Trp-512 were leading candidates)? To decide, we prepared sham-mutated smooth muscle heavy meromyosin (HMM), W441F HMM, and W512F HMM. On adding MgATP, emission of wild-type and W441F HMMs increased by 25–27%, but that of W512F HMM by 5%. So, in myosin, 512 is the “sensitive Trp.” Unexpectedly, properties of W512F HMM [elevated Ca2+-ATPase, depressed EDTA (K+)-ATPase, no regulation of its basal or actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase by phosphorylation of its “regulatory” light chain, limited actin activation, and inability to move actin filaments in a motility assay] are strikingly like those of smooth muscle myosin reacted at Cys-717 with thiol reagent. From crystallography-based [Houdusse, A., Kalabakis, V. N., Himmel, D., Szent-Györgyi, A. G. & Cohen, C. (1999) Cell 97, 459–470] simulations, we found that in wild-type HMM with MgADP added, Trp-512 is in a “hydrophobic pocket,” but that pocket becomes distorted in W512F HMM. We think that there is a “path of influence” from 512 to 717 to the active site. We suggest that the mutational changes at 512 are transmitted along this path to Cys-717, where they induce changes similar to those caused by reacting wild-type HMM with thiol reagent. PMID:11016961

  6. Interfacial Partitioning of a Loop Hinge Residue Contributes to Diacylglycerol Affinity of Conserved Region 1 Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela D.; Cole, Taylor R.; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional and novel isoenzymes of PKC are activated by the membrane-embedded second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) through its interactions with the C1 regulatory domain. The affinity of C1 domains to DAG varies considerably among PKCs. To gain insight into the origin of differential DAG affinities, we conducted high-resolution NMR studies of C1B domain from PKCδ (C1Bδ) and its W252Y variant. The W252Y mutation was previously shown to render C1Bδ less responsive to DAG (Dries, D. R., Gallegos, L. L., and Newton, A. C. (2007) A single residue in the C1 domain sensitizes novel protein kinase C isoforms to cellular diacylglycerol production. J. Biol. Chem. 282, 826–830) and thereby emulate the behavior of C1B domains from conventional PKCs that have a conserved Tyr at the equivalent position. Our data revealed that W252Y mutation did not perturb the conformation of C1Bδ in solution but significantly reduced its propensity to partition into a membrane-mimicking environment in the absence of DAG. Using detergent micelles doped with a paramagnetic lipid, we determined that both the residue identity at position 252 and complexation with diacylglycerol influence the geometry of C1Bδ-micelle interactions. In addition, we identified the C-terminal helix α1 of C1Bδ as an interaction site with the head groups of phosphatidylserine, a known activator of PKCδ. Taken together, our studies (i) reveal the identities of C1Bδ residues involved in interactions with membrane-mimicking environment, DAG, and phosphatidylserine, as well as the affinities associated with each event and (ii) suggest that the initial ligand-independent membrane recruitment of C1B domains, which is greatly facilitated by the interfacial partitioning of Trp-252, is responsible, at least in part, for the differential DAG affinities. PMID:25124034

  7. Identification of a Residue (Glu60) in TRAP Required for Inducing Efficient Transcription Termination at the trp Attenuator Independent of Binding Tryptophan and RNA.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Natalie M; Patterson, Andrea; Gollnick, Paul

    2017-03-15

    Transcription of the tryptophan (trp) operon in Bacillus subtilis is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. Attenuation is controlled by the trpRNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP). TRAP binds to a site in the 5' leader region of the nascent trp transcript in response to the presence of excess intracellular tryptophan. This binding induces transcription termination upstream of the structural genes of the operon. In prior attenuation models, the role of TRAP was only to alter the secondary structure of the leader region RNA so as to promote formation of the trp attenuator, which was presumed to function as an intrinsic terminator. However, formation of the attenuator alone has been shown to be insufficient to induce efficient termination, indicating that TRAP plays an additional role in this process. To further examine the function of TRAP, we performed a genetic selection for mutant TRAPs that bind tryptophan and RNA but show diminished termination at the trp attenuator. Five such TRAP mutants were obtained. Four of these have substitutions at Glu60, three of which are Lys (E60K) substitutions and the fourth of which is a Val (E60V) substitution. The fifth mutant obtained contains a substitution at Ile63, which is on the same β-strand of TRAP as Glu60. Purified E60K TRAP binds tryptophan and RNA with properties similar to those of the wild type but is defective at inducing termination at the trp attenuator in vitroIMPORTANCE Prior models for attenuation control of the B. subtilis trp operon suggested that the only role for TRAP is to bind to the leader region RNA and alter its folding to induce formation of an intrinsic terminator. However, several recent studies suggested that TRAP plays an additional role in the termination mechanism. We hypothesized that this function could involve residues in TRAP other than those required to bind tryptophan and RNA. Here we obtained TRAP mutants with alterations at Glu60 that are deficient at inducing termination in the

  8. Identification of a Residue (Glu60) in TRAP Required for Inducing Efficient Transcription Termination at the trp Attenuator Independent of Binding Tryptophan and RNA

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Natalie M.; Patterson, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transcription of the tryptophan (trp) operon in Bacillus subtilis is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. Attenuation is controlled by the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP). TRAP binds to a site in the 5′ leader region of the nascent trp transcript in response to the presence of excess intracellular tryptophan. This binding induces transcription termination upstream of the structural genes of the operon. In prior attenuation models, the role of TRAP was only to alter the secondary structure of the leader region RNA so as to promote formation of the trp attenuator, which was presumed to function as an intrinsic terminator. However, formation of the attenuator alone has been shown to be insufficient to induce efficient termination, indicating that TRAP plays an additional role in this process. To further examine the function of TRAP, we performed a genetic selection for mutant TRAPs that bind tryptophan and RNA but show diminished termination at the trp attenuator. Five such TRAP mutants were obtained. Four of these have substitutions at Glu60, three of which are Lys (E60K) substitutions and the fourth of which is a Val (E60V) substitution. The fifth mutant obtained contains a substitution at Ile63, which is on the same β-strand of TRAP as Glu60. Purified E60K TRAP binds tryptophan and RNA with properties similar to those of the wild type but is defective at inducing termination at the trp attenuator in vitro. IMPORTANCE Prior models for attenuation control of the B. subtilis trp operon suggested that the only role for TRAP is to bind to the leader region RNA and alter its folding to induce formation of an intrinsic terminator. However, several recent studies suggested that TRAP plays an additional role in the termination mechanism. We hypothesized that this function could involve residues in TRAP other than those required to bind tryptophan and RNA. Here we obtained TRAP mutants with alterations at Glu60 that are deficient at inducing

  9. Tryptophan Residue Located at the Middle of Putative Transmembrane Domain 11 Is Critical for the Function of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 2B1.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jialin; Jin, Meng; Yue, Mei; Wang, Meiyu; Zhang, Hongjian; Gui, Chunshan

    2016-10-03

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 2B1 (OATP2B1), which is highly expressed in enterocytes and hepatocytes could be a key determinant for the intestinal absorption and hepatic uptake of its substrates, most of which are amphipathic organic anions. Tryptophan residues may possess a multitude of functions for a transport protein through aromatic interactions, such as maintaining the proper protein structure, guiding the depth of membrane insertion, or interacting directly with substrates. There are totally six tryptophan residues in OATP2B1. However, little is known about their role in the function and expression of OATP2B1. Our results show that, while W272, W276, and W277 located at the border of extracellular loop 3 and transmembrane domain 6 exhibit a moderate effect on the surface expression of OATP2B1, W611 located at the middle of transmembrane domain 11 plays a critical role in the function of OATP2B1. The tryptophan-to-alanine mutation of W611 changes the kinetic characteristics of OATP2B1-mediated estrone-3-sulfate (E3S) transport radically, from a monophasic saturation curve (with Km and Vmax values being of 7.1 ± 1.1 μM and 182 ± 7 pmol/normalized mg/min, respectively) to a linear curve. Replacing alanine with a phenylalanine will rescue most of OATP2B1's function, suggesting that the aromatic side chain of residue 611 is very important. However, hydrogen-bond forming and positively charged groups at this position are not favorable. The important role of W611 is not substrate-dependent. Molecular modeling indicates that the side chain of W611 faces toward the substrate translocation pathway and might interact with substrates directly. Taken together, our findings reveal that W611 is critical for the function of OATP2B1.

  10. Five out of six tryptophan residues in the N-terminal extracellular domain of the rat GLP-1 receptor are essential for its ability to bind GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Wilmen, A; Van Eyll, B; Göke, B; Göke, R

    1997-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was utilized to investigate the requirement of tryptophan residues located in the N-terminal domain of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor for the ability to bind its ligand and to induce cAMP generation. W39, W72, W87, W91, W110, and W120 were mutated into alanine. Two of the six tryptophan residues, W72 and W110, are highly conserved within the receptor subfamily. After transfection of mutated cDNAs in COS-7 or CHL cells, it appeared that mutant W87 A bound [125I] GLP-1 with the same affinity as wild-type receptor and induced signal transduction to a comparable extent. In contrast, mutant receptors W39A, W72A, W91A, W110A, and W120A lost the ability to bind [125I] GLP-1. Because all mutated receptor cDNAs were transcribed on RNA level (Northern blot) and the receptor proteins were expressed at the plasma membrane level (Western blot), it is concluded that with the exception of W87 all trytophan residues are essential for receptor ligand interaction. This indicates the significance of hydrophobic interactions within the N-terminal domain of the GLP-1 receptor.

  11. Residual Stresses in Thermal Spray Coatings and Their Effect on Interfacial Adhesion: A Review of Recent Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, T. W.; Gill, S. C.

    1996-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings and their ef-fects on interfacial debonding. The main experimental techniques for measurement of residual stresse are briefly described, with particular attention given to the method of continuous curvature monitoring. Boundary conditions satisfied by all residual stress distributions are identified and expressions derived for the curvatures and stress distributions arising from a uniform misfit strain between coating and sub-strate.It is noted that stress distributions in thick coatings rarely correspond to the imposition of such a uniform misfit strain, so that recourse to numerical methods becomes essential for quantitative predic-tion of stress distributions. Relationships are presented between residual stresses and corresponding strain energy release rates during interfacial debonding. The effect on this of superimposing stresses from an externally applied load is outlined. The initiation of debonding is then considered, covering edge effects and other geometrical considerations. Finally, some specific case histories are briefly outlined to illustrate how the various theoretical concepts involved relate to industrial practice.

  12. Conformational Change of a Tryptophan Residue in BtuF Facilitates Binding and Transport of Cobinamide by the Vitamin B12 Transporter BtuCD-F

    PubMed Central

    Mireku, S. A.; Ruetz, M.; Zhou, T.; Korkhov, V. M.; Kräutler, B.; Locher, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    BtuCD-F is an ABC transporter that mediates cobalamin uptake into Escherichia coli. Early in vivo data suggested that BtuCD-F might also be involved in the uptake of cobinamide, a cobalamin precursor. However, neither was it demonstrated that BtuCD-F indeed transports cobinamide, nor was the structural basis of its recognition known. We synthesized radiolabeled cyano-cobinamide and demonstrated BtuCD-catalyzed in vitro transport, which was ATP- and BtuF-dependent. The crystal structure of cobinamide-bound BtuF revealed a conformational change of a tryptophan residue (W66) in the substrate binding cleft compared to the structure of cobalamin-bound BtuF. High-affinity binding of cobinamide was dependent on W66, because mutation to most other amino acids substantially reduced binding. The structures of three BtuF W66 mutants revealed that tight packing against bound cobinamide was only provided by tryptophan and phenylalanine, in line with the observed binding affinities. In vitro transport rates of cobinamide and cobalamin were not influenced by the substitutions of BtuF W66 under the experimental conditions, indicating that W66 has no critical role in the transport reaction. Our data present the molecular basis of the cobinamide versus cobalamin specificity of BtuCD-F and provide tools for in vitro cobinamide transport and binding assays. PMID:28128319

  13. Relative Spatial Positions of Tryptophan and Cationic Residues in Helical Membrane-active Peptides Determine Their Cytotoxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Rekdal, Øystein; Haug, Bengt Erik; Kalaaji, Manar; Hunter, Howard N.; Lindin, Inger; Israelsson, Ingrid; Solstad, Terese; Yang, Nannan; Brandl, Martin; Mantzilas, Dimitrios; Vogel, Hans J.

    2012-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of 10 analogs of the idealized amphipathic helical 21-mer peptide (KAAKKAA)3, where three of the Ala residues at different positions have been replaced with Trp residues, has been investigated. The peptide's cytotoxic activity was found to be markedly dependent upon the position of the Trp residues within the hydrophobic sector of an idealized α-helix. The peptides with Trp residues located opposite the cationic sector displayed no antitumor activity, whereas those peptides with two or three Trp residues located adjacent to the cationic sector exhibited high cytotoxic activity when tested against three different cancer cell lines. Dye release experiments revealed that in contrast to the peptides with Trp residues located opposite the cationic sector, the peptides with Trp residues located adjacent to the cationic sector induced a strong permeabilizing activity from liposomes composed of a mixture of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine and negatively charged phosphatidylserine (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (POPS)) (2:1) but not from liposomes composed of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine, POPC. Fluorescence blue shift and quenching experiments revealed that Trp residues inserted deeper into the hydrophobic environment of POPC/POPS liposomes for peptides with high cytotoxic activity. Through circular dichroism studies, a correlation between the cytotoxic activity and the α-helical propensity was established. Structural studies of one inactive and two active peptides in the presence of micelles using NMR spectroscopy showed that only the active peptides adopted highly coiled to helical structures when bound to a membrane surface. PMID:22057278

  14. Replacement of both tryptophan residues at 388 and 412 completely abolished cytochalasin B photolabelling of the GLUT1 glucose transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Inukai, K; Asano, T; Katagiri, H; Anai, M; Funaki, M; Ishihara, H; Tsukuda, K; Kikuchi, M; Yazaki, Y; Oka, Y

    1994-01-01

    A mutated GLUT1 glucose transporter, a Trp-388, 412 mutant whose tryptophans 388 and 412 were both replaced by leucines, was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Glucose transport activity was decreased to approx. 30% in the Trp-388, 412 mutant compared with that in the wild type, a similar decrease in transport activity had been observed previously in the Trp-388 mutant and the Trp-412 mutant which had leucine at 388 and 412 respectively. Cytochalasin B labelling of the Trp-388 mutant was only decreased rather than abolished, a result similar to that obtained previously for the Trp-412 mutant. Cytochalasin B labelling was finally abolished completely in the Trp-388, 412 mutant, while cytochalasin B binding to this mutant was decreased to approx. 30% of that of the wild-type GLUT1 at the concentration used for photolabelling. This level of binding is thought to be adequate to detect labelling, assuming that the labelling efficiency of these transporters is similar. These findings suggest that cytochalasin B binds to the transmembrane domain of the glucose transporter in the vicinity of helix 10-11, and is inserted covalently by photoactivation at either the 388 or the 412 site. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8092986

  15. Posttranslational isoprenylation of tryptophan in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Tomotoshi; Abe, Ikuro

    2017-01-01

    Posttranslational isoprenylation is generally recognized as a universal modification of the cysteine residues in peptides and the thiol groups of proteins in eukaryotes. In contrast, the Bacillus quorum sensing peptide pheromone, the ComX pheromone, possesses a posttranslationally modified tryptophan residue, and the tryptophan residue is isoprenylated with either a geranyl or farnesyl group at the gamma position to form a tricyclic skeleton that bears a newly formed pyrrolidine, similar to proline. The post-translational dimethylallylation of two tryptophan residues of a cyclic peptide, kawaguchipeptin A, from cyanobacteria has also been reported. Interestingly, the modified tryptophan residues of kawaguchipeptin A have the same scaffold as that of the ComX pheromones, but with the opposite stereochemistry. This review highlights the biosynthetic pathways and posttranslational isoprenylation of tryptophan. In particular, recent studies on peptide modifying enzymes are discussed. PMID:28326143

  16. Oxidation of apolipoprotein(a) inhibits kringle-associated lysine binding: the loss of intrinsic protein fluorescence suggests a role for tryptophan residues in the lysine binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, A.; Laws, W. R.; Harpel, P. C.

    1997-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a low-density lipoprotein complex consisting of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] disulfide-linked to apolipoprotein B-100. Lp(a) has been implicated in atherogenesis and thrombosis through the lysine binding site (LBS) affinity of its kringle domains. We have examined the oxidative effect of 2,2'-azobis-(amidinopropane) HCl (AAPH), a mild hydrophilic free radical initiator, upon the ability of Lp(a) and recombinant apo(a), r-apo(a), to bind through their LBS domains. AAPH treatment caused a time-dependent decrease in the number of functional Lp(a) or r-apo(a) molecules capable of binding to fibrin or lysine-Sepharose and in the intrinsic protein fluorescence of both Lp(a) and r-apo(a). The presence of a lysine analogue during the reaction prevented the loss of lysine binding and provided a partial protection from the loss of tryptophan fluorescence. The partial protection of fluorescence by lysine analogues was observed in other kringle-containing proteins, but not in proteins lacking kringles. No significant aggregation, fragmentation, or change in conformation of Lp(a) or r-apo(a) was observed as assessed by native or SDS-PAGE, light scattering, retention of antigenicity, and protein fluorescence emission spectra. Our results suggest that AAPH destroys amino acids in the kringles of apo(a) that are essential for lysine binding, including one or more tryptophan residues. The present study, therefore, raises the possibility that the biological roles of Lp(a) may be mediated by its state of oxidation, especially in light of our previous study showing that the reductive properties of sulfhydryl-containing compounds increase the LBS affinity of Lp(a) for fibrin. PMID:9385634

  17. Fluorescence and circular dichroism studies on the accessibility of tryptophan residues and unfolding of a jacalin-related α-d-galactose-specific lectin from mulberry (Morus indica).

    PubMed

    Datta, Debparna; J Swamy, Musti

    2017-05-01

    MLGL (Mulberry Latex Galactose-specific Lectin) is an α-d-galactose binding lectin isolated from the latex of mulberry (Morus indica) tree and contains two tryptophan residues in each of its subunits. The fluorescence emission maximum of native MLGL seen at 326nm shifts to 350nm upon incubation with 6M guanidinium thiocyanate (Gdn.SCN), suggesting that the tryptophans are located inside the hydrophobic core of the protein and become fully exposed upon denaturation. Fluorescence quenching studies revealed that the neutral acrylamide exhibits the highest quenching, with ~33% of total fluorescence in the native protein being quenched at a quencher concentration of 0.5M, whereas iodide (~24%) and cesium (~4%) ions showed significantly lower quenching. With the denatured protein, acrylamide quenching involves both dynamic and static processes as evident from an upward curving Stern-Volmer plot. Time-resolved fluorescence studies showed two lifetime components of 3.7ns and 1.3ns for the native protein, while three lifetime components were observed for the denatured protein. MLGL showed high resistance to urea (up to 8M) and guanidine hydrochloride (up to 6M), whereas treatment with 6M Gdn.SCN completely denatured the protein, via a broad sigmoidal transition with a transition midpoint at ~3.75M. Circular dichroism studies and hemagglutination assays showed that the secondary and tertiary structures as well as lectin activity of MLGL were unaffected up to 70°C. Additionally, pH dependent studies showed that the secondary structure of MLGL is unaltered in the pH range 6.2 to 8.5, but a decrease in lectin activity is observed (~50%) at pH6.2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Inactivation of influenza virus haemagglutinin by chlorine dioxide: oxidation of the conserved tryptophan 153 residue in the receptor-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2012-12-01

    Airborne influenza virus infection of mice can be prevented by gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). This study demonstrated that ClO(2) abolished the function of the haemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (H1N1) in a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent manner. The IC(50) during a 2 min reaction with ClO(2) at 25 °C was 13.7 µM, and the half-life time of HA with 100 µM ClO(2) at 25 °C was 19.5 s. Peptides generated from a tryptic digest of ClO(2)-treated virus were analysed by mass spectrometry. An HA fragment, (150)NLLWLTGK(157) was identified in which the tryptophan residue (W153) was 32 mass units greater than expected. The W153 residue of this peptide, which is derived from the central region of the receptor-binding site of HA, is highly conserved. It was shown that W153 was oxidized to N-formylkynurenine in ClO(2)-treated virus. It was concluded that the inactivation of influenza virus by ClO(2) is caused by oxidation of W153 in HA, thereby abolishing its receptor-binding ability.

  19. Role of the Tryptophan Residues in the Specific Interaction of the Sea Anemone Stichodactyla helianthus's Actinoporin Sticholysin II with Biological Membranes.

    PubMed

    García-Linares, Sara; Maula, Terhi; Rivera-de-Torre, Esperanza; Gavilanes, José G; Slotte, J Peter; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro

    2016-11-22

    Actinoporins are pore-forming toxins from sea anemones. Upon interaction with sphingomyelin-containing bilayers, they become integral oligomeric membrane structures that form a pore. Sticholysin II from Stichodactyla helianthus contains five tryptophans located at strategic positions; its role has now been studied using different mutants. Results show that W43 and W115 play a determinant role in maintaining the high thermostability of the protein, while W146 provides specific interactions for protomer-protomer assembly. W110 and W114 sustain the hydrophobic effect, which is one of the major driving forces for membrane binding in the presence of Chol. However, in its absence, additional interactions with sphingomyelin are required. These conclusions were confirmed with two sphingomyelin analogues, one of which had impaired hydrogen bonding properties. The results obtained support actinoporins' Trp residues playing a major role in membrane recognition and binding, but their residues have an only minor influence on the diffusion and oligomerization steps needed to assemble a functional pore.

  20. Mechanical and interfacial properties of poly(vinyl chloride) based composites reinforced by cassava stillage residue with different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjuan; Gan, Tao; Li, Qian; Su, Jianmei; Lin, Ye; Wei, Yongzuo; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei

    2014-09-01

    Cassava stillage residue (CSR), a kind of agro-industrial plant fiber, was modified by coupling agent (CA), mechanical activation (MA), and MA-assisted CA (MACA) surface treatments, respectively. The untreated and different surface treated CSRs were used to prepare plant fibers/polymer composites (PFPC) with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) as polymer matrix, and the properties of these CSR/PVC composites were compared. Surface treated CSR/PVC composites possessed better mechanical properties, water resistance and dimensional stability compared with the untreated CSR/PVC composite, attributing to the improvement of interfacial properties between CSR and PVC matrix. MACA-treated CSR was the best reinforcement among four types of CSRs (untreated, MA-treated, CA-treated, and MACA-treated CSRs) because MACA treatment led to the significant improvement of dispersion, interfacial adhesion and compatibility between CSR and PVC. MACA treatment could be considered as an effective and green method for enhancing reinforcement efficiency of plant fibers and the properties of PFPC.

  1. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Residual stress and poisson expansion effects on the fibre-matrix interfacial properties measured in fibre push tests

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A.M.; Elizalde, M.R.; Martinez-Esnaola, J.M.; Janczak, J.

    1996-12-31

    There is a wide range of values reported for the interfacial frictional shear stress {tau}, in the CAS/Nicalon glass ceramic matrix composite. Depending on the test method used, {tau} can vary from less than 10MPa to over 30MPa. The fibre push-down test generally gives values in the higher portion of this range, typically {tau} {ge} 25MPa. Two models describing the push-down test, that both assume a constant {tau} along the interface, are compared with data obtained using a Nanoindentation system. One ignores any residual stresses that may be present and the other includes axial residual stresses in the fibre. The interface fracture surface energy G{sub I} was significantly lower when residual stresses were considered. The {tau} was observed to depend on the radius of fibre that was pushed, increasing as radius decreased. The effect of Poisson expansion was therefore investigated and found to contribute significantly to the {tau} recorded in these tests. It is possible that the contribution to {tau} from Poisson expansion can be more than 50% of its measured value.

  3. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage IKe major coat protein transmembrane domain: role of an interfacial proline residue.

    PubMed

    Williams, K A; Deber, C M

    1993-10-15

    The transmembrane (TM) domain of the 53-residue major coat protein of the M13-related bacteriophage IKe (residues 24-42: LISQTWPVVTTVVVAGVLI) has been subjected to randomized mutagenesis to probe the conformation and stability of the TM domain, as well as the effect of structurally-important residues such as proline. TM mutants were obtained by the Eckstein method of site-directed mutagenesis using the IKe genome as template so as to eliminate the need for subcloning. Over 40 single- and double-site viable mutants of bacteriophage IKe were isolated. Every residue in the TM segment, except the highly conserved Trp29, could be mutated to at least one other residue; polar and charged mutations occurred in the TM segment adjacent to the N-terminal domain (residues 24-28), while non-polar substitutions predominated in the C-terminal portion (residues 30-42). The Pro30 locus tolerated four mutations-Ala, Gly, Cys, and Ser- which represent the four side chains of least volume. Mutant coat proteins obtained directly from the phage in milligram quantities were studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE gels. Wild type IKe coat protein solubilized in sodium deoxycholate micelles was found to occur as an alpha-helical, monomeric species which is stable at 95 degrees C, whereas the mutant Pro30-->Gly undergoes an irreversible conformational transition at ca. 90 degrees C to an aggregated beta-sheet structure. The result that Pro30 stabilizes the TM helix in the micellar membrane suggests a sterically-restricted location for the wild type Pro pyrrolidine side chain in the bulky Trp-Pro-Val triad, where it may be positioned to direct the initiation of the subsequent TM core domain helix.

  4. Structural Analysis of the Streptomyces avermitilis CYP107W1-Oligomycin A Complex and Role of the Tryptophan 178 Residue

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Cha, Gun-Su; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2016-01-01

    CYP107W1 from Streptomyces avermitilis is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of macrolide oligomycin A. A previous study reported that CYP107W1 regioselectively hydroxylated C12 of oligomycin C to produce oligomycin A, and the crystal structure of ligand free CYP107W1 was determined. Here, we analyzed the structural properties of the CYP107W1-oligomycin A complex and characterized the functional role of the Trp178 residue in CYP107W1. The crystal structure of the CYP107W1 complex with oligomycin A was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Oligomycin A is bound in the substrate access channel on the upper side of the prosthetic heme mainly by hydrophobic interactions. In particular, the Trp178 residue in the active site intercalates into the large macrolide ring, thereby guiding the substrate into the correct binding orientation for a productive P450 reaction. A Trp178 to Gly mutation resulted in the distortion of binding titration spectra with oligomycin A, whereas binding spectra with azoles were not affected. The Gly178 mutant’s catalytic turnover number for the 12-hydroxylation reaction of oligomycin C was highly reduced. These results indicate that Trp178, located in the open pocket of the active site, may be a critical residue for the productive binding conformation of large macrolide substrates. PMID:26883908

  5. Structural Analysis of the Streptomyces avermitilis CYP107W1-Oligomycin A Complex and Role of the Tryptophan 178 Residue.

    PubMed

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Cha, Gun-Su; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2016-03-01

    CYP107W1 from Streptomyces avermitilis is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of macrolide oligomycin A. A previous study reported that CYP107W1 regioselectively hydroxylated C12 of oligomycin C to produce oligomycin A, and the crystal structure of ligand free CYP107W1 was determined. Here, we analyzed the structural properties of the CYP107W1-oligomycin A complex and characterized the functional role of the Trp178 residue in CYP107W1. The crystal structure of the CYP107W1 complex with oligomycin A was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Oligomycin A is bound in the substrate access channel on the upper side of the prosthetic heme mainly by hydrophobic interactions. In particular, the Trp178 residue in the active site intercalates into the large macrolide ring, thereby guiding the substrate into the correct binding orientation for a productive P450 reaction. A Trp178 to Gly mutation resulted in the distortion of binding titration spectra with oligomycin A, whereas binding spectra with azoles were not affected. The Gly178 mutant's catalytic turnover number for the 12-hydroxylation reaction of oligomycin C was highly reduced. These results indicate that Trp178, located in the open pocket of the active site, may be a critical residue for the productive binding conformation of large macrolide substrates.

  6. Photooxidation of Tryptophan and Tyrosine Residues in Human Serum Albumin Sensitized by Pterin: A Model for Globular Protein Photodamage in Skin.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lara O; Roman, Ernesto A; Thomas, Andrés H; Dántola, M Laura

    2016-08-30

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in the circulatory system. Oxidized albumin was identified in the skin of patients suffering from vitiligo, a depigmentation disorder in which the protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation fails because of the lack of melanin. Oxidized pterins, efficient photosensitizers under UV-A irradiation, accumulate in the skin affected by vitiligo. In this work, we have investigated the ability of pterin (Ptr), the parent compound of oxidized pterins, to induce structural and chemical changes in HSA under UV-A irradiation. Our results showed that Ptr is able to photoinduce oxidation of the protein in at least two amino acid residues: tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr). HSA undergoes oligomerization, yielding protein structures whose molecular weight increases with irradiation time. The protein cross-linking, due to the formation of dimers of Tyr, does not significantly affect the secondary and tertiary structures of HSA. Trp is consumed in the photosensitized process, and N-formylkynurenine was identified as one of its oxidation products. The photosensitization of HSA takes place via a purely dynamic process, which involves the triplet excited state of Ptr. The results presented in this work suggest that protein photodamage mediated by endogenous photosensitizers can significantly contribute to the harmful effects of UV-A radiation on the human skin.

  7. Roles of Copper and a Conserved Aspartic Acid in the Autocatalytic Hydroxylation of a Specific Tryptophan Residue during Cysteine Tryptophylquinone Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Heather R; Sehanobish, Esha; Shiller, Alan M; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Davidson, Victor L

    2017-02-21

    The first posttranslational modification step in the biosynthesis of the tryptophan-derived quinone cofactors is the autocatalytic hydroxylation of a specific Trp residue at position C-7 on the indole side chain. Subsequent modifications are catalyzed by modifying enzymes, but the mechanism by which this first step occurs is unknown. LodA possesses a cysteine tryptophylquinone (CTQ) cofactor. Metal analysis as well as spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the mature and precursor forms of a D512A LodA variant provides evidence that copper is required for the initial hydroxylation of the precursor protein and that if alternative metals are bound, the modification does not occur and the precursor is unstable. It is shown that the mature native LodA also contains loosely bound copper, which affects the visible absorbance spectrum and quenches the fluorescence spectrum that is attributed to the mature CTQ cofactor. When copper is removed, the fluorescence appears, and when it is added back to the protein, the fluorescence is quenched, indicating that copper reversibly binds in the proximity of CTQ. Removal of copper does not diminish the enzymatic activity of LodA. This distinguishes LodA from enzymes with protein-derived tyrosylquinone cofactors in which copper is present near the cofactor and is absolutely required for activity. Mechanisms are proposed for the role of copper in the hydroxylation of the unactivated Trp side chain. These results demonstrate that the reason that the highly conserved Asp512 is critical for LodA, and possibly all tryptophylquinone enzymes, is not because it is required for catalysis but because it is necessary for CTQ biosynthesis, more specifically to facilitate the initial copper-dependent hydroxylation of a specific Trp residue.

  8. The stacking tryptophan of galactose oxidase: a second coordination sphere residue that has profound effects on tyrosyl radical behavior and enzyme catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Melanie S.; Tyler, Ejan M.; Akyumani, Nana; Kurtis, Christian R.; Spooner, R. Kate; Deacon, Sarah E.; Tamber, Sunita; Firbank, Susan J.; Mahmoud, Khaled; Knowles, Peter F.; Phillips, Simon E. V.; McPherson, Michael J.; Dooley, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The function of the stacking tryptophan, W290, a second coordination sphere residue in galactose oxidase has been investigated via steady-state kinetics measurements, absorption, CD and EPR spectroscopy, and x -ray crystallography of the W290F, W290G, and W290H variants. Enzymatic turnover is significantly lower in the W290 variants. The Km for D-galactose for W290H is similar to wild type, whereas the Km is greatly elevated in W290G and W290F, suggesting a role for W290 in substrate binding/positioning via the –NH group of the indole ring. Hydrogen bonding between W290 and azide in the wild type-azide crystal structure are consistent with this function. W290 modulates the properties and reactivity of the redox-active tyrosine radical; the Y272 tyrosyl radical in both the W290G and W290H variants have elevated redox potentials and are highly unstable compared to the radical in W290F, which has similar properties to the wild type tyrosyl radical. W290 restricts the accessibility of the Y272 radical site to solvent. Crystal structures show that Y272 is significantly more solvent exposed in W290G variant but that W290F limits solvent access comparable to the wild-type indole side chain. Spectroscopic studies indicate that the Cu(II) ground states in the semi-reduced W290 variants are very similar to that of the wild-type protein. In addition, the electronic structures of W290X-azide complexes the variants are also closely similar to the wild type electronic structure. Azide binding and azide-mediated proton uptake by Y495 are perturbed in the variants, indicating that tryptophan also modulates the function of the catalytic base (Y495) in the wild-type enzyme. Thus, W290 plays multiple critical roles in enzyme catalysis, affecting substrate binding, the tyrosyl radical redox potential and stability, and the axial tyrosine function. PMID:17385891

  9. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  10. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's using compensating/compliant interfacial layers. Part 2: OPTCOMP user's guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1994-05-01

    A user's guide for the computer program OPTCOMP is presented in this report. This program provides a capability to optimize the fabrication or service-induced residual stresses in uni-directional metal matrix composites subjected to combined thermo-mechanical axisymmetric loading using compensating or compliant layers at the fiber/matrix interface. The user specifies the architecture and the initial material parameters of the interfacial region, which can be either elastic or elastoplastic, and defines the design variables, together with the objective function, the associated constraints and the loading history through a user-friendly data input interface. The optimization procedure is based on an efficient solution methodology for the elastoplastic response of an arbitrarily layered multiple concentric cylinder model that is coupled to the commercial optimization package DOT. The solution methodology for the arbitrarily layered cylinder is based on the local-global stiffness matrix formulation and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions developed for elastoplastic boundary-value problems. The optimization algorithm employed in DOT is based on the method of feasible directions.

  11. Optimization of Residual Stresses in MMC's Using Compensating/Compliant Interfacial Layers. Part 2: OPTCOMP User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1994-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program OPTCOMP is presented in this report. This program provides a capability to optimize the fabrication or service-induced residual stresses in uni-directional metal matrix composites subjected to combined thermo-mechanical axisymmetric loading using compensating or compliant layers at the fiber/matrix interface. The user specifies the architecture and the initial material parameters of the interfacial region, which can be either elastic or elastoplastic, and defines the design variables, together with the objective function, the associated constraints and the loading history through a user-friendly data input interface. The optimization procedure is based on an efficient solution methodology for the elastoplastic response of an arbitrarily layered multiple concentric cylinder model that is coupled to the commercial optimization package DOT. The solution methodology for the arbitrarily layered cylinder is based on the local-global stiffness matrix formulation and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions developed for elastoplastic boundary-value problems. The optimization algorithm employed in DOT is based on the method of feasible directions.

  12. Active-site maturation and activity of the copper-radical oxidase GlxA are governed by a tryptophan residue.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Amanda K; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Hough, Michael A; Wilson, Michael T; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2017-02-20

    GlxA from Streptomyces lividans is a mononuclear copper-radical oxidase and a member of the auxiliary activity family 5 (AA5). Its domain organisation and low sequence homology make it a distinct member of the AA5 family in which the fungal galactose 6-oxidase (Gox) is the best characterised. GlxA is a key cuproenzyme in the copper-dependent morphological development of S. lividans with a function that is linked to the processing of an extracytoplasmic glycan. The catalytic sites in GlxA and Gox contain two distinct one-electron acceptors comprising the copper ion and a 3'-(S-cysteinyl) tyrosine. The latter is formed post-translationally through a covalent bond between a cysteine and a copper-co-ordinating tyrosine ligand and houses a radical. In GlxA and Gox, a second co-ordination sphere tryptophan residue (Trp288 in GlxA) is present, but the orientation of the indole ring differs between the two enzymes, creating a marked difference in the π-π stacking interaction of the benzyl ring with the 3'-(S-cysteinyl) tyrosine. Differences in the spectroscopic and enzymatic activity have been reported between GlxA and Gox with the indole orientation suggested as a reason. Here, we report a series of in vivo and in vitro studies using the W288F and W288A variants of GlxA to assess the role of Trp288 on the morphology, maturation, spectroscopic and enzymatic properties. Our findings point towards a salient role for Trp288 in the kinetics of copper loading and maturation of GlxA, with its presence essential for stabilising the metalloradical site required for coupling catalytic activity and morphological development. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Structural polymorphism of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) oligomers highlights the importance of interfacial residue interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Yu, Xiang; Liang, Guizhao; Zheng, Jie

    2011-01-10

    A 37-residue of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) is a main component of amyloid plaques found in the pancreas of ∼90% of type II diabetes patients. It is reported that hIAPP oligomers, rather than mature fibrils, are major toxic species responsible for pancreatic islet β-cell dysfunction and even cell death, but molecular structures of these oligomers remain elusive. In this work, on the basis of recent solid-state NMR and mass-per-length (MPL) data, we model a series of hIAPP oligomers with different β-layers (one, two, and three layers), symmetries (symmetry and asymmetry), and associated interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations. Three distinct interfaces formed by C-terminal β-sheet and C-terminal β-sheet (CC), N-terminal β-sheet and N-terminal β-sheet (NN), and C-terminal β-sheet and N-terminal β-sheet (CN) are identified to drive multiple cross-β-layers laterally associated together to form different amyloid organizations via different intermolecular interactions, in which the CC interface is dominated by polar interactions, the NN interface is dominated by hydrophobic interactions, and the CN interface is dominated by mixed polar and hydrophobic interactions. Overall, the structural stability of the proposed hIAPP oligomers is a result of delicate balance between maximization of favorable peptide-peptide interactions at the interfaces and optimization of solvation energy with globular structure. Different hIAPP oligomeric models indicate a general and intrinsic nature of amyloid polymorphism, driven by different interfacial side-chain interactions. The proposed models are compatible with recent experimental data in overall size, cross-section area, and molecular weight. A general hIAPP aggregation mechanism is proposed on the basis of our simulated models and experimental data.

  14. Tryptophan glycoconjugates in food and human urine.

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, B; Grun, C; Scheutzow, D; Herderich, M

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating the formation of tryptophan glycoconjugates other than well-established Amadori rearrangement products, HPLC-tandem MS (MS/MS) analysis of human urine collected from several healthy individuals proved the presence of one distinct tryptophan C-glycosyl compound [Horiuchi, Yonekawa, Iwahara, Kanno, Kurihara and Fujise (1994) J. Biochem. (Tokyo) 115, 362-366]. After isolation, unambiguous identification of this novel tryptophan metabolite as 2-(alpha-mannopyranosyl)-l-tryptophan was achieved by tandem MS combined with NMR spectroscopy including homonuclear COSY, heteronuclear multiple-bond connectivity and (1)H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence experiments. Remarkably, a thorough evaluation of vicinal proton-proton coupling constants in different solvents and nuclear Overhauser effect experiments demonstrate the predominant axial orientation of the hydroxymethyl group of the hexopyranosyl residue. Likewise this spatial arrangement indicates that the respective alpha-anomeric C-mannosylhexopyranose is preferentially adopting a (1)C(4) conformation in acidic methanol. Whereas only one distinct tryptophan mannoconjugate could be observed in human urine, HPLC-MS/MS analysis of food samples for the first time led to the identification of numerous N(1)-(beta-d-hexopyranosyl)-l-tryptophan, 2-(beta-d-hexopyranosyl)-l-tryptophan and 1-(1,2,3,4,5-pentahyd- roxypent-1-yl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives derived from the condensation of tryptophan with aldohexoses. Taking into consideration the significant differences between profiles and configurations of tryptophan glycoconjugates originating from dietary sources and human urine, C-2 mannosylation of tryptophan residues [de Beer, Vliegenthart, Loeffler and Hofsteenge (1995) Biochemistry 34, 11785-11789] represents a novel enzymic pathway in tryptophan metabolism in humans. PMID:10493906

  15. Tomographic investigation of the influence of initial wetting saturation, wettability and geometry of porous media on residual NAPL/water interfacial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Raoush, R. I.

    2010-12-01

    While fluid-fluid interfacial area is a key parameter governing many flow and transport processes in porous media, it is usually not accounted for in standard continuum-based models. In particular, fluid-fluid interfacial area is critical to such processes as dissolution, volatilization, biodegradation and to such constitutive relations as pressure-saturation and saturation-permeability. We present in this paper a pore-scale quantification of residual NAPL/water interfacial areas from high-resolution three-dimensional images at different experimental conditions. Experimental parameters of interest include geometry and wettability of porous media surfaces and initial saturation of the wetting phase. The synchrotron microtomography facility at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, was used to obtain three-dimensional images of the systems. Silica and quartz sands of different shape indices and different grain size distributions (median diameter ranged from 200 µm to 500 µm) were used to represent the porous media. Grain sizes were selected to achieve the minimum representative elementary volume of the samples. Residual NAPL in each sand system was obtained following cycles of drainage and imbibition of water and NAPL. Initial wetting saturations of the samples ranged from partial to complete saturation conditions. Five different fractionally wet sand systems (comprised of 100%, 75%, 50%, 25% and 0% hydrophobic mass fraction) were imaged and analyzed. Findings indicate that geometry and spatial variation in wettability of porous media surfaces have a significant impact on pore-scale characteristics of residual NAPL/water interfacial areas in porous media systems.

  16. Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLO™ fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Bhamji, I.; Withers, P. J.; Wolfe, D. E.; Motta, A. T.; Preuss, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the residual stresses and interfacial shear strength of a TiAlN coating on Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe alloy (ZIRLO™) substrate designed to improve corrosion resistance of fuel cladding used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, both during normal and exceptional conditions, e.g. a loss of coolant event (LOCA). The distribution and maximum value of the interfacial shear strength has been estimated using a modified shear-lag model. The parameters critical to this analysis were determined experimentally. From these input parameters the interfacial shear strength between the TiAlN coating and ZIRLO™ substrate was inferred to be around 120 MPa. It is worth noting that the apparent strength of the coating is high (∼3.4 GPa). However, this is predominantly due to the large compressive residuals stress (3 GPa in compression), which must be overcome for the coating to fail in tension, which happens at a load just 150 MPa in excess of this.

  17. Specificity in substrate binding by protein folding catalysts: tyrosine and tryptophan residues are the recognition motifs for the binding of peptides to the pancreas-specific protein disulfide isomerase PDIp.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddock, L. W.; Freedman, R. B.; Klappa, P.

    2000-01-01

    Using a cross-linking approach, we recently demonstrated that radiolabeled peptides or misfolded proteins specifically interact in vitro with two luminal proteins in crude extracts from pancreas microsomes. The proteins were the folding catalysts protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDIp, a glycosylated, PDI-related protein, expressed exclusively in the pancreas. In this study, we explore the specificity of these proteins in binding peptides and related ligands and show that tyrosine and tryptophan residues in peptides are the recognition motifs for their binding by PDIp. This peptide-binding specificity may reflect the selectivity of PDIp in binding regions of unfolded polypeptide during catalysis of protein folding. PMID:10794419

  18. Dimer Structure of an Interfacially Impaired Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Pholpholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao,C.; Shi, X.; Wehbi, H.; Zambonelli, C.; Head, J.; Seaton, B.; Roberts, M,.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the W47A/W242A mutant of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis has been solved to 1.8{angstrom} resolution. The W47A/W242A mutant is an interfacially challenged enzyme, and it has been proposed that one or both tryptophan side chains serve as membrane interfacial anchors (Feng, J., Wehbi, H., and Roberts, M. F. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 19867-19875). The crystal structure supports this hypothesis. Relative to the crystal structure of the closely related (97% identity) wild-type PI-PLC from Bacillus cereus, significant conformational differences occur at the membrane-binding interfacial region rather than the active site. The Trp {yields} Ala mutations not only remove the membrane-partitioning aromatic side chains but also perturb the conformations of the so-called helix B and rim loop regions, both of which are implicated in interfacial binding. The crystal structure also reveals a homodimer, the first such observation for a bacterial PI-PLC, with pseudo-2-fold symmetry. The symmetric dimer interface is stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, contributed primarily by a central swath of aromatic residues arranged in a quasiherringbone pattern. Evidence that interfacially active wild-type PI-PLC enzymes may dimerize in the presence of phosphatidylcholine vesicles is provided by fluorescence quenching of PI-PLC mutants with pyrene-labeled cysteine residues. The combined data suggest that wild-type PI-PLC can form similar homodimers, anchored to the interface by the tryptophan and neighboring membrane-partitioning residues.

  19. Ultrafast Hydration Dynamics Probed by Tryptophan at Protein Surface and Protein-DNA Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangzhong

    As we all live in a special water planet Earth, the significance of water to life has been universally recognized. The reason why water is so important to life has intrigued many researchers. This dissertation will focus on the ultrafast dynamics of protein surface water and protein-DNA interfacial water which have direct importance to the protein structure and function. Using tryptophan as an intrinsic fluorescence probe, combined with site-directed mutagenesis and ultrafast fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we can achieve single residue spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. We can also precisely determine the local hydration water dynamics by monitoring the Stokes shift of tryptophan one at a time. Previously, the protein surface hydration has been extensively studied by our group. In this thesis, we will provide more details on the methods we are using to extract the hydration dynamics, and also validate our methods from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. To further interrogate the interfacial water hydration dynamics relative to the protein surface hydration, we studied two DNA polymerases: DNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4) and DNA Polymerase Beta (Pol beta). Both proteins show typical surface hydration pattern with three distinct time components including: (i) the ultrafast sub-picosecond component reflects the bulk type water motion; (ii) a few picoseconds component shows the inner water relaxation mainly corresponding to the local libration and reorientation; (iii) the tens to hundred picoseconds component represents the water-protein coupled motion involving the whole water network reorganization. Dpo4, a loosely DNA binding protein, exhibits very flexible interfacial water which resembles its surface water yet with a significantly reduced ultrafast component. Such dynamic interfacial water not only maintains interfacial flexibility, but also contributes to the low fidelity of the protein. In contrast to the Dpo4, pol beta

  20. L-tryptophan

    MedlinePlus

    L-tryptophan is an amino acid, a protein building block that can be found in many plant and animal proteins. L-tryptophan is called an “essential” amino acid because the body can’t make it. It ...

  1. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes. Part 2: fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan in proteins.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan in proteins dissolved in pH 7 buffer, in ethanol and in 6 M guanidine pH 7.8 and in lyophilized proteins were measured. In all protein conditions, three lifetimes were obtained along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). The two shortest lifetimes are in the same range of those obtained for L-Trp in water or in ethanol. Thus, these two lifetimes originate from specific two sub-structures existing in the excited state and are inherent to the tryptophan structure independently of the surrounding environment (amino acids residues, solvent, etc.) In proteins, the third lifetime originates from the interactions that are occurring between tryptophan residues and neighboring amino acids. Populations of these lifetimes are independent of the excitation wavelength and thus originate from pre-defined sub structures existing in the excited state and put into evidence after tryptophan excitation. Fluorescence decay studies of different tripeptides having a tryptophan residue in second position show that the best analysis is obtained with two fluorescence lifetimes. Consequently, this result seems to exclude the possibility that peptide bond induces the third fluorescence lifetimes. Indole dissolved in water and/or in ethanol emits with two fluorescence lifetimes that are completely different from those observed for L-Trp. Absence of the third lifetime in ethanol demonstrates that indole behaves differently when compared to tryptophan. Thus, it seems not adequate to attribute fluorescence lifetime or fluorescence properties of tryptophan to indole ring and to compare tryptophan fluorescence properties in proteins to molecules having close structures such as NATA which fluoresces with one lifetime.

  2. Re-evaluation of intramolecular long-range electron transfer between tyrosine and tryptophan in lysozymes. Evidence for the participation of other residues.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Audette, Marilyne; Blouquit, Yves; Faraggi, Moshe; Sicard-Roselli, Cécile; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Jollès, Pierre

    2003-09-01

    One-electron oxidation of six different c-type lysozymes from hen egg white, turkey egg white, human milk, horse milk, camel stomach and tortoise was studied by gamma- and pulse-radiolysis. In the first step, one tryptophan side chain is oxidized to indolyl free radical, which is produced quantitatively. As shown already, the indolyl radical subsequently oxidizes a tyrosine side chain to the phenoxy radical in an intramolecular reaction. However this reaction is not total and its stoichiometry depends on the protein. Rate constants also vary between proteins, from 120 x s(-1) to 1000 x s(-1) at pH 7.0 and room temperature [extremes are hen and turkey egg white (120 x s(-1)) and human milk (1000 x s(-1))]. In hen and turkey egg white lysozymes we show that another reactive site is the Asn103-Gly104 peptidic bond, which gets broken radiolytically. Tryptic digestion followed by HPLC separation and identification of the peptides was performed for nonirradiated and irradiated hen lysozyme. Fluorescence spectra of the peptides indicate that Trp108 and/or 111 remain oxidized and that Tyr20 and 53 give bityrosine. Tyr23 appears not to be involved in the process. Thus new features of long-range intramolecular electron transfer in proteins appear: it is only partial and other groups are involved which are silent in pulse radiolysis.

  3. Oxidation of the Tryptophan 32 Residue of Human Superoxide Dismutase 1 Caused by Its Bicarbonate-dependent Peroxidase Activity Triggers the Non-amyloid Aggregation of the Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Fernando R.; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F.; Lima, Filipe S.; Cuccovia, Iolanda M.; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-01-01

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1WT and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp32 residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp32 residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1WT and hSOD1G93A mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp32 residue in the process. The results showed that Trp32 residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp32 residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1W32F mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp32 residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. PMID:25237191

  4. Effects on general acid catalysis from mutations of the invariant tryptophan and arginine residues in the protein tyrosine phosphatase from Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Hoff, R H; Hengge, A C; Wu, L; Keng, Y F; Zhang, Z Y

    2000-01-11

    General acid catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) is accomplished by a conserved Asp residue, which is brought into position for catalysis by movement of a flexible loop that occurs upon binding of substrate. With the PTPase from Yersinia, we have examined the effect on general acid catalysis caused by mutations to two conserved residues that are integral to this conformation change. Residue Trp354 is at a hinge of the loop, and Arg409 forms hydrogen bonding and ionic interactions with the phosphoryl group of substrates. Trp354 was mutated to Phe and to Ala, and residue Arg409 was mutated to Lys and to Ala. The four mutant enzymes were studied using steady state kinetics and heavy-atom isotope effects with the substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The data indicate that mutation of the hinge residue Trp354 to Ala completely disables general acid catalysis. In the Phe mutant, general acid catalysis is partially effective, but the proton is only partially transferred in the transition state, in contrast to the native enzyme where proton transfer to the leaving group is virtually complete. Mutation of Arg409 to Lys has a minimal effect on the K(m), while this parameter is increased 30-fold in the Ala mutant. The k(cat) values for R409K and for R409A are about 4 orders of magnitude lower than that for the native enzyme. General acid catalysis is rendered inoperative by the Lys mutation, but partial proton transfer during catalysis still occurs in the Ala mutant. Structural explanations for the differential effects of these mutations on movement of the flexible loop that enables general acid catalysis are presented.

  5. Oxidation of the tryptophan 32 residue of human superoxide dismutase 1 caused by its bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity triggers the non-amyloid aggregation of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Fernando R; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F; Lima, Filipe S; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-10-31

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1(WT) and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp(32) residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp(32) residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1(WT) and hSOD1(G93A) mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp(32) residue in the process. The results showed that Trp(32) residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp(32) residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1(W32F) mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp(32) residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Understanding the molecular basis of stability in Kunitz (STI) family of inhibitors in terms of a conserved core tryptophan residue: A theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Datta Sharma, Ravi; Goswami, Nabajyoti; Ghosh, Debasree; Majumder, Sudip

    2017-08-01

    β-trefoil is one of the superfolds among proteins. Important classes of proteins like Interleukins (ILs), FibroblastGrowth Factors (FGFs), Kunitz (STI) family of inhibitors etc. belong to this fold. Kunitz (STI) family of inhibitors of proteins possess a highly conserved and structurally important Trytophan 91 (W91) residue, which stitches the top layer of the barrel with the lid. In this article we have investigated the molecular insights of the involvement of this W91 residue in the stability and folding pathway of Kunitz (STI) family. Winged bean Chymotrypsin inhibitor (WCI), a member of Kunitz (STI) family was chosen as a model system for carrying out the work. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were run with a set of total six proteins, including wild type WCI (WT) & five mutants namely W91F, W91M, W91A, W91H and W91I. Among all of them the coordinates of four proteins were taken from their crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), where as the coordinates for the rest two was generated using in-silico modelling. Our results suggest that truly this W91 residue plays a determining role in stability and folding pathway of Kunitz (STI) family. The mutants are less stable and more susceptible to quicker unfolding at higher temperatures compared to the wild type WCI. These effects are most pronounced for the smallest mutants namely W91H and W91A, indicating more is the cavity created by mutation at W91 position more the proteins becomes unstable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of Residual Stresses in MMC's through Process Parameter Control and the use of Heterogeneous Compensating/Compliant Interfacial Layers. OPTCOMP2 User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program OPTCOMP2 is presented in this report. This program provides a capability to optimize the fabrication or service-induced residual stresses in unidirectional metal matrix composites subjected to combined thermomechanical axisymmetric loading by altering the processing history, as well as through the microstructural design of interfacial fiber coatings. The user specifies the initial architecture of the composite and the load history, with the constituent materials being elastic, plastic, viscoplastic, or as defined by the 'user-defined' constitutive model, in addition to the objective function and constraints, through a user-friendly data input interface. The optimization procedure is based on an efficient solution methodology for the inelastic response of a fiber/interface layer(s)/matrix concentric cylinder model where the interface layers can be either homogeneous or heterogeneous. The response of heterogeneous layers is modeled using Aboudi's three-dimensional method of cells micromechanics model. The commercial optimization package DOT is used for the nonlinear optimization problem. The solution methodology for the arbitrarily layered cylinder is based on the local-global stiffness matrix formulation and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions developed for elastoplastic boundary-value problems. The optimization algorithm employed in DOT is based on the method of feasible directions.

  8. Estimating Interfacial Curvature To Assess The Impact Of Ostwald Ripening On The Stability Of Residually Trapped CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Chalendar, J.; Garing, C.; Benson, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The stability of residually trapped CO2 is often taken for granted in the simulation studies used for predicting the long-term fate of CO2 in geological storage reservoirs. Ostwald ripening is one of the mechanisms that could potentially remobilize residually trapped CO2. This would cause the gradual growth of ganglia with low capillary pressures, at the expense of ganglia with higher capillary pressure. Ostwald ripening will be driven by differences in capillary pressure between ganglia, and subsequent diffusion of dissolved CO2 through the aqueous phase. Therefore, a critical question is to understand the distribution of capillary pressure in isolated ganglia. The goal of this study is to develop reliable methods for estimating capillary pressure of individual ganglia of gases that are trapped during imbibition. Multi-resolution X-ray microtomography datasets from air-water spontaneous imbibition experiments in sintered glass beads and sandstone samples with voxel sizes varying from 0.64 to 4.44 µm were acquired at the Advanced Light Source, in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A series of computational techniques to estimate curvature at the interface between two immiscible fluids in porous were developed. In a first step, isosurfaces are extracted using resources from MATLAB's Image Processing Toolbox or the Avizo software suite resulting in a triagonal mesh representing the considered surfaces. A second step is to identify and separate the interfaces between each of the three phases. The mesh is then smoothed and its curvature is estimated. The sensitivity of results to different curvature estimation and smoothing techniques is studied. Estimating curvature on unsmoothed meshes shows a high degree of sensitivity to the resolution of the images, as well as the method chosen to calculate curvature. When the mesh is smoothed using a heat diffusion method however, curvature estimation using different methods and resolutions converges, as verified by

  9. Multiple ligand-binding properties of the lipocalin member chicken alpha1-acid glycoprotein studied by circular dichroism and electronic absorption spectroscopy: the essential role of the conserved tryptophan residue.

    PubMed

    Zsila, Ferenc; Matsunaga, Hisami; Bikádi, Zsolt; Haginaka, Jun

    2006-08-01

    Multiple ligand-binding properties of the 30-kDa chicken alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (cAGP), a member of the lipocalin protein family, were investigated for the first time by using circular dichroism (CD) and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy methods. By measuring induced CD (ICD) spectra, high-affinity binding (K(a) approximately 10(5)-10(6) M(-1)) of several drugs, dyes and natural compounds to cAGP was demonstrated including antimalarial agents (quinacrine, primaquine), phenotiazines (chlorpromazine, methylene blue), propranolol, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (ketoprofen, diclofenac), tamoxifen, diazepam, tacrine, dicoumarol, cationic dyes (auramine O, thioflavine T, ethidium bromide), benzo[a]pyrene, L-thyroxine, bile pigments (bilirubin, biliverdin), alkaloids (piperine, aristolochic acid), saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Analysis of the extrinsic CD spectra with the study of the covalently modified protein and CD displacement experiments revealed that a single Trp26 residue of cAGP conserved in the whole lipocalin family is part of the binding site, and it is essentially involved in the ligand-binding process via pi-pi stacking interaction resulting in the appearance of strong induced CD bands due to the non-degenerate intermolecular exciton coupling between the pi-pi* transitions of the stacked indole ring-ligand chromophore. The finding that cAGP is able to accommodate a broad spectrum of ligands belonging to different chemical classes suggests that its core beta-barrel cavity is unusually wide containing overlapping sub-sites. Significance of these new data in understanding of the ligand-binding properties of other lipocalins, especially that of human AGP, and potential practical applications are briefly discussed. Overall, cAGP serves as a simple, ultimate model to extend our knowledge on ligand-binding properties of lipocalins and to study the role of tryptophan residues in molecular recognition processes.

  10. Inequivalent contribution of the five tryptophan residues in the C-lobe of human serum transferrin to the fluorescence increase when iron is released.

    PubMed

    James, Nicholas G; Byrne, Shaina L; Steere, Ashley N; Smith, Valerie C; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Mason, Anne B

    2009-04-07

    Human serum transferrin (hTF), with two Fe3+ binding lobes, transports iron into cells. Diferric hTF preferentially binds to a specific receptor (TFR) on the surface of cells, and the complex undergoes clathrin dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis. The clathrin-coated vesicle fuses with an endosome where the pH is lowered, facilitating iron release from hTF. On a biologically relevant time scale (2-3 min), the factors critical to iron release include pH, anions, a chelator, and the interaction of hTF with the TFR. Previous work, in which the increase in the intrinsic fluorescence signal was used to monitor iron release from the hTF/TFR complex, established that the TFR significantly enhances the rate of iron release from the C-lobe of hTF. In the current study, the role of the five C-lobe Trp residues in reporting the fluorescence change has been evaluated (+/-sTFR). Only four of the five recombinant Trp --> Phe mutants produced well. A single slow rate constant for iron release is found for the monoferric C-lobe (FeC hTF) and the four Trp mutants in the FeC hTF background. The three Trp residues equivalent to those in the N-lobe differed from the N-lobe and each other in their contributions to the fluorescent signal. Two rate constants are observed for the FeC hTF control and the four Trp mutants in complex with the TFR: k(obsC1) reports conformational changes in the C-lobe initiated by the TFR, and k(obsC2) is ascribed to iron release. Excitation at 295 nm (Trp only) and at 280 nm (Trp and Tyr) reveals interesting and significant differences in the rate constants for the complex.

  11. Structural Insights into Regioselectivity in the Enzymatic Chlorination of Tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; De Laurentis, Walter; Leang, Khim; Herrmann, Julia; Ihlefeld, Katja; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2009-01-01

    The regioselectively controlled introduction of chlorine into organic molecules is an important biological and chemical process. This importance derives from the observation that many pharmaceutically active natural products contain a chlorine atom. Flavin-dependent halogenases are one of the principal enzyme families responsible for regioselective halogenation of natural products. Structural studies of two flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases (PrnA and RebH) have generated important insights into the chemical mechanism of halogenation by this enzyme family. These proteins comprise two modules: a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding module and a tryptophan-binding module. Although the 7-halogenase studies advance a hypothesis for regioselectivity, this has never been experimentally demonstrated. PyrH is a tryptophan 5-halogenase that catalyzes halogenation on tryptophan C5 position. We report the crystal structure of a tryptophan 5-halogenase (PyrH) bound to tryptophan and FAD. The FAD-binding module is essentially unchanged relative to PrnA (and RebH), and PyrH would appear to generate the same reactive species from Cl-, O2, and 1,5-dihydroflavin adenine dinucleotide. We report additional mutagenesis data that extend our mechanistic understanding of this process, in particular highlighting a strap region that regulates FAD binding, and may allow communication between the two modules. PyrH has a significantly different tryptophan-binding module. The data show that PyrH binds tryptophan and presents the C5 atom to the reactive chlorinating species, shielding other potential reactive sites. We have mutated residues identified by structural analysis as recognizing the tryptophan in order to confirm their role. This work establishes the method by which flavin-dependent tryptophan halogenases regioselectively control chlorine addition to tryptophan. This method would seem to be general across the superfamily. PMID:19501593

  12. Tryptophan metabolism in depression

    PubMed Central

    Curzon, G.; Bridges, P. K.

    1970-01-01

    Psychiatric patients suffering from endogenous depression and a control group without endogenous depression were given oral loads of L-tryptophan and urinary excretion determined of the tryptophan metabolites on the pyrrolase pathway: kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid. Female endogenously depressed subjects excreted significantly more kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine but not the subsequent metabolite 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid than did female control subjects. Variability of excretion of kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine at different times by the same subject was much greater in the endogenously depressed than in the control group. There was no consistent temporal relationship between excretion of metabolites and severity of the depressive illness. The possible significance of the findings in relation to defective tryptophan metabolism in the brain in endogenous depression is commented upon. PMID:5478953

  13. On how a myosin tryptophan may be perturbed.

    PubMed Central

    Bivin, D B; Kubota, S; Pearlstein, R; Morales, M F

    1993-01-01

    A well-known indication that a nucleotide has bound to myosin is the enhancement of the fluorescence of a specific tryptophan in the "subfragment 1" segment of the protein. Empirically the effect has been enormously useful in myosin enzymology. But beyond an early suggestion that it arises from a purine-tryptophan charge-transfer complex, the mechanism of the effect has not been considered. Here we consider the alternative that it arises from an ionizable group (either another residue or the phosphate of the nucleotide) whose proximity to the tryptophan is altered by substrate binding. We study this possibility by studying the interaction of an ionizable residue and tryptophan when both are incorporated in a diketopiperazine structure. The geometry of the situation is inferred from molecular mechanics simulations. Unexpectedly, the best explanation seems to be that the field of the imposed charge, acting across space, affects events in the excited state of the indole. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8341700

  14. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on interfacial shear strength and post-peak residual strength of a PLGA fiber-reinforced brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Maenz, Stefan; Hennig, Max; Mühlstädt, Mike; Kunisch, Elke; Bungartz, Matthias; Brinkmann, Olaf; Bossert, Jörg; Kinne, Raimund W; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are promising materials for minimally invasive treatment of bone defects. However, CPCs have low mechanical strength and fracture toughness. One approach to overcome these limitations is the modification of the CPC with reinforcing fibers. The matrix-fiber interfacial shear strength (ISS) is pivotal for the biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs. The aim of the current study was to control the ISS between a brushite-forming CPC and degradable PLGA fibers by oxygen plasma treatment and to analyze the impact of the ISS alterations on its bulk mechanical properties. The ISS between CPC matrix and PLGA fibers, tested in a single-fiber pull-out test, increased up to 2.3-fold to max. 3.22±0.92MPa after fiber oxygen plasma treatment (100-300W, 1-10min), likely due to altered surface chemistry and morphology of the fibers. This ISS increase led to more efficient crack bridging and a subsequent increase of the post-peak residual strength at biomechanically relevant, moderate strains (up to 1%). At the same time, the work of fracture significantly decreased, possibly due to an increased proportion of fractured fibers unable to further absorb energy by frictional sliding. Flexural strength and flexural modulus were not affected by the oxygen plasma treatment. This study shows for the first time that the matrix-fiber ISS and some of the resulting mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs can be improved by chemical modifications such as oxygen plasma treatment, generating the possibility of avoiding catastrophic failures at the implant site and thus enhancing the applicability of biodegradable CPCs for the treatment of (load-bearing) bone defects.

  15. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  16. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  17. Consumption of peptide-included and free tryptophan induced by peroxyl radicals: A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, E; López-Alarcón, C

    2014-10-01

    It is well-known that tryptophan residues are efficiently oxidized by peroxyl radicals, generating kynurenine, and N-formyl kynurenine as well as hydroperoxide derivatives as products. In the present work we studied the kinetic of such reaction employing free and peptide-included tryptophan. Two azocompounds were used to produce peroxyl radicals: AAPH (2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride) and ABCVA (4,4'-Azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid)), which generate cationic and anionic peroxyl radicals, respectively. Tryptophan consumption was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy and the reactions were carried out in phosphate buffer (75mM, pH 7.4) at 45°C. Only a slight effect of the peroxyl radical charge was evidenced on the consumption of free tryptophan and the dipeptide Gly-Trp. Employing AAPH as peroxyl radical source, at low free tryptophan concentrations (1-10µM) near 0.3 mol of tryptophan were consumed per each mol of peroxyl radicals introduced into the system. However, at high free tryptophan concentrations (100µM-1mM) such stoichiometry increased in a tryptophan concentration-way. At 1mM three moles of tryptophan were consumed per mol of AAPH-derived peroxyl radicals, evidencing the presence of chain reactions. A similar behavior was observed when di and tri-peptides (Gly-Trp, Trp-Gly, Gly-Trp-Gly, Trp-Ala, Ala-Trp-Ala) were studied. Nonetheless, at low initial concentration (5µM), the initial consumption rate of tryptophan included in the peptides was two times higher than free tryptophan. In contrast, at high concentration (1mM) free and peptide-included tryptophan showed similar initial consumption rates. These results could be explained considering a disproportionation process of tryptophanyl radicals at low free tryptophan concentrations, a process that would be inhibited when tryptophan is included in peptides.

  18. Tryptophan Metabolism in Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Katrin; Kofler, Heinz; Strasser, Barbara; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, as well the early phase of atopic dermatitis, are characterized by a Th2-skewed immune environment. Th2-type cytokines are upregulated in allergic inflammation, whereas there is downregulation of the Th1-type immune response and related cytokines, such as interferon-x03B3; (IFN-x03B3;). The latter is a strong inducer of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), which degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, as part of an antiproliferative strategy of immunocompetent cells to halt the growth of infected and malignant cells, and also of T cells - an immunoregulatory intervention to avoid overactivation of the immune system. Raised serum tryptophan concentrations have been reported in patients with pollen allergy compared to healthy blood donors. Moreover, higher baseline tryptophan concentrations have been associated with a poor response to specific immunotherapy. It has been shown that the increase in tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy only exists outside the pollen season, and not during the season. Interestingly, there is only a minor alteration of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (Kyn/Trp, an index of tryptophan breakdown). The reason for the higher tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy outside the season remains a matter of discussion. To this regard, the specific interaction of nitric oxide (NO∙) with the tryptophan-degrading enzyme IDO-1 could be important, because an enhanced formation of NO∙ has been reported in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Importantly, NO∙ suppresses the activity of the heme enzyme IDO-1, which could explain the higher tryptophan levels. Thus, inhibitors of inducible NO∙ synthase should be reconsidered as candidates for antiallergic therapy out of season that may abrogate the arrest of IDO-1 by decreasing the production of NO∙. Considering its association with the pathophysiology of atopic disease, tryptophan metabolism may

  19. Effect of tryptophan oligopeptides on the size distribution of POPC liposomes: a dynamic light scattering and turbidimetric study.

    PubMed

    Stano, Pasquale; Bufali, Simone; Domazou, Anastasia S; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2005-01-01

    A chemical regulation of POPC liposome size distribution was investigated, based on the affinity of indole-containing compounds for phosphocholine membranes. In particular, tryptophan oligopeptides have shown interesting properties of size regulation, both when liposomes were formed in their presence and when the peptides were added to a preformed liposome suspension. Combining dynamic light scattering (DLS) and turbidimetric data, it was possible to show how such peptides had an influence on the size distribution of spontaneously formed liposomes prepared by the thin film hydration, reverse-phase evaporation and ethanol (or methanol) injection methods. In the presence of Trp-Trp or Trp-Trp-Trp, a disappearance of large vesicle aggregates was observed, as suggested also by light microscopy analysis. On the contrary, no effect was detected using extruded vesicles. Turbidimetric titration allowed the determination of the relative efficacy of the size regulators, Trp-Trp-Trp being about 20 times more powerful than the dimer, while the monomer had no effect. In addition, other indole-containing compounds and the antimicrobial peptide indolicidin were tested, showing similar behaviours. Discussing the results according to the current knowledge about the preference of Trp residues for interfacial regions in lecithin bilayers, this study confirms the relevant role of tryptophan in the biomembrane binding properties of many peptides and introduces a new behavior in the field of liposomes-peptides interactions.

  20. Chromatographic analysis of tryptophan metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sadok, Ilona; Gamian, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway generates multiple tryptophan metabolites called collectively kynurenines and leads to formation of the enzyme cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The first step in this pathway is tryptophan degradation, initiated by the rate‐limiting enzymes indoleamine 2,3‐dioxygenase, or tryptophan 2,3‐dioxygenase, depending on the tissue. The balanced kynurenine metabolism, which has been a subject of multiple studies in last decades, plays an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as infections, autoimmunity, neurological disorders, cancer, cataracts, as well as pregnancy. Understanding the regulation of tryptophan depletion provide novel diagnostic and treatment opportunities, however it requires reliable methods for quantification of kynurenines in biological samples with complex composition (body fluids, tissues, or cells). Trace concentrations, interference of sample components, and instability of some tryptophan metabolites need to be addressed using analytical methods. The novel separation approaches and optimized extraction protocols help to overcome difficulties in analyzing kynurenines within the complex tissue material. Recent developments in chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry provide new opportunity for quantification of tryptophan and its degradation products in various biological samples. In this review, we present current accomplishments in the chromatographic methodologies proposed for detection of tryptophan metabolites and provide a guide for choosing the optimal approach. PMID:28590049

  1. Metabolism of Tryptophan and Tryptophan Analogs by Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Myron N. V.; Signer, Ethan R.

    1990-01-01

    The alfalfa symbiont Rhizobium meliloti Rm1021 produces indole-3-acetic acid in a regulated manner when supplied with exogenous tryptophan. Mutants with altered response to tryptophan analogs still produce indole-3-acetic acid, but are Fix− because bacteria do not fully differentiate into the nitrogen-fixing bacteriod form. These mutations are in apparently essential genes tightly linked to a dominant streptomycin resistance locus. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667364

  2. Leucine and tryptophan metabolism in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Salter, M; Bender, D A; Pogson, C I

    1985-01-01

    The rate of tryptophan metabolism in isolated liver cells from animals fed on a high-leucine diet was greater than for cells from control animals. Leucine inhibited tryptophan metabolism and tryptophan uptake in isolated liver cells, probably by competing for membrane transport. Leucine had no effect on tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in vitro. 4-Methyl-2-oxovalerate increased tryptophan oxidation in incubations containing albumin, by displacing bound tryptophan and increasing the availability of the amino acid to the cell. The results suggest that, under extreme conditions, when the availability of tryptophan is low, leucine may be pellagragenic. PMID:3977834

  3. Nanoscale hydroxyl radical generation from multiphoton ionization of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Bisby, Roger H; Crisostomo, Ana G; Botchway, Stanley W; Parker, Anthony W

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of solutions containing both tryptophan and hydrogen peroxide to a pulsed ( approximately 180 fs) laser beam at 750 nm induces luminescence characteristic of 5-hydroxytryptophan. The results indicate that 3-photon excitation of tryptophan results in photoionization within the focal volume of the laser beam. The resulting hydrated electron is scavenged by hydrogen peroxide to produce the hydroxyl radical. The latter subsequently reacts with tryptophan to form 5-hydroxytryptophan. The involvement of hydroxyl radicals is confirmed by the use of ethanol and nitrous oxide as scavengers and their effects on the fluorescence yield in this system. It is postulated that such multiphoton ionization of tryptophanyl residues in cellular proteins may contribute to the photodamage observed during imaging of cells and tissues using multiphoton microscopy.

  4. Substitutions of Thr30 provide mechanistic insight into tryptophan-mediated activation of TRAP binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Payal, Vandana; Gollnick, Paul

    2006-01-01

    TRAP is an 11 subunit RNA binding protein that regulates expression of genes involved in tryptophan biosynthesis and transport in Bacillus subtilis. TRAP is activated to bind RNA by binding up to 11 molecules of l-tryptophan in pockets formed by adjacent subunits. The precise mechanism by which tryptophan binding activates TRAP is not known. Thr30 is in the tryptophan binding pocket. A TRAP mutant in which Thr30 is substituted with Val (T30V) does not bind tryptophan but binds RNA constitutively, suggesting that Thr30 plays a key role in the activation mechanism. We have examined the effects of other substitutions of Thr30. TRAP proteins with small beta-branched aliphatic side chains at residue 30 bind RNA constitutively, whereas those with a small polar side chain show tryptophan-dependent RNA binding. Several mutant proteins exhibited constitutive RNA binding that was enhanced by tryptophan. Although the tryptophan and RNA binding sites on TRAP are distinct and are separated by approximately 7.5 A, several substitutions of residues that interact with the bound RNA restored tryptophan binding to T30V TRAP. These observations support the hypothesis that conformational changes in TRAP relay information between the tryptophan and RNA binding sites of the protein.

  5. Tryptophan-free diet: a new means for rapidly decreasing brain tryptophan content and serotonin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gessa, G L; Biggio, G; Fadda, F; Corsini, G U; Tagliamonte, A

    1975-01-01

    Changes in the synthesis rate of brain serotonin are positively correlated with changes in the concentration of brain tryptophan, indicating that the concentration of tryptophan in the whole brain reflects that at sites of serotonin synthesis. In turn, the concentration of brain tryptophan is positively correlated with that of free serum tryptophan (tryptophan is the only amino acid bound to serum proteins) and negatively to that of other amino acids competing with tryptophan for the same transport from blood to brain. Consistently, experiments in rats have shown that treatments which increase free tryptophan in serum (in respect to competing amino acids) also increase brain tryptophan and serotonin turnover. Conversely, the ingestion of diets containing all amino acids except tryptophan cause a dramatic fall in free serum tryptophan and a parallel decline in brain tryptophan and serotonin synthesis. In man the administration of an amino acid mixture lacking trytophan produces a marked depletion in serum tryptophan concentration.

  6. The relation between residual stress, interfacial structure and the joint property in the SiO2f/SiO2-Nb joints.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Li, Zhuo Ran; Yang, Lai Shan; Lin, Jing Huang; Ba, Jin; Wang, Ze Yu; Qi, Jun Lei; Feng, Ji Cai

    2017-06-23

    In order to achieve a high-quality joint between SiO2f/SiO2 and metals, it is necessary to address the poor wettability of SiO2f/SiO2 and the high residual stress in SiO2f/SiO2-Nb joint. Here, we simultaneously realize good wettability and low residual stress in SiO2f/SiO2-Nb joint by combined method of HF etching treatment and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). After etching treatment, the wettability of E-SiO2f/SiO2 was improved, and the residual stress in the joint was decreased. In order to better control the quality of joints, efforts were made to understand the relationship between surface structure of E-SiO2f/SiO2 and residual stress in joint using FEA. Based on the direction of FEA results, a relationship between residual stress, surface structure and joint property in the brazed joints were investigated by experiments. As well the FEA and the brazing test results both realized the high-quality joint of E-SiO2f/SiO2-Nb and the shear strength of the joint reached 61.9 MPa.

  7. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan - prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-10-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies.

  8. Enhancement of stability of L-tryptophan dehydrogenase from Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133 and its application to L-tryptophan assay.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Daisuke; Okazaki, Seiji; Matsuda, Motoki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-02-20

    Microbial NAD(+)-dependent L-tryptophan dehydrogenase (TrpDH, EC1.4.1.19), which catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination and the reductive amination between L-tryptophan and indole-3-pyruvic acid, was found in the scytonemin biosynthetic pathway of Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. The TrpDH exhibited high specificity toward L-tryptophan, but its instability was a drawback for L-tryptophan determination. The mutant enzyme TrpDH L59F/D168G/A234D/I296N with thermal stability was obtained by screening of Escherichia coli transformants harboring various mutant genes, which were generated by error-prone PCR using complementation in an L-tryptophan auxotroph of E. coli. The specific activity and stability of this mutant enzyme were higher than those of the wild type enzyme. We also revealed here that in these four mutation points, the two amino acid residues Asp168 and Ile296 contributed to increase the enzyme stability, and the Leu59, Ala234 residues to increase its specific activity. Growth of the strain harboring the gene of above 4 point mutated enzyme was accelerated by the enhanced performance. In the present study, we demonstrated that TrpDH L59F/D168G/A234D/I296N was available for determination of L-tryptophan in human plasma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Tryptophan Pyrrolase in Endotoxin Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Robert J.; Berry, L. Joe

    1968-01-01

    Using substrate induction as a tool, we attempted to determine the role of tryptophan pyrrolase in the response to endotoxin in mice. Previous results have shown that the administration of the ld50 of endotoxin lowers tryptophan pyrrolase activity. α-Methyltryptophan was found to maintain tryptophan pyrrolase activity above control levels in endotoxin-poisoned mice without increasing survival. 5-Hydroxytryptophan, by contrast, lowered tryptophan pyrrolase activity but did not sensitize mice to endotoxin. These results suggest that tryptophan pyrrolase per se does not play a unique role in survival of mice poisoned with endotoxin. This enzyme, however, may reflect the fate of other liver enzymes inducible by adrenocorticoids. In mice given concurrent injections of tryptophan and endotoxin, tryptophan pyrrolase activity was elevated to a level intermediate between that of normal mice and that of mice given tryptophan alone. The mice injected with tryptophan and endotoxin also had about the same mortality as mice given endotoxin alone. Mice treated with tryptophan 4 hr after endotoxin, at a time when the substrate did not fully elevate tryptophan pyrrolase activity, died convulsively and in larger numbers than those given endotoxin alone. This effect was reversed by prior treatment with cyproheptadine, an antiserotonin drug. These results indicate that the depression of tryptophan pyrrolase activity previously observed in vitro after injection of endotoxin reflects an actual decrease in the in vivo activity of the enzyme. PMID:4869211

  10. Single tryptophan and tyrosine comparisons in the N-terminal and C-terminal interface regions of transmembrane GWALP peptides.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Nicholas J; Greathouse, Denise V; Grant, Christopher V; Opella, Stanley J; Koeppe, Roger E

    2013-11-07

    Hydrophobic membrane-spanning helices often are flanked by interfacial aromatic or charged residues. In this paper, we compare the consequences of single Trp → Tyr substitutions at each interface for the properties of a defined transmembrane helix in the absence of charged residues. The choice of molecular framework is critical for these single-residue experiments because the presence of "too many" aromatic residues (more than one at either membrane-water interface) introduces excess dynamic averaging of solid state NMR observables. To this end, we compare the outcomes when changing W(5) or W(19), or both of them, to tyrosine in the well-characterized transmembrane peptide acetyl-GGALW(5)(LA)6LW(19)LAGA-amide ("GWALP23"). By means of solid-state (2)H and (15)N NMR experiments, we find that Y(19)GW(5)ALP23 displays similar magnitudes of peptide helix tilt as Y(5)GW(19)ALP23 and responds similarly to changes in bilayer thickness, from DLPC to DMPC to DOPC. The presence of Y(19) changes the azimuthal rotation angle ρ (about the helix axis) to a similar extent as Y(5), but in the opposite direction. When tyrosines are substituted for both tryptophans to yield GY(5,19)ALP23, the helix tilt angle is again of comparable magnitude, and furthermore, the preferred azimuthal rotation angle ρ is relatively unchanged from that of GW(5,19)ALP23. The extent of dynamic averaging increases marginally when Tyr replaces Trp. Yet, importantly, all members of the peptide family having single Tyr or Trp residues near each interface exhibit only moderate and not highly extensive dynamic averaging. The results provide important benchmarks for evaluating conformational and dynamic control of membrane protein function.

  11. Characterization of a heterogeneous DNAPL source zone in the Borden aquifer using partitioning and interfacial tracers: residual morphologies and background sorption.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Niels; Cho, Jaehyun; Parker, Beth L; Annable, Michael D

    2010-06-25

    A partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) was performed in the Borden sand aquifer to characterize an aged heterogeneous DNAPL source zone. This zone evolved during 5 years of natural groundwater flow following the infiltration of 50 L chlorinated solvents DNAPL. To assess the lateral variability of remaining DNAPL mass and morphology, four sweepzones were analyzed. The low saturation residual nature of the source zone required correction of tracer breakthrough data for natural background sorption. Corrected estimates of the DNAPL percentage remaining (total 13.2-16.6%), average saturation (0.05-0.18%) and distribution across the sweepzones were in good agreement with previous findings based on detailed transect monitoring, core analyses and ground-penetrating radar reflection. Using a newly defined metric "average spherical radius equivalent (ASRE)", sweepzone estimates of the average size of DNAPL presence indicated the dominance of single pore DNAPL blobs and suggested the absence of DNAPL pools. Tracer tests indicated that DNAPL presence in the most DNAPL depleted sweepzone was potentially overestimated due to increased sediment sorption by residualized Sudan IV that was added to the DNAPL infiltrate. As hydrophobic compounds are normally present in spent solvent DNAPL, this suggests that additional sorption needs to be considered when using PITTs to characterize aged DNAPL source zones.

  12. L-tryptophan in depression.

    PubMed

    Farkas, T; Dunner, D L; Fieve, R R

    1976-06-01

    L-tryptophan, the amino acid precursor of serotonin, was administered to 16 depressive patients in a double-blind study of its potential antidepressant efficacy. Antidepressant responses were observed in one of ten unipolar patients and in three of six bipolar patients. These results are discussed in the context of possible interactions of amines with electrolyte systems in the etiology of affective illness.

  13. Role of aromatic residues at the lipid-water interface in micelle-bound bacteriophage M13 major coat protein.

    PubMed

    Yuen, C T; Davidson, A R; Deber, C M

    2000-12-26

    Analyses of transmembrane domains of proteins have revealed that aromatic residues tend to cluster at or near the lipid-water interface of the membrane. To assess protein-membrane interactions of such residues, a viable mutant library was generated of the major coat protein of bacteriophage M13 (a model single membrane-spanning protein) in which one or the other of its interfacial tyrosine residues (Tyr-21 and Tyr-24) is mutated. Using the interfacial tryptophan (Trp-26) as an intrinsic probe, blue shifts in fluorescence emission spectra and quenching constants indicated that mutants with a polar amino acid substitution (such as Y24D or Y24N) are less buried in a deoxycholate micelle environment than in the wild type protein. These polar mutants also exhibited alpha-helix to beta-structure transition temperatures in incremental-heating circular dichroism studies relatively lower than those of wild type and nonpolar mutants (such as Y21V, Y21I, and Y24A), indicating that specific side chains in the lipid-water interface influence local protein-micelle interactions. Mutant Y21F exhibited the highest transition temperature, suggesting that phenylalanine is ostensibly the most effective interfacial anchoring residue. Using phage viability as the assay in a combination of site-directed and saturation mutagenesis experiments, it was further observed that both Tyr residues could not simultaneously be "knocked out". The overall results support the notion that an interfacial Tyr is a primary recognition element for precise strand positioning in vivo, a function that apparently cannot be performed optimally by residues with simple aliphatic character.

  14. Molecular dynamics computations of brine-CO2 interfacial tensions and brine-CO2-quartz contact angles and their effects on structural and residual trapping mechanisms in carbon geo-sequestration.

    PubMed

    Iglauer, S; Mathew, M S; Bresme, F

    2012-11-15

    In the context of carbon geo-sequestration projects, brine-CO(2) interfacial tension γ and brine-CO(2)-rock surface water contact angles θ directly impact structural and residual trapping capacities. While γ is fairly well understood there is still large uncertainty associated with θ. We present here an investigation of γ and θ using a molecular approach based on molecular dynamics computer simulations. We consider a system consisting of CO(2)/water/NaCl and an α-quartz surface, covering a brine salinity range between 0 and 4 molal. The simulation models accurately reproduce the dependence of γ on pressure below the CO(2) saturation pressure at 300 K, and over predict γ by ~20% at higher pressures. In addition, in agreement with experimental observations, the simulations predict that γ increases slightly with temperature or salinity. We also demonstrate that for non-hydroxylated quartz surfaces, θ strongly increases with pressure at subcritical and supercritical conditions. An increase in temperature significantly reduces the contact angle, especially at low-intermediate pressures (1-10 MPa), this effect is mitigated at higher pressures, 20 MPa. We also found that θ only weakly depends on salinity for the systems investigated in this work.

  15. Single tryptophan of disordered loop from Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase: involvement in catalysis and microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Manish Kumar; Verma, Anita; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Shiv Vardan; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Among various tropical diseases, malaria is a major life-threatening disease caused by Plasmodium parasite. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the deadliest form of malaria, so-called cerebral malaria. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from P. falciparum is a homohexamer containing single tryptophan residue per subunit that accepts inosine and guanosine but not adenosine for its activity. This enzyme has been exploited as drug target against malaria disease. It is important to draw together significant knowledge about inherent properties of this enzyme which will be helpful in better understanding of this drug target. The enzyme shows disorder to order transition during catalysis. The single tryptophan residue residing in conserved region of transition loop is present in purine nucleoside phosphorylases throughout the Plasmodium genus. This active site loop motif is conserved among nucleoside phosphorylases from apicomplexan parasites. Modification of tryptophan residue by N-bromosuccinamide resulted in complete loss of activity showing its importance in catalysis. Inosine was not able to protect enzyme against N-bromosuccinamide modification. Extrinsic fluorescence studies revealed that tryptophan might not be involved in substrate binding. The tryptophan residue localised in electronegative environment showed collisional and static quenching in the presence of quenchers of different polarities.

  16. Liquid chromatography-fluorescence and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection of tryptophan degradation products of a recombinant monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Christine; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana; Neill, Alyssa; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-01

    Light exposure is one of several conditions used to study the degradation pathways of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Tryptophan is of particular interest among the 20 amino acids because it is the most photosensitive. Tryptophan degradation forms several products, including an even stronger photosensitizer and several reactive oxygen species. The current study reports a specific peptide mapping procedure to monitor tryptophan degradation. Instead of monitoring peptides using UV 214 nm, fluorescence detection with an excitation wavelength of 295 nm and an emission wavelength of 350 nm was used to enable specific detection of tryptophan-containing peptides. Peaks that decreased in area over time are likely to contain susceptible tryptophan residues. This observation can allow further liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis to focus only on those peaks to confirm tryptophan degradation products. After confirmation of tryptophan degradation, susceptibility of tryptophan residues can be compared based on the peak area decrease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating the efficacy of tryptophan fluorescence and absorbance as a selection tool for identifying protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harindarpal S.

    2010-01-01

    The environment of individual tryptophans in known protein structures and the effectiveness of four commercial robotic UV microscopes to illuminate tryptophan-containing protein crystals by either tryptophan fluorescence (epi-illumination) or absorbance (transmission) are evaluated. In agreement with other studies, tryptophan residues are found on average to be largely buried in protein structures (with ∼84% of their surface area buried) and to be surrounded by partially polar microenvironments (with ∼43% of their surface area covered by polar residues), which suggests an inherent degree of fluorescence signal quenching. In bacterial genomes, up to one-third (∼18.5% on average) of open reading frames are deficient in tryptophan. In the laboratory, because of the attenuation of UV light by the media commonly used in sitting-drop and hanging-drop crystallization trials, it was often necessary to simplify the light path by manually removing or inverting the supporting media. Prolonged exposure (minutes) to UV light precipitates some protein samples. The absorbance spectra of many commercially available media in crystallization trials are presented. The advantages of using tryptophan absorbance over fluorescence for characterizing crystals are discussed. PMID:20208182

  18. Tryptophan within basic peptide sequences triggers glycosaminoglycan-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Pallerla, Manjula; Zaltsman, Yefim; Burlina, Fabienne; Alves, Isabel D; Lequin, Olivier; Sagan, Sandrine

    2013-02-01

    Deciphering the structural requirements and mechanisms for internalization of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is required to improve their delivery efficiency. Herein, a unique role of tryptophan (Trp) residues in the interaction and structuring of cationic CPP sequences with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) has been characterized, in relation with cell internalization. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism, NMR, mass spectrometry, and phase-contrast microscopy, we compared the interaction of 7 basic CPPs with 5 classes of GAGs. We found that the affinity of CPPs for GAGs increases linearly with the number of Trp residues, from 30 nM for a penetratin analog with 1 Trp residue to 1.5 nM for a penetratin analog with 6 Trp residues for heparin (HI); peptides with Trp residues adopt a predominantly β-strand structure in complex with HI and form large, stable β-sheet aggregates with GAGs; and in the absence of any cytotoxicity effect, the quantity of peptide internalized into CHO cells increased 2 times with 1 Trp residue, 10 times with 2 Trp residues, and 20 times with 3 Trp residues, compared with +6 peptides with no Trp residues. Therefore, Trp residues represent molecular determinants in basic peptide sequences not only for direct membrane translocation but also for efficient endocytosis through GAGs.

  19. [Nature of tryptophan photooxidation products in lysozyme in the presence of methylene blue].

    PubMed

    Churakova, N I; Kravchenko, N A; Serebriakov, E P; Kaverzneva, E D

    1976-05-01

    One out of six trytophan residues in two lysozyme modification, obtained under lysozyme photooxidation in the presence of methylene blue, is found to be oxidized to N'-formylkinurenine (in one modification) and to kinurenine (in the other modification). The transition of one modification into another via detaching of N'-formyl group by soft acid hydrolysis has shown that one and the same tryptophan residue is oxidized in both products, Possible mechanism of tryptophan oxidation to the products mentioned is discu-sed on the basis of the hypothesis on signlet mechanism of lysozyme photooxidation in the presence of methylene blue.

  20. Parallel variation of ventricular CSF tryptophan and free serum tryptophan in man.

    PubMed Central

    Young, S N; Lal, S; Feldmuller, F; Sourkes, T L; Ford, R M; Kiely, M; Martin, J B

    1976-01-01

    Tryptophan was measured in the ventricular CSE and serum and the neutral amino acids leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were measured in the serum of two cases with ventricular drains. Samples were taken every two hours for 24 hours in one case and for 16 hours in the other. The CSF tryptophan was correlated significantly with the free--that is, non-albumin-bound--serum tryptophan but not with the total serum tryptophan. CSF tryptophan was not correlated significantly with the ratio of free serum tryptophan to the sum of the neutral amino acids. These data suggest that, in man, brain tryptophan concentrations are influenced by the free and not the total serum tryptophan and that physiological variations of the neutral amino acids do not appreciably influence the concentration of brain trytophan. PMID:1255214

  1. Parallel variation of ventricular CSF tryptophan and free serum tryptophan in man.

    PubMed

    Young, S N; Lal, S; Feldmuller, F; Sourkes, T L; Ford, R M; Kiely, M; Martin, J B

    1976-01-01

    Tryptophan was measured in the ventricular CSE and serum and the neutral amino acids leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were measured in the serum of two cases with ventricular drains. Samples were taken every two hours for 24 hours in one case and for 16 hours in the other. The CSF tryptophan was correlated significantly with the free--that is, non-albumin-bound--serum tryptophan but not with the total serum tryptophan. CSF tryptophan was not correlated significantly with the ratio of free serum tryptophan to the sum of the neutral amino acids. These data suggest that, in man, brain tryptophan concentrations are influenced by the free and not the total serum tryptophan and that physiological variations of the neutral amino acids do not appreciably influence the concentration of brain trytophan.

  2. Fragmentation of peptide radical cations containing a tyrosine or tryptophan residue: structural features that favor formation of [x(n-1) + H]˙⁺ and [z(n-1) + H]˙⁺ ions.

    PubMed

    Mädler, Stefanie; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Williams, Declan; Wang, Yating; Saminathan, Irine S; Zhao, Junfang; Siu, K W Michael; Hopkinson, Alan C

    2014-06-12

    Peptide radical cations A(n)Y(•+) (where n = 3, 4, or 5) and A5W(•+) have been generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of [Cu(II)(tpy)(peptide)](•2+) complexes. Apart from the charge-driven fragmentation at the N-Cα bond of the hetero residue producing either [c + 2H](+) or [z - H](•+) ions and radical-driven fragmentation at the Cα-C bond to give a(+) ions, unusual product ions [x + H](•+) and [z + H](•+) are abundant in the CID spectra of the peptides with the hetero residue in the second or third position of the chain. The formation of these ions requires that both the charge and radical be located on the peptide backbone. Energy-resolved spectra established that the [z + H](•+) ion can be produced either directly from the peptide radical cation or via the fragment ion [x + H](•+). Additionally, backbone dissociation by loss of the C-terminal amino acid giving [b(n-1) - H](•+) increases in abundance with the length of the peptides. Mechanisms by which peptide radical cations dissociate have been modeled using density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31++G** level) on tetrapeptides AYAG(•+), AAYG(•+), and AWAG(•+).

  3. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide.

  4. Protein source tryptophan versus pharmaceutical grade tryptophan as an efficacious treatment for chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Craig; Hudson, Susan Patricia; Hecht, Tracy; MacKenzie, Joan

    2005-04-01

    Intact protein rich in tryptophan was not seen as an alternative to pharmaceutical grade tryptophan since protein also contains large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) that compete for transport sites across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Deoiled gourd seed (an extremely rich source of tryptophan-22 mg tryptophan/1 g protein) was combined with glucose, a carbohydrate that reduces serum levels of competing LNAAs which was then compared to pharmaceutical grade tryptophan with carbohydrate as well as carbohydrate alone. Objective and subjective measures of sleep were employed to measure changes in sleep as part of a double blind placebo controlled study where subjects were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (1) Protein source tryptophan (deoiled gourd seed) in combination with carbohydrate; (2) pharmaceutical grade tryptophan in combination with carbohydrate; (3) carbohydrate alone. Out of 57 subjects 49 of those who began the study completed the three week protocol. Protein source tryptophan with carbohydrate and pharmaceutical grade tryptophan, but not carbohydrate alone, resulted in significant improvement on subjective and objective measures of insomnia. Protein source tryptophan with carbohydrate alone proved effective in significantly reducing time awake during the night. Protein source tryptophan is comparable to pharmaceutical grade tryptophan for the treatment of insomnia.

  5. Quantum chemical calculations of tryptophan → heme electron and excitation energy transfer rates in myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Suess, Christian J; Hirst, Jonathan D; Besley, Nicholas A

    2017-04-01

    The development of optical multidimensional spectroscopic techniques has opened up new possibilities for the study of biological processes. Recently, ultrafast two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy experiments have determined the rates of tryptophan → heme electron transfer and excitation energy transfer for the two tryptophan residues in myoglobin (Consani et al., Science, 2013, 339, 1586). Here, we show that accurate prediction of these rates can be achieved using Marcus theory in conjunction with time-dependent density functional theory. Key intermediate residues between the donor and acceptor are identified, and in particular the residues Val68 and Ile75 play a critical role in calculations of the electron coupling matrix elements. Our calculations demonstrate how small changes in structure can have a large effect on the rates, and show that the different rates of electron transfer are dictated by the distance between the heme and tryptophan residues, while for excitation energy transfer the orientation of the tryptophan residues relative to the heme is important. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside inhibit light-induced oxidation of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Adem, Yilma T; Molina, Patricia; Liu, Hongbin; Patapoff, Thomas W; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Esue, Osigwe

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the photo-protective effect of sugar-based surfactants--hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside--against light-induced oxidation of a monoclonal antibody. Reactive oxygen species are generated in solutions in the presence of light; these reactive species readily oxidize amino acids such as tryptophan. Hexyl glucosides and hexyl maltosides scavenge these reactive species and protect tryptophan residues from light-induced oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. As a result of the scavenging process, hydrogen peroxide is formed, especially at high (millimolar) concentrations of the alkyl glycoside surfactants. These results suggest that hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside have the potential to protect tryptophan residues against light-induced oxidation.

  7. Tryptophan

    MedlinePlus

    Murray MT. 5-Hydroxytryptophan. In: Pizzorno JE, Murray MT, eds. Textbook of Natural Medicine. 4th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2013:chap 98. United States Department of Health and ...

  8. Structure and Activity of an Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase that Charges tRNA with Nitro-Tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Buddha,M.; Crane, B.

    2005-01-01

    The most divergent of two tryptophanyl tRNA synthetases (TrpRS II) found in Deinococcus radiodurans interacts with a nitric oxide synthase protein that produces 4-nitro-tryptophan (4-NRP). TrpRS II efficiently charges transfer RNATrp with 4-NRP and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HRP). The crystal structures of TrpRS II bound to tryptophan and 5-HRP reveal residue substitutions that accommodate modified indoles. A class of auxiliary bacterial TrpRSs conserve this capacity to charge tRNA with nonstandard amino acids.

  9. Interfacial effects in multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W., Jr.

    1998-04-01

    Interfacial structure and the atomic interactions between atoms at interfaces in multilayers or nano-laminates have significant impact on the physical properties of these materials. A technique for the experimental evaluation of interfacial structure and interfacial structure effects is presented and compared to experiment. In this paper the impact of interfacial structure on the performance of x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultra-violet multilayer optic structures is emphasized. The paper is concluded with summary of these results and an assessment of their implications relative to multilayer development and the study of buried interfaces in solids in general.

  10. Decomposition of protein tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components. II. The statistical proof of discreteness of tryptophan classes in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Y K; Burstein, E A

    2001-01-01

    The physical causes for wide variation of Stokes shift values in emission spectra of tryptophan fluorophores in proteins have been proposed in the model of discrete states (Burstein, E. A., N. S. Vedenkina, and M. N. Ivkova. 1973. Photochem. Photobiol. 18:263-279; Burstein, E. A. 1977a. Intrinsic Protein Luminescence (The Nature and Application). In Advances in Science and Technology (Itogi Nauki i Tekhniki), Biophysics Vol. 7. VINITI, Moscow [In Russian]; Burstein, E. A. 1983. Molecular Biology (Moscow) 17:455-467 [In Russian; English translation]). It was assumed that the existence of the five most probable spectral classes of emitting tryptophan residues and differences among the classes were analyzed in terms of various combinations of specific and universal interactions of excited fluorophores with their environment. The development of stable algorithms of decomposition of tryptophan fluorescence spectra into log-normal components gave us an opportunity to apply two mathematically different algorithms, SImple fitting with Mean-Square criterion (SIMS) and PHase-plot-based REsolving with Quenchers (PHREQ) for the decomposition of a representative set of emission spectra of proteins. Here we present the results of decomposition of tryptophan emission spectra of >100 different proteins, some in various structural states (native and denatured, in complexes with ions or organic ligands, in various pH-induced conformations, etc.). Analysis of the histograms of occurrence of >300 spectral log-normal components with various maximum positions confirmed the statistical discreteness of several states of emitting tryptophan fluorophores in proteins. PMID:11509383

  11. Quenching of Tryptophan Fluorescence in Unfolded Cytochrome "c": A Biophysics Experiment for Physical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Kats, Dina I.; Kim, Judy E.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments that focus on protein folding provide excellent opportunities for undergraduate students to learn important topics in the expanding interdisciplinary field of biophysics. Here, we describe the use of Stern-Volmer plots to determine the extent of solvent accessibility of the single tryptophan residue (trp-59) in unfolded and…

  12. Quenching of Tryptophan Fluorescence in Unfolded Cytochrome "c": A Biophysics Experiment for Physical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Kats, Dina I.; Kim, Judy E.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments that focus on protein folding provide excellent opportunities for undergraduate students to learn important topics in the expanding interdisciplinary field of biophysics. Here, we describe the use of Stern-Volmer plots to determine the extent of solvent accessibility of the single tryptophan residue (trp-59) in unfolded and…

  13. Thermodynamics of tryptophan-mediated activation of the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Craig A; Manfredo, Amanda; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2006-06-27

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) functions in many bacilli to control the expression of the tryptophan biosynthesis genes. Transcription of the trp operon is controlled by TRAP through an attenuation mechanism, in which competition between two alternative secondary-structural elements in the 5' leader sequence of the nascent mRNA is influenced by tryptophan-dependent binding of TRAP to the RNA. Previously, NMR studies of the undecamer (11-mer) suggested that tryptophan-dependent control of RNA binding by TRAP is accomplished through ligand-induced changes in protein dynamics. We now present further insights into this ligand-coupled event from hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Scanning calorimetry showed tryptophan dissociation to be independent of global protein unfolding, while analysis of the temperature dependence of the binding enthalpy by ITC revealed a negative heat capacity change larger than expected from surface burial, a hallmark of binding-coupled processes. Analysis of this excess heat capacity change using parameters derived from protein folding studies corresponds to the ordering of 17-24 residues per monomer of TRAP upon tryptophan binding. This result is in agreement with qualitative analysis of residue-specific broadening observed in TROSY NMR spectra of the 91 kDa oligomer. Implications for the mechanism of ligand-mediated TRAP activation through a shift in a preexisting conformational equilibrium and an induced-fit conformational change are discussed.

  14. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32.

  15. Novel chemical degradation pathways of proteins mediated by tryptophan oxidation: tryptophan side chain fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Schöneich, Christian

    2017-01-30

    This minireview focuses on novel degradation pathways of proteins in solution via intermediary tryptophan (Trp) radical cations, which are generated via photo-induced electron transfer to suitable acceptors such as disulfide bonds. Gas-phase mass spectrometry studies had indicated the potential for Trp radical cations to fragment via release of 3-methylene-3H-indol-1-ium from the side chain. HPLC-MS/MS analysis demonstrates that analogous fragmentation reactions occur during the exposure of peptides and proteins to light or accelerated stability testing. The light exposure of selected peptides and monoclonal antibodies leads to the conversion of Trp to glycine (Gly) or glycine hydroperoxide (GlyOOH), where GlyOOH could be reduced to hydroxyglycine, which undergoes subsequent cleavage. Product formation is consistent with Cα -Cβ fragmentation of intermediary Trp radical cations. For the peptide octreotide and specific glycoforms of IgG1 Fc domains, Trp side chain cleavage in aqueous solution is indicated by the formation of 3-methyleneindolenine (3-MEI), which adds to nucleophilic side chains, for example to Lys residues adjacent to the original Trp residues. Trp side chain cleavage leads to novel reaction products on specific peptide and protein sequences, which may have consequences for potency and immunogenicity. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Metabolism of Tryptophan by Pseudomonas aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, R. L.; Elander, R. P.; Mabe, J. A.; Gorman, M.

    1970-01-01

    Exogenous tryptophan is metabolized by Pseudomonas aureofaciens to yield pyrrolnitrin [3-chloro-4-(2′-nitro-3′-chlorophenyl)-pyrrole], an antifungal agent. The ability of this culture to metabolize tryptophan analogues in a similar manner was investigated by addition of the appropriate compound to the fermentation. Tryptophan precursors and metabolites or nonphenyl-substituted tryptophans had little effect on pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis, but simple derivatives of indole inhibited the production of pyrrolnitrin. Tryptophans substituted at the 4 position decreased pyrrolnitrin production and were converted into the corresponding substituted indoles. Tryptophans substituted at the 5, 6, and 7 position with fluorine or at the 5 and 7 position with methyl yielded new pyrrolnitrin derivatives. Substitution of larger groups (such as chloro, bromo, trifluoromethyl, and methoxy) at these positions led to the formation of the intermediate, amino pyrrolnitrin [3-chloro-4-(2′-amino-3′-chlorophenyl)-pyrrole], with the appropriate new substituent. The trifluoromethyl group at the 6 position of tryptophan prevented chlorination at the 3 position of pyrrolnitrin. Images PMID:4316270

  17. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  18. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  19. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Nikita; Wales, Thomas E; Joseph, Raji E; Boyken, Scott E; Engen, John R; Jernigan, Robert L; Andreotti, Amy H

    2016-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site.

  20. Tryptophan in human hair: correlation with pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bertazzo, A; Biasiolo, M; Costa, C V; Cardin de Stefani, E; Allegri, G

    2000-08-01

    The distribution of tryptophan content in human hair of various colours was evaluated, in order to study the accumulation of this amino acid, precursor of serotonin, melatonin and niacin, in hair and the influence on hair pigmentation. Pigmentation is an important factor in determining drug incorporation into hair. Results from 1211 samples of hair from healthy subjects (577 men and 634 women) show that tryptophan levels are significantly higher in males (37.83 +/- 3.45 microg/g dry hair) than in females (26.62 +/- 2.40 microg/g hair). Besides sex, age also influences the distribution of tryptophan in human hair, the highest levels being found in both sexes in the first few years of life, probably due to the influence of milk, and in aging subjects in the groups of 61-80 and > 80 years. In order to investigate the influence of hair colour, hair samples were subdivided according to colour into blond, dark blond, red, light brown, brown, black, grey and white. The hair contents of tryptophan in both sexes was higher in brown and black hair than in blond hair, but in grey and white hair concentrations were the highest, demonstrating that tryptophan accumulates among hair fibres with age. Grouping subjects by age in relation to hair colour, we observed that at ages 1-5 and 6-12 years, colour did not influence tryptophan contents, but at ages 13-19 and 20-40 years tryptophan content increased significantly from blond to brown at 13-19 years and from blond to black at 20-40 years in both sexes. Therefore, variations in tryptophan levels of human hair appear to be correlated with differences in hair colour in both sexes. Tryptophan also accumulates in hair during keratinization, as shown by the presence of high levels of this amino acid in grey and white hair.

  1. Tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis: a radical approach to posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Victor L; Liu, Aimin

    2012-11-01

    Protein-derived cofactors are formed by irreversible covalent posttranslational modification of amino acid residues. An example is tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) found in the enzyme methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). TTQ biosynthesis requires the cross-linking of the indole rings of two Trp residues and the insertion of two oxygen atoms onto adjacent carbons of one of the indole rings. The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes the completion of TTQ within a precursor protein of MADH. The preMADH substrate contains a single hydroxyl group on one of the tryptophans and no crosslink. MauG catalyzes a six-electron oxidation that completes TTQ assembly and generates fully active MADH. These oxidation reactions proceed via a high valent bis-Fe(IV) state in which one heme is present as Fe(IV)=O and the other is Fe(IV) with both axial heme ligands provided by amino acid side chains. The crystal structure of MauG in complex with preMADH revealed that catalysis does not involve direct contact between the hemes of MauG and the protein substrate. Rather it is accomplished through long-range electron transfer, which presumably generates radical intermediates. Kinetic, spectrophotometric, and site-directed mutagenesis studies are beginning to elucidate how the MauG protein controls the reactivity of the hemes and mediates the long range electron/radical transfer required for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology.

  2. Interfacial water molecules in SH3 interactions: a revised paradigm for polyproline recognition.

    PubMed

    Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Ruiz-Sanz, Javier; Luque, Irene

    2012-03-01

    In spite of its biomedical relevance, polyproline recognition is still not fully understood. The disagreement between the current description of SH3 (Src homology 3) complexes and their thermodynamic behaviour calls for a revision of the SH3-binding paradigm. Recently, Abl-SH3 was demonstrated to recognize its ligands by a dual binding mechanism involving a robust network of water-mediated hydrogen bonds that complements the canonical hydrophobic interactions. The systematic analysis of the SH3 structural database in the present study reveals that this dual binding mode is universal to SH3 domains. Tightly bound buried-interfacial water molecules were found in all SH3 complexes studied mediating the interaction between the peptide ligand and the domain. Moreover, structural waters were also identified in a high percentage of the free SH3 domains. A detailed analysis of the pattern of water-mediated interactions enabled the identification of conserved hydration sites in the polyproline-recognition region and the establishment of relationships between hydration profiles and the sequence of both ligands and SH3 domains. Water-mediated interactions were also systematically observed in WW (protein-protein interaction domain containing two conserved tryptophan residues), UEV (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 variant) and EVH-1 [Ena/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) homology 1] structures. The results of the present study clearly indicate that the current description of proline-rich sequence recognition by protein-protein interaction modules is incomplete and insufficient for a correct understanding of these systems. A new binding paradigm is required that includes interfacial water molecules as relevant elements in polyproline recognition.

  3. Energetics of Photoinduced Charge Migration within the Tryptophan Tetrad of an Animal (6-4) Photolyase.

    PubMed

    Cailliez, Fabien; Müller, Pavel; Firmino, Thiago; Pernot, Pascal; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2016-02-17

    Cryptochromes and photolyases are flavoproteins that undergo cascades of electron/hole transfers after excitation of the flavin cofactor. It was recently discovered that animal (6-4) photolyases, as well as animal cryptochromes, feature a chain of four tryptophan residues, while other members of the family contain merely a tryptophan triad. Transient absorption spectroscopy measurements on Xenopus laevis (6-4) photolyase have shown that the fourth residue is effectively involved in photoreduction but at the same time could not unequivocally ascertain the final redox state of this residue. In this article, polarizable molecular dynamics simulations and constrained density functional theory calculations are carried out to reveal the energetics of charge migration along the tryptophan tetrad. Migration toward the fourth tryptophan is found to be thermodynamically favorable. Electron transfer mechanisms are sought either through an incoherent hopping mechanism or through a multiple sites tunneling process. The Jortner-Bixon formulation of electron transfer (ET) theory is employed to characterize the hopping mechanism. The interplay between electron transfer and relaxation of protein and solvent is analyzed in detail. Our simulations confirm that ET in (6-4) photolyase proceeds out of equilibrium. Multiple site tunneling is modeled with the recently proposed flickering resonance mechanism. Given the position of energy levels and the distribution of electronic coupling values, tunneling over three tryptophan residues may become competitive in some cases, although a hopping mechanism is likely to be the dominant channel. For both reactive channels, computed rates are very sensitive to the starting protein configuration, suggesting that both can take place and eventually be mixed, depending on the state of the system when photoexcitation takes place.

  4. Study of the tryptophan-terbium FRET pair coupled to silver nanoprisms for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    di Gennaro, Ane K; Gurevich, Leonid; Skovsen, Esben; Overgaard, Michael T; Fojan, Peter

    2013-06-14

    Plasmonic coupling between fluorophores and metal surfaces has become a focal point of optical research during the last two decades, however, the interactions of FRET couples with metal surfaces remain relatively unexplored. In this study, interactions of the tryptophan-Tb(3+) FRET pair with silver nanoprisms for potential biosensor development have been investigated. For this purpose an engineered lanthanide binding peptide (LBTtrp) containing tryptophan as the sensitizer for bound lanthanide ions (Tb(3+)) as well as a trypsin cleavage site was synthesized. The modified LBTtrp peptide contained two N-terminal cysteine residues to provide a stronger coupling to the silver nanoprisms (~6 nm high, ~50 nm wide). This study investigated the interaction between tryptophan, chelated Tb(3+) ions, and silver nanoprisms in solution using fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopy. We have found that Tb(3+) luminescence decreases upon binding of the LBTtrp-Tb(3+) to silver nanoprisms and increases upon trypsin cleavage. The transient absorption spectroscopy measurements showed a significant decrease in the lifetime of the excited singlet state of tryptophan upon Tb(3+) chelation, while coupling to the silver nanoprisms did not show a significant effect on tryptophan. The results obtained in this work demonstrate a first proof of concept for a new sensitive optical biosensor in solution.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of tryptophan oxidation in actin and troponin I from skeletal muscles using a rat model of acute oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Maria; Todorovsky, Toni; Kuleva, Nadezda; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Increased levels of "ROS" cause oxidative stress and are believed to play a key role in the development of age-related diseases and mammalian aging, e.g. through the oxidation of residues, at or close to, the protein surface. In this study, we have investigated the effects of ROS on tryptophan residues in alpha skeletal actin and troponin I (fast skeletal muscle isoform) using an established rat model of acute oxidative stress induced by X-ray irradiation. In the control samples (no oxidative stress), the single Trp residue of troponin I (position 161) and the four tryptophan residues present in actin (positions 79, 86, 340, and 356) were only oxidized at very low levels. Post-irradiation, the level of oxidized versions increased for most positions within 3 h. Tryptophan residues located inside the proteins, however, required longer time periods. Based on the increment masses of the tryptophan positions calculated from the b- and y-ion series of the tandem mass spectra, the following oxidation products of tryptophan were detected: kynurenine; oxolactone; hydroxytryptophan or oxindolylalanine (isobaric); hydroxykynurenine; dioxindolylalanine, N-formylkynurenine or dihydroxytryptophan (all three isobaric); and hydroxyl-N-formylkynurenine, with mass gains relative to tryptophan of 4, 14, 16, 20, 32, and 48 u, respectively. Despite a partial recovery after 24 h, the degree of oxidation of all oxidized versions was still higher than in the control samples.

  6. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  7. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  8. Quantification of Small Molecule–Protein Interactions using FRET between Tryptophan and the Pacific Blue Fluorophore

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a new method to quantify the affinity of small molecules for proteins. This method is based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between endogenous tryptophan (Trp) residues and the coumarin-derived fluorophore Pacific Blue (PB). Tryptophan residues are frequently found in proteins near ligand-binding sites, making this approach potentially applicable to a wide range of systems. To improve access to PB, we developed a scalable multigram synthesis of this fluorophore, starting with inexpensive 2,3,4,5-tetrafluorobenzoic acid. This route was used to synthesize fluorescent derivatives of biotin, as well as lower affinity thiobiotin, iminobiotin, and imidazolidinethione analogues that bind the protein streptavidin. Compared with previously published FRET acceptors for tryptophan, PB proved to be superior in both sensitivity and efficiency. These unique properties of PB enabled direct quantification of dissociation constants (Kd) as well as competitive inhibition constants (Ki) in the micromolar to nanomolar range. In comparison to analogous binding studies using fluorescence polarization, fluorescence quenching, or fluorescence enhancement, affinities determined using Trp-FRET were more precise and accurate as validated using independent isothermal titration calorimetry studies. FRET between tryptophan and PB represents a new tool for the characterization of protein–ligand complexes. PMID:28058293

  9. Tryptophan Content of the Serum Albumin of Normal and of Cadmium-Poisoned Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kench, J. E.; Sutherland, Elizabeth M.

    1967-01-01

    In order to characterize further the minialbumins (molecular weight 5,000 to 20,000) found in cadmium-poisoned men and animals, the tryptophan content of albumins found in the serum and urine of cadmium-poisoned monkeys was measured by two methods and compared with that of serum albumin (molecular weight 66,000) of normal animals. Normal serum albumin of the monkey was found to contain 2 residues of trytophan per molecule of the protein, whereas all albumins in the poisoned monkeys, whether of normal size or low-molecular weight, contained less tryptophan, this amino acid being absent entirely in the minialbumins of both serum and urine. Serum albumin of the usual molecular weight (66,000) in the cadmium-poisoned monkeys contained approximately 30% less tryptophan than its normal counterpart in untreated animals. Taken in conjunction with previous observations on the behaviour of minialbumins, which aggregate readily in low-salt media including isotonic saline, it is concluded that approximately 30% of the circulating serum albumin in the poisoned monkeys arose by aggregation of minialbumin molecules. On the basis of the close similarity in amino acid composition, in nearly all other respects, between the various albumins, it is suggested that minialbumin comprises a mixture of peptides derived by fission of the normal albumin molecule along its whole chain length, and that subsequently a peptide containing both tryptophan residues is either deleted metabolically or excluded in the preparation procedures. PMID:4965263

  10. Tryptophan metabolism in characterized neurones of Helix

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, N. N.

    1973-01-01

    [14C]-Tryptophan perfused through the central nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia is taken up by both 5-hydroxytryptamine-containing (GSC) and non-5-hydroxytryptamine-containing cells. Only the GSCs have the capacity to metabolize [14C]-tryptophan to form some 5-hydroxytryptophan and slightly more 5-hydroxytryptamine. Electrical stimulation of the GSCs, strong enough to elicit a firing of spikes, resulted in more 5-hydroxytryptamine being produced, though there was also a slight increase in the amount of labelled tryptophan and 5-hydroxytryptophan. Doubling the length of stimulation and the amount of [14C]-tryptophan perfused through the central nervous system had no great influence on the content of radioactive substances found in the GSC. Pretreatment of snails with p-chlorophenylalanine, though not interfering with the uptake of tryptophan into the GSCs, almost completely prevented the formation of 5-hydroxytryptophan. As well as showing that the enzyme tryptophanhydroxylase is only present in cells containing 5-hydroxytryptamine, these experiments demonstrate the possibility of studying the metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine in characterized neurones. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4271756

  11. Tryptophan exposure and accessibility in the chitooligosaccharide-specific phloem exudate lectin from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). A fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Swamy, Musti J

    2009-10-06

    The exposure and accessibility of the tryptophan residues in the chitooligosaccharide-specific pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin (PPL) have been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission lambda(max) of native PPL, seen at 338nm was red-shifted to 348nm upon denaturation by 6M Gdn.HCl in the presence of 10mM beta-mercaptoethanol, indicating near complete exposure of the tryptophan residues to the aqueous medium, whereas a blue-shift to 335nm was observed in the presence of saturating concentrations of chitotriose, suggesting that ligand binding leads to a decrease in the solvent exposure of the tryptophan residues. The extent of quenching was maximum with the neutral molecule, acrylamide whereas the ionic species, iodide and Cs(+) led to significantly lower quenching, which could be attributed to the presence of charged amino acid residues in close proximity to some of the tryptophan residues. The Stern-Volmer plot for acrylamide was linear for native PPL and upon ligand binding, but became upward curving upon denaturation, indicating that the quenching occurs via a combination of static and dynamic mechanisms. In time-resolved fluorescence experiments, the decay curves could be best fit to biexponential patterns, for native protein, in the presence of ligand and upon denaturation. In each case both lifetimes systematically decreased with increasing acrylamide concentrations, indicating that quenching occurs predominantly via a dynamic process.

  12. Reorientation of the helix of the tryptophan-rich gp41W peptide from HIV-1 at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Gladys; Benichou, Emmanuel; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Harfouch, Yara El; Brevet, Pierre-François; Besson, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp41 from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has an amino acid sequence enriched in tryptophan residues, the so-called gp41W peptide (i.e., KWASLWNWFNITNWLWYIK) and plays a crucial role in HIV-1 host cell infection. Using the coupling of Second Harmonic Generation targeting the tryptophan residues with lateral surface tension measurements, we investigate the interaction of gp41W with a neat air/water and a lipid/water interfaces. At the air/water interface, gp41W presents a well-defined orientation and this orientation is strongly modified at the lipid/water interface, depending on the surface pressure. These results show that this strategy is well suited to monitor tryptophan containing α-helices orientation at lipid/water interfaces.

  13. Correlation of tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay parameters with sup 1 H NMR-determined rotamer conformations: (tryptophan sup 2 )oxytocin

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.B.A.; Schwartz, G.P.; Laws, W.R. ); Wyssbrod, H.R.; Porter, R.A. ); Michaels, C.A. )

    1992-02-18

    While the fluorescence decay kinetics of tyrosine model compounds can be explained in terms of heterogeneity derived from the three ground-state {chi}{sup 1} rotamers, a similar correlation has yet to be directly observed for a tryptophan residue. In addition, the asymmetric indole ring might also lead to heterogeneity from {chi}{sup 2} rotations. In this paper, the time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence properties of (tryptophan{sup 2})oxytocin at pH 3 are presented and compared with {sup 1}H NMR results. According to the unrestricted analyses of individual fluorescence decay curves taken as a function of emission wavelength-independent decay constants, only three exponential terms are required. In addition, the preexponential weighting factors (amplitudes) have the same relative relationship (weights) as the {sup 1}H NMR-determined {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations of the indole side chain. {sup 15}N was used in heteronuclear coupling experiments to confirm the rotamer assignments. Inclusion of a linked function restricting the decay amplitudes to the {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations in the individual decay curve analyses and in the global analysis confirms this correlation. According to qualitative nuclear Overhauser data, there are two {chi}{sup 2} populations.

  14. Fluorescence-based characterization of non-fluorescent transient states of tryptophan – prospects for protein conformation and interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Hevekerl, Heike; Tornmalm, Johan; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence is extensively used for label-free protein characterization. Here, we show that by analyzing how the average tryptophan fluorescence intensity varies with excitation modulation, kinetics of tryptophan dark transient states can be determined in a simple, robust and reliable manner. Thereby, highly environment-, protein conformation- and interaction-sensitive information can be recorded, inaccessible via traditional protein fluorescence readouts. For verification, tryptophan transient state kinetics were determined under different environmental conditions, and compared to literature data. Conformational changes in a spider silk protein were monitored via the triplet state kinetics of its tryptophan residues, reflecting their exposure to an air-saturated aqueous solution. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence anti-bunching was discovered, reflecting local pH and buffer conditions, previously observed only by ultrasensitive measurements in highly fluorescent photo-acids. Taken together, the presented approach, broadly applicable under biologically relevant conditions, has the potential to become a standard biophysical approach for protein conformation, interaction and microenvironment studies. PMID:27748381

  15. L-tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride.

    PubMed

    Ghazaryan, V V; Fleck, M; Petrosyan, A M

    2015-02-05

    L-tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride is a new salt with (A⋯A(+)) type dimeric cation. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group P2(1), Z=2). The asymmetric unit contains one zwitterionic L-tryptophan molecule, one L-tryptophanium cation and one chloride anion. The dimeric cation is formed by a O-H⋯O hydrogen bond with the O⋯O distance equal to 2.5556(18) Å. The infrared and Raman spectra of the crystal are studied and compared with the spectra of L-tryptophanium chloride. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tyrosine fluorescence probing of conformational changes in tryptophan-lacking domain of albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanova, N. G.; Maksimov, E. G.; Arutyunyan, A. M.; Fadeev, V. V.; Shirshin, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    We addressed the possibility of using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence for monitoring conformational changes of proteins which are undetectable via tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence. The model objects, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, contain one and two Trp residues, respectively, while Tyr is more uniformly distributed over their structure. The results of the investigation of albumins interaction with ethanol using intrinsic Trp and Tyr steady-state and time-resolved picosecond fluorescence indicated the presence of an intermediate at 10% (v/v) of ethanol in solution, that was supported by the results of extrinsic fluorescence measurements with the Nile Red dye. Based on the comparison of HSA and BSA Trp and Tyr fluorescence, it was suggested that conformational changes at low ethanol concentration are located in the domain III of albumins, which lacks tryptophan residues. The sensitivity of Tyr fluorescence to domain III alterations was further verified by studying albumins interaction with GdnHCl.

  17. Tyrosine fluorescence probing of conformational changes in tryptophan-lacking domain of albumins.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, N G; Maksimov, E G; Arutyunyan, A M; Fadeev, V V; Shirshin, E A

    2017-03-05

    We addressed the possibility of using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence for monitoring conformational changes of proteins which are undetectable via tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence. The model objects, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, contain one and two Trp residues, respectively, while Tyr is more uniformly distributed over their structure. The results of the investigation of albumins interaction with ethanol using intrinsic Trp and Tyr steady-state and time-resolved picosecond fluorescence indicated the presence of an intermediate at 10% (v/v) of ethanol in solution, that was supported by the results of extrinsic fluorescence measurements with the Nile Red dye. Based on the comparison of HSA and BSA Trp and Tyr fluorescence, it was suggested that conformational changes at low ethanol concentration are located in the domain III of albumins, which lacks tryptophan residues. The sensitivity of Tyr fluorescence to domain III alterations was further verified by studying albumins interaction with GdnHCl.

  18. Relation between proteins tertiary structure, tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes and tryptophan S(o)→(1)L(b) and S(o)→(1)L(a) transitions. Studies on α1-acid glycoprotein and β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad René

    2011-05-01

    We measured fluorescence lifetimes and fluorescence spectra (excitation and emission) of tryptophan residues of α(1)-acid glycoprotein (three Trp residues) and β-lactoglobulin (two Trp residues) in absence and presence of 450 μM progesterone. Progesterone binds only to α(1)-acid glycoprotein. In absence of progesterone, each of the two proteins displays three fluorescence lifetimes. Addition of progesterone induces a partial inhibition of the S(o) → (1)L(a) transition without affecting fluorescence lifetimes. The same experiments performed in presence of denatured proteins in 6 M guanidine show that addition of progesterone inhibits partially the S(o) → (1)L(a) transition and its peak is 15 nm shifted to the red compared to that obtained for native proteins. However, the S(o) → (1)L(b) transition position peak is not affected by protein denaturation. Thus, the tertiary structure of the protein plays an important role by modulating the tryptophan electronic transitions. Fluorescence emission decay recorded in absence and presence of progesterone yields three fluorescence lifetimes whether proteins are denatured or not. Thus, protein tertiary structure is not responsible for the presence of three fluorescence lifetimes. These characterize tryptophan substructures reached at the excited states and which population (pre-exponential values) depend on the tryptophan residues interaction with their microenvironment(s) and thus on the global conformation of the protein.

  19. The roles of tryptophans in primer synthesis by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huidong; Lee, Seung-Joo; Richardson, Charles C

    2012-07-06

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Prokaryotic primases consist of a zinc-binding domain (ZBD) necessary for recognition of a specific template sequence and a catalytic RNA polymerase domain. Interactions of both domains with the DNA template and ribonucleotides are required for primer synthesis. Five tryptophan residues are dispersed in the primase of bacteriophage T7: Trp-42 in the ZBD and Trp-69, -97, -147, and -255 in the RNA polymerase domain. Previous studies showed that replacement of Trp-42 with alanine in the ZBD decreases primer synthesis, whereas substitution of non-aromatic residues for Trp-69 impairs both primer synthesis and delivery. However, the roles of tryptophan at position 97, 147, or 255 remain elusive. To investigate the essential roles of these residues, we replaced each tryptophan with the structurally similar tyrosine and examined the effect of this subtle alteration on primer synthesis. The substitution at position 42, 97, or 147 reduced primer synthesis, whereas substitution at position 69 or 255 did not. The functions of the tryptophans were further examined at each step of primer synthesis. Alteration of residue 42 disturbed the conformation of the ZBD and resulted in partial loss of the zinc ion, impairing binding to the ssDNA template. Replacement of Trp-97 with tyrosine reduced the binding affinity to NTP and the catalysis step. The replacement of Trp-147 with tyrosine also impaired the catalytic step. Therefore, Trp-42 is important in maintaining the conformation of the ZBD for template binding; Trp-97 contributes to NTP binding and the catalysis step; and Trp-147 maintains the catalysis step.

  20. T4 phage lysozyme: a protein designed for understanding tryptophan photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Bruce S.; Harris, Dan

    1990-05-01

    Bacteriophage T4 lysozyme in its wild type form contains three tryptophan residues (at sequence postions 126, 138 and 158). These three residues are in rather different environments in the protein: 126 and 158 are near the protein surface while residue 138 is more buried. T4 lysozyme has been genetically engineered to prepare all possible variants in which one or more of the tryptophan residues have been replaced by tyrosine. The available data supports the hypothesis that this substitution has, at most, a very minor effect on the structure of the protein. The three species with single tryptophan residues have been investigated in detail. The surface location of residue 126 compared to the buried location of residue 138 is reflected in the difference in collisional quenching observed with added potassium iodide. It is found that the spectral and radiative properties of the three proteins are very similar but that their radiationless decay properties are quite distinct. This is apparently due to short-range collisional quenching by neighboring side chains. Comparison with solution quenching measurements permits the identification of the specific quenching groups involved for each tryptophan residue and provides a semi-quantitative rationale for the radiationless decay rate. This collisional quenching interpretation is supported by mutational effects on fluorescence quantum yield. This simple picture of the behavior of these single-tryptophan proteins is clearly revealed in this particular case because of the unambiguous choice of collisional quenching groups. The time dependence of the fluorescence decay of each of these single-tryptophan proteins is quite complex. Several methods of analysis are presented and discussed in terms of their underlying physical basis. Internal collisional quenching, as suggested from the comparative studies, is expected to lead to non-exponential behavior. This is consistent with the observed time dependence. Analysis of the temporal

  1. Tyrosine and tryptophan act through the same binding site at the dimer interface of yeast chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Schnappauf, G; Krappmann, S; Braus, G H

    1998-07-03

    Tyrosine and tryptophan are the regulators of the dimeric yeast chorismate mutase. Biochemical studies reveal two binding sites per molecule for both effectors, tyrosine or tryptophan. A single binding site is built up by helix 8 and helices 4 and 5 of two different subunits. The binding sites have been analyzed in the active enzyme by site directed mutagenesis of critical codons of the coding gene, ARO7. Gly-141 and Ser-142, which both reside on helix 8, are involved in the binding of tyrosine or tryptophan presumably by interacting specifically with the amino- and carboxylate-groups of these amino acid effectors. Interaction with Thr-145 of helix 8 is required for a strong tyrosine binding to the allosteric site. Replacement of Arg-75, which connects helices 4 and 5 or of Arg-76, which is part of helix 5 by alanine residues, resulted in unregulated enzymes. These two residues are bonded to the carboxylate group and phenolic hydroxyl group of tyrosine, respectively, but do not interact with tryptophan by hydrogen bonding in the crystal structures. Phenylalanine, which has low binding affinity slightly activated the chorismate mutase. A T145V mutant chorismate mutase, however, showed increased activation by phenylalanine. Our results support a mechanism by which tyrosine contracts the allosteric site by interacting with its phenolic hydroxyl group. Tryptophan works in an inverse way by opening the allosteric site through the steric size of its side chain.

  2. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  3. Modulation of organic interfacial spin polarization by interfacial angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Guang-ping; Ren, Jun-feng; Wang, Chuan-kui; Hu, Gui-chao

    2017-01-01

    Based on ab initio theory, we theoretically investigated the interfacial spin polarization by adsorbing a benzene-dithiolate molecule onto a nickel surface with different interfacial angles. A variable magnitude and even an inversion of the interfacial spin polarization are observed with the increase of the interfacial angle. The orbital analysis shows that the interfacial spin polarization is codetermined by two kinds of orbital hybridization between the molecule and the ferromagnet, the pz-d hybridization and the sp3-d hybridization, which show different dependence on the angle. These results indicate a new way to manipulate the spin polarization at organic spinterface.

  4. Improving therapeutics in anorexia nervosa with tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2017-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that our diet is an important contributing factor in the development, management and prevention of a number of psychiatric illnesses. Tryptophan, an essential amino acid, is the sole precursor of neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin). Administration of tryptophan can boost serotonin neurotransmission to produce therapeutically important effects in serotonin deficiency disorders. Anorexia nervosa (AN) an eating disorder associated with high levels of psychiatric comorbidity including psychosis, hyperactivity, depression and anxiety has highest lethality of all psychiatric illnesses. Evidence suggests that excessive dieting and food restriction can decrease brain tryptophan and serotonin in AN patients to precipitate depression, psychosis and hyperactivity. There are currently no FDA approved pharmacological treatments available for AN patients; antidepressants and antipsychotics, largely used to treat associated psychiatric comorbidities are also not very effective. The aim of this non-systematic review article is to evaluate and document a potential importance of tryptophan supplementation in improving therapeutics in AN patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 21 CFR 582.5915 - Tryptophane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tryptophane. 582.5915 Section 582.5915 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5915 - Tryptophane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tryptophane. 582.5915 Section 582.5915 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. No effect of oral L-tryptophan or alpha-lactalbumin on total tryptophan levels in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Dowlati, Yekta; Ravindran, Arun V; Maheux, Maxim; Steiner, Meir; Stewart, Donna E; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2015-06-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbearing with a 13% prevalence rate. Sleep disturbances are also common, particularly during early postpartum. In theory, l-tryptophan could improve sleep and reduce depressed mood in early postpartum; however, the first step in clinical development of tryptophan for use in postpartum is to measure the effect of oral l-tryptophan on its concentrations in breast milk, which is presently unknown. The aims were to investigate the effect of oral l-tryptophan and alpha-lactalbumin, a protein with high tryptophan concentration, on total and free tryptophan levels in breast milk and plasma, and to compare free tryptophan levels in breast milk with those in common infant formulas. Thirty healthy breastfeeding women were randomly allocated to receive 2g or 4g of l-tryptophan, or, 20g or 40g of alpha-lactalbumin or no supplement. Free tryptophan levels were also measured in 12 different infant formulas. Total tryptophan in breast milk was unaffected by oral administration of l-tryptophan or alpha-lactalbumin (repeated measures of ANOVA (rANOVA), group effect: p=0.93). Both l-tryptophan and alpha-lactalbumin were associated with greater free tryptophan levels in breast milk (rANOVA, group effect: p<0.001) (representing 2% of total tryptophan), but these concentrations were within the range of commonly used infant formulas. In contrast to most sleep inducing medications, l-tryptophan does not affect its total concentration in breast milk. These results support further investigation of dietary l-tryptophan and alpha-lactalbumin as part of a dietary supplementation approach to address sleep disturbances in postpartum and reduce risk of PPD.

  8. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  9. The Effects of Dietary Tryptophan on Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lindseth, Glenda; Helland, Brian; Caspers, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Using a randomized crossover study design, 25 healthy young adults were examined for differences in anxiety, depression, and mood after consuming a high tryptophan and a low tryptophan diet for four days each. There was a two week washout between the diets. A within-subjects analysis of the participants’ mood indicated significantly (p < .01) more positive affect scores after consuming a high tryptophan diet as compared to a low tryptophan diet. Negative affect differences between the diets were not statistically significant (p > .05). Also, consuming more dietary tryptophan resulted in (p < .05) less depressive symptoms and decreased anxiety. PMID:25858202

  10. Tryptophan and Non-Tryptophan Fluorescence of the Eye Lens Proteins Provides Diagnostics of Cataract at the Molecular Level

    PubMed Central

    Gakamsky, Anna; Duncan, Rory R.; Howarth, Nicola M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Buttenschön, Kim K.; Daly, Daniel J.; Gakamsky, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    The chemical nature of the non-tryptophan (non-Trp) fluorescence of porcine and human eye lens proteins was identified by Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Fluorescence Steady-State and Lifetime spectroscopy as post-translational modifications (PTM) of Trp and Arg amino acid residues. Fluorescence intensity profiles measured along the optical axis of human eye lenses with age-related nuclear cataract showed increasing concentration of fluorescent PTM towards the lens centre in accord with the increased optical density in the lens nucleolus. Significant differences between fluorescence lifetimes of “free” Trp derivatives hydroxytryptophan (OH-Trp), N-formylkynurenine (NFK), kynurenine (Kyn), hydroxykynurenine (OH-Kyn) and their residues were observed. Notably, the lifetime constants of these residues in a model peptide were considerably greater than those of their “free” counterparts. Fluorescence of Trp, its derivatives and argpyrimidine (ArgP) can be excited at the red edge of the Trp absorption band which allows normalisation of the emission spectra of these PTMs to the fluorescence intensity of Trp, to determine semi-quantitatively their concentration. We show that the cumulative fraction of OH-Trp, NFK and ArgP emission dominates the total fluorescence spectrum in both emulsified post-surgical human cataract protein samples, as well as in whole lenses and that this correlates strongly with cataract grade and age. PMID:28071717

  11. Tryptophan as a link between psychopathology and somatic states.

    PubMed

    Russo, Sascha; Kema, Ido P; Fokkema, M Rebecca; Boon, Jim C; Willemse, Pax H B; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; den Boer, Johannes A; Korf, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Several somatic illnesses are associated with psychiatric comorbidity. Evidence is provided that availability of the essential amino acid tryptophan, which is the precursor of serotonin, may cause this phenomenon. We performed a database search to find relevant articles published between 1966 and 2002. For our search strategy, we combined several diseases from the categories hormonal, gastrointestinal, and inflammatory with the search terms "tryptophan" and "serotonin." The catabolism of tryptophan is stimulated under the influence of stress, hormones and inflammation by the induction of the enzymes tryptophan pyrrolase (in the liver) and IDO (ubiquitous). Because of the reduction in blood levels of tryptophan under these circumstances the formation of cerebral serotonin is decreased. It is argued that the coupling of peripheral tryptophan levels and cerebral serotonin levels has physiological significance. The clinical implications and therapeutic consequences of changes in tryptophan and consequently serotonin metabolism are discussed.

  12. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  13. Tryptophan-induced eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Criswell, L. A.; Sack, K. E.

    1990-01-01

    Eight patients who became ill while taking tryptophan had myalgia, fatigue, rash, fever, edema, alopecia, arthralgias, diminished joint motion, skin tightening, muscle cramping, and distal paresthesias. Three had shortness of breath, and one had pulmonary hypertension. Laboratory abnormalities included peripheral eosinophilia, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and elevated serum levels of aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase, and liver enzymes. Of 4 chest radiographs, 3 were abnormal. Of 5 skin and muscle biopsies, 4 showed sclerosis or mixed inflammatory cell infiltration of the dermis, subcutis, and fascia. Eosinophils were often present, but vasculitis was absent. Muscle inflammation was minimal. We conclude that the "eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome" is related to the ingestion of tryptophan and that abnormalities in the secretion of lymphokines may be important in its pathogenesis. PMID:2219890

  14. Resolution of the fluorescence equilibrium unfolding profile of trp aporepressor using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Royer, C. A.; Mann, C. J.; Matthews, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    Single tryptophan mutants of the trp aporepressor, tryptophan 19-->phenylalanine (W19F) and tryptophan 99-->phenylalanine (W99F), were used in this study to resolve the individual steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence urea unfolding profiles of the two tryptophan residues in this highly intertwined, dimeric protein. The wild-type protein exhibits a large increase in fluorescence intensity and lifetime, as well as a large red shift in the steady-state fluorescence emission spectrum, upon unfolding by urea (Lane, A.N. & Jardetsky, O., 1987, Eur. J. Biochem. 164, 389-396; Gittelman, M.S. & Matthews, C.R., 1990, Biochemistry 29, 7011-7020; Fernando, T. & Royer, C.A., 1992, Biochemistry 31, 6683-6691). Unfolding of the W19F mutant demonstrated that Trp 99 undergoes a large increase in intensity and a red shift upon exposure to solvent. Lifetime studies revealed that the contribution of the dominant 0.5-ns component of this tryptophan tends toward zero with increasing urea, whereas the longer lifetime components increase in importance. This lifting of the quenching of Trp 99 may be due to disruption of the interaction between the two subunits upon denaturation, which abolishes the interaction of Trp 99 on one subunit with the amide quenching group of Asn 32 on the other subunit (Royer, C.A., 1992, Biophys. J. 63, 741-750). On the other hand, Trp 19 is quenched in response to unfolding in the W99F mutant. Exposure to solvent of Trp 19, which is buried at the hydrophobic dimer interface in the native protein, results in a large red shift of the average steady-state emission.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8268795

  15. Characterization of the degradation products of a color-changed monoclonal antibody: tryptophan-derived chromophores.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Polozova, Alla; Gruia, Flaviu; Feng, Jinhua

    2014-07-15

    We describe the characterization of degradation products responsible for color change in near UV-visible light-irradiated and heat-stressed monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug product in liquid formulation. The treated samples were characterized using reversed-phase HPLC and size-exclusion HPLC with absorption spectroscopy. Both methods showed color change was due to chromophores formed on the mAb but not associated with the formulation excipients in both light-irradiated and heat-stressed mAb samples. These chromophores were further located by a new peptide mapping methodology with a combination of mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Mass spectrometry identified the major tryptophan oxidation products as kynurenine (Kyn), N-formylkynurenine (NFK), and hydroxytryptophan (OH-Trp). The absorption spectra showed that each of the tryptophan oxidation products exhibited a distinct absorption band above 280 nm shifted to the longer wavelengths in the order of OH-Trp < NFK < Kyn. The Kyn-containing peptide was detected by absorption at 420 nm. No new absorption bands were observed for either methionine or histidine oxidation products. This confirmed that tryptophan oxidation products, but not methionine and histidine oxidation products, were responsible for the color change. It is worth noting that a new oxidation product with the loss of hydrogen (2 Da mass decrease) for Trp-107 of the heavy chain was identified in the heat-stressed mAb sample. This oxidized tryptophan residue exhibited a distinct absorption band at the maximum absorbance wavelength 335 nm, which is responsible for the color change to yellow. This study showed that the new peptide mapping methodology with a combination of mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy is useful to identify tryptophan oxidation products as chromophores responsible for color change in stressed mAb drug product.

  16. L-Tryptophan, Sleep, and Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-10

    official recognition of the fact that psychopharmacological aids, in that case the benzodiazepine temazepam, could be used successfully in an operational...before effects on sleep latency were evident. These findings are consistent with several other reports (Moldofsky and Lue 1980; Nedopil and Brandl 1980... Brandl , A. Acute effects of 1-tryptophan and oxprenolol on the sleep on chronic hyposomnic patients (a double-blind study). Fifth Congress European

  17. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  18. Some Characteristics of Tryptophan Uptake in Claviceps species

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Larry W.; Robbers, James E.; Floss, Heinz G.

    1973-01-01

    Tryptophan serves as a precursor for the biosynthesis of alkaloids in the ergot fungus, Claviceps purpurea (Fries) Tulasne, and also is believed to act as an inducer of the enzymes necessary for alkaloid production. The characteristics of the transport system responsible for the accumulation of tryptophan in ergot mycelium were investigated, with the goal of clarifying the complex relationships among tryptophan uptake, size of the free intracellular pool of tryptophan, and alkaloid production. The characteristics of tryptophan uptake were studied by pulse feeding radioactively labeled tryptophan to cultures of Claviceps species, strain SD-58, which represented a variety of ages and nutritional states. Tryptophan accumulation in strain SD-58 is mediated by an energy-requiring system which exhibits specificity for neutral aromatic and aliphatic l-amino acids, is pH and temperature dependent, and shows saturation at high substrate concentrations. Tryptophan transport is a function of the intracellular concentration of free tryptophan, the nitrogen deficiency of the mycelium, the rate of growth, and alkaloid production, which were measured in Claviceps strain SD-58 growth in several culture media, some of which promoted alkaloid production and some of which did not. The results indicate that the initial velocity of tryptophan transport is not directly related to alkaloid production. PMID:4698208

  19. Tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in ferrous myoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Monni, Roberto; Al Haddad, André; van Mourik, Frank; Auböck, Gerald; Chergui, Majed

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that in ferric myoglobins (Mb) the fluorescence quenching of the photoexcited tryptophan 14 (*Trp14) residue is in part due to an electron transfer to the heme porphyrin (porph), turning it to the ferrous state. However, the invariance of *Trp decay times in ferric and ferrous Mbs raises the question as to whether electron transfer may also be operative in the latter. Using UV pump/visible probe transient absorption, we show that this is indeed the case for deoxy-Mb. We observe that the reduction generates (with a yield of about 30%) a low-valence Fe–porphyrin π [FeII(porph●−)] -anion radical, which we observe for the first time to our knowledge under physiological conditions. We suggest that the pathway for the electron transfer proceeds via the leucine 69 (Leu69) and valine 68 (Val68) residues. The results on ferric Mbs and the present ones highlight the generality of Trp–porphyrin electron transfer in heme proteins. PMID:25902517

  20. Tyrosine- and tryptophan-coated gold nanoparticles inhibit amyloid aggregation of insulin.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Kriti; Anand, Bibin G; Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh; Navya, P N; Daima, Hemant Kumar; Kar, Karunakar

    2015-12-01

    Here, we have strategically synthesized stable gold (AuNPs(Tyr), AuNPs(Trp)) and silver (AgNPs(Tyr)) nanoparticles which are surface functionalized with either tyrosine or tryptophan residues and have examined their potential to inhibit amyloid aggregation of insulin. Inhibition of both spontaneous and seed-induced aggregation of insulin was observed in the presence of AuNPs(Tyr), AgNPs(Tyr), and AuNPs(Trp) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles also triggered the disassembly of insulin amyloid fibrils. Surface functionalization of amino acids appears to be important for the inhibition effect since isolated tryptophan and tyrosine molecules did not prevent insulin aggregation. Bioinformatics analysis predicts involvement of tyrosine in H-bonding interactions mediated by its C=O, -NH2, and aromatic moiety. These results offer significant opportunities for developing nanoparticle-based therapeutics against diseases related to protein aggregation.

  1. Folding Kinetics of Staphylococcal Nuclease Studied by Tryptophan Engineering and Rapid Mixing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Kosuke; Cheng, Hong; Dolgikh, Dimitry A.; Roder, Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    To monitor the development of tertiary structural contacts during folding, a unique tryptophan residue was introduced at seven partially buried locations (residues 15, 27, 61, 76, 91, 102 and 121) of a tryptophan-free variant of staphylococcal nuclease (P47G/P117G/H124L/W140H). Thermal unfolding measurements by circular dichroism indicate that the variants are destabilized, but maintain the ability to fold into a native-like structure. For the variants with Trp at positions 15, 27 and 61, the intrinsic fluorescence is significantly quenched in the native state due to close contact with polar side chains that act as intramolecular quenchers. All other variants exhibit enhanced fluorescence under native conditions consistent with burial of the tryptophans in an apolar environment. The kinetics of folding was observed by continuous- and stopped-flow fluorescence measurements over refolding times ranging from 100 μs to 10 s. The folding kinetics of all variants is quantitatively described by a mechanism involving a major pathway with a series of intermediate states and a minor parallel channel. The engineered tryptophans in the β-barrel and the N-terminal part of the α-helical domain become partially shielded from the solvent at an early stage (< 1 ms), indicating that this region of the protein undergoes a rapid specific collapse and remains uncoupled from the rest of the α-helical domain until the late stages of folding. For several variants, a major increase in fluorescence coincides with the rate-limiting step of folding on the 100 ms time scale, indicating that these tryptophans reach their buried native environment only during the late stages of folding. Other variants show more complex behavior with a transient increase in fluorescence during the 10 ms phase followed by a decrease during the rate-limiting phase. These observations are consistent with burial of these probes in a collapsed, but loosely packed intermediate, followed by the rate

  2. Interfacial and emulsifying properties of designed β-strand peptides.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Annette F

    2010-12-07

    The structural and surfactant properties of a series of amphipathic β-strand peptides have been studied as a function of pH. Each nine-residue peptide has a framework of hydrophobic proline and phenylalanine amino acid residues, alternating with acidic or basic amino acids to give a sequence closely related to known β-sheet formers. Surface activity, interfacial mechanical properties, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), droplet sizing and zeta potential measurements were used to gain an overview of the peptide behavior as the molecular charge varied from ±4 to 0 with pH. ECD data suggest that the peptides form polyproline-type helices in bulk aqueous solution when highly charged, but may fold to β-hairpins rather than β-sheets when uncharged. In the uncharged state, the peptides adsorb readily at a macroscopic fluid interface to form mechanically strong interfacial films, but tend to give large droplet sizes on emulsification, apparently due to flocculation at a low droplet zeta potential. In contrast, highly charged peptide states gave a low interfacial coverage, but retained good emulsifying activity as judged by droplet size. Best emulsification was generally seen for intermediate charged states of the peptides, possibly representing a compromise between droplet zeta potential and interfacial binding affinity. The emulsifying properties of β-strand peptides have not been previously reported. Understanding the interfacial properties of such peptides is important to their potential development as biosurfactants.

  3. Enhancement of L-tryptophan 5-hydroxylation activity by structure-based modification of L-phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase from Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Kino, Kuniki; Hara, Ryotaro; Nozawa, Ai

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance l-tryptophan hydroxylation activity of l-phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase. It had been known that l-phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase from Chromobacterium violaceum could convert l-tryptophan to 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan and l-phenylalanine to l-tyrosine; however, the activity for l-tryptophan was extremely low compared to l-phenylalanine activity levels. We used the information on the crystal structures of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases to generate C. violaceuml-phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase with high l-tryptophan hydroxylating activity. In silico structural modeling analysis suggested that hydrophobic and/or stacking interactions with the substrate and cofactor at L101 and W180 in C. violaceuml-phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase would increase hydroxylation activity. Based on this hypothesis, we introduced a saturation mutagenesis towards these sites followed by the evaluation of 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan productivity using a modified Gibbs assay. Three and nine positive mutants were obtained from the L101 and W180 mutant libraries, respectively. Among the mutants, L101Y and W180F showed the highest l-tryptophan hydroxylation activity at the respective residues. Steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that k(cat) values for l-tryptophan hydroxylation were increased from 0.40 (wild-type) to 1.02 (L101Y) and 0.51 s(-1) (W180F). In addition, the double mutant (L101Y-W180F) displayed higher l-tryptophan hydroxylation activity than the wild-type and the W180F and L101Y mutants. The k(cat) value of L101Y-W180F increased to 2.08 s(-1), showing a 5.2-fold increase compared to wild-type enzyme levels.

  4. Tryptic digestion of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter: effects on ligand binding and tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    May, J M; Qu, Z C; Beechem, J M

    1993-09-21

    The conformation of the human erythrocyte glucose transport protein has been shown to determine its susceptibility to enzymatic cleavage on a large cytoplasmic loop. We took the converse approach and investigated the effects of tryptic digestion on the conformational structure of this protein. Exhaustive tryptic digestion of protein-depleted erythrocyte ghosts decreased the affinity of the residual transporter for cytochalasin B by 3-fold but did not affect the total number of binding sites. Tryptic digestion also increased the affinity of the residual transporter for D-glucose and inward-binding sugar phenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside but decreased that for the outward-binding 4,6-O-ethylidene glucose. These results suggest that tryptic cleavage stabilized the remaining transporter in an inward-facing conformation, but one with decreased affinity for cytochalasin B. The steady-state fluorescence emission scan of the purified reconstituted glucose transport protein was unaffected by tryptic digestion. Addition of increasing concentrations of potassium iodide resulted in linear Stern-Volmer plots, which were also unaffected by prior tryptic digestion. The tryptophan oxidant N-bromosuccinimide was investigated to provide a more sensitive measure of tryptophan environment. This agent irreversibly inhibited 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact erythrocytes and cytochalasin B binding in protein-depleted ghosts, with a half-maximal effect observed for each activity at about 0.3-0.4 nM. Treatment of purified glucose transport protein with N-bromosuccinimide resulted in a time-dependent quench of tryptophan fluorescence, which was resolved into two components by nonlinear regression using global analysis. Tryptic digestion retarded the rate of oxidation of the more slowly reacting class of tryptophans. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Correlation between tryptophan and hair pigmentation in human hair.

    PubMed

    Biasiolo, M; Bertazzo, A; Costa, C V; Allegri, G

    1999-01-01

    The concentration of tryptophan in human hair of various colours is determined in order to study their correlation with hair pigmentation. The mean levels of this amino acid in hair samples are higher in men than in women. Therefore, sex influences the content of tryptophan in human hair. In addition, age influences the distribution, the highest levels are observed in the 1-5 year age-group and in ageing subjects in the groups up to 61-80 years in both sexes. The hair samples subdivided, according the colour, into blond, dark blond, red, light brown, brown, black, grey, and white demonstrate that in both sexes the concentrations of tryptophan are higher in brown and black hair than in blond hair. However, the tryptophan levels are highest in grey and white hair, showing that tryptophan accumulates among hair fibres with age. Therefore, there is a correlation between tryptophan content and hair pigmentation.

  6. Dietary tryptophan intake and suicide rate in industrialized nations.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin; Tran, Ulrich S

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the ecological association of dietary tryptophan intake and suicide rates across industrialized nations. Tryptophan, an essential amino acid, is the rate-limiting precursor of serotonin biosynthesis. The serotonergic system has been strongly implicated in the neurobiology of suicide. Contemporary male and female suicide rates for the general population (42 countries) and the elderly (38 countries) were correlated with national estimates of dietary tryptophan intake. Measures of tryptophan intake were significantly negatively associated to national suicide rates. Controlling for national affluence, total alcohol consumption and happiness levels slightly attenuated these associations, but left all of them negative. The effect is an ecological (group-level) finding. Estimated per capita tryptophan supply is only a proxy for actual consumption. Developed nations ranking high in dietary tryptophan intake rank low in suicide rates, independent of national wealth, alcohol intake and happiness.

  7. Tryptophan and kynurenine determination in human hair by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dario, Michelli F; Freire, Thamires Batello; Pinto, Claudinéia Aparecida Sales de Oliveira; Prado, María Segunda Aurora; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2017-09-18

    Tryptophan, an amino acid found in hair proteinaceous structure is used as a marker of hair photodegradation. Also, protein loss caused by several chemical/physical treatments can be inferred by tryptophan quantification. Kynurenine is a photo-oxidation product of tryptophan, expected to be detected when hair is exposed mainly to UVB (290-320nm) radiation range. Tryptophan from hair is usually quantified directly as a solid or after alkaline hydrolysis, spectrofluorimetrically. However, these types of measure are not sufficiently specific and present several interfering substances. Thus, this work aimed to propose a quantification method for both tryptophan and kynurenine in hair samples, after alkali hydrolysis process, by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric and UV detection. The tryptophan and kynurenine quantification method was developed and validated. Black, white, bleached and dyed (blond and auburn) hair tresses were used in this study. Tryptophan and kynurenine were separated within ∼9min by HPLC. Both black and white virgin hair samples presented similar concentrations of tryptophan, while bleaching caused a reduction in the tryptophan content as well as dyeing process. Unexpectedly, UV/vis radiation did not promote significantly the conversion of tryptophan into its photo-oxidation product and consequently, kynurenine was not detected. Thus, this works presented an acceptable method for quantification of tryptophan and its photooxidation metabolite kynurenine in hair samples. Also, the results indicated that bleaching and dyeing processes promoted protein/amino acids loss but tryptophan is not extensively degraded in human hair by solar radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  9. Plasma L-Tryptophan Levels, Subjective Sleepiness and Daytime Sleep.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    hydroxylase enzyme at the first step in the serotonin synthetic pathway is not saturated (Friedman et al, 1972). The availability of the amino acid...changes in rats after parachloro- phenylalanine (PCPA). Wyatt’s work (Wyatt et al, 1970) showing 1-tryptophan effects on sleep in subjects pretreated with...tryptophan hydroxylase in midbrain of the rat. Science 166: 1274-76. Brezinova, V., Loudon, J., and Oswald, I. 1972. Tryptophan and sleep. Lancet 2: 1086-87

  10. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  11. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  12. Tryptophan Metabolism and White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Postolache, Teodor T; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Shukla, Dinesh K; Tagamets, Malle; Du, Xiaoming; Savransky, Anya; Lowry, Christopher A; Can, Adem; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities in the structure and functioning of white matter, but the underlying neuropathology is unclear. We hypothesized that increased tryptophan degradation in the kynurenine pathway could be associated with white matter microstructure and biochemistry, potentially contributing to white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. To test this, fasting plasma samples were obtained from 37 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls and levels of total tryptophan and its metabolite kynurenine were assessed. The ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan was used as an index of tryptophan catabolic activity in this pathway. White matter structure and function were assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Tryptophan levels were significantly lower (p<0.001), and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios were correspondingly higher (p=0.018) in patients compared with controls. In patients, lower plasma tryptophan levels corresponded to lower structural integrity (DTI fractional anisotropy) (r=0.347, p=0.038). In both patients and controls, the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio was inversely correlated with frontal white matter glutamate level (r=-0.391 and -0.350 respectively, p=0.024 and 0.036). These results provide initial evidence implicating abnormal tryptophan/kynurenine pathway activity in changes to white matter integrity and white matter glutamate in schizophrenia.

  13. Reaction of singlet oxygen with tryptophan in proteins: a pronounced effect of the local environment on the reaction rate.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Rasmus Lybech; Arnbjerg, Jacob; Ogilby, Peter R

    2012-06-13

    Singlet molecular oxygen, O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)), can influence many processes pertinent to the function of biological systems, including events that result in cell death. Many of these processes involve a reaction between singlet oxygen and a given amino acid in a protein. As a result, the behavior of that protein can change, either because of a structural alteration and/or a direct modification of an active site. Surprisingly, however, little is known about rate constants for reactions between singlet oxygen and amino acids when the latter are in a protein. In this report, we demonstrate using five separate proteins, each containing only a single tryptophan residue, that the rate constant for singlet oxygen reaction with tryptophan depends significantly on the position of this amino acid in the protein. Most importantly, the reaction rate constant depends not only on the accessibility of the tryptophan residue to oxygen, but also on factors that characterize the local molecular environment of the tryptophan in the protein. The fact that the local protein environment can either appreciably inhibit or accelerate the reaction of singlet oxygen with a given amino acid can have significant ramifications for singlet-oxygen-mediated events that perturb cell function.

  14. Assessment of measurement techniques to determine the interfacial properties of bilayer dental ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anunmana, Chuchai

    The clinical success of all-ceramic dental restorations depends on the quality of interfacial bonding between ceramic layers. In addition, the residual stress in the structure that developed during ceramic processing is one of the important factors that contributes to the quality of the bond. Because all-ceramic restorations are usually fabricated as bilayer or trilayer structures and failures of all-ceramic restorations have been frequently reported as chipping or delamination of the veneer layers, the interfacial quality of bilayer dental ceramic restorations was investigated. However, most of the published bond test data reflect strength values that are inversely related to cross-sectional areas and failure locations are frequently disregarded or bond strength values are misinterpreted. In addition, residual tensile stresses that develop in the structures because of thermal expansion/contraction mismatches may also adversely affect interfacial fracture resistance. The first objective of this study was to determine the interfacial toughness of bonded bilayer ceramics using two different approaches. The results indicate that the short-bar chevron-notch test and a controlled-flaw microtensile test can induce interfacial failure that represents true bonding quality. The second objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that residual stresses estimated from an indentation technique are not significantly different from residual stresses that are calculated based on fractography and flexural strength. The indentation technique may be useful as a simplified method to determine residual stresses in bilayer dental ceramics. The results of this study demonstrate that there is no significant difference in mean residual stresses determined from the two techniques. Because of relationship between residual stresses and apparent interfacial toughness, estimates of residual stresses can now be estimated more rapidly by measuring the apparent interfacial toughness of

  15. Formation of Lamellar Pores for Splats via Interfacial or Sub-interfacial Delamination at Chemically Bonded Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2017-02-01

    To comprehensively understand the formation mechanism of lamellar pores in splats, the delamination morphologies and crack patterns of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and lanthanum zirconia splats were examined. Results showed that both types of splats grew epitaxially on well-polished YSZ substrates, evidently confirming the formation of chemical bonding between splats and substrate. However, the interfacial or sub-interfacial delamination was observed in all kinds of splats in this study. Residual vertical cracks passing through delaminated domains (on bare substrate) were also observed, which clearly indicated that transverse delamination followed vertical cracking. Mechanical analysis about delamination was addressed, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  16. Inhibition of rat brain tryptophan metabolism by ethanol withdrawal and possible involvement of the enhanced liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, A A; Punjani, N F; Evans, C M; Evans, M

    1980-01-01

    1. Chronic ethanol administration to rats was previously shown to enhance brain 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis by increasing the availability of circulating tryptophan to the brain secondarily to the NAD(P)H-mediated inhibition of liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity. 2. At 24h after ethanol withdrawal, all the above effects were observed because liver [NAD(P)H] was still increased. By contrast, all aspects of liver and brain tryptophan metabolism were normal at 12 days after withdrawal. 3. At 7--9 days after withdrawal, brain 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis was decreased, as was tryptophan availability to the brain. Liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity at these time-intervals was maximally enhanced. 4. Administration of nicotinamide during the withdrawal phase not only abolished the withdrawal-induced enhancement of tryptophan pyrrolase activity on day 8, but also maintained the inhibition previously caused by ethanol. Under these conditions, the withdrawal-induced decreases in brain 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis and tryptophan availability to the brain were abolished, and both functions were enhanced. Nicotinamide alone exerted similar effects in control rats. 5. It is suggested that ethanol withdrawal inhibits brain 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis by decreasing tryptophan availability to the brain secondarily to the enhanced liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity. 6. The results are discussed in relation to the possible involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine in dependence on ethanol and other drugs. PMID:7195200

  17. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  18. Surface Enhanced Fluorescence of Tryptophan by Silver-Nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    The present study deals with the study of surface enhanced fluorescence of Tryptophan by Silver Nanoparticles. Absorption and fluorescence studies of Tryptophan with and without Ag-nanoparticles are presented here. Homebuilt Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Spectroscopy setup was used for the fluorescence studies. Calibration plots for absorption and fluorescence shows noticeable enhancement in the florescence signal.

  19. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  20. Tryptophan analogues. 1. Synthesis and antihypertensive activity of positional isomers.

    PubMed

    Safdy, M E; Kurchacova, E; Schut, R N; Vidrio, H; Hong, E

    1982-06-01

    A series of tryptophan analogues having the carboxyl function at the beta-position was synthesized and tested for antihypertensive activity. The 5-methoxy analogue 46 exhibited antihypertensive activity in the rat via the oral route and was much more potent than the normal tryptophan analogue. The methyl ester was found to be a critical structural feature for activity.

  1. Time-Resolved Emission Spectra Of Tryptophan And Proteins From Frequency-Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmacineki, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1988-06-01

    We report measurements of time-resolved emission spectra of N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATA), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, residues 1-24), and of S. Nuclease. These spectra were calculated from the frequency-response of the emission, measured at several wavelengths across the emission spectra. Measurements were performed on samples not quenched and quenched by acrylamide, the latter providing additional information on the short time events. The time-resolved center-of-gravity does not decay as a single exponential. At least two spectral relaxation times are needed to account for the present data. NATA and ACTH each display relaxation times near 50 and 800 ps, which may be characteristic of exposed tryptophan residues. S. nuclease displayed slower relaxation times near 0.5 and 10 ns, which probably reflect the dynamic protein matrix which surrounds the residue.

  2. The use of a long-lifetime component of tryptophan to detect slow orientational fluctuations of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Döring, K; Beck, W; Konermann, L; Jähnig, F

    1997-01-01

    The membrane protein porin and a synthetic polypeptide of 21 hydrophobic residues were inserted into detergent micelles or lipid membranes, and the fluorescence of their single tryptophan residue was measured in the time-resolved and polarized mode. In all cases, the tryptophan fluorescence exhibits a long-lifetime component of about 20 ns. This long-lifetime component was exploited to detect slow orientational motions in the range of tens of nanoseconds via the anisotropy decay. For this purpose, the analysis of the anisotropy has to be extended to account for different orientations of the dipoles of the short- and long-lifetime components. This is demonstrated for porin and the polypeptide solubilized in micelles, in which the longest relaxation time reflects the rotational diffusion of the micelle. When the polypeptide is inserted into lipid membranes, it forms a membrane-spanning alpha-helix, and the slowest relaxation process is interpreted as reflecting orientational fluctuations of the helix. PMID:8994617

  3. Tryptophan Metabolism in a Patient with Phenylketonuria and Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Keith N.; Michael, Alfred F.; Good, Robert A.

    1966-01-01

    Phenylketonuria and severe focal scleroderma were observed in a white male child. This is the first instance in which the association of these two rare disorders has been reported. Studies carried out on this patient provide a possible explanation for the abnormalities of indole metabolism in phenylketonuria. On an unrestricted diet, when serum phenylalanine levels were elevated, excessive urinary excretion of indolic tryptophan metabolites was seen 18-24 hours after oral tryptophan loading, and tryptophan was demonstrable in the stool. This was not observed when the serum phenylalanine was within normal limits on a low phenylalanine diet. Impaired intestinal tryptophan absorption secondary to elevated serum phenylalanine, by providing tryptophan substrate for bacterial degradation to indolic compounds which are absorbed and excreted in the urine, may partially explain the abnormalities of indole metabolism in phenylketonuria. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5929533

  4. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  5. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  6. Complete Phenotypic Recovery of an Alzheimer's Disease Model by a Quinone-Tryptophan Hybrid Aggregation Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Pellarin, Riccardo; Convertino, Marino; Frydman-Marom, Anat; Egoz-Matia, Nirit; Peled, Sivan; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Shalev, Deborah E.; Caflisch, Amedeo; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The rational design of amyloid oligomer inhibitors is yet an unmet drug development need. Previous studies have identified the role of tryptophan in amyloid recognition, association and inhibition. Furthermore, tryptophan was ranked as the residue with highest amyloidogenic propensity. Other studies have demonstrated that quinones, specifically anthraquinones, can serve as aggregation inhibitors probably due to the dipole interaction of the quinonic ring with aromatic recognition sites within the amyloidogenic proteins. Here, using in vitro, in vivo and in silico tools we describe the synthesis and functional characterization of a rationally designed inhibitor of the Alzheimer's disease-associated β-amyloid. This compound, 1,4-naphthoquinon-2-yl-L-tryptophan (NQTrp), combines the recognition capacities of both quinone and tryptophan moieties and completely inhibited Aβ oligomerization and fibrillization, as well as the cytotoxic effect of Aβ oligomers towards cultured neuronal cell line. Furthermore, when fed to transgenic Alzheimer's disease Drosophila model it prolonged their life span and completely abolished their defective locomotion. Analysis of the brains of these flies showed a significant reduction in oligomeric species of Aβ while immuno-staining of the 3rd instar larval brains showed a significant reduction in Aβ accumulation. Computational studies, as well as NMR and CD spectroscopy provide mechanistic insight into the activity of the compound which is most likely mediated by clamping of the aromatic recognition interface in the central segment of Aβ. Our results demonstrate that interfering with the aromatic core of amyloidogenic peptides is a promising approach for inhibiting various pathogenic species associated with amyloidogenic diseases. The compound NQTrp can serve as a lead for developing a new class of disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20559435

  7. Relative activities and stabilities of mutant Escherichia coli tryptophan synthase alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W K; Shin, H J; Milton, D L; Hardman, J K

    1991-01-01

    In vitro mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli trpA gene has yielded 66 mutant tryptophan synthase alpha subunits containing single amino acid substitutions at 49 different residue sites and 29 double and triple amino acid substitutions at 16 additional sites, all within the first 121 residues of the protein. The 66 singly altered mutant alpha subunits encoded from overexpression vectors have been examined for their ability to support growth in trpA mutant host strains and for their enzymatic and stability properties in crude extracts. With the exception of mutant alpha subunits altered at catalytic residue sites Glu-49 and Asp-60, all support growth; this includes those (48 of 66) that have no enzymatic defects and those (18 of 66) that do. The majority of the enzymatically defective mutant alpha subunits have decreased capacities for substrate (indole-3-glycerol phosphate) utilization, typical of the early trpA missense mutants isolated by in vivo selection methods. These defects vary in severity from complete loss of activity for mutant alpha subunits altered at residue positions 49 and 60 to those, altered elsewhere, that are partially (up to 40 to 50%) defective. The complete inactivation of the proteins altered at the two catalytic residue sites suggest that, as found via in vitro site-specific mutagenesis of the Salmonella typhimurium tryptophan synthetase alpha subunit, both residues probably also participate in a push-pull general acid-base catalysis of indole-3-glycerol phosphate breakdown for the E. coli enzyme as well. Other classes of mutant alpha subunits include some novel types that are defective in their functional interaction with the other tryptophan synthetase component, the beta 2 subunit. Also among the mutant alpha subunits, 19 were found altered at one or another of the 34 conserved residue sites in this portion of the alpha polypeptide sequence; surprisingly, 10 of these have wild-type enzymatic activity, and 16 of these can satisfy growth

  8. Dose-dependent effects of tryptophan on learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Huma; Mushtaq, Foqia; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2014-09-01

    The concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, Serotonin) varies as a result of physiological changes in the availability of its precursor tryptophan to the serotonergic neurons in the brain. Increase in brain tryptophan occurs following an increase in plasma tryptophan concentration. Tryptophan intake increases brain serotonin metabolism and enhances memory. The Present study was designed to investigate the effects of oral administration of tryptophan (TRP) at different doses (100, 300 and 500mg/kg) for two weeks on learning and memory functions and Neurochemical changes in rats. Control rats were given drinking water. Assessment of memory in rats was done by using the water Maze. on the 14th day trail training of water Maze was given to rats and after 1h of this 2nd trial of these rats were done. On the next day (After 24h of trail) long-term memories of these rats were monitored. After 1 hour of this all rats were killed by decapitation using guillotine. Brain and blood was collected and stored at -70°C. Neurochemical estimations of Plasma and brain tryptophan, 5-HT and 5-HIAA in brain were made by HPLC-EC. Result showed that administration of tryptophan enhanced performance on water Maze test. Tryptophan treated animals exhibited higher level of Plasma as well as brain tryptophan. 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels were also increased in tryptophan treated rats. Findings are discussed in context with the role of 5-HT metabolism in learning and memory process in rats. Results may help to understand the 5-HT changes following long term TRP administration in a dose dependent manner and will help to suggest the use of TRP in serotonin related illnesses.

  9. Probing alpha-helical secondary structure at a specific site in model peptides via restriction of tryptophan side-chain rotamer conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, K J; Neugebauer, W; Sikorska, M; Szabo, A G

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between alpha-helical secondary structure and the fluorescence properties of an intrinsic tryptophan residue were investigated. A monomeric alpha-helix forming peptide and a dimeric coiled-coil forming peptide containing a central tryptophan residue were synthesized. The fluorescence parameters of the tryptophan residue were determined for these model systems at a range of fractional alpha-helical contents. The steady-state emission maximum was independent of the fractional alpha-helical content. A minimum of three exponential decay times was required to fully describe the time-resolved fluorescence data. Changes were observed in the decay times and more significantly, in their relative contributions that could be correlated with alpha-helix content. The results were also shown to be consistent with a model in which the decay times were independent of both alpha-helix content and emission wavelength. In this model the relative contributions of the decay time components were directly proportional to the alpha-helix content. Data were also analyzed according to a continuous distribution of exponential decay time model, employing global analysis techniques. The recovered distributions had "widths" that were both poorly defined and independent of peptide conformation. We propose that the three decay times are associated with the three ground-state chi 1 rotamers of the tryptophan residue and that the changes in the relative contributions of the decay times are the result of conformational constraints, imposed by the alpha-helical main-chain, on the chi 1 rotamer populations. PMID:8061211

  10. Peptide Sequence and Conformation Strongly Influence Tryptophan Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Alston, Roy W.; Lasagna, Mauricio; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Scholtz, J. Martin; Reinhart, Gregory D.; Pace, C. Nick

    2008-01-01

    This article probes the denatured state ensemble of ribonuclease Sa (RNase Sa) using fluorescence. To interpret the results obtained with RNase Sa, it is essential that we gain a better understanding of the fluorescence properties of tryptophan (Trp) in peptides. We describe studies of N-acetyl-l-tryptophanamide (NATA), a tripeptide: AWA, and six pentapeptides: AAWAA, WVSGT, GYWHE, HEWTV, EAWQE, and DYWTG. The latter five peptides have the same sequence as those surrounding the Trp residues studied in RNase Sa. The fluorescence emission spectra, the fluorescence lifetimes, and the fluorescence quenching by acrylamide and iodide were measured in concentrated solutions of urea and guanidine hydrochloride. Excited-state electron transfer from the indole ring of Trp to the carbonyl groups of peptide bonds is thought to be the most important mechanism for intramolecular quenching of Trp fluorescence. We find the maximum fluorescence intensities vary from 49,000 for NATA with two carbonyls, to 24,400 for AWA with four carbonyls, to 28,500 for AAWAA with six carbonyls. This suggests that the four carbonyls of AWA are better able to quench Trp fluorescence than the six carbonyls of AAWAA, and this must reflect a difference in the conformations of the peptides. For the pentapeptides, EAWQE has a fluorescence intensity that is more than 50% greater than DYWTG, showing that the amino acid sequence influences the fluorescence intensity either directly through side-chain quenching and/or indirectly through an influence on the conformational ensemble of the peptides. Our results show that peptides are generally better models for the Trp residues in proteins than NATA. Finally, our results emphasize that we have much to learn about Trp fluorescence even in simple compounds. PMID:18065477

  11. Thermodynamics of interfacial changes in a protein-protein complex.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-03-04

    Recent experiments with biomacromolecular complexes suggest that structural modifications at the interfaces are vital for stability of the complexes and the functions of the biomacromolecules. Although several qualitative aspects about such interfaces are known from structural data, quantification of the interfacial changes is lacking. In this work, we study the thermodynamic changes at the interface in the complex between an enzyme, Nuclease A (NucA), and a specific inhibitor protein, NuiA. We calculate the conformational free energy and conformational entropy costs from histograms of the dihedral angles generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the complex and the free proteins. We extract the conformational thermodynamic parameters for changes in the tertiary structure of NuiA. We show that the binding is dominated by the interfacial changes, where the basic residues of NucA and acidic residues of NuiA are highly ordered and stabilized via strong electrostatic interactions. Our results correlate well with known information from structural studies. The tight interfacial structure is reflected in the significant changes in the structure and dynamics of the water molecules at the enzyme-inhibitor interface. The interfacial water molecules contribute significantly to the entropy loss for the overall complexation.

  12. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  13. Biosynthesis of Violacein, Structure and Function of l-Tryptophan Oxidase VioA from Chromobacterium violaceum*

    PubMed Central

    Füller, Janis J.; Röpke, René; Krausze, Joern; Rennhack, Kim E.; Daniel, Nils P.; Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Schulz, Stefan; Jahn, Dieter; Moser, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Violacein is a natural purple pigment of Chromobacterium violaceum with potential medical applications as antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer drugs. The initial step of violacein biosynthesis is the oxidative conversion of l-tryptophan into the corresponding α-imine catalyzed by the flavoenzyme l-tryptophan oxidase (VioA). A substrate-related (3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-2-methylpropanoic acid) and a product-related (2-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)prop-2-enoic acid) competitive VioA inhibitor was synthesized for subsequent kinetic and x-ray crystallographic investigations. Structures of the binary VioA·FADH2 and of the ternary VioA·FADH2·2-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)prop-2-enoic acid complex were resolved. VioA forms a “loosely associated” homodimer as indicated by small-angle x-ray scattering experiments. VioA belongs to the glutathione reductase family 2 of FAD-dependent oxidoreductases according to the structurally conserved cofactor binding domain. The substrate-binding domain of VioA is mainly responsible for the specific recognition of l-tryptophan. Other canonical amino acids were efficiently discriminated with a minor conversion of l-phenylalanine. Furthermore, 7-aza-tryptophan, 1-methyl-tryptophan, 5-methyl-tryptophan, and 5-fluoro-tryptophan were efficient substrates of VioA. The ternary product-related VioA structure indicated involvement of protein domain movement during enzyme catalysis. Extensive structure-based mutagenesis in combination with enzyme kinetics (using l-tryptophan and substrate analogs) identified Arg64, Lys269, and Tyr309 as key catalytic residues of VioA. An increased enzyme activity of protein variant H163A in the presence of l-phenylalanine indicated a functional role of His163 in substrate binding. The combined structural and mutational analyses lead to the detailed understanding of VioA substrate recognition. Related strategies for the in vivo synthesis of novel violacein derivatives are discussed. PMID:27466367

  14. Tryptophan and tryptophan-like substances in cloud water: Occurrence and photochemical fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Deguillaume, Laurent; Mailhot, Gilles; Brigante, Marcello

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates the occurrence and photochemical behaviour of tryptophan (TRP) in the cloud aqueous phase. The concentrations of tryptophan, TRYptophan LIke Substances (TRYLIS) and HUmic LIke Substances (HULIS) in real cloud water, collected between October 2013 and November 2014 at the top of the puy de Dôme station, were determined using the Excitation-Emission-Matrix (EEM) technique. The amount of free and complexed tryptophan (TRP) up to 10-7 M in cloud aqueous phase was quantified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence analysis, and its photoreactivity under sun-simulated conditions was investigated in synthetic water samples mimicking cloud aqueous phase compositions (oceanic and continental origins). TRP undergoes direct photolysis, and its degradation is enhanced in the presence of naturally occurring species able to photo-generate hydroxyl radicals (HOrad). The polychromatic quantum yield of TRP (ϕ290-340 nm TRP) is estimated to be 8.37 × 10-4 between 290 and 340 nm, corresponding to the degradation rate (RTRPd) of 1.29 × 10-11 M s-1 under our irradiation conditions. The degradation is accelerated up to 3.65 × 10-10 and 8.26 × 10-10 M s-1 in synthetic oceanic and continental cloud water samples doped with 100 μM hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Hydroxyl radical-mediated transformation leads to the generation of different functionalized and oxidized products, as well as small carboxylic acids, such as formate and acetate. Moreover, fluorescent signals of irradiated solutions indicate the formation of HULIS.

  15. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  16. Heavy atom induced phosphorescence study on the influence of internal structural factors on the photophysics of tryptophan in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka; Gałęcki, Krystian; Rożniakowski, Kamil; Kolesińska, Beata; Kamiński, Zbigniew J.; Wysocki, Stanisław

    2014-07-01

    In this study the effect of alanyl residue insertion into tryptophan and to some extent the effect of peptide bond on the photophysics of tryptophan chromophore has been studied. The photophysical parameters crucial in triplet state decay mechanism of aqueous AW, WA and AWA peptides have been determined applying our previously proposed methodology based on the heavy atom effect and compared with the previously reported values for tryptophan (Kowalska-Baron et al., 2012). The obtained results clearly indicated that the presence of alanyl residue and the peptide bond results in the changes in the fluorescence and phosphorescence decay kinetics of tryptophan. The fluorescence decays of the oligopeptides studied at pH 7 were biexponential. The longer lifetime component of WA arises from anionic form of this dipeptide, while the shorter one may be assigned to the zwitterionic form of WA. The observed invariance of the lifetimes of anionic and zwitterionic forms of WA throughout the pH studied supports the idea that these two components of WA fluorescence decay correspond to nearly independent species, possibly interconverting but at a rate slower than the fluorescence decay rates. Comparing the determined phosphorescence spectra of the oligopeptides studied with that of tryptophan, a slight blue-shift and more evident red-shift was observed in the spectrum of AW and WA, respectively. On the basis of the results of the phosphorescence measurements performed at pH 10, the 170 μs lifetime of WA, observed even at pH 7, may be assigned to the anionic form of the compound. It may be suggested that at pH 7 during the excited triplet state lifetime of WA there is a shift in the equilibrium towards the anionic form of this dipeptide. In the case of AW and AWA at pH 7 the obtained monoexponential decay kinetics, most probably, arise from zwitterionic forms of these peptides. The determined triplet quantum yield of AWA is slightly lower than that of tryptophan, while the quantum

  17. Metabolism of Tryptophans by Pseudomonas aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Elander, Richard P.; Mabe, James A.; Hamill, Robert H.; Gorman, Marvin

    1968-01-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Pseudomonas, classified as P. fluorescens biotype D or E or as P. multivorans, were examined for the production of pyrrolnitrin, an antifungal agent synthesized in P. aureofaciens. Eight strains were shown to produce pyrrolnitrin in shake-flask fermentation. Four cultures were from the multivorans taxon, and the remaining four were members of the fluorescens group. The antifungal agent produced in these strains was isolated and shown to be pyrrolnitrin by comparison with an authentic sample. The strains differed markedly with respect to the amount of pyrrolnitrin produced and in their utilization of exogenous tryptophan. Secondary metabolites, not related to pyrrolnitrin, were also examined and compared with those synthesized in P. aureofaciens. Marked differences were noted in both phenazine pigments and phenolic metabolites. The results of the study suggest that the production of pyrrolnitrin may be widespread in selected taxonomic groups of Pseudomonas. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4968963

  18. Tryptophan as a probe to study the anticancer mechanism of action and specificity of α-helical anticancer peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Guirong; Huang, Yibing; Feng, Qi; Chen, Yuxin

    2014-08-13

    In the present study, a single tryptophan, as a fluorescence probe, was shifted from the N-terminus to the middle and to the C-terminus of a 26-residue α-helical anticancer peptide sequence to study the mechanism of action and specificity. The hydrophobicity of peptides, as well as peptide helicity and self-associating ability, were slightly influenced by the position change of tryptophan in the peptide sequence, while the hemolytic activity and anticancer activity of the peptide analogs remained the same. The tryptophan fluorescence experiment demonstrated that peptide analogs were more selective against LUVs mimicking cancer cell membranes than LUVs mimicking normal cell membranes. During the interaction with target membranes, the N-terminus of an anticancer peptide may be inserted vertically or tilted into the hydrophobic components of the phospholipid bilayer first. The thermodynamic parameters of the peptides PNW and PCW, when interacting with zwitterionic DMPC or negatively charged DMPS, were determined by ITC. DSC experiments showed that peptide analogs significantly altered the phase transition profiles of DMPC, but did not dramatically modify the phase transition of DMPS. It is demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions are the main driving force for peptides interacting with normal cell membranes, whilst, electrostatic interactions dominate the interactions between peptides and cancer cell membranes. Utilizing tryptophan as a fluorescence probe molecule appears to be a practicable approach to determine the interaction of peptides with phospholipid bilayers.

  19. The ingestion of different dietary proteins by humans induces large changes in the plasma tryptophan ratio, a predictor of brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, John D; Langham, Kathryn A; Marcelino, Lyndsey M; Irvine, Zoë L E; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Kaye, Walter H

    2013-12-01

    The ingestion by rats of different proteins causes large differences in the plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids, which predicts brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis. We evaluated in humans whether ingesting these proteins also produces large excursions in the tryptophan ratio. Fasting males (n = 6) ingested V-8 Juice containing 40 g of α-lactalbumin, gluten, zein or starch. Blood was drawn before and at 30 min intervals after ingestion for 4 h; tryptophan and other large neutral amino acids were quantitated. Pre-meal plasma tryptophan was ~50 nmol/ml; the tryptophan ratio was ~0.010. α-Lactalbumin increased plasma tryptophan (3-fold) and the tryptophan ratio (50%); starch did not change either tryptophan variable, while gluten caused a modest (25%) and zein a large reduction (50%) in plasma tryptophan. Gluten and zein reduced the tryptophan ratio. The maximal difference in the tryptophan ratio occurred between α-lactalbumin and zein and was large (~3-fold). Since the plasma tryptophan ratio predicts brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis in rats, the differences in the ratio produced in humans by these proteins may modify serotonin synthesis, and perhaps elicit serotonin-linked changes in behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Tryptophan metabolism in the isolated perfused liver of the rat: effects of tryptophan concentration, hydrocortisone and allopurinol on tryptophan pyrrolase activity and kynurenine formation.

    PubMed Central

    Green, A R; Woods, H F; Joseph, M H

    1976-01-01

    1 The effect of tryptophan concentration on the rate of kynurenine appearance and tryptophan disappearance in the medium perfused through the isolated liver of the rat has been investigated. The effect of pretreatment of the rat with hydrocortisone or allopurinol was also examined, together with the effects of these treatments on liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity measured in vitro at the beginning and end of perfusion. 2 Hydrocortisone (5 mg/kg) injection 3 h before perfusion resulted in a four-fold increase in kynurenine production by the liver during perfusion with a medium containing either 0.1 mmol/1 or 1.0 mmol/1 tryptophan. Injection of allopurinol (20 mg/kg) together with hydrocortisone and addition of allopurinol (4 mg/100 ml) to the medium abolished the hydrocortisone-induced rise of kynurenine in the 0.1 mmol/tryptophan medium but not the 1.0 mmol/1 tryptophan medium. 3 Injection of cycloheximide (30 mg/kg) with hydrocortisone (5 mg/kg) 3 h before perfusion inhibited the hydrocortisone-induced rise of kynurenine production and the increase in pyrrolase activity measured in vitro both before and at the end of perfusion with 1.0 mmol/1 tryptophan. This last result suggests that protein synthesis is involved not only in hydrocortisone induction of pyrrolase but also in substrate induction. 4 Kynurenine production in the 1.0 mmol/1 tryptophan medium was less in both saline- and hydrocortisone-treated older rats (335-450 g) compared to younger rats (180-220 g). In agreement with a previous study, pyrrolase activity in vitro was also lower in both saline- and hydrocortisone- treated older rats at the beginning of the perfusion although activity had risen equally in both young and older rats at the end of perfusion. 5 There was little correlation between the rate of tryptophan disappearance from the medium and the activity of tryptophan pyrrolase either as measured in vitro or as indicated by the rate of kynurenine production. 6 In general, the production of

  1. Tryptophan degradation and neopterin levels in treated rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Yesim; Mete, Guray; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Sepici, Vesile; Simsek, Bolkan

    2012-01-01

    Increased kynurenine/tryptophan-reflects trytophan degradation-and neopterin levels have been regarded as a biochemical marker of cell-mediated immune response and inflammation. This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of tryptophan degradation and neopterin levels in active rheumatoid arthritis patients under therapy. In this case-control study, kynurenine and tryptophan levels were determined by HPLC; neopterin and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were measured with ELISA in 32 active rheumatoid arthritis patients and 20 healthy controls. Although mean values of tryptophan, kynurenine, ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan, neopterin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels did not show statistically significant differences between patient and control groups, neopterin levels correlated positively with kynurenine (r = 0.582, p < 0.02), kynurenine/tryptophan (r = 0.486, p < 0.05), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.472, p < 0.05) and RF (r = 0.478, p < 0.05) in the rheumatoid arthritis group. CRP levels of the patient group correlated with kynurenine levels (r = 0.524, p < 0.03). Determination of tryptophan degradation and neopterin levels in chronic inflammatory disease may provide a better understanding of progression of the disease.

  2. A Mathematical Model of Tryptophan Metabolism via the Kynurenine Pathway Provides Insights into the Effects of Vitamin B-6 Deficiency, Tryptophan Loading, and Induction of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase on Tryptophan Metabolites123

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Avila, Luisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Sitren, Harry S.; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B-6 deficiency is associated with impaired tryptophan metabolism because of the coenzyme role of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) for kynureninase and kynurenine aminotransferase. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we developed a mathematical model of tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. The model includes mammalian data on enzyme kinetics and tryptophan transport from the intestinal lumen to liver, muscle, and brain. Regulatory mechanisms and inhibition of relevant enzymes were included. We simulated the effects of graded reduction in cellular PLP concentration, tryptophan loads and induction of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) on metabolite profiles and urinary excretion. The model predictions matched experimental data and provided clarification of the response of metabolites in various extents of vitamin B-6 deficiency. We found that moderate deficiency yielded increased 3-hydroxykynurenine and a decrease in kynurenic acid and anthranilic acid. More severe deficiency also yielded an increase in kynurenine and xanthurenic acid and more pronounced effects on the other metabolites. Tryptophan load simulations with and without vitamin B-6 deficiency showed altered metabolite concentrations consistent with published data. Induction of TDO caused an increase in all metabolites, and TDO induction together with a simulated vitamin B-6 deficiency, as has been reported in oral contraceptive users, yielded increases in kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and xanthurenic acid and decreases in kynurenic acid and anthranilic acid. These results show that the model successfully simulated tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway and can be used to complement experimental investigations. PMID:23902960

  3. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI I.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. I. Effect of tryptophan and related compounds. J. Bacteriol. 84:979–987. 1962.—The effect of tryptophan and related compounds on tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase formation in Escherichia coli was determined. Several of these compounds stimulated the formation of tryptophanase while concomitantly decreasing the production of synthetase. A number of tryptophan analogues were found to inhibit growth. The possible mode of action of these substances was examined further. 5-Hydroxytryptophan greatly inhibited the formation of synthetase and also reduced growth. Its inhibitory action on growth was attributed, at least partially, to the false feedback inhibition of anthranilic acid formation. Tryptamine was found to be a potent inhibitor of the activity of synthetase, as well as of the enzyme(s) involved in the synthesis of anthranilic acid from shikimic acid. However, growth reduction was only partially reversed by tryptophan. Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid decreased growth and increased the formation of synthetase six- to eightfold. The action of these compounds was ascribed to their ability to block the endogenous formation of tryptophan. PMID:13959621

  4. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the “extended de Gennes-Fisher” local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out “manually.” Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25±0.05 is predicted.

  5. Intraprotein electron transfer between tyrosine and tryptophan in DNA photolyase from Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Aubert, C; Mathis, P; Eker, A P; Brettel, K

    1999-05-11

    Light-induced electron transfer reactions leading to the fully reduced, catalytically competent state of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor have been studied by flash absorption spectroscopy in DNA photolyase from Anacystis nidulans. The protein, overproduced in Escherichia coli, was devoid of the antenna cofactor, and the FAD chromophore was present in the semireduced form, FADH., which is inactive for DNA repair. We show that after selective excitation of FADH. by a 7-ns laser flash, fully reduced FAD (FADH-) is formed in less than 500 ns by electron abstraction from a tryptophan residue. Subsequently, a tyrosine residue is oxidized by the tryptophanyl radical with t(1)/(2) = 50 microseconds. The amino acid radicals were identified by their characteristic absorption spectra, with maxima at 520 nm for Trp. and 410 nm for TyrO. The newly discovered electron transfer between tyrosine and tryptophan occurred for approximately 40% of the tryptophanyl radicals, whereas 60% decayed by charge recombination with FADH- (t(1)/(2) = 1 ms). The tyrosyl radical can also recombine with FADH- but at a much slower rate (t(1)/(2) = 76 ms) than Trp. In the presence of an external electron donor, however, TyrO. is rereduced efficiently in a bimolecular reaction that leaves FAD in the fully reduced state FADH-. These results show that electron transfer from tyrosine to Trp. is an essential step in the process leading to the active form of photolyase. They provide direct evidence that electron transfer between tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in a native biological reaction.

  6. Exploring the mechanism of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Sarah J.; Mowat, Christopher G.; Chapman, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    The haem proteins TDO (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase) and IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase) are specific and powerful oxidation catalysts that insert one molecule of dioxygen into L-tryptophan in the first and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Recent crystallographic and biochemical analyses of TDO and IDO have greatly aided our understanding of the mechanisms employed by these enzymes in the binding and activation of dioxygen and tryptophan. In the present paper, we briefly discuss the function, structure and possible catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. PMID:19021508

  7. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  8. Smart interfacial bonding alloys

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. Hwang; J. C. Hamilton; J. E. Houston

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to explore the use of the newly discovered strain-stabilized 2-D interfacial alloys as smart interface bonding alloys (SIBA). These materials will be used as templates for the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. SIBA are formed by two metallic components which mix at an interface to relieve strain and prevent dislocations from forming in subsequent thin film growth. The composition of the SIBA is determined locally by the amount of strain, and therefore can react smartly to areas of the highest strain to relieve dislocations. In this way, SIBA can be used to tailor the dislocation structure of thin films. This project included growth, characterization and modeling of films grown using SIBA templates. Characterization will include atomic imaging of the dislocations structure, measurement of the mechanical properties of the film using interface force microscopy (IFM) and the nanoindenter, and measurement of the electronic structure of the SIBA with synchrotron photoemission. Resistance of films to sulfidation and oxidation will also be examined. The Paragon parallel processing computer will be used to calculate the structure of the SIBA and thin films in order to develop ability to predict and tailor SIBA and thin film behavior. This work will lead to the possible development of a new class of thin film materials with properties tailored by varying the composition of the SIBA, serving as a buffer layer to relieve the strain between the substrate and the thin film. Such films will have improved mechanical and corrosion resistance allowing application as protective barriers for weapons applications. They will also exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced electromigration making them particularly suitable for application as interconnects and other electronic needs.

  9. High stability and biological activity of the copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 analogues containing tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Kadej, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Copper(II) complex formation processes between the alloferon 1 (Allo1) (HGVSGHGQHGVHG) analogues where the tryptophan residue is introducing in the place His residue H1W, H6W, H9W and H12W have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD and EPR spectroscopic, and MS methods. For all analogues of alloferon 1 complex speciation have been obtained for a 1:1 metal-to-ligand molar ratio and 2:1 of H1W because of precipitation at higher (2:1, 3:1 and 4:1) ratios. At physiological pH7.4 and a 1:1 metal-to-ligand molar ratio the tryptophan analogues of alloferon 1 form the CuH-1L and/or CuH-2L complexes with the 4N binding mode. The introduction of tryptophan in place of histidine residues changes the distribution diagram of the complexes formed with the change of pH and their stability constants compared to the respective substituted alanine analogues of alloferon 1. The CuH-1L, CuH-2L and CuH-3L complexes of the tryptophan analogues are more stable from 1 to 5 log units in comparison to those of the alanine analogues. This stabilization of the complexes may result from cation(Cu(II))-π and indole/imidazole ring interactions. The induction of apoptosis in vivo, in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 was studied. The biological results show that copper(II) ions in vivo did not cause any apparent apoptotic features. The most active were the H12W peptide and Cu(II)-H12W complex formed at pH7.4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic diversity of the tryptophan pathway in chlamydiae: reductive evolution and a novel operon for tryptophan recapture

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gary; Bonner, Carol A; Jensen, Roy A

    2002-01-01

    Background Complete genomic sequences of closely related organisms, such as the chlamydiae, afford the opportunity to assess significant strain differences against a background of many shared characteristics. The chlamydiae are ubiquitous intracellular parasites that are important pathogens of humans and other organisms. Tryptophan limitation caused by production of interferon-γ by the host and subsequent induction of indoleamine dioxygenase is a key aspect of the host-parasite interaction. It appears that the chlamydiae have learned to recognize tryptophan depletion as a signal for developmental remodeling. The consequent non-cultivable state of persistence can be increasingly equated to chronic disease conditions. Results The genes encoding enzymes of tryptophan biosynthesis were the focal point of this study. Chlamydophila psittaci was found to possess a compact operon containing PRPP synthase, kynureninase, and genes encoding all but the first step of tryptophan biosynthesis. All but one of the genes exhibited translational coupling. Other chlamydiae (Chlamydia trachomatis, C. muridarum and Chlamydophila pneumoniae) lack genes encoding PRPP synthase, kynureninase, and either lack tryptophan-pathway genes altogether or exhibit various stages of reductive loss. The origin of the genes comprising the trp operon does not seem to have been from lateral gene transfer. Conclusions The factors that accommodate the transition of different chlamydial species to the persistent (chronic) state of pathogenesis include marked differences in strategies deployed to obtain tryptophan from host resources. C. psittaci appears to have a novel mechanism for intercepting an early intermediate of tryptophan catabolism and recycling it back to tryptophan. In effect, a host-parasite metabolic mosaic has evolved for tryptophan recycling. PMID:12225590

  11. Tryptophan end-tagging for promoted lipopolysaccharide interactions and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Datta, Aritreyee; Schmidtchen, Artur; Bhunia, Anirban; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-03-16

    The objective of the present study is the investigation of possibilities for boosting peptide anti-inflammatory effects by tryptophan end-tagging, including identification of underlying mechanisms for this. In doing so, effects of tryptophan end-tagging of KYE21 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRR), a peptide derived from heparin co-factor II, on membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) interactions were investigated by ellipsometry, NMR, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism measurements. Through its N-terminal W stretch, WWWKYE21 displays higher membrane binding, liposome rupture, and bacterial killing than unmodified KYE21. Analogously, W-tagging promotes binding to E. coli LPS and to its endotoxic lipid A moiety. Furthermore, WWWKYE21 causes more stable peptide/LPS complexes than KYE21, as evidenced by detailed NMR studies, adopting a pronounced helical conformation, with a large hydrophobic surface at the N-terminus due to the presence of W-residues, and a flexible C-terminus due to presence of several positively charged arginine residues. Mirroring its increased affinity for LPS and lipid A, WWWKYE21 displays strongly increased anti-inflammatory effect due to a combination of direct lipid A binding, peptide-induced charge reversal of cell membranes for LPS scavenging, and peptide-induced fragmentation of LPS aggregates for improved phagocytosis. Importantly, potent anti-inflammatory effects were observed at low cell toxicity, demonstrated for both monocytes and erythrocytes.

  12. Nanosecond dynamics of influenza A/M2TM and an amantadine resistant mutant probed by time-dependent red shifts of a native tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Vikas; Cristian, Lidia; Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig; DeGrado, William F.

    2013-08-01

    Proteins involved in functions such as electron transfer or ion transport must be capable of stabilizing transient charged species on time scales ranging from picoseconds to microseconds. We study the influenza A M2 proton channel, containing a tryptophan residue that serves as an essential part of the proton conduction pathway. We induce a transition dipole in tryptophan by photoexcitation, and then probe the dielectric stabilization of its excited state. The magnitude of the stabilization over this time regime was larger than that generally found for tryptophan in membrane or protein environments. M2 achieves a water-like stabilization over a 25 ns time scale, slower than that of bulk water, but sufficiently rapid to contribute to stabilization of charge as protons diffuse through the channel. These measurements should stimulate future MD studies to clarify the role of sidechain versus non-bulk water in defining the process of relaxation.

  13. Plasma tryptophan concentration in depressive illness and mania.

    PubMed

    Peet, M; Moody, J P; Worrall, E P; Walker, P; Naylor, G J

    1976-03-01

    Total and free plasma trytophan levels were measured in depressive and manic patients before and after recovery. No change was found in total or free plasma trytophan concentration on recovery from depressive illness. Free plasma tryptophan levels were higher in recovered manics than in active manics, and a group of four manic patients tested before and after recovery showed a significant increase in free plasma tryptophan concentration on recovery.

  14. Efficient Asymmetric Synthesis of Tryptophan Analogues Having Useful Photophysical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Poulami; Chen, Shengxi; Arce, Pablo M.

    2014-01-01

    Two new fluorescent probes of protein structure and dynamics have been prepared by concise asymmetric syntheses using the Schöllkopf chiral auxiliary. The site-specific incorporation of one probe into dihydrofolate reductase is reported. The utility of these tryptophan derivatives lies in their absorption and emission maxima which differ from those of tryptophan, as well as in their large Stokes shifts and high molar absorptivities. PMID:24392870

  15. Spectral and metal-binding properties of three single-point tryptophan mutants of the human transferrin N-lobe.

    PubMed Central

    He, Q Y; Mason, A B; Lyons, B A; Tam, B M; Nguyen, V; MacGillivray, R T; Woodworth, R C

    2001-01-01

    Human serum transferrin N-lobe (hTF/2N) contains three conserved tryptophan residues, Trp(8), Trp(128) and Trp(264), located in three different environments. The present report addresses the different contributions of the three tryptophan residues to the UV-visible, fluorescence and NMR spectra of hTF/2N and the effect of the mutations at each tryptophan residue on the iron-binding properties of the protein. Trp(8) resides in a hydrophobic box containing a cluster of three phenylalanine side chains and is H bonded through the indole N to an adjacent water cluster lying between two beta-sheets containing Trp(8) and Lys(296) respectively. The fluorescence of Trp(8) may be quenched by the benzene rings. The apparent increase in the rate of iron release from the Trp(8)-->Tyr mutant could be due to the interference of the mutation with the H-bond linkage resulting in an effect on the second shell network. The partial quenching in the fluorescence of Trp(128) results from the nearby His(119) residue. Difference-fluorescence spectra reveal that any protein containing Trp(128) shows a blue shift upon binding metal ion, and the NMR signal of Trp(128) broadens out and disappears upon the binding of paramagnetic metals to the protein. These data imply that Trp(128) is a major fluorescent and NMR reporter group for metal binding, and possibly for cleft closure in hTF/2N. Trp(264) is located on the surface of the protein and does not connect to any functional residues. This explains the facts that Trp(264) is the major contributor to both the absorbance and fluorescence spectra, has a strong NMR signal and the mutation at Trp(264) has little effect on the iron-binding and release behaviours of the protein. PMID:11171122

  16. Optical spectroscopic characterization of single tryptophan mutants of chicken skeletal troponin C: evidence for interdomain interaction.

    PubMed

    Moncrieffe, M C; Venyaminov, S Y; Miller, T E; Guzman, G; Potter, J D; Prendergast, F G

    1999-09-14

    The effects of metal ion binding on the optical spectroscopic properties and temperature stability of two single tryptophan mutants of chicken skeletal TnC, F78W and F154W, have been examined. The absence of tyrosine and other tryptophan residues allowed the unambiguous assignment of the spectral signal from the introduced Trp residue. Changes in the molar ellipticity values in the far-UV CD spectra of the mutant proteins on metal ion binding were similar to those of wild-type TnC suggesting that the introduction of the Trp residue had no effect on the total secondary structure content. The fluorescence and near-UV absorbance data reveal that, in the apo state, Trp-78 is buried while Trp-154 is exposed to solvent. Additionally, the highly resolved (1)L(b) band of Trp-78 seen in the near-UV absorbance and CD spectra of the apo state of F78W suggest that this residue is likely in a rigid molecular environment. In the calcium-saturated state, Trp-154 becomes buried while the solvent accessibility of Trp-78 increases. The fluorescence emission and near-UV CD of Trp-78 in the N-terminal domain were sensitive to calcium binding at the C-terminal domain sites. Measurements of the temperature stability reveal that events occurring in the N-terminal domain affect the stability of the C-terminal domain and vice versa. This, coupled with the titration data, strongly suggests that there are interactions between the N- and C-terminal domains of TnC.

  17. Saturation mutagenesis on Arg244 of the tryptophan C4-prenyltransferase FgaPT2 leads to enhanced catalytic ability and different preferences for tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aili; Li, Shu-Ming

    2016-06-01

    FgaPT2 from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyzes a Friedel-Crafts alkylation at C-4 of L-tryptophan and is involved in the biosynthesis of the ergot alkaloids fumigaclavines. Several tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides had also been prenylated by FgaPT2, but the turnover rate (k cat) was low. Here, we report the generation of FgaPT2 mutants by saturation mutagenesis at the amino acid residue Arg244 to improve its catalytic efficiency toward cyclic dipeptides. Thirteen mutated enzymes demonstrated up to 76-fold higher turnover number toward seven cyclic dipeptides than the non-mutated FgaPT2. More importantly, the mutated enzymes exhibited different preferences toward these substrates. This study provides a convenient approach for creation of new biocatalysts for production of C4-prenylated cyclic dipeptides.

  18. Tryptophan hydroxylase expression in human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Pisarchik, Alexander; Johansson, Olle; Jing, Chen; Semak, Igor; Slugocki, George; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2003-10-15

    We attempted to further characterize cutaneous serotoninergic and melatoninergic pathways evaluating the key biosynthetic enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). There was wide expression of TPH mRNA in whole human skin, cultured melanocytes and melanoma cells, dermal fibroblasts, squamous cell carcinoma cells and keratinocytes. Gene expression was associated with detection of TPH immunoreactive species by Western blotting. Characterization of the TPH immunoreactive species performed with two different antibodies showed expression of the expected protein (55-60 kDa), and of forms with higher and lower molecular weights. This pattern of broad spectrum of TPH expression including presumed degradation products suggests rapid turnover of the enzyme, as previously reported in mastocytoma cells. RP-HPLC of skin extracts showed fluorescent species with the retention time of serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. Immunocytochemistry performed in skin biopsies localized TPH immunoreactivity to normal and malignant melanocytes. We conclude that while the TPH mRNA and protein are widely expressed in cultured normal and pathological epidermal and dermal skin cells, in vivo TPH expression is predominantly restricted to cells of melanocytic origin.

  19. The Role of Placental Tryptophan Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sedlmayr, Peter; Blaschitz, Astrid; Stocker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the mechanisms and consequences of degradation of tryptophan (Trp) in the placenta, focusing mainly on the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), one of three enzymes catalyzing the first step of the kynurenine pathway of Trp degradation. IDO1 has been implicated in regulation of feto-maternal tolerance in the mouse. Local depletion of Trp and/or the presence of metabolites of the kynurenine pathway mediate immunoregulation and exert antimicrobial functions. In addition to the decidual glandular epithelium, IDO1 is localized in the vascular endothelium of the villous chorion and also in the endothelium of spiral arteries of the decidua. Possible consequences of IDO1-mediated catabolism of Trp in the endothelium encompass antimicrobial activity and immunosuppression, as well as relaxation of the placental vasotonus, thereby contributing to placental perfusion and growth of both placenta and fetus. It remains to be evaluated whether other enzymes mediating Trp oxidation, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2, Trp 2,3-dioxygenase, and Trp hydroxylase-1 are of relevance to the biology of the placenta. PMID:24904580

  20. The tryptophan aminotransferase Tam1 catalyses the single biosynthetic step for tryptophan-dependent pigment synthesis in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Zuther, Katja; Mayser, Peter; Hettwer, Ursula; Wu, Wenying; Spiteller, Peter; Kindler, Bernhard L J; Karlovsky, Petr; Basse, Christoph W; Schirawski, Jan

    2008-04-01

    Tryptophan is a precursor for many biologically active secondary metabolites. We have investigated the origin of indole pigments first described in the pityriasis versicolor-associated fungus Malassezia furfur. Some of the identified indole pigments have properties potentially explaining characteristics of the disease. As M. furfur is not amenable to genetic manipulation, we used Ustilago maydis to investigate the pathway leading to pigment production from tryptophan. We show by high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis that the compounds produced by U. maydis include those putatively involved in the etiology of pityriasis versicolor. Using a reverse genetics approach, we demonstrate that the tryptophan aminotransferase Tam1 catalyses pigment biosynthesis by conversion of tryptophan into indolepyruvate. A forward genetics approach led to the identification of mutants incapable of producing the pigments. These mutants were affected in the sir1 gene, presumably encoding a sulphite reductase. In vitro experiments with purified Tam1 showed that 2-oxo 4-methylthio butanoate serves as a substrate linking tryptophan deamination to sulphur metabolism. We provide the first direct evidence that these indole pigments form spontaneously from indolepyruvate and tryptophan without any enzymatic activity. This suggests that compounds with a proposed function in M. furfur-associated disease consist of indolepyruvate-derived spontaneously generated metabolic by-products.

  1. Fluorescence studies with malate dehydrogenase from rhizobium japonicum 3I1B-143 bacteroids: a two-tryptophan containing protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiron, Camillo A.; Eftink, Maurice R.; Waters, James K.; Emerich, David W.

    1990-05-01

    A number of fluorescence studies, both of trp residues and bound NADH, have been reported for porcine MDH. The large number of trp residues (6) complicates the interpretation of some studies. To circumvent this we have performed studies with a two tryptophan (per subunit) MDH from Rhizobium japonicum 311B-143 bacteroids. We have performed phase/modulation fluorescence lifetime measurements, as a function of temperature and added quencher KI, in order to resolved the 1.3 ns (blue) and 6.6 ns (red) contributions from the two classes of trp residues. Anisotropy decay studies have also been performed. The binding of NADH dynamically quenches the fluorescence of both tip residues, but, unlike mammalian cytoplasmic and mitochondrial MDH, there is not a large enhancement in fluorescence of bound NADH upon forming a ternary complex with either tartronic acid or D-malonate.

  2. Estimation of NAPL/Water Interfacial Areas in Well-Characterized Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, R.; Schroth, M. H.; Oostrom, M.; Zeyer, J.

    2004-12-01

    The NAPL/water interfacial area is an important parameter which affects the rate of NAPL dissolution in porous media. We generated a set of baseline data for specific interfacial area in a well-characterised laboratory system, and subsequently used these data to evaluate current models that seek to predict this parameter. The interfacial tracer technique was used to measure specific NAPL/water interfacial areas at residual NAPL-saturation in four grades of silica sand wet-packed into a 28cm-long, 3cm-i.d. column. The two-phase system contained water and hexadecane as NAPL. The first model tested distributes entrapped NAPL over the pore classes based on Land's algorithm and assumes spherical geometry for the resulting ganglia. The other model is thermodynamically based, assuming that reversible work done on the system results in an increase in the interfacial area, such that the area between drainage and imbibition curves can be related to the interfacial area. The interfacial tracer tests gave specific interfacial areas between 57 cm-1 for the finest sand and 16 cm-1 for the coarsest, compared to values between 33 cm-1 and 7 cm-1 for the first model and between 19 cm-1 and 5cm-1 for the thermodynamic model. The assumption of spherical geometry made by the first model serves to minimise the specific interfacial areas of the ganglia. Computed tomography (CT) scans of similar samples to those used in the column experiments showed that the geometry of the visible blobs was generally not spherical; hence it is reasonable to suggest that this may explain the underprediction by the first model. We believe the thermodynamic model underestimates the interfacial area because it assumes that entrapment occurs only within the largest pores. We also calculated a modified version of this model assuming entrapment across all pore classes; this yielded values between 64 cm-1 and 14 cm-1, suggesting that this may be a more appropriate method.

  3. Interfacial rheology in complex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Hudson, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Multiphase liquid systems are omnipresent in and essential to everyday life, e.g. foods, pharmaceutics, cosmetics, paints, oil recovery, etc. The morphology and stability of such systems depend on dynamic interfacial properties and processes. Typical methods utilized to measure such interfacial properties often employ drops that are much larger and flows that are much simpler than those encountered in typical processing applications. A microfluidic approach is utilized to measure dynamic structure and kinetics in multiphase systems with drop sizes comparable to those encountered in applications and flow complexity that is easily adjustable. The internal circulation and deformation of an aqueous droplet in clear mineral oil is measured using particle tracers and a detailed shape analysis, which is capable of measuring sub-micron deviations in drop shape. Deformation dynamics, detailed drop shape, interfacial tension, and internal circulation patterns and velocities are measured in Poiseuille and transient elongational flows. Flow kinematics are adjusted by varying the microchannel geometry, relative drop size, and drop height. The effects of confinement on interfacial dynamics and circulation patterns and velocities are also explored.

  4. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  5. Decreased tryptophan metabolism in patients with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are relatively common neurodevelopmental conditions whose biological basis has been incompletely determined. Several biochemical markers have been associated with ASDs, but there is still no laboratory test for these conditions. Methods We analyzed the metabolic profile of lymphoblastoid cell lines from 137 patients with neurodevelopmental disorders with or without ASDs and 78 normal individuals, using Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays. Results Metabolic profiling of lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the 87 patients with ASD as a clinical feature, as compared to the 78 controls, exhibited on average reduced generation of NADH when tryptophan was the sole energy source. The results correlated with the behavioral traits associated with either syndromal or non-syndromal autism, independent of the genetic background of the individual. The low level of NADH generation in the presence of tryptophan was not observed in cell lines from non-ASD patients with intellectual disability, schizophrenia or conditions exhibiting several similarities with syndromal autism except for the behavioral traits. Analysis of a previous small gene expression study found abnormal levels for some genes involved in tryptophan metabolic pathways in 10 patients. Conclusions Tryptophan is a precursor of important compounds, such as serotonin, quinolinic acid, and kynurenic acid, which are involved in neurodevelopment and synaptogenesis. In addition, quinolinic acid is the structural precursor of NAD+, a critical energy carrier in mitochondria. Also, the serotonin branch of the tryptophan metabolic pathway generates NADH. Lastly, the levels of quinolinic and kynurenic acid are strongly influenced by the activity of the immune system. Therefore, decreased tryptophan metabolism may alter brain development, neuroimmune activity and mitochondrial function. Our finding of decreased tryptophan metabolism appears to provide a unifying biochemical basis for ASDs and

  6. Disturbed Tryptophan Metabolism in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangge, H.; Stelzer, I.; Reininghaus, E.; Weghuber, D.; Postolache, T.T.; Fuchs, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS), a major pathologic consequence of obesity, is the main etiological factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the most common cause of death in the western world. A systemic chronic low grade immune-mediated inflammation (scLGI) is substantially implicated in AS and its consequences. In particular, pro-inflammatory cytokines play a major role, with Th1-type cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) being a key mediator. Among various other molecular and cellular effects, IFN- γ activates the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in monocyte-derived macrophages, dendritic, and other cells, which, in turn, decreases serum levels of the essential amino acid tryptophan (TRP). Thus, people with CVD often have increased serum kynurenine to tryptophan ratios (KYN/TRP), a result of an increased TRP breakdown. Importantly, increased KYN/TRP is associated with a higher likelihood of fatal cardiovascular events. A scLGI with increased production of the proinflammatory adipokine leptin, in combination with IFN-γ and interleukin-6 (IL-6), represents another central link between obesity, AS, and CVD. Leptin has also been shown to contribute to Th1-type immunity shifting, with abdominal fat being thus a direct contributor to KYN/TRP ratio. However, TRP is not only an important source for protein production but also for the generation of one of the most important neurotransmitters, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), by the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent TRP 5-hydroxylase. In prolonged states of scLGI, availability of free serum TRP is strongly diminished, affecting serotonin synthesis, particularly in the brain. Additionally, accumulation of neurotoxic KYN metabolites such as quinolinic acid produced by microglia, can contribute to the development of depression via NMDA glutamatergic stimulation. Depression had been reported to be associated with CVD endpoints, but it most likely represents only a secondary loop connecting excess adipose tissue, scLGI and

  7. Oxidation and inactivation of SERCA by selective reaction of cysteine residues with amino acid peroxides.

    PubMed

    Dremina, Elena S; Sharov, Victor S; Davies, Michael J; Schöneich, Christian

    2007-10-01

    The oxidative modification of proteins plays an important role in a wide range of pathological processes and aging. Proteins are modified by numerous biologic oxidants including hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals. More recently, an additional class of physiologically important oxidants has been identified, peptide and protein peroxides. The latter react quite rapidly and selectively with protein cysteine residues. The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) is reversibly regulated through NO-dependent S-glutathiolation of specific cysteine residues. The irreversible oxidation of these cysteine residues could, therefore, impair NO-dependent muscle relaxation. Here, we show that specific protein-derived (amino acid) peroxides react selectively with a subset of the 22 reduced cysteine residues of SERCA1, including a peptide-containing Cys674 and Cys675, where Cys674 (in SERCA2) represents one of the targets for NO-dependent S-glutathiolation. Out of 11 tested amino acid, peptide, and protein peroxides, those derived from free tryptophan and free tyrosine showed the highest reactivity towards SERCA, while no oxidation under similar experimental conditions was detected through hydrogen peroxide. Among the peroxides from tryptophan, those of free tryptophan showed a significantly higher reactivity as compared to those from N- and C-terminally blocked tryptophan. Quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis demonstrated that the highest reactivity of the tryptophan-derived peroxides was observed for Cys774 and Cys938, cysteine residues, which are embedded within the transmembrane domains of SERCA1. This unusual reactivity of transmembrane domains cannot be solely rationalized by the hydrophobicity of the oxidant, as the peroxide from dl-tryptophan shows considerable higher reactivity as compared to the one derived from N-acetyl-tryptophan methyl ester. Our data demonstrate a potential role of peptide- and protein

  8. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Richard J; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M; Majoul, Irina V; Hughson, Frederick M; Evans, Philip R; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J

    2015-11-17

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ'ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1-6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing.

  9. Effects of the protein environment on the spectral properties of tryptophan radicals in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin.

    PubMed

    Bernini, Caterina; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Olivucci, Massimo; Pogni, Rebecca; Basosi, Riccardo; Sinicropi, Adalgisa

    2013-03-27

    Many biological electron-transfer reactions involve short-lived tryptophan radicals as key reactive intermediates. While these species are difficult to investigate, the recent photogeneration of a long-lived neutral tryptophan radical in two Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin mutants (Az48W and ReAz108W) made it possible to characterize the electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties of such species and their sensitivity to the molecular environment. Indeed, in Az48W the radical is embedded in the hydrophobic core while, in ReAz108W it is solvent-exposed. Here we use density functional theory and multiconfigurational perturbation theory to construct quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics models of Az48W(•) and ReAz108W(•) capable of reproducing specific features of their observed UV-vis, resonance Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. The results show that the models can correctly replicate the spectral changes imposed by the two contrasting hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments. Most importantly, the same models can be employed to disentangle the molecular-level interactions responsible for such changes. It is found that the control of the hydrogen bonding between the tryptophan radical and a single specific surface water molecule in ReAz108W(•) represents an effective means of spectral modulation. Similarly, a specific electrostatic interaction between the radical moiety and a Val residue is found to control the Az48W(•) excitation energy. These modulations appear to be mediated by the increase in nitrogen negative charge (and consequent increase in hydrogen bonding) of the spectroscopic D2 state with respect to the D0 state of the chromophore. Finally, the same protein models are used to predict the relaxed Az48W(•) and ReAz108W(•) D2 structures, showing that the effect of the environment on the corresponding fluorescence maxima must parallel that of D0 absorption spectra.

  10. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP

    PubMed Central

    Suckling, Richard J.; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M.; Majoul, Irina V.; Hughson, Frederick M.; Evans, Philip R.; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ’ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1–6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing. PMID:26578768

  11. Tryptophan metabolism, disposition and utilization in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) requirements in pregnancy are several-fold: (1) the need for increased protein synthesis by mother and for fetal growth and development; (2) serotonin (5-HT) for signalling pathways; (3) kynurenic acid (KA) for neuronal protection; (4) quinolinic acid (QA) for NAD+ synthesis (5) other kynurenines (Ks) for suppressing fetal rejection. These goals could not be achieved if maternal plasma [Trp] is depleted. Although plasma total (free + albumin-bound) Trp is decreased in pregnancy, free Trp is elevated. The above requirements are best expressed in terms of a Trp utilization concept. Briefly, Trp is utilized as follows: (1) In early and mid-pregnancy, emphasis is on increased maternal Trp availability to meet the demand for protein synthesis and fetal development, most probably mediated by maternal liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition by progesterone and oestrogens. (2) In mid- and late pregnancy, Trp availability is maintained and enhanced by the release of albumin-bound Trp by albumin depletion and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) elevation, leading to increased flux of Trp down the K pathway to elevate immunosuppressive Ks. An excessive release of free Trp could undermine pregnancy by abolishing T-cell suppression by Ks. Detailed assessment of parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related measures (free and total Trp, albumin, NEFA, K and its metabolites and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in maternal blood and, where appropriate, placental and fetal material) in normal and abnormal pregnancies may establish missing gaps in our knowledge of the Trp status in pregnancy and help identify appropriate intervention strategies. PMID:26381576

  12. Folding of a tryptophan zipper peptide investigated on the basis of the nuclear Overhauser effect and thermal denaturation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soyoun; Hilty, Christian

    2011-12-29

    Short, secondary-structure-containing peptides are suitable models for the study of protein folding due to their relative simplicity. Here, we investigate thermal denaturation of the tryptophan zipper peptide, trpzip4, a peptide that forms a β-hairpin in solution. In order to monitor the thermal denaturation of peptides or small proteins, chemical shift values of H(α) or H(N) may be used. However, various factors other than secondary structure can influence chemical shift values, such as side-chain orientation of nearby aromatic residues. Nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) intensity from backbone interproton cross peaks is an alternative way to study thermal denaturation, as long as various factors that give rise to a change in NOE intensity upon changing the temperature are considered. As a relative indicator for denaturation, we define a cutoff temperature, where half of the initial NOE intensity is lost for each backbone interproton cross peak. For trpzip4, this cutoff temperature is highest for residues in the central part of the structure and lowest for residues near the termini. These observations support the notion that the structure of the trpzip4 peptide is stabilized by a hydrophobic cluster formed by tryptophan residues located in the central region of the β-hairpin. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  14. Characterization of interfacial solvent in protein complexes and contribution of wet spots to the interface description.

    PubMed

    Teyra, Joan; Pisabarro, M T

    2007-06-01

    Water networks in protein interfaces can complement direct interactions contributing significantly to molecular recognition, function, and stability of protein association. Thus, water can be seen as an extension or addition of protein structural features, which may add plenty of information to protein interfacial definition. However, solvent is frequently neglected in protein interaction studies. Analysis of the interfacial information contained in the PDB is essential to achieve more accurate descriptions of protein interfaces. With this aim, we have used the SCOWLP database (http://www.scowlp.org) and applied computational geometry methods to extract and analyze interfacial information of a high-resolution nonredundant dataset of 176 protein complexes containing obligate and transient interfaces. We have identified all interfacial residues and characterized them in terms of temperature factors, secondary structure, residue composition, and pairing preferences to understand their contribution to the interface description. We have paid special attention to water-bridged residues; focusing on those that interact only mediated by a water molecule called wet spots. Our results show that 40.1% of the interfacial residues are interacting through water and that wet spots represent a 14.5% of the total, emphasizing the importance of the inclusion of solvent in protein interaction studies, and the contribution of wet spots to interfacial description. Wet spots present similar characteristics to residues binding buried water molecules in the core or cavities of proteins; being preferably located in nonregular secondary structures and establishing hydrogen bonds by their main-chains. We observe that obligate and transient interfaces present a comparable amount of solvent. Moreover, the role of solvent in both complex types differs according to the different nature of their interfaces. The information obtained in our studies will assist in the process of accomplishing more

  15. Indole-3-Acetic Acid Biosynthesis in the Mutant Maize orange pericarp, a Tryptophan Auxotroph.

    PubMed

    Wright, A D; Sampson, M B; Neuffer, M G; Michalczuk, L; Slovin, J P; Cohen, J D

    1991-11-15

    The maize mutant orange pericarp is a tryptophan auxotroph, which results from mutation of two unlinked loci of tryptophan synthase B. This mutant was used to test the hypothesis that tryptophan is the precursor to the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Total IAA in aseptically grown mutant seedlings was 50 times greater than in normal seedlings. In mutant seedlings grown on media containing stable isotopelabeled precursors, IAA was more enriched than was tryptophan. No incorporation of label into IAA from tryptophan could be detected. These results establish that IAA can be produced de novo without tryptophan as an intermediate.

  16. Chemically defined media modifications to lower tryptophan oxidation of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hazeltine, Laurie B; Knueven, Kristine M; Zhang, Yan; Lian, Zhirui; Olson, Donald J; Ouyang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of biopharmaceuticals is a major product quality issue with potential impacts on activity and immunogenicity. At Eli Lilly and Company, high tryptophan oxidation was observed for two biopharmaceuticals in development produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. A switch from historical hydrolysate-containing media to chemically defined media with a reformulated basal powder was thought to be responsible, so mitigation efforts focused on media modification. Shake flask studies identified that increasing tryptophan, copper, and manganese and decreasing cysteine concentrations were individual approaches to lower tryptophan oxidation. When amino acid and metal changes were combined, the modified formulation had a synergistic impact that led to substantially less tryptophan oxidation for both biopharmaceuticals. Similar results were achieved in shake flasks and benchtop bioreactors, demonstrating the potential to implement these modifications at manufacturing scale. The modified formulation did not negatively impact cell growth and viability, product titer, purity, charge variants, or glycan profile. A potential mechanism of action is presented for each amino acid or metal factor based on its role in oxidation chemistry. This work served not only to mitigate the tryptophan oxidation issue in two Lilly biopharmaceuticals in development, but also to increase our knowledge and appreciation for the impact of media components on product quality.

  17. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 in seasonal affective disorder: underestimated perspectives?

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Popova, Nina K

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by recurrent depression occurring generally in fall/winter. Numerous pieces of evidence indicate the association of SAD with decreased brain neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) system functioning. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) is the key and rate-limiting enzyme in 5-HT synthesis in the brain. This paper concentrates on the relationship between TPH2 activity and mood disturbances, the association between human TPH2 gene expression and the risk of affective disorder, application of tryptophan to SAD treatment and the animal models of SAD. The main conclusions of this review are as follows: (i) the brain 5-HT deficiency contributes to the mechanism underlying SAD, (ii) TPH2 is involved in the regulation of some kinds of genetically defined affective disorders and (iii) the activation of 5-HT synthesis with exogenous l-tryptophan alone or in combination with light therapy could be effective in SAD treatment. The synergic effect of these combined treatments will have several advantages compared to light or tryptophan therapy alone. First, it is effective in the treatment of patients resistant to light therapy. Secondly, l-tryptophan treatment prolongs the antidepressant effect of light therapy.

  18. Comparison of fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in myocytes from rats treated with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan cetoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solutions that cause elective cardiac arrest are constantly evolving, but the ideal compound has not yet been found. The authors compare a new cardioplegic solution with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate (Group 2) and other one with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate (Group 1) in a model of isolated rat heart. Objective To quantify the fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in rat myocytes subjected to cardioplegia solution using histidine-tryptophan with glutamate in an experimental model, considering the caspase markers, IL-8 and KI-67. Methods Twenty male Wistar rats were anesthetized and heparinized. The chest was opened, the heart was withdrawn and 40 ml/kg of cardioplegia (with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate or histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution) was infused. The hearts were kept for 2 hours at 4ºC in the same solution, and thereafter placed in the Langendorff apparatus for 30 min with Ringer-Locke solution. Analyzes were performed for immunohistochemical caspase, IL-8 and KI-67. Results The fractal dimension and Shannon entropy were not different between groups histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate. Conclusion The amount of information measured by Shannon entropy and the distribution thereof (given by fractal dimension) of the slices treated with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate and histidine-tryptophan-glutamate were not different, showing that the histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution is as good as histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate to preserve myocytes in isolated rat heart. PMID:25140464

  19. One-step of tryptophan attenuator inactivation and promoter swapping to improve the production of L-tryptophan in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background L-tryptophan is an aromatic amino acid widely used in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In Escherichia coli, L-tryptophan is synthesized from phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate by enzymes in the shikimate pathway and L-tryptophan branch pathway, while L-serine and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate are also involved in L-tryptophan synthesis. In order to construct a microbial strain for efficient L-tryptophan production from glucose, we developed a one step tryptophan attenuator inactivation and promoter swapping strategy for metabolic flux optimization after a base strain was obtained by overexpressing the tktA, mutated trpE and aroG genes and inactivating a series of competitive steps. Results The engineered E. coli GPT1002 with tryptophan attenuator inactivation and tryptophan operon promoter substitution exhibited 1.67 ~ 9.29 times higher transcription of tryptophan operon genes than the control GPT1001. In addition, this strain accumulated 1.70 g l-1 L-tryptophan after 36 h batch cultivation in 300-mL shake flask. Bioreactor fermentation experiments showed that GPT1002 could produce 10.15 g l-1 L-tryptophan in 48 h. Conclusions The one step inactivating and promoter swapping is an efficient method for metabolic engineering. This method can also be applied in other bacteria. PMID:22380540

  20. One-step of tryptophan attenuator inactivation and promoter swapping to improve the production of L-tryptophan in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pengfei; Yang, Fan; Kang, Junhua; Wang, Qian; Qi, Qingsheng

    2012-03-02

    L-tryptophan is an aromatic amino acid widely used in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In Escherichia coli, L-tryptophan is synthesized from phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate by enzymes in the shikimate pathway and L-tryptophan branch pathway, while L-serine and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate are also involved in L-tryptophan synthesis. In order to construct a microbial strain for efficient L-tryptophan production from glucose, we developed a one step tryptophan attenuator inactivation and promoter swapping strategy for metabolic flux optimization after a base strain was obtained by overexpressing the tktA, mutated trpE and aroG genes and inactivating a series of competitive steps. The engineered E. coli GPT1002 with tryptophan attenuator inactivation and tryptophan operon promoter substitution exhibited 1.67 ~ 9.29 times higher transcription of tryptophan operon genes than the control GPT1001. In addition, this strain accumulated 1.70 g l(-1) L-tryptophan after 36 h batch cultivation in 300-mL shake flask. Bioreactor fermentation experiments showed that GPT1002 could produce 10.15 g l(-1) L-tryptophan in 48 h. The one step inactivating and promoter swapping is an efficient method for metabolic engineering. This method can also be applied in other bacteria. © 2012 Gu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Immunohistochemical evidence for the presence of tryptophan hydroxylase in the brains of insects as revealed by sheep anti-tryptophan hydroxylase polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuexiang; Tian, Ximei; Zhao, Zhifu; Qu, Yutang; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Jinbei; Liu, Tianyi; Yang, Lina; Lv, Jiye; Song, Chuantao

    2008-06-01

    Immediately following the discovery of tryptophan hydroxylase in Drosophila, we demonstrated the presence of tryptophan hydroxylase in the brain of the beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). However, whether tryptophan hydroxylase is present in the brains of other insects is still a matter of discussion. In the current study, sheep anti-tryptophan hydroxylase polyclonal antibody has been applied to test for tryptophan hydroxylase immunoreactivity in a broader taxonomic range of insect brains, including holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects: one species each of Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Diptera, and Blattaria, and two species of Lepidoptera. All species show consistent tryptophan hydroxylase immunoreactivity with distribution patterns matching that of serotonin. The immuno-positive results of such an antibody in brains from diverse orders of insects suggest that specific tryptophan hydroxylase responsible for central serotonin synthesis is probably present in the brains of all insects.

  2. Interfacial Surface Modification via Nanoimprinting to Increase Open-Circuit Voltage of Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emah, Joseph B.; George, Nyakno J.; Akpan, Usenobong B.

    2017-08-01

    The low-cost patterning of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) interfacial layers inserted between indium tin oxide and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid ester blends leads to an improvement in organic photovoltaics (OPV) device performance. Significantly, improvements in all device parameters, including the open-circuit voltage, are achieved. The nanoimprinted devices improved further as the pattern period and imprinting depth was reduced from 727 nm and 42 nm to 340 nm and 10 nm, respectively. A residue of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is found on the interfacial PEDOT:PSS film following patterning and can be used to explain the increase in OPV performance. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of the PEDOT:PSS interfacial layer demonstrated a reduction of the work function of 0.4 eV following nanoimprinting which may originate from chemical modification of the PDMS residue or interfacial dipole formation supported by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Ultimately, we have demonstrated a 39% improvement in OPV device performance via a simple low-cost modification of the anode interfacial layer. This improvement can be assigned to two effects resulting from a PDMS residue on the PEDOT:PSS surface: (1) the reduction of the anode work function which in turn decreases the hole extraction barrier, and (2) the reduction of electron transfer from the highest occupied molecular orbital of PCBM to the anode.

  3. Fluorescent proteins as biosensors by quenching resonance energy transfer from endogenous tryptophan: detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Alexa; Sarette, Joseph; Shawler, Evan; Lee, Taeyoung; Freund, Steve; Holwitt, Eric; Hicks, Barry W

    2013-10-15

    Ensuring domestic safety from terrorist attack is a daunting challenge because of the wide array of chemical agents that must be screened. A panel of purified fluorescent protein isoforms (FPs) was screened for the ability to detect various explosives, explosive simulants, and toxic agents. In addition to their commonly used visible excitation wavelengths, essentially all FPs can be excited by UV light at 280 nm. Ultraviolet illumination excites electrons in endogenous tryptophan (W) residues, which then relax by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to the chromophore of the FP, and thus the FPs emit with their typical visible spectra. Taking advantage of the fact that tryptophan excitation can be quenched by numerous agents, including nitroaromatics like TNT and nitramines like RDX, it is demonstrated that quenching of visible fluorescence from UV illumination of FPs can be used as the basis for detecting these explosives and explosive degradation products. This work provides the foundation for production of an array of genetically-modified FPs for in vitro biosensors capable of rapid, simultaneous, sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of explosive or toxic agents. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Molecular insights into substrate recognition and catalysis by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Forouhar, Farhad; Anderson, J L Ross; Mowat, Christopher G; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Hussain, Arif; Abashidze, Mariam; Bruckmann, Chiara; Thackray, Sarah J; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Tucker, Todd; Xiao, Rong; Ma, Li-Chung; Zhao, Li; Acton, Thomas B; Montelione, Gaetano T; Chapman, Stephen K; Tong, Liang

    2007-01-09

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) constitute an important, yet relatively poorly understood, family of heme-containing enzymes. Here, we report extensive structural and biochemical studies of the Xanthomonas campestris TDO and a related protein SO4414 from Shewanella oneidensis, including the structure at 1.6-A resolution of the catalytically active, ferrous form of TDO in a binary complex with the substrate L-Trp. The carboxylate and ammonium moieties of tryptophan are recognized by electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the enzyme and a propionate group of the heme, thus defining the L-stereospecificity. A second, possibly allosteric, L-Trp-binding site is present at the tetramer interface. The sixth coordination site of the heme-iron is vacant, providing a dioxygen-binding site that would also involve interactions with the ammonium moiety of L-Trp and the amide nitrogen of a glycine residue. The indole ring is positioned correctly for oxygenation at the C2 and C3 atoms. The active site is fully formed only in the binary complex, and biochemical experiments confirm this induced-fit behavior of the enzyme. The active site is completely devoid of water during catalysis, which is supported by our electrochemical studies showing significant stabilization of the enzyme upon substrate binding.

  5. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element.

  6. Conformational characterization of human eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha: a single tryptophan protein.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R K; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Varshney, Nishant K; Berwal, Sunil K; Suresh, C G; Gaikwad, Sushama M; Pal, Jayanta K

    2009-12-11

    The alpha-subunit of the human eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (heIF2alpha), a GTP binding protein, plays a major role in the initiation of protein synthesis. During various cytoplasmic stresses, eIF2alpha gets phosphorylated by eIF2alpha-specific kinases resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. The cloned and over expressed heIF2alpha, a protein with a single tryptophan (trp) residue was examined for its conformational characteristics using steady-state and time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and hydrophobic dye binding. The steady-state fluorescence spectrum, fluorescence lifetimes (tau(1)=1.13ns and tau(2)=4.74ns) and solute quenching studies revealed the presence of trp conformers in hydrophobic and differential polar environment at any given time. Estimation of the alpha-helix and beta-sheet content showed: (i) more compact structure at pH 2.0, (ii) distorted alpha-helix and rearranged beta-sheet in presence of 4M guanidine hydrochloride and (iii) retention of more than 50% ordered structure at 95 degrees C. Hydrophobic dye binding to the protein with loosened tertiary structure was observed at pH 2.0 indicating the existence of a molten globule-like structure. These observations indicate the inherent structural stability of the protein under various denaturing conditions.

  7. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element. PMID:25494332

  8. A Structure‐Guided Switch in the Regioselectivity of a Tryptophan Halogenase

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Sarah A.; Menon, Binuraj R. K.; Fisk, Heidi; Struck, Anna‐Winona; Levy, Colin; Leys, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Flavin‐dependent halogenases are potentially useful biocatalysts for the regioselective halogenation of aromatic compounds. Haloaromatic compounds can be utilised in the synthesis and biosynthesis of pharmaceuticals and other valuable products. Here we report the first X‐ray crystal structure of a tryptophan 6‐halogenase (SttH), which enabled key residues that contribute to the regioselectivity in tryptophan halogenases to be identified. Structure‐guided mutagenesis resulted in a triple mutant (L460F/P461E/P462T) that exhibited a complete switch in regioselectivity; with the substrate 3‐indolepropionate 75 % 5‐chlorination was observed with the mutant in comparison to 90 % 6‐chlorination for the wild‐type SttH. This is the first clear example of how regiocomplementary halogenases can be created from a single parent enzyme. The biocatalytic repertoire of SttH was also expanded to include a range of indolic and non‐indolic substrates. PMID:26840773

  9. Molecular Insights into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Ross Anderson, J.; Mowat, C.; Vorobiev, S.; Hussain, A.; Abashidze, M.; Bruckmann, C.; Thackray, S.; Seetharaman, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) constitute an important, yet relatively poorly understood, family of heme-containing enzymes. Here, we report extensive structural and biochemical studies of the Xanthomonas campestris TDO and a related protein SO4414 from Shewanella oneidensis, including the structure at 1.6-{angstrom} resolution of the catalytically active, ferrous form of TDO in a binary complex with the substrate l-Trp. The carboxylate and ammonium moieties of tryptophan are recognized by electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the enzyme and a propionate group of the heme, thus defining the l-stereospecificity. A second, possibly allosteric, l-Trp-binding site is present at the tetramer interface. The sixth coordination site of the heme-iron is vacant, providing a dioxygen-binding site that would also involve interactions with the ammonium moiety of l-Trp and the amide nitrogen of a glycine residue. The indole ring is positioned correctly for oxygenation at the C2 and C3 atoms. The active site is fully formed only in the binary complex, and biochemical experiments confirm this induced-fit behavior of the enzyme. The active site is completely devoid of water during catalysis, which is supported by our electrochemical studies showing significant stabilization of the enzyme upon substrate binding.

  10. Evidence of energy transfer from tryptophan to BSA/HSA protected gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Butler, Susan; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2014-09-01

    This work reports on the chromophores interactions within protein-protected gold nanoclusters. We conducted spectroscopic studies of fluorescence emissions originated from gold nanoclusters and intrinsic tryptophan (Trp) in BSA or HSA proteins. Both steady state fluorescence and lifetime measurements showed a significant Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from Trp to the gold nanocluster. Tryptophan lifetimes in the case of protein-protected gold nanoclusters are 2.6 ns and 2.3 ns for BSA and HSA Au clusters while 5.8 ns for native BSA and 5.6 for native HSA. The apparent distances from Trp to gold nanocluster emission center, we estimated as 24.75 Å for BSA and 23.80 Å for HSA. We also studied a potassium iodide (KI) quenching of protein-protected gold nanoclusters and compared with the quenching of BSA and HSA alone. The rates of Trp quenching were smaller in BSA-Au and HSA-Au nanoclusters than in the case of free proteins, which is consistent with shorter lifetime of quenched Trp(s) and lower accessibility for KI. While Trp residues were quenched by KI, the emissions originated from nanoclusters were practically unquenched. In summary, for BSA and HSA Au clusters, we found 55% and 59% energy transfer efficiency respectively from tryoptophan to gold clusters. We believe this interaction can be used to our advantage in terms of developing resonance energy transfer based sensing applications.

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence of the two tryptophans in horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ross, J B; Schmidt, C J; Brand, L

    1981-07-21

    The tryptophan fluorescence decay of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, at 10 degrees C in 0.1 M pH 7.4 sodium phosphate buffer, with excitation at 295 nm, is a double exponential with time constants of 3.8 and 7.2 ns. Within experimental error, the two lifetimes remain constant across the emission spectrum. Only the 3.8-ns lifetime is quenched in the NAD+-pyrazole ternary complex, and only the 7.2-ns lifetime is quenched by 0-0.05 M KI. On the basis of these results, we assign the 3.8-ns lifetime to the buried tryptophan, Trp-314, and the 7.2-ns lifetime to the exposed tryptophan, Trp-15. The steady-state lifetime-resolved emission spectrum of Trp-15 has a maximum at approximately 340 nm and that of Trp-15 is at approximately 325 nm. The total time-resolved emission, after 40 ns of decay, has a maximum between 338 and 340 nm and is primarily due to the Trp-15 emission. As a consequence of the wavelength dependence of the preexponential weighting factors, there is an increase in the average lifetime from the blue to the red edge of the emission. This increase reflects the change in the spectral contributions of Trp-15 and Trp-314. Consideration of the spectral overlap between the emission spectra of the two tryptophans and the absorption due to formation of the ternary complex, as well as the distances between the two residues and the bound NAD+, shows that the selective fluorescence quenching in the ternary complex can be accounted for entirely by singlet-single energy transfer. The decay of the fluorescence anisotropy was measured as a function of temperature from 10 to 40 degrees C and is well described by a monoexponential decay law. Over this temperature range the calculated hydrodynamic radius increases from 33.5 to 35.1 A. Evidently, the indole groups of Trp-15 and Trp-314 rotate with the protein as a whole, and there is some expansion of the protein matrix as the ambient temperature is increased.

  12. Potential role for nonesterified fatty acids in beta-adrenoceptor-induced increases in brain tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Lenard, Natalie R; Dunn, Adrian J

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that beta2- and beta3-adrenergic receptor-mediated increases in brain tryptophan are due to the liberation of fatty acids, which in turn displace tryptophan from its albumin-binding site and thus facilitate its entry into the brain. Male CD-1 mice were injected with subtype-selective beta-adrenergic agonists 1h before brain samples were collected for analysis of tryptophan content by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and blood samples were collected for analysis of total and free tryptophan and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. The beta2-selective agonist, clenbuterol (0.1 mg/kg), increased concentrations of tryptophan in all brain regions studied and decreased plasma total tryptophan, but had no effect on plasma free tryptophan or NEFAs. The beta3-selective agonists, BRL 37344 (0.2 mg/kg) or CL 316243 (0.01 mg/kg), increased brain tryptophan, plasma NEFAs and free tryptophan. Pretreatment with nicotinic acid (500 mg/kg), an inhibitor of lipolysis, almost completely prevented the increase in plasma free tryptophan and NEFAs, and attenuated the increase in brain tryptophan induced by CL 316243. These results suggest that beta2- and beta3-adrenergic agonists increase brain tryptophan by a mechanism other than the liberation of NEFAs. Nonetheless, beta3-adrenergic agonists appear to increase brain tryptophan by a mechanism that may depend partially on elevations of plasma NEFAs.

  13. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  14. Elastocapillary-mediated interfacial assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Particles confined to an interface are present in a large number of industrial applications and ubiquitous in cellular biophysics. Interactions mediated by the interface, such as capillary effects in the presence of surface tension, give rise to rafts and aggregates whose structure is ultimately determined by geometric characteristics of these adsorbed particles. A common strategy for assembling interfacial structures relies on exploiting these interactions by tuning particle anisotropy, either by constructing rigid particles with heterogeneous wetting properties or fabricating particles that have a naturally anisotropic shape. Less explored, however, is the scenario where the interface causes the particles to deform. In this talk I will discuss the implications for interfacial assembly using elastocapillary-mediated interactions. The competition between surface energy and elasticity can wrinkle and buckle adsorbed soft particles, leading to complicated (but programmable) aggregates.

  15. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  16. Molecular basis for catalysis and substrate-mediated cellular stabilization of human tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Forouhar, Farhad; Kim, Sung-Mi; Lew, Scott; Wang, YongQiang; Karkashon, Shay; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Hussain, Munif; Correia, Maria Almira; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) play a central role in tryptophan metabolism and are involved in many cellular and disease processes. Here we report the crystal structure of human TDO (hTDO) in a ternary complex with the substrates L-Trp and O2 and in a binary complex with the product N-formylkynurenine (NFK), defining for the first time the binding modes of both substrates and the product of this enzyme. The structure indicates that the dioxygenation reaction is initiated by a direct attack of O2 on the C2 atom of the L-Trp indole ring. The structure also reveals an exo binding site for L-Trp, located ~42 Å from the active site and formed by residues conserved among tryptophan-auxotrophic TDOs. Biochemical and cellular studies indicate that Trp binding at this exo site does not affect enzyme catalysis but instead it retards the degradation of hTDO through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal pathway. This exo site may therefore provide a novel L-Trp-mediated regulation mechanism for cellular degradation of hTDO, which may have important implications in human diseases. PMID:27762317

  17. Maintenance valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan requirements for poultry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M B; Sakomura, N K; Dorigam, J C P; da Silva, E P; Ferreira, N T; Fernandes, J B K

    2016-04-01

    Poultry maintenance requirements for valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan were measured by nitrogen balance using different unit systems. The nitrogen balance trial lasted 5 d with 48 h of fasting (with roosters receiving only water+sucrose) and the last 72 h for feeding and excreta collection. Forty grams of each diet first-limiting in valine, isoleucine, or tryptophan was fed by tube each day (3 d) to give a range of intakes from 0 to 101, 0 to 119, and 0 to 34 mg/kg BW d of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan, respectively. A nitrogen-free diet containing energy, vitamins, and minerals, meeting the rooster requirements, was offered ad libitum during these three d. To confirm that the amino acids studied were limiting, a treatment was added with a control diet formulated by adding 0.24 g/kg of L-valine, 0.21 g/kg of L-isoleucine, and 0.10 g/kg of L-tryptophan to the diets with lower amino acid level. Excreta were collected during the last 3 d of the balance period and the nitrogen content of the excreta was analyzed. For each amino acid, a linear regression between nitrogen retention (NR) and amino acid intake was performed. The equations from linear regression were: NR=-98.6 (±10.1)+2.4 (±0.2)×Val, NR=-46.9 (±7.1)+2.3 (±0.1)×Ile, NR=-39.5 (±7.7)+7.3 (±0.4)×Trp; where Val, Ile, and Trp are the intakes of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan in mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. The valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required to maintain the body at zero NR were calculated to be 41, 20, and 5 mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. For the system unit mg per kg of metabolic weight, the intake of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was 59, 32, and 9, respectively. Considering the degree of maturity of the animal and body protein content (BPm (0.73)×u), the amounts of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required for maintenance were calculated to be 247, 134, and 37 mg per unit of maintenance protein (BPm (0.73)×u) per d. Maintenance requirement is more

  18. Dynamic behavior in mathematical models of the tryptophan operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    This paper surveys the general theory of operon regulation as first formulated by Goodwin and Griffith, and then goes on to consider in detail models of regulation of tryptophan production by Bliss, Sinha, and Santillán and Mackey, and the interrelationships between them. We further give a linear stability analysis of the Santillán and Mackey model for wild type E. coli as well as three different mutant strains that have been previously studied in the literature. This stability analysis indicates that the tryptophan production systems should be stable, which is in accord with our numerical results.

  19. Role of brain tryptophan and serotonin in secondary anorexia.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo; Laviano, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    Anorexia and reduced energy intake contribute to worsen the prognosis of patients suffering from a number of chronic diseases, by promoting skeletal muscle wasting, leading to the development of malnutrition and eventually cachexia. The pathogenesis of cancer anorexia is still matter of debate. Many possible mediators, including hormones, peptides, and neurotransmitters, appear to be involved. However, consistent animal and clinical data suggest that brain tryptophan and serotonin may represent a common final pathway shared by many contributing factors. Supporting this hypothesis, recent data showed that the manipulation of brain tryptophan availability ameliorates anorexia and food intake in cancer patients.

  20. Tryptophan dendrimers that inhibit HIV replication, prevent virus entry and bind to the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Colomer, Ignacio; Quesada, Ernesto; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Camarasa, María-José; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Balzarini, Jan; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Dendrimers containing from 9 to 18 tryptophan residues at the peryphery have been efficiently synthesized and tested against HIV replication. These compounds inhibit an early step of the replicative cycle of HIV, presumably virus entry into its target cell. Our data suggest that HIV inhibition can be achieved by the preferred interaction of the compounds herein described with glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of the HIV envelope preventing interaction between HIV and the (co)receptors present on the host cells. The results obtained so far indicate that 9 tryptophan residues on the periphery are sufficient for efficient gp120/gp41 binding and anti-HIV activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  2. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  3. Interfacial sliding stress in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN fibrous monoliths.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Goretta, K. C.; Richardson,, J. W., Jr.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Energy Technology; Univ. de Sevilla

    2002-05-24

    Pushout tests of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cells in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN fibrous monoliths yielded values for debond and sliding stresses of 45{+-}8 and 25{+-}7 MPa, respectively. The sliding stress was consistent with estimates of residual stresses and the interfacial friction coefficient.

  4. Distinctive structure and interfacial activity of the human apolipoprotein A-IV 347S isoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Cook, Victoria R.

    2010-01-01

    The T347S polymorphism in the human apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV gene is present at high frequencies among all the world's populations. Carriers of a 347S allele exhibit faster clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, greater adiposity, and increased risk for developing atherosclerosis, which suggests that this conservative amino acid substitution alters the structure of apo A-IV. Herein we have used spectroscopic and surface chemistry techniques to examine the structure, stability, and interfacial properties of the apo A-IV 347S isoprotein. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the 347S isoprotein has similar α-helical structure but lower thermodynamic stability than the 347T isoprotein. Fluorescence spectroscopy found that the 347S isoprotein exhibits an enhanced tyrosine emission and reduced tyrosine→tryptophan energy transfer, and second derivative UV absorption spectra noted increased tyrosine exposure, suggesting that the 347S isoprotein adopts a looser tertiary conformation. Surface chemistry studies found that although the 347S isoprotein bound rapidly to the lipid interface, it has a lower interfacial exclusion pressure and lower elastic modulus than the 347T isoprotein. Together, these observations establish that the T347S substitution alters the conformation of apo A-IV and lowers its interfacial activity—changes that could account for the effect of this polymorphism on postprandial lipid metabolism. PMID:20554794

  5. Structural characterization of two pore-forming peptides: consequences of introducing a C-terminal tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alvaro I; Al-Rawi, Ahlam; Cook, Gabriel A; Gao, Jian; Iwamoto, Takeo; Prakash, Om; Tomich, John M; Chen, Jianhan

    2010-08-01

    Synthetic channel-forming peptides that can restore chloride conductance across epithelial membranes could provide a novel treatment of channelopathies such as cystic fibrosis. Among a series of 22-residue peptides derived from the second transmembrane segment of the glycine receptor alpha(1)-subunit (M2GlyR), p22-S22W (KKKKP ARVGL GITTV LTMTT QW) is particularly promising with robust membrane insertion and assembly. The concentration to reach one-half maximal short circuit current is reduced to 45 +/- 6 microM from that of 210 +/- 70 microM of peptide p22 (KKKKP ARVGL GITTV LTMTT QS). However, this is accompanied with nearly 50% reduction in conductance. Toward obtaining a molecular level understanding of the channel activities, we combine information from solution NMR, existing biophysical data, and molecular modeling to construct atomistic models of the putative pentameric channels of p22 and p22-S22W. Simulations in membrane bilayers demonstrate that these structural models, even though highly flexible, are stable and remain adequately open for ion conductance. The membrane-anchoring tryptophan residues not only rigidify the whole channel, suggesting increased stability, but also lead to global changes in the pore profile. Specifically, the p22-S22W pore has a smaller opening on average, consistent with lower measured conductance. Direct observation of several incidences of chloride transport suggests several qualitative features of how these channels might selectively conduct anions. The current study thus helps to rationalize the functional consequences of introducing a single C-terminal tryptophan. Availability of these structural models also paves the way for future work to rationally modify and improve M2GlyR-derived peptides toward potential peptide-based channel replacement therapy.

  6. Gene-Enzyme Relations of Tryptophan Mutants in STREPTOMYCES COELICOLOR A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Smithers, Charles M.; Engel, Paulinus P.

    1974-01-01

    Mutations in twenty-eight tryptophan mutants of S. coelicolor A3(2) were mapped relative to the nearest flanking markers. Mutants lacking single enzymatic activities for phosphoribosyltransferase, phosphoribosylanthranilate isomerase, indodeglycerol phosphate synthase, tryptophan synthase A and tryptophan synthase B were identified. PMID:4452474

  7. Tryptophan fluorescence monitors structural changes accompanying signalling state formation in the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Gensch, Thomas; Hendriks, Johnny; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2004-06-01

    Photoactive yellow protein, a small, water-soluble blue-light absorbing photoreceptor protein from Ectothiorhodospira(Halorhodospira)[space]halophila has a structure with two hydrophobic cores, of which the main one houses its light-sensitive chromophore (p-coumaric acid), separated by a central [small beta]-sheet. This photoreceptor protein contains a single tryptophan residue (W119) that is situated at the interface between the central beta-sheet and its N-terminal cap. The fluorescence properties of W119 in the dark state pG (lambda(max)= 328 nm; Phi(fl)= 0.01; nearly pH-independent) are typical for a buried tryptophan in a hydrophobic environment with significant quenching by nearby amino acid residues. Signalling state formation leads to pH-dependent fluorescence changes: At pH values <6.5 the fluorescence emission increases, with a minor blue shift of the emission maximum. Above this pH, the emission maximum of the tryptophan shifts considerably to the red, whereas its total intensity decreases. These results further support the contention that signalling state formation in PYP leads to significant changes in the structure of this protein, even at sites that are at a considerable distance from the chromophore. The nature of these changes in pB, however, depend upon the pH imposed upon the protein: At slightly alkaline pH, which presumably is closest to the pH to which this protein is exposed in vivo, these changes lead to an exposure of the part of the central beta-sheet harbouring W119. At slightly acidic pH the polarity of the environment of W119 is hardly affected by the formation of the signalling state but the quenching of its fluorescence emission, possibly by nearby amino acids, is reduced. On the other hand, its accessibility for quenching by small molecules in the solution is enhanced at acidic and alkaline pH in the signalling state (pB) compared to the dark state (pG). This latter observation points towards a more flexible structure of the N

  8. Tryptophan environment, secondary structure and thermal unfolding of the galactose-specific seed lectin from Dolichos lablab: fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Nabil Ali Mohammed; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar; Swamy, Musti J

    2006-07-01

    Fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic studies were carried out on the galactose-specific lectin from Dolichos lablab seeds (DLL-II). The microenvironment of the tryptophan residues in the lectin under native and denaturing conditions were investigated by quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein by a neutral quencher (acrylamide), an anionic quencher (iodide ion) and a cationic quencher (cesium ion). The results obtained indicate that the tryptophan residues of DLL-II are largely buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein matrix, with positively charged side chains residing close to at least some of the tryptophan residues under the experimental conditions. Analysis of the far UV CD spectrum of DLL-II revealed that the secondary structure of the lectin consists of 57% alpha-helix, 21% beta-sheet, 7% beta-turns and 15% unordered structures. Carbohydrate binding did not significantly alter the secondary and tertiary structures of the lectin. Thermal unfolding of DLL-II, investigated by monitoring CD signals, showed a sharp transition around 75 degrees C both in the far UV region (205 nm) and the near UV region (289 nm), which shifted to ca. 77-78 degrees C in the presence of 0.1 M methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, indicating that ligand binding leads to a moderate stabilization of the lectin structure.

  9. Association between Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Polymorphism and Completed Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fudalej, Sylwia; Ilgen, Mark; Fudalej, Marcin; Kostrzewa, Grazyna; Barry, Kristen; Wojnar, Marcin; Krajewski, Pawel; Blow, Frederic; Ploski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    The association between suicide and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1386483) was examined in the recently identified tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene. Blood samples of 143 suicide victims and 162 age- and sex-matched controls were examined. The frequency of the TT genotype in the TPH2 polymorphism was higher in suicide victims than in…

  10. Tryptophan-based Fluorophores for Studying Protein Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Poulami; Chen, Shengxi; Liu, C. Tony; Baldwin, Edwin A.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Hecht, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing interest in deciphering the interplay between protein function and conformational changes, small fluorescence probes will be especially useful for tracking changes in the crowded protein interior space. Presently, we describe the potential utility of six unnatural amino acid fluorescence donors structurally related to tryptophan and show how they can be efficiently incorporated into a protein as fluorescence probes. We also examine the various photophysical properties of the new Trp analogues, which are significantly redshifted in their fluorescence spectra relative to tryptophan. In general, the Trp analogues were well tolerated when inserted into E. coli DHFR, and did not perturb enzyme activity, although substitution for Trp22 did result in a diminution in DHFR activity. Further, it was demonstrated that D and E at position 37 formed efficient FRET pairs with acridon-2-ylalanine (Acd) at position 17. The same was also true for a DHFR construct containing E at position 79 and Acd at position 17. Together, these findings demonstrate that these tryptophan analogues can be introduced into DHFR with minimal disruption of function, and that they can be employed for the selective study of targeted conformational or electrostatic changes in proteins, even in the presence of unmodified tryptophans. PMID:25284250

  11. Association between Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Polymorphism and Completed Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fudalej, Sylwia; Ilgen, Mark; Fudalej, Marcin; Kostrzewa, Grazyna; Barry, Kristen; Wojnar, Marcin; Krajewski, Pawel; Blow, Frederic; Ploski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    The association between suicide and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1386483) was examined in the recently identified tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene. Blood samples of 143 suicide victims and 162 age- and sex-matched controls were examined. The frequency of the TT genotype in the TPH2 polymorphism was higher in suicide victims than in…

  12. Preliminary study: voluntary food intake in dogs during tryptophan supplementation.

    PubMed

    Fragua, Víctor; González-Ortiz, Gemma; Villaverde, Cecilia; Hervera, Marta; Mariotti, Valentina Maria; Manteca, Xavier; Baucells, María Dolores

    2011-10-01

    Tryptophan, a precursor of important molecules such as serotonin, melatonin and niacin, is an essential amino acid for dogs. In pigs, tryptophan supplementation has been shown to induce a significant increase in food intake. The aim of the present study was to assess whether long-term tryptophan supplementation increases voluntary food intake in dogs and to observe whether this was accompanied by a change in serum ghrelin. In the present study, sixteen adult Beagle dogs were used, with four male and four female dogs fed diets supplemented with tryptophan (1 g/dog per d) during 81 d (Trp) and four male and four female dogs that were not supplemented (control). A voluntary food intake test was performed during 5 d following the supplementation period. The Trp group tended to show a higher food intake during the voluntary food intake test (58.0 (SE 5.37) v. 77.5 (SE 3.65) g/kg metabolic weight per d; P = 0.074). No significant differences were found for serum ghrelin concentrations.

  13. Formation and Characterization of Marigranules from Tryptophan and Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Yoko

    1984-12-01

    We found that molecular oxygen and aromatic amino acids such as tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine were essential for the formation of marigranules. Among aromatic amino acids, tryptophan gave the best yield of marigranules. Among indole derivatives, kynurenine gave the best yield of marigranules. Large marigranules (0.3 3 μm in diameter) were formed from tryptophan in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+, and small marigranules (0.2 0.6 μm in diameter) were produced in the absence of such divalent metal ions. Marigranules formed from tryptophan were partially solubilized with methanol and completely solubilized with dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl-formamide. The solubilized marigranules consisted of polymers with molecular weights of 2×103 and 105 107 daltons. The methanol-soluble fraction provided well-defined vesicles upon sonication. Marigranule-like particles were formed from D,L-glyceraldehyde, D-erythrose and D-ribose but they were not formed from glycolaldehyde, L-arabinose and D-glucose. Among sugars, D-erythrose gave the best yield of the particles.

  14. Amygdala responsiveness is modulated by tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene variation.

    PubMed

    Canli, T; Congdon, E; Gutknecht, L; Constable, R T; Lesch, K P

    2005-11-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene (TPH2) codes for the enzyme of serotonin (5-HT) synthesis in the brain and variation of TPH2 has been implicated in disorders of emotion regulation. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate that a potentially functional variant of TPH2 modulates amygdala responsiveness to emotional stimuli of both negative and positive valence.

  15. Tryptophan Enhancement of Somatic Embryogenesis in Rice 1

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Sunitha; Nabors, Murray W.

    1983-01-01

    Cereal embryos can produce two types of callus. One type, termed “embryogenic,” consists of small meristematic-like cells and gives rise to many plants by somatic embryogenesis if placed on a suitable regeneration medium. The other is termed “nonembryogenic” and consists of long tubular cells which gives rise to few or no plants. High concentrations of tryptophan increased the formation of embryogenic callus in three rice cultivars (Oryza sativa L. Calrose 76, Pokkali, and IR 36) but not in four others (Mahsuri, Bg 400-1, H4, and Giza 159). The best concentration of tryptophan for Pokkali and Calrose 76 was 100 micrograms per milliliter, and for IR 36, 50 micrograms per milliliter. Indoleacetic acid at 100 micrograms per milliliter promoted an effect similar to that of tryptophan on Calrose 76. The difference between japonica (Calrose 76, Giza 159) and indica (Pokkali, IR 36) varieties is not the causal factor for the difference in response to tryptophan. Kinetin does not appear to be a requirement for embryogenic callus formation in Calrose 76. Plant regeneration from Calrose 76 embryogenic callus occurred at low levels in media containing no hormones. 6-benzyladenine, or 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid but not indoleacetic acid at 0.1 to 0.5 micrograms per milliliter significantly increased regeneration. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16663163

  16. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  17. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  18. Characterisation of photo-oxidation products within photoyellowed wool proteins: tryptophan and tyrosine derived chromophores.

    PubMed

    Dyer, J M; Bringans, S D; Bryson, W G

    2006-07-01

    Understanding the photodegradation of complex protein systems represents a significant goal in protein science. The photo-oxidation and resultant photoyellowing of wool in sunlight is a severe impediment to its marketability. However, although some photomodifications have been found in irradiated model amino acid systems, direct identification of the chromophoric photoproducts responsible for photoyellowing in irradiated wool itself has proved elusive. We here describe the direct characterisation and location of yellow chromophores and related photomodifications within the proteins of photoyellowed wool fabric, utilising a quasi-proteomic approach. In total, eight distinct photoproducts were characterised. Of these, five were derived from tryptophan; namely hydroxytryptophan, N-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, residues consistent with the dehydration of kynurenine, and hydroxykynurenine, while three were derived from tyrosine; namely dihydroxyphenylalanine, dityrosine, and a cross-linked residue consistent with a hydroxylated dityrosine residue. Fourteen modified peptide sequences were identified and the positions of modification for thirteen of these were located within the primary structure of known wool proteins. The nature of the photoproducts characterised offer valuable insight into the reaction pathways followed in the UV-induced photoyellowing of wool proteins.

  19. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  20. Tryptophan concentrations in rat brain. Failure to correlate with free serum tryptophan or its ratio to the sum of other serum neutral amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Fernstrom, J D; Hirsch, M J; Faller, D V

    1976-01-01

    Groups of rats were deprived of food overnight and then given free access to diets designed to raise (carbohydrate) or lower (carbohydrate and large neutral amino acids) brain tryptophan concentrations. Similar diets were supplemented with 40% fat and fed to other groups. All animals were killed 2h after food presentation. Sera from animals fed carbohydrate plus fat contained 2.5 times as much free tryptophan concentrations did not differ. Similarly, sera from rats fed on carbohydrate, large neutral amino acids, and 40% fat contained 5 times as much free tryptophan as those from rats given this meal without fat, but brain tryptophan concentrations increased by only 26%. Correlations were made between brain tryptophan and (1) free serum tryptophan, (2) the ratio of free serum tryptophan to the sum of the other large neutral amino acids in serum that compete with it for uptake into the brain, (3) total serum tryptophan or (4) the ratio of total serum tryptophan to the sum of its circulating competitors. The r values for correlations (3) and (4) (i.e. those involving total serum tryptophan) were appreciably higher than those for correlations (1) and (2). Brain tyrosine concentrations also were found to correlate well with the ratio of serum tyrosine to the sum of its competitors. Competition for uptake into the brain among large neutral amino acids (represented here by serum ratios) thus appears to determine the changes in the brain concentrations of these amino acids under physiological conditions(i.e. after food consumption). Total, not free, serum tryptophan is the relevant index for predicting brain tryptophan concentrations. PMID:1016241

  1. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  2. Tryptophan Metabolism in Rat Liver After Administration of Tryptophan, Kynurenine Metabolites, and Kynureninase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.; Bano, Samina

    2016-01-01

    Rat liver tryptophan (Trp), kynurenine pathway metabolites, and enzymes deduced from product/substrate ratios were assessed following acute and/or chronic administration of kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA), Trp, and the kynureni-nase inhibitors benserazide (BSZ) and carbidopa (CBD). KA activated Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), possibly by increasing liver 3-HAA, but inhibited kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) and kynureninase activities with 3-HK as substrate. 3-HK inhibited kynureninase activity from 3-HK. 3-HAA stimulated TDO, but inhibited kynureninase activity from K and 3-HK. Trp (50 mg/kg) increased kynurenine metabolite concentrations and KAT from K, and exerted a temporary stimulation of TDO. The kynureninase inhibitors BSZ and CBD also inhibited KAT, but stimulated TDO. BSZ abolished or strongly inhibited the Trp-induced increases in liver Trp and kynurenine metabolites. The potential effects of these changes in conditions of immune activation, schizophrenia, and other disease states are discussed. PMID:27547037

  3. Inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase abolishes fatigue induced by central tryptophan in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, L M S; Guimarães, J B; Wanner, S P; La Guardia, R B; Miranda, R M; Marubayashi, U; Soares, D D

    2014-02-01

    Fatigue during prolonged exercise is related to brain monoamines concentrations, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of increased central tryptophan (TRP) availability on physical performance and thermoregulation in running rats that were pretreated with parachlorophenylalanine (p-CPA), an inhibitor of the conversion of TRP to serotonin. On the 3 days before the experiment, adult male Wistar rats were treated with intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline or p-CPA. On the day of the experiment, animals received intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of either saline or TRP (20.3 μM) and underwent a submaximal exercise test until fatigue. Icv TRP-treated rats that received ip saline presented higher heat storage rate and a 69% reduction in time to fatigue compared with the control animals. Pretreatment with ip p-CPA blocked the effects of TRP on thermoregulation and performance. Moreover, ip p-CPA administration accelerated cutaneous heat dissipation when compared with saline-pretreated rats. We conclude that an elevated availability of central TRP interferes with fatigue mechanisms of exercising rats. This response is modulated by serotonergic pathways, because TRP effects were blocked in the presence of p-CPA. Our data also support that a depletion of brain serotonin facilitates heat loss mechanisms during exercise. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Redox Properties of Tryptophan Metabolism and the Concept of Tryptophan Use in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kang; Liu, Hongnan; Bai, Miaomiao; Gao, Jing; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    During pregnancy, tryptophan (Trp) is required for several purposes, and Trp metabolism varies over time in the mother and fetus. Increased oxidative stress (OS) with high metabolic, energy and oxygen demands during normal pregnancy or in pregnancy-associated disorders has been reported. Taking the antioxidant properties of Trp and its metabolites into consideration, we made four hypotheses. First, the use of Trp and its metabolites is optional based on their antioxidant properties during pregnancy. Second, dynamic Trp metabolism is an accommodation mechanism in response to OS. Third, regulation of Trp metabolism could be used to control/attenuate OS according to variations in Trp metabolism during pregnancy. Fourth, OS-mediated injury could be alleviated by regulation of Trp metabolism in pregnancy-associated disorders. Future studies in normal/abnormal pregnancies and in associated disorders should include measurements of free Trp, total Trp, Trp metabolites, and activities of Trp-degrading enzymes in plasma. Abnormal pregnancies and some associated disorders may be associated with disordered Trp metabolism related to OS. Mounting evidence suggests that the investigation of the use of Trp and its metabolites in pregnancy will be meanful. PMID:28737706

  5. Conformational study of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate (KPI) by tryptophan fluorescence and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shou-Wei; Tang, Chuan-He; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Wen, Qi-Biao

    2011-01-12

    Fluorescence and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to study changes in the conformation of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate (KPI) under various environmental conditions. The possible relationship between fluorescence data and DSC characteristics was also discussed. Tryptophan fluorescence and fluorescence quenching analyses indicated that the tryptophan residues in KPI, exhibiting multiple fluorophores with different accessibilities to acrylamide, are largely buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein matrix, with positively charged side chains close to at least some of the tryptophan residues. GdnHCl was more effective than urea and SDS in denaturing KPI. SDS and urea caused variable red shifts, 2-5 nm, in the emission λ(max), suggesting the conformational compactness of KPI. The result was further supported by DSC characteristics that a discernible endothermic peak was still detected up to 8 M urea or 30 mM SDS, also evidenced by the absence of any shift in emission maximum (λ(max)) at different pH conditions. Marked decreases in T(d) and enthalpy (ΔH) were observed at extreme alkaline and/or acidic pH, whereas the presence of NaCl resulted in higher T(d) and ΔH, along with greater cooperativity of the transition. Decreases in T(d) and ΔH were observed in the presence of protein perturbants, for example, SDS and urea, indicating partial denaturation and decrease in thermal stability. Dithiothreitol and N-ethylmaleimide have a slight effect on the thermal properties of KPI. Interestingly, a close linear relationship between the T(d) (or ΔH) and the λ(max) was observed for KPI in the presence of 0-6 M urea.

  6. Characterization of cyclo-Acetoacetyl-L-Tryptophan Dimethylallyltransferase in Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis: Substrate Promiscuity and Site Directed Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2009-01-01

    The fungal neurotoxin α-cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a nanomolar inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase with a unique pentacyclic indole tetramic acid scaffold is assembled by a three enzyme pathway CpaS, CpaD and CpaO in Aspergillus sp. We recently characterized the first pathway-specific enzyme CpaS, a hybrid two module polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) that generates cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan (cAATrp). Here we report the characterization of the second pathway-specific enzyme CpaD that regiospecifically dimethylallylates cAATrp to form β-cyclopiazonic acid. By exploring the tryptophan and tetramate moieties of cAATrp, we demonstrate that CpaD discriminates against free Trp but accepts tryptophan-containing thiohydantoins, diketopiperazines and linear peptides as substrates for C4-prenylation and also acts as regiospecific O-dimethylallyltransferase (DMAT) on a tyrosine-derived tetramic acid. Comparative evaluation of CpaDs from A. oryzae RIB40 and A. flavus NRRL3357 indicated the importance of the N-terminal region for its activity. Sequence alignment of CpaD with eleven homologous fungal Trp-DMATs revealed five regions of conservation suggesting the presense of critical motifs that could be diagonostic for discovering additional Trp-DMATs. Subsequent site-directed mutagenesis studies identified five polar/charged residues and five tyrosine residues within these motifs that are critical for CpaD activity. This motif characerization will enable a gene probe-based approach to discover additional biosynthetic Trp-DMATs. PMID:19877600

  7. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  8. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  10. Repetitive cleavage of elastomeric membrane via controlled interfacial fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Choi, Yong Whan; Kim, Min Sung; Um, Hyung Sik; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Pilnam; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report a method of fabricating thin layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with a thickness in the range of 60-80 nm, which can be repeatedly generated (more than 10 times) from the same block of PDMS via controlled interfacial fracture. The thin layers can be transferred to various substrates by peeling off from the bulk PDMS. The cleavage is attributed to the built-in stress at the fracture interface due to plasma treatment, resulting in the repetitive formation of the thin membranes, with no residue from processing, and with a surface roughness of ∼5 nm. We were able to demonstrate transferred patterns with controlled thickness by varying the oxygen plasma treatment conditions and the composition of bulk PDMS stamp. Using the method, we achieved residual-free patterns with submicrometer resolution for applications in biomolecule array templates.

  11. Probing the role of water in the tryptophan repressor-operator complex.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. P.; Grillo, A. O.; Boyer, M.; Royer, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Escherichia coli tryptophan repressor protein (TR) represses the transcription of several genes in response to the concentration of tryptophan in the environment. In the co-crystal structure of TR bound to a DNA fragment containing its target very few direct contacts between TR and the DNA were observed. In contrast, a number of solvent mediated contacts were apparent. NMR solution structures, however, did not resolve any solvent mediated bonds at the complex interface. To probe for the role of water in TR operator recognition, the effect of osmolytes on the interactions between TR and a target oligonucleotide bearing the operator site was examined. In the absence of specific solvent mediated hydrogen bonding interactions between the protein and the DNA, increasing osmolyte concentration is expected to strongly stabilize the TR operator interaction due to the large amount of macromolecular surface area buried upon complexation. The results of our studies indicate that xylose did not alter the binding affinity significantly, while glycerol and PEG had a small stabilizing effect. A study of binding as a function of betaine concentration revealed that this osmolyte at low concentration results in a stabilization of the 1:1 TR/operator complex, but at higher concentrations leads to a switching between binding modes to favor tandem binding. Analysis of the effects of betaine on the 1:1 complex suggest that this osmolyte has about 78% of the expected effect. If one accepts the analysis in terms of the number of water molecules excluded upon complexation, these results suggest that about 75 water molecules remain at the interface of the 1:1 dimer/DNA complex. This value is consistent with the number of water molecules found at the interface in the crystallographically determined structure and supports the notion that interfacial waters play an important thermodynamic role in the specific complexation of one TR dimer with its target DNA. However, the complexity of the

  12. Formation and Interrelationships of Tryptophanase and Tryptophan Synthetases in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Newton, W. Austin; Snell, Esmond E.

    1965-01-01

    Newton, W. Austin (University of California, Berkeley), and Esmond E. Snell. Formation and interrelationships of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetases in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 89:355–364. 1965.—In addition to the classical tryptophan-repressible tryptophan synthetase (TSase-tr), tryptophan auxotrophs of Escherichia coli contain another distinct tryptophan synthetase (TSase-ti) which is induced by tryptophan and is identical with tryptophanase (TPase). Escherichia coli B (wild type) forms only TSase-tr when the growth medium lacks tryptophan. When tryptophan is supplied, parallel induction of TPase and TSase-ti occurs while TSase-tr is repressed. Antiserum prepared against purified TPase neutralized TPase and TSase-ti equally, but not TSase-tr. TPase-negative strains of E. coli do not form TSase-ti. Unlike TSase-tr, TSase-ti is not readily detected by whole-cell assays. In the tryptophan auxotroph, E. coli B/1t7, a direct correlation exists between the effectiveness of 4-, 5-, and 6-methyl-tryptophan in inducing TPase and in promoting growth in the presence of indole. In a mutant of this organism, E. coli B/1t7-A, which is constitutive for TPase, 5-methyl-tryptophan and other substrates of TPase increased the rate of growth on limiting indole, a result ascribed to their ability to inhibit degradation of tryptophan and to supply the 3-carbon side chain for synthesis of tryptophan by TPase. This organism produced maximal amounts of TPase when inocula from log-phase cells grown in tryptophan-supplemented minimal medium were allowed to undergo two cell generations in an enriched broth medium. PMID:14255701

  13. Increased serum free tryptophan in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christmas, David M; Badawy, Abdulla A-B; Hince, Dana; Davies, Simon J C; Probert, Christopher; Creed, Tom; Smithson, John; Afzal, Muhammad; Nutt, David J; Potokar, John P

    2010-10-01

    Irregularities of serotonin function in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be due to changes in the metabolism of the serotonin precursor l-tryptophan. Dietary alteration of tryptophan intake may impact upon the mood and bowel symptoms of IBS. We hypothesized that diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (d-IBS) patients would exhibit an increase in plasma tryptophan due to alterations in tryptophan metabolism. We also hypothesized that a diet low in tryptophan would reverse this change and reduce symptoms. Thirteen patients with d-IBS had fasting serum free and total tryptophan, large neutral amino acids, and 6 kynurenine metabolites measured before and after 2 weeks of a strict dairy-free diet. Baseline tryptophan parameters were compared with an age- and sex-matched control group. Changes in the specific tryptophan parameters before and after dairy-free diet were correlated with symptoms of IBS and mood. Compared with the control group, d-IBS patients at baseline exhibited significantly higher free serum tryptophan (10.5 ± 4.35 vs 4.75 ± 2.43 μmol/L [means ± standard deviation], P = .006) and significantly lower tryptophan dioxygenase and total tryptophan oxidation as measured by the kynurenine to free tryptophan and total kynurenines to free tryptophan ratios (23.37 ± 10.12 vs 55.33 ± 16.02, P < .001 and 49.34 ± 17.84 vs 258.46 ± 98.67, P < .001, respectively). Dairy-free diet did not modulate metabolites of the kynurenine pathway or symptoms. Tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway is inhibited in d-IBS, and a dairy-free diet does not alter this. Our findings are consistent with possible enhanced serotonin activity in d-IBS.

  14. Grafted Peptides for the Control of Interfacial Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducker, William; Mosse, Wade; Gras, Sally

    2010-03-01

    Peptide or protein polymers that are used to control interfacial properties are usually prepared by solid-state synthesis and then adsorbed to an interface. Such a method results in a low yield and places restrictions on polymer structure, because the peptide must be designed to adsorb, as well as to provide the interfacial control. The method of grafting peptides from surfaces is an alternate method that is potentially very useful because the peptide is covalently linked, and the sequence limitations related to adsorption are removed. To demonstrate this technique, we have used solid-phase peptide synthesis to graft a 15-residue peptide, EKEKEKEKEKEKEGG, containing a zwitterionic sequence of alternating lysine and glutamic acid residues from the surface of an aminosilanized silicon wafer by placing the silicon wafer within a commercial microwave peptide synthesizer. We confirmed the presence of this peptide layer on the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ellipsometry. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was then used to study the forces between the peptide-modified surface and a borosilicate glass sphere as a function of solution pH. We will also discuss the use of grafted peptides to control the stability of colloidal suspensions.

  15. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of anti-TRAP (AT) reveals residues involved in binding to TRAP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-04-11

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free l-tryptophan in many Gram-positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT(3)) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT(12)) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the "top" region of AT(3), that are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation.

  16. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Rueden, Kelsey J.; Rucks, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia. Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. PMID:27400720

  17. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  18. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  19. Photodissociation dynamics of tryptophan and the implication of asymmetric photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Chien-Ming; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Huang, Huai Ching; Huang, Kuan Yu; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung; Chiang, Su-Yu

    2010-08-21

    Photodissociation of amino acid tryptophan in a molecular beam at wavelengths of 212.8 and 193 nm, corresponding to excitation to the second and third absorption bands, was investigated using multimass ion imaging techniques. The respective wavelengths also represent excitation to the edge of a positive circular dichroism band and the center of a negative circular dichroism band of L-tryptophan. Only one dissociation channel was observed at both photolysis wavelengths: C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}CHNH{sub 2}COOH{yields}C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}+CHNH{sub 2}COOH. Dissociation rates were found to be 1.3x10{sup 6} and 5x10{sup 6} s{sup -1} at the respective wavelengths. Comparison to theoretical calculation indicates that dissociation occurs on the ground state after internal conversion. Implication of asymmetric photolysis is discussed.

  20. Archetypal tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides: properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Palombo, Enzo A; Clayton, Andrew H A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant microorganisms ('superbugs') present a serious challenge to the success of antimicrobial treatments. Subsequently, there is a crucial need for novel bio-control agents. Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show a broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi or viruses and are strong candidates to complement or substitute current antimicrobial agents. Some AMPs are also effective against protozoa or cancer cells. The tryptophan (Trp)-rich peptides (TRPs) are a subset of AMPs that display potent antimicrobial activity, credited to the unique biochemical properties of tryptophan that allow it to insert into biological membranes. Further, many Trp-rich AMPs cross bacterial membranes without compromising their integrity and act intracellularly, suggesting interactions with nucleic acids and enzymes. In this work, we overview some archetypal TRPs derived from natural sources, i.e., indolicidin, tritrpticin and lactoferricin, summarising their biochemical properties, structures, antimicrobial activities, mechanistic studies and potential applications.

  1. Opposing Biological Functions of Tryptophan Catabolizing Enzymes During Intracellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Divanovic, Senad; Sawtell, Nancy M.; Trompette, Aurelien; Warning, Jamie I.; Dias, Alexandra; Cooper, Andrea M.; Yap, George S.; Arditi, Moshe; Shimada, Kenichi; DuHadaway, James B.; Prendergast, George C.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Mellor, Andrew L.; Munn, David H.; Aliberti, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have underscored physiological and pathophysiological roles for the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in immune counterregulation. However, IDO was first recognized as an antimicrobial effector, restricting tryptophan availability to Toxoplasma gondii and other pathogens in vitro. The biological relevance of these findings came under question when infectious phenotypes were not forthcoming in IDO-deficient mice. The recent discovery of an IDO homolog, IDO-2, suggested that the issue deserved reexamination. IDO inhibition during murine toxoplasmosis led to 100% mortality, with increased parasite burdens and no evident effects on the immune response. Similar studies revealed a counterregulatory role for IDO during leishmaniasis (restraining effector immune responses and parasite clearance), and no evident role for IDO in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Thus, IDO plays biologically important roles in the host response to diverse intracellular infections, but the dominant nature of this role—antimicrobial or immunoregulatory—is pathogen-specific. PMID:21990421

  2. Substrate-protein interaction in human tryptophan dioxygenase: the critical role of H76.

    PubMed

    Batabyal, Dipanwita; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2009-03-11

    The initial and rate-limiting step of the kynurenine pathway in humans involves the oxidation of tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine catalyzed by two hemeproteins, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (hTDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (hIDO). In hTDO, the conserved H76 residue is believed to act as an active site base to deprotonate the indole NH group of Trp, the initial step of the Trp oxidation reaction. In hIDO, this histidine is replaced by a serine. To investigate the role of the H76, we have studied the H76S and H76A mutants of hTDO. Activity assays show that the mutations cause a decrease in k(cat) and an increase in K(M) for both mutants. The decrease in the k(cat) is accounted for by the replacement of the active site base catalyst, H76, with a weaker base, possibly a water, whereas the increase in K(M) is attributed to the loss of the specific interactions between the H76 and the substrate as well as the protein matrix. Resonance Raman studies with various Trp analogs indicate that the substrate is positioned in the active site by the ammonium, carboxylate, and indole groups, via intricate H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This scenario is consistent with the observation that l-Trp binding significantly perturbs the electronic properties of the O(2)-adduct of hTDO. The important structural and functional roles of H76 in hTDO is underscored by the observation that the electronic configuration of the active ternary complex, l-Trp-O(2)-hTDO, is sensitive to the H76 mutations.

  3. Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies the Molecular Determinants of Distinct Barttin Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Daniel; Fischer, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    CLC-K chloride channels are expressed in the kidney and in the inner ear and require the accessory subunit barttin for proper function and membrane insertion. Barttin exerts multiple functions on CLC-proteins: it modifies protein stability and intracellular trafficking as well as channel activity, ion conduction, and gating. So far, the molecular determinants of these distinct barttin functions have remained elusive. Here we performed serial perturbation mutagenesis to identify the sequence determinants of barttin function. Barttin consists of two transmembrane helices followed by a long intracellular carboxyl terminus, and earlier work demonstrated that the transmembrane core of barttin suffices for most effects on the α-subunit. We individually substituted every amino acid of the predicted transmembrane core (amino acids 9–26 and 35–55) with tryptophan, co-expressed mutant barttin with hClC-Ka or V166E rClC-K1, and characterized CLC-K/barttin channels by patch clamp techniques, biochemistry, and confocal microscopy. The majority of mutations left the chaperone function of barttin, i.e. the effects on endoplasmic reticulum exit and surface membrane insertion, unaffected. In contrast, tryptophan insertion at multiple positions resulted in impaired activity of hClC-Ka/barttin and changes in gating of V166E rClC-K1/barttin. These results demonstrate that mutations in a cluster of hydrophobic residues within transmembrane domain 1 affect barttin-CLC-K interaction and impair gating modification by the accessory subunit. Whereas tight interaction is necessary for functional modification, even impaired association of barttin and CLC-K suffices for normal intracellular trafficking. Our findings allow definition of a likely interaction surface and clarify the mechanisms underlying CLC-K channel modification by barttin. PMID:26063802

  4. A thermodynamic investigation of reactions catalyzed by tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Kishore, N; Tewari, Y B; Akers, D L; Goldberg, R N; Miles, E W

    1998-07-27

    Microcalorimetry and high-performance liquid chromatography have been used to conduct a thermodynamic investigation of the following reactions catalyzed by the tryptophan synthase alpha 2 beta 2 complex (EC 4.2.1.20) and its subunits: indole(aq) + L-serine(aq) = L-tryptophan(aq) + H2O(1); L-serine(aq) = pyruvate(aq) + ammonia(aq); indole(aq) + D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate(aq) = 1-(indol-3-yl)glycerol 3-phosphate(aq); L-serine(aq) + 1-(indol-3-yl)glycerol 3-phosphate(aq) = L-tryptophan(aq) + D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate(aq) + H2O(1). The calorimetric measurements led to standard molar enthalpy changes for all four of these reactions. Direct measurements yielded an apparent equilibrium constant for the third reaction; equilibrium constants for the remaining three reactions were obtained by using thermochemical cycle calculations. The results of the calorimetric and equilibrium measurements were analyzed in terms of a chemical equilibrium model that accounted for the multiplicity of the ionic states of the reactants and products. Thermodynamic quantities for chemical reference reactions involving specific ionic forms have been obtained. These quantities permit the calculation of the position of equilibrium of the above four reactions as a function of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Values of the apparent equilibrium constants and standard transformed Gibbs free energy changes delta r G'(m) degree under approximately physiological conditions are given. Le Châtelier's principle provides an explanation as to why, in the metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of L-tryptophan, the third reaction proceeds in the direction of formation of indole and D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate even though the apparent equilibrium constant greatly favors the formation of 1-(indol-3-yl)glycerol 3-phosphate.

  5. Kinetics of Polymer Interfacial Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Koberstein, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Germanium crystals modified with high quality azide functional monolayers are used to directly monitor in situ the kinetics of interfacial ``click'' reactions with complementary alkyne end-functional poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PnBA) and polystyrene (PS) by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In the presence of copper (I), the azide-modified Ge substrates react quantitatively with PnBA and PS via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Time-resolved ATR-IR measurements show two regimes of kinetic behavior, as predicted by theory. In the first regime the rate is rapid and is controlled by diffusion of the polymer through the solvent, scaling with the square root of time. The rate slows considerably in the second regime, limited by penetration of the reacting polymer through the covalently bound polymer brush layer, scaling with the natural logarithm of time. The influence of polymer size and solvent quality are reported.

  6. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  7. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  8. Structural Insights into l-Tryptophan Dehydrogenase from a Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium, Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Taisuke; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Megumi; Hakumai, Yuichi; Fukui, Kenji; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Ashiuchi, Makoto; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2017-01-15

    l-Tryptophan dehydrogenase from Nostoc punctiforme NIES-2108 (NpTrpDH), despite exhibiting high amino acid sequence identity (>30%)/homology (>50%) with NAD(P)(+)-dependent l-Glu/l-Leu/l-Phe/l-Val dehydrogenases, exclusively catalyzes reversible oxidative deamination of l-Trp to 3-indolepyruvate in the presence of NAD(+) Here, we determined the crystal structure of the apo form of NpTrpDH. The structure of the NpTrpDH monomer, which exhibited high similarity to that of l-Glu/l-Leu/l-Phe dehydrogenases, consisted of a substrate-binding domain (domain I, residues 3 to 133 and 328 to 343) and an NAD(+)/NADH-binding domain (domain II, residues 142 to 327) separated by a deep cleft. The apo-NpTrpDH existed in an open conformation, where domains I and II were apart from each other. The subunits dimerized themselves mainly through interactions between amino acid residues around the β-1 strand of each subunit, as was observed in the case of l-Phe dehydrogenase. The binding site for the substrate l-Trp was predicted by a molecular docking simulation and validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Several hydrophobic residues, which were located in the active site of NpTrpDH and possibly interacted with the side chain of the substrate l-Trp, were arranged similarly to that found in l-Leu/l-Phe dehydrogenases but fairly different from that of an l-Glu dehydrogenase. Our crystal structure revealed that Met-40, Ala-69, Ile-74, Ile-110, Leu-288, Ile-289, and Tyr-292 formed a hydrophobic cluster around the active site. The results of the site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggested that the hydrophobic cluster plays critical roles in protein folding, l-Trp recognition, and catalysis. Our results provide critical information for further characterization and engineering of this enzyme.

  9. Tryptophan synthase: a multienzyme complex with an intramolecular tunnel.

    PubMed

    Miles, E W

    2001-01-01

    Tryptophan synthase is a classic enzyme that channels a metabolic intermediate, indole. The crystal structure of the tryptophan synthase alpha2beta2 complex from Salmonella typhimurium revealed for the first time the architecture of a multienzyme complex and the presence of an intramolecular tunnel. This remarkable hydrophobic tunnel provides a likely passageway for indole from the active site of the alpha subunit, where it is produced, to the active site of the beta subunit, where it reacts with L-serine to form L-tryptophan in a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent reaction. Rapid kinetic studies of the wild type enzyme and of channel-impaired mutant enzymes provide strong evidence for the proposed channeling mechanism. Structures of a series of enzyme-substrate intermediates at the alpha and beta active sites are elucidating enzyme mechanisms and dynamics. These structural results are providing a fascinating picture of loops opening and closing, of domain movements, and of conformational changes in the indole tunnel. Solution studies provide further evidence for ligand-induced conformational changes that send signals between the alpha and beta subunits. The combined results show that the switching of the enzyme between open and closed conformations couples the catalytic reactions at the alpha and beta active sites and prevents the escape of indole.

  10. Quenching of red cell tryptophan fluorescence by mercurial compounds.

    PubMed

    Verkman, A S; Lukacovic, M F; Tinklepaugh, M S; Dix, J A

    1986-01-01

    Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in red cell ghost membranes labeled with N-ethylmaleimide (N-EM) is quenched in a dose-dependent manner by the organic mercurial p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (p-CMBS). Fluorescence lifetime analysis shows that quenching occurs by a static mechanism. Binding of p-CMBS occurs by a rapid (less than 5 s) biomolecular association (dissociation constant K1 = 1.8 mM) followed by a slower unimolecular transition with forward rate constant k2 = 0.015 s-1 and reverse rate constant k-2 = 0.0054 s-1. Analysis of the temperature dependence of k2 gives delta H = 6.5 kcal/mol and delta S = -21 eu. The mercurial compounds p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, p-aminophenylmercuric acetate, and mercuric chloride quench red cell tryptophan fluorescence by the same mechanism as p-CMBS does; the measured k2 value was the same for each compound, whereas K1 varied. p-CMBS also quenches the tryptophan fluorescence in vesicles reconstituted with purified band 3, the red cell anion exchange protein, in a manner similar to that in ghost membranes. These experiments define a mercurial binding site on band 3 in ghosts treated with N-EM and establish the binding mechanism to this site. The characteristics of this p-CMBS binding site on band 3 differ significantly from those of the p-CMBS binding site involved in red cell water and urea transport inhibition.

  11. Tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan in gastroesophageal malignancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Tom; Kumar, Sacheen; Markar, Sheraz R; Antonowicz, Stefan; Hanna, George B

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal cancer has a rapidly increasing incidence worldwide and reliable biomarkers are urgently required to facilitate earlier diagnosis and improve survival. The aromatic amino acids tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan represent potential biomarkers and their relation to gastroesophageal cancer will be evaluated in this review. An electronic literature search was performed to identify all published research relating to the measurement of tyrosine, phenylalanine, or tryptophan in the biofluids or tissues of patients with gastroesophageal cancer. Sixteen studies were included in this systematic review. Six studies investigated serum concentrations, which all found decreased concentrations of these aromatic amino acids, except one study that found increased phenylalanine. Five studies reported increased concentrations within gastric content of these patients and two reported increased urinary concentrations. Tissue concentrations of these aromatic amino acids were increased in three studies. Tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan represent potential biomarkers of gastroesophageal cancer, and further research is necessary to definitively establish the mechanism responsible for altered concentrations of these compounds in patients with gastroesophageal cancer.

  12. Concurrent quantification of tryptophan and its major metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Lesniak, Wojciech G.; Jyoti, Amar; Mishra, Manoj K.; Louissaint, Nicolette; Romero, Roberto; Chugani, Diane C.; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2014-01-01

    An imbalance in tryptophan (TRP) metabolites is associated with several neurological and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, analytical methods allowing for simultaneous quantification of TRP and its major metabolites would be highly desirable, and may be valuable as potential biomarkers. We have developed a HPLC method for concurrent quantitative determination of tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid in tissue and fluids. The method utilizes the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of TRP and its metabolites that enable UV absorbance and fluorescence detection by HPLC, without additional labeling. The origin of the peaks related to analytes of interest was confirmed by UV–Vis spectral patterns using a PDA detector and mass spectrometry. The developed methods were validated in rabbit fetal brain and amniotic fluid at gestational day 29. Results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature for the same regions. This method allows for rapid quantification of tryptophan and four of its major metabolites concurrently. A change in the relative ratios of these metabolites can provide important insights in predicting the presence and progression of neuroinflammation in disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24036037

  13. Tryptophan and tyrosine catabolic pattern in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, A; Deepadevi, K V; Arun, P; Manojkumar, V; Kurup, P A

    2000-09-01

    Catabolism of tryptophan and tyrosine in relation to the isoprenoid pathway was studied in neurological and psychiatric disorders. The concentration of trytophan, quinolinic acid, kynurenic acid, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was found to be higher in the plasma of patients with all these disorders; while that of tyrosine, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine was lower. There was increase in free fatty acids and decrease in albumin (factors modulating tryptophan transport) in the plasma of these patients. Concentration of digoxin, a modulator of amino acid transport, and the activity of HMG CoA reductase, which synthesizes digoxin, were higher in these patients; while RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity showed a decrease. Concentration of plasma ubiquinone (part of which is synthesised from tyrosine) and magnesium was also lower in these patients. No morphine could be detected in the plasma of these patients except in MS. On the other hand, strychnine and nicotine were detectable. These results indicate hypercatabolism of tryptophan and hypocatabolism of tyrosine in these disorders, which could be a consequence of the modulating effect of hypothalamic digoxin on amino acid transport.

  14. Polarization of Tryptophan Fluorescence from Single Striated Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    dos Remedios, C. G.; Millikan, R. G. C.; Morales, M. F.

    1972-01-01

    Instrumentation has been developed to detect rapidly the polarization of tryptophan fluorescence from single muscle fibers in rigor, relaxation, and contraction. The polarization parameter (P⊥) obtained by exiciting the muscle tryptophans with light polarized perpendicular to the long axis of the muscle fiber had a magnitude P⊥ (relaxation) > P⊥ (contraction) > P⊥ (rigor) for the three types of muscle fibers examined (glycerinated rabbit psoas, glycerinated dorsal longitudinal flight muscle of Lethocerus americanus, and live semitendinosus of Rana pipiens). P⊥ from single psoas fibers in rigor was found to increase as the sarcomere length increased but in relaxed fibers P⊥ was independent of sarcomere length. After rigor, pyrophosphate produced little or no change in P⊥, but following an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-containing solution, pyrophosphate produced a value of P⊥ that fell between the contraction and relaxation values. Sinusoidal or square wave oscillations of the muscle of amplitude 0.5–2.0% of the sarcomere length and frequency 1, 2, or 5 Hz were applied in rigor when the myosin cross-bridges are considered to be firmly attached to the thin filaments. No significant changes in P⊥ were observed in either rigor or relaxation. The preceding results together with our present knowledge of tryptophan distribution in the contractile proteins has led us to the conclusion that the parameter P⊥ is a probe of the contractile state of myosin which is probably sensitive to the orientation of the myosin S1 subfragment. PMID:4332133

  15. Comparison of tryptophan interactions to free and grafted BSA protein.

    PubMed

    Garnier, F; Randon, J; Rocca, J L

    2000-04-28

    The binding of d- and l-tryptophan molecules to bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein has been studied using liquid chromatography and ultrafiltration in the pH range from 7 to 11. A hydrophobic interaction between tryptophan and BSA has been observed at pH 7.0 on BSA grafted chromatographic column. However, this interaction is negligible at higher pH for which the interaction to the stereospecific site was predominant. For both grafted and free proteins, the complexation mechanism was a competitive binding of d- and l-enantiomers on a single site. The apparent complexation constants for both d- and l-tryptophan show a maximum in the pH range 9-10. The variations of the apparent complexation constants versus pH were the result of the protonation of both the amino acid and a single site of the protein assuming that the complexation occurs between the zwitter-ionic amino acid form and the unprotonated BSA site. The apparent pK(BSA) is slightly shifted from 8.3 for grafted BSA protein to 9.4 for free BSA protein. This shift is presumably as a result of the different protein conformation.

  16. Nanosensor detection of an immunoregulatory tryptophan influx/kynurenine efflux cycle.

    PubMed

    Kaper, Thijs; Looger, Loren L; Takanaga, Hitomi; Platten, Michael; Steinman, Lawrence; Frommer, Wolf B

    2007-10-01

    Mammalian cells rely on cellular uptake of the essential amino acid tryptophan. Tryptophan sequestration by up-regulation of the key enzyme for tryptophan degradation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), e.g., in cancer and inflammation, is thought to suppress the immune response via T cell starvation. Additionally, the excreted tryptophan catabolites (kynurenines) induce apoptosis of lymphocytes. Whereas tryptophan transport systems have been identified, the molecular nature of kynurenine export remains unknown. To measure cytosolic tryptophan steady-state levels and flux in real time, we developed genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer nanosensors (FLIPW). The transport properties detected by FLIPW in KB cells, a human oral cancer cell line, and COS-7 cells implicate LAT1, a transporter that is present in proliferative tissues like cancer, in tryptophan uptake. Importantly, we found that this transport system mediates tryptophan/kynurenine exchange. The tryptophan influx/kynurenine efflux cycle couples tryptophan starvation to elevation of kynurenine serum levels, providing a two-pronged induction of apoptosis in neighboring cells. The strict coupling protects cells that overproduce IDO from kynurenine accumulation. Consequently, this mechanism may contribute to immunosuppression involved in autoimmunity and tumor immune escape.

  17. A Jerte Valley Cherry-Based Product as a Supply of Tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, María; Espino, Javier; Toribio-Delgado, Antonio F.; Cubero, Javier; Maynar-Mariño, Juan I.; Barriga, Carmen; Paredes, Sergio D.; Rodríguez, Ana B.

    2012-01-01

    L-Tryptophan (tryptophan) is an essential amino acid in humans. It has important roles as a precursor of different bioactive compounds. Based on previous studies in which tryptophan has been shown to be present in fresh cherries, the aim of the present work was to analyze the tryptophan content of a Jerte Valley cherry-based product. A previously optimized method of analysis of tryptophan was used, ie, high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FL). As expected, HPLC/FL technique permitted to detect and quantify the tryptophan content in a different matrix rather than fresh cherries. In fact, the Jerte Valley cherry-based product contained 69.54 ± 10.64 ppm of tryptophan, thereby showing that this product is a good source of tryptophan. In summary, it has been proven that the Jerte Valley cherry-based product is rich in tryptophan and may be indicated as a supply of this essential amino acid as well as having potential health benefits for conditions where tryptophan is necessary. PMID:22553424

  18. The tryptophan depletion theory in delirium: not confirmed in elderly hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    de Jonghe, Annemarieke; van Munster, Barbara C; Fekkes, Durk; van Oosten, Hannah E; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2012-01-01

    The tryptophan depletion theory assumes that low tryptophan levels are present in delirium. These lower levels may be regarded as a biochemical marker for cellular immune activation, which may lead to increased catabolism of tryptophan into kynurenine via stimulation of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by interferon-γ. To compare plasma tryptophan and kynurenine levels, and IDO activity in hospitalized patients with and without delirium. Repeated plasma samples were prospectively collected in hip fracture patients, aged 65 years and older. The presence of delirium was assessed daily. The associations of a delirious state and tryptophan, kynurenine, and the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio measured in samples taken 'before', 'during delirium', and 'after delirium' were analyzed with linear mixed models. A total of 469 samples from 140 patients were collected. Adjusted for the days on which they were drawn, there was no difference for all three measured factors in patients with and without delirium, except for an association between a higher kynurenine/tryptophan ratio and delirium in a subgroup analysis in preoperative samples. The results do not confirm the previously found lower tryptophan levels in delirium on which the tryptophan depletion theory is based. However, a preoperative higher kynurenine/tryptophan ratio could be indicative of delirium. Copyright © 2012 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-healing sandwich structures incorporating an interfacial layer with vascular network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Peters, Kara; Li, Yulong

    2013-02-01

    A self-healing capability specifically targeted for sandwich composite laminates based on interfacial layers with built-in vascular networks is presented. The self-healing occurs at the facesheet-core interface through an additional interfacial layer to seal facesheet cracks and rebond facesheet-core regions. The efficacy of introducing the self-healing system at the facesheet-core interface is evaluated through four-point bend and edgewise compression testing of representative foam core sandwich composite specimens with impact induced damage. The self-healing interfacial layer partially restored the specific initial stiffness, doubling the residual initial stiffness as compared to the control specimen after the impact event. The restoration of the ultimate specific skin strength was less successful. The results also highlight the critical challenge in self-healing of sandwich composites, which is to rebond facesheets which have separated from the core material.

  20. Tryptophan sidechain dynamics in hydrophobic oligopeptides determined by use of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weaver, A J; Kemple, M D; Prendergast, F G

    1988-07-01

    Two oligopeptides, t-boc-LAWAL-OMe and t-boc-LALALW-OMe, were synthesized for the purpose of examining the sidechain dynamics of the tryptophan residue in hydrophobic environments by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. In both peptides, the tryptophan sidechain was greater than 95% enriched with 13C at the C delta 1 position. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and steady-state nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data were obtained at 50.3 and 75.4 MHz for both peptides in CD3OD, and at 75.4 MHz for t-boc-LALALW-OMe in lysolecithin-D2O micelles. We have adapted the model-free approach of G. Lipari and A. Szabo (1982, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104:4546) to interpret the 13C-NMR data. Computer-generated curves based on experimental data obtained at a single frequency demonstrate relationships between an effective correlation time for tryptophan sidechain motion (tau e), a generalized order parameter (sigma) describing the extent of motional restriction, and an overall correlation time for the peptide (tau m). Assuming predominantly dipolar relaxation, least-squares fits of the dual frequency relaxation data provide values for these parameters for both peptides. The contribution of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), however, is also explicitly assessed in the data analysis, and is shown to perturb the predicted sigma, tau e, and tau m values and to decrease chi(2) values observed in nonlinear least-squares analysis of the data. Because of uncertainty in the contribution of CSA to the relaxation of the indole ring 13C delta 1 atom, nonlinear least-squares analysis of the relaxation data were performed with and without inclusion of a CSA term in the appropriate relaxation equations. Neglecting CSA, an overall peptide correlation time of 0.69 ns is predicted for t-boc-LAWAL-OMe in CD3OD at 20 degrees C compared with 1.28 ns for t-boc-LALALW-OMe. Given these tau m values and taking into account the effect of measurement error in the T1 and NOE data, the internal

  1. Crystal Structure and Mechanism of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase, a Heme Enzyme Involved in Tryptophan Catabolism and in Quinolinate Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Kang, S.; Mukherjee, T.; Bale, S.; Crane, B.; Begley, T.; Ealick, S.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) from Ralstonia metallidurans was determined at 2.4 {angstrom}. TDO catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of L-tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, which is the initial step in tryptophan catabolism. TDO is a heme-containing enzyme and is highly specific for its substrate L-tryptophan. The structure is a tetramer with a heme cofactor bound at each active site. The monomeric fold, as well as the heme binding site, is similar to that of the large domain of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the same reaction except with a broader substrate tolerance. Modeling of the putative (S)-tryptophan hydroperoxide intermediate into the active site, as well as substrate analogue and mutagenesis studies, are consistent with a Criegee mechanism for the reaction.

  2. Measurement of NAPL-water interfacial areas and mass transfer rates in two-dimensional flow cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Muzi; Zhai, Yuanzheng; Wan, Li

    2016-11-01

    The nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL)-water interfacial area and the mass transfer rate across the NAPL and water interface are often key factors in in situ groundwater pollution treatment. In this study, the NAPL-water interfacial area and residual NAPL saturation were measured using interfacial and partitioning tracer tests in a two-dimensional flow cell. The results were compared with previous column and field experiment results. In addition, the mass transfer rates at various NAPL-water interfacial areas were investigated. Fe(2+)-activated persulfate was used for in situ chemical oxidation remediation to remove NAPL gradually. The results showed that the reduction of NAPL-water interfacial areas as well as NAPL saturation by chemical oxidation caused a linear decrease in the interphase mass transfer rates (R(2) = 0.97), revealing the relationship between mass transfer rates and interfacial areas in a two-dimensional system. The NAPL oxidation rates decreased with the reduction of interfacial areas, owing to the control of NAPL mass transfer into the aqueous phase.

  3. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  4. The carbonate radical anion-induced covalent aggregation of human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase, and alpha-synuclein: intermediacy of tryptophan- and tyrosine-derived oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Andrekopoulos, Christopher; Joseph, Joy; Crow, John; Kalyanaraman, B

    2004-06-01

    In this review, we describe the free radical mechanism of covalent aggregation of human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (hSOD1). Bicarbonate anion (HCO3-) enhances the covalent aggregation of hSOD1 mediated by the SOD1 peroxidase-dependent formation of carbonate radical anion (CO3*-), a potent and selective oxidant. This species presumably diffuses out the active site of hSOD1 and reacts with tryptophan residue located on the surface of hSOD1. The oxidative degradation of tryptophan to kynurenine and N-formyl kynurenine results in the covalent crosslinking and aggregation of hSOD1. Implications of oxidant-mediated aggregation of hSOD1 in the increased cytotoxicity of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are discussed.

  5. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  6. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  7. Interfacial reactions in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A study of the interfacial reaction characteristics of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide and disordered titanium alloy composites has determined that the matrix alloy compositions affect the microstructure and the distribution of the reaction products, as well as the growth kinetics of the reaction zones. The interfacial reaction products in the ordered titanium aluminide composite are more complicated than those in the disordered titanium-alloy composite. The activation energy of the interfacial reaction in the ordered titanium aluminide composite is also higher than that in the disordered titanium alloy composite. Designing an optimum interface is necessary to enhance the reliability and service life at elevated temperatures. 16 refs.

  8. Solid solution directionally solidified eutectics: Model systems for structure-property relationships in interfacial fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Luke Nathaniel

    The next generation of high temperature materials for application in aerospace and power generation systems will be required to withstand temperatures well in excess of 1200°C, often in oxidizing atmospheres. Oxide-oxide directionally solidified eutectics (DSE's) have shown promise as high temperature ceramic materials, only to be limited by their lack of fracture toughness at room temperature. In the case of DSE oxide materials, the interfacial fracture behavior has been blamed for the poor performance in the past and is the subject of interest in this work. In this thesis, the solid solution, directionally solidified quaternary eutectic (SS-DSE), Co1-xNixO/ZrO2(CaO), is developed as a model system for the study of interfacial fracture in oxide-oxide DSE's. A variety of structural and mechanical characterization techniques are applied to investigate structure-property relationships for interfacial fracture behavior. The optical floating zone technique was employed for growing both the eutectic crystals and their single crystal counterparts, Co1-x NixO. Co1-xNixO/ZrO2(CaO) was shown to possess the necessary structural elements to serve as a model system for interfacial fracture. Lamellar microstructures were observed for all compositions. The crystallographic relationships between phases evolved as a model solid solution. Interdiffusion of chemical species was minimal, allowing the layers to treated independently. The core of this thesis is dedicated to studying the nature of interfacial fracture behavior in oxide eutectics. This study is motivated by the novel observation of extensive interfacial delamination for the system CoO/ZrO 2(CaO). A transition from interfacial delamination to interfacial penetration is observed for compositions of Co1-xNixO/ZrO 2(CaO) with x > 0.2. The residual stress state in these materials was investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction-based techniques. The role of plasticity in interfacial fracture was explored using a

  9. Partitioning and interfacial tracers for differentiating NAPL entrapment configuration: column-scale investigation.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Barranco, F T; Illangasekare, T H

    2001-12-15

    Research on the use of partitioning and interfacial tracers has led to the development of techniques for estimating subsurface NAPL amount and NAPL-water interfacial area. Although these techniques have been utilized with some success at field sites, current application is limited largely to NAPL at residual saturation, such as for the case of post-remediation settings where mobile NAPL has been removed through product recovery. The goal of this study was to fundamentally evaluate partitioning and interfacial tracer behavior in controlled column-scale test cells for a range of entrapment configurations varying in NAPL saturation, with the results serving as a determinant of technique efficacy (and design protocol) for use with complexly distributed NAPLs, possibly at high saturation, in heterogeneous aquifers. Representative end members of the range of entrapment configurations observed under conditions of natural heterogeneity (an occurrence with residual NAPL saturation [discontinuous blobs] and an occurrence with high NAPL saturation [continuous free-phase LNAPL lens]) were evaluated. Study results indicated accurate prediction (using measured tracer retardation and equilibrium-based computational techniques) of NAPL amount and NAPL-water interfacial area for the case of residual NAPL saturation. For the high-saturation LNAPL lens, results indicated that NAPL-water interfacial area, but not NAPL amount (underpredicted by 35%), can be reasonably determined using conventional computation techniques. Underprediction of NAPL amount lead to an erroneous prediction of NAPL distribution, as indicated by the NAPL morphology index. In light of these results, careful consideration should be given to technique design and critical assumptions before applying equilibrium-based partitioning tracer methodology to settings where NAPLs are complexly entrapped, such as in naturally heterogeneous subsurface formations.

  10. Residual Cap

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-10

    This MOC image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions

  11. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  12. L-Tryptophan: Effects on Daytime Sleep Latency and the Waking EEG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-22

    TRYPTOPHAN: EFFECTS ON DAYTIME SLEEP LATENCY AND THE WAKING EEG pr Cheryl L. Slinweber, Reidun Ursin, 1 Raymond P. Hilbert and Richard L. Hilderbrand 2 p...Gessa, 1973; Curzon & Knott , 1974; Gessa & Tagliamonte, 1974), and it has been previously suggested that 1-tryptophan may have hyp- notic effects...Curzon, G. & Knott , P.J. Fatty acids in the disposition of tryptophan. In: Aromatic Amino Acids in the Brain, Ciba Foundation Symposium 22, Elsevier

  13. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  14. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  15. Recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, P; Hoeben, M A; van der Lans, R G J M; Kwant, G; van der Wielen, L A M

    2002-05-20

    In this article, a qualitative study of the recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning in liquid-liquid biphasic systems is presented. A range of crystallised biomolecules with varying polarities have been chosen such as glycine, phenylglycine and ampicillin. Liquid-liquid biphasic systems in a range of polarity differences were selected such as an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), water-butanol and water-hexanol. The results indicate that interfacial partitioning of crystals occurs even when their density exceeds that of the individual liquid phases. Yet, not all crystals partition to the same extent to the interface to form a stable and thick interphase layer. This indicates some degree of selectivity. From the analysis of these results in relation to the physicochemical properties of the crystals and the liquid phases, a hypothetical mechanism for the interfacial partitioning is deduced. Overall these results support the potential of interfacial partitioning as a large scale separation technology.

  16. Circumvention of defective neutral amino acid transport in Hartnup disease using tryptophan ethyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, A J; Butler, I J

    1989-01-01

    Tryptophan ethyl ester, a lipid-soluble tryptophan derivative, was used to bypass defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport in a child with Hartnup disease. The child's baseline tryptophan concentrations in serum (20 +/- 6 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid (1.0 +/- 0.2 microM) were persistently less than 50% of normal values. Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a serotonin metabolite, was also less than 50% of normal (21 +/- 2 ng/ml). Serum tryptophan concentrations increased only modestly and briefly after an oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of oral L-tryptophan, reflecting the absorptive defect. An oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of tryptophan ethyl ester resulted in a prompt increase in serum tryptophan to a peak of 555 microM. Sustained treatment with 20 mg/kg q6h resulted in normalization of serum (66 +/- 15 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid tryptophan concentrations (mean = 2.3 microM). Cerebrospinal fluid 5-HIAA increased to more normal concentrations (mean = 33 ng/ml). No toxicity was observed over an 8-mo period of treatment, chronic diarrhea resolved, and body weight, which had remained unchanged for 7 mo before ester therapy, increased by approximately 26%. We concluded that tryptophan ethyl ester is effective at circumventing defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport and may be useful in the treatment of Hartnup disease. PMID:2472426

  17. Circumvention of defective neutral amino acid transport in Hartnup disease using tryptophan ethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Jonas, A J; Butler, I J

    1989-07-01

    Tryptophan ethyl ester, a lipid-soluble tryptophan derivative, was used to bypass defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport in a child with Hartnup disease. The child's baseline tryptophan concentrations in serum (20 +/- 6 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid (1.0 +/- 0.2 microM) were persistently less than 50% of normal values. Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a serotonin metabolite, was also less than 50% of normal (21 +/- 2 ng/ml). Serum tryptophan concentrations increased only modestly and briefly after an oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of oral L-tryptophan, reflecting the absorptive defect. An oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of tryptophan ethyl ester resulted in a prompt increase in serum tryptophan to a peak of 555 microM. Sustained treatment with 20 mg/kg q6h resulted in normalization of serum (66 +/- 15 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid tryptophan concentrations (mean = 2.3 microM). Cerebrospinal fluid 5-HIAA increased to more normal concentrations (mean = 33 ng/ml). No toxicity was observed over an 8-mo period of treatment, chronic diarrhea resolved, and body weight, which had remained unchanged for 7 mo before ester therapy, increased by approximately 26%. We concluded that tryptophan ethyl ester is effective at circumventing defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport and may be useful in the treatment of Hartnup disease.

  18. Serotonergic function, substance craving, and psychopathology in detoxified alcohol-addicted males undergoing tryptophan depletion.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Dirk; Herchenhein, Thomas; Kirchhainer, Julia; Bandelow, Borwin; Falkai, Peter; Engel, Kirsten; Malchow, Berend; Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula

    2010-12-01

    Alcohol addiction is associated with alterations of central nervous dopaminergic and serotonergic functions. Acute tryptophan depletion has not yet been applied in detoxified alcohol-addicted patients in order to investigate its impact on psychopathology, psychoneuroendocrinology, and substance craving behaviour. 25 alcohol-addicted males randomly either received a tryptophan-free or tryptophan-containing amino acid drink and 7 days later the respective other drink. Anxiety, depression, and craving were assessed before and 5 h after the drink. Tryptophan, 5-HIAA, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and HVA in serum were measured before and after both treatments. Nocturnal urinary cortisol measurements and genotyping for the HTTLPR polymorphism of the SLC6A4 gene were performed. Tryptophan depletion resulted in a significant reduction of total and free serum tryptophan while the tryptophan-rich drink increased serum levels. Both treatments caused a significant increase of serum serotonin levels, however, serum 5-HIAA was decreased after depletion but increased after sham depletion. Dopamine and norepinephrine were elevated after tryptophan depletion and sham. Depletion increased depression scores (MADRS), while the full amino acid drink improved state and trait anxiety ratings (STAI) and substance craving. Urinary cortisol excretion was not affected by both treatments. Patients with the ll genotype of the serotonin transporter gene displayed lower baseline tryptophan levels compared to patients with the heterozygous genotype. Results suggest an impaired serotonergic function in alcohol-addicted males.

  19. Free and bound tryptophan in human plasma during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Tricklebank, M D; Pickard, F J; de Souza, S W

    1979-03-01

    The concentration of tryptophan and the degree of binding of the amino acid to protein were examined in human plasma during the perinatal period. Both total and unbound (free) tryptophan were higher in cord vein plasma than in the maternal circulation, the concentration gradient being approximately 1 : 2. The proportion of the total plasma tryptophan concentration that was not bound to protein was less in cord vein plasma than in the maternal circulation. After birth the proportion in infant plasma fell significantly. Both total and free tryptophan fell during the first 24 hours of postnatal life. Total tryptophan returned to the cord vein plasma level 6--8 days after birth whilst free tryptophan failed to increase during the period of the observations. In premature infants total and free tryptophan also declined in concentration 12--24 hours after birth, suggesting the phenomenon to be related to birth rather than to gestational age. Phenylalanine remained unchanged whilst tyrosine increased in concentration during the first 80 hours of postnatal life. Thus, the availability of tryptophan to the tissues appears to decline during the immediate postnatal period and the results suggest that the requirement for tryptophan during this time may exceed the supply from standard artifical milk preparations.

  20. An Experiment in Mixing and Interfacial Stress.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    bottom stress above indicated is disappointing. The cause of the disagree- ment in one part is the difficulty of low flow measurements and in another...TEST CHART NATIONA fHURIAAll MtDAPPA 𔃻 MISCELLANEOUS PAPER HL-85-1 Fi & Lz ’ IAN EXPERIMENT IN MIXINGIAND USAm op INTERFACIAL STRESS by Garbis H...INTERFACIAL STRESS S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) I. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER) Garbis H. Keulegan 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND

  1. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  2. Interfacial Instabilities on a Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Mehravaran, Kian

    2013-11-01

    The fragmentation of droplets is an essential stage of several natural and industrial applications such as fuel atomization and rain phenomena. In spite of its relatively long history, the mechanism of fragmentation is not clear yet. This is mainly due to small length and time scales as well as the non-linearity of the process. In the present study, two and three-dimensional numerical simulations have been performed to understand the early stages of the fragmentation of an initially spherical droplet. Simulations are performed for high Reynolds and a range of relatively high Weber numbers (shear breakup). To resolve the small-scale instabilities generated over the droplet, a second-order adaptive finite volume/volume of fluids (FV/VOF) method is employed, where the grid resolution is increased with the curvature of the gas-liquid interface as well as the vorticity magnitude. The study is focused on the onset and growth of interfacial instabilities. The role of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (in surface wave formation) and Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in azimuthal transverse modulation) are shown and the obtained results are compared with the linear instability theories for zero and non-zero vorticity layers. Moreover, the analogy between the fragmentation of a single drop and a co-axial liquid jet is discussed. The current results can be used for the further development of the current secondary atomization models.

  3. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  4. NMR crystallography of enzyme active sites: probing chemically detailed, three-dimensional structure in tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F

    2013-09-17

    NMR crystallography--the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry--offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically detailed structure. Initially, researchers used NMR crystallography to refine diffraction data from organic and inorganic solids. Now we are applying this technique to explore active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate. Researchers cannot achieve this level of detail from X-ray, NMR,or computational methodologies in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5-2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate but do not directly identify the protonation states. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but they rely on researcher-specified chemical details. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which scientists can develop models of the active site using computational chemistry; they can then distinguish these models by comparing calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at the highest possible resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of

  5. Three types of induced tryptophan optical activity compared in model dipeptides: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Hudecová, Jana; Horníček, Jan; Buděšínský, Miloš; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Šafařík, Martin; Zhang, Ge; Keiderling, Timothy A; Bouř, Petr

    2012-08-06

    The tryptophan (Trp) aromatic residue in chiral matrices often exhibits a large optical activity and thus provides valuable structural information. However, it can also obscure spectral contributions from other peptide parts. To better understand the induced chirality, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of Trp-containing cyclic dipeptides c-(Trp-X) (where X = Gly, Ala, Trp, Leu, nLeu, and Pro) are analyzed on the basis of experimental spectra and density functional theory (DFT) computations. The results provide valuable insight into the molecular conformational and spectroscopic behavior of Trp. Whereas the ECD is dominated by Trp π-π* transitions, VCD is dominated by the amide modes, well separated from minor Trp contributions. The ROA signal is the most complex. However, an ROA marker band at 1554 cm(-1) indicates the local χ(2) angle value in this residue, in accordance with previous theoretical predictions. The spectra and computations also indicate that the peptide ring is nonplanar, with a shallow potential so that the nonplanarity is primarily induced by the side chains. Dispersion-corrected DFT calculations provide better results than plain DFT, but comparison with experiment suggests that they overestimate the stability of the folded conformers. Molecular dynamics simulations and NMR results also confirm a limited accuracy of the dispersion-DFT model in nonaqueous solvents. Combination of chiral spectroscopies with theoretical analysis thus significantly enhances the information that can be obtained from the induced chirality of the Trp aromatic residue. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Tryptophan 415 Is Critical for the Cholesterol Transport Functions of Scavenger Receptor BI.

    PubMed

    Holme, Rebecca L; Miller, James J; Nicholson, Kay; Sahoo, Daisy

    2016-01-12

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are anti-atherogenic particles, primarily due to their role in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway whereby HDL delivers cholesteryl esters (CE) to the liver for excretion upon interaction with its receptor, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI). We designed experiments to test the hypothesis that one or more of the eight highly conserved tryptophan (Trp; W) residues in SR-BI are critical for mediating function. We created a series of Trp-to-phenylalanine (Phe, F) mutant receptors, as well as Trp-less SR-BI (ΔW-SR-BI), and assessed their ability to mediate cholesterol transport. Wild-type (WT) or mutant SR-BI receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, and cell surface expression was confirmed. Next, we showed that Trp-less- and W415F-SR-BI had significantly decreased abilities to bind HDL and promote selective uptake of HDL-CE, albeit with higher selective uptake efficiency as compared to WT-SR-BI. Interestingly, only Trp-less-, but not W415F-SR-BI, showed an impaired ability to mediate efflux of free cholesterol (FC). Furthermore, both W415F- and Trp-less-SR-BI were unable to reorganize plasma membrane pools of FC based on lack of sensitivity to exogenous cholesterol oxidase. Restoration of Trp 415 into the Trp-less-SR-BI background was unable to rescue Trp-less-SR-BI's impaired functions, suggesting that Trp 415 is critical, but not sufficient for full receptor function. Furthermore, with the exception of Trp 262, restoration of individual extracellular Trp residues, in combination with Trp 415, into the Trp-less-SR-BI background partially rescued SR-BI function, indicating that Trp 415 must be present in combination with other Trp residues for proper cholesterol transport functions.

  7. Enhanced enzymatic degradation of tryptophan by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase contributes to the tryptophan-deficient state seen after major trauma.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Katharina; Neurauter, Gabriele; Wirleitner, Barbara; Fleming, Arthur W; Peterson, Verlyn M; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2005-03-01

    Decreased lymphocyte proliferation, lymphopenia, immunodepression, and opportunistic infections are common after major trauma. Early alimentation in these patients corrects lymphopenia, enhances immunity, and reduces the incidence of infections, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Tryptophan is essential for the production and function of rapidly proliferating cells such as lymphocytes. Tryptophan is enzymatically degraded by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), whose activity is solely dependent on expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Because increased expression of IFN-gamma has been reported in trauma patients, we investigated whether enhanced IDO-mediated tryptophan degradation is associated with lymphopenia and poor outcomes after major trauma. The incidence of bacteremic sepsis (BS), adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiple organ dysfunction/failure syndromes (MODS/MOF), and death was prospectively documented in 22 trauma patients with a mean ISS of 24.9 +/- 2.2. Sequential blood samples were obtained from admission through postinjury day 10. Five patients developed BS, three of whom developed ARDS; two of the three ARDS patients developed MOF and died on day 10. Trauma patients had significantly lower tryptophan levels (days 1-10), higher kynurenine:tryptophan ratios (days 1-2), and fewer lymphocytes (days 1-4) than healthy volunteers (P < 0.05). Although patients with poor outcomes (i.e., BS, ARDS, MOF, and death) had significantly lower tryptophan levels and greater lymphopenia on several days after injury, the sample size was too small to draw any definitive conclusions. These data indicate that decreased plasma tryptophan levels and lymphopenia typically occur after major trauma. A concomitant increase in kynurenine suggests that the observed tryptophan deficiency is caused, in part, by IDO-mediated tryptophan degradation.

  8. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  9. Gallium uptake in tryptophan-related pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Patel, R. )

    1991-02-01

    We describe a patient who developed fever, fatigue, muscle weakness, dyspnea, skin rash, and eosinophilia after taking high doses of tryptophan for insomnia for two years. A gallium-67 scan revealed diffuse increased uptake in the lung and no abnormal uptake in the muscular distribution. Bronchoscopy and biopsy confirmed inflammatory reactions with infiltration by eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes. CT scan showed an interstitial alveolar pattern without fibrosis. EMG demonstrated diffuse myopathy. Muscle biopsy from the right thigh showed an inflammatory myositis with eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltrations.

  10. A tyrosine-tryptophan dyad and radical-based charge transfer in a ribonucleotide reductase-inspired maquette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; McCaslin, Tyler G.; Veglia, Gianluigi; Porcelli, Fernando; Yohannan, Jiby; Guo, Zhanjun; McDaniel, Miranda; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2015-12-01

    In class 1a ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a substrate-based radical is generated in the α2 subunit by long-distance electron transfer involving an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O.) in the β2 subunit. The conserved W48 β2 is ~10 Å from Y122OH; mutations at W48 inactivate RNR. Here, we design a beta hairpin peptide, which contains such an interacting tyrosine-tryptophan dyad. The NMR structure of the peptide establishes that there is no direct hydrogen bond between the phenol and the indole rings. However, electronic coupling between the tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in the peptide. In addition, downshifted ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) frequencies are observed for the radical state, reproducing spectral downshifts observed for β2. The frequency downshifts of the ring and CO bands are consistent with charge transfer from YO. to W or another residue. Such a charge transfer mechanism implies a role for the β2 Y-W dyad in electron transfer.

  11. A tyrosine–tryptophan dyad and radical-based charge transfer in a ribonucleotide reductase-inspired maquette

    PubMed Central

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; McCaslin, Tyler G.; Veglia, Gianluigi; Porcelli, Fernando; Yohannan, Jiby; Guo, Zhanjun; McDaniel, Miranda; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2015-01-01

    In class 1a ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a substrate-based radical is generated in the α2 subunit by long-distance electron transfer involving an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O·) in the β2 subunit. The conserved W48 β2 is ∼10 Å from Y122OH; mutations at W48 inactivate RNR. Here, we design a beta hairpin peptide, which contains such an interacting tyrosine–tryptophan dyad. The NMR structure of the peptide establishes that there is no direct hydrogen bond between the phenol and the indole rings. However, electronic coupling between the tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in the peptide. In addition, downshifted ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) frequencies are observed for the radical state, reproducing spectral downshifts observed for β2. The frequency downshifts of the ring and CO bands are consistent with charge transfer from YO· to W or another residue. Such a charge transfer mechanism implies a role for the β2 Y-W dyad in electron transfer. PMID:26627888

  12. Room temperature fluorescence and phosphorescence study on the interactions of iodide ions with single tryptophan containing serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Gałęcki, Krystian; Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka

    2016-12-05

    In this study, the influence of heavy-atom perturbation, induced by the addition of iodide ions, on the fluorescence and phosphorescence decay parameters of some single tryptophan containing serum albumins isolated from: human (HSA), equine (ESA) and leporine (LSA) has been studied. The obtained results indicated that, there exist two distinct conformations of the proteins with different exposure to the quencher. In addition, the Stern-Volmer plots indicated saturation of iodide ions in the binding region. Therefore, to determine quenching parameter, we proposed alternative quenching model and we have performed a global analysis of each conformer to define the effect of iodide ions in the cavity by determining the value of the association constant. The possible quenching mechanism may be based on long-range through-space interactions between the buried chromophore and quencher in the aqueous phase. The discrepancies of the decay parameters between the albumins studied may be related with the accumulation of positive charge at the main and the back entrance to the Drug Site 1 where tryptophan residue is located.

  13. Room temperature fluorescence and phosphorescence study on the interactions of iodide ions with single tryptophan containing serum albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałęcki, Krystian; Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the influence of heavy-atom perturbation, induced by the addition of iodide ions, on the fluorescence and phosphorescence decay parameters of some single tryptophan containing serum albumins isolated from: human (HSA), equine (ESA) and leporine (LSA) has been studied. The obtained results indicated that, there exist two distinct conformations of the proteins with different exposure to the quencher. In addition, the Stern-Volmer plots indicated saturation of iodide ions in the binding region. Therefore, to determine quenching parameter, we proposed alternative quenching model and we have performed a global analysis of each conformer to define the effect of iodide ions in the cavity by determining the value of the association constant. The possible quenching mechanism may be based on long-range through-space interactions between the buried chromophore and quencher in the aqueous phase. The discrepancies of the decay parameters between the albumins studied may be related with the accumulation of positive charge at the main and the back entrance to the Drug Site 1 where tryptophan residue is located.

  14. Analysis of the co-operative interaction between the allosterically regulated proteins GK and GKRP using tryptophan fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Zelent, Bogumil; Raimondo, Anne; Barrett, Amy; Buettger, Carol W.; Chen, Pan; Gloyn, Anna L.; Matschinsky, Franz M.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic glucose phosphorylation by GK (glucokinase) is regulated by GKRP (GK regulatory protein). GKRP forms a cytosolic complex with GK followed by nuclear import and storage, leading to inhibition of GK activity. This process is initiated by low glucose, but reversed nutritionally by high glucose and fructose or pharmacologically by GKAs (GK activators) and GKRPIs (GKRP inhibitors). To study the regulation of this process by glucose, fructose-phosphate esters and a GKA, we measured the TF (tryptophan fluorescence) of human WT (wild-type) and GKRP-P446L (a mutation associated with high serum triacylglycerol) in the presence of non-fluorescent GK with its tryptophan residues mutated. Titration of GKRP-WT by GK resulted in a sigmoidal increase in TF, suggesting co-operative PPIs (protein–protein interactions) perhaps due to the hysteretic nature of GK. The affinity of GK for GKRP was decreased and binding co-operativity increased by glucose, fructose 1-phosphate and GKA, reflecting disruption of the GK–GKRP complex. Similar studies with GKRP-P446L showed significantly different results compared with GKRP-WT, suggesting impairment of complex formation and nuclear storage. The results of the present TF-based biophysical analysis of PPIs between GK and GKRP suggest that hepatic glucose metabolism is regulated by a metabolite-sensitive drug-responsive co-operative molecular switch, involving complex formation between these two allosterically regulated proteins. PMID:24568320

  15. Air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated soils: Evaluation of interfacial domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2002-10-01

    A gas-phase miscible-displacement method, using decane as an interfacial tracer, was used to measure air-water interfacial areas for a sand with water contents ranging from ˜2% to 20%. The expected trend of decreasing interfacial areas with increasing water contents was observed. The maximum estimated interfacial area of 19,500 cm-1 appears reasonable given it is smaller than the measured surface area of the porous medium (60,888 cm-1). Comparison of the experimental data presented herein with literature data provided further insight into the characterization of the air-water interface in unsaturated porous media. Specifically, comparison of interfacial areas measured using gas-phase versus aqueous-phase methods indicates that the gas-phase method generally yields larger interfacial areas than the aqueous-phase methods, even when accounting for differences in water content and physical properties of the porous media. The observations are consistent with proposed differences in interfacial accessibility of the aqueous- and gas-phase tracers. Evaluation of the data in light of functional interfacial domains, described herein, yields the hypothesis that aqueous interfacial tracers measure primarily air-water interfaces formed by "capillary water," while gas-phase tracers measure air-water interfaces formed by both capillary and surface-adsorbed (film) water. The gas- and aqueous-phase methods may each provide interfacial area information that is more relevant to specific problems of interest. For example, gas-phase interfacial area measurements may be most relevant to contaminant transport in unsaturated systems, where retention at the air-water interface may be significant. Conversely, the aqueous-phase methods may yield information with direct bearing on multiphase flow processes that are dominated by capillary-phase behavior.

  16. Antihypertensive and cardioprotective effects of the dipeptide isoleucine-tryptophan and whey protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Kopaliani, I; Jannasch, A; Mund, C; Todorov, V; Henle, T; Deussen, A

    2015-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are treatment of choice in hypertensive patients. Clinically used inhibitors exhibit a structural similarity to naturally occurring peptides. This study evaluated antihypertensive and cardioprotective effects of ACE-inhibiting peptides derived from food proteins in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Isoleucine-tryptophan (in vitro IC50 for ACE = 0.7 μm), a whey protein hydrolysate containing an augmented fraction of isoleucine-tryptophan, or captopril was given to spontaneously hypertensive rats (n = 60) over 14 weeks. Two further groups, receiving either no supplement (Placebo) or intact whey protein, served as controls. Systolic blood pressure age-dependently increased in the Placebo group, whereas the blood pressure rise was effectively blunted by isoleucine-tryptophan, whey protein hydrolysate and captopril (-42 ± 3, -38 ± 5, -55 ± 4 mm Hg vs. Placebo). At study end, myocardial mass was lower in isoleucine-tryptophan and captopril groups but only partially in the hydrolysate group. Coronary flow reserve (1 μm adenosine) was improved in isoleucine-tryptophan and captopril groups. Plasma ACE activity was significantly decreased in isoleucine-tryptophan, hydrolysate and captopril groups, but in aortic tissue only after isoleucine-tryptophan or captopril treatment. This was associated with lowered expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2. Following isoleucine-tryptophan and captopril treatments, gene expression of renin was significantly increased indicating an active feedback within renin-angiotensin system. Whey protein hydrolysate and isoleucine-tryptophan powerfully inhibit plasma ACE resulting in antihypertensive effects. Moreover, isoleucine-tryptophan blunts tissue ACE activity, reduces matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and improves coronary flow reserve. Thus, whey protein hydrolysate and particularly isoleucine-tryptophan may serve as innovative food additives with the goal of attenuating

  17. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-07-03

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds.

  18. A kinetic study of the photodynamic effect on tryptophan methyl ester and tryptophan octyl ester in DOPC vesicles.

    PubMed

    Posadaz, Ariana; Correa, N Mariano; Biasutti, M Alicia; García, Norman A

    2010-01-01

    The photodynamic effect on tryptophan methyl ester (trpME) and tryptophan octyl ester (trpOE), using the O(2)((1)Delta(g))-photosensitizers Rose Bengal (RB) and Perinaphthenone (PN) has been studied in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of the phospholipid 1,2-di-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) by stationary photolysis and time-resolved methods. This work reports on the influence of both the site (O(2)((1)Delta(g))) generation and the location of the tryptophan derivatives (trpD), on the photo-oxidation process in a compartmentalized system. The apparent rate constant values for chemical quenching of O(2)((1)Delta(g)) by trpOE (k(r,app)), was higher in vesicles than in water. Also, the ratio between apparent reactive and overall rate constant values for the deactivation of O(2)((1)Delta(g)) (k(r,app)/k(t,app)), increases in vesicles as compared with water, when the oxidative species is generated in the lipidic region or at the interface. Nevertheless, this quotient is lower than the corresponding value in water when O(2)((1)Delta(g)) is generated in the aqueous pseudophase. For trpME, the k(r,app)/k(t,app)values in vesicles and in water are quite similar, confirming the fact that trpME is located in the water pseudophase. Results are discussed in terms of relative protection against O(2)((1)Delta(g)) attack in a microheterogeneous medium as compared with water.

  19. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  20. Conserved Tryptophan Motifs in the Large Tegument Protein pUL36 Are Required for Efficient Secondary Envelopment of Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Lyudmila; Buch, Anna; Döhner, Katinka; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Prank, Ute; Sandbaumhüter, Malte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replicates in the skin and mucous membranes, and initiates lytic or latent infections in sensory neurons. Assembly of progeny virions depends on the essential large tegument protein pUL36 of 3,164 amino acid residues that links the capsids to the tegument proteins pUL37 and VP16. Of the 32 tryptophans of HSV-1-pUL36, the tryptophan-acidic motifs 1766WD1767 and 1862WE1863 are conserved in all HSV-1 and HSV-2 isolates. Here, we characterized the role of these motifs in the HSV life cycle since the rare tryptophans often have unique roles in protein function due to their large hydrophobic surface. The infectivity of the mutants HSV-1(17+)Lox-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA and HSV-1(17+)Lox-CheVP26-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA, in which the capsid has been tagged with the fluorescent protein Cherry, was significantly reduced. Quantitative electron microscopy shows that there were a larger number of cytosolic capsids and fewer enveloped virions compared to their respective parental strains, indicating a severe impairment in secondary capsid envelopment. The capsids of the mutant viruses accumulated in the perinuclear region around the microtubule-organizing center and were not dispersed to the cell periphery but still acquired the inner tegument proteins pUL36 and pUL37. Furthermore, cytoplasmic capsids colocalized with tegument protein VP16 and, to some extent, with tegument protein VP22 but not with the envelope glycoprotein gD. These results indicate that the unique conserved tryptophan-acidic motifs in the central region of pUL36 are required for efficient targeting of progeny capsids to the membranes of secondary capsid envelopment and for efficient virion assembly. IMPORTANCE Herpesvirus infections give rise to severe animal and human diseases, especially in young, immunocompromised, and elderly individuals. The structural hallmark of herpesvirus virions is the tegument, which contains evolutionarily conserved proteins that are essential for several

  1. Conserved Tryptophan Motifs in the Large Tegument Protein pUL36 Are Required for Efficient Secondary Envelopment of Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Lyudmila; Buch, Anna; Döhner, Katinka; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Prank, Ute; Sandbaumhüter, Malte; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replicates in the skin and mucous membranes, and initiates lytic or latent infections in sensory neurons. Assembly of progeny virions depends on the essential large tegument protein pUL36 of 3,164 amino acid residues that links the capsids to the tegument proteins pUL37 and VP16. Of the 32 tryptophans of HSV-1-pUL36, the tryptophan-acidic motifs (1766)WD(1767) and (1862)WE(1863) are conserved in all HSV-1 and HSV-2 isolates. Here, we characterized the role of these motifs in the HSV life cycle since the rare tryptophans often have unique roles in protein function due to their large hydrophobic surface. The infectivity of the mutants HSV-1(17(+))Lox-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA and HSV-1(17(+))Lox-CheVP26-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA, in which the capsid has been tagged with the fluorescent protein Cherry, was significantly reduced. Quantitative electron microscopy shows that there were a larger number of cytosolic capsids and fewer enveloped virions compared to their respective parental strains, indicating a severe impairment in secondary capsid envelopment. The capsids of the mutant viruses accumulated in the perinuclear region around the microtubule-organizing center and were not dispersed to the cell periphery but still acquired the inner tegument proteins pUL36 and pUL37. Furthermore, cytoplasmic capsids colocalized with tegument protein VP16 and, to some extent, with tegument protein VP22 but not with the envelope glycoprotein gD. These results indicate that the unique conserved tryptophan-acidic motifs in the central region of pUL36 are required for efficient targeting of progeny capsids to the membranes of secondary capsid envelopment and for efficient virion assembly. Herpesvirus infections give rise to severe animal and human diseases, especially in young, immunocompromised, and elderly individuals. The structural hallmark of herpesvirus virions is the tegument, which contains evolutionarily conserved proteins that are essential for several stages of

  2. Measuring air-water interfacial areas with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Peng, Sheng; Schnaar, Gregory; Murao, Asami

    2007-03-15

    Air-water interfacial areas as a function of water saturation were measured for a sandy, natural porous medium using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. In addition, interfacial areas measured in a prior study with the gas-phase interfacial partitioning tracer-test method for the same porous medium were included for comparison. For all three methods, total air-water interfacial areas increased with decreasing water saturation. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer-test methods were generally larger than those obtained from microtomography, and the disparity increased as water saturation decreased. The interfacial areas measured by microtomography extrapolated to a value (147 cm(-1)) very similar to the specific solid surface area (151 cm(-1)) calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, indicating that the method does not characterize the area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity (surface roughness, microporosity). This is consistent with the method resolution of approximately 12 microm. In contrast, the interfacial areas measured with the gas-phase tracer tests approached the N2/BET measured specific solid surface area (56000 cm(-1)), indicating that this method does characterize the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. The largest interfacial area measured with the aqueous-phase tracer tests was 224 cm(-1), while the extrapolated maximum interfacial area was approximately 1100 cm(-1). Both of these values are larger than the smooth-sphere specific solid surface area but much smaller than the N2/BET specific solid surface area, which suggests that the method measures a limited portion of the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. All three methods provide measures of total (capillary + film) interfacial area, a primary difference being that the film-associated area is a smooth-surface equivalent for the

  3. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  4. Tryptophan: A gut microbiota-derived metabolites regulating inflammation.

    PubMed

    Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Chassaing, Benoit; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2017-02-06

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which comprise Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic intestinal disorders with an increased prevalence and incidence over the last decade in many different regions over the world. The etiology of IBD is still not well defined, but evidence suggest that it results from perturbation of the homeostasis between the intestinal microbiota and the mucosal immune system, with the involvement of both genetic and environmental factors. Genome wide association studies, which involve large-scale genome-wide screening of potential polymorphism, have identified several mutations associated with IBD. Among them, Card9, a gene encoding an adapter molecule involved in innate immune response to fungi (via type C-lectin sensing) through the activation of IL-22 signaling pathway, has been identified as one IBD susceptible genes. Dietary compounds, which represent a source of energy and metabolites for gut bacteria, are also appreciated to be important actors in the etiology of IBD, for example by altering gut microbiota composition and by regulating the generation of short chain fatty acids. A noteworthy study published in the June 2016 issue of Nature Medicine by Lamas and colleagues investigates the interaction between Card9 and the gut microbiota in the generation of the microbiota-derived tryptophan metabolite. This study highlights the role of tryptophan in dampening intestinal inflammation in susceptible hosts.

  5. Inhibiting tryptophan metabolism enhances interferon therapy in kidney cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Josephine F.; Kim, Jeffrey; Aboud, Omran Abu; Wettersten, Hiromi; Stewart, Benjamin; Berryhill, Grace; Uzal, Francisco; Hovey, Russell C.; Chen, Ching-Hsien; Anderson, Katie; Graef, Ashley; Sarver, Aaron L; Modiano, Jaime F.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing in incidence, and a complete cure remains elusive. While immune-checkpoint antibodies are promising, interferon-based immunotherapy has been disappointing. Tryptophan metabolism, which produces immunosuppressive metabolites, is enhanced in RCC. Here we show indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) expression, a kynurenine pathway enzyme, is increased not only in tumor cells but also in the microenvironment of human RCC compared to normal kidney tissues. Neither kynurenine metabolites nor IDO inhibitors affected the survival or proliferation of human RCC or murine renal cell adenocarcinoma (RENCA) cells in vitro. However, interferon-gamma (IFNγ) induced high levels of IDO1 in both RCC and RENCA cells, concomitant with enhanced kynurenine levels in conditioned media. Induction of IDO1 by IFNα was weaker than by IFNγ. Neither the IDO1 inhibitor methyl-thiohydantoin-DL-tryptophan (MTH-trp) nor IFNα alone inhibited RENCA tumor growth, however the combination of MTH-trp and IFNα reduced tumor growth compared to IFNα. Thus, the failure of IFNα therapy for human RCC is likely due to its inability to overcome the immunosuppressive environment created by increased IDO1. Based on our data, and given that IDO inhibitors are already in clinical trials for other malignancies, IFNα therapy with an IDO inhibitor should be revisited for RCC. PMID:27572319

  6. Effects of tryptophan loading on human cognition, mood, and sleep.

    PubMed

    Silber, B Y; Schmitt, J A J

    2010-03-01

    Modulating central serotonergic function by acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) has provided the fundamental insights into which cognitive functions are influenced by serotonin. It may be expected that serotonergic stimulation by tryptophan (Trp) loading could evoke beneficial behavioural changes that mirror those of ATD. The current review examines the evidence for such effects, notably those on cognition, mood and sleep. Reports vary considerably across different cognitive domains, study designs, and populations. It is hypothesised that the effects of Trp loading on performance may be dependent on the initial state of the serotonergic system of the subject. Memory improvements following Trp loading have generally been shown in clinical and sub-clinical populations where initial serotonergic disturbances are known. Similarly, Trp loading appears to be most effective for improving mood in vulnerable subjects, and improves sleep in adults with some sleep disturbances. Research has consistently shown Trp loading impairs psychomotor and reaction time performance, however, this is likely to be attributed to its mild sedative effects.

  7. Tryptophan Biochemistry: Structural, Nutritional, Metabolic, and Medical Aspects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Rossi, Alessandra; Giannaccini, Gino

    2016-01-01

    L-Tryptophan is the unique protein amino acid (AA) bearing an indole ring: its biotransformation in living organisms contributes either to keeping this chemical group in cells and tissues or to breaking it, by generating in both cases a variety of bioactive molecules. Investigations on the biology of Trp highlight the pleiotropic effects of its small derivatives on homeostasis processes. In addition to protein turn-over, in humans the pathways of Trp indole derivatives cover the synthesis of the neurotransmitter/hormone serotonin (5-HT), the pineal gland melatonin (MLT), and the trace amine tryptamine. The breakdown of the Trp indole ring defines instead the “kynurenine shunt” which produces cell-response adapters as L-kynurenine, kynurenic and quinolinic acids, or the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). This review aims therefore at tracing a “map” of the main molecular effectors in human tryptophan (Trp) research, starting from the chemistry of this AA, dealing then with its biosphere distribution and nutritional value for humans, also focusing on some proteins responsible for its tissue-dependent uptake and biotransformation. We will thus underscore the role of Trp biochemistry in the pathogenesis of human complex diseases/syndromes primarily involving the gut, neuroimmunoendocrine/stress responses, and the CNS, supporting the use of -Omics approaches in this field. PMID:26881063

  8. Tryptophan: A gut microbiota-derived metabolites regulating inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Chassaing, Benoit; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which comprise Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic intestinal disorders with an increased prevalence and incidence over the last decade in many different regions over the world. The etiology of IBD is still not well defined, but evidence suggest that it results from perturbation of the homeostasis between the intestinal microbiota and the mucosal immune system, with the involvement of both genetic and environmental factors. Genome wide association studies, which involve large-scale genome-wide screening of potential polymorphism, have identified several mutations associated with IBD. Among them, Card9, a gene encoding an adapter molecule involved in innate immune response to fungi (via type C-lectin sensing) through the activation of IL-22 signaling pathway, has been identified as one IBD susceptible genes. Dietary compounds, which represent a source of energy and metabolites for gut bacteria, are also appreciated to be important actors in the etiology of IBD, for example by altering gut microbiota composition and by regulating the generation of short chain fatty acids. A noteworthy study published in the June 2016 issue of Nature Medicine by Lamas and colleagues investigates the interaction between Card9 and the gut microbiota in the generation of the microbiota-derived tryptophan metabolite. This study highlights the role of tryptophan in dampening intestinal inflammation in susceptible hosts. PMID:28217370

  9. A model for multiexponential tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins is modeled by multiexponential functions characterized by lifetimes and preexponential factors. Commonly, multiple conformations of the protein are invoked to explain the recovery of two or more lifetimes from the experimental data. However, in many proteins the structure seems to preclude the possibility of multiple conformers sufficiently different from one another to justify such an inference. We present here another plausible multiexponential model based on the assumption that an energetically excited donor surrounded by N acceptor molecules decays by specific radiative and radiationless relaxation processes, and by transferring its energy to acceptors present in or close to the protein matrix. If interactions between the acceptors themselves and back energy transfer are neglected, we show that the intensity decay function contain 2N exponential components characterized by the unperturbed donor lifetime, by energy transfer rates and a probability of occurrence for the corresponding process. We applied this model to the fluorescence decay of holo- and apoazurin, ribonuclease T1, and the reduced single tryptophan mutant (W28F) of thioredoxin. Use of a multiexponential model for the analysis of the fluorescence intensity decay can therefore be justified, without invoking multiple protein conformations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312471

  10. Tryptophan catabolism in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulcev, Makedonka; Reilly, Cavan; Griffin, Timothy J; Broeckling, Corey D; Sandri, Brian J; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Hodgson, Shane W; Woodruff, Prescott G; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exacerbations are a leading cause of morbidity in COPD. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD). Methods We measured metabolites via mass spectrometry (MS) in plasma drawn within 24 hours of admission to the hospital for 33 patients with an AECOPD (day 0) and 30 days later and for 65 matched controls. Individual metabolites were measured via selective reaction monitoring with mass spectrometry. We used a mixed-effect model to compare metabolite levels in cases compared to controls and a paired t-test to test for differences between days 0 and 30 in the AECOPD group. Results We identified 377 analytes at a false discovery rate of 5% that differed between cases (day 0) and controls, and 31 analytes that differed in the AECOPD cases between day 0 and day 30 (false discovery rate: 5%). Tryptophan was decreased at day 0 of AECOPD compared to controls corresponding to an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. Conclusion Patients with AECOPD have a unique metabolomic signature that includes a decrease in tryptophan levels consistent with an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. PMID:27729784

  11. Abnormal kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Wang, Huan; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2017-08-01

    Kynurenine pathway (KP) is the primary path of tryptophan (Trp) catabolism in most mammalian cells. The KP generates several bioactive catabolites, such as kynurenine (Kyn), kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), xanthurenic acid (XA), and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA). Increased catabolite concentrations in serum are associated with several cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart disease, atherosclerosis, and endothelial dysfunction, as well as their risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and aging. The first catabolic step in KP is primarily controlled by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Following this first step, the KP has two major branches, one branch is mediated by kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) and kynureninase (KYNU) and is responsible for the formation of 3-HK, 3-HAA, and quinolinic acid (QA); and another branch is controlled by kynurenine amino-transferase (KAT), which generates KA. Uncontrolled Trp catabolism has been demonstrated in distinct CVD, thus, understanding the underlying mechanisms by which regulates KP enzyme expression and activity is paramount. This review highlights the recent advances on the effect of KP enzyme expression and activity in different tissues on the pathological mechanisms of specific CVD, KP is an inflammatory sensor and modulator in the cardiovascular system, and KP catabolites act as the potential biomarkers for CVD initiation and progression. Moreover, the biochemical features of critical KP enzymes and principles of enzyme inhibitor development are briefly summarized, as well as the therapeutic potential of KP enzyme inhibitors against CVD is briefly discussed.

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer involving eosin-tryptophan conjugates. Long-lived radical pair states for systems incorporating aromatic amino acid side chains

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II; Farahat, C.W.; Oh, C. )

    1994-07-14

    The electron-transfer photochemistry of the covalent derivatives of the dye eosin, in which the xanthene dye is covalently attached to the amino acid L-tryptophan via the thiohydantoin derivative, the tryptophan dipeptide, and an ethyl ester derivative, has been investigated. The singlet excited state of the dye is significantly quenched on attachment of the aromatic amino acid residue. Dye triplet states are also intercepted through intramolecular interaction of excited dye and amino acid pendants. Flash photolysis experiments verify that this interaction involves electron transfer from the indole side chains of tryptophan. Rate constants for electron transfer are discussed in terms of the distance relationships for the eosin chromophore and aromatic redox sites on peptide derivatives, the pathway for [sigma]-[pi] through-bond interaction between redox sites, and the multiplicity and state of protonation for electron-transfer intermediates. Selected electron-transfer photoreactions were studied under conditions of binding of the peptide derivatives in a high molecular weight, water-soluble, globular polymer, poly(vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone). 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Cell Adhesion on RGD-Displaying Knottins with Varying Numbers of Tryptophan Amino Acids to Tune the Affinity for Assembly on Cucurbit[8]uril Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan; Cavatorta, Emanuela; Huskens, Jurriaan; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2017-09-05

    Cell adhesion is studied on multivalent knottins, displaying RGD ligands with a high affinity for integrin receptors, that are assembled on CB[8]-methylviologen-modified surfaces. The multivalency in the knottins stems from the number of tryptophan amino acid moieties, between 0 and 4, that can form a heteroternary complex with cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) and surface-tethered methylviologen (MV(2+)). The binding affinity of the knottins with CB[8] and MV(2+) surfaces was evaluated using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Specific binding occurred, and the affinity increased with the valency of tryptophans on the knottin. Additionally, increased multilayer formation was observed, attributed to homoternary complex formation between tryptophan residues of different knottins and CB[8]. Thus, we were able to control the surface coverage of the knottins by valency and concentration. Cell experiments with mouse myoblast (C2C12) cells on the self-assembled knottin surfaces showed specific integrin recognition by the RGD-displaying knottins. Moreover, cells were observed to elongate more on the supramolecular knottin surfaces with a higher valency, and in addition, more pronounced focal adhesion formation was observed on the higher-valency knottin surfaces. We attribute this effect to the enhanced coverage and the enhanced affinity of the knottins in their interaction with the CB[8] surface. Collectively, these results are promising for the development of biomaterials including knottins via CB[8] ternary complexes for tunable interactions with cells.

  14. Modeling the fluorescence of protein-embedded tryptophans with ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemistry: the limiting cases of parvalbumin and monellin.

    PubMed

    Pistolesi, Sara; Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Pogni, Rebecca; Basosi, Riccardo; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2009-12-10

    We show that a quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics strategy based on ab initio (i.e., first principle) multiconfigurational perturbation theory can reproduce the spectral properties of a tryptophan residue embedded in the contrasting hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments of parvalbumin and monellin, respectively. We show that the observed absorption and emission energies can be reproduced with a less than 3 kcal mol(-1) error. The analysis of the computed emission energies based on a protein disassembly scheme and protein electrostatic potential mapping allows for a detailed understanding of the factors modulating the tryptophan emission. It is shown that for monellin, where the tryptophan is exposed to the solvent, the fluorescence wavelength is controlled not only by the distribution of the point charges of the protein-solvent environment but also by specific hydrogen bonds and, most important, by the environment-induced change in chromophore structure. In contrast, in parvalbumin, where the chromophore is embedded in the protein core, the structure and emission maxima are the same as those of an isolated 3-methylindole fluorophore. Consistently, we find that in parvalbumin the solvation does not change significantly the computed emission energy.

  15. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  16. Serotonin-related tryptophan in children with insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rocío; Manjarrez, Gabriel; Nishimura, Elisa; Hernandez, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    In the course of the present research in school children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, we observed that the free fraction of L-tryptophan, the free fraction of L-tryptophan/total L-tryptophan, and the free fraction of L-tryptophan/neutral amino acids ratios, are significantly reduced. The decrease of free fraction of L-tryptophan in plasma with a concomitant decrease of the free fraction of L-tryptophan/neutral amino acids ratio suggest a decrease in the transport of the precursor amino acid to the brain and in the serotonin synthesis rate, similar to that observed in diabetic animals. This finding may be of relevance in the pathophysiology and in the clinical picture, which could be related to an alteration of serotonin metabolism and neurotransmission in the brain and may be possibly related to neuropsychiatric disorders in diabetic school children. Thus we propose that the free fraction of L-tryptophan and the free fraction of L-tryptophan/neutral amino acids ratios may be clinically useful as indicators of brain serotonergic activity in these patients. In our laboratory, we are currently obtaining additional data on the functional role of the brain serotonergic system in humans to further support the relevance of our results.

  17. Metabolism of tryptophan by Pseudomonas aureofaciens and its relationship to pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Salcher, O; Lingens, F

    1980-12-01

    Studies on the metabolism of tryptophan in Pseudomonas aureofaciens ATCC 15926 revealed different metabolic routes for the L- and D-isomer besides the biosynthetic pathway for pyrrolnitrin synthesis. L-Tryptophan catabolism follows the aromatic route via anthranilic acid. Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase were induced by L-tryptophan. Kynureninase and anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase were induced by L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine and anthranilic acid. Anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase was absent from a mutant strain of P. aureofaciens ATCC 19526 which produced about 30-fold increased amounts of pyrrolnitrin. The Km values of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and kynureninase did not differ substantially between the two strains. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase, 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase, tryptophanase and indolyl-3-alkane alpha-hydroxylase activities were not detected. D- and L-tryptophan were converted to indole-3-acetic acid. This additional catabolic pathway was well as tryptophan racemase activity was constitutive and present in both strains.

  18. Dissimilation of Tryptophan and Related Indolic Compounds by Ruminal Microorganisms In Vitro1

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, M. T.; Carlson, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Intraruminal doses of L-tryptophan cause acute pulmonary edema and emphysema in cattle. The D and L isomers of tryptophan and 22 related indolic compounds were incubated with ruminal microorganisms in vitro. Incubation of L-[U-benzene ring-14C]tryptophan with ruminal microorganisms for 24 h resulted in 39% of the added radioactivity being incorporated into skatole, 7% into indole, and 4% into indoleacetate (IAA). D-Tryptophan was not degraded to any of these metabolites. The major pathway of skatole formation from L-tryptophan appeared to be by the decarboxylation of IAA. Incubation of [2-14C]IAA with ruminal microorganisms for 24 h resulted in 38% incorporation into skatole. L-[5-Hydroxy]tryptophan was degraded to 5-hydroxyskatole and 5-hydroxyindole, whereas 5-hydroxyindoleacetate was degraded to only 5-hydroxyskatole. Incubation of indolepyruvate, indolelactate, and indolealdehyde with ruminal microorganisms resulted in the formation of both skatole and indole. Under similar conditions, indoleacetaldehyde was converted to IAA and tryptophol. The addition of increasing concentrations of glucose (0 to 110 mM) reduced the formation of both skatole and indole from L-tryptophan and resulted in the accumulation of IAA. Antibiotics reduced the degradation of L-tryptophan to skatole and indole, with kanamycin and neomycin particularly effective in reducing the decarboxylation of IAA to skatole. PMID:4545142

  19. Self-assembling tryptophan-based designer peptides as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ishanki; Jha, Divya; Admane, Prasad; Panda, Amulya K; Haridas, V

    2016-01-15

    A series of tryptophan-based peptides W1a, b-W4a, b, with diverse architectures were designed and synthesized. These tryptophan containing peptides can self-assemble to spherical particle. This self-assembled system was demonstrated to encapsulate rhodamine B and penetrate the cell membrane. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluid displacement fronts in porous media: pore scale interfacial jumps, pressure bursts and acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps and pressure bursts that involve intense interfacial energy release in the form of acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and transport properties behind the front. We present experimental studies using acoustic emission technique (AE), rapid imaging, and liquid pressure measurements to characterize these processes during drainage and imbibition in simple porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (AE amplitudes obey a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion reflecting fluid redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Imaging revealed that the velocity of interfacial jumps often exceeds front velocity by more than 50 fold and is highly inertial component (Re>1000). Pore invasion volumes reduced deduced from pressure fluctuations waiting times (for constant withdrawal rates) show remarkable agreement with geometrically-deduced pore volumes. Discrepancies between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to constraints on evacuation opportunity times and simultaneous invasion events. A mechanistic model for interfacial motions in a pore-throat network was developed to investigate interfacial dynamics focusing on the role of inertia. Results suggest that while pore scale dynamics were sensitive to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerted only a minor effect on phase entrapment. The study on pore scale invasion events paints a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provides new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts that are essential for improved macroscopic description of multiphase flows in porous media.

  1. Probing the role of tryptophans in Aequorea victoria green fluorescent proteins with an expanded genetic code.

    PubMed

    Budisa, Nediljko; Pal, Prajna Paramita; Alefelder, Stefan; Birle, Petra; Krywcun, Tatjana; Rubini, Marina; Wenger, Waltraud; Bae, Jae Hyun; Steiner, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    The expanded genetic code in combination with site-directed mutagenesis was used to probe spectroscopic and structural roles of tryptophan (Trp) residues in Aequorea victoria green fluorescent proteins (avGFPs). Nine different halogen-, chalcogen-, and methyl-containing Trp isosteric analogues and surrogates were incorporated into avGFPs containing indole moieties in, and outside of, the chromophore, by the use of the selective pressure incorporation method. Such isosteric replacements introduced minimal local geometry changes in indole moieties, often to the level of single atomic exchange ('atomic mutation') and do not affect three-dimensional structures of avGFPs but induce changes in spectral properties. Our approach offers a new platform to re-evaluate issues like resonance transfer, mechanisms of chromophore formation and maturation, as well as the importance of local geometry and weak sulphur-aromatic interactions for avGFP spectral properties and structural stability. The library of novel tailor-made avGFP mutants and variants generated in this work has demonstrated not only the potentials of the expanded genetic code to study spectroscopic functions, but also a new approach to generate tailor-made proteins with interesting and useful spectral properties.

  2. Milk proteins as a source of tryptophan-containing bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Tryptophan (W) is an essential amino acid which is primarily required for protein synthesis. It also acts as a precursor of key biomolecules for human health (serotonin, melatonin, tryptamine, niacin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), phosphorylated NAD (NADP), quinolinic acid, kynureric acid, etc.). Among dietary proteins, milk proteins are particularly rich in W. W residues within milk proteins may be released by proteolytic/peptidolytic enzymes either as a free amino acid or as part of peptide sequences. Different W-containing peptides originating from milk proteins have been shown in vitro to display a wide range of bioactivities such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition along with antioxidant, antidiabetic and satiating related properties. Free W has been shown in certain instances to have an effect on cognition and the aforementioned bioactive properties. However, a higher bioactive potency has generally been observed with specific W-containing peptides compared to free W. Since W is thermolabile, the impact of processing on the stability of W-containing peptides needs to be considered. Milk protein-derived W-containing peptides may have significant potential as natural health promoting agents in humans.

  3. Characterization of N-Acetyl-Tryptophan Degradation in Protein Therapeutic Formulations.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Kyle L; Leiske, Danielle; Salisbury, Cleo M

    2017-08-24

    N-Acetyl-tryptophan (NAT) is used as a stabilizer for preparations of human serum albumin and has more recently been demonstrated to provide oxidative protection for labile Trp residues in monoclonal antibodies. As a component in the formulations of protein therapeutics, NAT is sacrificially degraded; therefore understanding the identity and quantity of NAT degradants potentially formed in these drug products is essential to understanding the potential patient impact of this additive. Here we report a simple reversed phase chromatography approach that allows systematic investigation of NAT degradation in relevant formulations under stressed conditions. Screening a panel of NAT-containing samples following a variety of forced stress conditions led to a range of NAT degradation from minimal (3%) to significant (83%). NAT degradants were observed to be largely conserved between oxidative and thermal stress conditions. Online mass spectrometry and standard compound synthesis allowed for identification of the major degradants in the stressed sample panel. NAT degradation was minimal under recommended storage conditions and in relevant thermal stress conditions for a representative protein therapeutic drug product, suggesting that NAT is stable under normal manufacturing, storage, and handling conditions. This work supports the use of NAT as an antioxidant in liquid drug product formulations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. NMR Crystallography of a Carbanionic Intermediate in Tryptophan Synthase: Chemical Structure, Tautomerization, and Reaction Specificity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carbanionic intermediates play a central role in the catalytic transformations of amino acids performed by pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Here, we make use of NMR crystallography—the synergistic combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography, and computational chemistry—to interrogate a carbanionic/quinonoid intermediate analogue in the β-subunit active site of the PLP-requiring enzyme tryptophan synthase. The solid-state NMR chemical shifts of the PLP pyridine ring nitrogen and additional sites, coupled with first-principles computational models, allow a detailed model of protonation states for ionizable groups on the cofactor, substrates, and nearby catalytic residues to be established. Most significantly, we find that a deprotonated pyridine nitrogen on PLP precludes formation of a true quinonoid species and that there is an equilibrium between the phenolic and protonated Schiff base tautomeric forms of this intermediate. Natural bond orbital analysis indicates that the latter builds up negative charge at the substrate Cα and positive charge at C4′ of the cofactor, consistent with its role as the catalytic tautomer. These findings support the hypothesis that the specificity for β-elimination/replacement versus transamination is dictated in part by the protonation states of ionizable groups on PLP and the reacting substrates and underscore the essential role that NMR crystallography can play in characterizing both chemical structure and dynamics within functioning enzyme active sites. PMID:27779384

  5. De novo generation of antimicrobial LK peptides with a single tryptophan at the critical amphipathic interface.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Won, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Wahn-Soo; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2009-09-01

    De novo design of amphipathic model peptides has been successful for generating many antimicrobial peptides with various lengths and amino acid compositions. Here, we suggest a very simple strategy to design antimicrobial peptides with a short length and a simple amino acid composition. Amphipathic helical properties were conferred by using only leucines and lysines and a single tryptophan was positioned at the critical amphipathic interface between the hydrophilic ending side and the hydrophobic starting side, in the helical wheel projection. According to this rule, the model peptides with 7 to 13 residues exhibited antimicrobial activity. Among them, the most potent activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, covering all of the nine bacterial strains tested in this study, was found for the 11-mer sequences having a 1:1 (L(5)K(5)W(6)) or a 3:2 (L(6)K(4)W(6)) ratio of leucines to lysines. In particular, the former peptide L(5)K(5)W(6) could be evaluated as the most useful agent, as it showed no significant hemolytic activity with a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Copyright 2009 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Enantiomer-Selective Photo-Induced Reaction of Protonated Tryptophan with Disaccharides in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thuc N; Fujihara, Akimasa

    2017-07-08

    In order to investigate chemical evolution in interstellar molecular clouds, enantiomer-selective photo-induced chemical reactions between an amino acid and disaccharides in the gas phase were examined using a tandem mass spectrometer containing an electrospray ionization source and a cold ion trap. Ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectra of cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes of protonated tryptophan (Trp) enantiomers with disaccharides consisting of two D-glucose units, such as D-maltose or D-cellobiose, were obtained by photoexcitation of the indole ring of Trp. NH2CHCOOH loss via cleavage of the Cα-Cβ bond in Trp induced by hydrogen atom transfer from the NH3(+) group of a protonated Trp was observed in a noncovalent heterochiral H(+)(L-Trp)(D-maltose) complex. In contrast, a photo-induced chemical reaction forming the product ion with m/z 282 occurs in homochiral H(+)(D-Trp)(D-maltose). For D-cellobiose, both NH2CHCOOH elimination and the m/z 282 product ion were observed, and no enantiomer-selective phenomena occurred. The m/z 282 product ion indicates that the photo-induced C-glycosylation, which links D-glucose residues to the indole moiety of Trp via a C-C bond, can occur in cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes, and its enantiomer-selectivity depends on the structure of the disaccharide.

  7. Post-translational biosynthesis of the protein-derived cofactor tryptophan tryptophylquinone

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Victor L.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2014-01-01

    Methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of methylamine to formaldehyde and ammonia. Tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) is the protein-derived cofactor of MADH that is required for these catalytic activities. TTQ is biosynthesized through the post-translational modification of two Trp residues within MADH, during which the indole rings of two Trp side chains are cross-linked and two oxygen atoms are inserted into one of the indole rings. MauG is a c-type diheme enzyme that catalyzes the final three reactions in TTQ formation. In total, this is a six-electron oxidation process requiring three cycles of MauG-dependent two-electron oxidation events using either H2O2 or O2. The MauG redox form that is responsible for the catalytic activity is an unprecedented bis-Fe(IV) species. The amino acids of MADH that are modified are ~ 40 Å from the site where MauG binds oxygen, and the reaction proceeds by a hole hopping electron transfer mechanism. This review will address these highly unusual aspects of the long range catalytic reaction that is mediated by MauG. PMID:23746262

  8. Enantiomer-Selective Photo-Induced Reaction of Protonated Tryptophan with Disaccharides in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Thuc N.; Fujihara, Akimasa

    2017-07-01

    In order to investigate chemical evolution in interstellar molecular clouds, enantiomer-selective photo-induced chemical reactions between an amino acid and disaccharides in the gas phase were examined using a tandem mass spectrometer containing an electrospray ionization source and a cold ion trap. Ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectra of cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes of protonated tryptophan (Trp) enantiomers with disaccharides consisting of two uc(d)-glucose units, such as uc(d)-maltose or uc(d)-cellobiose, were obtained by photoexcitation of the indole ring of Trp. NH2CHCOOH loss via cleavage of the Cα-Cβ bond in Trp induced by hydrogen atom transfer from the NH3 + group of a protonated Trp was observed in a noncovalent heterochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(d)-maltose) complex. In contrast, a photo-induced chemical reaction forming the product ion with m/z 282 occurs in homochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(d)-maltose). For uc(d)-cellobiose, both NH2CHCOOH elimination and the m/z 282 product ion were observed, and no enantiomer-selective phenomena occurred. The m/z 282 product ion indicates that the photo-induced C-glycosylation, which links uc(d)-glucose residues to the indole moiety of Trp via a C-C bond, can occur in cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes, and its enantiomer-selectivity depends on the structure of the disaccharide.

  9. Regioselective Nitration of Nα,N1-Bis(trifluoroacetyl)-L-Tryptophan Methyl Ester: Efficient Synthesis of 2-Nitro and 6-Nitro-N-Trifluoroacetyl-L-Tryptophan Methyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Andrew S.; Som, Phanneth; Metcalf, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Nitration of Nα,N1-bis(trifluoroacetyl)-L-tryptophan methyl ester with HNO3 in acetic anhydride at 0° C provides Nα-trifluoroacetyl-2-nitro-L-tryptophan methyl ester in 67% yield, whereas nitration in trifluoroacetic acid at 0° C gives Nα-trifluoroacetyl-6-nitro-L-tryptophan methyl ester in 69% yield. PMID:18851915

  10. Interfacial tension of polyelectrolyte complex coacervate phases.

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Jian; Priftis, Dimitrios; Farina, R; Perry, Sarah L.; Leon, Lorraine F.; Whitmer, Jonathan; Hoffmann, Kyle; Tirrell, Matthew; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-06-01

    We consider polyelectrolyte solutions which, under suitable conditions, phase separate into a liquid-like coacervate phase and a coexisting supernatant phase that exhibit an extremely low interfacial tension. Such interfacial tension provides the basis for most coacervate-based applications, but little is known about it, including its dependence on molecular weight, charge density, and salt concentration. By combining a Debye-Huckel treatment for electrostatic interactions with the Cahn-Hilliard theory, we derive explicit expressions for this interfacial tension. In the absence of added salts, we find that the interfacial tension scales as N-3/2(eta/eta(c)-1)(3/2) near the critical point of the demixing transition, and that it scales as eta(1/2) far away from it, where N is the chain length and eta measures the electrostatic interaction strength as a function of temperature, dielectric constant, and charge density of the polyelectrolytes. For the case with added salts, we find that the interfacial tension scales with the salt concentration psi as N-1/4(1-psi/psi(c))(3/2) near the critical salt concentration psi(c). Our predictions are shown to be in quantitative agreement with experiments and provide a means to design new materials based on polyelectrolyte complexation.

  11. Probing Interfacial Emulsion Stability Controls using Electrorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuyu; Brandvik, Amy; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    The stability of water-in-oil emulsions is controlled by interfacial mechanisms that include oil film rheology of approaching drops and the strength of drop interfaces. Film drainage is mainly a function of the continuous phase rheology. Temperature is used to regulate the viscosity of the continuous phase and hence determine its effect on emulsion stability through film drainage, in contrast with interfacial strength. In this study, one crude oil is used to formulate water-in-oil emulsions. Oil-water interfacial tension is measured to gauge other interfacial changes with temperature. The critical field value, used as proxy of emulsion stability, approaches a plateau value for each crude oil- aqueous solution pair, at sufficiently high temperature (50 ^oC), which is interpreted to reflect the intrinsic drop-coating film resistance to coalescence. Interfacial tension does vary significantly with either aqueous phase composition or temperature. From comparison with previous results, we speculate that drop coating film is composed of a fraction of asphaltic compunds.

  12. On the hierarchy of interfacial dislocation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Olson, G. B.

    1985-04-01

    Many different types of dislocations have been defined in dislocation models for grain boundaries and interphase boundaries. It is emphasized that there is no unique dislocation model for a boundary, and that the formal dislocation content depends upon the choice of the lattice correspondence relating the adjoining lattices. However, it is concluded that no problems of real physical significance arise from this lack of uniqueness. “Best≓, or most useful, descriptions often exist, and these are discussed. A hierarchy consisting of four different types of interfacial dislocations may be distinguished, which is useful in describing the dislocation content of interfaces. These entities are termed: (1) primary interfacial dislocations; (2) secondary interfacial dislocations; (3) coherency interfacial dislocations; and (4) translational interfacial dislocations. While there may be a lack of agreement on terminology in the literature, it is believed that these dislocation types are distinguishable and play unique roles in useful dislocation models for interfaces. Detailed descriptions of these dislocation types are given, and actual examples in real interfaces are presented. It is concluded that dislocation descriptions of interface structures become of purely formal significance in the limit of fully incoherent interfaces since the cores are then delocalized. The utility of various dislocation descriptions therefore depends on the degree to which various types of local coherency exist.

  13. Proton affinity of the histidine-tryptophan cluster motif from the influenza A virus from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Klein, Michael L.; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been used to compare and contrast the deprotonation reaction of a histidine residue in aqueous solution with the situation arising in a histidine-tryptophan cluster. The latter is used as a model of the proton storage unit present in the pore of the M2 proton conducting ion channel. We compute potentials of mean force for the dissociation of a proton from the Nδ and Nɛ positions of the imidazole group to estimate the pKas. Anticipating our results, we will see that the estimated pKa for the first protonation event of the M2 channel is in good agreement with experimental estimates. Surprisingly, despite the fact that the histidine is partially desolvated in the M2 channel, the affinity for protons is similar to that of a histidine in aqueous solution. Importantly, the electrostatic environment provided by the indoles is responsible for the stabilization of the charged imidazolium.

  14. Effect of tryptophan and its metabolites on gastric emptying of liquid meals in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cooke, A R; Ward, W O

    1976-09-01

    The effects of tryptophan and its metabolites were studied to determine whether the known inhibiting effect of tryptophan on emptying was due to local or systemic effects or due to tryptophan metabolites. In five dogs with chronic gastric fistulas, instillation of 300 ml of DL-kynurenine (5mM), 5-hydroxytryptophan (mM), or 5-hydroxytryptamine (20 mM) into the gut did not slow gastric emptying. Furthermore, iv infusion of L-tryptophan (5, 20, 50 mM), DL-kynurenine (2, 5, 10 mM), 5-hydroxytryptamine (2mM, 10 mM), and 3-indolepyruvic acid (2, 5, 10 mM) also did not slow gastric emptying. These studies indicate that tryptophan slows gastric emptying by exciting a receptor in the gut and not by a direct effect on the stomach or brain or via its major metabolites.

  15. Tryptophan-functionalized gold nanoparticles for deep UV imaging of microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Pajović, Jelena D; Dojčilović, Radovan; Božanić, Dušan K; Kaščáková, Slavka; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Dimitrijević-Branković, Suzana; Vodnik, Vesna V; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Luyt, Adriaan S; Djoković, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible fluorescent nanostructures were prepared by a functionalization of gold nanoparticles with the amino acid tryptophan. The gold-tryptophan bioconjugates were investigated by TEM and HRTEM and various spectroscopy methods (XPS, FTIR, UV-vis and photoluminescence). It was found that the gold nanoparticles, initially 8 nm in diameter, aggregate in the presence of the amino acid. From the XPS and FTIR spectroscopy results, it was concluded that the tryptophan gold interactions mainly take place via indole and carboxyl groups. Although the indole group is involved in the interaction with the gold surfaces, the tryptophan-gold hybrids showed strong fluorescence due to the presence of multilayers of tryptophan. Deep ultra violet (DUV) imaging performed at the SOLEIL synchrotron showed that it is possible to detect these hybrid nanostructures within Escherichia coli cells.

  16. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A.

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  17. Measuring residue associations in protein structures. Possible implications for protein folding.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Zuker, M; Brocchieri, L

    1994-06-03

    We propose a number of distance measures between residues in protein structures based on average, minimum and maximum distances of all atom (backbone and side-chain) coordinates or with respect to side-chain atom coordinates only. The d1-distance (D1-distance) refers to the average distance between side-chain (backbone and side-chain) atoms of a residue pair in a given structure. The dm-distance (Dm-distance) refers to the minimum distance between side-chain atoms (non-trivial minimum distance between all atoms of a residue pair). For each distance measure, averaging and normalizing over representative protein structures, association values and closeness orderings for all amino acid types are determined. The expected associations of side-chain interactions between oppositely charged residues, among hydrophobic residues and of cysteine with cysteine are confirmed. Several surprising associations are observed relative to (1) the aromatic residues tyrosine and tryptophan, but not phenylalanine; (2) multiple histidine residues; (3) asymmetries of arginine versus lysine, aspartate versus glutamate, alanine versus glycine, and asparagine versus glutamine; (4) absence of correlations of alpha-carbon distances with side-chain distances. The all atoms D1-distance attractions are dominated by steric relationships, with glycine and alanine significantly close to all amino acids, whereas large residues are under-associated with all residue types. In contrast, for the closeness ordering corresponding to the minimum side-chain dm-distance, glycine and alanine are among the least associated. However, in the d1-distance alanine is significantly close to all hydrophobic residues with the exception of tryptophan. The dm-distance preferences display a pervasive attraction for tyrosine by almost all residue types, the prominence of tyrosine and tryptophan in cation-aromatic interactions, and the versatility of histidine in functionality. The principal findings suggest a new

  18. Interfacial Shear Rheology of Coffee Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läuger, Jörg; Heyer, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    Both oscillatory and rotational measurements on the film formation process and on interfacial rheological properties of the final film of coffee samples with different concentrations are presented. As higher the concentration as faster the film formation process is, whereas the concentration does not have a large effect on the visco-elastic properties of the final films. Two geometries, a biconical geometry and a Du Noüy ring have been employed. The presented results show that interfacial shear rheology allows detailed investigations on coffee films. Although with a Du Noüy ring it is possible to measure the qualitative behavior and relative differences only the biconical geometry is sensitive enough to test weak films and to reveal real absolute values for the interfacial shear rheological quantities.

  19. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O(2-) migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm(-2) at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  20. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  1. Mephisto: Interfacial Destabilization in Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favier, J. J.; Malmejac, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The destabilizing mechanisms at a solidification interface were studied to obtain information on the kinetics and morphologies in the transient and steady state, and to separate the influences of liquid phase instabilities from interfacial instabilities. A differential seebeck voltage measurements technique was developed to provide a continuous record of the solid-liquid interface temperature as the solidification rate is varied to determine the kinetic coefficients. Signal processing and noise suppression techniques allow nonovolt precision which corresponds to mK accuracy for the interfacial temperature.

  2. Monitoring of interfacial tensions by drop counting

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Boring, C.P.; McLaughlin, J.F.; Harless, D.P.

    1988-11-01

    A capillary tube device was shown to provide a rapid means of measuring the interfacial tension between water and Freon-113. The measurement technique is based on counting the number of drops that form when a fixed volume of water passes through the capillary tube into the bulk Freon. The interfacial tension is predicted to be proportional to the number of drops to the negative 2/3 power. Calibration curves were obtained for Freon-water samples containing known concentrations of a surfactant. A standard Gibbs adsorption curve was obtained. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. NOVEL METHODS FOR MEASURING AIR-WATER INTERFACIAL AREA IN UNSATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Ouni, Asma El; Araujo, Juliana B.; Zhong, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented. PMID:25732632

  4. Cooperative folding units of escherichia coli tryptophan repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Wallqvist, A; Lavoie, T A; Chanatry, J A; Covell, D G; Carey, J

    1999-01-01

    A previously published computational procedure was used to identify cooperative folding units within tryptophan repressor. The theoretical results predict the existence of distinct stable substructures in the protein chain for the monomer and the dimer. The predictions were compared with experimental data on structure and folding of the repressor and its proteolytic fragments and show excellent agreement for the dimeric form of the protein. The results suggest that the monomer, the structure of which is currently unknown, is likely to have a structure different from the one it has within the context of the highly intertwined dimer. Application of this method to the repressor monomer represents an extension of the computations into the realm of evaluating hypothetical structures such as those produced by threading. PMID:10465773

  5. Effects of carbohydrates on brain tryptophan availability and stress performance.

    PubMed

    Markus, C R

    2007-09-01

    Although glucose intake has been associated with enhanced mental performance, this does not follow a clear synchronized relationship and findings are inconsistent. Given the brain's need for glucose during demanding conditions, glucose intake may be beneficial for stress performance. Brain serotonin may be involved as a postprandial mechanism initiated by increases in plasma tryptophan to the sum of the other large neutral amino acids (Trp/LNAA ratio). We tested whether carbohydrate drinks compared to placebo drinks increase the plasma Trp/LNAA ratio and improve stress performance and mood. Thirty-seven healthy subjects were monitored in a double-blind placebo-controlled study for performance when continuously exposed to cold pressor stress; 2h after carbohydrate- or placebo-intake. Cold pressor stress significantly increased cortisol and reduced mood and cognitive performance, whereas carbohydrates significantly increased plasma Trp/LNAA and positively influenced performance and mood under stress.

  6. Tryptophan Metabolites and Their Impact on Multiple Sclerosis Progression.

    PubMed

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Wootla, Bharath; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-14

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates involvement of tryptophan metabolites and in particular activation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) in neurocognitive disorders under CNS inflammatory conditions. The KP is involved in several brain-associated disorders including Parkinson's disease, AIDS dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and brain tumors. Our review is an attempt to address any relevant association between dysregulation of KP and multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory CNS disorder that ultimately leads to demyelinated brain areas and severe neurological deficits. Modulation of KP is a new topic for the field of MS and warrants further research. The availability of potential KP modulators approved for MS may shed some light into the therapeutic potential of KP antagonists for the treatment of MS patients.

  7. Tryptophan Catabolites and Their Impact on Multiple Sclerosis Progression.

    PubMed

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Wootla, Bharath; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates involvement of tryptophan metabolites and in particular activation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) in neurocognitive disorders under CNS inflammatory conditions. The KP is involved in several brain-associated disorders including Parkinson's disease, AIDS dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and brain tumors. Our review is an attempt to address any relevant association between dysregulation of KP and multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory CNS disorder that ultimately leads to demyelinated brain areas and severe neurological deficits. Modulation of KP is a new topic for the field of MS and warrants further research. The availability of potential KP modulators approved for MS may shed some light into the therapeutic potential of KP antagonists for the treatment of MS patients.

  8. Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, S M; Clarke, G; Borre, Y E; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-01-15

    The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is becoming clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is also substantial overlap between behaviours influenced by the gut microbiota and those which rely on intact serotonergic neurotransmission. The developing serotonergic system may be vulnerable to differential microbial colonisation patterns prior to the emergence of a stable adult-like gut microbiota. At the other extreme of life, the decreased diversity and stability of the gut microbiota may dictate serotonin-related health problems in the elderly. The mechanisms underpinning this crosstalk require further elaboration but may be related to the ability of the gut microbiota to control host tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway, thereby simultaneously reducing the fraction available for serotonin synthesis and increasing the production of neuroactive metabolites. The enzymes of this pathway are immune and stress-responsive, both systems which buttress the brain-gut axis. In addition, there are neural processes in the gastrointestinal tract which can be influenced by local alterations in serotonin concentrations with subsequent relay of signals along the scaffolding of the brain-gut axis to influence CNS neurotransmission. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota might be a viable treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders.

  9. Biochemistry of primary headaches: role of tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, G; Cevoli, S; Colavito, D; Leon, A

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of migraine as well as cluster headache (CH) is yet a debated question. In this review, we discuss the possible role of the of tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism in the pathogenesis of these primary headaches. These include the abnormalities in the synthesis of neurotransmitters: high level of DA, low level of NE and very elevated levels of octopamine and synephrine (neuromodulators) in plasma of episodic migraine without aura and CH patients. We hypothesize that the imbalance between the levels of neurotransmitters and elusive amines synthesis is due to a metabolic shift directing tyrosine toward an increased decarboxylase and reduced hydroxylase enzyme activities. The metabolic shift of the tyrosine is favored by a state of neuronal hyperexcitability and a reduced mitochondrial activity present in migraine. In addition we present biochemical studies performed in chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache patients to verify if the same anomalies of the tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism are present in these primary headaches and, if so, their possible role in the chronicity process of CM and CTTH. The results show that important abnormalities of tyrosine metabolism are present only in CM patients (very high plasma levels of DA, NE and tryptamine). Tryptamine plasma levels were found significantly lower in both CM and CTTH patients. In view of this, we propose that migraine and, possibly, CH attacks derive from neurotransmitter and neuromodulator metabolic abnormalities in a hyperexcitable and hypoenergetic brain that spread from the frontal lobe, downstream, resulting in abnormally activated nuclei of the pain matrix. The low tryptamine plasma levels found in CM and CTTH patients suggest that these two primary chronic headaches are characterized by a common insufficient serotoninergic control of the pain threshold.

  10. The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation is activated during osteoblastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Christopher; Li, Wei; Santner-Nanan, Brigitte; Lim, Chai K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Ball, Helen J; Hunt, Nicholas H; Nanan, Ralph; Duque, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the anabolic effect of interferon gamma (IFNγ) on bone have not been carefully examined. Using microarray expression analysis, we found that IFNγ upregulates a set of genes associated with a tryptophan degradation pathway, known as the kynurenine pathway, in osteogenic differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). We, therefore, hypothesized that activation of the kynurenine pathway plays a role in osteoblastogenesis even in the absence of IFNγ. Initially, we observed a strong increase in tryptophan degradation during osteoblastogenesis with and without IFNγ in the media. We next blocked indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), the most important enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, using a siRNA and pharmacological approach and observed a strong inhibition of osteoblastogenesis with a concomitant decrease in osteogenic factors. We next examined the bone phenotype of Ido1 knockout (Ido1(-/-)) mice. Compared to their wild-type littermates, Ido1(-/-) mice exhibited osteopenia associated with low osteoblast and high osteoclast numbers. Finally, we tested whether the end products of the kynurenine pathway have an osteogenic effect on hMSC. We identified that picolinic acid had a strong and dose-dependent osteogenic effect in vitro. In summary, we demonstrate that the activation of the kynurenine pathway plays an important role during the commitment of hMSC into the osteoblast lineage in vitro, and that this process can be accelerated by exogenous addition of IFNγ. In addition, we found that mice lacking IDO1 activity are osteopenic. These data therefore support a new role for the kynurenine pathway and picolinic acid as essential regulators of osteoblastogenesis and as potential new targets of bone-forming cells in vivo. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity in Tryptophan Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Marti, Marcelo A.; Estrin, Dario A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) and Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) are the only two heme-proteins that catalyze the oxidation reaction of tryptophan (Trp) to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). While human IDO (hIDO) is able to oxidize both L and D-Trp, human TDO (hTDO) displays a major specificity towards L-Trp. In this work we aim to interrogate the molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity of hTDO. Our previous molecular dynamics simulation studies of Xanthomonas campestris TDO (xcTDO) showed that an H-bond between T254 (T342 in hTDO) and the ammonium group of the substrate is present in the L-Trp-bound enzyme, but not in the D-Trp bound enzyme. The fact that this is the only notable structural alteration induced by the change in the stereo structure of the substrate prompted us to produce and characterize the T342A mutant of hTDO to evaluate the structural role of T342 in controlling the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme. The experimental results indicate that the mutation only slightly perturbs the global structural properties of the enzyme, but it totally abolishes the substrate stereoselectivity. Molecular Dynamics simulations of xcTDO show that T254 controls the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme by (i) modulating the H-bonding interaction between the NH3+ group and epoxide oxygen of the ferryl/indole 2,3-epoxide intermediate of the enzyme, and (ii) regulating the dynamics of two active site loops, loop250–260 and loop117–130, critical for substrate-binding. PMID:22082147

  12. In Vivo Function of Tryptophans in the Arabidopsis UV-B Photoreceptor UVR8[W

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Andrew; Jenkins, Gareth I.

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) is a photoreceptor specifically for UV-B light that initiates photomorphogenic responses in plants. UV-B exposure causes rapid conversion of UVR8 from dimer to monomer, accumulation in the nucleus, and interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), which functions with UVR8 in UV-B responses. Studies in yeast and with purified UVR8 implicate several tryptophan amino acids in UV-B photoreception. However, their roles in UV-B responses in plants, and the functional significance of all 14 UVR8 tryptophans, are not known. Here we report the functions of the UVR8 tryptophans in vivo. Three tryptophans in the β-propeller core are important in maintaining structural stability and function of UVR8. However, mutation of three other core tryptophans and four at the dimeric interface has no apparent effect on function in vivo. Mutation of three tryptophans implicated in UV-B photoreception, W233, W285, and W337, impairs photomorphogenic responses to different extents. W285 is essential for UVR8 function in plants, whereas W233 is important but not essential for function, and W337 has a lesser role. Ala mutants of these tryptophans appear monomeric and constitutively bind COP1 in plants, but their responses indicate that monomer formation and COP1 binding are not sufficient for UVR8 function. PMID:23012433

  13. Was the Chlamydial Adaptative Strategy to Tryptophan Starvation an Early Determinant of Plastid Endosymbiosis?

    PubMed

    Cenci, Ugo; Ducatez, Mathieu; Kadouche, Derifa; Colleoni, Christophe; Ball, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiales were recently proposed to have sheltered the future cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids in a common inclusion. The intracellular pathogens are thought to have donated those critical transporters that triggered the efflux of photosynthetic carbon and the consequent onset of symbiosis. Chlamydiales are also suspected to have encoded glycogen metabolism TTS (Type Three Secretion) effectors responsible for photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the eukaryotic cytosol. We now review the reasons underlying other chlamydial lateral gene transfers evidenced in the descendants of plastid endosymbiosis. In particular we show that half of the genes encoding enzymes of tryptophan synthesis in Archaeplastida are of chlamydial origin. Tryptophan concentration is an essential cue triggering two alternative modes of replication in Chlamydiales. In addition, sophisticated tryptophan starvation mechanisms are known to act as antibacterial defenses in animal hosts. We propose that Chlamydiales have donated their tryptophan operon to the emerging plastid to ensure increased synthesis of tryptophan by the plastid ancestor. This would have allowed massive expression of the tryptophan rich chlamydial transporters responsible for symbiosis. It would also have allowed possible export of this valuable amino-acid in the inclusion of the tryptophan hungry pathogens. Free-living single cell cyanobacteria are devoid of proteins able to transport this amino-acid. We therefore investigated the phylogeny of the Tyr/Trp transporters homologous to E. coli TyrP/Mre and found yet another LGT from Chlamydiales to Archaeplastida thereby considerably strengthening our proposal.

  14. Tryptophan overloading activates brain regions involved with cognition, mood and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luana C A; Viana, Milena B; Andrade, José S; Souza, Melyssa A; Céspedes, Isabel C; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2017-02-16

    Tryptophan is the only precursor of serotonin and mediates serotonergic activity in the brain. Previous studies have shown that the administration of tryptophan or tryptophan depletion significantly alters cognition, mood and anxiety. Nevertheless, the neurobiological alterations that follow these changes have not yet been fully investigated. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of a tryptophan-enriched diet on immunoreactivity to Fos-protein in the rat brain. Sixteen male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups that either received standard chow diet or a tryptophan-enriched diet for a period of thirty days. On the morning of the 31st day, animals were euthanized and subsequently analyzed for Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei and in regions that receive serotonin innervation from these two brain areas. Treatment with a tryptophan-enriched diet increased Fos-ir in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, paraventricular hypothalamus, arcuate and ventromedial hypothalamus, dorsolateral and dorsomedial periaqueductal grey and dorsal and median raphe nucleus. These observations suggest that the physiological and behavioral alterations that follow the administration of tryptophan are associated with the activation of brain regions that regulate cognition and mood/anxiety-related responses.

  15. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  16. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating.

  17. Body temperature effect on methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced acute decrease in tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Che, S; Johnson, M; Hanson, G R; Gibb, J W

    1995-12-07

    Brain tryptophan hydroxylase activity decreases within 15 min after a single administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. In the present study, the effect of body temperature on this acute decrease of tryptophan hydroxylase activity was examined. 2 h after a single dose of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (20 mg/kg, s.c.), rats exhibited hyperthermia (38.7 degrees C) or hypothermia (35.8 degrees C) when maintained at 25 degrees C or 6 degrees C, respectively. The rectal temperature of control animals maintained at 6 degrees C was not altered. Tryptophan hydroxylase activity measured in the hippocampus, striatum and frontal cortex of hyperthermic rats treated with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine was decreased to 61%, 65%, and 71% of control levels, respectively, 2 h after drug treatment. However, in hypothermic rats, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine had no effect on tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the hippocampus, striatum or frontal cortex. Non-drug-induced hyperthermia or hypothermia did not affect tryptophan hydroxylase activity. Since hypothermia may prevent the 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced decrease in tryptophan hydroxylase activity by reducing the formation of free radicals, the effect of a free radical scavenging agent, N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone, was examined. N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (200 mg/kg, i.p.) alone caused hypothermia but had no direct effect on tryptophan hydroxylase activity. Preadministration of N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone prevented 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine from raising the temperature above normal and attenuated the drug-induced decrease in tryptophan hydroxylase activity in hippocampus, striatum and frontal cortex. However, when the rats treated with a combination of N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine were maintained at hyperthermic conditions, N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone had no protective effect. These results suggest that body temperature plays a

  18. Tryptophan scanning mutagenesis in TM2 of the GABAA receptor α subunit: effects on channel gating and regulation by ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Susumu; Lin, Audrey; Nikolaeva, Natalia; Trudell, James R; Mihic, S John; Harris, R Adron; Harrison, Neil L

    2000-01-01

    Each residue in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of the human GABAA receptor α2 subunit was individually mutated to tryptophan. The wild-type or mutant α2 subunits were expressed with the wild-type human GABAA receptor β2 subunit in Xenopus oocytes, and the effects of these mutations were investigated using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Four mutations (V257W, T262W, T265W and S270W) produced receptors which were active in the absence of agonist, and this spontaneous open channel activity was blocked by both picrotoxin and bicuculline, except in the α2(V257W)β2 mutant receptor, which was not sensitive to picrotoxin. Six mutations (V257W, V260W, T262W, T267W, S270W and A273W) enhanced the agonist sensitivity of the receptor, by 10–100 times compared with the wild-type α2β2 receptor. Other mutations (T261W, V263W, L269W, I271W and S272W) had little or no effect on the apparent affinity of the receptor to GABA. Eight of the tryptophan mutations (R255, T256, F258, G259, L264, T265, M266 or T268) resulted in undetectable GABA-induced currents. The S270W mutation eliminated potentiation of GABA by ethanol, whereas T261W markedly increased the action of ethanol. The T262W mutation produced direct activation (10% of maximal GABA response) by ethanol in the absence of GABA, while other mutations did not alter the action of ethanol significantly. These results are consistent with a unique role for S270 in the action of ethanol within the TM2 region, and with models of GABAA receptor channel function, in which specific residues within TM2 are critical for the regulation of channel gating (S270, L264), while other residues (L269, I271 and S272) have little effect on these functions and may be non-critical structural residues. PMID:10991923

  19. The role of interfacial water in ``nano''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzar, Alenka; Wang, Jihang; Daub, Chris; Bratko, Dusan; Chemisty Department, VCU Team

    2011-03-01

    To understand the role of interfacial water on nanostructred surfaces is important for materials science and biology. The talk will describe some of our recent progress in predicting and understanding the effects of nanopatterning on topologically or chemically heterogeneous surfaces on wetting via in silico experiments.

  20. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, A. E.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  1. [Importance of interfacial characteristics in pharmaceutical technology].

    PubMed

    Dredán, Judit; Csóka, Gabriella; Marton, Sylvia; Antal, István

    2003-01-01

    Since drug release from the dosage forms has priority to absorption from the gastrointestinal system, physico-chemical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems is essential during the development of an optimal formulation with high efficacy and quality. Interfacial parameters of several pharmaceutical excipients were studied regarding their possible modifying effect on drug release from the dosage form. These inactive ingredients may influence the interfacial phenomena of the drug carrier system, which behaviour determines both the efficacy and the quality of the pharmaceutical preparation In this work authors deal mainly with the two introducing steps of the LADME model influenced by interfacial parameters on them, namely with the liberation of drug from the dosage form and with the characteristics influencing the absorption through biological membranes, respectively. The objective of the present work was to study modifying effects of excipients on drug liberation in connection with their physical and chemical characteristics such as interfacial tension of solid and liquid phases, wetting contact angle of solid phase and--a calculated quantity,--adhesion tension of the solid particles.

  2. Assessment of Tryptophan Uptake and Kinetics Using 1-(2-18F-Fluoroethyl)-l-Tryptophan and α-11C-Methyl-l-Tryptophan PET Imaging in Mice Implanted with Patient-Derived Brain Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Muzik, Otto; Guastella, Anthony R.; Klinger, Neil V.; Polin, Lisa A.; Cai, Hancheng; Xin, Yangchun; Mangner, Thomas J.; Zhang, Shaohui; Juhász, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway is involved in the pathophysiology of a variety of human diseases including cancers. α-11C-methyl-l-tryptophan (11C-AMT) PET imaging demonstrated increased tryptophan uptake and trapping in epileptic foci and brain tumors, but the short half-life of 11C limits its widespread clinical application. Recent in vitro studies suggested that the novel radiotracer 1-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-l-tryptophan (18F-FETrp) may be useful to assess tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. In this study, we tested in vivo organ and tumor uptake and kinetics of 18F-FETrp in patient-derived xenograft mouse models and compared them with 11C-AMT uptake. Methods: Xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma and metastatic brain tumors (from lung and breast cancer) were developed by subcutaneous implantation of patient tumor fragments. Dynamic PET scans with 18F-FETrp and 11C-AMT were obtained for mice bearing human brain tumors 1–7 d apart. The biodistribution and tumoral SUVs for both tracers were compared. Results: 18F-FETrp showed prominent uptake in the pancreas and no bone uptake, whereas 11C-AMT showed higher uptake in the kidneys. Both tracers showed uptake in the xenograft tumors, with a plateau of approximately 30 min after injection; however, 18F-FETrp showed higher tumoral SUV than 11C-AMT in all 3 tumor types tested. The radiation dosimetry for 18F-FETrp determined from the mouse data compared favorably with the clinical 18F-FDG PET tracer. Conclusion: 18F-FETrp tumoral uptake, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry data provide strong preclinical evidence that this new radiotracer warrants further studies that may lead to a broadly applicable molecular imaging tool to examine abnormal tryptophan metabolism in human tumors. PMID:27765857

  3. Interfacial closure of contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, F.; Rauer, C.; Moriceau, H.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the contact between solid surfaces is a long-standing problem which has a strong impact on the physics of many processes such as adhesion, friction, lubrication and wear. Experimentally, the investigation of solid/solid interfaces remains challenging today, due to the lack of experimental techniques able to provide sub-nanometer scale information on interfaces buried between millimeters of materials. Yet, a strong interest exists improving the modeling of contact mechanics of materials in order to adjust their interface properties (e.g., thermal transport, friction). We show here that the essential features of the residual gap between contacting surfaces can be measured using high energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity. The presence of this nano-gap is general to the contact of solids. In some special case however, it can be removed when attractive forces take over repulsive contributions, depending on both height and wavelength of asperity distributions (roughness). A criterion for this instability is established in the standard case of van der Waals attractive forces and elastic asperity compression repulsive forces (Hertz model). This collapse instability is confirmed experimentally in the case of silicon direct bonding, using high-energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity and adhesion energy measurements. The possibility to achieve fully closed interfaces at room temperature opens interesting perspectives to build stronger assemblies with smaller thermal budgets.

  4. Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-13

    investigation supported by this grant moved beyond past studies of interfacial and colloidal phenomena involving isotropic liquids to explore and understand a...2010 20-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 liquid crystals, interfacial phenomena, colloids , amphiphiles

  5. Exogenous Tryptophan Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing of Chronically Stressed Mice through Inhibition of TNF-α and IDO Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Luana Graziella; Bortolot, Beatriz Salari; Cecatto, Matheus Jorand; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Romana-Souza, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    Stress prolongs the inflammatory response compromising the dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Acute stress-induced inflammation increases indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase-stimulated tryptophan catabolism. To investigate the role of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression and tryptophan administration in adverse effects of stress on cutaneous wound healing, mice were submitted to chronic restraint stress and treated with tryptophan daily until euthanasia. Excisional lesions were created on each mouse and 5 or 7 days later, the lesions were analyzed. In addition, murine skin fibroblasts were exposed to elevated epinephrine levels plus tryptophan, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Tryptophan administration reversed the reduction of the plasma tryptophan levels and the increase in the plasma normetanephrine levels induced by stress 5 and 7 days after wounding. Five days after wounding, stress-induced increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, and this was inhibited by tryptophan. Stress-induced increase in the lipid peroxidation and the amount of the neutrophils, macrophages and T cells number was reversed by tryptophan 5 days after wounding. Tryptophan administration inhibited the reduction of myofibroblast density, collagen deposition, re-epithelialization and wound contraction induced by stress 5 days after wounding. In dermal fibroblast culture, the tryptophan administration increased the cell migration and AKT phosphorylation in cells treated with high epinephrine levels. In conclusion, tryptophan-induced reduction of inflammatory response and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression may have accelerated cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice. PMID:26057238

  6. Relationship between plasma and brain tryptophan in pigs during experimental hepatic coma before and after hemodialysis with selective membranes.

    PubMed

    Delorme, M L; Denis, J; Nordlinger, B; Boschat, M; Opolon, P

    1981-03-01

    Experimental acute liver ischemia in pigs induces an increment in plasma free tryptophan with decreased total tryptophan. Brain tryptophan is elevated in all brain areas. A slight, but significant increase of brain serotonin is demonstrated in the striatum only, while 5-HIAA (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) is significantly lower in the hypothalamus. Other brain areas do not show significant changes in serotonin and 5-HIAA levels. Neither the high plasma free tryptophan levels, nor the decreased sum of neutral competitive amino acids are consistent with such an elevation of brain tryptophan. Hemodialysis was carried out with two different kinds of membranes: cuprophan (with an efficient removal of molecules up to molecular weight 1300) and AN 69 polyacrylonitrile (efficient removal up to 15,000). Ammonia and aminoacid clearance are similar for both membranes. After AN 69, plasmatic free tryptophan and brain tryptophan are lower than after liver devascularization, but still higher than normal. Serotonin significantly increases in the cortex, midbrain and hypothalamus without concomitant rise of 5-HIAA levels. After cuprophan hemodialysis, plasma total tryptophan is lower than in normal and even comatose animals, whereas free tryptophan is normal. Intracerebral tryptophan is similar to AN 69 dialysed animals, but in the hypothalamus it is similar to nondialysed animals. Brain serotonin levels are not modified. 5-HIAA decreases in the hypothalamus. This finding suggests that middle molecules (which are not cleared out with cuprophan hemodialysis) are involved in the intracerebral transfer of tryptophan and the metabolism of serotonin, mainly in the hypothalamus.

  7. [Changes in the tryptophan content during the technological manufacturing processes of several wheat flour products].

    PubMed

    Horvatić, M; Grüner, M

    1989-12-01

    The change of tryptophan contents in proteins of bread and cookies under technological processing conditions were investigated. Tryptophan contents in all cookie samples were noted to be significantly (p = 0.05) reduced in relation to corresponding dough. The relative decreases are significantly correlated with fat content and the degree of unsaturation of fats in the dough of cookies (r = 0.802 and r = 0.777, p = 0.01), independently of various physical parameters during different cookie samples' processing. Tryptophan decrease in proteins of bread during baking was not significant.

  8. Torsional vibrational modes of tryptophan studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Zeng, F; Yang, Y; Xing, Q; Chechin, A; Xin, X; Zeylikovich, I; Alfano, R R

    2004-03-01

    The low-frequency torsional modes, index of refraction, and absorption of a tryptophan film and pressed powders from 0.2 to 2.0 THz (6.6-66 cm(-1)) were measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy at room temperature. It was found that there were two dominated torsional vibrational modes at around 1.435 and 1.842 THz. The associated relaxation lifetimes ( approximately 1 ps) for these modes of the tryptophan molecule were measured. Using a density-functional calculation, the origins of the observed torsional vibrations were assigned to the chain and ring of the tryptophan molecule.

  9. A bio-aerosol detection technique based on tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuyao; Zhang, Pei; Zhu, Linglin; Zhao, Yongkai; Huang, Huijie

    2011-12-01

    Based on the measurement of intrinsic fluorescence, a set of bio-aerosol including virus aerosols detection instrument is developed, with which a method of calibration is proposed using tryptophan as the target. The experimental results show a good linear relationship between the fluorescence voltage of the instrument and the concentration of the tryptophan aerosol. An excellent correlation (R2>=0.99) with the sensitivity of 4000PPL is obtained. The research demonstrates the reliability of the bio-aerosol detection by measuring the content of tryptophan. Further more the feasibility of prejudgment to the species of bio-aerosol particles with the multi-channel fluorescence detection technology is discussed.

  10. Effects of tryptophan supplementation on cashmere fiber characteristics, serum tryptophan, and related hormone concentrations in cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Zhang, W; Song, W H; Sun, P; Jia, Z H

    2012-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of tryptophan (Trp) supplementation on cashmere fiber characteristics and on serum Trp, melatonin (MEL), prolactin (PRL), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) concentrations in cashmere goats during the cashmere fast-growth period. Thirty-six Liaoning cashmere wether goats were stratified on the basis of body weight (28±0.8 kg) and assigned randomly to 1 of the following 4 rumen-protected Trp treatments: 0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 g per goat per day. The experimental period lasted 137 d. Blood samples were collected monthly during the daytime (8:00 AM) and at night (8:00 PM). Tryptophan supplementation improved cashmere growth rates, cashmere weight, and body weight (P=0.001) and increased serum Trp levels, nighttime MEL concentrations, IGF-1, and T3 and T4 concentrations (P<0.05). Across the treatments and sampling months, a highly positive correlation between cashmere growth rate and nighttime serum MEL concentrations was observed (r=0.879, P=0.001). A moderately negative correlation between cashmere growth rates and serum PRL concentrations during the day and at night (rday=-0.645, P=0.007; rnight=-0.583, P=0.018) was observed. A moderately positive correlation between the cashmere growth rate and the daytime serum IGF-1 concentration (r=0.536, P=0.032) was observed, and no correlation was found between the cashmere growth rate and the other serum hormone concentrations. These data indicate that changes in serum concentrations of MEL, IGF-1, and PRL are related to cashmere growth in Liaoning cashmere goats during the cashmere fast-growth period. Under the experimental conditions of the current trial, we suggest that Trp may promote cashmere growth by increasing daytime IGF-1 and nighttime MEL secretion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased Tryptophan Metabolism is Associated With Activity of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Susanna; Schulte, Berenice; Al-Massad, Natalie; Thieme, Florian; Schulte, Dominik M; Bethge, Johannes; Rehman, Ateequr; Tran, Florian; Aden, Konrad; Häsler, Robert; Moll, Natalie; Schütze, Gregor; Schwarz, Markus J; Waetzig, Georg H; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Schreiber, Stefan

    2017-08-18

    Administration of tryptophan, and some of its metabolites, reduces the severity of colitis in mice, whereas removing tryptophan from the diet increases susceptibility to colitis. Transfer of the intestinal microbiome can increase susceptibility of mice to colitis. We aimed to systematically evaluate serum levels of tryptophan and its metabolites in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and study their association with clinical and serologic features. We studied 535 consecutive patients with IBD (211 with ulcerative colitis [UC], 234 with Crohn's disease [CD]; 236 male), enrolled in Germany from August 2013 through April 2014 and followed until July 2016. Serum samples were collected from patients and 100 matched individuals without IBD (controls); levels of tryptophan were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolites of tryptophan were measured in serum from 148 patients and 100 controls by mass spectrometry. We measured levels of interleukin 22 (IL22) in serum from 28 patients by ELISA. Paired stool and serum samples were collected from a subset of patients with active UC (n=10) or CD (n=8) to investigate associations between serum levels of tryptophan and composition of the fecal microbiota, analyzed by 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing. We used real-time PCR to measure levels of mRNAs in colonic biopsies from 60 patients with UC, 50 with CD; and 30 controls. We collected information on patients' disease activity scores, medications, laboratory assessments, clinical examinations during recruitment and follow-up visits. Serum levels of tryptophan were significantly lower in patients with IBD than controls (P=5.3x10-6) with a stronger reduction in patients with CD (vs control, P=1.1x10-10) than UC (vs control P=2.8x10-3). We found a negative correlation between serum levels of tryptophan and disease activity or level of c-reactive protein. Levels of mRNAs encoding tryptophan 2,3- dioxygenase-2 (TDO2) and solute carrier family 6 member 19

  12. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  13. Insights into the catalysis of a lysine-tryptophan bond in bacterial peptides by a SPASM domain radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) peptide cyclase.

    PubMed

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Decamps, Laure; Guillot, Alain; Kubiak, Xavier; Ruffié, Pauline; Sandström, Corine; Berteau, Olivier

    2017-06-30

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes are emerging as a major superfamily of biological catalysts involved in the biosynthesis of the broad family of bioactive peptides called ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs). These enzymes have been shown to catalyze unconventional reactions, such as methyl transfer to electrophilic carbon atoms, sulfur to Cα atom thioether bonds, or carbon-carbon bond formation. Recently, a novel radical SAM enzyme catalyzing the formation of a lysine-tryptophan bond has been identified in Streptococcus thermophilus, and a reaction mechanism has been proposed. By combining site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical assays, and spectroscopic analyses, we show here that this enzyme, belonging to the emerging family of SPASM domain radical SAM enzymes, likely contains three [4Fe-4S] clusters. Notably, our data support that the seven conserved cysteine residues, present within the SPASM domain, are critical for enzyme activity. In addition, we uncovered the minimum substrate requirements and demonstrate that KW cyclic peptides are more widespread than anticipated, notably in pathogenic bacteria. Finally, we show a strict specificity of the enzyme for lysine and tryptophan residues and the dependence of an eight-amino acid leader peptide for activity. Altogether, our study suggests novel mechanistic links among SPASM domain radical SAM enzymes and supports the involvement of non-cysteinyl ligands in the coordination of auxiliary clusters. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Residual Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions. The variation in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors including, but not limited to, varying proportions of dust and solid carbon dioxide, undulating topography, and differences in the roughness of the slopes versus the flat surfaces.

    Location near: 86.7oS, 343.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  15. New insights in the interpretation of tryptophan fluorescence : origin of the fluorescence lifetime and characterization of a new fluorescence parameter in proteins: the emission to excitation ratio.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2007-07-01

    Origin of tryptophan fluorescence is still up to these days a quiz which is not completely solved. Fluorescence emission properties of tryptophan within proteins are in general considered as the result of fluorophore interaction within its environment. For example, a low fluorescence quantum yield is supposed to be the consequence of an important fluorophore-environment interaction. However, are we sure that the fluorophore has been excited upon light absorption? What if fluorophore excitation did not occur as the result of internal conformation specific to the fluorophore environment? Are we sure that all absorbed energy is used for the excitation process? Fluorescence lifetimes of Trp residues are considered to originate from rotamers or conformers resulting from the rotation of the indole ring within the peptide bonds. However, how can we explain the fact that in most of the proteins, the two lifetimes 0.5 and 3 ns, attributed to the conformers, are also observed for free tryptophan in solution? The present work, performed on free tryptophan and tyrosine in solution and on different proteins, shows that absorption and excitation spectra overlap but their intensities at the different excitation wavelengths are not necessarily equal. Also, we found that fluorescence emission intensities recorded at different excitation wavelengths depend on the intensities at these excitation wavelengths and not on the optical densities. Thus, excitation is not equal to absorption. In our interpretation of the data, we consider that absorbed photons are not necessary used only for the excitation, part of them are used to reorganize fluorophore molecules in a new state (excited structure) and another part is used for the excitation process. A new parameter that characterizes the ratio of the number of emitted photons over the real number of photons used to excite the fluorophore can be defined. We call this parameter, the emission to excitation ratio. Since our results were

  16. The structure of tryptophan 7-halogenase (PrnA) suggests a mechanism for regioselective chlorination

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Changjiang; Flecks, Silvana; Unversucht, Susanne; Haupt, Caroline; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H

    2012-01-01

    Chlorinated natural products include vancomycin and cryptophycin A. Their biosyntheses involves regioselective chlorination by flavin-dependent halogenases. We report the structural characterization of tryptophan 7-halogenase (PrnA), which regioselectively chlorinates tryptophan. Tryptophan and FAD are separated by a 10Å-long tunnel and bound by distinct enzyme modules. The FAD module is conserved in halogenases and is related to flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Based on biochemical studies, crystal structures and by analogy with monooxygenases, we predict FADH2 reacts with O2 making peroxy-flavin which is decomposed by Cl−. The resulting HOCl is guided through the tunnel, to tryptophan, where it is activated to participate in electrophilic aromatic substitution. PMID:16195462

  17. Acute tryptophan depletion in humans: a review of theoretical, practical and ethical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon N.

    2013-01-01

    The acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) technique has been used extensively to study the effect of low serotonin in the human brain. This review assesses the validity of a number of published criticisms of the technique and a number of previously unpublished potential criticisms. The conclusion is that ATD can provide useful information when results are assessed in conjunction with results obtained using other techniques. The best-established conclusion is that low serotonin function after tryptophan depletion lowers mood in some people. However, this does not mean that other variables, altered after tryptophan depletion, are necessarily related to low serotonin. Each aspect of brain function has to be assessed separately. Furthermore, a negative tryptophan depletion study does not mean that low serotonin cannot influence the variable studied. This review suggests gaps in knowledge that need to be filled and guidelines for carrying out ATD studies. PMID:23428157

  18. Clinical evaluation of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan as an antidepressant drug.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Kudo, Y; Kaneko, Z

    1978-01-01

    Effectiveness of 5-hydroxy-L-trytophan as an antidepressant drug was studied with 59 patients with depressive symptoms using Rating Scale for Depression made by Clinico-Psychopharmacology Research Group in Japan for a preparatory step of a double blind clinical study of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan treatment of depression. A daily dose of 150--300 mg of 5-hydroxyl-L-tryptophan was administered for three weeks. Favorable responses were observed in 40 patients (67.8%), of whom 13 patients were markedly improved. These effects were noticed in 32 patients (80% of the improved patients) within a week of the treatment. Analysis of General Improvement Rating in the various subtypes of depressive symptoms indicated that endogenous depression and involutional or senile depression were the preferable indication of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan loading. The main side effects of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan were gastrointestinal disturbances which were minimized by the simultaneous administration of metoclopromide or trihexyphenidyl.

  19. Functional modification of agarose: a facile synthesis of a fluorescent agarose-tryptophan based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kondaveeti, Stalin; Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, A K

    2013-08-14

    Microwave assisted facile synthesis of a fluorescent agarose-l-tryptophan hydrogel material employing carbodiimide chemistry (dicyclohexylcarbodiimide/4-dimethylaminopyridine; DCC/DMAP) has been described. The product formed fluorescent hydrogel at 1-1.5% (w/v), exhibiting fluorescence emission in water (λmax 350 nm; 1x10(-4)M), which was significantly higher (ca. 65%) than that of tryptophan at the same concentration. Subsequently, the agarose ester was cross linked with the natural cross linker genipin to yield a blue hydrogel (G-Ag-TrpEst), confirming thereby the insertion of tryptophan moiety on to agarose backbone. Both the ester and cross linked hydrogels demonstrated gelling characteristics similar to agarose and were stable across a wide range of pH media (pHs 1.2, 7.0 and 12.5) under ambient conditions. These tryptophan containing fluorescent hydrogel materials may find applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical industries as potential radical scavengers and sensors.

  20. Ordered mesoporous materials based on interfacial assembly and engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-04

    Ordered mesoporous materials have inspired prominent research interest due to their unique properties and functionalities and potential applications in adsorption, separation, catalysis, sensors, drug delivery, energy conversion and storage, and so on. Thanks to continuous efforts over the past two decades, great achievements have been made in the synthesis and structural characterization of mesoporous materials. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in preparing ordered mesoporous materials from the viewpoint of interfacial assembly and engineering. Five interfacial assembly and synthesis are comprehensively highlighted, including liquid-solid interfacial assembly, gas-liquid interfacial assembly, liquid-liquid interfacial assembly, gas-solid interfacial synthesis, and solid-solid interfacial synthesis, basics about their synthesis pathways, princples and interface engineering strategies. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  2. Conversion of L-tryptophan to serotonin and melatonin in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Semak, Igor; Pisarchik, Alexander; Sweatman, Trevor; Szczesniewski, Andre; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2002-01-30

    We showed in human melanoma cells tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) and hydroxyindole methyltransferase genes expression with the sequential enzymatic activities of TPH, serotonin (Ser) N-acetyltransferase and hydroxyindole methyltransferase. The presence of the products Ser, 5OH-tryptophan, N-acetylserotonin, melatonin (Mel), 5-methoxytryptamine and 5-methoxytryptophol was documented by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Thus, human melanoma cells can synthesize and metabolize Ser and Mel.

  3. Nutritional tryptophan restriction impairs plasticity of retinotectal axons during the critical period.

    PubMed

    Penedo, Letícia Abel; Oliveira-Silva, Priscilla; Gonzalez, Ericka M C; Maciel, Rafaela; Jurgilas, Patricia B; Melibeu, Adriana da Cunha Faria; Campello-Costa, Paula; Serfaty, Claudio Alberto

    2009-05-01

    The use-dependent specification of neural circuits occurs during post-natal development with a conspicuous influence of environmental factors, such as malnutrition that interferes with the major steps of brain maturation. Serotonin (5-HT), derived exclusively from the essential aminoacid tryptophan, is involved in mechanisms of development and use-dependent plasticity of the central nervous system. We studied the effects of the nutritional restriction of tryptophan in the plasticity of uncrossed retinotectal axons following a retinal lesion to the contralateral retina during the critical period in pigmented rats. Litters were fed through their mothers with a low tryptophan content diet, based on corn and gelatin, a complemented diet with standard tryptophan requirements for rodents or standard laboratory diet. The results suggest a marked reduction in the plasticity of intact axons into denervated territories in the tryptophan restricted group in comparison to control groups. Tryptophan complementation between PND10-21 completely restored retinotectal plasticity. However, the re-introduction of tryptophan after the end of the critical period (between PND28-P41) did not restore the sprouting ability of uncrossed axons suggesting a time-dependent effect to the reversion of plasticity deficits. Tryptophan-restricted animals showed a reduced activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and altered expressions of phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 and AKT. Our results demonstrate the influence of this essential aminoacid as a modulator of neural plasticity during the critical period through the reduction of serotonin content which alters plasticity-related signaling pathways and matrix degradation.

  4. Effects of tryptophan depletion and a simulated alcohol binge on impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Donald M.; Mullen, Jillian; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Liang, Yuanyuan; Karns, Tara E.; Lake, Sarah L.; Mathias, Charles W.; Roache, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers have suggested that binge drinkers experience disproportionate increases in impulsivity during the initial period of drinking, leading to a loss of control over further drinking, and that serotonergic mechanisms may underlie such effects. Methods We examined the effects of a simulated-alcohol binge and tryptophan depletion on three types of impulsivity: response initiation (IMT task), response inhibition (GoStop task), and delay discounting (SKIP task), and tested whether observed effects were related to “real world” binge drinking. 179 adults with diverse drinking histories completed a within-subject crossover design over 4 experimental days. Each day, participants underwent one of four test conditions: tryptophan depletion/alcohol, tryptophan depletion/placebo, tryptophan balanced control/alcohol, or tryptophan balanced control/placebo. The simulated binge involved consuming 0.3 g/kg of alcohol at 5, 6, and 7 hours after consuming the tryptophan depletion/balanced mixture. Impulsivity was measured before and after each drink. Results Relative to the placebo beverage condition, when alcohol was consumed, impulsive responding was increased at moderate and high levels of intoxication on the IMT and GoStop, but only at high levels of intoxication on the SKIP. Tryptophan depletion had no effect on impulsivity measured under either placebo or alcohol beverage conditions. Effects of alcohol and tryptophan manipulations on impulsivity were unrelated to patterns of binge drinking outside the laboratory. Conclusion The effects of alcohol consumption on impulsivity depend on the component of impulsivity being measured and the dose of alcohol consumed. Such effects do not appear to be a result of reduced serotonin synthesis. Additionally, “real world” binge drinking behaviors were unrelated to behavioral changes observed in the laboratory. PMID:25730415

  5. [Tryptophan 7-halogenase from Pseudomonas aureofaciens ACN strain: gene cloning and sequencing and the enzyme expression].

    PubMed

    Burd', V N; van Pee, K H

    2004-01-01

    The gene of tryptophan 7-halogenase was isolated from the Pseudomonas aureofaciens ACN strain producing pyrrolnitrin, a chlorocontaining antibiotic, and sequenced. A high homology degree (over 95%) was established for the genes and the corresponding halogenases from P. aureofaciens ACN and P. fluorescens BL915. The tryptophan 7-halogenase gene was amplified by PCR, and the corresponding enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli cells using the pBSII SK+ vector.

  6. Synergistic effect of the L-tryptophan and kynurenic acid with dipyrone or paracetamol in mice.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Nayrton Flávio Moura; Rios, Emiliano Ricardo Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Alyne Mara Rodrigues; Freire, Leonardo Vasconcelos; Dias, Marília Leite; de França Fonteles, Marta Maria; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço

    2013-09-25

    Our great interest in this work was study the synergism between l-tryptophan and dipyrone or paracetamol as well as the interaction of kynurenic acid (l-tryptophan metabolite) and these analgesics agents utilizing a robust methodology. We performed the writhing test induced by acetic acid in mice to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of the treatments isolated and combined (p.o. and i.p.). Dose-response curves were constructed and the values of ED50 for treatment alone and combined were statistically compared. In addition, isobolographic analysis was performed and the experimental values were compared with the theoretical values for simple additive effect. The combined treatment with l-tryptophan and dipyrone or paracetamol reduced significantly the ED50 of these analgesics when compared to the isolated treatments. l-tryptophan alone has no antinociceptive effect. l-Tryptophan increases the central amount of 5-HT and the synergism with dipyrone is antagonized by the 5-HT depletion. The kyna has an antinociceptive dose-related effect and a synergistic interaction with dipyrone and paracetamol verified by isobolographic analyses and confirmed by experimental values of ED50 of combined treatments were statistically lower than theoretical calculated values for simple additive effect. Melatonin antagonist receptor attenuates the antinociceptive synergism between l-tryptophan and dipyrone. Our results demonstrate that the increased 5-HT amount on the central nervous system is not per se capable to induce antinociception. The l-tryptophan interacts synergistically with dipyrone and paracetamol both orally and by i.p. route. This effect is dependent on the biotransformation of l-tryptophan to 5-HT and involves kynurenic acid and melatonin receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dietary tryptophan alleviates dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis through aryl hydrocarbon receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Islam, Jahidul; Sato, Shoko; Watanabe, Kouichi; Watanabe, Takaya; Ardiansyah; Hirahara, Keisuke; Aoyama, Yukihide; Tomita, Shuhei; Aso, Hisashi; Komai, Michio; Shirakawa, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis is the typical progression of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Amino acids, particularly tryptophan, have been reported to exert a protective effect against colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), but the precise underlying mechanisms remain incompletely clarified. Tryptophan metabolites are recognized to function as endogenous ligands for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), which is a critical regulator of inflammation and immunity. Thus, we conducted this study to investigate whether dietary tryptophan supplementation protects against DSS-induced colitis by acting through Ahr. Female wild-type (WT) and Ahr-deficient (knockout; KO) mice (10-12 weeks old) were divided into four groups and fed either a control or 0.5% tryptophan diet. The tryptophan diet ameliorated DSS-induced colitis symptoms and severity in WT mice but not in KO mice, and the diet reduced the mRNA expression of Il-6, Tnfα, Il-1β and the chemokines Ccl2, Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 in the WT groups. Furthermore, Il-22 and Stat3 mRNA expression in the colon was elevated in WT mice fed with the tryptophan diet, which mainly protected epithelial layer integrity, and Ahr also modulated immune homeostasis by regulating Foxp3 and Il-17 mRNA expression. These data suggest that tryptophan-containing diet might ameliorate DSS-induced acute colitis and regulate epithelial homeostasis through Ahr. Thus, tryptophan could serve as a promising preventive agent in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ligand-dependent conformational equilibria of serum albumin revealed by tryptophan fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed Central

    Chadborn, N; Bryant, J; Bain, A J; O'Shea, P

    1999-01-01

    Ligand-dependent structural changes in serum albumin are suggested to underlie its role in physiological solute transport and receptor-mediated cellular selection. Evidence of ligand-induced (oleic acid) structural changes in serum albumin are shown in both time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence quenching and anisotropy measurements of tryptophan 214 (Trp214). These studies were augmented with column chromatography separations. It was found that both the steady-state and time-resolved Stern-Volmer collisional quenching studies of Trp214 with acrylamide pointed to the existence of an oleate-dependent structural transformation. The bimolecular quenching rate constant of defatted human serum albumin, 1.96 x 10(9) M-1 s-1, decreased to 0.94 x 10(9) M-1 s-1 after incubation with oleic acid (9:1). Furthermore, Stern-Volmer quenching studies following fractionation of the structural forms by hydrophobic interaction chromatography were in accordance with this interpretation. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of the Trp214 residue yielded information of motion within the protein together with the whole protein molecule. Characteristic changes in these motions were observed after the binding of oleate to albumin. The addition of oleate was accompanied by an increase in the rotational diffusion time of the albumin molecule from approximately 22 to 33.6 ns. Within the body of the protein, however, the rotational diffusion time for Trp214 exhibited a slight decrease from 191 to 182 ps and was accompanied by a decrease in the extent of the angular motion of Trp214, indicating a transition after oleate binding to a more spatially restricted but less viscous environment. PMID:10096914

  9. Tryptophan at the transmembrane–cytosolic junction modulates thrombopoietin receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Defour, Jean-Philippe; Itaya, Miki; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Brett, Ian C.; Pecquet, Christian; Sato, Takeshi; Smith, Steven O.; Constantinescu, Stefan N.

    2013-01-01

    Dimerization of single-pass membrane receptors is essential for activation. In the human thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR), a unique amphipathic RWQFP motif separates the transmembrane (TM) and intracellular domains. Using a combination of mutagenesis, spectroscopy, and biochemical assays, we show that W515 of this motif impairs dimerization of the upstream TpoR TM helix. TpoR is unusual in that a specific residue is required for this inhibitory function, which prevents receptor self-activation. Mutations as diverse as W515K and W515L cause oncogenic activation of TpoR and lead to human myeloproliferative neoplasms. Two lines of evidence support a general mechanism in which W515 at the intracellular juxtamembrane boundary inhibits dimerization of the TpoR TM helix by increasing the helix tilt angle relative to the membrane bilayer normal, which prevents the formation of stabilizing TM dimer contacts. First, measurements using polarized infrared spectroscopy show that the isolated TM domain of the active W515K mutant has a helix tilt angle closer to the bilayer normal than that of the wild-type receptor. Second, we identify second-site R514W and Q516W mutations that reverse dimerization and tilt angle changes induced by the W515K and W515L mutations. The second-site mutations prevent constitutive activation of TpoR W515K/L, while preserving ligand-induced signaling. The ability of tryptophan to influence the angle and dimerization of the TM helix in wild-type TpoR and in the second-site revertants is likely associated with its strong preference to be buried in the headgroup region of membrane bilayers. PMID:23359689

  10. Heparin-Promoted Cellular Uptake of the Cell-Penetrating Glycosaminoglycan Binding Peptide, GBPECP, Depends on a Single Tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Hung, Li-Chun; Jiang, Ingjye; Chen, Chien-Jung; Lu, Jia-Yin; Hsieh, Yi-Fen; Kuo, Ping-Hsieh; Hung, Yi-Lin; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Sue, Shih-Che

    2017-02-17

    A 10-residue, glycosaminoglycan-binding peptide, GBPECP, derived from human eosinophil cationic protein has been recently designated as a potent cell-penetrating peptide. A model system containing peptide, glycan, and lipid was monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the cell-penetrating mechanism. Heparin octasaccharide with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) lipid micelle was titrated into the GBPECP solution. Our data revealed substantial roles for the charged residues Arg5 and Lys7 in recognizing heparin, whereas Arg3 had less effect. The aromatic residue Trp4 acted as an irreplaceable moiety for membrane insertion, as the replacement of Trp4 with Arg4 abolished cell penetration, although it significantly improved the heparin-binding ability. GBPECP bound either heparin or lipid in the presence or absence of the other ligand indicating that the peptide has two alternative binding sites: Trp4 is responsible for lipid insertion, and Arg5 and Lys7 are for GAG binding. We developed a molecular model showing that the two effects synergistically promote the penetration. The loss of either effect would abolish the penetration. GBPECP has been proven to enter cells through macropinocytosis. The GBPECP treatment inhibited A549 lung cancer cell migration and invasion, implying that the cellular microenvironment would be modulated by GBPECP internalization. The intracellular penetration of GBPECP leading to inhibition of epithelial cell migration and invasion depends on the presence of the tryptophan residue in its sequence compared with similar derivative peptides. Therefore, GBPECP shows substantial potential as a novel delivery therapeutic through rapid and effective internalization and interference with cell mobility.

  11. L-Tryptophan: Basic Metabolic Functions, Behavioral Research and Therapeutic Indications

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Dawn M; Dawes, Michael A; Mathias, Charles W; Acheson, Ashley; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Dougherty, Donald M

    2009-01-01

    An essential component of the human diet, L-tryptophan is critical in a number of metabolic functions and has been widely used in numerous research and clinical trials. This review provides a brief overview of the role of L-tryptophan in protein synthesis and a number of other metabolic functions. With emphasis on L-tryptophan’s role in synthesis of brain serotonin, details are provided on the research uses of L-tryptophan, particularly L-tryptophan depletion, and on clinical trials that have been conducted using L-tryptophan supplementation. The ability to change the rates of serotonin synthesis in the brain by manipulating concentrations of serum tryptophan is the foundation of much research. As the sole precursor of serotonin, experimental research has shown that L-tryptophan’s role in brain serotonin synthesis is an important factor involved in mood, behavior, and cognition. Furthermore, clinical trials have provided some initial evidence of L-tryptophan’s efficacy for treatment of psychiatric disorders, particularly when used in combination with other therapeutic agents. PMID:20651948

  12. SELECTIVE INHIBITION BY TRYPTOPHAN ANALOGUES OF MURINE TOXIN SYNTHESIS IN PASTEURELLA PESTIS

    PubMed Central

    Montie, Thomas C.; Ajl, Samuel J.

    1964-01-01

    Montie, Thomas C. (Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pa.), and Samuel J. Ajl. Selective inhibition by tryptophan analogues of murine toxin synthesis in Pasteurella pestis. J. Bacteriol. 88:1467–1475. 1964.—Washed-cell suspensions of Pasteurella pestis, avirulent strain “Tjiwidej,” exhibited a preferential inhibition of toxin synthesis relative to total protein formation, when grown in the presence of various tryptophan analogues. Growth was partially inhibited in the presence of methyl analogues. High concentrations of 5-fluorotryptophan induced slight growth-inhibitory effects. However, toxin production was more sensitive to these levels of the analogue. Growth inhibition appeared not to relate to toxin inhibition. Inhibition of toxin synthesis by analogues was reversed by l-tryptophan and indole. Shikimic acid but not anthranilic acid antagonized the action of 4-methyltryptophan on selective toxin synthesis. The formation of tryptophanless protein accounted for continued protein synthesis in tryptophan-depleted cells. Protein resolved by acrylamide gel electrophoresis from crude cell extracts exhibited two toxic protein bands. The synthesis of one toxin-protein band, the less-mobile of the two, appeared to be associated with the membrane fraction of the cell, and was selectively blocked in cells grown in the presence of tryptophan analogues. Cellular tryptophan levels may determine the quantity and quality of proteins made. Images PMID:14234807

  13. 5-Fluoroindole Resistance Identifies Tryptophan Synthase Beta Subunit Mutants in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Barczak, A. J.; Zhao, J.; Pruitt, K. D.; Last, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the biochemical genetics of the Arabidopsis thaliana tryptophan synthase beta subunit was initiated by characterization of mutants resistant to the inhibitor 5-fluoroindole. Thirteen recessive mutations were recovered that are allelic to trp2-1, a mutation in the more highly expressed of duplicate tryptophan synthase beta subunit genes (TSB1). Ten of these mutations (trp2-2 through trp2-11) cause a tryptophan requirement (auxotrophs), whereas three (trp2-100 through trp2-102) remain tryptophan prototrophs. The mutations cause a variety of changes in tryptophan synthase beta expression. For example, two mutations (trp2-5 and trp2-8) cause dramatically reduced accumulation of TSB mRNA and immunologically detectable protein, whereas trp2-10 is associated with increased mRNA and protein. A correlation exists between the quantity of mutant beta and wild-type alpha subunit levels in the trp2 mutant plants, suggesting that the synthesis of these proteins is coordinated or that the quantity or structure of the beta subunit influences the stability of the alpha protein. The level of immunologically detectable anthranilate synthase alpha subunit protein is increased in the trp2 mutants, suggesting the possibility of regulation of anthranilate synthase levels in response to tryptophan limitation. PMID:7635295

  14. The maize auxotrophic mutant orange pericarp is defective in duplicate genes for tryptophan synthase beta.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A D; Moehlenkamp, C A; Perrot, G H; Neuffer, M G; Cone, K C

    1992-01-01

    orange pericarp (orp) is a seedling lethal mutant of maize caused by mutations in the duplicate unli