Science.gov

Sample records for interferometry ice-radar measurement

  1. Columbia Glacier stake location, mass balance, glacier surface altitude, and ice radar data, 1978 measurement year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayo, L.R.; Trabant, D.C.; March, Rod; Haeberli, Wilfried

    1979-01-01

    A 1 year data-collection program on Columbia Glacier, Alaska has produced a data set consisting of near-surface ice kinematics, mass balance, and altitude change at 57 points and 34 ice radar soundings. These data presented in two tables, are part of the basic data required for glacier dynamic analysis, computer models, and predictions of the number and size of icebergs which Columbia Glacier will calve into shipping lanes of eastern Prince William Sound. A metric, sea-level coordinate system was developed for use in surveying throughout the basin. Its use is explained and monument coordinates listed. A series of seven integrated programs for calculators were used in both the field and office to reduce the surveying data. These programs are thoroughly documented and explained in the report. (Kosco-USGS)

  2. Precision measurement with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Development of atom interferometry and its application in precision measurement are reviewed in this paper. The principle, features and the implementation of atom interferometers are introduced, the recent progress of precision measurement with atom interferometry, including determination of gravitational constant and fine structure constant, measurement of gravity, gravity gradient and rotation, test of weak equivalence principle, proposal of gravitational wave detection, and measurement of quadratic Zeeman shift are reviewed in detail. Determination of gravitational redshift, new definition of kilogram, and measurement of weak force with atom interferometry are also briefly introduced. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB832805) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11227803).

  3. Field fluctuations measured by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauber, R. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Vogel, K.; Schleich, W. P.; Walther, H.

    2010-09-01

    We derive the complete photon count statistics of an interferometer based on two beam splitters. As a special case we consider a joint intensity-electric field measurement. Our approach is based on the transformation properties of state vectors as well as field operators at a beam splitter. The work presented here was stimulated by discussions during the Lake Garda Conference 2001. The recent experimental interest in six-port interferometry has moved us to return to the problem. We feel, moreover, that the topic is appropriate for the Festschrift in honour of Stig Stenholm since he can truly be considered a pioneer in the field of quantum networks. We hope that our discussion may pique his interest.

  4. Measuring subwavelength spatial coherence with plasmonic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, Drew; Li, Dongfang; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    Optical interferometry has enabled quantification of the spatial and temporal correlations of electromagnetic fields, which laid the foundations for the theory of optical coherence. Despite significant advances in fundamental theories and applications, the measurement of nanoscale coherence lengths for highly incoherent optical fields has remained elusive. Here, we employ plasmonic interferometry (that is, optical interferometry with surface plasmons) to characterize the spatial degree of coherence of light beams down to subwavelength scales, with measured coherence lengths as low as ∼330 nm for an incident wavelength of 500 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrate a compact coherence meter that integrates this method with an image sensor. Precise determination of spatial coherence can advance high-resolution imaging and tomographic schemes, and provide an experimental platform for the development and testing of optical coherence theories at the nanoscale.

  5. Large angle measurement by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Dan; Blanaru, Constantin; Damian, Victor S.; Logofatu, Petre-Catalin; Tumbar, R.; Dobroiu, Adrian

    1995-03-01

    An interferometric set-up able to measure angles as large as +180 degree(s) is presented. The principle of the method is to measure a linear displacement (translation) produced by a crank-gear mechanism which converts the angular movement of a rotating table. The optical scheme and consideration on the accuracy of the method are presented.

  6. Space Interferometry Mission: Measuring the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, James; Dallas, Saterios; Laskin, Robert; Unwin, Stephen; Yu, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will be the NASA Origins Program's first space based long baseline interferometric observatory. SIM will use a 10 m Michelson stellar interferometer to provide 4 microarcsecond precision absolute position measurements of stars down to 20th magnitude over its 5 yr. mission lifetime. SIM will also provide technology demonstrations of synthesis imaging and interferometric nulling. This paper describes the what, why and how of the SIM mission, including an overall mission and system description, science objectives, general description of how SIM makes its measurements, description of the design concepts now under consideration, operations concept, and supporting technology program.

  7. Hydroxyl density measurements with resonant holographic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Trolinger, J.D.; Hess, C.F.; Yip, B.; Battles, B.; Hanson, R.K. Stanford University, CA )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes experimentation with a new type of flow diagnostics referred to as Resonant Holographic Interferometry Spectroscopy (RHIS). This technique combines the power of holography with the species selectivity of spectroscopy to provide three-dimensional images of the density profile of selected species in complex flows. The technique is particularly suitable to study mixing processes as well as to measure minor species in combustion processes. The method would allow the measurement of minor species in the presence of major species, as well as major species in a heterogeneous low pressure environment. Both experiments and modeling are being conducted to establish the feasibility of RHIS in measuring the hydroxyl concentrations in combustion processes. It is expected that in addition to the species concentration, the resonant holographic technique has the potential of providing temperature, pressure, and flow velocity. 28 refs.

  8. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  9. Grating interferometry method for torsion measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-rong; Qiao, Yan-feng; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yao-yu

    2006-01-01

    Method of grating interferometry was presented for torsion angle measurement, moire fringe generated by two gratings is used in a new field, it breaks through moire fringe's routine application. Measurement principle is described, torsion angle can be gotten by the tilt angle or the width of moire fringe. Different from moire fringe's characteristic information extracting methods in traditional measurement fields, fringe-tilt method and fringe-width method were put forward to extract moire fringe's characteristic information. Fringe-tilt method is on the basis of moire fringe's tilt to acquire torsion angle, uniform formula was built aiming at all positions of two gratings in the coordinates, fringe-width method is on the basis of moire fringe's width to acquire torsion angle, three key problems are given about fringe-width method. Thick, middle and thin moire fringe were collected in experiments and processed by two methods, fringe-width method's result shows that magnitude of boat torsion error is satisfied with that of theoretical precision analysis, and the change rule of torsion error is also same to that of theoretical analysis, the thicker fringe is, the higher precision is, when fringe width arrives to be 1695μm, the precision is 1.7", the thinner fringe is, the lower precision is, when fringe width arrives to be 734.7μm, the precision is 6.7". In addition to these, the results of repeatability experiments, sensibility experiments are given. In a word, the measurement principle is right and the precision of fringe processing is also reliable.

  10. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  11. Defect Depth Measurement Using White Light Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Don; Starr, Stan

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the White Light Interferometry project are the following: (1) Demonstrate a small hand-held instrument capable of performing inspections of identified defects on Orbiter outer pane window surfaces. (2) Build and field-test a prototype device using miniaturized optical components. (3) Modify the instrument based on field testing and begin the conversion of the unit to become a certified shop-aid.

  12. Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, Stephen; Wilson, Robert W.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Bender, Peter; Burke, Bernard F.; Cornwell, Tim; Drever, Ronald; Dyck, H. Melvin; Johnston, Kenneth J.; Kibblewhite, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The following recommended programs are reviewed: (1) infrared and optical interferometry (a ground-based and space programs); (2) compensation for the atmosphere with adaptive optics (a program for development and implementation of adaptive optics); and (3) gravitational waves (high frequency gravitational wave sources (LIGO), low frequency gravitational wave sources (LAGOS), a gravitational wave observatory program, laser gravitational wave observatory in space, and technology development during the 1990's). Prospects for international collaboration and related issues are also discussed.

  13. Speckle interferometry measurements in testing halls for civil engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, Mauro; Jacquot, Pierre M.

    1999-08-01

    Speckle interferometry is an interesting tool for the measurement of micro-deformations and has found application in many different fields ranging from material testing to structural assessment. This kind of applications, however, has often been confined inside optical laboratories where operational conditions are optimal. This paper is devoted to the extension of speckle interferometry to various measurements--performed not inside well protected rooms but in testing halls dedicated to experimentation in civil engineering--where the environmental conditions are severe for an interferometric method.

  14. Focus retrocollimated interferometry for long-radius-of-curvature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yang

    2001-12-01

    Focus retrocollimated interferometry is described for measuring long radius of curvature (>1 m), and achievable accuracy is discussed. It is shown that this method can be applied to both concave and convex spherical surfaces and can provide measurement to accuracy of 0.01-0.1%.

  15. Deformation Measurement Of Lumbar Vertebra By Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Toshiro; Kojima, Arata; Ogawa, Ryoukei; Iwata, Koichi; Nagata, Ryo

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of normal lumbar vertebra and one with the interarticular part cut off to simulate hemi-spondylolysis were measured by the double exposure holographic interferometry. In the normal lumbar vertebra, displacement due to the load applied to the inferior articular process was greater than that of superior articular process under the same load. The interarticular part was subjected to the high stress. From these points, one of the valuable data to consider the cause of spondylolysis was obtained.

  16. Infrasonic interferometry applied to synthetic and measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, Julius T.; Evers, Läslo G.; Ruigrok, Elmer; Wapenaar, Kees; Simons, Dick G.

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of the traveltime of infrasound through the atmosphere is interesting for several applications. For example, it could be used to determine temperature and wind of the atmosphere, since the traveltime depends on these atmospheric conditions (Haney, 2009). In this work the traveltime is estimated with infrasonic interferometry. In other words, we calculate the crosscorrelations of data of spatially distributed receivers. With this method the traveltime between two receivers is determined without the need for ground truth events. In a first step, we crosscorrelate synthetic data, which are generated by a raytracing model. This model takes into account the traveltime along the rays, the attenuation of the different atmospheric layers, the spreading of the rays and the influence of caustics. In these numerical experiments we show that it is possible to determine the traveltime through infrasonic interferometry. We present the results of infrasonic interferometry applied to measured data. Microbaroms are used in the crosscorrelation approach. Microbaroms are caused by ocean waves and are measured by the 'Large Aperture Infrasound Array' (LAIA). LAIA is being installed by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) in the framework of the radio-astronomical 'Low Frequency Array' (LOFAR) initiative. LAIA consists currently of around twenty receivers (microbarometers) with an aperture of around 100 km, allowing for several inter-station distances. Here, we show the results of crosscorrelations as a function of receivers distance, to assess the signal coherency. This research is made possible by the support of the 'Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research' (NWO). Haney, M., 2009. Infrasonic ambient noise interferometry from correlations of microbaroms, Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L19808

  17. Measurement of the gravity-field curvature by atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rosi, G; Cacciapuoti, L; Sorrentino, F; Menchetti, M; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the gravity-field curvature based on three conjugated atom interferometers. Three atomic clouds launched in the vertical direction are simultaneously interrogated by the same atom interferometry sequence and used to probe the gravity field at three equally spaced positions. The vertical component of the gravity-field curvature generated by nearby source masses is measured from the difference between adjacent gravity gradient values. Curvature measurements are of interest in geodesy studies and for the validation of gravitational models of the surrounding environment. The possibility of using such a scheme for a new determination of the Newtonian constant of gravity is also discussed. PMID:25615464

  18. Measurement of the gravity-field curvature by atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rosi, G; Cacciapuoti, L; Sorrentino, F; Menchetti, M; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the gravity-field curvature based on three conjugated atom interferometers. Three atomic clouds launched in the vertical direction are simultaneously interrogated by the same atom interferometry sequence and used to probe the gravity field at three equally spaced positions. The vertical component of the gravity-field curvature generated by nearby source masses is measured from the difference between adjacent gravity gradient values. Curvature measurements are of interest in geodesy studies and for the validation of gravitational models of the surrounding environment. The possibility of using such a scheme for a new determination of the Newtonian constant of gravity is also discussed.

  19. IMAP: Interferometry for Material Property Measurement in MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.D.; Miller, S.L.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-03-10

    An interferometric technique has been developed for non-destructive, high-confidence, in-situ determination of material properties in MEMS. By using interferometry to measure the full deflection curves of beams pulled toward the substrate under electrostatic loads, the actual behavior of the beams has been modeled. No other method for determining material properties allows such detailed knowledge of device behavior to be gathered. Values for material properties and non-idealities (such as support post compliance) have then been extracted which minimize the error between the measured and modeled deflections. High accuracy and resolution have been demonstrated, allowing the measurements to be used to enhance process control.

  20. Refractive index measurement using comparative interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojan, Mihaela; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Garoi, F.; Iordache, Iuliana

    2007-05-01

    The refractive index of a material medium is an important optical parameter since it exhibits the optical properties of the material. The adulteration problem is increasing day by day and hence simple, automatic and accurate measurement of the refractive index of materials is of great importance these days. For solid thin films materials Abeles method was reconsidered. Quick, measurements of refractive index using simple techniques and refractometers can help controlling adulteration of liquids of common use to a greater extent. Very simple interferometric set-up using Fizeau fringe patterns compares the fringe pitch as obtained in a cell with two levels: one down level with the unknown refractive index liquids and the upper level with gas air. A CCD matrix and a PC can handle the data and produce the results up to for digits.

  1. Measurement of the shape of objects by two wavelength interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlíček, Pavel; Naik, Dinesh N.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a fast and precise optical 3D measurement method. The principle is similar to that of white-light interferometry. The broad-band light source of white-light interferometry is replaced by two lasers with different wavelengths. The object to be measured is placed into one arm of a Michelson interferometer and moved along the optical axis. The intensity measured at the output of the interferometer is equal to the field autocorrelation. In the case of two wavelengths, the autocorrelation is a periodical function with peaks as a result of their beating. The period can be adjusted by the choice of the wavelength difference. By choosing a short period, a fast and precise measurement is performed in the range of a single beat. However, such a measurement is ambiguous if the object has structures deeper than the beat period. The ambiguity is removed by a fast auxiliary measurement with a long beat period covering the whole depth range of the object. The auxiliary measurement need not be precise and can be completed quickly with a large sampling step.

  2. Measurement of gauge blocks by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, M.; Haas, S.; Piree, H.; Gavalyugov, V.; Tamakyarska, D.; Thalmann, R.; Balling, P.; Garnaes, J.; Hald, J.; Farid, N.; Prieto, E.; Lassila, A.; Salgado, J. A.; Lewis, A.; Bandis, C.; Mudronja, V.; Banreti, E.; Balsamo, A.; Pedone, P.; Bergmans, R. H.; Karlsson, H.; Ramotowski, Z.; Eusebio, L.; Saraiva, F.; Duta, A.; Zelenika, S.; Bergstrand, S.; Fira, R.; Yandayan, T.; Sendogdu, D.; Ganioglu, O.; Asli Akgoz, S.; Franke, P.

    2016-01-01

    The key comparison EURAMET.L-K1.2011 on gauge blocks was carried out in the framework of a EURAMET project starting in 2012 and ending in 2015. It involved the participation of 24 National Metrology Institutes from Europe and Egypt, respectively. 38 gauge blocks of steel and ceramic with nominal central lengths between 0.5 mm and 500 mm were circulated. The comparison was conducted in two loops with two sets of artifacts. A statistical technique for linking the reference values was applied. As a consequence the reference value of one loop is influenced by the measurements of the other loop although they did not even see the artifacts of the others. This influence comes solely from three "linking laboratories" which measure both sets of artifacts. In total there were 44 results were not fully consistent with the reference values. This represents 10% of the full set of 420 results which is a considerable high number. At least 12 of them are clearly outliers where the participants have been informed by the pilot as soon as possible. The comparison results help to support the calibration and measurement capabilities (CMCs) of the laboratories involved in the CIPM MRA. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Precision Measurements with Matter-wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; Christensen, Dan; Washburn, Matthew; Archibald, James; van Zjill, Marshall; Birrell, Jeremiah; Burdett, Adam; Durfee, Dallin

    2007-06-01

    We will discuss progress on a neutral-calcium beam interferometer which is nearing completion. We will also present a proposal to measure electric and magnetic fields with extreme precision using a slow ion interferometer. The calcium interferometer utilizes a thermal beam for simplicity and high atom flux. Doppler shifts will be reduced using a novel alignment scheme for the Ramsey beams using precision prisms. The ion interferometer will utilize a slow beam of strontium-87 ions created by photon-ionizing a slow atomic beam. The ions will interact with three sets of laser beams which will drive stimulated Raman transitions. The proposed device will be used to search for variations from Coulomb's inverse-square law and a possible photon rest mass with a precision which is several orders of magnitude better than previous laboratory experiments.

  4. Equivalent wavelength self-mixing interferometry for displacement measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Li, Chengwei; Li, Songquan; Li, Dongyu

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve fringe precision of a self-mixing signal, a simple and effective method based on an equivalent wavelength self-mixing interferometer is presented. And a linearization fringe counting method is proposed for equivalent wavelength self-mixing interferometry to quickly reconstruct target displacement. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated by means of simulated signals and confirmed by several experimental measurements for both harmonic and aleatory target displacement with a fringe resolution of ∼125  nm. PMID:27607290

  5. Automated small tilt-angle measurement using Lau interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Shashi; Singh, Sumitra; Rana, Santosh

    2005-10-01

    A technique for a tilt-angle measurement of reflecting objects based on the Lau interferometry coupled with the moire readout has been proposed. A white-light incoherent source illuminates a set of two gratings, resulting in the generation of the Fresnel image due to the Lau effect. The Fresnel image is projected onto a reflecting object. The image reflected from the object is superimposed onto an identical grating, which results in the formation of a moire fringe pattern. The inclination angle of moire fringes is a function of tilt angle of the object. Theory and experimental arrangement of the proposed technique is presented and results of the investigation are reported.

  6. Insect wing deformation measurements using high speed digital holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Daniel D; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; De la Torre-I, Manuel H; Salas-Araiza, Manuel D; Caloca-Mendez, Cristian; Gutierrez Hernandez, David Asael

    2010-03-15

    An out-of-plane digital holographic interferometry system is used to detect and measure insect's wing micro deformations. The in-vivo phenomenon of the flapping is registered using a high power cw laser and a high speed camera. A series of digital holograms with the deformation encoded are obtained. Full field deformation maps are presented for an eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly (Pterourus multicaudata). Results show no uniform or symmetrical deformations between wings. These deformations are in the order of hundreds of nanometers over the entire surface. Out-of-plane deformation maps are presented using the unwrapped phase maps. PMID:20389581

  7. Magnetostriction Measured by Holographic Interferometry with the Simple and Inexpensive "Arrowhead" Setup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladera, Celso L.; Donoso, Guillermo; Contreras, Johnny H.

    2012-01-01

    Double-exposure holographic interferometry is applied to measure the "linear" or "longitudinal" magnetostriction constant of a soft-ferrite rod. This high-accuracy measurement is done indirectly, by measuring the small rotations of a lever in contact with the rod using double-exposure holographic interferometry implemented with a robust…

  8. Burg algorithm for enhancing measurement performance in wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Rebecca; Muhamedsalih, Hussam; Martin, Haydn; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2016-06-01

    Wavelength scanning interferometry (WSI) is a technique for measuring surface topography that is capable of resolving step discontinuities and does not require any mechanical movement of the apparatus or measurand, allowing measurement times to be reduced substantially in comparison to related techniques. The axial (height) resolution and measurement range in WSI depends in part on the algorithm used to evaluate the spectral interferograms. Previously reported Fourier transform based methods have a number of limitations which is in part due to the short data lengths obtained. This paper compares the performance auto-regressive model based techniques for frequency estimation in WSI. Specifically, the Burg method is compared with established Fourier transform based approaches using both simulation and experimental data taken from a WSI measurement of a step-height sample.

  9. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  10. Comparing laser interferometry and atom interferometry approaches to space-based gravitational-wave measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ira Thorpe, James; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul; Baker, John G.

    2012-07-01

    The science enabled by a space-based low-frequency gravitational-wave instrument is a high-priority objective of the international astronomy community. Mission concepts based on laser interferometry, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), have been thoroughly studied and determined to be capable of delivering significant science returns. Ongoing developments in laboratory atom interferometry techniques have inspired new gravitational-wave mission concepts. We present a comparative analysis of LISA-like light interferometer systems and atom interferometer systems for gravitational-wave detection. Specific attention is paid to the sources of instrumental noise that are most important for light interferometer systems. We find that the response to laser frequency noise is identical in light interferometer and atom interferometer systems and that similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple-arm interferometers) must be employed to reach interesting gravitational wave sensitivities. Response to acceleration of the optical platforms is slightly different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but the acceleration noise requirements are similar. Based on this analysis, we find no clear advantage of the atom interferometry approach over traditional laser interferometry.

  11. Projection Moire Interferometry Measurements of Micro Air Vehicle Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat s wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  12. Spatial-heterodyne interferometry for transmission (SHIFT) measurements

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Philip R.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Tobin, Ken W.

    2006-10-10

    Systems and methods are described for spatial-heterodyne interferometry for transmission (SHIFT) measurements. A method includes digitally recording a spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis using a reference beam, and an object beam that is transmitted through an object that is at least partially translucent; Fourier analyzing the digitally recorded spatially-heterodyned hologram, by shifting an original origin of the digitally recorded spatially-heterodyned hologram to sit on top of a spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined by an angle between the reference beam and the object beam, to define an analyzed image; digitally filtering the analyzed image to cut off signals around the original origin to define a result; and performing an inverse Fourier transform on the result.

  13. Three-Dimensional Displacement Measurement Using Diffractive Optic Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Cole, Helen J.; Shepherd, Robert L.; Ashley Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces a powerful new optical method which utilizes diffractive optic interferometry (DOI) to measure both in-plane and out-of-plane displacement with variable sensitivity using the same optical system. Sensitivity is varied by utilizing various combinations of the different wavefronts produced by a conjugate pair of binary Optical elements; a transmission grating is used to produce several illumination beams while a reflective grating replicated on the surface of a specimen, provides the reference for the undeformed state. A derivation of the equations which govern the method is included along with a discussion Of the experimental tests conducted to verify the theory. Overall, the results are excellent, with experimental data agreeing to within a few percent of the theoretical predictions.

  14. Direct Measurement of Aerosol Absorption Using Photothermal Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Efforts to bound the contribution of light absorption in aerosol radiative forcing is still very much an active area of research in large part because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering. In response to this and other technical issues, the aerosol community has actively pursued the development of new instruments to measure aerosol absorption (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP)). In this poster, we introduce the technique of photothermal interferometry (PTI), which combines the direct measurement capabilities of photothermal spectroscopy (PTS) with high-sensitivity detection of the localized heating brought about by the PT process through interferometry. At its most fundamental level, the PTI technique measures the optical pathlength change that one arm of an interferometer (referred to as the 'probe' arm) experiences relative to the other arm of the interferometer (called the 'reference' arm). When the two arms are recombined at a beamsplitter, an interference pattern is created. If the optical pathlength in one arm of the interferometer changes, a commensurate shift in the interference pattern will take place. For the specific application of measuring light absorption, the heating of air surrounding the light- absorbing aerosol following laser illumination induces the optical pathlength change. This localized heating creates a refractive index gradient causing the probe arm of the interferometer to take a slightly different optical pathlength relative to the unperturbed reference arm. This effect is analogous to solar heating of a road causing mirages. As discussed above, this altered optical pathlength results in a shift in the interference pattern that is then detected as a change in the signal intensity by a single element detector. The current optical arrangement utilizes a folded Jamin interferometer design (Sedlacek, 2006) that provides a platform that is robust with respect to sensitivity

  15. Dynamic measurement of deformation using Fourier transform digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinya; Wu, Sijin; Yang, Lianxiang

    2013-10-01

    Digital holographic interferometry (DHI) is a well-established optical technique for measurement of nano-scale deformations. It has become more and more important due to the rapid development of applications in aerospace engineering and biomedicine. Traditionally, phase shift technique is used to quantitatively measure the deformations in DHI. However, it cannot be applied in dynamic measurement. Fourier transform phase extraction method, which can determine the phase distribution from only a single hologram, becomes a promising method to extract transient phases in DHI. This paper introduces a digital holographic interferometric system based on 2D Fourier transform phase extraction method, with which deformations of objects can be measured quickly. In the optical setup, the object beam strikes a CCD via a lens and aperture, and the reference beam is projected on the CCD through a single-mode fiber. A small inclination angle between the diverging reference beam and optical axial is introduced in order to physically separate the Fourier components in frequency domain. Phase maps are then obtained by the utilization of Fourier transform and windowed inverse Fourier transform. The capability of the Fourier transform DHI is discussed by theoretical discussion as well as experiments.

  16. Strain/stress measurements using electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Tilo; Mischo, Horst K.; Ettemeyer, Andreas; Wang, Zhiguo; Wegner, Ronny

    1998-12-01

    In its classical application Electronic Speckle-Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) is used to measure deformations with high resolution. Additionally, this methods also able to measure the 3D topography of technical surfaces even with discontinuities. If adequate set-ups are used, combined measurements of shape and deformation can also be carried out. Especially in production of machines and other metal parts, the determination of the stress and strain e.g. of welding points is a very important issue for evaluating about the quality of the specimen under test. Here, the use of wire resistance strain gauges is state-of-the-art for measuring length variations of parts under mechanical load. It is very time-consuming to prepare the corresponding measurement environment for strain gauges. Moreover, only very limited information about the strain can be measured by this means because all information is integrated over the whole area covered by the strain gauges without lateral resolution. In order to extend this kind of metrology to a matrix of some thousands points even including sensitivity in the out-of-plane-direction, ESPI-methods can be used. As described in this paper, it is therefore necessary to perform both,the shape and the deformation measurement to obtain the necessary information. Of course, the directions of sensitivity depend on the contour of the test specimen ad can be determined due to the previously measured topography. In this paper current work on the field of stress and strain measurements with ESPI is described. The experimental result of several technical applications is shown and it is compared to measurements with conventional strain gauges. Further possible technical applications are discussed and the prototype of an ESPI stress sensor is presented.

  17. Measurement of tidal current fields with SRTM along track interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, H.; Breit, H.; Eineder, M.; Flament, P.; Romeiser, R.

    2003-04-01

    Although the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM, http://www.dfd.dlr.de/srtm/) SAR interferometer was designed to deliver Digital Elevation Models from across track interferometry it turned out that it contained also an Along Track Interferometer (ATI). The paper describes how the ATI can be used to determine the velocity of moving ground objects. These may be cars, trains and ships but the focus of the paper is on the measurement of fast tidal ocean surface currents. The big advantage of the SAR-ATI method over buoys is that the measurement covers a large area and "images" of surface currents can be obtained.The advatage over the well established altimeter measurements is the much higher geometrical resolution and that it works close to coasts and in river outflows. Finally, the advantages over coastal radars is that a spaceborne system can deliver data from round the world. In the paper the results from two test sites, near Brest in France and in the Dutch Waddenzee, will be presented. Comparisons of the SRTM current fields with available current models of these areas show both a very good agreement. The ATI-method will be used in future SAR missions like TerraSAR-X to provide high resolution current maps from many interesting parts of the world.

  18. Measurements of the tympanic membrane with digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Solís, S.; Mendoza Santoyo, F.; Del Socorro Hernández-Montes, M.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper a digital holographic interferometry (DHI) system with three object-illumination beams is used for the first time to detect and measure micrometer deformations on the surface of a tympanic membrane. Using this optical setup allows all three object displacement components x, y, and z, to be independently calculated. The corresponding deformations are registered using a cw laser in stroboscopic mode and a CCD camera synchronized to the excitation acoustic wave that produces a resonant vibration mode on the tympanic membrane surface. A series of digital holographic interferograms record the displacements undergone by the tympanic membrane and from them full field deformation phase maps are obtained. From the latter it is possible to observe the displacement of the tympanic membrane in response to the sound pressure. The study was performed on the tympanic membrane taken from a post-mortem cat. The results show the feasibility to apply a similar optomechanical arrangement for the study in humans, representing an alternative technique for the study of pathologies in the tympanic membrane.

  19. Shape measurements of microscopic objects using computational shear interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agour, Mostafa; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2016-03-01

    We present an efficient and less time consuming implementation of Computational Shear Interferometry (CoSI) by applying a smoothness on the assigned wave field. The method is used to recover the three dimensional form of a micro injection molded part from a set of shear measurements. For this purpose, six shear experiments have been recorded with the shears varying in orientation and magnitude. Varying the shears orientation and magnitude is applied using a setup consisting of a 4f filter with a reflective phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) in the corresponding Fourier plane. The SLM is used as an electronic diffraction grating with a blazed structure. Based on the birefringent properties of the SLM two orthogonally polarized images, one diffracted and one reflected, appear on the camera sensor and produce shear interferograms. The shift between the images depends on the period and the orientation of the blazed grating. From shear interferograms, the phase of light diffracted by the object is reconstructed by CoSI. Thus the height map of the object is determined.

  20. Advances in Swept-Wavelength Interferometry for Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Eric D.

    2011-12-01

    Originally developed for radar applications in the 1950s, swept-wavelength interferometry (SWI) at optical wavelengths has been an active area of research for the past thirty years, with applications in fields ranging from fiber optic telecommunications to biomedical imaging. It now forms the basis of several measurement techniques, including optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR), swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), and frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) lidar. In this thesis, I present several novel contributions to the field of SWI that include improvements and extensions to the state of the art in SWI for performing precision measurements. The first is a method for accurately monitoring the instantaneous frequency of the tunable source to accommodate nonlinearities in the source tuning characteristics. This work ex- tends the commonly used method incorporating an auxiliary interferometer to the increasingly relevant cases of long interferometer path mismatches and high-speed wavelength tuning. The second contribution enables precision absolute range measurements to within a small fraction of the transform-limited range resolution of the SWI system. This is accomplished through the use of digital filtering in the time domain and phase slope estimation in the frequency domain. Measurements of optical group delay with attosecond-level precision are experimentally demonstrated and applied to measurements of group refractive index and physical thickness. The accuracy of the group refractive index measurement is shown to be on the order of 10-6, while measurements of absolute thicknesses of macroscopic samples are accomplished with accuracy on the order of 10 nm. Furthermore, sub-nanometer uncertainty for relative thickness measurements can be achieved. For the case of crystalline silicon wafers, the achievable uncertainty is on the same order as the Si-Si bond length, opening the door to potential thickness profiling with single atomic

  1. Monitoring and measuring corrosion under coating by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, K.; Al-Sabti, F.

    1996-10-01

    In a previous study, a mathematical model relating surface and bulk behaviors of metals in aqueous solution has been developed. The model was established based on principles of holographic interferometry for measuring microsurface dissolution, i.e. mass loss, and on those of electrochemistry for measuring the bulk electronic current, i.e. corrosion current. In the present work, an optical corrosion-meter was built based on the above model. The corrosion meter consists of an electrochemical cell in which coated metallic samples are tested in aqueous solutions. Furthermore, the corrosion meter has a holographic camera with a thermoplastic film for in situ processing holograms in order to obtain real time-holographic interferograms of the sample in the electrochemical cell. During experiments, the samples remain in aqueous solution without any physical contact. In the meantime, corrosion data can be obtained from the interpretation of the interferograms of the sample as a function of the elapsed time of the experiments. Also, the open circuit potential of the sample is measured with respect to the interferometric data. Consequently, corrosion current density of epoxy coated aluminum, stainless steel, and low carbon steel in 1M KCl, 1M NaCl, and 1M NaOH solutions were obtained by using the optical corrosion-meter. A comparison between the corrosion data of the different alloys showed that the corrosion current density of the coated stainless steel in 1 M NaCi is nearly three fold higher than that of the coated carbon steel in 1 M NaOH. In contrast, the coated aluminum sample shows no sign of corrosion in 1M KCl.

  2. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-09-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10-8 for a distance of 50 m.

  3. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10−8 for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  4. Measurement of micro-V-groove dihedral using white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fengzhou; Zeng, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a micro-V-grooves dihedral measurement method using white light interferometry on multiple reflection phenomena. When an optical instrument is used to measure microstructures with steep large gradient faces with high reflection rate, considerable measurement errors caused by multiple scattering or multiple reflecting can be observed. These difficulties have limited the application of white light interferometry in the measurement of microstructures. However, the study has found that the multiple-reflection phenomena can be utilized to measure V-groove dihedral angle. The precision of dihedral measurement is a guarantee of ultra-precise machining of retro-reflection mirrors which requires a non-contact measurement to avoid scratches and surface defects caused by the contact probe. The proposed method is capable of obtaining more accurate surface profile data compared to common white light interferometry. Experimental results verify the method and the consistence between the proposed method and contact mode profilometer.

  5. Deformation of Alaskan volcanoes measured using SAR interferometry and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Doerte

    Geodetic measurements using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) show deformation of Okmok, Westdahl, and Fisher volcanoes in the Alaska-Aleutian arc. This thesis shows the variety of deformation signals observed, presents models for the observations, and interprets them in terms of underlying processes. InSAR data show deflation of Okmok caldera during its last eruption in 1997, preceded and followed by inflation of smaller magnitude. Modeling shows that the main deformation source, interpreted as a central magma reservoir, is located at 2.5 to 5.0 km depth beneath the approximate center of the caldera, and 5 km away from the active vent. Mass balance calculations and comparison with the long-term eruptive frequency indicate that Okmok may be supplied with magma continuously from a deep source. GPS measurements between 1998 and 2001 show inflation of Westdahl volcano, with a source located about 7 km beneath the summit. The combined subsurface volume increase measured during the GPS and an earlier InSAR observation period [Lu et al., 2000a] accounts for at least 15% more than the volume erupted from Westdahl in 1991--92, suggesting that an eruption of that size could occur at any time. Neighboring Fisher caldera shows subsidence and contraction across the caldera center that is not related to any eruptive activity. The main mechanisms to explain this deformation are degassing and contractional cooling of a shallow magma body, or depressurization of Fisher's hydrothermal system, possibly triggered by an earthquake in the vicinity of the caldera in 1999. A systematic coherence analysis of SAR interferograms documents the cooling history of the 1997 Okmok lava flow. The flow is incoherent directly after emplacement, but coherence increases as more time has passed since the eruption, and also the shorter the period spanned by the interferogram. Coherence is regained three years after the eruption. This corresponds to

  6. Water induced geohazards measured with spaceborne interferometry techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncos, V.; Serban, F.; Teleaga, D.; Ciocan, V.; Sorin, M.; Caranda, D.; Zamfirescu, F.; Andrei, M.; Copaescu, S.; Radu, M.; Raduca, V.

    2012-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic occurrence of groundwater is inducing surficial crustal deformation processes that can be accurately measured with high spatial density from space, regardless of the ground access conditions. The detection of the surface deformation allows uncovering spatial and temporal patterns of subsurface processes such as land subsidence, cave-ins and differential ground settlement related to water content. InSAR measurements combined with ground truth data permit estimation of the mechanical properties of the rocks and the development of models and scenarios to predict disaster events such as cave-ins, landslides and soil liquefaction in the case of an Earthquake. A number of three sites in Romania that suffer of ground instability because of the water component will be presented. The DInSAR, Interferograms Stacking and Persistent Scatterers Interferometry techniques were applied to retrieve as accurate as possible the displacement information. The first studied site is the city of Bucharest; using 7 years of ERS data ground instability was detected on a large area that represents the historical watershed of the Dambovita river. A network of water wells shows that the ground instability is directly proportional to the groundwater depth. The second site is the Ocnele Mari brine extraction area. The exploitation of the Ocnele Mari salt deposit started from the Roman Empire time using the mining technology and from 1954 the salt dissolution technology which involves injecting water into the ground using a well and extracting the brine (water and salt) through another well. The extraction of salt through dissolution led to slow ground subsidence but the flooding and dissolution of the Roman caves led to catastrophic cave-ins and the relocation of an entire village. The water injection technique is still applied and the Roman cave system is an unknown, therefore further catastrophic events are expected. The existing theoretical simulations of the

  7. Wavefront metrology measurements at SACLA by means of X-ray grating interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Yves; Rutishauser, Simon; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Kameshima, Takashi; Flechsig, Uwe; Yabashi, Makina; David, Christian

    2014-04-21

    The knowledge of the X-ray wavefront is of importance for many experiments at synchrotron sources and hard X-ray free-electron lasers. We will report on metrology measurements performed at the SACLA X-ray Free Electron Laser by means of grating interferometry which allows for an at-wavelength, in-situ, and single-shot characterization of the X-ray wavefront. At SACLA the grating interferometry technique was used for the study of the X-ray optics installed upstream of the end station, two off-set mirror systems and a double crystal monochromator. The excellent quality of the optical components was confirmed by the experimental results. Consequently grating interferometry presents the ability to support further technical progresses in X-ray mirror manufacturing and mounting.

  8. Heisenberg-limited interferometry with pair coherent states and parity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry, Christopher C.; Mimih, Jihane

    2010-07-15

    After reviewing parity-measurement-based interferometry with twin Fock states, which allows for supersensitivity (Heisenberg limited) and super-resolution, we consider interferometry with two different superpositions of twin Fock states, namely, two-mode squeezed vacuum states and pair coherent states. This study is motivated by the experimental challenge of producing twin Fock states on opposite sides of a beam splitter. We find that input two-mode squeezed states, while allowing for Heisenberg-limited sensitivity, do not yield super-resolutions, whereas both are possible with input pair coherent states.

  9. Measurement technique for determining the temperature distribution in a transparent solid using holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Kashiwagi, T

    1987-03-01

    Temperature distributions in transparent solids have been determined by measurements of changes in the refractive index of the sample using a holographic interferometry technique. The steady-state temperature distributions within two samples, fused silica and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), were measured to demonstrate the technique. Various errors in the measured temperature distribution caused by refraction and heat losses from the sample are discussed and estimated.

  10. Study on a multi-delay spectral interferometry for stellar radial velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Haijiao; Tang, Jin; Ji, Hangxin; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Liang

    2014-08-01

    High accuracy radial velocity measurement isn't only one of the most important methods for detecting earth-like Exoplanets, but also one of the main developing fields of astronomical observation technologies in future. Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) generates a kind of particular interference spectrum through combining a fixed-delay interferometer with a medium-resolution spectrograph. It effectively enhances radial velocity measuring accuracy by several times. Another further study on multi-delay interferometry was gradually developed after observation success with only a fixed-delay, and its relative instrumentation makes more impressive performance in near Infrared band. Multi-delay is capable of giving wider coverage from low to high frequency in Fourier field so that gives a higher accuracy in radial velocity measurement. To study on this new technology and verify its feasibility at Guo Shoujing telescope (LAMOST), an experimental instrumentation with single fixed-delay named MESSI has been built and tested at our lab. Another experimental study on multi-delay spectral interferometry given here is being done as well. Basically, this multi-delay experimental system is designed in according to the similar instrument named TEDI at Palomar observatory and the preliminary test result of MESSI. Due to existence of LAMOST spectrograph at lab, a multi-delay interferometer design actually dominates our work. It's generally composed of three parts, respectively science optics, phase-stabilizing optics and delay-calibrating optics. To switch different fixed delays smoothly during observation, the delay-calibrating optics is possibly useful to get high repeatability during switching motion through polychromatic interferometry. Although this metrology is based on white light interferometry in theory, it's different that integrates all of interference signals independently obtained by different monochromatic light in order to avoid dispersion error caused by

  11. Development of a Hybrid Atomic Force Microscopic Measurement System Combined with White Light Scanning Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system’s dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system’s good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method. PMID:22368463

  12. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  13. A comparison of electronic heterodyne moire deflectometry and electronic heterodyne holographic interferometry for flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.; Stricker, J.

    1985-01-01

    Electronic heterodyne moire deflectometry and electronic heterodyne holographic interferometry are compared as methods for the accurate measurement of refractive index and density change distributions of phase objects. Experimental results are presented to show that the two methods have comparable accuracy for measuring the first derivative of the interferometric fringe shift. The phase object for the measurements is a large crystal of KD*P, whose refractive index distribution can be changed accurately and repeatably for the comparison. Although the refractive index change causes only about one interferometric fringe shift over the entire crystal, the derivative shows considerable detail for the comparison. As electronic phase measurement methods, both methods are very accurate and are intrinsically compatible with computer controlled readout and data processing. Heterodyne moire is relatively inexpensive and has high variable sensitivity. Heterodyne holographic interferometry is better developed, and can be used with poor quality optical access to the experiment.

  14. Developments in moire interferometry for out-of-plane displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, A.; Cheung, M. T.

    Moire interferometry is used to measure out-of-plane displacements with very high sensitivity. The experimental set-up is similar to that used for in-plane displacement measurement with a small modification. In the in-plane method, the deformed real specimen grating interferes with the fixed virtual reference grating to produce the moire fringes; while for the out-of-plane displacement method, the deformed virtual grating interferes with a real reference grating to produce the moire pattern.

  15. Measurement of a three-dimensional hypersonic density field using holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, Stephen Eugene

    1990-08-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a holographic interferometry system to measure and analyze density distributions about a generic maneuvering reentry vehicle in a hypersonic wind tunnel. This data is needed to understand the flow physics better so that accurate models of the processes that govern the dynamics and thermodynamics of the flow can be developed and validated. A dual-plate holographic interferometry system, providing full-field, non-intrusive measurements, was developed to acquire data at a given projection angle. The phase of the modulated laser wave was determined from the interferograms using a digital phase shifting method with a measurement resolution of 100 microns. Cross sectional distributions were then recovered from the phase measurements using an algebraic reconstruction technique. The data base obtained consisted of a series of density distributions at axial locations of interest. The interferometric data was supplemented with surface measurements, schlieren and oil flow photographs. Analysis of the data showed an extensive region of separated flow around the control surfaces, resulting in loss of control effectiveness and severe localized heating, which could not be modeled by the computational solution used for comparison. Holographic interferometry was shown to be a viable measurement technique for obtaining accurate, 3D density distributions in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  16. Temperature measurement of an axisymmetric flame using phase shift holographic interferometry with fast Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieng, S. M.; Lai, W. Z.

    Because of the importance of the temperature scalar measurements in combination diagonostics, application of phase shift holographic interferometry to temperature measurement of an axisymmetrically premixed flame was experimentally investigated. The test apparatus is an axisymmetric Bunsen burner. Propane of 99 percent purity is used as the gaseous fuel. A fast Fourier transform, a more efficient and accurate approach for Abel inversion, is used for reconstructed the axisymmetric temperature field from the interferometric data. The temperature distribution is compared with the thermocouple-measured values. The comparison shows that the proposed technique is satisfactory. The result errors are analyzed in detail. It is shown that this technique overcomes most of the earlier problems and limitations detrimental to the conventional holographic interferometry.

  17. Time-resolved spatial phase measurements with 2-dimensional spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Colby; Planchon, Thomas; Amir, Wafa; Squier, Jeff A.; Durfee, Charles G.

    2007-03-01

    We are using 2-dimensional spectral interferometry for sensitive measurements of spatial phase distortions. The reference pulse and the time-delayed probe pulse are coincident on an imaging spectrometer, yielding spectral and spatial phase information. This technique offers the potential of higher sensitivity than traditional spatial interferometry since there are many fringes of data for each spatial point. We illustrate this technique with measurements of the thermal lensing profile in a cryogenically cooled Ti:sapphire amplifier crystal that is pumped by tens of watts of power from four frequency-doubled Nd:YLF lasers running at 1 kHz. By adjusting the relative delay of the probe and reference pulses, we characterize the thermal transients during and after the pump pulses. We compare the measured transient thermal profiles with those calculated with a finite-element model.

  18. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement using wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Zhou, Yanzhou; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2004-07-01

    We describe a technique for measuring depth-resolved displacement fields within a three-dimensional (3D) scattering medium based on wavelength scanning interferometry. Sequences of two-dimensional interferograms are recorded whilst the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resulting 3D intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide one component of the 3D displacement field. The technique is illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently controlled reflecting surfaces. Advantages over the corresponding method based on low-coherence interferometry include a depth range unlimited by mechanical scanning devices, and immunity from fringe contrast reduction when imaging through dispersive media.

  19. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement by wavelength-scanning electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2005-07-01

    We show, for the first time to our knowledge, how wavelength-scanning interferometry can be used to measure depth-resolved displacement fields through semitransparent scattering surfaces. Temporal sequences of speckle interferograms are recorded while the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resultant three-dimensional (3-D) intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3-D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide the out-of-plane component of the 3-D displacement field. The principle of the technique is explained in detail and illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently tilted semitransparent scattering surfaces. Results are validated by standard two-beam electronic speckle pattern interferometry.

  20. Dynamical measurement of refractive index distribution using digital holographic interferometry based on total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwei; Di, Jianglei; Li, Ying; Xi, Teli; Zhao, Jianlin

    2015-10-19

    We present a method for dynamically measuring the refractive index distribution in a large range based on the combination of digital holographic interferometry and total internal reflection. A series of holograms, carrying the index information of mixed liquids adhered on a total reflection prism surface, are recorded with CCD during the diffusion process. Phase shift differences of the reflected light are reconstructed exploiting the principle of double-exposure holographic interferometry. According to the relationship between the reflection phase shift difference and the liquid index, two dimensional index distributions can be directly figured out, assuming that the index of air near the prism surface is constant. The proposed method can also be applied to measure the index of solid media and monitor the index variation during some chemical reaction processes. PMID:26480394

  1. Wireless non-contact measurement of human's heartbeat and bloodflow with microwave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    We present a technique for measuring human's heart beat and blood flow. The technique is based on interferometry at radio frequency (RF) and can produce very fine resolution and fast response. RF interferometry is a process detecting the change of phase and capable of resolving any physical quantity being measured within a fraction of the operating wavelength. It has relatively faster system response time than other techniques due to the fact that it is typically operated with a single-frequency source rather than across a frequency range. In measurement of heart beat and blood flow in the human body, a RF signal is used as the irradiating source and the change of the phase of the return signal over time is detected in the signal processing. This phase change is processed to extract the Doppler frequency shift used for calculating the heart beat or blood flow. Accurate wireless non-contact measurement of human's heart beat and blood flow with RF interferometry will advance the practice of medicine and promise substantial benefits to patients and medical professionals.

  2. White-light interferometry on rough surfaces--measurement uncertainty caused by noise.

    PubMed

    Pavliček, Pavel; Hýbl, Ondřej

    2012-02-01

    White-light interferometry on rough surfaces is an optical method for the measurement of the geometrical form of objects. The longitudinal coordinate of the measured surface is obtained from the measured interferogram by means of an evaluation method. However, the longitudinal coordinate cannot be determined completely accurately because the interferogram is affected by noise. We calculate the lower limit of the longitudinal measurement uncertainty caused by noise by use of the Cramer-Rao inequality. Additionally, we calculate the lower limit of the longitudinal measurement uncertainty caused by shot noise only.

  3. Systematic comparison between line integrated densities measured with interferometry and polarimetry at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M.; Zilli, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Boboc, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-15

    A systematic comparison between the line integrated electron density derived from interferometry and polarimetry at JET has been carried out. For the first time the reliability of the measurements of the Cotton-Mouton effect has been analyzed for a wide range of main plasma parameters and the possibility to evaluate the electron density directly from polarimetric data has been studied. The purpose of this work is to recover the interferometric data with the density derived from the measured Cotton-Mouton effect, when the fringe jump phenomena occur. The results show that the difference between the line integrated electron density from interferometry and polarimetry is with one fringe (1.143x10{sup 19} m{sup -2}) for more than 90% of the cases. It is possible to consider polarimetry as a satisfactory alternative method to interferometry to measure the electron density and it could be used to recover interferometric signal when a fringe jumps occurs, preventing difficulties for the real-time control of many experiments at the JET machine.

  4. Measurement-only topological quantum computation via anyonic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonderson, Parsa Freedman, Michael Nayak, Chetan

    2009-04-15

    We describe measurement-only topological quantum computation using both projective and interferometrical measurement of topological charge. We demonstrate how anyonic teleportation can be achieved using 'forced measurement' protocols for both types of measurement. Using this, it is shown how topological charge measurements can be used to generate the braiding transformations used in topological quantum computation, and hence that the physical transportation of computational anyons is unnecessary. We give a detailed discussion of the anyonics for implementation of topological quantum computation (particularly, using the measurement-only approach) in fractional quantum Hall systems.

  5. Characterization of drying paint coatings by dynamic speckle and holographic interferometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Budini, N; Mulone, C; Balducci, N; Vincitorio, F M; López, A J; Ramil, A

    2016-06-10

    In this work we implemented dynamic speckle and holographic interferometry techniques to characterize the drying process of solvent-based paint coatings. We propose a simple way to estimate drying time by measuring speckle activity and incrementally fitting experimental data through standard regression algorithms. This allowed us to predict drying time after about 20-30 min of paint application, which is fast compared to usual times required to reach the so-called tack-free state (≈2  h). In turn, we used holographic interferometry to map small thickness variations in the coating surface during drying. We also demonstrate that results obtained from both techniques correlate with each other, which allows us to improve the accuracy of the drying time estimation. PMID:27409029

  6. Optical measurement of the axial eye length by laser Doppler interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, C K

    1991-03-01

    A new technique has been developed to determine the axial length of the human eye in vivo. Based on laser interferometry in conjunction with the Doppler technique, it uses partially coherent light. This new technique complies with laser safety regulations. High accuracy is achieved, the optical length (OL) can be determined within +/- 30 microns, and the reproducibility of the geometric eye length is greater than +/- 25 microns. Possible errors are discussed. First comparisons with the ultrasound technique yield good agreement for emmetropic subjects and for subjects with a myopia of up to 10 diopters. The advantages of the laser doppler interferometry (LDI) technique are high accuracy, high transversal resolution, and more comfort for the patient (it is a noncontact method; no anesthesia is needed). Possible future applications of LDI, like measurements of fundus profiles and of retinal thickness, are mentioned.

  7. A new approach to high precision phase measurement interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, N.; Debell, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of a phase measuring interferometer system which represents a unique approach to the extraction and analysis of wavefront data from the interferometer output. In contrast to fringe pattern analysis systems, the digitally based instrument described is a direct phase measuring interferometer system which is capable of providing a graphical representation of both the sign and magnitude of the phase distribution across the test wavefront. Attention is given to basic theory, the instrument measurement head, the 8080-based computer used as a processor, system performance specifications, measurement precision and accuracy, and measurement capabilities.

  8. Sub-pixel phase-measuring interferometry with interlace stitching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, James T.

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of mid spatial frequency figure error is critical to large precision optics for missions such as TPF-C. This presentation introduces a technique for increasing the spatial sampling resolution to meet these requirements using conventional video resolution phase-measuring interferometer. Technique involves sub-pixel data shifts, interlaced stitching and PSF deconvolution.

  9. Synthetic-wavelength self-mixing interferometry for displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junbao; Zhu, Hongbin; Xia, Wei; Guo, Dongmei; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    A simple synthetic-wavelength self-mixing interferometer is proposed for precision displacement measurement. Choosing the frequency difference of the orthogonally polarized dual frequency He-Ne laser appropriately, we introduce synthetic wavelength theory into self-mixing interference principle and demonstrate a feasible optical configuration by simply adjusting the optical design of self-mixing interferometer. The phase difference between the two orthogonally polarized feedback fringes is observed, and the tiny displacement of the object can be measured through the phase change of the synthetic signal. Since the virtual synthetic wavelength is 106 times larger than the operating wavelength, sub-nanometer displacement of the object can be obtained in millimeter criterion measurement without modulation, demodulation and complicated electrical circuits. Experimental results verifies the synthetic wavelength self-mixing interferometer's ability of measuring nanoscale displacement, which provides a potential approach for contactless precision displacement measurement in a number of scientific and industrial applications.

  10. Dichroic spectrally-resolved interferometry to overcome the measuring range limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Ki-Nam

    2015-09-01

    In this investigation, a simple method to eliminate the dead zone without the minimum measurable distance and extend the measurable range of spectrally resolved interferometry (SRI) twice based on the bandwidth separation by a dichroic beam splitter (DBS) is proposed. The main advantage of this dichroic SRI is that it can be simply implemented with a dichroic beam splitter and another reference mirror from the typical SRI. Feasibility experiments were performed to verify the principle of the dichroic SRI and the result confirmed the effectiveness of this method as the extended measuring range. Some practical error sources are considered and the alternative solutions are also discussed.

  11. Measurement of intraocular distances in human eyes by using Fourier domain low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang; Zhu, Lida; Li, Qinghua; Ma, Zhenhe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a system for rapidly measuring the intraocular distances of human eyes in vivo with high sensitivity by using Fourier domain low-coherence interferometry. The system mainly consisting of a rapid focus displacement unit and a reference arm which has a variable optical path length. This system is capable of providing a complete biometrical assessment of a human eye in a single measurement procedure, including cornea thickness, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, and axial length. The system is experimentally verified by measuring the four parameters of a human eye in vivo.

  12. Non-contact angle measurement based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Lian

    2014-11-01

    We present a novel precise angle measurement scheme based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry (PLFI), which outputs two parallel laser beams and thus their displacement difference reflects the angle variation of the target. Due to its ultrahigh sensitivity to the feedback light, PLFI realizes the direct non-contact measurement of non-cooperative targets. Experimental results show that PLFI has an accuracy of 8″ within a range of 1400″. The yaw of a guide is also measured and the experimental results agree with those of the dual-frequency laser interferometer Agilent 5529A.

  13. Analysis of Polarizability Measurements Made with Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoire, Maxwell; Brooks, Nathan; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We present revised measurements of the static electric dipole polarizabilities of K, Rb, and Cs based on atom interferometer experiments presented in [Phys. Rev. A 2015, 92, 052513] but now re-analyzed with new calibrations for the magnitude and geometry of the applied electric field gradient. The resulting polarizability values did not change, but the uncertainties were significantly reduced. Then we interpret several measurements of alkali metal atomic polarizabilities in terms of atomic oscillator strengths $f_{ik}$, Einstein coefficients $A_{ik}$, state lifetimes $\\tau_{k}$, transition dipole matrix elements $D_{ik}$, line strengths $S_{ik}$, and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients. Finally, we combine atom interferometer measurements of polarizabilities with independent measurements of lifetimes and $C_6$ values in order to quantify the residual contribution to polarizability due to all atomic transitions other than the principal $ns$-$np_J$ transitions for alkali metal atoms.

  14. Rapid subsidence over oil fields measured by SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Eric J.; Blom, Ronald G.; Goldstein, Richard M.

    The Lost Hills and Belridge oilfields are in the San Joaquin Valley, California. The major oil reservoir is high porosity and low permeability diatomite. Extraction of large volumes from shallow depths causes reduction in pore pressure and subsequent compaction, forming a surface subsidence bowl. We measure this subsidence from space using interferometric analysis of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data collected by the European Space Agency Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-1 and ERS-2). Maximum subsidence rates are as high as 40 mm in 35 days or >400 mm/yr, measured from interferograms with time separations ranging from one day to 26 months. The 8- and 26-month interferograms contain areas where the subsidence gradient exceeds the measurement possible with ERS SAR, but shows increased detail in areas of less rapid subsidence. Synoptic mapping of subsidence distribution from satellite data powerfully complements ground-based techniques, permits measurements where access is difficult, and aids identification of underlying causes.

  15. Spin Hall effect of light measured by interferometry.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Chandravati; Ranganathan, D; Joseph, Joby

    2013-07-15

    We demonstrate a experimental method to measure the spin Hall effect of light (SHEL), which is based on the interference between two orthogonal circularly polarized beams with the help of a polarizer. Our method can measure the SHEL across the entire exit pupil, not only at the centroid as is the case with earlier methods, and hence one can scan the transverse section of the beam. We measured the SHEL of an aluminium mirror and a glass plate using a He-Ne laser at wavelength 633 nm, for incidence angles varying from 22° to 70°. The experimental results are in good agreement with theory. We also measured the shift across the transverse section of a Gaussian beam using same method.

  16. Dispersion measurements of water with white-light interferometry.

    PubMed

    Van Engen, A G; Diddams, S A; Clement, T S

    1998-08-20

    We measure the second- and third-order dispersion coefficients, d(2)k/domega(2) and d(3)k/domega(3), of water for wavelengths from 0.45 to 1.3 mum using a Michelson white-light interferometer. In this interval, the second-order dispersion ranges from 0.068 to -0.1 fs(2)/mum, and the third-order dispersion ranges from 0.048 to 1.18 fs(3)/mum. We observe an oscillation in d(2)k/domega(2) near 1.1 mum that is due to water absorption features near that wavelength. From the dispersion coefficients, derivatives of the index of refraction of water are calculated and compared with available equations. These measured values of d(2)n/dlambda(2) and d(3)n/dlambda(3) should be useful in the evaluation and improvement of existing equations for n(lambda) in water.

  17. High-resolution Angle Measurement based on Michelson Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fang; Fan, Kuang-Chao

    In this paper a reconfigured Michelson interferometer for high-resolution angle measurement is proposed. The anglular displacement of the object mirror will cause optical path difference that generates interference. With an optical phase shift module the photodetectors will collect quadrature signals with 90° phase shift. With pulse counting and phase subdivision processing the optical path change can be calculated and then converted to anglular displacement. The proposed structure is also featured by its miniature design. The optical system is only 55 mm by 55 mm in area. In order to facilitate the alignment of optical components and improve the signal quality, a new optical bonding technology by mechanical fixture is proposed so that the optics can be permanently pressed together without air gap in between. Experiments show that the resolution is 0.01", the accuracy is less than 0.03", and the repeatability is within 0.1" for the measurement range of ± 50 arc seconds.

  18. Elastohydrodynamic film thickness measurements of artificially produced surface dents and grooves. [using optical interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, L. D.; Cusano, C.

    1978-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness measurements using optical interferometry were made of artificially produced dents and grooves under rolling and sliding conditions. These measurements are compared to stylus traces of the dent and groove profiles to determine the local deformation associated with micro-EHD pressure generation. The surface geometry associated with the dents and grooves became intimately involved in the lubrication process itself, creating local pressure variations that substantially deformed the local surface geometry, particularly under sliding conditions. The rolling results implied surface initiated fatigue, and the sliding results showed clearly the EHD surface interactions that must occur prior to scuffing failure.

  19. Two-wavelength method for endoscopic shape measurement by spatial phase-shifting speckle-interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kandulla, Jochen; Kemper, Björn; Knoche, Sabine; von Bally, Gert

    2004-10-10

    A two-wavelength method for endoscopic topography reconstruction is introduced that can be applied to out-of-plane sensitive electronic-speckle-pattern interferometry systems based on rigid endoscope imaging systems. The surface measurement is performed by detection of the phase-difference distribution affected by a change in the applied laser wavelength. Furthermore, the off-axis endoscopic illumination geometry is taken into account by an approximation. Experimental results of the characterization of the endoscopic surface reconstruction technique and the measurement accuracy obtained are described and discussed. Finally, the applicability of the method is demonstrated with results from the topographic reconstruction of a free-form surface. PMID:15508598

  20. Homodyne and heterodyne optical interferometry for frequency dependent piezoelectric displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahoussaye, Keith; Guo, Ruyan; Bhalla, Amar

    2014-09-01

    The electromechanical coupling in piezoelectric materials has been widely studied however a unified view of this interaction as function of frequencies using different measurement techniques has not previously been available. This study examines and compares multiple optical based homodyne and heterodyne interferometry techniques for displacement measurement over a wide range of frequencies and including a comparison made by using a commercial Laser Doppler Vibrometer. Ferroelectric lead titanate PbTiO3 with high ferroelectric strain is studied in this work. Frequency dependence of the electromechanical displacement is obtained using multiple techniques and the emphasis is given to near resonant frequency interrogations.

  1. Proposed Atom Interferometry Gravitational Wave Measurements Over a Single Baseline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2013-04-01

    A recent paper by Graham et al. [1] proposed gravitational wave measurements using an atom interferometer at each end of a single baseline between two spacecraft. The suggested approach makes use of extremely narrow linewidth single photon transitions, such as the 698 nm clock transition in Sr-87. A case discussed has a L = 500 km baseline length between spacecraft, N = 300 large momentum transfer beamsplitters, and a total measurement time of 100 s. The authors point out that many sources of errors in measuring GW signals cancel because they are nearly the same for both parts of the split atom wave functions and/or for both interferometers. Thus a much reduced sensitivity to laser frequency noise is reported. However, it seems that the requirements on this kind of mission are still very demanding. For example, large differences in phase between the 2 parts of the wave function for each interferometer are expected due to jitter in the timing of the laser pulses. This makes it more difficult to determine the sign of the desired GW signals. And, if the atom cloud temperature of 100 pK and the Rabi frequency of 500 Hz considered in previous papers are assumed, the fraction of the atoms contributing to the final signal would be small. This is because of the total of 2,400 successful state transitions required for each half of the wave function if N = 300 LMT beamsplitters are used. [1] P. W. Graham, J. M. Hogan, M. A. Kasevich, and S. Rajendran, arXiv:1206.0818v1 [gr-qc] 5 Jun 2012.

  2. Optical-mechanical properties of diseased cells measured by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Bishitz, Y.; Gabai, H.; Girshovitz, P.

    2013-04-01

    Interferometric phase microscopy (IPM) enables to obtain quantitative optical thickness profiles of transparent samples, including live cells in-vitro, and track them in time with sub-nanometer accuracy without any external labeling, contact or force application on the sample. The optical thickness measured by IPM is a multiplication between the cell integral refractive index differences and its physical thickness. Based on the time-dependent optical thickness profile, one can generate the optical thickness fluctuation map. For biological cells that are adhered to the surface, the variance of the physical thickness fluctuations in time is inversely proportional to the spring factor indicating on cell stiffness, where softer cells are expected fluctuating more than more rigid cells. For homogenous refractive index cells, such as red blood cells, we can calculate a map indicating on the cell stiffness per each spatial point on the cell. Therefore, it is possible to obtain novel diagnosis and monitoring tools for diseases changing the morphology and the mechanical properties of these cells such as malaria, certain types of anaemia and thalassemia. For cells with a complex refractive-index structure, such as cancer cells, decoupling refractive index and physical thickness is not possible in single-exposure mode. In these cases, we measure a closely related parameter, under the assumption that the refractive index does not change much within less than a second of measurement. Using these techniques, we lately found that cancer cells fluctuate significantly more than healthy cells, and that metastatic cancer cells fluctuate significantly more than primary cancer cells.

  3. Diffraction effects in length measurements by laser interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sasso, C P; Massa, E; Mana, G

    2016-03-21

    High-accuracy dimensional measurements by laser interferometers require corrections because of diffraction, which makes the effective fringe-period different from the wavelength of a plane (or spherical) wave λ0. By using a combined X-ray and optical interferometer as a tool to investigate diffraction across a laser beam, we observed wavelength variations as large as 10-8λ0. We show that they originate from the wavefront evolution under paraxial propagation in the presence of wavefront- and intensity-profile perturbations.

  4. Diffraction effects in length measurements by laser interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sasso, C P; Massa, E; Mana, G

    2016-03-21

    High-accuracy dimensional measurements by laser interferometers require corrections because of diffraction, which makes the effective fringe-period different from the wavelength of a plane (or spherical) wave λ0. By using a combined X-ray and optical interferometer as a tool to investigate diffraction across a laser beam, we observed wavelength variations as large as 10-8λ0. We show that they originate from the wavefront evolution under paraxial propagation in the presence of wavefront- and intensity-profile perturbations. PMID:27136842

  5. Measuring Diffusion of Liquids by Common-Path Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2003-01-01

    A method of observing the interdiffusion of a pair of miscible liquids is based on the use of a common-path interferometer (CPI) to measure the spatially varying gradient of the index refraction in the interfacial region in which the interdiffusion takes place. Assuming that the indices of refraction of the two liquids are different and that the gradient of the index of refraction of the liquid is proportional to the gradient in the relative concentrations of either liquid, the diffusivity of the pair of liquids can be calculated from the temporal variation of the spatial variation of the index of refraction. This method yields robust measurements and does not require precise knowledge of the indices of refraction of the pure liquids. Moreover, the CPI instrumentation is compact and is optomechanically robust by virtue of its common- path design. The two liquids are placed in a transparent rectangular parallelepiped test cell. Initially, the interface between the liquids is a horizontal plane, above which lies pure liquid 2 (the less-dense liquid) and below which lies pure liquid 1 (the denser liquid). The subsequent interdiffusion of the liquids gives rise to a gradient of concentration and a corresponding gradient of the index of refraction in a mixing layer. For the purpose of observing the interdiffusion, the test cell is placed in the test section of the CPI, in which a collimated, polarized beam of light from a low-power laser is projected horizontally through a region that contains the mixing layer.

  6. Slope measurement of bent plates using double grating shearing interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanotia, Jitendra; Prakash, Shashi; Rana, Santosh; Sasaki, Osami

    2011-06-20

    A grating-based shearing interferometeric setup for slope measurement of bent plates has been proposed. The specimen under test is illuminated by a collimated beam from the laser. Light reflected from the specimen passes through two identical holographic gratings placed in tandem. The grating frequency has been so chosen that the diffracted orders from each grating are separated out distinctly. Two first-order beams diffracted from each of the gratings superpose in space. In the resulting interferogram, the fringes due to slope information of the object are visualized. Mathematical formulation for experimental determination of slope values has been undertaken. Validation of the experimental results with theoretical predictions in case of cantilever beam provides good correlation. The main advantage of the technique has been the realization of very compact geometry without the need for spatial filtering arrangement commonly associated with the grating-based techniques used to date.

  7. Measurement of microresonator frequency comb coherence by spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Jang, J K; Anthony, J; Coen, S; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2016-01-15

    We experimentally investigate the spectral coherence of microresonator optical frequency combs. Specifically, we use a spectral interference method, typically used in the context of supercontinuum generation, to explore the variation of the magnitude of the complex degree of first-order coherence across the full comb bandwidth. We measure the coherence of two different frequency combs and observe wholly different coherence characteristics. In particular, we find that the observed dynamical regimes are similar to the stable and unstable modulation instability regimes reported in previous theoretical studies. Results from numerical simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. In addition to demonstrating a new technique to assess comb stability, our results provide strong experimental support for previous theoretical analyses. PMID:26766693

  8. Laser wakefield excitation and measurement by femtosecond longitudinal interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Le Blanc, S.P.; Fisher, D.; Tajima, T.; Downer, M.C.; Babine, A.; Stepanov, A.; Sergeev, A.

    1996-04-01

    Plasma density oscillations (Langmuir waves) in the wake of an intense (I{sub peak} {approximately} 3 {times} 10{sup 17}W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulse (100 fs) are measured with ultrafast time resolution using a longitudinal interferometric technique. Phase shifts consistent with large amplitude ({delta}n{sub e}/n{sub e} {approximately} 1) density waves at the electron plasma frequency were observed in a fully tunnel-ionized He plasma, corresponding to longitudinal electric fields of {approximately} 10 GV/m. Strong radial ponderomotive forces enhance the density oscillations. As this technique utilizes a necessary component of any laser-based plasma accelerator, it promises to be a powerful tool for on-line monitoring and control of future plasma-based particle accelerators.

  9. Francis M. Pipkin Award Talk - Precision Measurement with Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger

    2015-05-01

    Atom interferometers are relatives of Young's double-slit experiment that use matter waves. They leverage light-atom interactions to masure fundamental constants, test fundamental symmetries, sense weak fields such as gravity and the gravity gradient, search for elusive ``fifth forces,'' and potentially test properties of antimatter and detect gravitational waves. We will discuss large (multiphoton-) momentum transfer that can enhance sensitivity and accuracy of atom interferometers several thousand fold. We will discuss measuring the fine structure constant to sub-part per billion precision and how it tests the standard model of particle physics. Finally, there has been interest in light bosons as candidates for dark matter and dark energy; atom interferometers have favorable sensitivity in searching for those fields. As a first step, we present our experiment ruling out chameleon fields and a broad class of other theories that would reproduce the observed dark energy density.

  10. Research on the measurement of thin film thickness based on phaseshift interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi-lei; Su, Jun-hong; Yang, Li-hong; Xu, Jun-qi

    2009-05-01

    Only by solving the problem of accurate measurement of thin film thickness, will it be possible to solve the problem of thin film preparation. A novel measurement method of thin film thickness based on phase-shift interferometry is presented in the paper. Taking advantage of Twyman-Green interferometer, the multi-frame interferogram measured the thin film can be obtained by receiving the interference fringes of thin film by means of CCD and using digital acquisition card to collect interferogram and with the help of computer control PZT driver and modulation piezoelectric regulator to promote reference mirror uniformly-spaced movement. After the gained interferogram were disposed of phase unwrapped, 3D wavefront containing the information of thin film thickness can be obtained. According to the characteristics between the thin film thickness and the unwrapping phase, taking advantage of the overlapping 4-frame average algorithm, corresponding relationships between the quantification phase information and thin film thickness of each point has been established to realize the thin film thickness accurate measurement. The results show that this method has the advantage of non-contact, the high accuracy, not only has testified the feasibility of film thickness measurement with phase-shift interferometry, but also has further ensured research and optimization of the thin film preparation technics. The PV and RMS value of the measured thin film thickness are 0.162μm and 0.043μm respectively.

  11. Surface measurement of indium tin oxide thin film by wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2015-08-10

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been widely used in displays such as liquid crystal displays and touch panels because of their favorable electrical conductivity and optical transparency. The surface shape and thickness of ITO thin films must be precisely measured to improve their reliability and performance. Conventional measurement techniques take single point measurements and require expensive systems. In this paper, we measure the surface shape of an ITO thin film on top of a transparent plate using wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometry. The surface shape was determined by compensating for the phase error introduced by optical interference from the thin film, which was calculated using the phase and amplitude distributions measured by wavelength-tuning. The proposed measurement method achieved noncontact, large-aperture, and precise measurements of transparent thin films. The surface shape of the sample was experimentally measured to an accuracy of 5.13 nm. PMID:26368388

  12. Cell volume and plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in epithelial cell layers measured by interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Farinas, J; Verkman, A S

    1996-01-01

    The development of strategies to measure plasma membrane osmotic water permeability (Pf) in epithelial cells has been motivated by the identification of a family of molecular water channels. A general approach utilizing interferometry to measure cell shape and volume was developed and applied to measure Pf in cell layers. The method is based on the cell volume dependence of optical path length (OPL) for a light beam passing through the cell. The small changes in OPL were measured by interferometry. A mathematical model was developed to relate the interference signal to cell volume changes for cells of arbitrary shape and size. To validate the model, a Mach-Zehnder interference microscope was used to image OPL in an Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell layer and to reconstruct the three-dimensional cell shape (OPL resolution < lambda/25). As predicted by the model, a doubling of cell volume resulted in a change in OPL that was proportional to the difference in refractive indices between water and the extracellular medium. The time course of relative cell volume in response to an osmotic gradient was computed from serial interference images. To measure cell volume without microscopy and image analysis, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was constructed in which one of two interfering laser beams passed through a flow chamber containing the cell layer. The interference signal in response to an osmotic gradient was analyzed to quantify the time course of relative cell volume. The calculated MDCK cell plasma membrane Pf of 6.1 x 10(-4) cm/s at 24 degrees C agreed with that obtained by interference microscopy and by a total internal reflection fluorescence method. Interferometry was also applied to measure the apical plasma membrane water permeability of intact toad urinary bladder; Pf increased fivefold after forskolin stimulation to 0.04 cm/s at 23 degrees C. These results establish and validate the application of interferometry to quantify cell volume and osmotic water

  13. Measurement of elasto-plastic deformations by speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bova, Marco; Bruno, Luigi; Poggialini, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    In the paper the authors present an experimental equipment for elasto-plastic characterization of engineering materials by tensile tests. The stress state is imposed to a dog bone shaped specimen by a testing machine fixed on the optical table and designed for optimizing the performance of a speckle interferometer. All three displacement components are measured by a portable speckle interferometer fed by three laser diodes of 50 mW, by which the deformations of a surface of about 6×8 mm2 can be fully analyzed in details. All the equipment is driven by control electronics designed and realized on purpose, by which it is possible to accurately modify the intensity of the illumination sources, the position of a PZT actuator necessary for applying phase-shifting procedure, and the overall displacement applied to the specimen. The experiments were carried out in National Instrument LabVIEW environment, while the processing of the experimental data in Wolfram Mathematica environment. The paper reports the results of the elasto-plastic characterization of a high strength steel specimen.

  14. Surface topographical changes measured by phase-locked interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Fung, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    An electronic optical laser interferometer capable of resolving depth differences of as low as 30 A and planar displacements of 6000 A was constructed to examine surface profiles of bearing surfaces without physical contact. Topological chemical reactivity was determined by applying a drop of dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid and measuring the profile of the solid surface before and after application of this probe. Scuffed bearing surfaces reacted much faster than virgin ones but that bearing surfaces exposed to lubricants containing an organic chloride reacted much more slowly. The reactivity of stainless steel plates, heated in a nitrogen atmosphere to different temperatures, were examined later at ambient temperature. The change of surface contour as a result of the probe reaction followed Arrhenius-type relation with respect to heat treatment temperature. The contact area of the plate of a ball/plate sliding elastohydrodynamic contact run on trimethylopropane triheptanoate with or without additives was optically profiled periodically. As scuffing was approached, the change of profile within the contact region changed much more rapidly by the acid probe and assumed a constant high value after scuffing. A nonetching metallurgical phase was found in the scuff mark, which was apparently responsible for the high reactivity.

  15. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  16. A laser interferometer for measuring straightness and its position based on heterodyne interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Benyong; Zhang Enzheng; Yan Liping; Li Chaorong; Tang Wuhua; Feng Qibo

    2009-11-15

    Not only the magnitude but also the position of straightness errors are of concern to users. However, current laser interferometers used for measuring straightness seldom give the relative position of the straightness error. To solve this problem, a laser interferometer for measuring straightness and its position based on heterodyne interferometry is proposed. The optical configuration of the interferometer is designed and the measurement principle is analyzed theoretically. Two experiments were carried out. The first experiment verifies the validity and repeatability of the interferometer by measuring a linear stage. Also, the second one for measuring a flexure-hinge stage demonstrates that the interferometer is capable of nanometer measurement accuracy. These results show that this interferometer has advantages of simultaneously measuring straightness error and the relative position with high precision, and a compact structure.

  17. Measurement of volume resistivity/conductivity of metallic alloy in inhibited seawater by optical interferometry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, K.

    2011-03-15

    Optical interferometry techniques were used for the first time to measure the volume resistivity/conductivity of carbon steel samples in seawater with different concentrations of a corrosion inhibitor. In this investigation, the real-time holographic interferometry was carried out to measure the thickness of anodic dissolved layer or the total thickness, U{sub total}, of formed oxide layer of carbon steel samples during the alternating current (ac) impedance of the samples in blank seawater and in 5-20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater, respectively. In addition, a mathematical model was derived in order to correlate between the ac impedance (resistance) and the surface (orthogonal) displacement of the surface of the samples in solutions. In other words, a proportionality constant [resistivity ({rho}) or conductivity ({sigma})= 1/{rho}] between the determined ac impedance [by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique] and the orthogonal displacement (by the optical interferometry techniques) was obtained. The value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample in the blank seawater was found similar to the value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample air, around 1 x 10{sup -5}{Omega} cm. On the contrary, the measured values of the resistivity of the carbon steel samples were 1.85 x 10{sup 7}, 3.35 x 10{sup 7}, and 1.7 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm in 5, 10, and 20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater solutions, respectively. Furthermore, the determined value range of {rho} of the formed oxide layers, from 1.7 x 10{sup 7} to 3.35 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm, is found in a reasonable agreement with the one found in literature for the Fe oxide-hydroxides, i.e., goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and for the lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm. The {rho} value of the Fe oxide-hydroxides, 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm, was found slightly higher than the {rho} value range of the formed oxide layer of the present study. This is because the former value was determined

  18. Mode-shape measurement of piezoelectric plate using temporal speckle pattern interferometry and temporal standard deviation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Yuan; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2011-11-01

    This study proposes an image processing method to improve the quality of interference fringes in mode-shape measurement using temporal speckle pattern interferometry. A vibrating piezoelectric plate at resonance was investigated, and the full-field optical information was saved as a sequence of images. According to derived statistical properties, an algorithm was developed to remove noise from both the background and disturbance, resulting in high-resolution images of excellent quality. In addition, the resonant frequency and mode shape obtained using the proposed algorithm demonstrate excellent agreement with theoretical results obtained by the finite element method. PMID:22048391

  19. Coda wave interferometry for the measurement of thermally induced ultrasonic velocity variations in CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, Richard; Dayal, Vinay; Barnard, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic velocity measurement is a well-established method to measure properties and estimate strength as well as detect and locate damage. Determination of accurate and repeatable ultrasonic wave velocities can be difficult due to the influence of environmental and experimental factors. Diffuse fields created by a multiple scattering environment have been shown to be sensitive to homogeneous strain fields such as those caused by temperature variations, and Coda Wave Interferometry has been used to measure the thermally induced ultrasonic velocity variation in concrete, aluminum, and the Earth's crust. In this work, we analyzed the influence of several parameters of the experimental configuration on the measurement of thermally induced ultrasonic velocity variations in a carbon-fiber reinforced polymer plate. Coda Wave Interferometry was used to determine the relative velocity change between a baseline signal taken at room temperature and the signal taken at various temperatures. The influence of several parameters of the experimental configuration, such as the material type, the receiver aperture size, and fiber orientation on the results of the processing algorithm was evaluated in order to determine the optimal experimental configuration.---This work is supported by the NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Program of the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University.

  20. Self-mixing interferometry for rotational speed measurement of servo drives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Liu, Ji-Gou; Zhang, Quan; Kennel, Ralph

    2016-01-10

    Self-mixing interferometry (SMI) is an efficient technique applied to measure distance, velocity, displacement, and vibration. In this work, a compact and low cost SMI is applied to measure the rotational speed of a servo drive up to 6000 RPM. The application of SMI to rotational speed measurement of servo drives instead of the usage of incremental encoders is proposed. The Doppler frequency is obtained via analysis on the power spectral density, which is estimated by the smoothing periodogram method based on the fast Fourier transformation. The signals are processed in MATLAB and LABVIEW, showing that the SMI can be applied to dynamic rotational speed measurement of servo drives. Results of experiments demonstrate that this system is implementable for rotational speed measurement over the whole range from 3 RPM to 6000 RPM. In addition, the system used to measure rotational speed can also accurately record changes in position without integrating the velocity. PMID:26835757

  1. Multiplexed low coherence interferometry instrument for measuring microbicide gel thickness distribution.

    PubMed

    Drake, Tyler K; Robles, Francisco E; Wax, Adam

    2009-04-01

    We present a Fourier-domain, multiplexed low coherence interferometry (LCI) instrument designed for application to intravaginal measurement of microbicidal gel distribution. Microbicide gels are topical products developed to combat sexually transmitted diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, by acting as delivery vehicles for active drugs and barrier layers to vaginal tissue. Measuring microbicide gel vaginal distribution is key to understanding the gel's biological effectiveness. This study presents a new LCI system for measuring gel distribution that uses six multiplexed channels to achieve broad area scanning without the need for a mechanical scanner. The presented results characterize the performance of the Fourier-domain multiplexed LCI system in measuring gel thickness distribution. The system demonstrates good optical signal-to-noise ratio, steady performance across all channels, negligible cross talk, and accurate measurement with micrometer scale resolution. The potential impact of using a multiplexed LCI system for in vivo measurements is also discussed. PMID:19340102

  2. Ultrafast measurements of optical spectral coherence by single-shot time-stretch interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiqing; Wei, Xiaoming; Ren, Zhibo; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2016-01-01

    The palette of laser technology has significantly been enriched by the innovations in ultrafast optical pulse generation. Our knowledge of the complex pulse dynamics, which is often highly nonlinear and stochastic in nature, is however limited by the scarcity of technologies that can measure fast variation/fluctuation of the spectral phase (or coherence) and amplitude in real-time, continuously. To achieve this goal, we demonstrate ultrafast interferometry enabled by optical time-stretch for real- time spectral coherence characterization with microsecond-resolution. Accessing the single-shot interferograms continuously, it further reveals the degree of second-order coherence, defined by the cross-spectral density function, at high speed-a capability absent in any existing spectroscopic measurement tools. As the technique can simultaneously measure both the high-speed variations of spectrally resolved coherence and intensity, time-stretch interferometry could create a new arena for ultrafast pulse characterization, especially favorable for probing and understanding the non-repetitive or stochastic dynamics in real-time. PMID:27295560

  3. Ultrafast measurements of optical spectral coherence by single-shot time-stretch interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiqing; Wei, Xiaoming; Ren, Zhibo; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    The palette of laser technology has significantly been enriched by the innovations in ultrafast optical pulse generation. Our knowledge of the complex pulse dynamics, which is often highly nonlinear and stochastic in nature, is however limited by the scarcity of technologies that can measure fast variation/fluctuation of the spectral phase (or coherence) and amplitude in real-time, continuously. To achieve this goal, we demonstrate ultrafast interferometry enabled by optical time-stretch for real- time spectral coherence characterization with microsecond-resolution. Accessing the single-shot interferograms continuously, it further reveals the degree of second-order coherence, defined by the cross-spectral density function, at high speed-a capability absent in any existing spectroscopic measurement tools. As the technique can simultaneously measure both the high-speed variations of spectrally resolved coherence and intensity, time-stretch interferometry could create a new arena for ultrafast pulse characterization, especially favorable for probing and understanding the non-repetitive or stochastic dynamics in real-time. PMID:27295560

  4. Ultrafast measurements of optical spectral coherence by single-shot time-stretch interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yiqing; Wei, Xiaoming; Ren, Zhibo; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-06-01

    The palette of laser technology has significantly been enriched by the innovations in ultrafast optical pulse generation. Our knowledge of the complex pulse dynamics, which is often highly nonlinear and stochastic in nature, is however limited by the scarcity of technologies that can measure fast variation/fluctuation of the spectral phase (or coherence) and amplitude in real-time, continuously. To achieve this goal, we demonstrate ultrafast interferometry enabled by optical time-stretch for real- time spectral coherence characterization with microsecond-resolution. Accessing the single-shot interferograms continuously, it further reveals the degree of second-order coherence, defined by the cross-spectral density function, at high speed-a capability absent in any existing spectroscopic measurement tools. As the technique can simultaneously measure both the high-speed variations of spectrally resolved coherence and intensity, time-stretch interferometry could create a new arena for ultrafast pulse characterization, especially favorable for probing and understanding the non-repetitive or stochastic dynamics in real-time.

  5. Development of an angular displacement measurement technique through birefringence heterodyne interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hung-Lin; Lee, Ju-Yi; Chen, Lin-Yu; Yang, Yang

    2016-04-01

    An angular displacement measurement sensor with high resolution for large range measurement is presented. The design concept of the proposed method is based on the birefringence effect and phase detection of heterodyne interferometry. High system symmetry and simple operation can be easily achieved by employing an innovative sandwich optical design for the angular sensor. To evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed method, several experiments were performed. The experimental results demonstrate that our angular displacement measurement sensor can achieve a measurement range greater than 26°. Considering the high-frequency noise, the measurement resolution of the system is approximately 1.2° × 10-4. Because of the common-path arrangement, our proposed method can provide superior immunity against environmental disturbances. PMID:27136979

  6. Land subsidence in Houston, Texas, measured by radar interferometry and constrained by extensometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Sean M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott; Tapley, Byron D.

    2003-11-01

    We present results from a radar interferometry study over the Houston-Galveston, Texas Gulf Coast region. From the nearly 60 potential interferograms considered, an atmospheric artifact assessment is performed and a tractable set of interferograms selected for detailed processing and error analysis. The subsequent interferogram time series spanning 1996-1998 is constrained by coincident extensometer data with root-mean-square error less than 2.5 mm. The interferogram time series confirms that historic subsidence in east Houston has stopped. Consistent with current groundwater use patterns, broad-scale subsidence bowls are observed in west and northwest Houston, where maximum subsidence rates are in excess of 2 and 4 cm yr-1, respectively. Linear interferogram phase signatures associated with approximately 1 cm of differential subsidence across faults, including the Long Point fault in northwest Houston, are observed. Near the Seabrook extensometer, a hereto-unidentified subsidence bowl with a maximum subsidence rate in excess of 3 cm yr-1 is revealed. This study demonstrates that when used in conjunction with a set of traditional geodetic measurements, radar interferometry can measure the spatial and temporal evolution of urban land subsidence within even the most challenging of environments.

  7. Versatile chromatic dispersion measurement of a single mode fiber using spectral white light interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Dug Young

    2006-11-27

    We present a versatile and accurate chromatic dispersion measurement method for single mode optical fibers over a wide spectral range (200 nm) using a spectral domain white light interferometer. This technique is based on spectral interferometry with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer setup and a broad band light source. It takes less than a second to obtain a spectral interferogram for a few tens of centimeter length fiber sample. We have demonstrated that the relative group velocity, the chromatic dispersion and the dispersion slope of a sample fiber can be obtained very accurately regardless of the zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of a sample after frequency dependent optical phase was directly retrieved from a spectral interferogram. The measured results with our proposed method were compared with those obtained with a conventional time-domain dispersion measurement method. A good agreement between those results indicates that our proposed method can measure the chromatic dispersion of a short length optical fiber with very high accuracy.

  8. Cellular organization and substructure measured using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Wax, Adam; Yang, Changhuei; Backman, Vadim; Badizadegan, Kamran; Boone, Charles W; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2002-01-01

    We measure the organization and substructure of HT29 epithelial cells in a monolayer using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry. This new technique probes cellular structure by measuring scattered light, as in flow cytometry, but offers an advantage in that the structure can be examined in situ, avoiding the need to disrupt the cell monolayer. We determine the size distribution of the cell nuclei by fitting measured light-scattering spectra to the predictions of Mie theory. In addition, we obtain information about the cellular organization and substructure by examining the spatial correlations within the monolayer. A remarkable finding is that the spatial correlations over small length scales take the form of an inverse power law, indicating the fractal nature of the packing of the subcellular structures. We also identify spatial correlations on a scale large compared with the size of a cell, indicating an overlying order within the monolayer. PMID:11916880

  9. Dispersive white-light interferometry for absolute distance measurement with dielectric multilayer systems on the target.

    PubMed

    Schnell, U; Dändliker, R; Gray, S

    1996-04-01

    We have extended the use of a dispersive white-light interferometer for absolute distance measurement to include effects of dielectric multilayer systems on the target. The phase of the ref lected wave changes as a function of wavelength and layer thickness and causes errors in the interferometric distance measurement. With dispersive white-light interferometry these effects can be measured in situ, and the correct mechanical distance can be determined. The effects of thin films deposited upon the target have been investigated for one and two layers (photoresist and SiO(2) upon Si). Experimental results show that the thicknesses of these layers can also be determined with an accuracy of the order of 10 nm.

  10. A research of weak absorption measurements in crystal based on photothermal interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Liu, Zongkai; Wang, Shiwu

    2013-07-01

    It is important for testing the process of crystal growing and crystal quality. This paper built a mathematical model based on principle of photothermal common-path interferometry, the index change induced in the crystal by the heating pump beam and the phase distortion of probe beam in the heated area are presented then obtain the intensity distribution of the interference in the near filed. Optical geometry of focusing pump beam and intersecting pump and probe beams at waist position of the pump beam is used. This optical instruction can be adjusted easily and stabilized. Now CRYSTECH have the largest NLO crystals product line in the world, especially KTP crystals. With absorption measurements in nonlinear laser crystal KTP as an example to investigate the experimental parameters affecting the photothermal interference signal and high measuring precision. The analysis of experimental data showed this kind of instruction can reach the measurement accuracy of 0.1ppm.

  11. Oblique frequency domain interferometry measurements using the middle and upper atmosphere radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. D.; Fukao, S.; Larsen, M. F.; Yamamoto, M.; Tsuda, T.; Kato, S.

    1992-09-01

    First results are presented from oblique frequency domain interferometry (FDI) measurements conducted using the middle and upper atmosphere radar in Japan in October 1990. Using the idea of Doppler sorting, an equation is derived which shows a parabolic variation of the oblique FDI cross-spectral phase as a function of Doppler velocity. However, because of the small range of Doppler velocities observed with the measured cross spectra, the phase has an approximate linear variation; that is, the cross spectra sample only a small portion of the parabolic structure and are therefore approximately linear and are shown to follow the model closely. Using the oblique FDI configuration, a comparison is drawn between simultaneous measurements of signal-to-noise ratio, coherence, three-dimensional wind, and profiles of FDI cross spectra. We find that the regions that exhibit a well-defined scattering layer correspond to those regions of high aspect sensitivity. An explanation is suggested based on the anisotropy of the turbulence.

  12. Residual Stress Measurements with Laser Speckle Correlation Interferometry and Local Heat Treating

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.; Miller, R.F.; Vikram, C.S.

    1994-01-06

    A new experimental technique has been devised to measure residual stresses in ductile materials with a combination of laser speckle pattern interferometry and spot heating. The speckle pattern interferometer measures in-plane deformations while the heating provides for very localized stress relief. The residual stresses are determined by the amount of strain that is measured subsequent to the heating and cool-down of the region being interrogated. A simple lumped parameter model is presented to provide a description of the method. This description is followed by presentations of the results of finite element analyses and experimental results with uniaxial test specimens. Excellent agreement between the experiments and the computer analyses were obtained.

  13. Optical-mechanical signatures of cancer cells based on fluctuation profiles measured by interferometry.

    PubMed

    Bishitz, Yael; Gabai, Haniel; Girshovitz, Pinhas; Shaked, Natan T

    2014-08-01

    We propose to establish a cancer biomarker based on the unique optical-mechanical signatures of cancer cells measured in a noncontact, label-free manner by optical interferometry. Using wide-field interferometric phase microscopy (IPM), implemented by a portable, off-axis, common-path and low-coherence interferometric module, we quantitatively measured the time-dependent, nanometer-scale optical thickness fluctuation maps of live cells in vitro. We found that cancer cells fluctuate significantly more than healthy cells, and that metastatic cancer cells fluctuate significantly more than primary cancer cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements validated the results. Our study shows the potential of IPM as a simple clinical tool for aiding in diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. PMID:23585163

  14. Comparison of anterior segment measurements using rotating Scheimpflug imaging and partial coherence interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Mohammad; Hashemi, Hassan; Mehravaran, Shiva; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Shariati, Mohammad; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    AIM To compare central corneal thickness (CCT) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) measurements using rotating Scheimpflug imaging and partial coherence interferometry. METHODS As part of the first phase of Shahroud Eye Cohort Study with 5 190 subjects of 40 to 64 years of age, CCT and ACD were measured using Scheimpflug imaging with the Pentacam (Oculus, Inc., Lynnwood, WA, USA) and partial coherence interferometry with the Allegro BioGraph (Wavelight, Erlangen, Germany). RESULTS After applying exclusion criteria, we had data of 4 387 subjects with a mean age of 50.7±6.2 years. Mean CCT with Pentacam and BioGraph were 528.6±33.2µm and 525.6±32µm respectively; the difference was statistically significant (P<0.001), but the correlation was high (R=0.920). Mean ACD measurements using Pentacam and BioGraph were 2.68±0.35mm and 2.62±0.33mm respectively; the inter-device difference was significant (P<0.001) with high correlation (R=0.944). The 95% limits of agreements between devices were -22.65µm to 28.61µm and -0.16mm to 0.29mm for CCT and ACD measurements, respectively. CONCLUSION For both CCT and ACD, the BioGraph gave significantly lower values than the Pentacam (P<0.05). Despite the high inter-device correlation, the 95% limits of agreements were wide, and this may limit their interchangeability in measuring the CCT and ACD. PMID:23991388

  15. Optical Feedback Interferometry for Velocity Measurement of Parallel Liquid-Liquid Flows in a Microchannel.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Perchoux, Julien; Loubière, Karine; Tronche, Clément; Prat, Laurent; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Optical feedback interferometry (OFI) is a compact sensing technique with recent implementation for flow measurements in microchannels. We propose implementing OFI for the analysis at the microscale of multiphase flows starting with the case of parallel flows of two immiscible fluids. The velocity profiles in each phase were measured and the interface location estimated for several operating conditions. To the authors knowledge, this sensing technique is applied here for the first time to multiphase flows. Theoretical profiles issued from a model based on the Couette viscous flow approximation reproduce fairly well the experimental results. The sensing system and the analysis presented here provide a new tool for studying more complex interactions between immiscible fluids (such as liquid droplets flowing in a microchannel). PMID:27527178

  16. Surface topography measurement based on color images processing in white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tong; Gu, Yue; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-05-01

    Microstructure surface topography is a key aspect of micro-nano measuring research for it has an obvious influence on the performance and quality of micro-nano devices. Scanning white light interferometry is a common method of testing surface profiling. In this paper, a color CCD camera, rather than a black-and-white CCD camera, was utilized to acquire white light interference images, which contain information of RGB channels. Based on acquired color interference images, wavelet transform method was employed to calculate phase value of corresponding channel in each scanning position. Then zero-optical-path-difference positions were accurately determined via a constructed evaluation function and least square method. Surface topography was eventually obtained via linear relationship of relative height and the zero-optical-path-difference position. The proposed method was verified by simulation and experiment of measuring standard step provided by VLSI Standards Incorporated.

  17. In Situ Frequency Measurement of Inidividual Nanostructures Using Fiber Optical Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas; Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for the resonance frequency measurement of nanocantilevers, which displays both high spatial selectivity and sensitivity to specimen vibrations by utilizing a tapered uncoated fiber tip. The spatial selectivity is determined by the tip geometry, the high sensitivity to vibrations stems from interference of wave fronts reflected on the specimen and on the fiber tip itself. No reference plane on the specimen is needed, as demonstrated with the example of a freestanding silicon nitride cantilever. The resulting system is integrated in the DB-235 dual beam FIB system, thus allowing the measurement of sample responses in-situ, during observation in SEM mode. By combining optical interferometry and narrow band RF amplification and detection, we demonstrate an exceptional vibrational sensitivity at high spatial resolution.

  18. Optical Feedback Interferometry for Velocity Measurement of Parallel Liquid-Liquid Flows in a Microchannel.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Perchoux, Julien; Loubière, Karine; Tronche, Clément; Prat, Laurent; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2016-08-04

    Optical feedback interferometry (OFI) is a compact sensing technique with recent implementation for flow measurements in microchannels. We propose implementing OFI for the analysis at the microscale of multiphase flows starting with the case of parallel flows of two immiscible fluids. The velocity profiles in each phase were measured and the interface location estimated for several operating conditions. To the authors knowledge, this sensing technique is applied here for the first time to multiphase flows. Theoretical profiles issued from a model based on the Couette viscous flow approximation reproduce fairly well the experimental results. The sensing system and the analysis presented here provide a new tool for studying more complex interactions between immiscible fluids (such as liquid droplets flowing in a microchannel).

  19. Comparison between x-ray scattering and velocity-interferometry measurements from shocked liquid deuterium.

    PubMed

    Falk, K; Regan, S P; Vorberger, J; Crowley, B J B; Glenzer, S H; Hu, S X; Murphy, C D; Radha, P B; Jephcoat, A P; Wark, J S; Gericke, D O; Gregori, G

    2013-04-01

    The equation of state of light elements is essential to understand the structure of Jovian planets and inertial confinement fusion research. The Omega laser was used to drive a planar shock wave in the cryogenically cooled deuterium, creating warm dense matter conditions. X-ray scattering was used to determine the spectrum near the boundary of the collective and noncollective scattering regimes using a narrow band x-ray source in backscattering geometry. Our scattering spectra are thus sensitive to the individual electron motion as well as the collective plasma behavior and provide a measurement of the electron density, temperature, and ionization state. Our data are consistent with velocity-interferometry measurements previously taken on the same shocked deuterium conditions and presented by K. Falk et al. [High Energy Density Phys. 8, 76 (2012)]. This work presents a comparison of the two diagnostic systems and offers a detailed discussion of challenges encountered. PMID:23679534

  20. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample.

  1. Optical Feedback Interferometry for Velocity Measurement of Parallel Liquid-Liquid Flows in a Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E.; Perchoux, Julien; Loubière, Karine; Tronche, Clément; Prat, Laurent; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Optical feedback interferometry (OFI) is a compact sensing technique with recent implementation for flow measurements in microchannels. We propose implementing OFI for the analysis at the microscale of multiphase flows starting with the case of parallel flows of two immiscible fluids. The velocity profiles in each phase were measured and the interface location estimated for several operating conditions. To the authors knowledge, this sensing technique is applied here for the first time to multiphase flows. Theoretical profiles issued from a model based on the Couette viscous flow approximation reproduce fairly well the experimental results. The sensing system and the analysis presented here provide a new tool for studying more complex interactions between immiscible fluids (such as liquid droplets flowing in a microchannel). PMID:27527178

  2. High sensitivity resonance frequency measurements of individualmicro-cantilevers using fiber optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2009-03-04

    We describe a setup for the resonance frequency measurement of individual microcantilevers. The setup displays both high spatial selectivity and sensitivity to specimen vibrations by utilizing a tapered uncoated fiber tip. The high sensitivity to specimen vibrations is achieved by the combination of optical Fabry-Perot interferometry and narrow band RF detection. Wave fronts reflected on the specimen and on the fiber tip end face interfere, thus no reference plane on the specimen is needed, as demonstrated with the example of freestanding silicon nitride micro-cantilevers. The resulting system is integrated in a DB-235 dual beam FIB system, thereby allowing the measurement of micro-cantilever responses during observation in SEM mode. The FIB was used to modify the optical fiber tip. At this point of our RF system development, the microcantilevers used to characterize the detector were not modified in situ.

  3. Interseismic deformation of the Shahroud fault system (NE Iran) from space-borne radar interferometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Z.; Pathier, E.; Walker, R. T.; Walpersdorf, A.; Tavakoli, F.; Nankali, H.; Sedighi, M.; Doin, M.-P.

    2015-07-01

    The Shahroud fault system is a major active structure in the Alborz range of NE Iran whose slip rate is not well constrained despite its potential high seismic hazard. In order to constrain the slip rate of the eastern Shahroud fault zone, we use space-borne synthetic aperture radar interferometry with both ascending and descending Envisat data to determine the rate of interseismic strain accumulation across the system. We invert the slip rate from surface velocity measurements using a half-space elastic dislocation model. The modeling results are consistent with a left-lateral slip rate of 4.75 ± 0.8 mm/yr on the Abr and Jajarm, strands of the Shahroud fault, with a 10 ± 4 km locking depth. This is in good agreement with the 4-6 mm/yr of left-lateral displacement rate accumulated across the total Shahroud fault system obtained from GPS measurements.

  4. The use of holographic interferometry for measurements of temperature in a rectangular heat pipe. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marn, Jure

    1989-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a nonintrusive method and as such possesses considerable advantages such as not disturbing the velocity and temperature field by creating obstacles which would alter the flow field. These optical methods have disadvantages as well. Holography, as one of the interferometry methods, retains the accuracy of older methods, and at the same time eliminates the system error of participating components. The holographic interferometry consists of comparing the objective beam with the reference beam and observing the difference in lengths of optical paths, which can be observed during the propagation of the light through a medium with locally varying refractive index. Thus, change in refractive index can be observed as a family of nonintersecting surfaces in space (wave fronts). The object of the investigation was a rectangular heat pipe. The goal was to measure temperatures in the heat pipe, which yields data for computer code or model assessment. The results were obtained by calculating the temperatures by means of finite fringes.

  5. The measurement of the diameter change of a piezoelectric transducer cylinder with the white-light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Abdelaziz; Jiang, Yi; Liu, Yuewu; Wang, Zhen

    2014-05-01

    The measurement of the diameter change of a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) cylinder with the white-light interferometry is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. One arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is wrapped on the PZT cylinder, and the phase change of the interferogram of the MZI is used to determine the diameter change when a DC voltage is applied on the PZT cylinder. The Fourier transform white-light interferometry is used for recovering the phase change of the interferometer. The experimental results show that the diameter change resolution of 0.8 nm for the PZT cylinder with diameter of 40 mm is achieved.

  6. Measuring neoplastic transformation in the hamster cheek pouch using Fourier domain low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Robert N.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Brown, William; Wax, Adam

    2008-02-01

    Fourier Domain Low Coherence Interferometry (fLCI) is a promising technique which combines the depth resolution of low coherence interferometry with the sensitivity of light scattering spectroscopy for probing the health of epithelial tissue layers. Our new fLCI system configuration utilizes a white light Xe arc lamp source and a 4-f interferometer which re-images light scattered from the sample onto the detection plane. The system employs an imaging spectrometer at the detection plane to acquire depth resolved profiles from 252 adjacent spatial points without the need for any scanning. The limited spatial coherence of the light source requires the resolution of adjacent spatial points for the generation of depth information. Depth-resolved spectral information is recovered by performing a short-time Fourier transform on the detected spectra, similar to spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Wavelength dependent variations in scattering intensity are analyzed as a function of depth to obtain information about the neoplastic transformation of the probed cells. Previous studies have demonstrated fLCI as an excellent technique for probing the scatterer morphology of simple phantoms and of in vitro cancer cell monolayers. We now seek to assess the ability of the new fLCI system to measure the health of subsurface tissue layers using the hamster cheek pouch model. Seven hamsters will have one cheek pouch treated with the known carcinogen DMBA. At the conclusion of the 24 week treatment period the animals will be anesthetized and the cheek pouches will be extracted. We will use the fLCI optical system to measure the neoplastic transformation of the in situ subsurface tissue layers in both the normal and DMBA-treated cheek pouches. Traditional histological analysis will be used to verify the fLCI measurements. We expect our results to establish the feasibility of fLCI to distinguish between healthy and dysplastic epithelial tissues in the hamster cheek pouch.

  7. Surface Deformation and Coherence Measurements of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, from SIR-C Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Zebker, H. A.; Webb, F. H.; Fielding, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    The shuttle imaging radar C/X synthetic aperture radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) radar on board the space shuttle Endeavor imaged Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, in April and October 1994 for the purpose of measuring active surface deformation by the methods of repeat-pass differential radar interferometry. Observations at 24 cm (L band) and 5.6 cm (C band) wavelengths were reduced to interferograms showing apparent surface deformation over the 6-month interval and over a succession of 1-day intervals in October. A statistically significant local phase signature in the 6-month interferogram is coincident with the Pu'u O'o lava vent. Interpreted as deformation, the signal implies centimeter-scale deflation in an area several kilometers wide surrounding the vent. Peak deflation is roughly 14 cm if the deformation is purely vertical, centered southward of the Pu'u O'o caldera. Delays in the radar signal phase induced by atmospheric refractivity anomalies introduce spurious apparent deformation signatures, at the level of 12 cm peak-to-peak in the radar line-of-sight direction. Though the phase observations are suggestive of the wide-area deformation measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) methods, the atmospheric effects are large enough to limit the interpretation of the result. It is difficult to characterize centimeter-scale deformations spatially distributed over tens of kilometers using differential interferometry without supporting simultaneous, spatially distributed measurements of reactivity along the radar line of sight. Studies of the interferometric correlation of images acquired at different times show that L band is far superior to C band in the vegetated areas, even when the observations are separated by only 1 day. These results imply longer wavelength instruments are more appropriate for studying surfaces by repeat-pass observations.

  8. High temperature fatigue deformation behaviors of thermally sprayed steel measured with electronic speckle pattern interferometry method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rongguang; Kido, Mitsuo

    2003-07-14

    High temperature fatigue (R=0) damage and deformation behaviors of SUS304 steel thermally sprayed with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiCr coating were investigated using an electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) method. Surface cracks and delamination occurred after 1x10{sup 5} cycles test when {sigma}{sub max} was 202 MPa at 873 K. The lengths and number of cracks and delamination largely decreased when {sigma}{sub max} or temperature decreased to 115 MPa or 573 K, respectively. Strain values along cracks measured with the ESPI method were much larger than other areas due to crack opening under the tensile load. The positions of strain concentration zones on strain distribution figures by ESPI method were well corresponded to those of cracks on sprayed coatings. Strain values decreased largely where local delamination occurred.

  9. Measuring In-Plane Displacements with Variable Sensitivity Using Diffractive Optic Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Robert L.; Gilbert, John A.; Cole, Helen J.; Ashley, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper introduces a method called diffractive optic interferometry (DOI) which allows in-plane displacement components to be measured with variable sensitivity. DOI relies on binary optical elements fabricated as phase-type Dammann gratings which produce multiple diffraction orders of nearly equal intensity. Sensitivity is varied by combining the different wavefronts produced by a conjugate pair of these binary optical elements; a transmission element is used to produce several illumination beams while a reflective element, replicated on the surface of a specimen, provides the reference for the undeformed state. The steps taken to design and fabricate these binary optical elements are described. The specimen grating is characterized, and tested on a disk subjected to diametrical compression. Overall, the results are excellent, with experimental data agreeing to within a few percent of the theoretical predictions.

  10. Vibration measurement based on electronic speckle pattern interferometry and radial basis function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiangjun; Shao, Xinxing; Geng, Zhencen; Yang, Fujun; Jiang, Yijun; He, Xiaoyuan

    2015-11-01

    A method incorporating amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI) with radial basis function (RBF) was proposed to investigate vibration characteristics of structures. The vibration patterns were obtained by AF-ESPI. A novel pre-filtering RBF method was presented to improve the quality of patterns. The out-of-plane vibration amplitude was rebuilt after fringe analysis. Ideal pre-filtering widow sizes for the presented RBF were given based on numerical experiments. For validation, an aluminum circular plate with fixed boundary was determined and compared with FEM, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed method. Finally, vibration characteristics of sandwich panels with honeycomb core were measured. The influence of presence of a pre-notch at different location was also investigated.

  11. Spatial-Heterodyne Interferometry For Reflection And Transm Ission (Shirt) Measurements

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN; Bingham, Philip R [Knoxville, TN; Tobin, Ken W [Harriman, TN

    2006-02-14

    Systems and methods are described for spatial-heterodyne interferometry for reflection and transmission (SHIRT) measurements. A method includes digitally recording a first spatially-heterodyned hologram using a first reference beam and a first object beam; digitally recording a second spatially-heterodyned hologram using a second reference beam and a second object beam; Fourier analyzing the digitally recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram to define a first analyzed image; Fourier analyzing the digitally recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram to define a second analyzed image; digitally filtering the first analyzed image to define a first result; and digitally filtering the second analyzed image to define a second result; performing a first inverse Fourier transform on the first result, and performing a second inverse Fourier transform on the second result. The first object beam is transmitted through an object that is at least partially translucent, and the second object beam is reflected from the object.

  12. LISA Long-Arm Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James I.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of LISA Long-Arm Interferometry is presented. The contents include: 1) LISA Interferometry; 2) Constellation Design; 3) Telescope Design; 4) Constellation Acquisition; 5) Mechanisms; 6) Optical Bench Design; 7) Phase Measurement Subsystem; 8) Phasemeter Demonstration; 9) Time Delay Interferometry; 10) TDI Limitations; 11) Active Frequency Stabilization; 12) Spacecraft Level Stabilization; 13) Arm-Locking; and 14) Embarassment of Riches.

  13. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  14. Effects of wall temperature on skin-friction measurements by oil-film interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottini, H.; Kurita, M.; Iijima, H.; Fukagata, K.

    2015-10-01

    Wind-tunnel skin-friction measurements with thin-oil-film interferometry have been taken on an aluminum sample to investigate the effects of wall temperature on the accuracy of the technique. The sample has been flush-mounted onto a flat plate with an electric heater at its bottom and mirror-smooth temperature-sensitive paint sprayed on its top. The heater has varied the sample temperature from ambient to 328 K, and the paint has permitted wall temperature measurements on the same area of the skin-friction measurements and during the same test. The measured wall temperatures have been used to calculate the correct oil viscosities, and these viscosities and the constant nominal viscosity at 298 K have been used to calculate two different sets of skin-friction coefficients. These sets have been compared to each other and with theoretical values. This comparison shows that the effects of wall temperature on the accuracy of skin-friction measurements are sensible, and more so as wall temperature differs from 298 K. Nonetheless, they are effectively neutralized by the use of wall temperature measurements in combination with the correct oil viscosity-temperature law. In this regard, the special temperature-sensitive paint developed for this study shows advantages with respect to more traditional wall temperature measurement techniques.

  15. Measuring Crustal Deformation Caused by the Nepal (Gorkha) Earthquake Using ALOS-2 SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Yarai, H.

    2015-12-01

    A huge earthquake (Mw 7.8, USGS) occurred on 25 April, 2015 in Nepal, followed by the largest aftershock (Mw 7.3, USGS) on 12 May. We applied an InSAR technique to detect crustal deformation caused by the earthquakes using L-band SAR data acquired by ALOS-2. One of the advantages of ALOS-2 over ALOS is ScanSAR interferometry. Beam synchronization, which is a critical factor for ScanSAR interferometry, is always tuned among ALOS-2 observations. While a width of 350 km is covered by a ScanSAR acquisition, the provided data is divided into five swaths with each width of 70 km. Adjacent swaths have an overlapping area with a width of several kilometers, where interferometric phases for two swaths are basically comparable. We processed each swath independently. Preliminary interferograms are contaminated by noises with long wavelength, which makes it difficult to measure the amount of the crustal deformation accurately. We reduce the noises by following steps. First, pseudo reference points with no displacement are put at intervals of 40-100 km outside of the possible deforming area. The differential phase at the points are assumed to be due to the noises. The curved surface of the noises is estimated by smoothly interpolating the differential phase at the points. Note that the pseudo reference points should be located in a high coherence area where the phases can be unwrapped. Furthermore the points in the overlapping area between adjacent swaths allow to preserve consistency of the phases between adjacent swaths. The interferograms show the clear and detailed crustal deformation (published on http://www.gsi.go.jp/cais/topic150429-index-e.html). The maximum of a quasi up-down component of the deformation estimated from the interferograms with different beam directions reaches over 1.4 m uplift at 20 km northeast from Kathmandu and 0.6 m subsidence at a northern part of the deforming area.

  16. Ground Deformation Measurement with SAR Interferometry - Exupéry Project WP2 Space Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Xiaoying; Eineder, Michael; Minet, Christian

    2010-05-01

    As one of major natural hazards volcanic unrest and volcanic eruption are gaining more attention nowadays. The Exupéry project aimed at setting-up an Early Response System (VFRS) for volcanic activity was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Within Work Package 2 'Space Based Observations' SAR interferometry is used for monitoring the ground deformation. In comparison with conventional monitoring techniques like GPS the surface changes can be directly detected by using 2 SAR images from different acquisition times and an external DEM. Persistent scatterer SAR interferometry (PSI) method is applied by using a stack of interferograms with common master image. Instead of whole SAR scene only the coherent scatterers during whole acquisition duration are selected and its phase measurements are used to estimate modelled parameters such as deformation velocity, DEM error and atmospheric distortions. In mountainous area backscatterers are decorrelated during the time because of vegetation. To ensure the coherence corner reflector (CR) is used to get stable backscattering. To test the whole system a campaign was carried out during April to August 2009. Two CRs were installed for TerraSAR-X satellite on the test site Lagoa do Fogo volcano. During the campaign 11 strip-map scenes were gathered consequently. Post-processed interferograms as well as the coherence maps were delivered to database center in Hannover and would be published in project website. Time series analysis with coherent scatterers from the stacking was applied in order to detect complex deformation from mountainous area. The CRs were successfully detected in SAR image and will be used as reference points in PSI processing. At the end the interferograms computed from different wavelengths will be compared in this area.

  17. Label-free measurement of microbicidal gel thickness using low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Kelly E.; Boyer, Jeffrey D.; Henderson, Marcus H.; Katz, David F.; Wax, Adam

    2006-03-01

    Spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry (LCI) was used to measure the thickness of microbicidal gels applied to a cylindrical calibration test socket. Microbicides are topical formulations containing active ingredients targeted to inhibit specific pathogens that are currently under development for application to the epithelial lining of the lower female reproductive tract to combat sexually transmitted infections such as HIV. Understanding the deployment and drug delivery of these formulations is vital to maximizing their effectiveness. Previously, in vivo measurements of microbicidal formulation thickness were assessed using fluorescence measurements of fluorescein-labeled gels via an optical endoscope-based device. Here we present an LCI-based device that measures the thickness of a formulation without the use of any exogenous agents by analyzing the interference pattern generated between the reflections from the front and back surface of the sample. Results are presented that validate the effectiveness and performance of the LCI measurement in a clinically relevant system as compared to an existing fluorescence-based method. The impact of the new LCI-based design on in vivo measurements is discussed.

  18. Comparison of digital holographic interferometry and constant temperature anemometry for measurement of temperature field in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít.; Vít, Tomáś; Dančová, Petra; Kopecký, Václav

    2015-05-01

    The presented paper shows possibility of using digital holographic interferometry (DHI) for temperature field measurement in moving fluids. This method uses a modified Twymann-Green setup having double sensitivity instead of commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of interferometer in order to obtain sufficient phases change of the field. On the other hand this setup is not light efficient as Mach-Zehnder interferometer. For measurement of the fast periodical phenomenon is not necessary to use always the high speed camera. One can consider this field to coherent phenomenon. With employing one digital camera synchronized to periodic field and external triggered one can capture whole period of the phenomenon. However the projections form one viewing direction of asymmetrical temperature field maybe misguided. Hence for sufficient examination of the asymmetrical field one should capture a large number of the phenomenon's projections from different viewing directions. This projections are later used for 3D tomographic reconstruction of the whole temperature field and its time evolution. One of the commonly used method for temperature field measurement in moving fluids is hot wire method - constant temperature anemometry (CTA). In contrast to whole field measurement of DHI it is an invasive point temperature measurement method. One of the limiting factor of using CTA in moving fluids is frequency of temperature changes. This changes should not exceed 1 kHz. This limitation could be overcome by using of optical methods such as DHI. The results of temperature field measurement achieved by both method are compared in the paper.

  19. Theoretical Accuracy of Along-Track Displacement Measurements from Multiple-Aperture Interferometry (MAI)

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyung-Sup; Lee, Won-Jin; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of precise along-track displacements has been made with the multiple-aperture interferometry (MAI). The empirical accuracies of the MAI measurements are about 6.3 and 3.57 cm for ERS and ALOS data, respectively. However, the estimated empirical accuracies cannot be generalized to any interferometric pair because they largely depend on the processing parameters and coherence of the used SAR data. A theoretical formula is given to calculate an expected MAI measurement accuracy according to the system and processing parameters and interferometric coherence. In this paper, we have investigated the expected MAI measurement accuracy on the basis of the theoretical formula for the existing X-, C- and L-band satellite SAR systems. The similarity between the expected and empirical MAI measurement accuracies has been tested as well. The expected accuracies of about 2–3 cm and 3–4 cm (γ = 0.8) are calculated for the X- and L-band SAR systems, respectively. For the C-band systems, the expected accuracy of Radarsat-2 ultra-fine is about 3–4 cm and that of Sentinel-1 IW is about 27 cm (γ = 0.8). The results indicate that the expected MAI measurement accuracy of a given interferometric pair can be easily calculated by using the theoretical formula. PMID:25251408

  20. Projection Moire Interferometry for Rotorcraft Applications: Deformation Measurements of Active Twist Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Soto, Hector L.; South, Bruce W.

    2002-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used during wind tunnel tests to obtain azimuthally dependent blade bending and twist measurements for a 4-bladed Active Twist Rotor (ATR) system in simulated forward flight. The ATR concept offers a means to reduce rotor vibratory loads and noise by using piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators embedded in the blade structure to twist each blade as they rotate throughout the rotor azimuth. The twist imparted on the blades for blade control causes significant changes in blade loading, resulting in complex blade deformation consisting of coupled bending and twist. Measurement of this blade deformation is critical in understanding the overall behavior of the ATR system and the physical mechanisms causing the reduction in rotor loads and noise. PMI is a non-contacting, video-based optical measurement technique capable of obtaining spatially continuous structural deformation measurements over the entire object surface within the PMI system field-of-view. When applied to rotorcraft testing, PMI can be used to measure the azimuth-dependent blade bending and twist along the full span of the rotor blade. This paper presents the PMI technique as applied to rotorcraft testing, and provides results obtained during the ATR tests demonstrating the PMI system performance. PMI measurements acquired at select blade actuation conditions generating minimum and maximum rotor loads are provided to explore the interrelationship between rotor loads, blade bending, and twist.

  1. Depth-resolved measurement of ocular fundus pulsations by low-coherence tissue interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragostinoff, Nikolaus; Werkmeister, René M.; Gröschl, Martin; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2009-09-01

    A device that allows for the measurement of ocular fundus pulsations at preselected axial positions of a subject's eye is presented. Unlike previously presented systems, which only allow for observation of the strongest reflecting retinal layer, our system enables the measurement of fundus pulsations at a preselected ocular layer. For this purpose the sample is illuminated by light of low temporal coherence. The layer is then selected by positioning one mirror of a Michelson interferometer according to the depth of the layer. The device contains a length measurement system based on partial coherence interferometry and a line scan charge-coupled device camera for recording and online inspection of the fringe system. In-vivo measurements in healthy humans are performed as proof of principle. The algorithms used for enhancing the recorded images are briefly introduced. The contrast of the observed interference pattern is evaluated for different positions of the measurement mirror and at various distances from the front surface of the cornea. The applications of such a system may be wide, including assessment of eye elongation during myopia development and blood-flow-related changes in intraocular volume.

  2. Transient Measurements Under Simulated Mantle Conditions - Simultaneous DTF-Ultrasonic Interferometry, X-Radiography, XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.; Schilling, F. R.; Lathe, C.; Wunder, B.

    2004-12-01

    The interpretation of seismic data from the Earth's deep interior requires measurements of the physical properties of Earth materials under experimental simulated mantle conditions. Elastic wave velocity measurement by ultrasonic interferometry is an important tool for the determination of the elastic properties in multi-anvil devices. Whereas the classical sweep method is very time-consuming, the ultrasonic data transfer function technique (DTF), simultaneously generating all the frequencies used in the experiment, first described by Li et al. (2002), requires just few seconds to save the response of the system. The success of the technique substantially depends on the excitation function and the resolution used for saving the DTF (Mueller et al., 2004a). Background discussion as well as high pressure AƒA_A,A¿A,A 1/2 high temperature results demonstrate how to optimize the technique. All Ultrasonic interferometry allows highly precise travel time measurement at a sample enclosed in a high-pressure multi-anvil device. But under high pressure conditions the influence of sample deformation on the frequencies for destructive and constructive interference used for the evaluation of the elastic properties might be stronger than that from the shift of the elastic moduli. Consequently ultrasonic interferometry requires the exact sample length measurement under in situ conditions. X-ray imaging using brillant synchrotron radiation, called X-radiography, produces grey-scale images of the sample under in situ conditions by converting the X-ray image to an optical one by a CE-YAG-crystal. Saving the optical image by a CCD-camera after redirection by a mirrow, also requires few seconds. To derive the sample length, the different brightness of sample, buffer rod and reflector at the electronic image is evaluated (Mueller et al., 2004b). Contrary to XRD measurements, imaging the sample by X-rays requires a beam diameter larger than the sample length. Therefore the fixed

  3. Speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Rajpal S.

    2002-03-01

    Illumination of a rough surface by a coherent monochromatic wave creates a grainy structure in space termed a speckle pattern. It was considered a special kind of noise and was the bane of holographers. However, its information-carrying property was soon discovered and the phenomenon was used for metrological applications. The realization that a speckle pattern carried information led to a new measurement technique known as speckle interferometry (SI). Although the speckle phenomenon in itself is a consequence of interference among numerous randomly dephased waves, a reference wave is required in SI. Further, it employs an imaging geometry. Initially SI was performed mostly by using silver emulsions as the recording media. The double-exposure specklegram was filtered to extract the desired information. Since SI can be configured so as to be sensitive to the in-plane displacement component, the out-of-plane displacement component or their derivatives, the interferograms corresponding to these were extracted from the specklegram for further analysis. Since the speckle size can be controlled by the F number of the imaging lens, it was soon realized that SI could be performed with electronic detection, thereby increasing its accuracy and speed of measurement. Furthermore, a phase-shifting technique can also be incorporated. This technique came to be known as electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). It employed the same experimental configurations as SI. ESPI found many industrial applications as it supplements holographic interferometry. We present three examples covering diverse areas. In one application it has been used to measure residual stress in a blank recordable compact disk. In another application, microscopic ESPI has been used to study the influence of relative humidity on paint-coated figurines and also the effect of a conservation agent applied on top of this. The final application is to find the defects in pipes. These diverse applications

  4. Step-Height Measurement of Surface Functionalized Micromachined Microcantilever Using Scanning White Light Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Kurhekar, Anil Sudhakar; Apte, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-cantilever arrays with different dimensions are fabricated by micromachining technique onto silicon <1 0 0> substrate. These sputtered Gold-Coated micro-cantilevers were later surface functionalized. Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical SWLI using LASER probe are employed to characterize the morphology and image measurement of the micro-cantilever arrays, respectively. Compared with conventional AFM and SPM measurement technique, the proposed method has demonstrated sufficient flexibility and reliability. The experimental results have been analyzed and presented in this paper for MEMS Micro-cantilevers. The scanning White Light Interferometry based two point high resolution optical method is presented for characterizing Micro-cantilevers and other MEMS micro-structures. The repeatable error and the repeatable precision produced in the proposed image measurement method is nanometre confirmable. In this piece of work, we investigate the micro-structure fabrication and image measurement of Length, Width and Step-Height of micro-cantilever arrays fabricated using bulk micromachining technique onto Silicon <100> substrate. PMID:24098867

  5. Fundus pulsation measurement by laser interferometry: a noninvasive technique for the assessment of hemodynamic drug effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmetterer, Leopold F.; Wolzt, M.; Lexer, Franz; Unfried, Christian J.; Fassolt, A.; Fercher, Adolf F.; Eichler, Hans-Georg

    1995-05-01

    The pulse-synchronous pulsations of the eye fundus are measured by laser interferometry. The eye is illuminated by the beam of a single mode laser diode. The light is reflected at the front side of the cornea and the retina. The two remitted waves product interference fringes, from which the distance changes between cornea and retina can be determined. The interferometer is coupled to a fundus camera, so that fundus pulsations can be measured at preselected points on the retina with high transversal resolution. This technique was used to study the influence of phenylephrine (a peripherally vasoconstricting drug), isoproterenol (a predominantly positive inotropic drug), sodium nitroprusside (a peripherally vasocilating drug) on fundus pulsations in healthy volunteers. The effect of isoproterenol to increase pulse pressure amplitude was detectable even at low doses. Neither sodium nitroprusside nor phenylephrine had a significant influence on ocular fundus pulsations. These results show that measurement of fundus pulsations in the macula estimates the pressure pulse amplitude in choroidal vessels. Measurements of fundus pulsations at preselected points of the retina, show that fundus pulsations in the macular region are larger than in peripheral parts of the retina but smaller than in the optic disc region under baseline conditions.

  6. Measurement of air refractive index fluctuation based on interferometry with two different reference cavity lengths.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianghua; Luo, Huifu; Wang, Sumei; Wang, Feng; Chen, Xinhua

    2012-09-01

    A measurement method based on interferometry with two different reference cavity lengths is presented and applied in air refractive index measurement in which the two cavity lengths and a laser wavelength are combined to generate two wavelength equivalents of cavity. Corresponding calculation equations are derived, and the optical path configuration is designed, which is inspired by the traditional synthetic wavelength method. Theoretical analyses indicate that the measurement uncertainty of the determined index of refraction is about 2.3×10(-8), which is mainly affected by the length precision of the long vacuum cavity and the ellipticity of polarization components of the dual-frequency laser, and the range of nonambiguity is 3.0×10(-5), which is decided by the length difference of the two cavities. Experiment results show that the accuracy of air refractive index measurement is better than 5.0×10(-8) when the laboratory conditions changes slowly. The merit of the presented method is that the classical refractometry can be also used without evacuation of the gas cavity during the experiment. Furthermore, the application of the traditional synthetic wavelength method may be extended by using the wavelength equivalents of cavity, any value of which can be easily acquired by changing cavity length rather than using actual wavelengths whose number is limited. PMID:22945157

  7. Formation of x-ray vortex dipoles using a single diffraction pattern and direct phase measurement using interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sawada, Kei; Taguchi, Munetaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Ohigashi, Takuji; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2009-03-09

    We have devised a method for generating x-ray vortices by using a diffraction pattern from a simple aperture with illumination wave fronts with spherical curvatures. The interferometry visualized the x-ray vortex dipoles by the direct phase measurement. Our interference technique enabled us to sensitively detect and quantitatively measure various phase dislocations on the x-ray wave fronts, providing useful methodologies for beam diagnostics and materials science.

  8. Use Of Phase Measuring Interferometry In Quantity Production Of High Quality Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, P. R., Jr.; Grosso, R. P.; Crane, R.

    1982-05-01

    The advantages of Phase Measuring Interferometry (PMI) over conventional half-wave fringe contour measurements are well known. They include greater sensitivity through reduced fringe-to-fringe interval, ease of minimizing instrumental errors, shorter turnaround time to process results and data averaging to circumvent random environmental effects. Prior publications have described typical designs of PMI devices as well as some of their applications in the optical industry. At Perkin-Elmer, we have found that only through the use of advanced PMI technology can quantity production of very high quality optics be achieved on a timely and cost-effective basis. In this paper, we report some experiences with PMI as the primary method of in-process and final testing of a variety of optical components currently being manufactured in production quantity. Component apertures are as large as 47 cm. Measurements are typically made to precisions of the order of 0.01k (X/100) peak-to-peak and 0.001λ (λ/1000) rms. Examples include three types of reflecting optics of widely differing sizes and configurations: an Amici-type roof mirror, a concave spherical mirror and a convex spherical mirror.

  9. Measurement of hinge moments and model deformations in wind tunnels by means of Moire interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Peter H.; Butefisch, K. A.

    1995-09-01

    A nonintrusive Moire interferometry system has been designed to acquire the instantaneous deformation of models during wind tunnel testing. The resulting interferograms are evaluated without manual intervention using a technique based on the Fourier Transform. The deformation of a large- scale model wing (generic model of a transport aircraft with a full span of 3.40 m) has been measured in the 8 m X 6 m test section of the subsonic Deutsch-Niederlandischer-Windkanal (DNW). At 400 individual locations along the span, the bending and twist deformations of the wing have been measured with an average accuracy of +/- 0.1 mm and +/- 0.03 degree(s), respectively. In a second experiment, the bending angle of a flap of a hypersonic vehicle was measured in order to determine the hinge moment due to aerodynamic loads. The experiment was carried out in the transonic wind tunnel Gottingen (TWG). To obtain data for comparison, the hinges were equipped with strain gauges. The results of both techniques show a maximum deviation of 0.02 degree(s).

  10. Simple digital phase-measuring algorithm for low-noise heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokuyama, Wataru; Nozato, Hideaki; Ohta, Akihiro; Hattori, Koichiro

    2016-08-01

    We present a digital algorithm for measuring the phase of a sinusoidal signal that combines the modified digital fringe-counting method with two-sample zero crossing to enable sequential signal processing. This technique can be applied to a phase meter for measuring dynamic phase differences between two sinusoidal signals with high resolution, particularly for heterodyne interferometry. The floor noise obtained from a demonstration with an electrical apparatus is 5× {{10}-8} \\text{rad}\\text{/}{{\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}}{}} at frequencies above approximately 0.1 Hz for 80 kHz signal frequency. In addition, by applying this method to a commercial heterodyne interferometer with a modulation frequency of 80 MHz, the floor-noise level is confirmed to be 7× {{10}-14}\\text{m}\\text{/}{{\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}}{}} from 4 kHz to 1 MHz. We also confirm the validity of the algorithm by comparing its results with those from a standard homodyne interferometer for measuring shock-motion peak acceleration greater than 5000 \\text{m} {{\\text{s}}-2} and a 10 mm stroke.

  11. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10{sup -7} or better, resulting in a resolution of {+-}25 {mu}m for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented.

  12. Study of the Earth's interior using measurements of sound velocities in minerals by ultrasonic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Baosheng; Liebermann, Robert C.

    2014-07-29

    This paper reviews the progress of the technology of ultrasonic interferometry from the early 1950s to the present day. During this period of more than 60 years, sound wave velocity measurements have been increased from at pressures less than 1 GPa and temperatures less than 800 K to conditions above 25 GPa and temperatures of 1800 K. This is complimentary to other direct methods to measure sound velocities (such as Brillouin and impulsive stimulated scattering) as well as indirect methods (e.g., resonance ultrasound spectroscopy, static or shock compression, inelastic X-ray scattering). Newly-developed pressure calibration methods and data analysis procedures using a finite strain approach are described and applied to data for the major mantle minerals. The implications for the composition of the Earth’s mantle are discussed. The state-of-the-art ultrasonic experiments performed in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation can provide simultaneous measurements of the elastic bulk and shear moduli and their pressure and temperature derivatives with direct determination of pressure. The current status and outlook/challenges for future experiments are summarized.

  13. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry technique for the measurement of complex mechanical structures for aero-spatial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, René; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Garranzo, Daniel; Pintado, José M.; Frovel, Malte; Belenguer, Tomás

    2010-09-01

    Using the electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) technique in the in-plane arrangement, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a composite material that will be used in a passive focusing mechanism of an aerospace mission was measured. This measurement with ESPI was compared with another interferometric method (Differential Interferometer), whose principal characteristic is its high accuracy, but the measurement is only local. As a final step, the results have been used to provide feedback with the finite element analysis (FEA). Before the composite material measurements, a quality assessment of the technique was carried out measuring the CTE of Aluminum 6061-T6. Both techniques were compared with the datasheet delivered by the supplier. A review of the basic concepts was done, especially with regards to ESPI, and the considerations to predict the quality in the fringes formation were explained. Also, a review of the basic concepts for the mechanical calculation in composite materials was done. The CTE of the composite material found was 4.69X10-6 +/- 3X10-6K-1. The most important advantage between ESPI and differential interferometry is that ESPI provides more information due to its intrinsic extended area, surface deformation reconstruction, in comparison with the strictly local measurement of differential interferometry

  14. Precision measurement of refractive index of air based on laser synthetic wavelength interferometry with Edlén equation estimation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Enzheng; Zhang, Shihua; Yang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    A novel method for the precision measurement of refractive index of air (n(air)) based on the combining of the laser synthetic wavelength interferometry with the Edlén equation estimation is proposed. First, a n(air_e) is calculated from the modified Edlén equation according to environmental parameters measured by low precision sensors with an uncertainty of 10(-6). Second, a unique integral fringe number N corresponding to n(air) is determined based on the calculated n(air_e). Then, a fractional fringe ε corresponding to n(air) with high accuracy can be obtained according to the principle of fringe subdivision of laser synthetic wavelength interferometry. Finally, high accurate measurement of n(air) is achieved according to the determined fringes N and ε. The merit of the proposed method is that it not only solves the problem of the measurement accuracy of n(air) being limited by the accuracies of environmental sensors, but also avoids adopting complicated vacuum pumping to measure the integral fringe N in the method of conventional laser interferometry. To verify the feasibility of the proposed method, comparison experiments with Edlén equations in short time and in long time were performed. Experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of n(air) is better than 2.5 × 10(-8) in short time tests and 6.2 × 10(-8) in long time tests. PMID:26329237

  15. I Situ Laser Interferometry and Fluorescence Quenching Measurements of Poly(methyl Methacrylate) Thin Film Dissolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei

    The dissolution mechanisms of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films in selected organic solvents was investigated. The dissolution was monitored using an in situ laser interferometry and fluorescence quenching (LIFQ) technique. Phenanthrene -labeled PMMA (Phe-PMMA) was used as a probe. Solutions of PMMA in toluene were spin-coated onto sapphire substrate to form films approximately 1 μm thick. The LIFQ results show that for PMMA film dissolution the transition layer thickness increases until the dissolution reaches its steady state. Then this final transition layer thickness (FTL) does not change until solvent vanguard molecules reach the surface of the substrate. Thermal history effects on PMMA film dissolution were examined. The dissolution rate decreases with increasing baking temperature and reaches a constant value for annealing at 150^circC. The results show that the thermal history has negligible effect on the factor of reduction f obtained from interferometry measurements. Fluorescence quenching measurements, by contrast, suggest that transition layer thickness decreases with increasing baking temperature. This suggests that the fluorescence quenching part of the LIFQ experiment is sensitive to the Fickian precursor portion of the solvent concentration profile in the film. The dissolution of PMMA films in acetone, 2-butanone, and 2-pentanone was studied. The results show that the dissolution rate decreases significantly with increasing solvent molecular size. Significant differences are found for FTL values calculated from LIFQ experiments and those calculated from f obtained by laser interferometry. Values of f are essentially identical in three solvents used. The effect of non-solvent on PMMA dissolution was studied by using 2-propanol and 2-butanone mixtures as solvents. The dissolution rate decreases with increasing non-solvent content. This indicates a strong thermodynamic effect, especially at high concentration of non-solvent. Molecular weight

  16. The Development and Hover Test Application of a Projection Moire Interferometry Blade Displacement Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K.

    2012-01-01

    Projection moir interferometry (PMI) was employed to measure blade deflections during a hover test of a generic model-scale rotor in the NASA Langley 14x22 subsonic wind tunnel s hover facility. PMI was one of several optical measurement techniques tasked to acquire deflection and flow visualization data for a rotor at several distinct heights above a ground plane. Two of the main objectives of this test were to demonstrate that multiple optical measurement techniques can be used simultaneously to acquire data and to identify and address deficiencies in the techniques. Several PMI-specific technical challenges needed to be addressed during the test and in post-processing of the data. These challenges included developing an efficient and accurate calibration method for an extremely large (65 inch) height range; automating the analysis of the large amount of data acquired during the test; and developing a method to determinate the absolute displacement of rotor blades without a required anchor point measurement. The results indicate that the use of a single-camera/single-projector approach for the large height range reduced the accuracy of the PMI system compared to PMI systems designed for smaller height ranges. The lack of the anchor point measurement (due to a technical issue with one of the other measurement techniques) limited the ability of the PMI system to correctly measure blade displacements to only one of the three rotor heights tested. The new calibration technique reduced the data required by 80 percent while new post-processing algorithms successfully automated the process of locating rotor blades in images, determining the blade quarter chord location, and calculating the blade root and blade tip heights above the ground plane.

  17. Length and refractive index measurement by Fourier transform interferometry and frequency comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balling, Petr; Mašika, Pavel; Křen, Petr; Doležal, Miroslav

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we describe the progress we have made in our simultaneous length measurement and the femtosecond comb interferometric spectroscopy in a conventional arrangement with a moving mirror. Scanning and detection over an interval longer than the distance between two consecutive pulses of the frequency comb allow for a spectral resolution of the individual frequency modes of the comb. Precise knowledge of comb mode frequency leads to a precise estimation of the spectral characteristics of inspected phenomena. Using the pulse train of the frequency comb allows for measurement with highly unbalanced lengths of interferometer arms, i.e. an absolute long distance measurement. Further, we present a non-contact (double sided) method of measurement of the length/thickness of plane-parallel objects (gauge blocks, glass samples) by combining the fs comb (white light) with single frequency laser interferometry. The position of a fringe packet is evaluated by estimating the stationary phase position for any wavelength in the spectral band used. The repeatability of this position estimation is a few nanometres regardless of whether dispersion of the arms is compensated (transform limited fringe packet ˜10 fringes FWHM) or highly different (fringe packet stretched to >200 fringes FWHM). The measurement of steel gauge block by this method was compared with the standard method, and deviation (+13 ± 12) nm for gauge blocks (2 to 100) mm was found. The measurement of low reflecting ceramic gauges or clear glass samples was also tested. In the case of glass, it becomes possible to measure simultaneously both the thickness and the refractive index (and dispersion) of flat samples.

  18. Status of a UAVSAR designed for repeat pass interferometry for deformation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Shaffer, Scott; Muellerschoen, Ron; Jones, Cathleen; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Paul, Rose

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently implementing a reconfigurable polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track interferometric (RTI) SAR data, also known as differential interferometric measurements. Differential interferometry can provide key deformation measurements, important for the scientific studies of Earthquakes and volcanoes. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The expected performance of the flight control system will constrain the flight path to be within a 10 m diameter tube about the desired flight track. The radar wilI be designed to operate on a UAV (Unpiloted Aria1 Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a minimally piloted vehicle (MPV), such as the Proteus buitt by Scaled Composites or on a NASA Gulfstream III. The radar design is a fully polarimetric with an 80 MHz bandwidth (2 m range resolution) and 16 km range swath. The antenna is an electronically steered along track to assure that the actual antenna pointing can be controlled independent of the wind direction and speed. Other features supported by the antenna include an elevation monopulse option and a pulse-to-pulse resteering capability that will enable some novel modes of operation. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft (13800 m). The program began out as an Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  19. 3D digital holographic interferometry as a tool to measure the tympanic membrane motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Socorro Hernández-Montes, M.; Muñoz Solis, S.; Mendoza Santoyo, F.

    2012-10-01

    Most of the current optical non-invasive methodologies used to characterize the tympanic membrane (TM) motion generate data in the z direction only, i.e., employ an out-of-plane sensitive configuration. In this paper, 3-D digital holographic interferometry (3-D DHI), is used to measure micrometer displacements from the TM surface. The proposed optical configuration provides information from three sensitivity vectors that separate the contributions from x, y and z displacement components. In order to achieve high accuracy of the sensitivity vector and to obtain the complete determination of the 3-D TM displacements, its surface contour is obtained by moving only two object illumination sources chosen from any pair within the DHI optical setup. Results are presented from measurements corresponding to individual displacements maps for the three orthogonal displacements components x, y and z combined with the TM shape from an ex-vivo cat. These results will no doubt contribute to enhance the understanding and determinate the mechanical properties of this complex tissue.

  20. Time course and topographic distribution of ocular fundus pulsation measured by low-coherence tissue interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragostinoff, Nikolaus; Werkmeister, René M.; Klaizer, József; Gröschl, Martin; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-12-01

    Low-coherence tissue interferometry is a technique for the depth-resolved measurement of ocular fundus pulsations. Whereas fundus pulsation amplitudes at preselected axial positions can readily be assessed by this method, coupling of the interferometer with a pulse oximeter additionally allows for the reconstruction of the time course of ocular fundus pulsation with respect to the cardiac cycle of the subject. For this purpose, the interferogram resulting from the superposition of waves reflected at the cornea and the ocular fundus is recorded synchronously with the plethysmogram. A new method for evaluating the time course of synthetic interferograms in combination with plethysmograms based on averaging several pulse periods has been developed. This technique allows for the analysis of amplitudes, time courses, and phase differences of fundus pulsations at preselected axial and transversal positions and for creating fundus pulsation movies. Measurements are performed in three healthy emmetropic subjects at angles from 0 deg to 18 deg to the axis of vision. Considerably different time courses, amplitudes, and phases with respect to the cardiac cycle are found at different angles. Data on ocular fundus pulsation obtained with this technique can-among other applications-be used to verify and to improve biomechanical models of the eye.

  1. Far-Infrared Laser Interferometry Measurements on the STP-3(M) Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Shigeyuki; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Tsukishima, Takashige; Arimoto, Hideki; Sato, Koichi; Matsuoka, Akio

    1994-04-01

    Far-infrared laser interferometry at 432 µm was carried out on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch. Measurements along two vertical chords showed a change from a parabolic-like to a flat-like electron density profile after field reversal. A density profile inversion and a correlated toroidal magnetic flux perturbation were also observed during the transition from the current rising to the current decay phase. Measurements of electron density fluctuations indicated relative fluctuation levels of ˜10% for both chords during the current rising phase and ˜5% and ˜15% during the current decay phase for the central and outer chords, respectively. Spectral analysis showed a ˜30 kHz mode consistent with poloidal mode number m=0 magnetic fluctuations, and a ˜90 kHz mode localized to the outer region of the plasma, which was strongly excited during the current decay phase and may be connected to particle and energy transport in STP-3(M).

  2. Far-infrared laser interferometry measurements on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Shigeyuki; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Tsukishima, Takashige; Arimoto, Hideki; Sato, Koichi; Matsuoka, Akio

    1993-09-01

    Far-infrared laser interferometry at 432 micro m was carried out on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch. Measurements along two vertical chords showed a change from a parabolic-like to a flat-like electron density profile after field reversal. A density profile inversion and a correlated toroidal magnetic flux perturbation were also observed during the transition from the current rising to the current decay phase. Measurements of electron density fluctuations indicated relative fluctuation levels of approx. 10% for both chords during the current rising phase and approx. 5% and approx. 15% during the current decay phase for the central and outer chords, respectively. Spectral analysis showed a approx. 30 kHz mode consistent with poloidal mode number m = 0 magnetic fluctuations, and a approx. 90 kHz mode localized to the outer region of the plasma, which was strongly excited during the current decay phase and may be connected to particle and energy transport in STP-3(M).

  3. Superheterodyne configuration for two-wavelength interferometry applied to absolute distance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Droz, Nathalie; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    We present a new superheterodyne technique for long-distance measurements by two-wavelength interferometry (TWI). While conventional systems use two acousto-optic modulators to generate two different heterodyne frequencies, here the two frequencies result from synchronized sweeps of optical and radio frequencies. A distributed feedback laser source is injected in an intensity modulator that is driven at the half-wave voltage mode. A radio-frequency signal is applied to this intensity modulator to generate two optical sidebands around the optical carrier. This applied radio frequency consists of a digital ramp between 13 and 15 GHz, with 1 ms duration and with an accuracy of better than 1 ppm. Simultaneously, the laser source is frequency modulated by a current modulation that is synchronized on the radio-frequency ramp as well as on a triangle waveform. These two frequency-swept optical signals at the output of the modulator illuminate a Michelson interferometer and create two distinct distance-dependent heterodyne frequencies on the photodetector. The superheterodyne signal is then detected and bandpass filtered to retrieve the absolute distance measurement. Experiments between 1 and 15 m confirm the validity of this new concept, leading to a distance accuracy of {+-} 50 {mu}m for a 1 ms acquisition time.

  4. Evaluation of the wave measurement in a stormy sea by the Along-Track interferometry SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, S.

    2015-12-01

    NICT developed the along-track interferometry SAR (AT-InSAR) system to detect the running cars and ships and measure sea surface velocity in 2011. The preliminary experiments for the running truck and ship were performed and it confirmed that the system performance was satisfactory to its specifications. In addition, a method to estimate the wave height from the sea surface velocity measured by the AT-InSAR was developed. The preliminary wave height observation was performed in a calm sea, and it was confirmed that the wave height could be estimated from the measured sea surface velocity. The purpose of this study is to check the capability of the ocean waves observation in a stormy sea by the AT-InSAR. Therefore, the ocean wave observation was performed under the low atmospheric pressure. The observation area is the sea surface at 10 km off the coast of Kushiro, south-east to Hokaido, JAPAN on the 4th of March 2015. The wind speed was 8〜10m/s during the observation, and the significant wave height and period were 1.5m and 6.0s. The observation was performed in 2 directions and the accuracy of the estimation results were checked. The significant wave height and period measured by the AT-InSAR agreed with it measured by the wave gage located close to this observation area. In addition, it was confirmed that there were no irregular wave heights in the distribution of the estimated wave height. As a result, it became clear that the AT-InSAR could observe the wave height in a stormy sea.

  5. Spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure material dispersion over a wide spectral band in a single acquisition.

    PubMed

    Arosa, Yago; Lago, Elena López; Varela, Luis Miguel; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2016-07-25

    In this paper we apply spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure refractive and group index over a wide spectral band from 400 to 1000 nm. The output of a Michelson interferometer is spectrally decomposed by a homemade prism spectrometer with a high resolution camera. The group index is determined directly from the phase extracted from the spectral interferogram while the refractive index is estimated once its value at a given wavelength is known. PMID:27464179

  6. Measurement of the Optical Coherence of a Femtosecond Pulsed Laser by Shearing Interferometry with a Double-Frequency Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Hai; Qian, Jiang-yuan; Xie, Jian-ping; A, B. Fedotov; X, Xiao; M, M. T. Loy

    1998-01-01

    Shearing interferometry of an ion-etched holographic double-frequency grating is used to measure the optical coherence of femtosecond pulsed lasers. The experimental results show that the optical coherence of the femtosecond light beam is not only related to the spectral width and size of the light source but is also related to the pulse duration and mode-locked laser state. The results of theoretical analysis and numerical calculation are also given. Application of this research is also discussed.

  7. Measurement Of Displacements Introduced By Extra-Oral Orthodontic Forces On A Macerated Skull By Means Of Speckle Interferometry: A Preliminary Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleutghen, J.; Dermaut, L. R.; Boone, P. M.; De Caluwe, M.

    1983-06-01

    A technique was developed for measuring tooth displacements, caused by extraoral orthodontic forces. By using speckle-interferometry as measurement technique and a macerated dry human skull as test object, a reliable investigation procedure is developed. Resolution of total displacement into vector components is realized by simple trigonometry. These observations showed to be very interesting for the understanding of the biomechanics of clinical headgear forces. For the purpose of orthodontic research speckle interferometry was applied and is expected to be a promising technique.

  8. Deformation of the Augustine Volcano, Alaska, 1992-2005, measured by ERS and ENVISAT SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Chang-Wook; Lu, Zhong; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Won, Joong-Sun

    2008-01-01

    The Augustine Volcano is a conical-shaped, active stratovolcano located on an island of the same name in Cook Inlet, about 290 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Augustine has experienced seven significant explosive eruptions - in 1812, 1883, 1908, 1935, 1963, 1976, 1986, and in January 2006. To measure the ground surface deformation of the Augustine Volcano before the 2006 eruption, we applied satellite radar interferometry using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from three descending and three ascending satellite tracks acquired by European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 and 2 and the Environment Satellite (ENVISAT). Multiple interferograms were stacked to reduce artifacts caused by atmospheric conditions, and we used a singular value decomposition method to retrieve the temporal deformation history from several points on the island. Interferograms during 1992 and 2005 show a subsidence of about 1-3 cm/year, caused by the contraction of pyroclastic flow deposits from the 1986 eruption. Subsidence has decreased exponentially with time. Multiple interferograms between 1992 and 2005 show no significant inflation around the volcano before the 2006 eruption. The lack of a pre-eruption deformation signal suggests that the deformation signal from 1992 to August 2005 must have been very small and may have been obscured by atmospheric delay artifacts. 

  9. Detection of atmospheric pressure loading using very long baseline interferometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, T. M.; Herring, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Loading of the Earth by the temporal redistribution of global atmospheric mass is likely to displace the positions of geodetic monuments by tens of millimeters both vertically and horizontally. Estimates of these displacements are determined by convolving National Meteorological Center (NMC) global values of atmospheric surface pressure with Farrell's elastic Green's functions. An analysis of the distances between radio telescopes determined by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) between 1984 and 1992 reveals that in many of the cases studied there is a significant contribution to baseline length change due to atmospheric pressure loading. Our analysis covers intersite distances of between 1000 and 10,000 km and is restricted to those baselines measured more than 100 times. Accounting for the load effects (after first removing a best fit slope) reduces the weighted root-mean-square (WRMS) scatter of the baseline length residuals on 11 of the 22 baselines investigated. The slight degradation observed in the WRMS scatter on the remaining baselines is largely consistent with the expected statistical fluctuations when a small correction is applied to a data set having a much larger random noise. The results from all baselines are consistent with approximately 60% of the computed pressure contribution being present in the VLBI length determinations. Site dependent coefficients determined by fitting local pressure to the theoretical radial displacement are found to reproduce the deformation caused by the regional pressure to within 25% for most inland sites. The coefficients are less reliable at near coastal and island stations.

  10. Status of a UAV SAR Designed for Repeat Pass Interferometry for Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Hoffman, Jim; Miller, Tim; Lou, Yunling; Muellerschoen, Ron; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Rosen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Under the NASA ESTO sponsored Instrument Incubator Program we have designed a lightweight, reconfigurable polarimetric L-band SAR designed for repeat pass deformation measurements of rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes. This radar will be installed on an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) or a lightweight, high-altitude, and long endurance platform such as the Proteus. After a study of suitable available platforms we selected the Proteus for initial development and testing of the system. We want to control the repeat track capability of the aircraft to be within a 10 m tube to support the repeat deformation capability. We conducted tests with the Proteus using real-time GPS with sub-meter accuracy to see if pilots could fly the aircraft within the desired tube. Our results show that pilots are unable to fly the aircraft with the desired accuracy and therefore an augmented autopilot will be required to meet these objectives. Based on the Proteus flying altitude of 13.7 km (45,000 ft), we are designing a fully polarimetric L-band radar with 80 MHz bandwidth and 16 km range swath. This radar will have an active electronic beam steering antenna to achieve Doppler centroid stability that is necessary for repeat-pass interferometry (RPI). This paper will present are design criteria, current design and expected science applications.

  11. Geodetic measurement of deformation in the Loma Prieta, California earthquake with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.A.; Ma, C.; Sauber, J.M.; Ryan, J.W. ); Gordon, D.; Caprette, D.S. ); Shaffer, D.B.; Vandenberg, N.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Following the Loma Prieta earthquake, two mobile Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) systems operated by the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project and the NOAA National Geodetic Survey were deployed at three previously established VLBI sites in the earthquake area: Fort Ord (near Monterey), the Presidio (in San Francisco) and Point Reyes. From repeated VLBI occupations of these sites since 1983, the pre-earthquake rates of deformation have been determined with respect to a North American reference frame with 1{sigma} formal standard errors of {approximately}1 mm/yr. The VLBI measurements immediately following the earthquake showed that the Fort Ord site was displaced 49 {plus minus} 4 mm at an azimuth of 11 {plus minus} 4{degree} and that the Presidio site was displaced 12 {plus minus} 5 mm at an azimuth of 148 {plus minus} 13{degree}. No anomalous change was detected at Point Reyes with 1{sigma} uncertainty of 4 mm. The estimated displacements at Fort Ord and the Presidio are consistent with the static displacements predicted on the basis of a coseismic slip model in which slip on the southern segment is shallower than slip on the more northern segment is shallower than slip on the more northern segment of the fault rupture. The authors also give the Cartesian positions at epoch 1990.0 of a set of VLBI fiducial stations and the three mobile sites in the vicinity of the earthquake.

  12. Surface movements of emplaced lava flows measured by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, N. F.; Wadge, G.; Williams, C. A.; Morley, J. G.; Muller, J.-P.; Murray, J. B.; Upton, M.

    2001-06-01

    Lava flows continue to move after they have been emplaced by flow mechanisms. This movement is largely vertical and can be detected using differential synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry. There are three main components to this motion: (1) movement of surface scatterers, resulting in radar phase decorrelation, (2) measurable subsidence of the flow surface due to thermal contraction and clast repacking, and (3) time-dependent depression of the flow substrate. These effects act in proportion to the thickness of the lava flow and decay with time, although there is a time lag before the third component becomes significant. We explore these effects using SAR data from the ERS satellites over the Etna volcano, Sicily. Phase decorrelation on young, thick a'a lava flows persists for a few years and probably results from surface block rotations during flow contraction. Maximum measured subsidence rates of the 1991-1993 lava flow over a period of 70 days are about 0.7 mm day-1, but are potentially greater in areas of data decorrelation. These rates fall to <2.7 × 10-2 mm day-1 after about 20 years in flows about 50 m thick, sooner for thinner flows. Comparison with measured subsidence rates on Kilauean lava lakes suggests that thermal contraction only accounts for about one third of the observed subsidence. The remaining motion is thought to come from surface clast repacking during cooling and from creep mechanisms in the flow substrate. Measurements of postemplacement surface movement provide new constraints on the thermomechanical properties of lava flows and have cautionary implications for the interpretation of interferometric SAR data of volcanoes.

  13. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.

    2015-02-15

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field.

  14. Dynamic measurement for the solution concentration variation using digital holographic interferometry and discussion for the measuring accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianlin; Zhang, Yanyan; Jiang, Hongzhen; Di, Jianglei

    2013-06-01

    Based on digital holographic interferometry (DHI), a method for dynamically measuring the solution concentration variation is introduced. Firstly, a series of digital holograms containing the information of the solution concentration variation is recorded by CCD. Then, according to the relationship between the phase change of the reconstructed object wave and the solution concentration, the two-dimensional (2D) solution concentration distributions in different time are figured out. Taking the measurement of the solution concentration in crystallization process as a sample, the experimental results turn out that it is feasible to in situ, full-field and dynamically monitor the solution concentration variation with the proposed method. We also discuss how to assure the measurement accuracy in following aspects: (1) implementation of the phase correction to eliminate the influence of the environment for the measurement process; (2) determination of the phase calibration base in the space-domain phase unwrapping process according to the time-domain phase unwrapping result of the arbitrary point in solution; (3) the experimental approaches and analysis for improving the measurement accuracy.

  15. Phase-sensitive swept-source interferometry for absolute ranging with application to measurements of group refractive index and thickness.

    PubMed

    Moore, Eric D; McLeod, Robert R

    2011-04-25

    Interferometric range measurements using a wavelength-tunable source form the basis of several measurement techniques, including optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR), swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), and frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) lidar. We present a phase-sensitive and self-referenced approach to swept-source interferometry that yields absolute range measurements with axial precision three orders of magnitude better than the transform-limited axial resolution of the system. As an example application, we implement the proposed method for a simultaneous measurement of group refractive index and thickness of an optical glass sample. PMID:21643062

  16. Optimised 3D surface measurement of hydroxyapatite layers using adapted white light scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Montaner, Denis; Pramatarova, Lilyana; Zanev, Zenko

    2006-09-01

    Biomineralization is intensively studied at present due to its importance in the formation of bones, teeth, cartilage, etc. Hydroxyapatite is one of the most common natural biomaterials and the primary structural component of bones and teeth. We have grown bio-like hydroxyapatite layers in-vitro on stainless steel, silicon and silica glass by using a biomimetic approach (immersion in a supersaturated aqueous solution resembling the ion composition of human blood plasma). Using classical techniques such as stylus profiling, AFM or SEM, it was found difficult, destructive or time-consuming to measure the topography, thickness and profile of the heterogeneous, thick and rough hydroxyapatite layers. White light scanning interferometry, on the other hand, has been found to be particularly useful for analyzing such bio-like layers, requiring no sample preparation and being rapid and non-destructive. The results have shown a typical layer thickness of up to 20 μm and a rms roughness of 4 μm. The hydroxyapatite presents nonetheless a challenge for this technique because of its semi-translucence, high roughness and the presence of cavities within its volume. This results in varying qualities of fringe pattern depending on the area, ranging from classical fringes on smooth surfaces, to complex speckle-like fringes on rough surfaces, to multiple fringe signals along the optical axis in the presence of buried layers. In certain configurations this can affect the measurement precision. In this paper we present the latest results for optimizing the measurement conditions in order to reduce such errors and to provide additional useful information concerning the layer.

  17. Snowpack displacement measured by terrestrial radar interferometry as precursor for wet snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caduff, Rafael; Wiesmann, Andreas; Bühler, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Wet snow and full depth gliding avalanches commonly occur on slopes during springtime when air temperatures rise above 0°C for longer time. The increase in the liquid water content changes the mechanical properties of the snow pack. Until now, forecasts of wet snow avalanches are mainly done using weather data such as air and snow temperatures and incoming solar radiation. Even tough some wet snow avalanche events are indicated before the release by the formation of visible signs such as extension cracks or compressional bulges in the snow pack, a large number of wet snow avalanches are released without any previously visible signs. Continuous monitoring of critical slopes by terrestrial radar interferometry improves the scale of reception of differential movement into the range of millimetres per hour. Therefore, from a terrestrial and remote observation location, information on the mechanical state of the snow pack can be gathered on a slope wide scale. Recent campaigns in the Swiss Alps showed the potential of snow deformation measurements with a portable, interferometric real aperture radar operating at 17.2 GHz (1.76 cm wavelength). Common error sources for the radar interferometric measurement of snow pack displacements are decorrelation of the snow pack at different conditions, the influence of atmospheric disturbances on the interferometric phase and transition effects from cold/dry snow to warm/wet snow. Therefore, a critical assessment of those parameters has to be considered in order to reduce phase noise effects and retrieve accurate displacement measurements. The most recent campaign in spring 2015 took place in Davos Dorf/GR, Switzerland and its objective was to observe snow glide activity on the Dorfberg slope. A validation campaign using total station measurements showed good agreement to the radar interferometric line of sight displacement measurements in the range of 0.5 mm/h. The refinement of the method led to the detection of numerous gliding

  18. Standards for ultrashort-laser-pulse-measurement techniques and their consideration for self-referenced spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Michelle; Steinmeyer, Günter; Trebino, Rick

    2014-06-01

    Issues important for new ultrashort-pulse-measurement techniques include the generation of theoretical example traces for common pulses, validity ranges, ambiguities, coherent artifacts, device calibration sensitivity, iterative retrieval convergence, and feedback regarding measurement accuracy. Unfortunately, in the past, such issues have gone unconsidered, yielding long histories of unsatisfactory measurements. We review these issues here in the hope that future proposers of new techniques will consider them without delay, and, as an example, we address them for a relatively new technique: self-referenced spectral interferometry.

  19. Renewed uplift at the Yellowstone caldera measured by leveling surveys and satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.; Wicks, C.; Thatcher, W.

    1999-01-01

    A first-order leveling survey across the northeast part of the Yellowstone caldera in September 1998 showed that the central caldera floor near Le Hardy Rapids rose 24 ?? 5 mm relative to the caldera rim at Lake Butte since the previous survey in September 1995. Annual surveys along the same traverse from 1985 to 1995 tracked progressive subsidence near Le Hardy Rapids at an average rate of -19 ?? 1 mm/year. Earlier, less frequent surveys measured net uplift in the same area during 1923-1976 (14 ?? 1 mm/year) and 1976-1984 (22 ?? 1 mm/year). The resumption of uplift following a decade of subsidence was first detected by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry, which revealed approximately 15 mm of uplift in the vicinity of Le Hardy Rapids from July 1995 to June 1997. Radar interferograms show that the center of subsidence shifted from the Sour Creek resurgent dome in the northeast part of the caldera during August 1992 to June 1993 to the Mallard Lake resurgent dome in the southwest part during June 1993 to August 1995. Uplift began at the Sour Creek dome during August 1995 to September 1996 and spread to the Mallard Lake dome by June 1997. The rapidity of these changes and the spatial pattern of surface deformation suggest that ground movements are caused at least in part by accumulation and migration of fluids in two sill-like bodies at 5-10 km depth, near the interface between Yellowstone's magmatic and deep hydrothermal systems.

  20. Measurement of micro-strain across resin-dentin interfaces using microscopic moiré interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Judy D.; Sobolewski, Paul; Thakur, Varun; Arola, Dwayne; Nazari, Ahmed; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanical behavior of resin-dentine interfaces during loading. The presence of relatively compliant hybrid and adhesive layers between stiffer dentin and resin composite should deform more during compressive loading. Objective The objective of this study was to measure changes in microstrain across bonded dentine interfaces in real time using a recently developed microscope moiré interferometer. Method This system used a miniature moiré interferometer, using two CCD cameras for simultaneous recording of longitudinal and transverse deformation fields, a piezotransducer for fringe shifting and use of a microscope objective with magnification up to 600×. Small beams (1 × 2 × 6 mm) of moist resin-bonded dentine covered with a diffraction grating replica were placed in a miniature compression tester to allow controlled loading from 2-37 N while imaging the interference fringe patterns. Results Dentine beams bonded with Single Bond/Z100 under compressive loading of resin-dentine interfaces exhibited comparatively large strains across the adhesive-hybrid layer interface. When the wrapped phase maps were unwrapped to permit conversion of fringe order to displacements, the 2-D profiles of strain fields revealed nonuniform strains across the adhesive interface. In the adhesive/hybrid layer zone, the negative strain was larger (i.e. -6000 με) than that seen in the adjacent resin composite or underlying mineralized dentin. The changes were elastic because they disappeared when the load was removed. Significance Microscopic moiré interferometry can be very useful in revealing real-time strain of bonded interfaces under load. PMID:18045678

  1. Measurement of monovalent and polyvalent carbohydrate-lectin binding by back-scattering interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kussrow, Amanda; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Wolfenden, Mark L; Cloninger, Mary J; Finn, M G; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2009-06-15

    Carbohydrate-protein binding is important to many areas of biochemistry. Here, backscattering interferometry (BSI) has been shown to be a convenient and sensitive method for obtaining quantitative information about the strengths and selectivities of such interactions. The surfaces of glass microfluidic channels were covalently modified with extravidin, to which biotinylated lectins were subsequently attached by incubation and washing. The binding of unmodified carbohydrates to the resulting avidin-immobilized lectins was monitored by BSI. Dose-response curves that were generated within several minutes and were highly reproducible in multiple wash/measure cycles provided adsorption coefficients that showed mannose to bind to concanavalin A (conA) with 3.7 times greater affinity than glucose consistent with literature values. Galactose was observed to bind selectively and with similar affinity to the lectin BS-1. The avidities of polyvalent sugar-coated virus particles for immobilized conA were much higher than monovalent glycans, with increases of 60-200 fold per glycan when arrayed on the exterior surface of cowpea mosaic virus or bacteriophage Qbeta. Sugar-functionalized PAMAM dendrimers showed size-dependent adsorption, which was consistent with the expected density of lectins on the surface. The sensitivity of BSI matches or exceeds that of surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance techniques, and is sensitive to the number of binding events, rather than changes in mass. The operational simplicity and generality of BSI, along with the near-native conditions under which the target binding proteins are immobilized, make BSI an attractive method for the quantitative characterization of the binding functions of lectins and other proteins.

  2. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  3. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  4. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2016-07-12

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  5. The Quantitative Measurement Of Temperature Distribution In 3-D Thermal Field With High-Speed Real-Time Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji-zong, Wu; Wei-qiao, Fu; Qin, Wu

    1989-06-01

    The theory of using high-speed real-time holographic interferometry to measure quantitatively 3-D thermal field is discussed in thispaper. An experimental arrangement, and the holographic interference fringes of thermal field formed by the electrAc heating coil wires which were taken by the high-speed camera are given. With CONCEPT 32/2725 computer system and corresponding programms the distribution of 3-D thermal field is calculated and plotted Finally, the problems required to be improved and solved for the method of measuring quantitatively 3-D thermal field are discussed.

  6. Measurement of Creep on the Calaveras Fault at Coyote Dam using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B.; Cassotto, R.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Werner, C. L.; Boettcher, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Calaveras fault in central California is part of the San Andreas fault system. Coyote Dam, an earthen dam that straddles the fault ~13km northeast of Gilroy, experiences creep style deformation that ranges from 10 to 15 mm/yr. Uncertainty in the location of the fault, coupled with the historic rate of deformation, affect the dam's safety factor. Assessing the impact of fault creep on the dam's stability is paramount to its safety evaluation, but is difficult to resolve due to limited spatial and temporal sampling of conventional methods. Terrestrial radar interferometry (TRI), like satellite-based observations, produces high spatial resolution maps of ground deformation. Unlike space-based sensors, TRI can be readily deployed and the observation geometry selected to get the maximum line of sight (LOS) signal. TRI also benefits from high temporal sampling which can be used to reduce errors related to atmospheric phase delays and high temporal sampling also facilitates tracking rapidly moving features such as landslides and glaciers. GAMMA Portable Radar Interferometer (GPRI) measurements of Coyote Dam rock faces were made from concrete piers built upstream and downstream of the dam. The GPRI operates at a radar frequency of 17.2 GHz with a spatial resolution at the dam of approximately 0.9 m x 2.0 m. Changes in LOS path length smaller than 0.1mm can be measured. Data were acquired approximately every 2 to 3 weeks over a 7-month period to map the fault trace through the dam faces. Our study exploits the dense record of observations obtained, and the relatively short distance of the radar to the dam to minimize atmospheric affects. We investigate how the deformation evolves in time and the orientation of fault through the dam, including the strike and dip as measured along the dam surface. Our results show rates consistent with GPS data and regional satellite observations, but produce a much more detailed map of the fault on the dam than possible with GPS or

  7. Vibration measurement of the tympanic membrane of guinea pig temporal bones using time-averaged speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hiroshi; Ando, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Masataka; Sugawara, Hironori; Koike, Takuji; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Hozawa, Koji; Gemma, Takashi; Nara, Makoto

    2002-05-01

    ``Time-averaged holography'' and ``holographic interferometry'' enable recording of the complete vibration pattern of a surface within several seconds. The results appear in the form of fringes. Vibration amplitudes smaller than 100 nm are not readily measurable by these techniques, because such small amplitudes produce variations in gray level, but not fringes. In practice, to obtain clear fringes in these measurements, stimulus sound pressures higher than 100 dB SPL must be used. The phase of motion is also not obtainable from such fringe techniques. In this study, a sinusoidal phase modulation technique is described, which allows detection of both small amplitudes of motion and their phase from time-averaged speckle pattern interferometry. In this technique, the laser injection current is modulated and digital image processing is used to analyze the measured patterns. When the sound-pressure level of stimuli is between 70 and 85 dB SPL, this system is applied to measure the vibratory response of the tympanic membrane (TM) of guinea pig temporal bones at frequencies up to 4 kHz where complicated vibration modes are observed. The effect of the bulla on TM displacements is also quantified. Results indicate that this system is capable of measuring the nanometer displacements of the TM, produced by stimuli of 70 dB SPL.

  8. Dynamic measurement by digital holographic interferometry based on complex phasor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, C. J.; Quan, C.; Chen, W.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, complex phasor (CP) method is employed in digital holographic interferometry. Unlike commonly used digital phase subtraction (DPS), the proposed technique processes a CP instead of phase. It is shown that the results obtained by directly filtering the phase produce large errors. It is demonstrated that the phase is not a signal but rather a property of a signal. In addition, the results obtained by the CP method are also compared with those obtained by conventional sine/cosine transformation method.

  9. Measuring the thickness of soap bubbles with phase-shift interferometry.

    PubMed

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Sordini, Andrea; Gabrieli, Riccardo; Melozzi, Mauro; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2013-08-26

    A model for the optical path difference introduced by a soap bubble in transmission is described. The model is then used with interferometric data to solve for the fringe order, and to define a procedure to extract the global film thickness in presence of turbulence flows occurring during the drainage process due to gravity. Experimental results on soap bubbles examined in single-pass phase-shift interferometry are presented. PMID:24105512

  10. Application of Shear Plate Interferometry to Jet Diffusion Flame Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; OBrien, Chris J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1997-01-01

    diagnostics of flames are, however, necessarily limited to detection of radiative emission in the visible range, and offer only qualitative information about the nature of the processes in the flame. In particular, the study sought to understand the structure of the inhibitor-perturbed flames with regard to temperature and species concentration in the outer region of the flame. Whereas thermocouple measurements can be used in ground based studies, their implementation in drop-tower rigs is limited. A possible approach to determine the temperature field around the flame is to use interferometric techniques. The implementation and testing of a shear-plate interferometry technique is described below.

  11. Absolute distance measurement by multi-heterodyne interferometry using a frequency comb and a cavity-stabilized tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Balling, Petr; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a multi-heterodyne system capable of absolute distance measurement using a frequency comb and a tunable diode laser locked to a Fabry-Perot cavity. In a series of subsequent measurements, numerous beat components can be obtained by downconverting the optical frequency into the RF region with multi-heterodyne interferometry. The distances can be measured via the mode phases with a series of synthetic wavelengths. The comparison with the reference interferometer shows an agreement within 1.5 μm for the averages of five measurements and 2.5 μm for the single measurement, which is at the 10-8 relative precision level. PMID:27411152

  12. Simple tunable dual-wavelength fiber laser and multiple self-mixing interferometry to large step height measurement.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lianlian; Xie, Fang; Ma, Sen; Wang, Yunzhi; Chen, Liang

    2016-09-19

    A simple tunable dual-wavelength fiber laser was developed and multiple self-mixing interferometry to large step height measurement was demonstrated. The fiber laser, which can emit two wavelengths without laser mode competition, is composed of a single fiber ring cavity and two fiber branches. Each branch includes a length of erbium-doped fiber and a fiber Bragg grating. Large step heights can be measured using multiple self-mixing interference of the two wavelengths. The maximum height that can be measured is half synthetic wavelength of the two wavelengths. A step height of 2mm constructed with two gauge blocks has been measured. The standard deviation of measurement results is 2.5nm. PMID:27661923

  13. Interferometry concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millour, F.

    2014-09-01

    This paper serves as an introduction to the current book. It provides the basic notions of long-baseline optical/infrared interferometry prior to reading all the subsequent chapters, and is not an extended introduction to the field.

  14. Improved measurement of low residual stresses by speckle correlation interferometry and local heat treating

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.

    2000-02-23

    The results presented in this paper clearly demonstrate that the dynamic range of this measurement technique can be improved substantially over the earlier experiments. It is just as clear that a more systematic study must be performed to quantify these improvements and to generate usable calibrations. These results are also encouraging in the sense that this technique may now be appropriate for other materials with high thermal diffusivities. Previous attempts to measure residual stresses by laser annealing and electronic speckle pattern interferometry have been successful for moderate to high stress levels. The method uses an infrared laser for relieving stress in a small spot. A dab on temperature indicating paint is applied to the spot and a specklegram of the spot and the surrounding area is captured. The paint is then heated with a laser until it melts. The heat is transferred from the paint into the metal resulting in a small amount of localized stress relief as the yield stress of the material drops below the stress levels surrounding the spot. Once the spot and area around it have cooled a second speckle-gram is captured and the images are processed to determine the in-plane strain. The amount of stress relief depends on the melting temperature of the paint since yield stress is a function of temperature. The measurement of local stress relief by heating is subject to limitations that result from thermal expansion competing with the reduction in yield stress of the spot at the elevated temperature. That is, as the spot is heated it tends to temporarily reduce the stress in the region surrounding the spot as it expands into this surrounding region. This limits the amount of stress relief that can occur. This can be overcome to some extent by using higher temperature paints, which in turn lowers the yield stress in the heated spot. At some point, however, the thermal expansion overtakes the surrounding stress field and can even drive it into compression

  15. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1984-06-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed.

  16. Temperature measurement of axisymmetric flames under the influence of magnetic field using Talbot interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Kumar, Manoj; Shakher, Chandra

    2014-10-01

    Combustion process control is related with ecological improvement and the problem of energy efficiency; hence it has a wide interest at both economical and scientific levels. Application of a magnetic field is one of the most promising methods of combustion control. The presence of magnetic field induces the changes in flame behavior. The effect of uniform magnetic field developed by permanent magnet is studied by Talbot interferometry using circular gratings. Experimental results show a small decrease in flame temperature and increase in flame dimensions.

  17. Transcontinental baselines and the rotation of the Earth measured by radio interferometry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, I I; Robertson, D S; Knight, C A; Counselman, C C; Rogers, A E; Hinteregger, H F; Lippincott, S; Whitney, A R; Clark, T A; Niell, A E; Spitzmesser, D J

    1974-12-01

    Nine separate very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiments, carried out in 1972 and 1973 with radio telescopes 3900 kilometers apart, yielded values for the baseline length with a root-mean-square deviation about the mean of less than 20 centitneters. The corresponding fractional spread is about five parts in 10(8). Changes in universal time and in polar motion were also detertnined accurately from these data; the root-mean-square scatter of these results with respect to those based on optical methods were 2.9 milliseconds and 1.3 meters, respectively. Solid-earth tides were apparently detected, but no useful estimate of their amplituide was extracted.

  18. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed.

  19. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three-dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-21849

  20. Temperature measurement of axisymmetric flames under the influence of magnetic field using Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Shilpi E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com Kumar, Manoj E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com Shakher, Chandra E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Combustion process control is related with ecological improvement and the problem of energy efficiency; hence it has a wide interest at both economical and scientific levels. Application of a magnetic field is one of the most promising methods of combustion control. The presence of magnetic field induces the changes in flame behavior. The effect of uniform magnetic field developed by permanent magnet is studied by Talbot interferometry using circular gratings. Experimental results show a small decrease in flame temperature and increase in flame dimensions.

  1. Automatic Fringe Detection for Oil Film Interferometry Measurement of Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, Jonathan W.; Decker, Robert K.; Jafari, Farhad

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes two years of work on investigating algorithms for automatically detecting fringe patterns in images acquired using oil-drop interferometry for the determination of skin friction. Several different analysis methods were tested, and a combination of a windowed Fourier transform followed by a correlation was found to be most effective. The implementation of this method is discussed and details of the process are described. The results indicate that this method shows promise for automating the fringe detection process, but further testing is required.

  2. Measurement of the local displacement field generated by a microindentation using digital speckle pattern interferometry and its application to investigate coating adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinko, Andrés E.; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a technique to investigate the adhesion of thin coatings which combines digital speckle pattern interferometry and an indentation test. The proposed approach is based on the measurement of the local displacement field produced by a microindentation introduced on the coated surface of a specimen. It is experimentally demonstrated that the buckling of the coating generated by the microindentation depends on its adhesion to the substrate. Experiments carried out in specimens with different conditions in the coating-substrate interface show that digital speckle pattern interferometry can be used to determine the size of the buckled region and to give a measurement of the coating adhesion strength.

  3. Multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry for micro-structures measurement based on color image processing in white light interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tong; Li, Feng; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2016-07-01

    Conventional multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry utilizes two or three monochromatic light sources, such as lasers, to realize the measurement of the surface topography with large discontinuity. In this paper, the white light source, with a single-chip CCD color camera, is used to accomplish multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry. In addition, we propose an algorithm which combines white light phase-shifting algorithm, equivalent wavelength method and fringe order method to achieve measuring and calibrating the micro-structures ranging from nanometer scale to micrometer scale. Finally, the proposed method is validated by a traceable step height standard.

  4. Visual measurement of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet by dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Zhong, Liyun; Luo, Chunshu; Niu, Wenhu; Lu, Xiaoxu

    2015-01-01

    To perform the visual measurement of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet, a dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry (DCSPSI) method is proposed. Based on polarization components to simultaneously generate a pair of orthogonal interferograms with the phase shifts of π/2, the real-time phase of a dynamic process can be retrieved with two-step phase-shifting algorithm. Using this proposed DCSPSI system, the transient mass (TM) of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet with different initial mass were presented through measuring the real-time 3D shape of a droplet. Moreover, the mass flux density (MFD) of the evaporating droplet and its regional distribution were also calculated and analyzed. The experimental results show that the proposed DCSPSI will supply a visual, accurate, noncontact, nondestructive, global tool for the real-time multi-parameter measurement of the droplet evaporation. PMID:26178451

  5. Measurement of temperature and temperature distribution in gaseous flames by digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry using holographic optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Shakher, Chandra

    2015-10-01

    Digital speckle pattern lateral shear interferometry (DSPSI) based on volume phase holographic grating for the measurement of temperature and temperature distribution in candle flames is presented. The DSPSI setup uses the volume phase holographic grating combined with ground glass to shear the wavefronts. The shear of the two wavefronts is controlled by the distance between volume phase holographic grating and the ground glass. The sheared wavefronts on the ground glass are imaged onto the CMOS detector by an imaging lens. Two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to the absence of the flame and the presence of the flame. The fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. A single fringe pattern was used to extract phase by the application of Riesz transform and the monogenic signal. The measured values of the temperature of the candle flame by DSPSI is compared with that of R-type Platinum-Platinum Rhodium thermocouple and the results are well within experimental limits.

  6. Quantitative measurement of displacement in photopolymer layers during holographic recording using phase shifting electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Bavigadda, Viswanath; Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit; Toal, Vincent; Naydenova, Izabela

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the displacement profile due to shrinkage in acrylamide-based photopolymer layer during holographic recording. Using phase shifting electronic speckle pattern interferometry the displacement at each pixel in the image of the object is measured by phase shifting technique so that a complete displacement profile of the object can be obtained. It was observed that the displacement profile is Gaussian and resembles to the profile of the recording beam. We observed an increase in shrinkage from 2 μm at 20 seconds of recording to 7.5 μm after 120 seconds of recording. The technique allows for real time measurement of the shrinkage profile.

  7. Implications of very long baseline interferometry measurements on North American intra-plate crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allenby, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry experiments over the last 1-3/4 years between Owens Valley, CA and Haystack, MA Radio Observatories suggest an upper limit of east-west crustal deformation between the two sites of about 1 cm/yr. In view of the fact that the baseline between the two sites traverses most of the major geological provinces of the United States, this low rate of crustal deformation has direct relevance to intra-plate crustal tectonics. The most active region traversed by this baseline is the Basin and Range province, which was estimated by various researchers to be expanding in an east-west direction at rates of .3 to 1.5 cm/yr. The Colorado Plateau and Rocky Mountain system also appear to be expanding, but at a somewhat lower rate, while east of the Rocky Mountains, the predominant stress appears to be compressional, nearly horizontal, and east to northeast trending.

  8. Geodetic and Astrometric Measurements with Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The use of very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations for the estimation of geodetic and astrometric parameters is discussed. Analytic models for the dependence of delay and delay rate on these parameters are developed and used for parameter estimation by the method of weighted least squares. Results are presented from approximately 15,000 delay and delay-rate observations, obtained in a series of nineteen VLBI experiments involving a total of five stations on two continents. The closure of baseline triangles is investigated and found to be consistent with the scatter of the various baseline-component results. Estimates are made of the wobble of the earth's pole and of the irregularities in the earth's rotation rate. Estimates are also made of the precession constant and of the vertical Love number, for which a value of 0.55 + or - 0.05 was obtained.

  9. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to Measure Earth's Surface Topography and Its Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürgmann, Roland; Rosen, Paul A.; Fielding, Eric J.

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) from Earth-orbiting spacecraft provides a new tool to map global topography and deformation of the Earth's surface. Radar images taken from slightly different viewing directions allow the construction of digital elevation models of meter-scale accuracy. These data sets aid in the analysis and interpretation of tectonic and volcanic landscapes. If the Earth's surface deformed between two radar image acquisitions, a map of the surface displacement with tens-of-meters resolution and subcentimeter accuracy can be constructed. This review gives a basic overview of InSAR for Earth scientists and presents a selection of geologic applications that demonstrate the unique capabilities of InSAR for mapping the topography and deformation of the Earth.

  10. A new approach to the measurement of protein solubility by Michaelson interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, R. J.; Hou, W. B.; Kudryavtsev, A. B.; DeLucas, L. J.

    2001-11-01

    Protein concentration influences nucleation and crystal growth rates, therefore an appropriate degree of supersaturation is essential for the preparation of large and good quality crystals. Knowledge of a protein's solubility dependence on solution variables such as temperature, pH, or ionic strength can be very useful for defining optimum conditions for protein crystal growth work. We have refined a Michaelson interferometry technique reported by Sazaki et al. (J. Crystal Growth 169 (1996) 355.) for determination of protein solubility using the proteins lysozyme and equine serum albumin by examining the behavior of both surface and concentration gradient fringes. This has provided a sensitive and accurate estimate of protein solubility using small crystals (0.2 mm×0.1 mm).

  11. Iris as a reflector for differential absorption low-coherence interferometry to measure glucose level in the anterior chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zeng, Nan; Ji, Yanhong; Li, Yao; Dai, Xiangsong; Li, Peng; Duan, Lian; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    We present a method of glucose concentration detection in the anterior chamber with a differential absorption optical low-coherent interferometry (LCI) technique. Back-reflected light from the iris, passing through the anterior chamber twice, was selectively obtained with the LCI technique. Two light sources, one centered within (1625 nm) and the other centered outside (1310 nm) of a glucose absorption band were used for differential absorption measurement. In the eye model and pig eye experiments, we obtained a resolution glucose level of 26.8 mg/dL and 69.6 mg/dL, respectively. This method has a potential application for noninvasive detection of glucose concentration in aqueous humor, which is related to the glucose concentration in blood.

  12. Analysis of the feasibility of an experiment to measure carbon monoxide in the atmosphere. [using remote platform interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortner, M. H.; Alyea, F. N.; Grenda, R. N.; Liebling, G. R.; Levy, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring atmospheric carbon monoxide from a remote platform using the correlation interferometry technique was considered. It has been determined that CO data can be obtained with an accuracy of 10 percent using this technique on the first overtone band of CO at 2.3 mu. That band has been found to be much more suitable than the stronger fundamental band at 4.6 mu. Calculations for both wavelengths are presented which illustrate the effects of atmospheric temperature profiles, inversion layers, ground temperature and emissivity, CO profile, reflectivity, and atmospheric pressure. The applicable radiative transfer theory on which these calculations are based is described together with the principles of the technique.

  13. Measurement of dynamic patterns of an elastic membrane at bi-modal vibration using high speed electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preciado, Jorge Sanchez; Lopez, Carlos Perez; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza

    2014-05-01

    Implementing a hybrid arrangement of Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) and high speed Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) we were able to measure the dynamic patterns of a flat rectangular elastic membrane clamped at its edges stimulated with the sum of two resonance frequencies. ESPI is a versatile technique to analyze in real-time the deformation of a membrane since its low computational cost and easy implementation of the optical setup. Elastic membranes present nonlinear behaviors when stimulated with low amplitude signals. The elastic membrane under test, with several non rational related vibrating modals below the 200 Hz, was stimulated with two consecutives resonant frequencies. The ESPI patterns, acquired at high speed rates, shown a similar behavior for the dual frequency stimulation as in the case of patterns formed with the entrainment frequency. We think this may be related to the effects observed in the application of dual frequency stimulation in ultrasound.

  14. Measurement of the temporal evolution of periodic induced displacement derivatives using stoboscopic electronic speackle-shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Davila, Abundio; Mendiola, G.; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2001-02-01

    Single pulsed subtraction electronic speckle-shearing pattern interferometry is used to measure the time evolution of deformations induced by periodic impulse loading on a metal plate. This is accomplished with a stroboscopic system based on a pulsed laser and an interline-transfer CCD camera running at 60 frames/s. In a few seconds, a sequence of hundreds of interferograms is recorded with an effective sampling time interval of some tens of microseconds. We describe the experimental setup used to generate the transient deformation on the metal plate and also the synchronization of laser pulses and image acquisition. Several correlation fringe patterns are presented, showing the time evolution of the deformation. Finally, these data are used to calculate optical phase maps and displacement derivative fields for different times after the application of the dynamic load on the object.

  15. Measurement of dynamic patterns of an elastic membrane at bi-modal vibration using high speed electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Preciado, Jorge Sanchez; Lopez, Carlos Perez; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza

    2014-05-27

    Implementing a hybrid arrangement of Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) and high speed Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) we were able to measure the dynamic patterns of a flat rectangular elastic membrane clamped at its edges stimulated with the sum of two resonance frequencies. ESPI is a versatile technique to analyze in real-time the deformation of a membrane since its low computational cost and easy implementation of the optical setup. Elastic membranes present nonlinear behaviors when stimulated with low amplitude signals. The elastic membrane under test, with several non rational related vibrating modals below the 200 Hz, was stimulated with two consecutives resonant frequencies. The ESPI patterns, acquired at high speed rates, shown a similar behavior for the dual frequency stimulation as in the case of patterns formed with the entrainment frequency. We think this may be related to the effects observed in the application of dual frequency stimulation in ultrasound.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of refractive index and wedge angle of optical windows using Fizeau interferometry and a cyclic path optical configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Y. Pavan; Chatterjee, Sanjib

    2009-08-20

    We present a new technique for the simultaneous measurement of refractive index and wedge angle of optical windows using Fizeau interferometry and a cyclic path optical configuration (CPOC). Two laterally separated beams are obtained from an expanded collimated beam using an aperture containing two rectangular openings. The test wedge plate is placed in one of the two separated beams. Using CPOC, these two beams are made to overlap and interfere, producing interference fringes in the overlapping region. The beams reflected from the front and back surfaces of the test wedge plate interfere and produce Fizeau fringes. The refractive index is related to the spacing of the above two beam fringes. The wedge angle is determined from the evaluated values of the refractive index and Fizeau fringe spacing. The results obtained for a BK-7 optical window are presented.

  17. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun

    2015-04-15

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10{sup −6}(K{sup −1}) at the range of 298 K–598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K–748 K.

  18. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun; Zhang, Shulian

    2015-04-01

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10-6(K-1) at the range of 298 K-598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K-748 K.

  19. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun; Zhang, Shulian

    2015-04-01

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10(-6)(K(-1)) at the range of 298 K-598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K-748 K. PMID:25933843

  20. Hot Exozodiacal Dust Disks, their Detection and Variability, as Measured with Long-Baseline Optical Interferometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas Jon

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared long-baseline optical interferometry has provided the first unambiguous resolved detections of hot dust around main sequence stars (Absil et al. 2006). This showed that an unexpectedly dense population of (sub)micrometer dust grains close exists to their sublimation temperature of approximately 1400K. A later survey (Absil et al. 2013) revealed that these "hot exozodiacal disks" are relatively common around spectral type A-K stars. Current models of circumstellar debris disks suggest that in the inner region, within 1 AU, of the disk the timescale for complete removal of submicron dust is on the order of a few years (Wyatt 2008). The presence of dust close to the star is surprising because most cold debris belts detected are collisionally dominated. Mutual collisions grind the dust down to the size where radiation pressure pushes the dust out before Poynting-Robertson drag has a chance to pull the dust inward. Competing models exist to explain the persistence of this dust; some of which suggest that dust production is a punctuated and chaotic process fueled by asteroid collisions and comet infall that would show variability on timescales of a few years.High precision long-baseline interferometry observations in the K-band with the FLUOR (Fiber Linked Unit for Optical Recombination) beam combiner at the CHARA (Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy) Array provided the data for these exozodiacal dust detections. This original instrument has undergone upgrades as part of JouFLU (Jouvence of FLUOR) project. The new instrument has been used to expand the original survey and to re-observe stars from the previous exozodiacal disk survey to search for predicted variations in the detected disks. We have found evidence that for some systems the amount of circumstellar flux from these previously detected exozodiacal disks, or exozodis, has varied greatly. The flux from some exozodis has increased, others decreased, and for a few the amount has remained

  1. Synchronous triple-optical-path digital speckle pattern interferometry with fast discrete curvelet transform for measuring three-dimensional displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guoqing; Wang, Kaifu; Wang, Yanfang; She, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) is a well-established and widely used optical measurement technique for obtaining qualitative as well as quantitative measurements of objects deformation. The simultaneous measurement of an object's surface displacements in three dimensions using DSPI is of great interest. This paper presents a triple-optical-path DSPI based method for the simultaneous and independent measurement of three-dimensional (3D) displacement fields. In the proposed method, in-plane speckle interferometers with dual-observation geometry and an out-of-plane interferometer are optimally combined to construct an integrated triple-optical-path DSPI system employing the phase shift technique, which uses only a single laser source and three cameras. These cameras are placed along a single line to synchronously capture real-time visible speckle fringe patterns in three dimensions. In addition, a pre-filtering method based on the fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT) is utilized for denoising the obtained wrapped phase patterns to improve measurement accuracy. Finally, the simultaneous measurement of the 3D displacement fields of a simple beam and a composite laminated plate respectively subjected to three-point and single-point bend loading are investigated to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Modulated photoactivation of composite restoration: measurement of cuspal movement using holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Blažić, Larisa; Pantelić, Dejan; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Belić, Ilija; Panić, Bratimir

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of modulated photoactivation on cuspal movement. Eight class II MOD composite restorations were analyzed under various photoactivation protocols in a real-time manner using holographic interferometry. During the first photoactivation protocol, the composite restoration was illuminated for 200 s continuously. In the second protocol, the polymerization lamp was first turned on for 5 s, then turned off for 120 s, and again turned on for a final 195 s. In both protocols, radiant exposure was the same. A significant decrease (p < 0.05) in cuspal deflection was found for two-step irradiation (average value of total cuspal deflection was 5.03 ± 0.62 µm) compared to continuous irradiation (average value of total cuspal deflection was 5.95 ± 0.65 µm). The two-step photoactivation protocol was found preferable, since it resulted in a significantly lower cuspal deflection (11% lower, compared to the continuous illumination).

  3. Measurements of deformations in osseous structures and implants by digital speckle interferometry (DSPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Rosario; González-Peña, Rolando; Cibrián, Rosa; Buendía, Mateo; Mínguez, Fe; Laguía, Manuel; Molina, Teresa; Marti, Luis; Esteve, José; Caballero, José; Micó, Vicente; Sanjuan, Elena

    2006-09-01

    Knowledge of how osseous structures and implants behave under deforming stress is an interesting point when evaluating the response of an implanted prosthesis. The failure of an implant is not always due to the great stress a structure may be subjected to at a particular moment, but rather to the effects of deterioration associated with lesser stress but which is continuously applied. Therefore it is helpful to know how bones and implants respond to this lesser stress. Digital speckle interferometry (DSPI) is suitable for this type of determination, as it is a highly sensitive, non-invasive optical technique. In this study we present the results we obtained when determining the elasticity of a sample of a macerated human radius, a titanium implant and a titanium screw used to treat the fractures of this bone. The correlation ratios we obtained in determining Young's modulus were in the order of r=0.994. Models were made of these structures using the finite elements method (FEM) with the aid of the ANSYS 10.0 program, applying Young's modulus values determined by DSPI. With a view to monitoring the accuracy of the FEM models of the bone and the implant elements we designed a flexion experiment to obtain the DSPI values in and out of plane. The high degree of concordance between the results of both methods makes it possible to continue studying osseous samples with a fixed implant, and also other implants made of different alloys.

  4. Full-field displacement and strain measurement of small complex bony structures with digital speckle pattern interferometry and shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soons, Joris; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a simple digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) and shearography setup to measure the displacement and the corresponding strains of small complex bony structures. We choose both optical techniques because we want to obtain very small deformations (+/- 20 μm) of small objects (+/- 1cm). Furthermore full field and in situ measurements are preferred. We first use a Michelson DSPI arrangement with phase shifting. In this way we can obtain the out-of-plane displacements precisely. Second, shearography is introduced to measure the derivative of the out-ofplane displacement. In this way some intrinsic disadvantages of DSPI can be overcome. We have developed these setups to measure the out-of-plane deformations of (small) bird beaks when realistic external forces are applied. In this way, we have a full field validation measurement to which we can compare the outcome of realistic finite element models. The aim is to determine whether the shape, and not only the size, of the bird beaks are optimized to deal with the biting forces that a species encounters. This quantitative analysis will help biologists to investigate if beak morphology is adapted to feeding habits. Applying the method to the famous evolution model of the Darwin's finches will provide scientific proof of functional evolution. In this paper we will present both the DSPI and shearography setup, a comparison of the performance of both techniques on a simple deflection of a cantilever beam and the first results obtained on loaded bird beaks.

  5. Compact sensor combining digital speckle pattern interferometry and the hole-drilling technique to measure nonuniform residual stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Matías R.; Albertazzi, Armando

    2013-10-01

    A portable device to essentially measure residual stress fields outside an optical bench is presented. This system combines the hole-drilling technique with digital speckle pattern interferometry. A novel feature of this device is its high degree of compaction since only one base supports simultaneously the measurement module and the hole-drilling device. A new version of the American society for testing and materials standard E837 for the measurement of residual stresses has been improved including a computation method for nonuniform residual stresses. According to this standard, a hole with a maximum depth of 1.0 mm should be introduced into the material to assess the stress distribution along the hole's depth. The discretization of the stress distribution is performed in 20 equal steps of 0.05 mm, getting the deformations generated for stress relief in every drilling step. A description of the compact device showing the solution for a fast and easy interchanging process between modules is also presented. The proposed system was compared with a traditional method using strain gages, and a good agreement was shown between stress distributions measured with both methods. Finally, the portable device was used to evaluate the residual stress distribution in a sample with a rod welded by friction hydro pillar processing.

  6. Evaluation of the uncertainty of phase-difference measurements in (quasi-)Fourier transform digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doval, Ángel F.; Trillo, Cristina; López Vázquez, José Carlos; Fernández, José L.

    2015-08-01

    Estimation of the uncertainty is an essential requisite for high-end measurement systems. In this communication we derive an expression to evaluate the standard uncertainty of the phase-difference measurements resulting from Fourier and quasi-Fourier transform digital holographic interferometry. We apply the law of propagation of uncertainty, as defined in the "Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement" (GUM), to the digital reconstruction of two holograms by Fourier transformation and to the subsequent calculation of the phase change between the holographic reconstructions. The resulting expression allows the evaluation of the uncertainty of the phase difference at every pixel in the reconstruction plane in terms of the measured hologram brightness values and their uncertainty at the whole of the pixels of the original digital holograms. This expression is simplified by assuming a linear dependence between the uncertainty and the local value of the original holograms; in that case, the local uncertainty of the phase difference can be evaluated from the local complex values of the reconstructed holograms. We assess the behavior of the method by comparing the predicted standard uncertainty with the sample variance obtained from experiments conducted under repeatability conditions, and found a good correlation between both quantities. This experimental procedure can be also used to calibrate the parameters of the linear function relating the uncertainty with the local value of the digital holograms, for a given set of operational conditions of the acquisition device.

  7. Measurement of slow-moving along-track displacement from an efficient multiple-aperture SAR interferometry (MAI) stacking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jo, Min-Jeong; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Won, Joong-Sun; Poland, Michael; Miklius, Asta; Lu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-aperture SAR interferometry (MAI) has demonstrated outstanding measurement accuracy of along-track displacement when compared to pixel-offset-tracking methods; however, measuring slow-moving (cm/year) surface displacement remains a challenge. Stacking of multi-temporal observations is a potential approach to reducing noise and increasing measurement accuracy, but it is difficult to achieve a significant improvement by applying traditional stacking methods to multi-temporal MAI interferograms. This paper proposes an efficient MAI stacking method, where multi-temporal forward- and backward-looking residual interferograms are individually stacked before the MAI interferogram is generated. We tested the performance of this method using ENVISAT data from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, where displacement on the order of several centimeters per year is common. By comparing results from the proposed stacking methods with displacements from GPS data, we documented measurement accuracies of about 1.03 and 1.07 cm/year for the descending and ascending tracks, respectively—an improvement of about a factor of two when compared with that from the conventional stacking approach. Three-dimensional surface-displacement maps can be constructed by combining stacked InSAR and MAI observations, which will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of geological phenomena.

  8. Digitally Enhanced Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Ware, Brent; Lay, Oliver; Dubovitsky, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Spurious interference limits the performance of many interferometric measurements. Digitally enhanced interferometry (DEI) improves measurement sensitivity by augmenting conventional heterodyne interferometry with pseudo-random noise (PRN) code phase modulation. DEI effectively changes the measurement problem from one of hardware (optics, electronics), which may deteriorate over time, to one of software (modulation, digital signal processing), which does not. DEI isolates interferometric signals based on their delay. Interferometric signals are effectively time-tagged by phase-modulating the laser source with a PRN code. DEI improves measurement sensitivity by exploiting the autocorrelation properties of the PRN to isolate only the signal of interest and reject spurious interference. The properties of the PRN code determine the degree of isolation.

  9. Recent advances in interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, C. A.

    2013-02-01

    Observations of spectroscopic double stars with long baseline optical interferometry have resolved many pairs, allowing their orbits to be measured and stellar masses and distances to be derived. A number of these measurements have accuracies worthy of comparison with high quality results from eclipsing binaries, thus able challenge stellar evolution models. I will review the contributions, and also show recent results, among them observations of massive O-stars and multiple systems.

  10. Measurement of the residual stress tensor on the surface of a specimen by layer removal and interferometry: uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, J.; Rivero, R.; Lira, I.; François, M.

    2009-11-01

    A new method for measuring the principal residual stresses on the surface of a thin metallic specimen is presented. The novelty of the method resides in a combination of the layer removal technique by chemical etching and of electronic speckle pattern interferometry to measure the ensuing deformation. It is shown that the loci of constant deflection with respect to the original plane surface are conic sections. An interferometer sensitive to out-of-plane displacements was used, yielding fringe patterns that reproduced those curves. Immediate visualization of the orientation and relative magnitude of the principal stresses within the removed layer was then possible. A fit of the measured deformation to the theoretical shape, together with knowledge of the initial and final thickness of the specimen and of the elastic properties of the material (a cold-rolled low-carbon steel sheet), allowed estimating the principal stresses. It is shown that the critical factor that determines the uncertainty of these estimates is the thickness of the removed layer.

  11. A LISA Interferometry Primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge for all gravitational wave detectors in the detection of changes in the fractional difference between pairs of test masses with sufficient precision to measure astrophysical strains with amplitudes on the order of approx.10(exp -21). ln the case of the five million km arms of LISA, this equates to distance measurements on the ten picometer level. LISA interferometry utilizes a decentralized topology, in which each of the sciencecraft houses its own light sources, detectors, and electronics. The measurements made at each of the sciencecraft are then telemetered to ground and combined to extract the strain experienced by the constellation as a whole. I will present an overview of LISA interferometry and highlight some of the key components and technologies that make it possible.

  12. Simultaneous time-resolved measurement of flow field and surface deformation combining tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cao; Miorini, Rinaldo; Katz, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Flow induced vibrations are ubiquitous in numerous applications, for which knowledge of the relationship between surface deformation and the corresponding flow field is vital to the understanding of the processes involved. A novel technique, combining tomographic PIV (TPIV) and Mach-Zehnder interferometry (MZI), has been developed to perform simultaneous, time-resolved measurements of both the 3D flow field above a complaint transparent PDMS wall, and the spatial distribution of surface deformation. Five high speed cameras are involved, four for TPIV, and the fifth for MZI. The same high-speed laser is used for both measurements by allowing a small fraction (0.1%) of the TPIV light, which is transmitted through PDMS coating, to propagate through a 99.9% mirror to the MZI camera. This object beam interferes with a similarly weak reference beam that does not pass through the sample volume. Methods for extracting the deformation from the resulting fringes will be discussed, such as fringe enhancement techniques to improve the S/N ratio. Sample velocity and deformation results recorded at 3kHz will be presented, demonstrating the ability of combined TPIV and MZI to study the dynamical interactions between 3D flow structure and surface deformation. Sponsored by ONR and NSF-MRI.

  13. Application of laser interferometry to the evaluation of the dynamic characteristics of rolling bearings and comparison with piezoelectric device measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela Arvizo, Dagoberto; Rodríguez Lelis, José Maria; Vargas Treviño, Marciano; Flores Gil, Aarón; May Alarcón, Manuel; Villanueva Luna, Adrián E.

    2007-03-01

    Bearings are elements of rotating machinery that are widely used as low friction joint elements between other machine elements. Like any other machine element they posses a finite life which is dependent on a number of factors, among them manufacture, assembling, maintenances, load, etc. Bearing failures are amongst the principal causes of machinery overhaul. They by themselves are a source of vibration which is a function of surface conditions, clearances, misalignment, etc. Each of these defects present a specific dynamic signature, and can be analyzed by a number of techniques already in used, among them the laser vibrometry. This is a non-contact, non-disturbing method commonly used for measurements of vibrations on static objects. The technique offers the possibility to measure vibrations on thin-walled (light), and rotating objects as well as sound fields. Common vibration signal analysis in rotating machinery are restricted to low frequencies, up to 3000 Hz, and in some cases when analyzing contact problems and fatigue at 7000 up to 15000 Hz. In this work, are presented the primary results to employ laser interferometry to study the dynamic signals generated by rolling bearings, and the feasibility to employ it to study high frequency problems of these machine elements.

  14. Measurement of dynamical paths from elastic objects at the entrainment frequencies using high speed digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Carlos Pérez; Santoyo, Fernando Mendoza

    2012-06-01

    Digital holographic interferometry (DHI) is a powerful tool to study the mechanical evolution of vibrating objects. Data obtained from interferometric fringe patterns render results with high spatial resolution amplitudes of the order of few micrometers to sub micrometers. Modern cameras with high speed frame acquisition enable the measurement of several samples of the evolving amplitude within a complete mechanical oscillation period, allowing the study of the temporal mechanical evolution as well. An interesting phenomenon which may be observed and studied with DHI is that of frequency entrainment, a feature that appears in some elastic objects. If a periodic mechanical force of frequency ω is applied to a flat rectangular elastic membrane clamped at its edges, produces a resonant frequency ωR that has a limit cycle, but as the difference between the two frequencies decreases the object frequency falls in synchronicity with the forcing frequency within a certain band of frequencies. In this paper we describe the full field of view experiments to measure these dynamical paths that are forced to oscillate near the resonant frequency where the entrainment is reached. We also discuss the possibility of using these paths as a form of generating spatio-temporal patterns for mathematical biological models simulations, a key subject in the biomedical area.

  15. A novel application of speckle interferometry for the measurement of strain distributions in semi-sweet biscuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Q.; Wildman, R. D.; Huntley, J. M.; Whitworth, M. B.

    2003-12-01

    The spontaneous formation of cracks in biscuits following baking, also known as checking, is an issue that manufacturers would like to be able to predict and avoid. Unfortunately the mechanisms driving this phenomenon are not well understood. Speckle interferometry was used to study moisture-induced in-plane strain development in biscuits. This sensitive and non-contacting technique for measuring surface displacements has two major advantages over more commonly used methods; firstly, strains can be detected at a far higher sensitivity (down to 2 × 10-6) than previously accessible and secondly the method is a whole-field technique, enabling observation of the development of strain distributions during moisture migration. For biscuits exposed to step changes in humidity, initial strain rates of up to 10-5min-1 were measured, which decreased as the moisture content approached equilibrium, leading to an accumulated strain of ~10-2 after 48 h. Under these conditions, a homogeneous, uniform strain distribution was observed. The data were used to calculate the hygroscopic expansion coefficient, which was linearly related to moisture content and provides the necessary constitutive link between strain and biscuit moisture content needed to model biscuit checking.

  16. Measurement of planar refractive index profiles with rapid variations in glass using interferometry and total variation regularized differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oven, R.

    2015-12-01

    Planar refractive index profiles with rapid variations, formed in glass, are measured with interferometry. This involves forming a bevel in the glass and orientating the fringe pattern to be normal to the bevel edge. The index profile is determined by differentiation of the phase function of the fringe pattern. The differentiation has been performed using the total variation regularization method in order to preserve rapid changes in the derivative. This new approach avoids the necessity of filtering, in order to reduce noise, in the direction perpendicular to the bevel, which would otherwise smooth out the rapid index changes. The method is assessed using a model refractive index profile that contains an index gradient of 0.24 μm-1 and is then applied practically to measure the refractive index profile of electrically poled BK7 glass. The new approach allows the sharp transition in the index between poled and unpoled glass to be observed as well as the accumulation of potassium ions beyond the poled glass region.

  17. Strain, curvature, and twist measurements in digital holographic interferometry using pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution based method

    SciTech Connect

    Rajshekhar, G.; Gorthi, Sai Siva; Rastogi, Pramod

    2009-09-15

    Measurement of strain, curvature, and twist of a deformed object play an important role in deformation analysis. Strain depends on the first order displacement derivative, whereas curvature and twist are determined by second order displacement derivatives. This paper proposes a pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution based method for measurement of strain, curvature, and twist in digital holographic interferometry where the object deformation or displacement is encoded as interference phase. In the proposed method, the phase derivative is estimated by peak detection of pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution evaluated along each row/column of the reconstructed interference field. A complex exponential signal with unit amplitude and the phase derivative estimate as the argument is then generated and the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution along each row/column of this signal is evaluated. The curvature is estimated by using peak tracking strategy for the new distribution. For estimation of twist, the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution is evaluated along each column/row (i.e., in alternate direction with respect to the previous one) for the generated complex exponential signal and the corresponding peak detection gives the twist estimate.

  18. FINE-SCALE STRUCTURE OF THE QUASAR 3C 279 MEASURED WITH 1.3 mm VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Rusen; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Crew, Geoffrey; Cappallo, Roger J.; Akiyama, Kazunori; Honma, Mareki; Algaba, Juan C.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Inoue, Makoto; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Dexter, Matt; Brinkerink, Christiaan; Chamberlin, Richard; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Gurwell, Mark A.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Loinard, Laurent; and others

    2013-07-20

    We report results from five day very long baseline interferometry observations of the well-known quasar 3C 279 at 1.3 mm (230 GHz) in 2011. The measured nonzero closure phases on triangles including stations in Arizona, California, and Hawaii indicate that the source structure is spatially resolved. We find an unusual inner jet direction at scales of {approx}1 pc extending along the northwest-southeast direction (P.A. = 127 Degree-Sign {+-} 3 Degree-Sign ), as opposed to other (previously) reported measurements on scales of a few parsecs showing inner jet direction extending to the southwest. The 1.3 mm structure corresponds closely with that observed in the central region of quasi-simultaneous super-resolution Very Long Baseline Array images at 7 mm. The closure phase changed significantly on the last day when compared with the rest of observations, indicating that the inner jet structure may be variable on daily timescales. The observed new direction of the inner jet shows inconsistency with the prediction of a class of jet precession models. Our observations indicate a brightness temperature of {approx}8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K in the 1.3 mm core, much lower than that at centimeter wavelengths. Observations with better uv coverage and sensitivity in the coming years will allow the discrimination between different structure models and will provide direct images of the inner regions of the jet with 20-30 {mu}as (5-7 light months) resolution.

  19. Measurement of electron density in atmospheric pressure small-scale plasmas using CO2-laser heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon-Young; Takano, Nobuhiko; Urabe, Keiichiro; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2009-08-01

    CO2-laser heterodyne interferometry was applied to measure electron density ne in three different types of high pressure (including atmospheric pressure) small-scale plasma sources: a short hollow cathode (HC) discharge tube, a pulsed dc plasma jet and a micro-HC plasma jet. The interfering contribution of the gas density reduction due to Joule heating of the measured phase shift was separated from the electron component based on these different temporal dependences. The typical values of ne measured in the short HC discharge tube with helium gas were on the order of 1013 cm-3 at a discharge current that varied from 25 to 225 mA and the pressure from a few tens to hundreds of Torr; the values measured in argon gas were further increased by a factor of five to six. For the dc He plasma jet ejected into open air, the radial profile of ne on the order of 1014 cm-3 presented a hollowed distribution based on the tubular cathode structure. The micro-HC structure allowed us to evaluate ne in both the parallel and the perpendicular directions with respect to the plasma jet axis, and the derived values of ne from both directions were consistent. Thus, we verified that this diagnostic technique can be applied to measure ne in various sub-millimeter scale plasmas operated at atmospheric pressure in pulsed operation modes with a sensitivity of about 1013 cm-3 (at an optical length of 1 mm) and a spatial resolution better than 100 µm.

  20. The achromatic chessboard, a new concept of a phase shifter for nulling interferometry: IV. Advanced experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickel, Damien; Rouan, Daniel; Pelat, Didier; Reess, Jean-Michel; Dupuis, Olivier; Chemla, Fanny; Cohen, Mathieu

    2012-09-01

    Context. To characterize their atmospheres in order to find evidences of life, one has to detect directly photons from the exoplanets to measure their spectra. One possible technique is dark fringe interferometry that needs an achromatic π phase shift in one arm of the interferometer. We have conceived a phase shifter made of two cellular mirrors, in which each cell position and phase shift is specific, so that the behaviour of the nulling with respect to wavelength is flat within a broad range. Aims. We want to validate experimentally two versions of this achromatic phase shifter: a transmissive one in bulk optics and a reflective one using a segmented deformable mirror. What we present in this paper are the last results obtained in the lab. Methods. We built an optical bench in the visible that allows us to test the principle and characterize the performances and the limits of this phase shifter. Results. We tested several transmissive and one reflective phase shifter and obtained, for instance, an attenuation of about 2.10-3 for a white source (from 430 to 830 nm) that proved the achromatic behavior of the phase shifter. The preliminary performances and limitations are analyzed.

  1. Growth rate measurements of lysozyme crystals under microgravity conditions by laser interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Murayama, Kenta; Oshi, Kentaro; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Shimaoka, Taro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Tachibana, Masaru

    2013-10-01

    The growth rate vs. supersaturation of a lysozyme crystal was successfully measured in situ together with the crystal surface observation and the concentration measurements onboard the International Space Station. A Michelson-type interferometer and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer were, respectively, employed for real-time growth rate measurements and concentration field measurements. The hardware development, sample preparation, operation, and analysis methods are described.

  2. Analyzing spatial correlations in tissue using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry measurements guided by co-located optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghoon; Heflin, Stephanie; Kresty, Laura A; Halling, Meredith; Perez, Laura N; Ho, Derek; Crose, Michael; Brown, William; Farsiu, Sina; Arshavsky, Vadim; Wax, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical technique used to measure nuclear morphology in situ. However, a/LCI is not an imaging modality and can produce ambiguous results when the measurements are not properly oriented to the tissue architecture. Here we present a 2D a/LCI system which incorporates optical coherence tomography imaging to guide the measurements. System design and characterization are presented, along with example cases which demonstrate the utility of the combined measurements. In addition, future development and applications of this dual modality approach are discussed. PMID:27446664

  3. Analyzing spatial correlations in tissue using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry measurements guided by co-located optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghoon; Heflin, Stephanie; Kresty, Laura A.; Halling, Meredith; Perez, Laura N.; Ho, Derek; Crose, Michael; Brown, William; Farsiu, Sina; Arshavsky, Vadim; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical technique used to measure nuclear morphology in situ. However, a/LCI is not an imaging modality and can produce ambiguous results when the measurements are not properly oriented to the tissue architecture. Here we present a 2D a/LCI system which incorporates optical coherence tomography imaging to guide the measurements. System design and characterization are presented, along with example cases which demonstrate the utility of the combined measurements. In addition, future development and applications of this dual modality approach are discussed. PMID:27446664

  4. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  5. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  6. Experimental Evaluation of White Light Fabry-Perot Interferometry Fiber-Optic Strain Gages when Measuring Small Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.Cyr, William; Figueroa, Fernando; VanDyke, David; McVay, Greg; Mitchell, Mark

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate whether fiber optic strain gages (FOSG) are "better" sensors than typical foil gages. A particularly attractive feature of FOSG was their specified resolution of 0.01% of full-scale (0.1 micro strain for 1000 micro strain full-scale). This feature would make FOSG practical tank level sensors, by measuring very small strains on the support structure of a tank. A specific application in mind was to measure liquid oxygen tank level, with support beams that were predicted to contract approximately 11 micro strain as the tank goes from empty to full. Among various fiber optic technologies currently available, Fabry-Perot Interferometry using white light was selected. This technology exhibits highly desirable feature such as absolute strain measurement, linearity over its full-scale, and temperature compensation. However, experiment results suggest that the resolution is 0.8 micro strain, at best, calibration from one sensor to another can be off by 2.4 - 11.2%, and that temperature compensation is not fully predictable, with errors of up to 3.5 micro strain over an 11C range. Hence, when compared with classic foil gages, FOSG possess less accuracy, similar resolution and repeatability (precision), and superior linearity over their entire operating range. They are immune to EMI and their signals suffer minimal degradation over long distances. It is also expected that drift with time will be minimal in FOSG whereas the gage factor of foil sensors changes over time when exposed to varying environmental conditions. In conclusion, FOSG are "better" than foil gages as long as the application allows calibration of individual units as installed for operation.

  7. Measurements of the Ground-State Polarizabilities of Cs, Rb, and K using Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoire, Maxwell; Hromada, Ivan; Holmgren, William; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alex

    2016-05-01

    We measured the ground-state static electric-dipole polarizabilities of Cs, Rb, and K atoms with 0.2% uncertainty using a three-nanograting Mach-Zehnder atom beam interferometer. Since thermal Cs atoms have short de Broglie wavelengths, we developed measurement methods that do not require resolved atom diffraction: we used phase choppers to measure atomic beam velocity distributions, and electric field gradients to induce polarizability-dependent phase shifts. Our measurements provide benchmark tests for atomic structure calculations and thus test the underlying theory used to interpret atomic parity non-conservation experiments.

  8. Measurement of energy contrast of amplified ultrashort pulses using cross-polarized wave generation and spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Marin; Meier, Amanda K; Galloway, Benjamin; Adams, Daniel E; Squier, Jeff A; Durfee, Charles G

    2014-07-28

    We present a method using spectral interferometry (SI) to characterize a pulse in the presence of an incoherent background such as amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The output of a regenerative amplifier is interfered with a copy of the pulse that has been converted using third-order cross-polarized wave generation (XPW). The ASE shows as a pedestal background in the interference pattern. The energy contrast between the short-pulse component and the ASE is retrieved. The spectra of the interacting beams are obtained through an improvement to the self-referenced spectral interferometry (SRSI) analysis. PMID:25089416

  9. Development of an integrated endoscopic device for multiplexed low coherence interferometry measurements of microbicide gel coating thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Tyler K.; Robles, Francisco E.; DeSoto, Michael; Henderson, Marcus H.; Katz, David F.; Wax, Adam P.

    2009-02-01

    Microbicide gels are topical products that have recently been developed to combat sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS. The extent of gel coverage, thickness, and structure are crucial factors in gel effectiveness. It is necessary to be able to monitor gel distribution and behavior under various circumstances, such as coatis, and over an extended time scale in vivo. We have developed a multiplexed, Fourier-domain low coherence interferometry (LCI) system as a practical method of measuring microbicide gel distribution, with precision and accuracy comparable to currently used fluorometric techniques techniques. The multiplexed system achieved a broad scanning area without the need for a mechanical scanning device, typical of OCT systems, by utilizing six parallel channels with simultaneous data collection. We now propose an imaging module which will allow the integration of the multiplexed LCI system into the current fluorescence system in conjunction with an endoscope. The LCI imaging module will meet several key criteria in order to be compatible with the current system. The fluorescent system features a 4-mm diameter rigid endsoscope enclosed in a 27-mm diameter polycarbonate tube, with a water immersion tip. Therefore, the LCI module must be low-profile as well as water-resistant to fit inside the current design. It also must fulfill its primary function of delivering light from each of the six channels to the gel and collecting backscattered light. The performance of the imaging module will be characterized by scanning a calibration socket which contains grooves of known depths, and comparing these measurements to the fluorometric results.

  10. Optical substrate thickness measurement system using hybrid fiber-freespace optics and selective wavelength interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.; Sheikh, Mumtaz; Perez, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Proposed and demonstrated is a simple few components non-contact thickness measurement system for optical quality semi-transparent samples such as Silicon (Si) and 6H Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical chips used for designing sensors. The instrument exploits a hybrid fiber-freespace optical design that enables self-calibrating measurements via the use of confocal imaging via single mode fiber-optics and a self-imaging type optical fiber collimating lens. Data acquisition for fault-tolerant measurements is accomplished via a sufficiently broadband optical source and a tunable laser and relevant wavelength discriminating optics. Accurate sample thickness processing is achieved using the known material dispersion data for the sample and the few (e.g., 5) accurately measured optical power null wavelengths produced via the sample etalon effect. Thicknesses of 281.1 μm and 296 μm are measured for given SiC and Si optical chips, respectively.

  11. Broad spectral range measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers using spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Martynkien, T.; Mergo, P.; Urbańczyk, W.

    2011-05-01

    Chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers is measured over a broad spectral range (e.g. 500-1600 nm) using two white-light spectral interferometric techniques. First, a technique employing an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber in the test arm is used to measure the wavelength dependence of the differential group effective index, or equivalently the chromatic dispersion of one polarization mode supported by the fiber. Second, a technique employing a tandem configuration of a Michelson interferometer and the optical fiber under test is used to measure the group modal birefringence in the fiber. From these measurements, the chromatic dispersion of the other polarization mode supported by the fiber is retrieved. We measured by these techniques the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in four air-silica holey fibers and revealed the dependence of zero-dispersion wavelength on the geometry of the holey fiber.

  12. Measurements of the ground-state polarizabilities of Cs, Rb, and K using atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoire, Maxwell D.; Hromada, Ivan; Holmgren, William F.; Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander D.

    2015-11-01

    We measured the ground-state static electric-dipole polarizabilities of Cs, Rb, and K atoms using a three-nanograting Mach-Zehnder atom beam interferometer. Our measurements provide benchmark tests for atomic structure calculations and thus test the underlying theory used to interpret atomic parity-nonconservation experiments. We measured αCs=4 π ɛ0×59.39 (9 ) Å3,αRb=4 π ɛ0×47.39 (8 ) Å3 , and αK=4 π ɛ0×42.93 (7 ) Å3 . In atomic units, these measurements are αCs=401.2 (7 ) ,αRb=320.1 (6 ) , and αK=290.0 (5 ) . We report ratios of polarizabilities αCs/αRb=1.2532 (10 ) ,αCs/αK=1.3834 (9 ) , and αRb/αK=1.1040 (9 ) with smaller fractional uncertainty because the systematic errors for individual measurements are largely correlated. Since Cs atom beams have short de Broglie wavelengths, we developed measurement methods that do not require resolved atom diffraction. Specifically, we used phase choppers to measure atomic beam velocity distributions, and we used electric field gradients to give the atom interference pattern a phase shift that depends on atomic polarizability.

  13. Combined density gradient and velocity field measurements in transient flows by means of Differential Interferometry and Long-range \\varvec{μ}PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordel, S.; Nowak, T.; Skoda, R.; Hussong, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, Long-range Microparticle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and Differential Interferometry (DI) are combined in a novel manner to enable both velocity and depth-integrated density gradient field measurements using the same laser pulse for both recordings. In the present work, temperature-driven boundary layer flows could be successfully determined to an accuracy of δ T=0.17 K with a spatial resolution of 405 μm for interference and 101 μm for μPIV measurements. The DI measurements are refraction compensated, and both temperature and velocity fields are compared with results from numerical simulations.

  14. Speckle Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, F. P.; Jin, F.; Wang, Q.; Zhu, N.

    Before the milestone work of Leedertz in 1970 coherent speckles generated from a laser illuminated object are considered noise to be eliminated or minimized. Leedertz shows that coherent speckles are actually information carriers. Since then the speckle technique has found many applications to fields of mechanics, metrology, nondestructive evaluation and material sciences. Speckles need not be coherent. Artificially created socalled white light speckles can also be used as information carriers. In this paper we present two recent developments of speckle technique with applications to micromechanics problems using SIEM (Speckle Interferometry with Electron Microscopy), to nondestructive evaluation of crevice corrosion and composite disbond and vibration of large structures using TADS (Time-Average Digital Specklegraphy).

  15. Radius of Curvature Measurement of Large Optics Using Interferometry and Laser Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Connelly, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The determination of radius of curvature (ROC) of optics typically uses either a phase measuring interferometer on an adjustable stage to determine the position of the ROC and the optics surface under test. Alternatively, a spherometer or a profilometer are used for this measurement. The difficulty of this approach is that for large optics, translation of the interferometer or optic under test is problematic because of the distance of translation required and the mass of the optic. Profilometry and spherometry are alternative techniques that can work, but require a profilometer or a measurement of subapertures of the optic. The proposed approach allows a measurement of the optic figure simultaneous with the full aperture radius of curvature.

  16. Crustal Deformation Measurements Using Repeat-pass JERS 1 SAR Interferometry Near the Izu Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, Satoshi; Rosen, Paul A.; Tobita, Mikio; Murakami, Makoto

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the precision of interferometric SAR measurements of surface deformation of the Earth using 24-cm wavelength data acqured by the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite 1 (JERS 1) spacecraft, over the Izu Peninsula, Japan.

  17. Laser interferometry method for absolute measurement of the acceleration of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, O. K.

    1971-01-01

    Gravimeter permits more accurate and precise absolute measurement of g without reference to Potsdam values as absolute standards. Device is basically Michelson laser beam interferometer in which one arm is mass fitted with corner cube reflector.

  18. Interferometry based technique for intensity profile measurements of far IR beams.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Alexander A; Khazanov, Efim A; Kozhevatov, Ilya E; Palashov, Oleg V

    2007-06-20

    We present a novel, to the best of our knowledge, method for measuring the intensity profile of far-IR beams. The method is based on the measurements of nonstationary variation in optical thickness of a fused-silica plate heated by the studied radiation. The optical thickness is observed by means of a reflecting interferometer. Purpose-made experimental setup allows one to measure beams with an aperture of up to 60 mm with a spatial resolution of 1 mm. The accessibility of the utilized technologies and the possibility to easily increase the aperture are the major advantages of this approach. The probable area of application for the method is measurements of beams produced by powerful industrial far-IR lasers. PMID:17538679

  19. Remarks on Residual Stress Measurement by Hole-Drilling and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hole drilling is the most widespread method for measuring residual stress. It is based on the principle that drilling a hole in the material causes a local stress relaxation; the initial residual stress can be calculated by measuring strain in correspondence with each drill depth. Recently optical techniques were introduced to measure strain; in this case, the accuracy of the final results depends, among other factors, on the proper choice of the area of analysis. Deformations are in fact analyzed within an annulus determined by two parameters: the internal and the external radius. In this paper, the influence of the choice of the area of analysis was analysed. A known stress field was introduced on a Ti grade 5 sample and then the stress was measured in correspondence with different values of the internal and the external radius of analysis; results were finally compared with the expected theoretical value. PMID:25276850

  20. Continual in-plane displacement measurement with temporal wavelet transform speckle pattern interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Deng, Yan; Duan, Yiting; Zhang, Zhifeng; Wei, Cheng; Chen, Shiqian; Cui, Jianying; Feng, Qibo

    2012-01-01

    A heterodyne temporal speckle pattern interferometer that measures the in-plane displacement dynamically has been built. The object is displaced in its plane continuously and the frequency-modulated output signals with a carrier frequency are recorded by a CCD camera. The displacement information is extracted with wavelet transform technique. Preliminary experiments have been performed with such interferometer. The respective measurement results recovered from wavelet transform and Fourier transform are compared.

  1. Far-infrared polarimetry/interferometry for poloidal magnetic field measurement on ZT-40M

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    The measurement of internal magnetic field profiles may be a very important step in the understanding of magnetic confinement physics issues. The measurement of plasma-induced Faraday rotation is one of the more promising internal magnetic field diagnostics. This thesis describes the development of a heterodyne polarimeter/interferometer for internal poloidal magnetic field measurement on ZT-40M. Heterodyne techniques were employed because of the insensitivity to spurious signal amplitude changes that cause errors in other methods. Initial problems in polarimetric sensitivity were observed that were ultimately found to be related to discharge-induced motions of the constrained diagnostic access on ZT-40M. Grazing incidence motions of the constrained diagnostic access on ZT-40M. Grazing incidence reflections on metallic surfaces of the diagnostic ports caused polarization changes that affected the measurement accuracy. Installation of internally threaded sleeves to baffle the reflections eliminated the sensitivity problem, and allowed useful Faraday rotation measurements to be made. Simultaneous polarimetric and interferometric measurements have also been demonstrated. The ability to assemble a working heterodyne polarimeter/interferometer is no longer in question. The extension of the present system to multichord operation requires increased laser power and efficiency.

  2. Measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in optical fibres using white-light spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Kadulová, M.

    2010-04-01

    We report on a white-light interferometric technique for a broad spectral range measurement (e.g. 500-1600 nm) of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in short-length optical fibres. The technique utilizes an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fibre under test of known length inserted in one of the interferometer arms and the other arm with adjustable path length. We record a series of spectral interferograms by VIS-NIR and NIR fibre-optic spectrometers to measure the equalization wavelength as a function of the path length difference, or equivalently the differential group index dispersion of one polarization mode. The differential group dispersion of the other polarization mode is obtained from measurement of the group modal birefringence dispersion. We verify the applicability of the method by measuring the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in a birefringent holey fibre. We apply a five-term power series fit to the measured data and confirm by its differentiation that the chromatic dispersion agrees well with that specified by the manufacturer. We also measure by this technique the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in an elliptical-core fibre.

  3. Measurement Variability of Vertical Scanning Interferometry Tool Used for Orbiter Window Defect Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II

    2009-01-01

    The ability to sufficiently measure orbiter window defects to allow for window recertification has been an ongoing challenge for the orbiter vehicle program. The recent Columbia accident has forced even tighter constraints on the criteria that must be met in order to recertify windows for flight. As a result, new techniques are being investigated to improve the reliability, accuracy and resolution of the defect detection process. The methodology devised in this work, which is based on the utilization of a vertical scanning interferometric (VSI) tool, shows great promise for meeting the ever increasing requirements for defect detection. This methodology has the potential of a 10-100 fold greater resolution of the true defect depth than can be obtained from the currently employed micrometer based methodology. An added benefit is that it also produces a digital elevation map of the defect, thereby providing information about the defect morphology which can be utilized to ascertain the type of debris that induced the damage. However, in order to successfully implement such a tool, a greater understanding of the resolution capability and measurement repeatability must be obtained. This work focused on assessing the variability of the VSI-based measurement methodology and revealed that the VSI measurement tool was more repeatable and more precise than the current micrometer based approach, even in situations where operator variation could affect the measurement. The analysis also showed that the VSI technique was relatively insensitive to the hardware and software settings employed, making the technique extremely robust and desirable

  4. Rabi interferometry and sensitive measurement of the Casimir-Polder force with ultracold gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chwedenczuk, Jan; Piazza, Francesco; Smerzi, Augusto; Pezze, Luca

    2010-09-15

    We show that Rabi oscillations of a degenerate fermionic or bosonic gas trapped in a double-well potential can be exploited for the interferometric measurement of external forces at micrometer length scales. The Rabi interferometer is less sensitive but easier to implement than the Mach-Zehnder, since it does not require dynamical beam-splitting or recombination processes. As an application we propose a measurement of the Casimir-Polder force acting between the atoms and a dielectric surface. We find that even if the interferometer is fed with a coherent state of relatively small number of atoms, and in the presence of realistic experimental noise, the force might be measured with a sensitivity sufficient to discriminate between thermal and zero-temperature regimes of the Casimir-Polder potential. Higher sensitivities can be reached with bosonic spin squeezed states.

  5. High-precision broadband measurement of refractive index by picosecond real-time interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zheng Jie; Jin, Dafei; Fang, Nicholas X

    2016-08-20

    The refractive index is one of the most important quantities that characterize a material's optical properties. However, it is hard to measure this value over a wide range of wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate a new technique to achieve a spectrally broad refractive index measurement. When a broadband pulse passes through a sample, different wavelengths experience different delays. By comparing the delayed pulse to a reference pulse, the zero path difference position for each wavelength can be obtained and the material's dispersion can be retrieved. Our technique is highly robust and accurate, and can be miniaturized in a straightforward manner. PMID:27556980

  6. High-precision broadband measurement of refractive index by picosecond real-time interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zheng Jie; Jin, Dafei; Fang, Nicholas X

    2016-08-20

    The refractive index is one of the most important quantities that characterize a material's optical properties. However, it is hard to measure this value over a wide range of wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate a new technique to achieve a spectrally broad refractive index measurement. When a broadband pulse passes through a sample, different wavelengths experience different delays. By comparing the delayed pulse to a reference pulse, the zero path difference position for each wavelength can be obtained and the material's dispersion can be retrieved. Our technique is highly robust and accurate, and can be miniaturized in a straightforward manner.

  7. Microwave interferometry technique for obtaining gas interface velocity measurements in an expansion tube facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laney, C. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A microwave interferometer technique to determine the front interface velocity of a high enthalpy gas flow, is described. The system is designed to excite a standing wave in an expansion tube, and to measure the shift in this standing wave as it is moved by the test gas front. Data, in the form of a varying sinusoidal signal, is recorded on a high-speed drum camera-oscilloscope combination. Measurements of average and incremental velocities in excess of 6,000 meters per second were made.

  8. 100-Picometer Interferometry for EUVL

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G E; Phillion, D W; Johnson, M A; Nguyen, N O; Barty, A; Snell, F J; Dillon, D R; Bradsher, L S

    2002-03-18

    Future extreme ultraviolet lithography (EWL) steppers will, in all likelihood, have six-mirror projection cameras. To operate at the diffraction limit over an acceptable depth of focus each aspheric mirror will have to be fabricated with an absolute figure accuracy approaching 100 pm rms. We are currently developing visible light interferometry to meet this need based on modifications of our present phase shifting diffraction interferometry (PSDI) methodology where we achieved an absolute accuracy of 250pm. The basic PSDI approach has been further simplified, using lensless imaging based on computational diffractive back-propagation, to eliminate auxiliary optics that typically limit measurement accuracy. Small remaining error sources, related to geometric positioning, CCD camera pixel spacing and laser wavelength, have been modeled and measured. Using these results we have estimated the total system error for measuring off-axis aspheric EUVL mirrors with this new approach to interferometry.

  9. Simultaneous displacement and slope measurement in electronic speckle pattern interferometry using adjustable aperture multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Wang, Shengjia; Aulbach, Laura; Koch, Alexander W

    2016-08-01

    This paper suggests the use of adjustable aperture multiplexing (AAM), a method which is able to introduce multiple tunable carrier frequencies into a three-beam electronic speckle pattern interferometer to measure the out-of-plane displacement and its first-order derivative simultaneously. In the optical arrangement, two single apertures are located in the object and reference light paths, respectively. In cooperation with two adjustable mirrors, virtual images of the single apertures construct three pairs of virtual double apertures with variable aperture opening sizes and aperture distances. By setting the aperture parameter properly, three tunable spatial carrier frequencies are produced within the speckle pattern and completely separate the information of three interferograms in the frequency domain. By applying the inverse Fourier transform to a selected spectrum, its corresponding phase difference distribution can thus be evaluated. Therefore, we can obtain the phase map due to the deformation as well as its slope of the test surface from two speckle patterns which are recorded at different loading events. By this means, simultaneous and dynamic measurements are realized. AAM has greatly simplified the measurement system, which contributes to improving the system stability and increasing the system flexibility and adaptability to various measurement requirements. This paper presents the AAM working principle, the phase retrieval using spatial carrier frequency, and preliminary experimental results. PMID:27505365

  10. Low-coherence interferometry based roughness measurement on turbine blade surfaces using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yibo; Li, Yinan; Kaestner, Markus; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a non-contact optical system, a low-coherence interferometer (LCI), is introduced for the purpose of measuring the surface roughness of turbine blades. The designed system not only possesses a high vertical resolution and is able to acquire the roughness topography, but also it has a large vertical scanning range compared to other commonly used optical systems. The latter characteristic allows us to measure turbine blades surfaces with large curvature without collisions between the lens and the measurement object. After obtaining the surface topography, wavelet analysis is applied to decompose the original surface into multiple bandwidths to conduct a multiscale analysis. The results show that the developed LCI system proofs a good performance not only in obtaining the surface topography in the roughness scale but also in being able to measure surfaces of objects that possess a complex geometry in a large vertical range. Furthermore, the applied biorthogonal wavelet in this study has performed good amplitude and phase properties in extracting the roughness microstructures from the whole surface. Finally, the traditional roughness parameters, such as the mean surface roughness Sa and the Root Mean Square (RMS) roughness Sq, are evaluated in each decomposed subband and their correlations with the scale of each subband are analyzed.

  11. Measurement of ultrasonic pressure by heterodyne interferometry with a fiber-tip sensor.

    PubMed

    Koch, C

    1999-05-01

    A fiber-optic measurement system is described that allows ultrasound to be detected in fluids. It is based on a heterodyne interferometer, and the sensing element consists of a metal-coated fiber tip. The heterodyne technique permits direct acquisition of the sound pressure. The required ac photodetection is carried out with wide bandwidth, and the system provides high temporal and spatial resolution. For optimum performance the system parameters are matched to the sound-wave properties of the current application with the aid of theoretical and numerical calculations. The fiber-optic sensor system was applied to two problems of ultrasonic exposimetry in which the favorable features of the measurement technique were exploited. Shock waves from an electromagnetic lithotripter were investigated by use of the wide bandwidth of the system, and the subharmonic in an ultrasonic cleaner was detected, which indicates cavitation.

  12. Speckle interferometry of nearby multiple stars. IV. Measurements in 2004 and new orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balega, I. I.; Balega, Yu. Yu.; Maksimov, A. F.; Malogolovets, E. V.; Rastegaev, D. A.; Shkhagosheva, Z. U.; Weigelt, G.

    2007-12-01

    The results of speckle interferometric observations of 104 binary and 6 triple stars performed at the BTA 6 m telescope in 2004 October are presented. Nearby low-mass stars are mostly observed for the program, among which 59 there are new binaries recently discovered by the Hipparcos astrometric satellite. Concurrently with the diffraction-limited position measurements we obtained 154 brightness ratio measurements of binary and multiple star components in different bands of the visible spectrum. New, first-resolved binaries are the symbiotic star CH Cyg with a weak companion at 0.043″ separation and the pair of red dwarfs, GJ 913 = HIP 118212. In addition, we derived the orbital parameters for two interferometric systems: the CN-giant pair HD 210211 = HIP 109281 (P = 10.7 yr) and the G2V-K2V G2V-K2V binary GJ 9830 = HIP 116259 (P = 15.7 yr).

  13. Measurement of the chromatic dispersion in birefringent microstructured fibers by spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statkiewicz-Barabach, G.; Van Hoeken, A.; Mikolajczyk, M.; Urbanczyk, W.

    2008-06-01

    We present an application of the interferometric method for measuring the chromatic dispersion of microstructured birefringent fibers in a wide wavelength range employing a portable spectrometer with resolution of 0.5 nm. The method utilizes an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a tested fiber in one arm and the other arm with a controllable path length. We recorded a series of spectral signals to find the length of the reference arm (with compensated group delay coming from the tested fiber) as a function of wavelength. We also present the results of dispersion measurements in three highly birefringent microstructured fibers manufactured by the Laboratory of Optical Fiber Technology, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland.

  14. Measurements of the wavefront outer scale at Paranal: influence of this parameter in interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, Rodolphe; Ziad, Aziz; Borgnino, Julien; Martin, Francois; Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    2000-07-01

    The Generalized Seeing Monitor (GSM) has undertaken a campaign of measurement of the optical turbulent parameters: the Fried's parameter, the outer scale (L0) and the isoplanatic patch, at Paranal, the site of the VLT, in December 1998. The principle aim of this mission was to measure L0 values at Paranal. In a first part, we present the GSM, the results of the mission and particularly the statistics of L0. In a second part, we emphasize the effect of L0 on the optical path difference (OPD) values for the co-phasing of an interferometer. We derive the exact formulation of the OPD for the Von Karman model and we give the expected OPD at Paranal with L0 values measured by the GSM. We give also the expression of the residual OPD at the output of a fringe tracker system as a function of L0, of the exposure time of the fringe sensor and of the frequency of the closed-loop of the system.

  15. Temporal averaging of phase measurements in the presence of spurious phase drift - Application to phase-stepped real-time holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovryn, B.; Haacke, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    A technique that compensates for low spatial frequency spurious phase changes during an interference experiment is developed; it permits temporal averaging of multiple-phase measurements, made before and after object displacement. The method is tested with phase-stepped real-time holographic interferometry applied to cantilever bending of a piezoelectric bimorph ceramic. Results indicate that temporal averaging of the corrected data significantly reduces the white noise in a phase measurement without incurring systematic errors or sacrificing spatial resolution. White noise is reduced from 3 deg to less than 1 deg using these methods.

  16. Potentials of L-band ALOS interferometry for the measurement of ground deformations at Etna volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briole, P.; Panagiotis, E.; Puglisi, G.; Guglielmino, F.; Bonforte, A.; Murakami, M.

    2009-04-01

    Using eleven ascending PALSAR scenes acquired by the Japanese satellite ALOS over Etna, between January 2007 and September 2008, we produced a series of interferograms covering the volcano and surroundings, by using ROI-PAC software. We compare our results with ENVISAT interferograms covering the same period. The coherence is significantly higher than C-band and it is particularly high in the inhabited areas and on lava flows emplaced during last centuries, where local subsidence is observed on the most recent ones; important improvements in the coherency are also achieved on forested areas. L-band interferometric pairs having large baselines, up to 3 km, are still usable but the coherency significantly fall off, as the baseline increases. Deformation patterns are well measured, and the use of L-band dataset is particular useful in those cases where the coherency in C-band is usually low. This is the case, for instance, of the north-eastern sector of the volcano, where the large forested area made difficult to measure the important ground deformations produced by the dynamic of the Pernicana Fault and the NE Rift zone. The known left lateral strike slip creep across the Pernicana fault is, indeed, well mapped. It can be quantified over the observation interval along the entire fault and compared with the GPS measurements. In the next years, we hope that the acquisition plan of ALOS will permit the capture of more PALSAR scene with the same sensor and orbit parameters. This will constitute a new and exceptional data base, crucial for the knowledge of the dynamics of Etna.

  17. Invited Article: Expanded and improved traceability of vibration measurements by laser interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Hans-Jürgen von

    2013-12-15

    Traceability to the International System of Units has been established for vibration and shock measurements as specified in international document standards, recommendations, and regulations to ensure product quality, health, and safety. New and upgraded laser methods and techniques developed by national metrology institutes and by leading manufacturers in the past two decades have been swiftly specified as standard methods in the ISO 16063 series of international document standards. In ISO 16063-11:1999, three interferometric methods are specified for the primary calibration of vibration transducers (reference standard accelerometers) in a frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 kHz. In order to specify the same (modified) methods for the calibration of laser vibrometers (ISO 16063-41:2011), their applicability in an expanded frequency range was investigated. Steady-state sinusoidal vibrations were generated by piezoelectric actuators at specific frequencies up to 347 kHz (acceleration amplitudes up to 376 km/s{sup 2}). The displacement amplitude, adjusted by the special interferometric method of coincidence to 158.2 nm (quarter the wavelength of the He-Ne laser light), was measured by the standardized interferometric methods of fringe counting and sine-approximation. The deviations between the measurement results of the three interferometric methods applied simultaneously were smaller than 1 %. The limits of measurement uncertainty specified in ISO 16063-11 between 1 Hz to 10 kHz were kept up to frequencies, which are orders of magnitude greater; the uncertainty limit 0.5 % specified at the reference frequency 160 Hz was not exceeded at 160 kHz. The reported results were considered during the development of ISO 16063-41 by specifying the instrumentation and procedures for performing calibrations of rectilinear laser vibrometers in the frequency range typically between 0.4 Hz and 50 kHz—the interferometric methods may be applied within expanded frequency ranges using

  18. Chromium-doped forsterite: dispersion measurement with white-light interferometry.

    PubMed

    Thomann, Isabell; Hollberg, Leo; Diddams, Scott A; Equall, Randy

    2003-03-20

    Using a Michelson white-light interferometer, we measure the group-delay dispersion and third-order dispersion coefficients, d2(phi)/d(omega)2 and d3(phi)/d(omega)3, of chromium-doped forsterite (Cr:Mg2SiO4) over wavelengths of 1050-1600 nm for light polarized along both the c and b crystal axes. In this interval, the second-order dispersion for the c axis ranges from 35 fs2/mm to -14 fs2/mm, and the third-order dispersion ranges from 36 fs3/mm to 142 fs3/mm. For the b axis the second-order dispersion ranges from 35 fs2/mm to -15 fs2/mm and the third-order from 73 fs3/mm to 185 fs3/mm. Our data are relevant for the development of optimized dispersion compensation tools for Cr:Mg2SiO4 femtosecond lasers. These measurements help to clarify previously published results and show some significant discrepancies that existed, especially in the third-order dispersion. Our results should furthermore be useful to build up an analytic expression for the index of refraction of chromium forsterite.

  19. Improved measurement of grain wall contact forces in granular beds using wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanzhou; Wildman, Ricky D.; Huntley, Jonathan M.

    2005-06-01

    We describe a wholefield optical technique based on a wavelength scanning Fizeau interferometer for measuring the contact forces between a granular bed and a transparent substrate. The substrate material is polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), aluminium-coated on the internal surface, and changes to the interference pattern formed by reflection from the two surfaces allow the displacement field induced by the contacting grains to be visualized. Quantitative displacement data are obtained by phase shifting the interference pattern using a tunable laser. In order to avoid miscalibration errors associated with the non-linearities of the laser source, a Newton-Raphson iteration scheme is employed to search for the correct PZT voltage required for the linear phase-shifting steps. A new 31-frame phase-shifting algorithm based on the Chebyshev window function was designed to deal with the problems of residual miscalibration and higher harmonics created by multiple reflections within the substrate. The resulting noise in the measurements is below 1 nm, and the repeatability of the load-displacement relationship was found to be approximately 10 nm.

  20. Measurement of grain wall contact forces in a granular bed using frequency-scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, M. S.; Huntley, J. M.; Wildman, R. D.

    2005-07-01

    Micro-mechanical theories have recently been developed to model the propagation of force through a granular material based on single grain interactions. We describe here an experimental technique, developed to validate such theories, that is able to measure the individual contact forces between the grains and the wall of the containing vessel, thereby avoiding the spatial averaging effect of conventional pressure transducers. The method involves measuring interferometrically the deflection of an interface within a triple-layer elastic substrate consisting of epoxy, silicone rubber, and glass. A thin coating of gold between the epoxy and rubber acts as a reflective film, with the reference wave provided by the glass/air interface. Phase shifting is carried out by means of a tunable laser. Phase difference maps are calculated using a 15-frame phase-shifting formula based on a Hanning window. The resulting displacement resolution of order 1 nm allows the wall stiffness to be increased by some two orders of magnitude compared to previously described methods in the literature.

  1. Single-beam, dual-view digital holographic interferometry for biomechanical strain measurements of biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelić, Dejan V.; Grujić, Dušan Ž.; Vasiljević, Darko M.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a method for dual-view biomechanical strain measurements of highly asymmetrical biological objects, like teeth or bones. By using a spherical mirror, we were able to simultaneously record a digital hologram of the object itself and the mirror image of its (otherwise invisible) rear side. A single laser beam was sufficient to illuminate both sides of the object, and to provide a reference beam. As a result, the system was mechanically very stable, enabling long exposure times (up to 2 min) without the need for vibration isolation. The setup is simple to construct and adjust, and can be used to interferometrically observe any object that is smaller than the mirror diameter. Parallel data processing on a CUDA-enabled (compute unified device architecture) graphics card was used to reconstruct digital holograms and to further correct image distortion. We used the setup to measure the deformation of a tooth due to mastication forces. The finite-element method was used to compare experimental results and theoretical predictions.

  2. Reverse transduction measured in the living cochlea by low-coherence heterodyne interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that the remarkable sensitivity and frequency selectivity of mammalian hearing depend on outer hair cell-generated force, which amplifies sound-induced vibrations inside the cochlea. This 'reverse transduction' force production has never been demonstrated experimentally, however, in the living ear. Here by directly measuring microstructure vibrations inside the cochlear partition using a custom-built interferometer, we demonstrate that electrical stimulation can evoke both fast broadband and slow sharply tuned responses of the reticular lamina, but only a slow tuned response of the basilar membrane. Our results indicate that outer hair cells can generate sufficient force to drive the reticular lamina over all audible frequencies in living cochleae. Contrary to expectations, the cellular force causes a travelling wave rather than an immediate local vibration of the basilar membrane; this travelling wave vibrates in phase with the reticular lamina at the best frequency, and results in maximal vibration at the apical ends of outer hair cells. PMID:26732830

  3. A Practical Theorem on Using Interferometry to Measure the Global 21-cm Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venumadhav, Tejaswi; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Doré, Olivier; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-08-01

    The sky-averaged, or global, background of redshifted 21 cm radiation is expected to be a rich source of information on cosmological reheating and reionization. However, measuring the signal is technically challenging: one must extract a small, frequency-dependent signal from under much brighter spectrally smooth foregrounds. Traditional approaches to study the global signal have used single antennas, which require one to calibrate out the frequency-dependent structure in the overall system gain (due to internal reflections, for example) as well as remove the noise bias from auto-correlating a single amplifier output. This has motivated proposals to measure the signal using cross-correlations in interferometric setups, where additional calibration techniques are available. In this paper we focus on the general principles driving the sensitivity of the interferometric setups to the global signal. We prove that this sensitivity is directly related to two characteristics of the setup: the cross-talk between readout channels (i.e., the signal picked up at one antenna when the other one is driven) and the correlated noise due to thermal fluctuations of lossy elements (e.g., absorbers or the ground) radiating into both channels. Thus in an interferometric setup, one cannot suppress cross-talk and correlated thermal noise without reducing sensitivity to the global signal by the same factor—instead, the challenge is to characterize these effects and their frequency dependence. We illustrate our general theorem by explicit calculations within toy setups consisting of two short-dipole antennas in free space and above a perfectly reflecting ground surface, as well as two well-separated identical lossless antennas arranged to achieve zero cross-talk.

  4. Digital stroboscopic holographic interferometry for power flow measurements in acoustically driven membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, William; Pires, Felipe; De Greef, Daniël; Vanlanduit, Steve J. A.; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of the eardrum and the ossicles in the hearing chain, it remains an open question how acoustical energy is transmitted between them. Identifying the transmission path at different frequencies could lead to valuable information for the domain of middle ear surgery. In this work a setup for stroboscopic holography is combined with an algorithm for power flow calculations. With our method we were able to accurately locate the power sources and sinks in a membrane. The setup enabled us to make amplitude maps of the out-of-plane displacement of a vibrating rubber membrane at subsequent instances of time within the vibration period. From these, the amplitude maps of the moments of force and velocities are calculated. The magnitude and phase maps are extracted from this amplitude data, and form the input for the power flow calculations. We present the algorithm used for the measurements and for the power flow calculations. Finite element models of a circular plate with a local energy source and sink allowed us to test and optimize this algorithm in a controlled way and without the present of noise, but will not be discussed below. At the setup an earphone was connected with a thin tube which was placed very close to the membrane so that sound impinges locally on the membrane, hereby acting as a local energy source. The energy sink was a little piece of foam carefully placed against the membrane. The laser pulses are fired at selected instants within the vibration period using a 30 mW HeNe continuous wave laser (red light, 632.8 nm) in combination with an acousto-optic modulator. A function generator controls the phase of these illumination pulses and the holograms are recorded using a CCD camera. We present the magnitude and phase maps as well as the power flow measurements on the rubber membrane. Calculation of the divergence of this power flow map provides a simple and fast way of identifying and locating an energy source or sink. In conclusion

  5. History of Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of stellar interferometry from the suggestion of Fizeau that stellar interferometry was possible,to the use of the Mark I, II and III for astrometry. Photographs, and parts of original articles are presented.

  6. Electron density measurements in an atmospheric pressure air plasma by means of infrared heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipold, Frank; Stark, Robert H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2000-09-01

    An infrared heterodyne interferometer has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the electron density in direct current, atmospheric pressure discharges in air. Spatial resolution of the electron density in the high-pressure glow discharge with characteristic dimensions on the order of 100 µm required the use of a CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 µm. For this wavelength and electron densities greater than 1011 cm-3 the index of refraction of the atmospheric air plasma is mainly determined by heavy particles rather than electrons. The electron contribution to the refractive index was separated from that of the heavy particles by taking the different relaxation times of the two particle species into account. With the discharge operated in a repetitive pulsed mode, the initial rapid change of the refractive index was assumed to be due to the increase in electron density, whereas the following slower rise is due to the decrease in gas density caused by gas heating. By reducing the time between pulses, direct current conditions were approached, and the electron density as well as the gas density, and gas temperature, respectively, were obtained through extrapolation. A computation inversion method was used to determine the radial distribution of the plasma parameters in the cylindrical discharge. For a direct-current filamentary discharge in air, at a current of 10 mA, the electron density was found to be 1013 cm-3 in the centre, decreasing to half of this value at a radial distance of 0.21 mm. Gaussian temperature profiles with σ = 1.1 mm and maximum values of 1000-2000 K in the centre were also obtained with, however, larger error margins than for electron densities.

  7. Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  8. Development of dual-wavelength fiber ring laser and its application to step-height measurement using self-mixing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, S; Xie, F; Chen, L; Wang, Y Z; Dong, L L; Zhao, K Q

    2016-03-21

    A dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber (EDF) ring laser was developed and its application to step-height measurement using two-wavelength self-mixing interferometry (SMI) was demonstrated. The fiber laser can emit two different wavelengths without any laser mode competition. It is composed of two EDF laser cavities and employs fiber Bragg gratings to determine which wavelengths are emitted. The step heights can be measured using SMI of the two wavelengths, and the maximum height that can be measured is half the synthetic wavelength of the two wavelengths. A step height of 1mm was constructed using two gauge blocks and then measured using the laser. The measurement was repeated ten times, and the standard deviation of the measurements was 2.4nm. PMID:27136766

  9. Temperature-fluctuation-sensitive accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in low-coherence interferometry in characterizing arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changyun; Wei, Bing; Yang, Longzhi; Wang, Gencheng; Wang, Yuehai; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-09-20

    We investigate the accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in characterizing optical multipath components by low-coherence interferometry. The accumulative effect is caused by the fluctuation of the environment temperature, which leads to the variation of the refractive index of the device under test. The resulting phase measurement errors accumulate with the increasing of the phase difference between the two interferometer arms. Our experiments were carried out to demonstrate that the accumulative effect is still obvious even though the thermo-optical coefficient of the device under test is quite small. Shortening the measurement time to reduce the fluctuation of the environment temperature can effectively restrain the accumulative effect. The experiments show that when the scanning speed increases to 4.8 mm/s, the slope of the phase measurement errors decreases to 5.52×10(-8), which means the accumulative effect can be ignored.

  10. Temperature-fluctuation-sensitive accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in low-coherence interferometry in characterizing arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changyun; Wei, Bing; Yang, Longzhi; Wang, Gencheng; Wang, Yuehai; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-09-20

    We investigate the accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in characterizing optical multipath components by low-coherence interferometry. The accumulative effect is caused by the fluctuation of the environment temperature, which leads to the variation of the refractive index of the device under test. The resulting phase measurement errors accumulate with the increasing of the phase difference between the two interferometer arms. Our experiments were carried out to demonstrate that the accumulative effect is still obvious even though the thermo-optical coefficient of the device under test is quite small. Shortening the measurement time to reduce the fluctuation of the environment temperature can effectively restrain the accumulative effect. The experiments show that when the scanning speed increases to 4.8 mm/s, the slope of the phase measurement errors decreases to 5.52×10(-8), which means the accumulative effect can be ignored. PMID:26406502

  11. High-frequency fluctuation measurements by far-infrared laser Faraday-effect polarimetry-interferometry and forward scattering system on MST.

    PubMed

    Ding, W X; Lin, L; Duff, J R; Brower, D L

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced transport driven by global tearing modes has been measured by Faraday-effect polarimetry and interferometry (phase measurements) in the MST reversed field pinch. However, the role of small-scale broadband magnetic and density turbulence in transport remains unknown. In order to investigate broadband magnetic turbulence, we plan to upgrade the existing detector system by using planar-diode fundamental waveguide mixers optimized for high sensitivity. Initial tests indicate these mixers have ×10 sensitivity improvement compared to currently employed corner-cube Schottky-diode mixers and ×5 lower noise. Compact mixer design will allow us to resolve the wavenumbers up to k ∼ 1-2 cm(-1) for beam width w = 1.5 cm and 15 cm(-1) for beam width w = 2 mm. The system can also be used to measure the scattered signal (amplitude measurement) induced by both plasma density and magnetic fluctuations.

  12. Rapid uplift in Laguna del Maule volcanic field of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (Chile) measured by satellite radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, K.; Ali, T.; Singer, B. S.; Pesicek, J. D.; Thurber, C. H.; Jicha, B. R.; Lara, L. E.; Hildreth, E. W.; Fierstein, J.; Williams-Jones, G.; Unsworth, M. J.; Keranen, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone extends over 500 square kilometers and comprises more than 130 individual vents. As described by Hildreth et al. (2010), the history has been defined from sixty-eight Ar/Ar and K-Ar dates. Silicic eruptions have occurred throughout the past 3.7 Ma, including welded ignimbrite associated with caldera formation at 950 ka, small rhyolitic eruptions between 336 and 38 ka, and a culminating ring of 36 post-glacial rhyodacite and rhyolite coulees and domes that encircle the lake. Dating of five post-glacial flows implies that these silicic eruptions occurred within the last 25 kyr. Field relations indicate that initial eruptions comprised modest volumes of mafic rhyodacite magma that were followed by larger volumes of high silica rhyolite. The post-glacial flare-up of silicic magmatism from vents distributed around the lake, is unprecedented in the history of this volcanic field. Using satellite radar interferometry (InSAR), Fournier et al. (2010) measured uplift at a rate of more than 180 mm/year between 2007 and 2008 in a round pattern centered on the west side of LdM. More recent InSAR observations suggest that rapid uplift has continued from 2008 through early 2011. In contrast, Fournier et al. found no measurable deformation in an interferogram spanning 2003 through 2004. In this study, we model the deformation field using the General Inversion of Phase Technique (GIPhT), as described by Feigl and Thurber (2009). Two different models fit the data. The first model assumes a sill at ~5 km depth has been inflating at a rate of more than 20 million cubic meters per year since 2007. The second model assumes that the water level in the lake dropped at a rate of 20 m/yr from January 2007 through February 2010, thus reducing the load on an elastic simulation of the crust. The rate of intrusion inferred from InSAR is an order of magnitude higher than the average rate derived from well-dated arc

  13. Combined x-ray scattering, radiography, and velocity interferometry/streaked optical pyrometry measurements of warm dense carbon using a novel technique of shock-and-release

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, K.; Collins, L. A.; Kagan, G.; Kress, J. D.; Montgomery, D. S.; Srinivasan, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Tzeferacos, P.; Benage, J. F.

    2014-05-15

    This work focused on a new application of the shock-and-release technique for equation of state (EOS) measurements. Warm dense matter states at near normal solid density and at temperatures close to 10 eV in diamond and graphite samples were created using a deep release from a laser-driven shock at the OMEGA laser facility. Independent temperature, density, and pressure measurements that do not depend on any theoretical models or simulations were obtained using imaging x-ray Thomson scattering, radiography, velocity interferometry, and streaked optical pyrometry. The experimental results were reproduced by the 2-D FLASH radiation hydrodynamics simulations finding a good agreement. The final EOS measurement was then compared with widely used SESAME EOS models as well as quantum molecular dynamics simulation results for carbon, which were very consistent with the experimental data.

  14. Combined x-ray scattering, radiography, and velocity interferometry/streaked optical pyrometry measurements of warm dense carbon using a novel technique of shock-and-releasea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, K.; Collins, L. A.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kagan, G.; Kress, J. D.; Montgomery, D. S.; Srinivasan, B.; Tzeferacos, P.; Benage, J. F.

    2014-05-01

    This work focused on a new application of the shock-and-release technique for equation of state (EOS) measurements. Warm dense matter states at near normal solid density and at temperatures close to 10 eV in diamond and graphite samples were created using a deep release from a laser-driven shock at the OMEGA laser facility. Independent temperature, density, and pressure measurements that do not depend on any theoretical models or simulations were obtained using imaging x-ray Thomson scattering, radiography, velocity interferometry, and streaked optical pyrometry. The experimental results were reproduced by the 2-D FLASH radiation hydrodynamics simulations finding a good agreement. The final EOS measurement was then compared with widely used SESAME EOS models as well as quantum molecular dynamics simulation results for carbon, which were very consistent with the experimental data.

  15. Single-Shot Measurement of Temporally-Dependent Polarization State of Femtosecond Pulses by Angle-Multiplexed Spectral-Spatial Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that temporally-dependent polarization states of ultrashort laser pulses can be reconstructed in a single shot by use of an angle-multiplexed spatial-spectral interferometry. This is achieved by introducing two orthogonally polarized reference pulses and interfering them with an arbitrarily polarized ultrafast pulse under measurement. A unique calibration procedure is developed for this technique which facilitates the subsequent polarization state measurements. The accuracy of several reconstructed polarization states is verified by comparison with that obtained from an analytic model that predicts the polarization state on the basis of its method of production. Laser pulses with mJ-level energies were characterized via this technique, including a time-dependent polarization state that can be used for polarization-gating of high-harmonic generation for production of attosecond pulses. PMID:27596951

  16. Single-Shot Measurement of Temporally-Dependent Polarization State of Femtosecond Pulses by Angle-Multiplexed Spectral-Spatial Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that temporally-dependent polarization states of ultrashort laser pulses can be reconstructed in a single shot by use of an angle-multiplexed spatial-spectral interferometry. This is achieved by introducing two orthogonally polarized reference pulses and interfering them with an arbitrarily polarized ultrafast pulse under measurement. A unique calibration procedure is developed for this technique which facilitates the subsequent polarization state measurements. The accuracy of several reconstructed polarization states is verified by comparison with that obtained from an analytic model that predicts the polarization state on the basis of its method of production. Laser pulses with mJ-level energies were characterized via this technique, including a time-dependent polarization state that can be used for polarization-gating of high-harmonic generation for production of attosecond pulses. PMID:27596951

  17. Single-Shot Measurement of Temporally-Dependent Polarization State of Femtosecond Pulses by Angle-Multiplexed Spectral-Spatial Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that temporally-dependent polarization states of ultrashort laser pulses can be reconstructed in a single shot by use of an angle-multiplexed spatial-spectral interferometry. This is achieved by introducing two orthogonally polarized reference pulses and interfering them with an arbitrarily polarized ultrafast pulse under measurement. A unique calibration procedure is developed for this technique which facilitates the subsequent polarization state measurements. The accuracy of several reconstructed polarization states is verified by comparison with that obtained from an analytic model that predicts the polarization state on the basis of its method of production. Laser pulses with mJ-level energies were characterized via this technique, including a time-dependent polarization state that can be used for polarization-gating of high-harmonic generation for production of attosecond pulses.

  18. Readout for intersatellite laser interferometry: Measuring low frequency phase fluctuations of high-frequency signals with microradian precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerberding, Oliver; Diekmann, Christian; Kullmann, Joachim; Tröbs, Michael; Bykov, Ioury; Barke, Simon; Brause, Nils Christopher; Esteban Delgado, Juan José; Schwarze, Thomas S.; Reiche, Jens; Danzmann, Karsten; Rasmussen, Torben; Hansen, Torben Vendt; Enggaard, Anders; Pedersen, Søren Møller; Jennrich, Oliver; Suess, Martin; Sodnik, Zoran; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Precision phase readout of optical beat note signals is one of the core techniques required for intersatellite laser interferometry. Future space based gravitational wave detectors like eLISA require such a readout over a wide range of MHz frequencies, due to orbit induced Doppler shifts, with a precision in the order of μ rad / √{ Hz } at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. In this paper, we present phase readout systems, so-called phasemeters, that are able to achieve such precisions and we discuss various means that have been employed to reduce noise in the analogue circuit domain and during digitisation. We also discuss the influence of some non-linear noise sources in the analogue domain of such phasemeters. And finally, we present the performance that was achieved during testing of the elegant breadboard model of the LISA phasemeter, which was developed in the scope of a European Space Agency technology development activity.

  19. Spatial and temporal film thickness measurement of a soap bubble based on large lateral shearing displacement interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Zhou, Huaichun; Lou, Chun; Zhu, Jinrong

    2012-12-20

    The film thickness of a hanging soap bubble has been studied along its gravitational orientation after its birth and before its bursting using large lateral shearing displacement interferometry, with a theoretical error of less than 0.325λ. The results show that the spatial distribution of the film thickness could be approximated with an exponential model in all captured frames, especially in the lower half of the soap bubble. Before its bursting, a special zone, where the water layer has drained out while the surfactant solution layer remains, will occur at the top of the soap bubble and gradually expand toward the bottom. Moreover, the simulated fringe patterns based on the computed values match well with the experimentally observed ones.

  20. Advances in ice radar studies of a temperate alpine glacier, South Cascade Glacier, Washington, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fountain, A.G.; Jacobel, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    South Cascade Glacier, Washington, U.S.A., is one of the most extensively studied glaciers in the Western Hemisphere. In addition to mass-balance measurements, which date to 1958, numerous hydrological investigations have been carried out during the last three decades, and repeated ice-thickness determinations have been made using a variety of techniques. In the late 1960s, the basal topography was initially determined by gravitimetric methods. In the mid-1970s some of the first depth measurements using radar on temperate ice were made. The basal topography was remapped soon after from a series of point radar measurements and boreholes drilled to the glacier bottom. During the 1990s, the ice thickness was remapped using digital recording of continuous profiles that obtained over 5000 ice-thickness measurements. Profiles have been corrected for the finite beamwidth of the antenna radiation pattern and reflections in steep terrain, resulting in a significantly improved depiction of the basal surface and internal structures. The map based on our recent radar profiles confirms the large-scale features of the basal topography previously depicted and reveals more structural detail. A bright reflector was detected at the base of the glacier and could be traced in adjacent profiles. Comparison with results from water-level measurements in boreholes drilled to the bed indicates that the reflector is a subglacial conduit.

  1. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  2. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  3. Virtually calibrated projection moire interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Mark; Blotter, Jonathan

    2005-05-01

    Projection moire interferometry (PMI) is an out-of-plane displacement measurement technique that consists of differencing reference and deformed images of a grid pattern projected onto the test object. In conventional PMI, a tedious process of computing the fringe sensitivity coefficient (FSC), which requires moving the test object or the reference plane to known displacements, is used. We present a new technique for computing the FSC values that is called virtually calibrated projection moire interferometry (VCPMI). VCPMI is based on computer simulations of the conventional PMI process and does not require moving the actual test object or reference plane. We validate the VCPMI approach by comparing results for a flat plate and an airfoil with those made by use of other measurement methods.

  4. Toward robust deconvolution of pass-through paleomagnetic measurements: new tool to estimate magnetometer sensor response and laser interferometry of sample positioning accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hirokuni; Xuan, Chuang; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2016-07-01

    Pass-through superconducting rock magnetometers (SRM) offer rapid and high-precision remanence measurements for continuous samples that are essential for modern paleomagnetism studies. However, continuous SRM measurements are inevitably smoothed and distorted due to the convolution effect of SRM sensor response. Deconvolution is necessary to restore accurate magnetization from pass-through SRM data, and robust deconvolution requires reliable estimate of SRM sensor response as well as understanding of uncertainties associated with the SRM measurement system. In this paper, we use the SRM at Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan, as an example to introduce new tool and procedure for accurate and efficient estimate of SRM sensor response. To quantify uncertainties associated with the SRM measurement due to track positioning errors and test their effects on deconvolution, we employed laser interferometry for precise monitoring of track positions both with and without placing a u-channel sample on the SRM tray. The acquired KCC SRM sensor response shows significant cross-term of Z-axis magnetization on the X-axis pick-up coil and full widths of ~46-54 mm at half-maximum response for the three pick-up coils, which are significantly narrower than those (~73-80 mm) for the liquid He-free SRM at Oregon State University. Laser interferometry measurements on the KCC SRM tracking system indicate positioning uncertainties of ~0.1-0.2 and ~0.5 mm for tracking with and without u-channel sample on the tray, respectively. Positioning errors appear to have reproducible components of up to ~0.5 mm possibly due to patterns or damages on tray surface or rope used for the tracking system. Deconvolution of 50,000 simulated measurement data with realistic error introduced based on the position uncertainties indicates that although the SRM tracking system has recognizable positioning uncertainties, they do not significantly debilitate the use of deconvolution to accurately restore high

  5. Readout for intersatellite laser interferometry: Measuring low frequency phase fluctuations of high-frequency signals with microradian precision.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver; Diekmann, Christian; Kullmann, Joachim; Tröbs, Michael; Bykov, Ioury; Barke, Simon; Brause, Nils Christopher; Esteban Delgado, Juan José; Schwarze, Thomas S; Reiche, Jens; Danzmann, Karsten; Rasmussen, Torben; Hansen, Torben Vendt; Enggaard, Anders; Pedersen, Søren Møller; Jennrich, Oliver; Suess, Martin; Sodnik, Zoran; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Precision phase readout of optical beat note signals is one of the core techniques required for intersatellite laser interferometry. Future space based gravitational wave detectors like eLISA require such a readout over a wide range of MHz frequencies, due to orbit induced Doppler shifts, with a precision in the order of μrad/√Hz at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. In this paper, we present phase readout systems, so-called phasemeters, that are able to achieve such precisions and we discuss various means that have been employed to reduce noise in the analogue circuit domain and during digitisation. We also discuss the influence of some non-linear noise sources in the analogue domain of such phasemeters. And finally, we present the performance that was achieved during testing of the elegant breadboard model of the LISA phasemeter, which was developed in the scope of a European Space Agency technology development activity. PMID:26233398

  6. Grounding line retreat of Pope, Smith, and Kohler Glaciers, West Antarctica, measured with Sentinel-1a radar interferometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuchl, B.; Mouginot, J.; Rignot, E.; Morlighem, M.; Khazendar, A.

    2016-08-01

    We employ Sentinel-1a C band satellite radar interferometry data in Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans mode to map the grounding line and ice velocity of Pope, Smith, and Kohler glaciers, in West Antarctica, for the years 2014-2016 and compare the results with those obtained using Earth Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-1/2) in 1992, 1996, and 2011. We observe an ongoing, rapid grounding line retreat of Smith at 2 km/yr (40 km since 1996), an 11 km retreat of Pope (0.5 km/yr), and a 2 km readvance of Kohler since 2011. The variability in glacier retreat is consistent with the distribution of basal slopes, i.e., fast along retrograde beds and slow along prograde beds. We find that several pinning points holding Dotson and Crosson ice shelves disappeared since 1996 due to ice shelf thinning, which signal the ongoing weakening of these ice shelves. Overall, the results indicate that ice shelf and glacier retreat in this sector remain unabated.

  7. Comparison of Anterior Segment Measurements with Scheimpflug/Placido Photography-Based Topography System and IOLMaster Partial Coherence Interferometry in Patients with Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinhai; Liao, Na; Bao, Fangjun; Yu, Ye; Lu, Weicong; Hu, Qingjie; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the consistency of anterior segment measurements obtained using a Sirius Scheimpflug/Placido photography-based topography system (CSO, Italy) and IOLMaster partial coherence interferometry (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Germany) in eyes with cataracts. Methods. A total of 90 eyes of 90 patients were included in this prospective study. The anterior chamber depth (ACD), keratometry (K), corneal astigmatism axis, and white to white (WTW) values were randomly measured three times with Sirius and IOLMaster. Concordance between them was assessed by calculating 95% limits of agreement (LoA). Results. The ACD and K taken with the Sirius were statistically significantly higher than that taken with the IOLMaster; however, the Sirius significantly underestimated the WTW values compared with the IOLMaster. Good agreement was found for Km and ACD measurements, with 95% LoA of −0.20 to 0.54 mm and −0.16 to 0.34 mm, respectively. Poor agreement was observed for astigmatism axis and WTW measurements, as the 95% LoA was −23.96 to 23.36° and −1.15 to 0.37 mm, respectively. Conclusion. With the exception of astigmatism axis and WTW, anterior segment measurements taken by Sirius and IOLMaster devices showed good agreement and may be used interchangeably in patients with cataracts. PMID:25400939

  8. Comparison of Anterior Segment Measurements with Scheimpflug/Placido Photography-Based Topography System and IOLMaster Partial Coherence Interferometry in Patients with Cataracts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhai; Liao, Na; Savini, Giacomo; Bao, Fangjun; Yu, Ye; Lu, Weicong; Hu, Qingjie; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the consistency of anterior segment measurements obtained using a Sirius Scheimpflug/Placido photography-based topography system (CSO, Italy) and IOLMaster partial coherence interferometry (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Germany) in eyes with cataracts. Methods. A total of 90 eyes of 90 patients were included in this prospective study. The anterior chamber depth (ACD), keratometry (K), corneal astigmatism axis, and white to white (WTW) values were randomly measured three times with Sirius and IOLMaster. Concordance between them was assessed by calculating 95% limits of agreement (LoA). Results. The ACD and K taken with the Sirius were statistically significantly higher than that taken with the IOLMaster; however, the Sirius significantly underestimated the WTW values compared with the IOLMaster. Good agreement was found for Km and ACD measurements, with 95% LoA of -0.20 to 0.54 mm and -0.16 to 0.34 mm, respectively. Poor agreement was observed for astigmatism axis and WTW measurements, as the 95% LoA was -23.96 to 23.36° and -1.15 to 0.37 mm, respectively. Conclusion. With the exception of astigmatism axis and WTW, anterior segment measurements taken by Sirius and IOLMaster devices showed good agreement and may be used interchangeably in patients with cataracts. PMID:25400939

  9. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K A

    1997-12-01

    EUV lithography is a promising and viable candidate for circuit fabrication with 0.1-micron critical dimension and smaller. In order to achieve diffraction-limited performance, all-reflective multilayer-coated lithographic imaging systems operating near 13-nm wavelength and 0.1 NA have system wavefront tolerances of 0.27 nm, or 0.02 waves RMS. Owing to the highly-sensitive resonant reflective properties of multilayer mirrors and extraordinarily tight tolerances set forth for their fabrication, EUV optical systems require at-wavelength EUV interferometry for final alignment and qualification. This dissertation discusses the development and successful implementation of high-accuracy EUV interferometric techniques. Proof-of-principle experiments with a prototype EUV point-diffraction interferometer for the measurement of Fresnel zoneplate lenses first demonstrated sub-wavelength EUV interferometric capability. These experiments spurred the development of the superior phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI), which has been implemented for the testing of an all-reflective lithographic-quality EUV optical system. Both systems rely on pinhole diffraction to produce spherical reference wavefronts in a common-path geometry. Extensive experiments demonstrate EUV wavefront-measuring precision beyond 0.02 waves RMS. EUV imaging experiments provide verification of the high-accuracy of the point-diffraction principle, and demonstrate the utility of the measurements in successfully predicting imaging performance. Complementary to the experimental research, several areas of theoretical investigation related to the novel PS/PDI system are presented. First-principles electromagnetic field simulations of pinhole diffraction are conducted to ascertain the upper limits of measurement accuracy and to guide selection of the pinhole diameter. Investigations of the relative merits of different PS/PDI configurations accompany a general study of the most significant sources

  10. The equation of state of 5-nitro-2,4-dihydro-1,2,4,-triazol-3-one determined via in-situ optical microscopy and interferometry measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Zaug, Joseph M.; Bastea, Sorin; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.

    2016-04-07

    Quasi-hydrostatic high-pressure equations of state (EOS) are typically determined, for crystalline solids, by measuring unit-cell volumes using x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. However, when characterizing low-symmetry materials with large unit cells, conventional XRD approaches may become problematic. To overcome this issue, we examined the utility of a "direct" approach toward determining high pressure material volume by measuring surface area and sample thickness using optical microscopy and interferometry (OMI) respectively. We have validated this experimental approach by comparing results obtained for TATB (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene) with an EOS determined from synchrotron XRD measurements; and, a good match is observed. We have measured the highmore » pressure EOS of 5-nitro-2,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazol-3-one (α-NTO) up to 33 GPa. No high-pressure XRD EOS data have been published on α-NTO, probably due to its complex crystal structure. Furthermore, the results of this study suggest that OMI is a reliable and versatile alternative for determining EOSs, especially when conventional methodologies are impractical.« less

  11. Geometric time delay interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2005-08-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave observatory LISA, a NASA-ESA mission to be launched after 2012, will achieve its optimal sensitivity using time delay interferometry (TDI), a LISA-specific technique needed to cancel the otherwise overwhelming laser noise in the interspacecraft phase measurements. The TDI observables of the Michelson and Sagnac types have been interpreted physically as the virtual measurements of a synthesized interferometer. In this paper, I present Geometric TDI, a new and intuitive approach to extend this interpretation to all TDI observables. Unlike the standard algebraic formalism, Geometric TDI provides a combinatorial algorithm to explore exhaustively the space of second-generation TDI observables (i.e., those that cancel laser noise in LISA-like interferometers with time-dependent arm lengths). Using this algorithm, I survey the space of second-generation TDI observables of length (i.e., number of component phase measurements) up to 24, and I identify alternative, improved forms of the standard second-generation TDI observables. The alternative forms have improved high-frequency gravitational-wave sensitivity in realistic noise conditions (because they have fewer nulls in the gravitational-wave and noise response functions), and are less susceptible to instrumental gaps and glitches (because their component phase measurements span shorter time periods).

  12. Holograph and Interferometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a method to create holograms for use in different interferometry techniques. Students utilize these techniques in experiments to study the structural integrity of a clarinet reed and the effects of temperature on objects. (MDH)

  13. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1982-06-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect has been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical pathlength of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10/sup -5/ cm/sup -1/ can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10/sup -3/ cm/sup -1/. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 x 10/sup -6/ cm/sup -1/.

  14. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-05-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect have been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical path length of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup [minus]1] can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10[sup [minus]3] cm[sup [minus]1]. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm[sup [minus]1]. 6 figs.

  15. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, David A.; Keller, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect has been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical pathlength of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.-1 can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10.sup.-3 cm.sup.-1. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5.times. 10.sup.-6 cm.sup.-1.

  16. Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 9.2 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au+Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. The data were collected using the large acceptance STAR detector at {radical}s{sub NN} = 9.2 GeV from a test run of the collider in the year 2008. Midrapidity results on multiplicity density (dN/dy) in rapidity (y), average transverse momentum (), particle ratios, elliptic flow, and HBT radii are consistent with the corresponding results at similar {radical}s{sub NN} from fixed target experiments. Directed flow measurements are presented for both midrapidity and forward rapidity regions. Furthermore the collision centrality dependence of identified particle dN/dy, , and particle ratios are discussed. These results also demonstrate that the capabilities of the STAR detector, although optimized for {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, are suitable for the proposed QCD critical point search and exploration of the QCD phase diagram at RHIC.

  17. Beam-energy-dependent two-pion interferometry and the freeze-out eccentricity of pions measured in heavy ion collisions at the STAR detector

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-07-10

    In this study, we present results of analyses of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV measured in the STAR detector as part of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan program. The extracted correlation lengths (HBT radii) are studied as a function of beam energy, azimuthal angle relative to the reaction plane, centrality, and transverse mass (mT) of the particles. The azimuthal analysis allows extraction of the eccentricity of the entire fireball at kinetic freeze-out. The energy dependence of this observable is expected to be sensitive to changes in the equation of state. A new global fit method is studied as an alternate method to directly measure the parameters in the azimuthal analysis. The eccentricity shows a monotonic decrease with beam energy that is qualitatively consistent with the trend from all model predictions and quantitatively consistent with a hadronic transport model.

  18. Beam-energy-dependent two-pion interferometry and the freeze-out eccentricity of pions measured in heavy ion collisions at the STAR detector

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-07-10

    In this study, we present results of analyses of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV measured in the STAR detector as part of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan program. The extracted correlation lengths (HBT radii) are studied as a function of beam energy, azimuthal angle relative to the reaction plane, centrality, and transverse mass (mT) of the particles. The azimuthal analysis allows extraction of the eccentricity of the entire fireball at kinetic freeze-out. The energy dependence of this observable is expected to be sensitive to changes in the equationmore » of state. A new global fit method is studied as an alternate method to directly measure the parameters in the azimuthal analysis. The eccentricity shows a monotonic decrease with beam energy that is qualitatively consistent with the trend from all model predictions and quantitatively consistent with a hadronic transport model.« less

  19. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  20. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a ∕LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a∕LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus. PMID:21280890

  1. Global astrometry with the space interferometry mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boden, A.; Unwin, S.; Shao, M.

    1997-01-01

    The prospects for global astrometric measurements with the space interferometry mission (SIM) are discussed. The SIM mission will perform four microarcsec astrometric measurements on objects as faint as 20 mag using the optical interferometry technique with a 10 m baseline. The SIM satellite will perform narrow angle astrometry and global astrometry by means of an astrometric grid. The sensitivities of the SIM global astrometric performance and the grid accuracy versus instrumental parameters and sky coverage schemes are reported on. The problems in finding suitable astrometric grid objects to support microarcsec astrometry, and related ground-based observation programs are discussed.

  2. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  3. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.J.

    1992-09-01

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurements satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  4. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurements satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  5. Interferometry with synthetic gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Taylor, Jacob M.; Galitski, Victor M.

    2011-03-15

    We propose a compact atom interferometry scheme for measuring weak, time-dependent accelerations. Our proposal uses an ensemble of dilute trapped bosons with two internal states that couple to a synthetic gauge field with opposite charges. The trapped gauge field couples spin to momentum to allow time-dependent accelerations to be continuously imparted on the internal states. We generalize this system to reduce noise and estimate the sensitivity of such a system to be S{approx}10{sup -7}(m/s{sup 2}/{radical}(Hz)).

  6. An Interferometry Imaging Beauty Contest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Cotton, William D.; Hummel, Christian A.; Monnier, John D.; Zhaod, Ming; Young, John S.; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Meimon, Serge C.; Mugnier, Laurent; LeBesnerais, Guy; Thiebaut, Eric; Tuthill, Peter G.; Hani, Christopher A.; Pauls, Thomas; DuvertI, Gilles; Garcia, Paulo; Kuchner, Marc

    2004-01-01

    We present a formal comparison of the performance of algorithms used for synthesis imaging with optical/infrared long-baseline interferometers. Six different algorithms are evaluated based on their performance with simulated test data. Each set of test data is formated in the interferometry Data Exchange Standard and is designed to simulate a specific problem relevant to long-baseline imaging. The data are calibrated power spectra and bispectra measured with a ctitious array, intended to be typical of existing imaging interferometers. The strengths and limitations of each algorithm are discussed.

  7. Advances in Small-Telescope Speckle Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, David J.

    2016-06-01

    The current revolution in CMOS camera technology has enabled a new generation of small telescope systems targeted at the measurement of close binary systems using the techniques of speckle interferometry and bispectrum analysis. These inexpensive, ultra-sensitive, high resolution cameras are now outperforming CCD technology, and come at a truly affordable price. In addition, dedicated, user-friendly speckle interferometry reduction software has been developed for the amateur, making it easy to perform the otherwise complicated data processing tasks. This talk will address these recent advances in hardware and software, and describe some of the results of the informal amateur-professional collaboration that has formed around them.

  8. MARBLE (Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometry for Baseline Length Evaluation): Development of a Compact VLBI System for Calibrating GNSS and Electronic Distance Measurement Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, R.; Ishii, A.; Takiguchi, H.; Kimura, M.; Sekido, M.; Takefuji, K.; Ujihara, H.; Hanado, Y.; Koyama, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kurihara, S.; Kokado, K.; Kawabata, R.; Nozawa, K.; Mukai, Y.; Kuroda, J.; Ishihara, M.; Matsuzaka, S.

    2012-12-01

    We are developing a compact VLBI system with a 1.6-m diameter aperture dish in order to provide reference baseline lengths for calibration. The reference baselines are used to validate surveying instruments such as GPS and EDM and is maintained by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). The compact VLBI system will be installed at both ends of the reference baseline. Since the system is not sensitive enough to detect fringes between the two small dishes, we have designed a new observation concept including one large dish station. We can detect two group delays between each compact VLBI system and the large dish station based on conventional VLBI measurement. A group delay between the two compact dishes can be indirectly calculated using a simple equation. We named the idea "Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometry for Baseline Length Evaluation", or MARBLE system. The compact VLBI system is easy transportable and consists of the compact dish, a new wide-band front-end system, azimuth and elevation drive units, an IF down-converter unit, an antenna control unit (ACU), a counterweight, and a monument pillar. Each drive unit is equipped with a zero-backlash harmonic drive gearing component. A monument pillar is designed to mount typical geodetic GNSS antennas easily and an offset between the GNSS antenna reference point. The location of the azimuth-elevation crossing point of the VLBI system is precisely determined with an uncertainty of less than 0.2 mm. We have carried out seven geodetic VLBI experiments on the Kashima-Tsukuba baseline (about 54 km) using the two prototypes of the compact VLBI system between December 2009 and December 2010. The average baseline length and repeatability of the experiments is 54184874.0 ± 2.4 mm. The results are well consistent with those obtained by GPS measurements. In addition, we are now planning to use the compact VLBI system for precise time and frequency comparison between separated locations.

  9. VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY MEASURED PROPER MOTION AND PARALLAX OF THE γ-RAY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J0218+4232

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yuanjie; Chen, Ding; Yang, Jun; Campbell, Robert M.; Janssen, Gemma; Stappers, Ben

    2014-02-20

    PSR J0218+4232 is a millisecond pulsar (MSP) with a flux density ∼0.9 mJy at 1.4 GHz. It is very bright in the high-energy X-ray and γ-ray domains. We conducted an astrometric program using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.6 GHz to measure its proper motion and parallax. A model-independent distance would also help constrain its γ-ray luminosity. We achieved a detection of signal-to-noise ratio S/N >37 for the weak pulsar in all five epochs. Using an extragalactic radio source lying 20 arcmin away from the pulsar, we estimate the pulsar's proper motion to be μ{sub α}cos δ = 5.35 ± 0.05 mas yr{sup –1} and μ{sub δ} = –3.74 ± 0.12 mas yr{sup –1}, and a parallax of π = 0.16 ± 0.09 mas. The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) proper motion has significantly improved upon the estimates from long-term pulsar timing observations. The VLBI parallax provides the first model-independent distance constraints: d=6.3{sub −2.3}{sup +8.0} kpc, with a corresponding 3σ lower-limit of d = 2.3 kpc. This is the first pulsar trigonometric parallax measurement based solely on EVN observations. Using the derived distance, we believe that PSR J0218+4232 is the most energetic γ-ray MSP known to date. The luminosity based on even our 3σ lower-limit distance is high enough to pose challenges to the conventional outer gap and slot gap models.

  10. Lens sag and diameter measurement of large-size microlenses using sub-pixel algorithm and optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shir-Kuan; Yang, Shih-Wei

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, an automatic optical inspection system is designed specifically to measure the diameter and lens sag of large-size microlenses: 1. The proposed algorithm of measuring lens diameter locates the lens center through the Euclidean distance array, and determines the lens edge along an initiated ray using linear interpolation with sub-pixel accuracy. 2. The lens sag is calculated from a single fringe pattern of large-size microlens, in combination with the measured lens diameter. 3. According to the experiment results, the proposed system has advantages of high applicability, rapid processing speed, and good accuracy with the RMS error≤1% of measuring a large-size microlens, but without the requirement of prior training. The system architecture of non-contact measurement would not cause scratches on the lens surface and is inexpensive, thus, which is particularly suitable for the in-line inspection of industry field.

  11. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  12. Multiple Beam Interferometry in Elementary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolansky, S.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses a relatively simple technique for demonstrating multiple beam interferometry. The technique can be applied to measuring (1) radii of curvature of lenses, (2) surface finish of glass, and (3) differential phase change on reflection. Microtopographies, modulated fringe systems and opaque objects may also be observed by this technique.…

  13. Measurement of Soret and Fickian diffusion coefficients by orthogonal phase-shifting interferometry and its application to protein aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan F.; Komiya, Atsuki; Henry, Daniel; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a method to measure thermodiffusion and Fickian diffusion in transparent binary solutions. The measuring instrument consists of two orthogonally aligned phase-shifting interferometers coupled with a single rotating polarizer. This high-resolution interferometer, initially developed to measure isothermal diffusion coefficients in liquid systems [J. F. Torres, A. Komiya, E. Shoji, J. Okajima, and S. Maruyama, Opt. Lasers Eng. 50, 1287 (2012)], was modified to measure transient concentration profiles in binary solutions subject to a linear temperature gradient. A convectionless thermodiffusion field was created in a binary solution sample that is placed inside a Soret cell. This cell consists of a parallelepiped cavity with a horizontal cross-section area of 10 × 20 mm2, a variable height of 1-2 mm, and transparent lateral walls. The small height of the cell reduces the volume of the sample, shortens the measurement time, and increases the hydrodynamic stability of the system. An additional free diffusion experiment with the same optical apparatus provides the so-called contrast factors that relate the unwrapped phase and concentration gradients, i.e., the measurement technique is independent and robust. The Soret coefficient is determined from the concentration and temperature differences between the upper and lower boundaries measured by the interferometer and thermocouples, respectively. The Fickian diffusion coefficient is obtained by fitting a numerical solution to the experimental concentration profile. The method is validated through the measurement of thermodiffusion in the well-known liquid pairs of ethanol-water (ethanol 39.12 wt.%) and isobutylbenzene-dodecane (50.0 wt.%). The obtained coefficients agree with the literature values within 5.0%. Finally, the developed technique is applied to visualize biomolecular thermophoresis. Two protein aqueous solutions at 3 mg/ml were used as samples: aprotinin (6.5 kDa)-water and lysozyme (14.3 k

  14. Applications of speckle interferometry to civil engineering in Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pena, Rolando; Cibrian-Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M.; Marti-Lopez, Luis

    2003-05-01

    Speckle interferometry has been introduced in Civil Engineering at CUJAE in 1988 as a useful technique in research work. This paper describes some applications of speckle interferometry in civil engineering. Speckle photography has been utilized to study deformation in shearwalls, and also studding of behavior building model under concentrate loading. Displacements were numerically calculated using a finite element method. Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) has been used for the measurement of the Young's modulus in mortars and concrete. Obtained values of the Young's modulus are in good agreement with reported for mortars or measured by a static compressive technique for concrete.

  15. Calibration and imaging algorithms for full-Stokes optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Nicholas M.; Mozurkewich, David; Schmidt, Luke M.; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Edel, Stanislav S.; Jones, Carol E.; Halonen, Robert J.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Hutter, Donald J.

    2012-07-01

    Optical interferometry and polarimetry have separately provided new insights into stellar astronomy, especially in the fields of fundamental parameters and atmospheric models. Optical interferometers will eventually add full-Stokes polarization measuring capabilities, thus combining both techniques. In this paper, we: 1) list the observables, calibration quantities, and data acquisition strategies for both limited and full optical interferometric polarimetry (OIP); 2) describe the masking interferometer AMASING and its polarization measuring enhancement called AMASING-POL; 3) show how a radio interferometry imaging package, CASA, can be used for optical interferometry data reduction; and 4) present imaging simulations for Be stars.

  16. Precision surveying using very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. W.; Clark, T. A.; Coates, R.; Ma, C.; Robertson, D. S.; Corey, B. E.; Counselman, C. C.; Shapiro, I. I.; Wittels, J. J.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Radio interferometry measurements were used to measure the vector baselines between large microwave radio antennas. A 1.24 km baseline in Massachusetts between the 36 meter Haystack Observatory antenna and the 18 meter Westford antenna of Lincoln Laboratory was measured with 5 mm repeatability in 12 separate experiments. Preliminary results from measurements of the 3,928 km baseline between the Haystack antenna and the 40 meter antenna at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory in California are presented.

  17. Techniques in Broadband Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J

    2004-01-04

    This is a compilation of my patents issued from 1997 to 2002, generally describing interferometer techniques that modify the coherence properties of broad-bandwidth light and other waves, with applications to Doppler velocimetry, range finding, imaging and spectroscopy. Patents are tedious to read in their original form. In an effort to improve their readability I have embedded the Figures throughout the manuscript, put the Figure captions underneath the Figures, and added section headings. Otherwise I have resisted the temptation to modify the words, though I found many places which could use healthy editing. There may be minor differences with the official versions issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office, particularly in the claims sections. In my shock physics work I measured the velocities of targets impacted by flyer plates by illuminating them with laser light and analyzing the reflected light with an interferometer. Small wavelength changes caused by the target motion (Doppler effect) were converted into fringe shifts by the interferometer. Lasers having long coherence lengths were required for the illumination. While lasers are certainly bright sources, and their collimated beams are convenient to work with, they are expensive. Particularly if one needs to illuminate a wide surface area, then large amounts of power are needed. Orders of magnitude more power per dollar can be obtained from a simple flashlamp, or for that matter, a 50 cent light bulb. Yet these inexpensive sources cannot practically be used for Doppler velocimetry because their coherence length is extremely short, i.e. their bandwidth is much too wide. Hence the motivation for patents 1 & 2 is a method (White Light Velocimetry) for allowing use of these powerful but incoherent lamps for interferometry. The coherence of the illumination is modified by passing it through a preparatory interferometer.

  18. Direct measurement instrument for lattice spacing on regular crystalline surfaces using a scanning tunneling microscope and laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerkkumsup, Pongpun; Aketagawa, Masato; Takada, Koji; Watanabe, Tomonori; Sadakata, Shin

    2003-03-01

    An instrument for direct measurement of the lattice spacing on regular crystalline surfaces, which incorporates a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a phase modulation homodyne interferometer (PMHI), was developed. Our aim was to verify the applicability of the length measurement method in which the lattice spacing on the crystalline surface obtained with the STM is used as a fine scale and the optical interference fringe, i.e., wavelength λ, of the PMHI is used as a coarse scale. The instrument consists of a STM head with a YZ axes tip scanner, a precise X-axis sample stage with flexure springs, and the PMHI with a four-path differential configuration. Combining the movements of the YZ-axes tip scanner and the X-axis sample stage, the instrument can perform long atomic STM imaging of the crystalline surface along the X axis, which is also the fast scanning axis for eliminating thermal drift. The relative displacement of the X-axis sample stage between optical interference dark fringes (=null points) of the PMHI, which is λ/16 times the integer value in the design, can be measured with a resolution of 10 pm or less using the phase modulation technique. The lattice spacing on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystalline surface was measured by comparing the number of atoms in the atomic STM image of 100 nm length with the optical fringes of the PMHI. The mean and expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the lattice spacing between α sites of the HOPG surface were 0.246 nm and 7 pm, respectively. The mean value was very close to that reported by Park and Quate [Sang-II Park and C. F. Quate, Appl. Phys. Lett. 48, 112 (1986)]. The experimental results also show the feasibility of realizing length measurement using the lattice spacing on the crystalline surface and the PMHI.

  19. Measuring Variable Scales of Surface Deformation in and around the Yellowstone Caldera with TerraSAR-X Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, C. W., Jr.; Dzurisin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing three years of TerraSAR-X (TSX) Stripmap data covering the Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming, we identify several examples showing the benefits of the high spatial and temporal resolution TSX data. Although the Stripmap footprints are small, compared to those of past SAR satellites, we are nonetheless able to track subsidence/uplift cycles of the ~50 x 80 km Yellowstone caldera using multiple strips. The Stripmap data are also useful for measuring deformation associated with the area of the North Rim anomaly, an area of repeated uplift and subsidence, ~30 km in diameter near the intersection of the north caldera rim, north-trending Mammoth-Norris Corridor, and west-northwest trending seismic belt east of Hebgen Lake. We measured ~45 mm of uplift associated with an episode that occurred mostly during the winter of 2013-2014 (as verified by GPS), and ~15 mm of subsequent subsidence in the early summer of 2014. The TSX Stripmap data have also proven effective at measuring small-scale deformation features. Because of the high-resolution of the TSX Stripmap data, we have also been able to measure many small-scale deforming features in Yellowstone National Park that are associated with apparent aquifer discharge/recharge cycles, unstable slope movement, geyser basin deformation, and deformation related to other hydrothermal features. We present an example of ~3 cm of seasonal deformation likely resulting from water movement in and out of an aquifer along the southwest caldera rim. We also document subsidence of ~1 cm/yr in a circular area nearly 0.5 km across near the vent from the Pitchstone Plateau, a thick rhyolite flow that erupted nearly 70 ka. TSX data are instrumental in identifying the seasonal variation found in some of these features, and in measuring the small spatial areas of deformation associated with other features.

  20. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2010-07-10

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  1. Differential spacecraft tracking by interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Border, James S.; Folkner, William M.

    1990-01-01

    This study estimates measurement system errors for two space vehicles on the surface of Mars, and for two Mars orbiting spacecraft, which are being tracked by differential interferometry. In these examples, signals from all spacecraft lie within the same beamwidth of an earth-based radio antenna. The measurements of all spacecraft signals are made simultaneously; errors that scale with angular source separation or with temporal separation between measurement epochs are practically removed. It is shown that errors due to system thermal noise and to systematic effects within ground receiver electronics dominate, except for geometries when signals pass close to the sun, when solar plasma becomes the dominant error source. The instantaneous relative position of two orbiters may be measured to within ten meters, leading to 50-meter three-dimensional orbital accuracy.

  2. Measurement for polarization mode dispersion of LiNbO3 integrated waveguide modulator used white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhangjun; Peng, Feng; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Ai; Liang, Shuai; Yuan, Yonggui; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    We present a method to measure the polarization mode dispersion (PMD) of the LiNbO3 multifunctional integrated waveguide modulator (MFIWM) which is consist of a Y-waveguide, two extended polarization maintaining (PM) fibers, lead-in PM pigtail and lead-out PM pigtail. This method is based on an all-fiber time-domain scanning white light interferometer and utilizes fast Fourier transform (FFT) technology to obtain interferometric phase. The PMD of each part of MFIWM was measured and distinguished accurately. It's demonstrated that, the PMD of Y-waveguide is 13.5 ps/nm/km@1555nm which is approximately 40~160 times of the PMD of PM fibers in the MFIWM under test.

  3. Spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry for phase-sensitive measurement of Faraday rotation at multiple depths.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Jou; Black, Adam J; Akkin, Taner

    2013-10-10

    We describe a method for differential phase measurement of Faraday rotation from multiple depth locations simultaneously. A polarization-maintaining fiber-based spectral-domain interferometer that utilizes a low-coherent light source and a single camera is developed. Light decorrelated by the orthogonal channels of the fiber is launched on a sample as two oppositely polarized circular states. These states reflect from sample surfaces and interfere with the corresponding states of the reference arm. A custom spectrometer, which is designed to simplify camera alignment, separates the orthogonal channels and records the interference-related oscillations on both spectra. Inverse Fourier transform of the spectral oscillations in k-space yields complex depth profiles, whose amplitudes and phase difference are related to reflectivity and Faraday rotation within the sample, respectively. Information along a full depth profile is produced at the camera speed without performing an axial scan for a multisurface sample. System sensitivity for the Faraday rotation measurement is 0.86 min of arc. Verdet constants of clear liquids and turbid media are measured at 687 nm. PMID:24217734

  4. Single-shot digital holographic interferometry using a high power pulsed laser for full field measurement of traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Greef, Daniël; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2012-06-01

    In the past, interferometric holographic techniques have been used extensively to perform full-field, yet timeaveraged analysis of vibrational patterns. When time-resolved information was needed, optical scanning single-point measurement techniques, such as heterodyne interferometric vibrometry, were available. Recently, stroboscopically illuminated digital holography has proven to yield both full-field and time-resolved information of vibrations with nanometer range amplitudes. In this technique, short laser pulses, synchronized to the vibration phase, are recorded. Good results have been achieved for high-frequency vibrations. However, due to the low energy in a single pulse, acquisition time increases for decreasing vibration frequency in order to receive enough energy on the camera, introducing problems such as artifacts due to slow movements of the object or electronic read-out noise. In this work, stroboscopic holography is combined with a high power, frequency doubled pulsed Nd:YAG laser, which produces enough energy in a single pulse to perform single-shot holographic recordings. This new setup allows imaging vibrations ranging from quasi-static deformations to high-frequency vibrations (1 - 20000 Hz), while avoiding the earlier mentioned acquisition issues. The additional challenge is to synchronize the lasers flash tube and Q-switch to the image acquisition and the vibration phase of the measured object. Results of measurements on a stretched circular latex membrane will be presented. The out-of-plane displacement of the membrane is visualized over the entire surface as a function of time, thus providing true four-dimensional information. Extracting the vibration phase map is useful, for instance to reveal travelling waves, which are invisible on time averaged images.

  5. Group velocity dispersion of CdSSe/ZnS core-shell colloidal quantum dots measured with white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanEngen Spivey, Amelia G.

    2016-03-01

    We measure the group velocity dispersion coefficient of CdSSe/ZnS core-shell colloidal quantum dots in liquid suspension in the ∼700-900 nm wavelength range using a white-light Michelson interferometer. Two different sizes of dots are investigated. In both cases, the group velocity dispersion coefficient decreases with increasing wavelength above the absorption edge in the dots. For quantum dots in which the linear absorption spectrum shows clear peaks, the absorption characteristics of the dots can be used to accurately model the wavelength-dependence of the group velocity dispersion coefficient.

  6. The orbit of Phi Cygni measured with long-baseline optical interferometry - Component masses and absolute magnitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. T.; Hummel, C. A.; Quirrenbach, A.; Buscher, D. F.; Mozurkewich, D.; Vivekanand, M.; Simon, R. S.; Denison, C. S.; Johnston, K. J.; Pan, X.-P.

    1992-01-01

    The orbit of the double-lined spectroscopic binary Phi Cygni, the distance to the system, and the masses and absolute magnitudes of its components are presented via measurements with the Mar III Optical Interferometer. On the basis of a reexamination of the spectroscopic data of Rach & Herbig (1961), the values and uncertainties are adopted for the period and the projected semimajor axes from the present fit to the spectroscopic data and the values of the remaining elements from the present fit to the Mark III data. The elements of the true orbit are derived, and the masses and absolute magnitudes of the components, and the distance to the system are calculated.

  7. Measurement of laser-induced thermo-elastic deformation in an optic using polarization-based lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Mark A.

    A polarization-based shearing interferometer is presented that is capable of measuring the thermal deformation of a mirror subject to heating from absorption of a Gaussian laser beam. The shear is generated by spatial walk-off in a birefringent crystal. By adjusting the orientation of the crystal, the components of the wavefront gradient can be independently measured to allow determination of the full wavefront vector gradate as well as reconstruction of the wavefront. Furthermore, the monolithic nature of the birefringent crystal allows non-critical alignment of the interferometer's components. The interferogram is modulated, and a homodyne detection algorithm analyzes the modulated interferograms to extract the components of the wavefront gradient from which the wavefront is reconstructed. The thermal deformation of the laser-heated mirror was accurately observed with a sensitivity better than λ/160. The sensitivity of this interferometer is scale invariant, and we present a method to account for the non-uniform spatial frequency response of the interferometer.

  8. Deck and Cable Dynamic Testing of a Single-span Bridge Using Radar Interferometry and Videometry Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piniotis, George; Gikas, Vassilis; Mpimis, Thanassis; Perakis, Harris

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the dynamic testing of a roadway, single-span, cable-stayed bridge for a sequence of static load and ambient vibration monitoring scenarios. Deck movements were captured along both sideways of the bridge using a Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and a Ground-based Microwave Interfererometer (GBMI) system. Cable vibrations were measured at a single point location on each of the six cables using the GBMI technique. Dynamic testing involves three types of analyses; firstly, vibration analysis and modal parameter estimation (i. e., natural frequencies and modal shapes) of the deck using the combined DIC and GBMI measurements. Secondly, dynamic testing of the cables is performed through vibration analysis and experimental computation of their tension forces. Thirdly, the mechanism of cable-deck dynamic interaction is studied through their Power Spectra Density (PSD) and the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) analyses. Thereby, the global (deck and cable) and local (either deck or cable) bridge modes are identified, serving a concrete benchmark of the current state of the bridge for studying the evolution of its structural performance in the future. The level of synergy and complementarity between the GBMI and DIC techniques for bridge monitoring is also examined and assessed.

  9. Full-field vibration measurements of the violin using digital stroboscopic holographic interferometry and electromagnetic stimulation of the strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keersmaekers, Lissa; Keustermans, William; De Greef, Daniël; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    We developed a setup in which the strings of the violin are driven electromagnetically, and the resulting vibration of the instrument is measured with digital stroboscopic holography. A 250mW single mode green laser beam is chopped using an acousto-optic modulator, generating illumination pulses of 2% of the vibration period. The phase of the illumination pulse is controlled by a programmable function generator so that digital holograms can be recorded on a number of subsequent time positions within the vibration phase. From these recordings, the out of plane motion as a function of time is reconstructed in full field. We show results of full-field vibration amplitude and vibration phase maps, and time resolved full-field deformations of the violin back plane. Time resolved measurements show in detail how the deformation of the violin plane changes as a function of time at different frequencies. We found very different behavior under acoustic stimulation of the instrument and when using electromagnetic stimulation of a string. The aim of the work it to gather data which can be used in power flow calculations to study how the energy of the strings is conducted to the body of the violin and eventually is radiated as sound.

  10. Application of digital holographic interferometry to pressure measurements of symmetric, supercritical and circulation-control airfoils in transonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Francisco J.

    1987-01-01

    Six airfoil interferograms were evaluated using a semiautomatic image-processor system which digitizes, segments, and extracts the fringe coordinates along a polygonal line. The resulting fringe order function was converted into density and pressure distributions and a comparison was made with pressure transducer data at the same wind tunnel test conditions. Three airfoil shapes were used in the evaluation to test the capabilities of the image processor with a variety of flows. Symmetric, supercritical, and circulation-control airfoil interferograms provided fringe patterns with shocks, separated flows, and high-pressure regions for evaluation. Regions along the polygon line with very clear fringe patterns yielded results within 1% of transducer measurements, while poorer quality regions, particularly near the leading and trailing edges, yielded results that were not as good.

  11. Measurements of Land Subsidence Rates on the North-western Portion of the Nile Delta Using Radar Interferometry Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugate, Joseph M.

    The Nile Delta is home to around 75 million people and most of Egypt's farmland and agricultural production. This area is currently threatened by Mediterranean Sea waters due to factors such as sediment starvation, climate change, and sea level fluctuations as well as subsidence. The low elevation and relief of the Nile Delta exposes many coastal communities, including the city of Alexandria, to potential inundation. This situation has become a concern for the area's residents but a better understanding of the processes occurring there can aid in deciding a suitable response. Recent studies have documented Holocene subsidence rates in the northeast part of the Nile Delta that average up to 8mm/year. In this study, PS-InSAR techniques are used to measure modern land subsidence rates on the north-central and north-western Nile Delta. Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) techniques were applied to 23 ESA radar scenes from 2 orbital tracks spanning from 1992 to 2000 in the north-central and north-west portions of the Nile Delta. The area includes the cities of Alexandria, Greater Mahala, and Mansoura as well as the Rosetta promontory and lake Burullus, Idku Lagoon, and Maryut Lagoon. Results indicate that modern average-vertical ground motion velocities for the north-western and north-central Nile Delta range from emergent to subsidence of 8.5 mm/yr. The range of velocities measured are spatially varied in a complex way across the study area. Patterns of subsidence correlate closely to areas of most recent sediment deposition such as along coastlines and rivers, as well as in lagoons and lakes. Average subsidence velocities are also lower across the western sections of the Nile Delta than in the northeastern delta.

  12. Nonlinear reflection of a spherically divergent N-wave from a plane surface: Optical interferometry measurements in air

    SciTech Connect

    Karzova, M.; Yuldashev, P.; Khokhlova, V.; Ollivier, S.; Blanc-Benon, Ph.

    2015-10-28

    Mach stem is a well-known structure typically observed in the process of strong (acoustic Mach numbers greater than 0.4) step-shock waves reflection from a rigid boundary. However, this phenomenon has been much less studied for weak shocks in nonlinear acoustic fields where Mach numbers are in the range from 0.001 to 0.01 and pressure waveforms have more complicated waveforms than step shocks. The goal of this work was to demonstrate experimentally how nonlinear reflection occurs in air for very weak spherically divergent acoustic spark-generated pulses resembling an N-wave. Measurements of reflection patterns were performed using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A thin laser beam with sub-millimeter cross-section was used to obtain the time resolution of 0.4 µs, which is 6 times higher than the time resolution of the condenser microphones. Pressure waveforms were reconstructed using the inverse Abel transform applied to the phase of the signal measured by the interferometer. The Mach stem formation was observed experimentally as a result of collision of the incident and reflected shock pulses. It was shown that irregular reflection of the pulse occurred in a dynamic way and the length of the Mach stem increased linearly while the pulse propagated along the surface. Since the front shock of the spark-generated pulse was steeper than the rear shock, irregular type of reflection was observed only for the front shock of the pulse while the rear shock reflection occurred in a regular regime.

  13. The Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is the next major space mission in NASA's Origins program after SIRTF. The SIM architecture uses three Michelson interferometers in low-earth orbit to provide 4 microarcsecond precision absolute astrometric measurements on approx. 40,000 stars. SIM will also provide synthesis imaging in the visible waveband to a resolution of 10 milliarcsecond, and interferometric nulling to a depth of 10(exp -4). A near-IR (1-2 micron) capability is being considered. Many key technologies will be demonstrated by SIM that will be carried over directly or can be readily scaled to future Origins missions such as TPF. The SIM spacecraft will carry a triple Michelson interferometer with baselines in the 10 meter range. Two interferometers act as high precision trackers, providing attitude information at all time, while the third one conducts the science observations. Ultra-accurate laser metrology and active systems monitor the systematic errors and to control the instrument vibrations in order to reach the 4 microarcsecond level on wide-angle measurements. SIM will produce a wealth of new astronomical data. With an absolute positional precision of 4 microarcsecond, SIM will improve on the best currently available measures (the Hipparcos catalog) by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude, providing parallaxes accurate to 10% and transverse velocities to 0.2 km/s anywhere in the Galaxy, to stars as faint as 20th magnitude. With the addition of radial velocities, knowledge of the 6-dimension phase space for objects of interest will allow us to attack a wide array of previously inaccessible problems such as: search for planets down to few earth masses; calibration of stellar luminosities and by means of standard candles, calibration of the cosmic distance scale; detecting perturbations due to spiral arms, disk warps and central bar in our galaxy; probe of the gravitational potential of the Galaxy, several kiloparsecs out of the galactic plane; synthesis imaging

  14. Simultaneous Immersion Mirau Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulko, Oleksandra

    The present work describes a novel imaging technique for label-free no-UV vibration-insensitive imaging of live cells in an epi-illumination geometry. This technique can be implemented in a variety of imaging applications. For example, it can be used for cell targeting as a part of a platform for targeted cell irradiations - single-cell microbeam. The goal of microbeam facilities is to provide biological researchers with tools to study the effects of ionizing radiation on live cells. A common way of cell labeling - fluorescent staining - may alter cellular metabolism and UV illumination presents potential damage for the genetic material. The new imaging technique will allow the researchers to separate radiation-induced effects from the effects caused by confounding factors like fluorescent staining or UV light. Geometry of irradiation endstations at some microbeam facilities precludes the use of transmitted light, e.g. in the Columbia University's Radiological Research Accelerator Facility microbeam endstation, where the ion beam exit window is located just below the sample. Imaging techniques used at such endstations must use epi-illumination. Mirau Interferometry is an epi-illumination, non-stain imaging modality suitable for implementation at a microbeam endstation. To facilitate interferometry and to maintain cell viability, it is desirable that cells stay in cell growth medium during the course of an experiment. To accommodate the use of medium, Immersion Mirau Interferometry has been developed. A custom attachment for a microscope objective has been designed and built for interferometric imaging with the possibility of immersion of the apparatus into cell medium. The implemented data collection algorithm is based on the principles of Phase-Shifting Interferometry. The largest limitation of Phase-Shifting Interferometry is its sensitivity to the vertical position of the sample. In environments where vibration isolation is difficult, this makes image

  15. Subaperture stitching interferometry based on digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feng; Lu, Xiaoyun; Dong, Bin; Ma, Xichao; Xiao, Wen

    2016-11-01

    A novel subaperture stitching interferometry based on digital holography is developed to measure the deformation of spherical surfaces. The subaperture measurement is performed by off-axis digital holography on single exposure. Then, the subaperture phase maps are obtained by digital holographic reconstruction, in which the phase aberration caused by position errors of each subaperture measurement is effectively compensated by the method of numerical parametric lens. After that, the full aperture phase map is retrieved by a subaperture stitching algorithm, in which the relative alignment errors of adjacent subapertures are eliminated with an iterative process of stitching optimization. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed interferometry, which provides a rapid and robust way to measure spherical surfaces with high resolution and precision. A practical example is given to demonstrate the performance of this method. The stitching result shows good agreement with the full-aperture result.

  16. DISTANCE AND PROPER MOTION MEASUREMENT OF THE RED SUPERGIANT, PZ CAS, IN VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY H{sub 2}O MASER ASTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuno, K.; Asaki, Y.; Imai, H.; Oyama, T. E-mail: asaki@vsop.isas.jaxa.jp E-mail: t.oyama@nao.ac.jp

    2013-09-10

    We present the very long baseline interferometry H{sub 2}O maser monitoring observations of the red supergiant, PZ Cas, at 12 epochs from 2006 April to 2008 May. We fitted maser motions to a simple model composed of a common annual parallax and linear motions of the individual masers. The maser motions with the parallax subtracted were well modeled by a combination of a common stellar proper motion and a radial expansion motion of the circumstellar envelope. We obtained an annual parallax of 0.356 {+-} 0.026 mas and a stellar proper motion of {mu}{sub {alpha}}{sup *} cos {delta} = -3.7 {+-} 0.2 and {mu}{sup *}{sub {delta}}=-2.0{+-}0.3 mas yr{sup -1} eastward and northward, respectively. The annual parallax corresponds to a trigonometric parallax of 2.81{sup +0.22}{sub -0.19} kpc. By rescaling the luminosity of PZ Cas in any previous studies using our trigonometric parallax, we estimated the location of PZ Cas on a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and found that it approaches a theoretically evolutionary track around an initial mass of {approx}25 M{sub Sun }. The sky position and the distance to PZ Cas are consistent with the OB association, Cas OB5, which is located in a molecular gas super shell. The proper motion of PZ Cas is close to that of the OB stars and other red supergiants in Cas OB5 measured by the Hipparcos satellite. We derived the peculiar motion of PZ Cas of U{sub s} = 22.8 {+-} 1.5, V{sub s} = 7.1 {+-} 4.4, and W{sub s} = -5.7 {+-} 4.4 km s{sup -1}. This peculiar motion has rather a large U{sub s} component, unlike those of near high-mass star-forming regions with negatively large V{sub s} motions. The uniform proper motions of the Cas OB5 member stars suggest random motions of giant molecular clouds moving into local potential minima in a time-dependent spiral arm, rather than a velocity field caused by the spiral arm density wave.

  17. Antimatter interferometry for gravity measurements.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul; Zhmoginov, Andrey; Robicheaux, Francis; Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Müller, Holger

    2014-03-28

    We describe a light-pulse atom interferometer that is suitable for any species of atom and even for electrons and protons as well as their antiparticles, in particular, for testing the Einstein equivalence principle with antihydrogen. The design obviates the need for resonant lasers through far-off resonant Bragg beam splitters and makes efficient use of scarce atoms by magnetic confinement and atom recycling. We expect to reach an initial accuracy of better than 1% for the acceleration of the free fall of antihydrogen, which can be improved to the part-per million level.

  18. Applications of whole field interferometry in mechanics and acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Nils-Erik

    1999-07-01

    A description is given of fringe formation in holographic interferometry, in electronic speckle pattern interferometry, in electro-optic or TV holography and for a newly developed system for pulsed TV-holography. A numerical example, which simulates the equations describing the different techniques, is included. A strain measuring system using defocused digital speckle photography is described. Experiments showing mode shapes of musical instruments, transient bending wave propagation in beams and plates as well as sound pressure fields in air are included.

  19. Signal competition in heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rochefoucauld, Ombeline; Khanna, Shyam M.; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2006-06-01

    The Organ of Corti is a complex structure with many reflecting surfaces characterized by a wide range of reflectivities. Heterodyne interferometry has been the primary technique for measuring motion of the cochlear sensory tissue for some time. We would like to know under what conditions reflections from out-of-focus surfaces affect the measured velocity of the in-focus surface. Heterodyne interferometry uses interference between two laser beams (object and reference). The velocity of the test object shifts the frequency of the object beam due to the Doppler effect. The heterodyne signal (a frequency modulated (FM) wave) is decoded using a frequency demodulator. By reviewing the theory of FM demodulation and showing tests with our Revox FM demodulator, we demonstrate that the influence of a secondary signal on a measurement depends on the modulation index (ratio of the frequency deviation (Δf=2V °/λ) to the modulation frequency, f m where V ° is the velocity amplitude and λ is the laser wavelength). For high-modulation-index signals, the fundamental component of the FM demodulator output is not affected by a secondary signal unless the secondary signal's power is nearly as large as that of the primary signal. However, the output waveform can be distorted. For a low-modulation-index signal, a secondary competing signal can have a relatively large effect on the fundamental component of the output signal, but the output signal waveform is not distorted. The results underscore the benefit of steep optical sectioning to reduce contamination by out-of-focus signals.

  20. Michelson interferometry with Keck I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter G.; Monnier, John D.; Danchi, William C.; Haniff, Christopher A.

    1998-07-01

    We have used the technique of aperture masking to transform the 10m Keck telescope into a separate-element, multiple aperture Michelson interferometer. This has allowed a dramatic gain in signal-to-noise to be achieved as compared to conventional full-pupil interferometry for bright targets such as evolved giant and supergiant stars. Preliminary results from a program of near-IR diffraction-limited imaging of such stars are presented. Multi-wavelength images in the IR JHK and L bands have revealed complex and asymmetric morphologies in the inner dust shells surrounding a number of proto-typical dust-enshrouded IR stars. In addition, we have imaged the stellar photospheres of some of our largest target stars, allowing us to measure diameters and search for structure, such as giant convective cells, on the stellar surface.

  1. Uncertainty formulations for multislit interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biniok, Johannes C. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of (far-field) multislit interferometry we investigate the utility of two formulations of uncertainty in accounting for the complementarity of spatial localization and fringe width. We begin with a characterization of the relevant observables and general considerations regarding the suitability of different types of measures. The detailed analysis shows that both of the discussed uncertainty formulations yield qualitatively similar results, confirming that they correctly capture the relevant tradeoff. One approach, based on an idea of Aharonov and co-workers, is intuitively appealing and relies on a modification of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation. The other approach, developed by Uffink and Hilgevoord for single- and double-slit experiments, is readily applied to multislits. However, it is found that one of the underlying concepts requires generalization and that the choice of the parameters requires more consideration than was known.

  2. Determination of thin hydrodynamic lubricating film thickness using dichromatic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Wong, P L; Guo, F; Liu, H C

    2014-09-10

    This paper introduces the application of dichromatic interferometry for the study of hydrodynamic lubrication. In conventional methods, two beams with different colors are projected consecutively on a static object. By contrast, the current method deals with hydrodynamic lubricated contacts under running conditions and two lasers with different colors are projected simultaneously to form interference images. Dichromatic interferometry incorporates the advantages of monochromatic and chromatic interferometry, which are widely used in lubrication research. This new approach was evaluated statically and dynamically by measuring the inclination of static wedge films and the thickness of the hydrodynamic lubricating film under running conditions, respectively. Results show that dichromatic interferometry can facilitate real-time determination of lubricating film thickness and is well suited for the study of transient or dynamic lubricating problems. PMID:25321689

  3. Spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    A bibliographic guide is presented to publications of spatial interferometry techniques applied to optical astronomy. Listings appear in alphabetical order, by first author, as well as in specific subject categories listed in chronological order, including imaging theory and speckle interferometry, experimental techniques, and observational results of astronomical studies of stars, the Sun, and the solar system.

  4. Pressure and temperature dependence of the elasticity of pyrope-majorite [Py 60Mj 40 and Py 50Mj 50] garnets solid solution measured by ultrasonic interferometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwanmesia, Gabriel D.; Wang, Liping; Triplett, Richard; Liebermann, Robert C.

    2009-05-01

    Compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities have been measured for two synthetic polycrystalline specimens of pyrope-majorite garnets [Py 60Mj 40 and Py 50Mj 50] by ultrasonic interferometry to 8 GPa and 1000 K, in a DIA-type cubic anvil high pressure apparatus (SAM-85) interfaced with synchrotron X-radiation and X-ray imaging. Elastic bulk ( KS) and shear ( G) moduli data obtained at the end of the cooling cycles were fitted to functions of Eulerian strain to third order yielding pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli (∂ KS/∂ P) T = 4.3 (3); (∂ G/∂ P) T = 1.5 (1) for Py 60Mj 40 garnet and (∂ KS/∂ P) T = 4.4 (1); (∂ G/∂ P) T = 1.3 (1) for Py 50Mj 40 garnet. Both (∂ KS/∂ P) T and (∂ G/∂ P) T are identical for the two garnet compositions and are also consistent with Brillouin scattering data for polycrystalline Py 50Mj 50. Moreover, the new pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli are equal within experimental uncertainties to those of end-member pyrope garnet from ultrasonic studies [Gwanmesia, G.D., Zhang. J, Darling, K., Kung, J., Li, B., Wang, L., Neuville, D., Liebermann, R.C., 2006. Elasticity of polycrystalline pyrope (Mg 3Al 2Si 3O 12) to 9 GPa and 1000 °C. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 155, 179-190] and from Brillouin spectroscopic studies [Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., 2002a. Elasticity of majorite and majorite-pyrope solid solution to high pressure: implications for the transition zone. Geophys. Res. 9(2), 1017], thereby demonstrating that the pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli are independent of the physical acoustics technique employed and unaffected by substitution of Si for Mg and Al within the Py-Mj solid solution in the range (Py 100-Py 50) of the present measurements. Temperature dependence of the elastic obtained from linear regression of entire P- T- K and P- T- G data are (∂ KS/∂ T) P = -14.6 (4) MPa/K; (∂ G/∂ T) P = -9.4 (4) MPa/K for Py 60Mj 40 garnet, and (∂ KS/∂ T) P = -14.6 (4) MPa/K; (

  5. Near-Earth Object Astrometric Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    Using astrometric interferometry on near-Earth objects (NEOs) poses many interesting and difficult challenges. Poor reflectance properties and potentially no significant active emissions lead to NEOs having intrinsically low visual magnitudes. Using worst case estimates for signal reflection properties leads to NEOs having visual magnitudes of 27 and higher. Today the most sensitive interferometers in operation have limiting magnitudes of 20 or less. The main reason for this limit is due to the atmosphere, where turbulence affects the light coming from the target, limiting the sensitivity of the interferometer. In this analysis, the interferometer designs assume no atmosphere, meaning they would be placed at a location somewhere in space. Interferometer configurations and operational uncertainties are looked at in order to parameterize the requirements necessary to achieve measurements of low visual magnitude NEOs. This analysis provides a preliminary estimate of what will be required in order to take high resolution measurements of these objects using interferometry techniques.

  6. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  7. GPS radio interferometry of travelling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Palamartchouk, K. S.; Perevalova, N. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents some results investigating the new possibilities of radio interferometry of Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) that are based on exploiting standard measurements of transionospheric radio signal characteristics and coordinate-time measurements using dual-frequency multichannel receivers of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method for GPS radio interferometry (SADM-GPS) is proposed for determining the characteristics of the TIDs dynamics by measuring variations of GPS phase derivatives with respect to time and spatial coordinates. These data are used to calculate corresponding values of the velocity vector, in view of a correction for satellite motions based on the current information available regarding the angular coordinates of the satellites. Subsequently, velocity and direction distributions are constructed and analyzed to verify the hypothesis of whether there is a predominant displacement. If it exists, then the pattern can be considered to be travelling, and the mean travel velocity can be determined from the velocity distribution. Through a computer simulation it was shown that multi-satellite GPS radio interferometry in conjunction with the SADM-GPS algorithm allows the detection and measurement of the velocity vector of TIDs in virtually the entire azimuthal range of possible TID propagation directions. The use of the proposed method is exemplified by an investigation of TIDs during the solar eclipse of 9 March 1997, using the GPS-radio interferometer GPSINT at Irkutsk.

  8. Two color holographic interferometry for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Weber, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a primary candidate for determining temperature and concentration in crystal growth experiments designed for space. The method measures refractive index changes within the fluid of an experimental test cell resulting from temperature and/or concentration changes. When the refractive index changes are caused by simultaneous temperature and concentration changes, the contributions of the two effects cannot be separated by single wavelength interferometry. By using two wavelengths, however, two independent interferograms can provide the additional independent equation required to determine the two unknowns. There is no other technique available that provides this type of information. The primary objectives of this effort were to experimentally verify the mathematical theory of two color holographic interferometry (TCHI) and to determine the practical value of this technique for space application. In the foregoing study, the theory of TCHI has been tested experimentally over a range of interest for materials processing in space where measurements of temperature and concentration in a solution are required. New techniques were developed and applied to stretch the limits beyond what could be done with existing procedures. The study resulted in the production of one of the most advanced, enhanced sensitivity holographic interferometers in existence. The interferometric measurements made at MSFC represent what is believed to be the most accurate holographic interferometric measurements made in a fluid to date. The tests have provided an understanding of the limitations of the technique in practical use.

  9. Comparison of the results of refractometric measurements in the process of diffusion, obtained by means of the backgroundoriented schlieren method and the holographic interferometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiskii, A. V.; Mironova, T. V.

    2015-08-01

    The results of the study of interdiffusion of two liquids, obtained using the holographic recording scheme with a nonstationary reference wave with the frequency linearly varying in space and time are compared with the results of correlation processing of digital photographs, made with a random background screen. The spatio-temporal behaviour of the signal in four basic representations ('space - temporal frequency', 'space - time', 'spatial frequency - temporal frequency' and 'spatial frequency - time') is found in the holographic experiment and calculated (in the appropriate coordinates) based on the background-oriented schlieren method. Practical coincidence of the results of the correlation analysis and the holographic double-exposure interferometry is demonstrated.

  10. Kaon decay interferometry as meson dynamics probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ambrosio, G.; Paver, N.

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the time-dependent interferences between KL and KS in the decays in 3π and ππγ, to be studied at interferometry machines such as the φ factory and CERN LEAR. We emphasize the possibilities and the advantages of using interferences, in comparision with width measurements, to obtain information both on CP-conserving and CP-violating amplitudes. Comparision with present data and suggestions for future experiments are made.

  11. Moire interferometry for thermal expansion of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, D. E.; Tenney, D. R.; Post, D.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    Moire interferometry by reflection has been demonstrated using a real reference grating of 1200 lines/mm. The method is shown to be well adapted to thermal environments. Thermal expansion coefficients of graphite-epoxy composites have been measured with high precision over a wide range from nearly zero to 3300 microstrains in the temperature range 297-422 K. Random errors characterized by one standard deviation can be as small as one microstrain.

  12. Two color holographic interferometry for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a primary candidate for the measurement of temperature and concentration in various crystal growth experiments destined for space. The method measures refractive index changes in the experiment test cell. A refractive index change can be caused by concentration changes, temperature changes, or a combination of temperature and concentration changes. If the refractive index changes are caused by temperature and concentration changes occurring simultaneously in the experiment test cell, the contributions by the two effects cannot be separated by conventional measurement methods. By using two wavelengths, two independent interferograms can be produced from the reconstruction of the hologram. The two interferograms will be different due to dispersion properties of fluid materials. These differences provide the additional information that allows the separation of simultaneously occurring temperature and concentration gradients. There is no other technique available that can provide this type of information. The primary objectives of this effort are to experimentally verify the mathematical theory of two color holographic interferometry and to determine the practical value of this technique for space application. To achieve these objectives, the accuracy and sensitivity of the technique must be determined for geometry's and materials that are relevant to the Materials Processing in the Space program of NASA. This will be achieved through the use of a specially designed two-color holographic interferometry breadboard optical system. In addition to experiments to achieve the primary goals, the breadboard will also provide inputs to the design of an optimum space flight system.

  13. Temperature measurement of axi- symmetric butane diffusion flame under the influence of upward decreasing gradient magnetic field using digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Varun; Kumar, Manoj; Shakher, Chandra

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, digital holographic interferometry (DHI) is implemented to investigate the effect of upward decreasing gradient magnetic field on the temperature and temperature profile of diffusion flame created by butane torch burner. In the experiment double exposure digital holographic interferometry is used to calculate the temperature distribution inside the flame. First a digital hologram is recorded in the absence of flame and second hologram is recorded in the presence of flame. Phases in two different states of air (i.e. in absence of flame and presence of flame) are reconstructed individually by numerical method. The phase difference map is obtained by subtracting the reconstructed phase of air in presence and absence of flame. Refractive index inside the flame is obtained from the axi-symmetric phase difference data using the Abel inversion integral. Temperature distribution inside the flame is calculated from the refractive index data using Lorentz - Lorentz equation. Experiment is conducted on a diffusion flame created by butane torch burner in the absence of magnetic field and in presence of upward decreasing gradient magnetic field. Experimental investigations reveal that the maximum temperature inside the flame increases under the influence of upward decreasing magnetic field.

  14. Complex master slave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rivet, Sylvain; Maria, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Feuchter, Thomas; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    A general theoretical model is developed to improve the novel Spectral Domain Interferometry method denoted as Master/Slave (MS) Interferometry. In this model, two functions, g and h are introduced to describe the modulation chirp of the channeled spectrum signal due to nonlinearities in the decoding process from wavenumber to time and due to dispersion in the interferometer. The utilization of these two functions brings two major improvements to previous implementations of the MS method. A first improvement consists in reducing the number of channeled spectra necessary to be collected at Master stage. In previous MSI implementation, the number of channeled spectra at the Master stage equated the number of depths where information was selected from at the Slave stage. The paper demonstrates that two experimental channeled spectra only acquired at Master stage suffice to produce A-scans from any number of resolved depths at the Slave stage. A second improvement is the utilization of complex signal processing. Previous MSI implementations discarded the phase. Complex processing of the electrical signal determined by the channeled spectrum allows phase processing that opens several novel avenues. A first consequence of such signal processing is reduction in the random component of the phase without affecting the axial resolution. In previous MSI implementations, phase instabilities were reduced by an average over the wavenumber that led to reduction in the axial resolution.

  15. Speckle Interferometry with Amateur-Class Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshaw, Richard; Wuthrich, Ethan; Dolbear, Kyle

    2015-05-01

    The relatively young field of speckle interferometry of close double stars has up to now been the domain of large telescopes and expensive scientific CCD cameras. With the advent of relatively inexpensive and high-performance CCD cameras, the domain of speckle interferometry has been extended into the serious amateur realm allowing amateurs with equipment as small as 8-inches aperture to do actual speckle analysis of binary star systems. This paper describes the work of one such team of amateur astronomers and students as part of their course work for an on-line scientific research experience course provided on-line by Cuesta College of San Luis Obispo, California. An explanation of speckle and how it works is followed by a discussion of how the camera was calibrated, then a discussion of the research methodology. Results of calibration and double star measurements are then given and implications of the process and results discussed.

  16. Dual-polarization interferometry: an analytical technique to measure changes in protein structure in real time, to determine the stoichiometry of binding events, and to differentiate between specific and nonspecific interactions.

    PubMed

    Swann, Marcus J; Peel, Louise L; Carrington, Simon; Freeman, Neville J

    2004-06-15

    The study of solution-phase interactions between small molecules and immobilized proteins is of intense interest, especially to the pharmaceutical industry. An optical sensing technique, dual polarization interferometry, has been employed for the detailed study of a model protein system, namely, d-biotin interactions with streptavidin immobilized on a solid surface. Changes in thickness and density of an immobilized streptavidin layer as a result of the binding of d-biotin have been directly measured in solution and in real time. The results obtained from this approach are in excellent agreement with X-ray crystallographic data for the structural changes expected in the streptavidin-D-biotin system. The mass changes measured on binding d-biotin also agree closely with anticipated binding capacity values. Determination of the density changes occurring in the protein adlayer provides a means for differentiation between specific and nonspecific interactions. PMID:15158477

  17. Optical interferometry in fluid dynamics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Optical interferometry techniques have been applied to the investigation of transonic airfoil flow fields in large-scale wind tunnels. Holographic interferometry techniques were used in the study of two-dimensional symmetric NACA 64A010 and Douglas Aircraft Company DSMA671 supercritical airfoil performance in the NASA Ames 2 ft x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. Quantitative data obtained from the interferograms were compared to the surface pressure data. The excellent agreement obtained verified the accuracy of the flow visualization and demonstrated the potential for acquiring quantitative scalar results. Measurements of the inviscid flow speed and the boundary layer and wake velocity profiles were extracted from the interferograms and compared to laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. These results were also in good agreement. A method for acquiring real-time interferometric data in large-scale facilities was developed. This method, based on the point diffraction interferometer, was successfully tested in the Ames 2 ft x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. The holographic and real-time interferometry methods were applied to the investigations of circulation control airfoils utilizing the Coanda effect. These results revealed the details of the jet interaction with the trailing edge boundary layer and the other parameters affecting the lift augmentation.

  18. Optical interferometry in fluid dynamics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Optical interferometry techniques were applied to the investigation of transonic airfoil flow fields in large wind tunnels. Holographic interferometry techniques were used to study 2 dimensional symmetric NACA 64A010 and Douglas Aircraft Co. DSMA671 supercritical airfoil performance in the NASA Ames 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. Quantitative data obtained from the interferograms were compared to the surface pressure data. The agreement obtained verified the accuracy of the flow visualization and demonstrated the potential for acquiring quantitative scalar results. Measurements of the inviscid flow speed and the boundary layer and wake velocity profiles were extracted from the interferograms and compared to laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. These results were also in good agreement. A method for acquiring real time interferometric data in large scale facilities was developed. This method, based on the point diffraction interferometer, was successfully tested in the 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. The holographic and real time interferometry methods were applied to the investigations of circulation control airfoils utilizing the Coanda effect. These results reveals the details of the jet interacting with the trailing edge boundary layer and the other parameters affecting the lift augmentation.

  19. Atom Interferometry on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Dennis; Seidel, Stephan; Lachmann, Maike; Rasel, Ernst; Quantus Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The universality of free fall is one of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature. The comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry comprises a method to precisely test this assumption. By performing the experiments in a microgravity environment the sensitivity of such an atom interferometric measurement can be increased. In order to fully utilize the potential of these experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein condensate as the initial state of the atom interferometer is necessary. As a step towards the transfer of such a system in space an atom optical experiment is currently being prepared as the scientific payload for a sounding rocket mission. This mission is aiming at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein condensate in space and using this quantum degenerate matter as a source for atom interferometry. The launch of the rocket is planned for 2015 from ESRANGE. This first mission will be followed by two more that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures in space and simultaneous atom interferometry with two atomic species. Their success would mark a major advancement towards a precise measurement of the universality of free fall with a space-born atom interferometer. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under grant number DLR 50 1131-37.

  20. The development of thin film metrology by coherence scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Hirokazu; Smith, Roger; Walls, John M.; Mansfield, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Scanning White Light Interferometry (SWLI), now referred to as Coherence Scanning Interferometry (CSI), is established as a powerful tool for sub-nanometer surface metrology. The technique provides accurate and rapid three dimensional topographical analysis without contacting the surface under measurement. This paper will focus on recent developments of CSI using the Helical Complex Field (HCF) function that have extended its use for important thin film measurements. These developments now enable CSI to perform thin film thickness measurements, to measure the surface profile and the interfacial surface roughness of a buried interface and to derive optical constants (index of refraction n and extinction coefficient K).

  1. Intellectual property in holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingand, Nadya; Hunt, David

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of patents and patent applications on holographic interferometry, and highlights the possibilities offered by patent searching and analysis. Thousands of patent documents relevant to holographic interferometry were uncovered by the study. The search was performed in the following databases: U.S. Patent Office, European Patent Office, Japanese Patent Office and Korean Patent Office for the time frame from 1971 through May 2006. The patent analysis unveils trends in patent temporal distribution, patent families formation, significant technological coverage within the market of system that employ holographic interferometry and other interesting insights.

  2. Portable intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, Elliott P.; Camarata, Matthew A.

    2012-07-01

    A limitation of the current generation of long baseline optical interferometers is the need to make the light interfere prior to detection. This is unlike the radio regime where signals can be recorded fast enough to use electronics to accomplish the same result. This paper describes a modern optical intensity interferometer based on electronics with picosecond timing resolution. The instrument will allow for portable optical interferometry with much larger baselines than currently possible by using existing large telescopes. With modern electronics, the limiting magnitude of the technique at a 4-m aperture size becomes competitive with some amplitude-based interferometers. The instrumentation will permit a wireless mode of operation with GPS clocking technology, extending the work to extremely large baselines. We discuss the basic observing strategy, a planned observational program at the Lowell Observatory 1.8-m and 1.0-m telescopes, and the science that can realistically be done with this instrumentation.

  3. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  4. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  5. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Malbet, F.

    2005-12-01

    The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share an interest in long baseline stellar interferometry. It was established in 1995 and is the focus of activity of the IAU Working Group on Optical/Infrared Interferometry. Here you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, news items, recent papers and preprints, and resources for further research. The email news forum was established in 2001 to complement the website and to facilitate exchanges and collaborations. The forum includes an email exploder and an archived list of discussions. You are invited to explore the forum and website at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov. Work by PRL was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Development of Speckle Interferometry Algorithm and System

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsir, A. A. M.; Jafri, M. Z. M.; Lim, H. S.

    2011-05-25

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) method is a wholefield, non destructive measurement method widely used in the industries such as detection of defects on metal bodies, detection of defects in intergrated circuits in digital electronics components and in the preservation of priceless artwork. In this research field, this method is widely used to develop algorithms and to develop a new laboratory setup for implementing the speckle pattern interferometry. In speckle interferometry, an optically rough test surface is illuminated with an expanded laser beam creating a laser speckle pattern in the space surrounding the illuminated region. The speckle pattern is optically mixed with a second coherent light field that is either another speckle pattern or a smooth light field. This produces an interferometric speckle pattern that will be detected by sensor to count the change of the speckle pattern due to force given. In this project, an experimental setup of ESPI is proposed to analyze a stainless steel plate using 632.8 nm (red) wavelength of lights.

  7. Azimuthal-Angle Dependence of Charged-Pion-Interferometry Measurements with Respect to Second- and Third-Order Event Planes in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the second- and third-order event plane for Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the second- and third-order event planes. The results for the second-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the third-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the third-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  8. Azimuthal-angle dependence of charged-pion-interferometry measurements with respect to second- and third-order event planes in Au+Au collisions at √[S(NN)]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2014-06-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the second- and third-order event plane for Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the second- and third-order event planes. The results for the second-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the third-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the third-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  9. Robust signal evaluation for Chromatic Confocal Spectral Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Tobias; Lyda, Wolfram; Gronle, Marc; Mauch, Florian; Osten, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The hybrid measurement principle Chromatic Confocal Spectral Interferometry combines Spectral Interferometry with Chromatic Confocal Microscopy and therefore benefits from their respective advantages. Our actual demonstrator setup enables an axial measurement range up to 100 μm with resolution up to 5 nm depending on the employed evaluation method and the characteristics of the object's surface. On structured surfaces, lateral features down to 1 μm can be measured. As the sensor raw signal consists of a Spectral Interferometry type wavelet modulated by a confocal envelope, two classes of evaluation methods working on the phasing or the position of the envelope are employed. Even though both of these information channels are subject to their respective problems, we show that a proper combination of the individual methods leads to a robust signal evaluation. In particular, we show that typical artifacts on curved surfaces, that are known from Chromatic Confocal Microscopy, are minimized or completely removed by taking the phasing of the Spectral Interferometry wavelet into consideration. At the same time the problem of determining the right fringe order of the Spectral Interferometry signal at surface discontinuities can be solved by evaluation of the confocal envelope. We present here a first approach using a contrast threshold on the signal and a median referencing for trusted sections of the analysed topography, which yields a reduction of artifacts in a submicron range on steep gradients, discontinuous specimen or curved mirror-like surfaces.

  10. Optical Interferometry Motivation and History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A history and motivation of stellar interferometry is presented. The topics include: 1) On Tides, Organ Pipes, and Soap Bubbles; 2) Armand Hippolyte Fizeau (1819-1896); 3) Fizeau Suggests Stellar Interferometry 1867; 4) Edouard Stephan (1837-1923); 5) Foucault Refractor; 6) Albert A. Michelson (1852-1931); 7) On the Application of Interference Methods to Astronomy (1890); 8) Moons of Jupiter (1891); 9) Other Applications in 19th Century; 10) Timeline of Interferometry to 1938; 11) 30 years goes by; 12) Mount Wilson Observatory; 13) Michelson's 20 ft Interferometer; 14) Was Michelson Influenced by Fizeau? 15) Work Continues in the 1920s and 30s; 16) 50 ft Interferometer (1931-1938); 17) Light Paths in the 50 ft Interferometer; 18) Ground-level at the 50 ft; 19) F.G. Pease (1881-1938); 20) Timeline of Optical Interferometry to 1970; 21) A New Type of Stellar Interferometer (1956); 22) Intensity Interferometer (1963- 1976; 23) Robert Hanbury Brown; 24) Interest in Optical Interferometry in the 1960s; 25) Interferometry in the Early 1970s; and 26) A New Frontier is Opened up in 1974.

  11. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  12. Resolving microstructures in Z pinches with intensity interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J. P.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    Nearly 60 years ago, Hanbury Brown and Twiss [R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, Nature 178, 1046 (1956)] succeeded in measuring the 30 nrad angular diameter of Sirius using a new type of interferometry that exploited the interference of photons independently emitted from different regions of the stellar disk. Its basis was the measurement of intensity correlations as a function of detector spacing, with no beam splitting or preservation of phase information needed. Applied to Z pinches, X pinches, or laser-produced plasmas, this method could potentially provide spatial resolution under one micron. A quantitative analysis based on the work of Purcell [E. M. Purcell, Nature 178, 1449 (1956)] reveals that obtaining adequate statistics from x-ray interferometry of a Z-pinch microstructure would require using the highest-current generators available. However, using visible light interferometry would reduce the needed photon count and could enable its use on sub-MA machines.

  13. Precision optical interferometry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    POINTS, an astrometric Optical interferometer with a nominal measurement accuracy of 5 microarcseconds for the angle between a pair of stars separated by about 90 deg, is presently under consideration by two divisions of NASA-OSSA. It will be a powerful new multi-disciplinary tool for astronomical research. If chosen as the TOPS-1 (Toward Other Planetary Systems) instrument by the Solar-System Exploration Division, it will perform a definitive search for extra-solar planetary systems, either finding and characterizing a large number of them or showing that they are far less numerous than now believed. If chosen as the AIM (Astrometric Interferometry Mission) by the Astrophysics Division, POINTS will open new areas of astrophysical research and change the nature of the questions being asked in some old areas. In either case. it will be the first of a new class of powerful instruments in space and will prove the technology for the larger members of that class to follow. Based on a preliminary indication of the observational needs of the two missions, we find that a single POINTS mission will meet the science objectives of both TOPS-1 and AIM. The instrument detects dispersed fringe (channel led spectrum) and therefore can tolerate large pointing errors.

  14. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  15. Interferometry in the Era of Very Large Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    Research in modern stellar interferometry has focused primarily on ground-based observatories, with very long baselines or large apertures, that have benefited from recent advances in fringe tracking, phase reconstruction, adaptive optics, guided optics, and modern detectors. As one example, a great deal of effort has been put into development of ground-based nulling interferometers. The nulling technique is the sparse aperture equivalent of conventional coronography used in filled aperture telescopes. In this mode the stellar light itself is suppressed by a destructive fringe, effectively enhancing the contrast of the circumstellar material located near the star. Nulling interferometry has helped to advance our understanding of the astrophysics of many distant objects by providing the spatial resolution necessary to localize the various faint emission sources near bright objects. We illustrate the current capabilities of this technique by describing the first scientific results from the Keck Interferometer Nuller that combines the light from the two largest optical telescopes in the world including new, unpublished measurements of exozodiacal dust disks. We discuss prospects in the near future for interferometry in general, the capabilities of secondary masking interferometry on very large telescopes, and of nulling interferometry using outriggers on very large telescopes. We discuss future development of a simplified space-borne NIR nulling architecture, the Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer, capable of detecting and characterizing an Earth twin in the near future and how such a mission would benefit from the optical wavelength coverage offered by large, ground-based instruments.

  16. Recording depth and signal competition in heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rochefoucauld, Ombeline; Khanna, Shyam M.; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2005-03-01

    A common way to measure submicroscopic motion of the organ of Corti is heterodyne interferometry. The depth over which vibration can be accurately measured with heterodyne interferometry is determined by both the optics, which controls to what extent light from nonfocal planes reaches the photodetectors, and demodulation electronics, which determines to what extent signal generated by out-of-focal-plane light influences the measurements. The influence of a second reflecting surface is investigated theoretically and experimentally. By reviewing the theory of FM demodulation and showing tests with a Revox FM demodulator, it is demonstrated that the influence of a secondary signal on a measurement depends on the modulation index. Both high- and low-modulation index signals are encountered in heterodyne interferometry of the cochlea. Using a He-Ne-like diode laser (λ=638 nm), the border between low- and high-modulation signals is at a displacement of about 25-100 nm. Confocal interferometry reduces the magnitude of out-of-focus signals, and therefore their effect on vibration measurement. The response of the confocal system to reflected signals from two surfaces separated by distances encountered within the cochlear partition is shown. The results underscore the benefit of steep optical sectioning for intracochlear measurements. .

  17. Damage Detection Using Holography and Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews classical approaches to damage detection using laser holography and interferometry. The paper then details the modern uses of electronic holography and neural-net-processed characteristic patterns to detect structural damage. The design of the neural networks and the preparation of the training sets are discussed. The use of a technique to optimize the training sets, called folding, is explained. Then a training procedure is detailed that uses the holography-measured vibration modes of the undamaged structures to impart damage-detection sensitivity to the neural networks. The inspections of an optical strain gauge mounting plate and an International Space Station cold plate are presented as examples.

  18. Moire interferometry for vibration analysis of plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, A.; Cheung, M. T.

    1987-12-01

    Moire interferometry is used to locate nodal regions and measure vibration amplitudes of sinusoidally vibrating square plates. The high sensitivity afforded by this technique makes possible the study of plate vibrations at high frequencies and low amplitudes. The initial pattern is modulated by the zero-order Bessel function representing the vibratory motion. The fringe (or fringes) with best contrast indicate the nodal regions, while the higher order fringes, describing loci of points vibrating with the same amplitude, have decreasing contrast which is improved by spatial filtering.

  19. Three-color differential interferometry.

    PubMed

    Desse, J M

    1997-10-01

    It is shown that differential interferometry using a Wollaston prism and a three-color laser source is an optical technique that has all the advantages of differential interferometry in polarized white light and of classical monochromatic interferometry. The interference fringe pattern obtained is very large and colored and presents a central white fringe that enables easy identification of the zero order of the interferogram. The three-color source is obtained by filtering the unwanted lines of the ionized laser (mixed argon and krypton) and balancing the three red, green, and blue lines by a technique that involves placing birefringent plates between the polarizer and the analyzer, the thickness of which has been calculated to create a natural filter. The unsteady aerodynamic flow downstream of a diamond shape airfoil has been visualized with this technique, which shows that the power of the light source is sufficient to record the interferograms at a high rate. PMID:18264221

  20. Three-color differential interferometry.

    PubMed

    Desse, J M

    1997-10-01

    It is shown that differential interferometry using a Wollaston prism and a three-color laser source is an optical technique that has all the advantages of differential interferometry in polarized white light and of classical monochromatic interferometry. The interference fringe pattern obtained is very large and colored and presents a central white fringe that enables easy identification of the zero order of the interferogram. The three-color source is obtained by filtering the unwanted lines of the ionized laser (mixed argon and krypton) and balancing the three red, green, and blue lines by a technique that involves placing birefringent plates between the polarizer and the analyzer, the thickness of which has been calculated to create a natural filter. The unsteady aerodynamic flow downstream of a diamond shape airfoil has been visualized with this technique, which shows that the power of the light source is sufficient to record the interferograms at a high rate.

  1. Interferometry-based Kolsky bar apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinadav, C.; Ashuach, Y.; Kreif, R.

    2011-07-01

    A new experimental approach of the Kolsky bar system using optical interferometry is presented for determination of dynamic behavior of materials. Conventional measurements in the Kolsky bar system are based on recording the strain histories on the incident and transmitter bars with two strain gauges, and require good adhesion between the gauge and the bar. We suggest an alternative approach, based on measuring the actual velocities of the bars by using fiber-based velocity interferometry. Two fiber focusers illuminate the bars at a small angle and collect reflected Doppler-shifted light, which is interfered with a reference beam. Velocities are calculated from short-time Fourier transform and phase-based analysis, and the dynamic stress-strain curve is derived directly from the measured velocity traces. We demonstrate that the results coincide with those obtained by conventional strain gauge measurements. The new method is non-intervening and thus not affected by bar impacts, making it more robust and reliable than strain gauges.

  2. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  3. High-Speed Digital Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vine, Glenn; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Ware, Brent; Spero, Robert E.; Wuchenich, Danielle M.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry (DI) is a laser metrology technique employing pseudo-random noise (PRN) codes phase-modulated onto an optical carrier. Combined with heterodyne interferometry, the PRN code is used to select individual signals, returning the inherent interferometric sensitivity determined by the optical wavelength. The signal isolation arises from the autocorrelation properties of the PRN code, enabling both rejection of spurious signals (e.g., from scattered light) and multiplexing capability using a single metrology system. The minimum separation of optical components is determined by the wavelength of the PRN code.

  4. Polarization Effects Aboard the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Jason; Young, Martin; Dubovitsky, Serge; Dorsky, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    For precision displacement measurements, laser metrology is currently one of the most accurate measurements. Often, the measurement is located some distance away from the laser source, and as a result, stringent requirements are placed on the laser delivery system with respect to the state of polarization. Such is the case with the fiber distribution assembly (FDA) that is slated to fly aboard the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) next decade. This system utilizes a concatenated array of couplers, polarizers and lengthy runs of polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber to distribute linearly-polarized light from a single laser to fourteen different optical metrology measurement points throughout the spacecraft. Optical power fluctuations at the point of measurement can be traced back to the polarization extinction ration (PER) of the concatenated components, in conjunction with the rate of change in phase difference of the light along the slow and fast axes of the PM fiber.

  5. In situ mechanical interferometry of matrigel films.

    PubMed

    Reed, Jason; Walczak, Wanda J; Petzold, Odessa N; Gimzewski, James K

    2009-01-01

    Many biological materials and cell substrates are very soft (Young's modulus <500 Pa) and it is difficult to characterize their mechanical properties. Here we report local elasticity of the surface layers of Matrigel films used for cell culture. We used a new measurement technology, mechanical imaging interferometry, to obtain point mechanical measurements over micron-sized areas. The median values of 650 +/- 400 Pa (# measurements, n = 50), determined by the Hertz contact model, agree well with bulk measurements; however, on the microscale, the films were heterogeneous and contained regions distinctly stiffer than average (1-2 kPa). The first measurement of yield strengths of 170 +/- 100 Pa (n = 43) indicates that Matrigel films deform plastically at stress levels of similar scale to cell tractional forces.

  6. Mask Design for the Space Interferometry Mission Internal Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marx, David; Zhao, Feng; Korechoff, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the mask design used for the internal metrology of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). Included is information about the project, the method of measurements with SIM, the internal metrology, numerical model of internal metrology, wavefront examples, performance metrics, and mask design

  7. Seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution without wavefield separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravasi, Matteo; Meles, Giovanni; Curtis, Andrew; Rawlinson, Zara; Yikuo, Liu

    2015-07-01

    Seismic interferometry comprises a suite of methods to redatum recorded wavefields to those that would have been recorded if different sources (so-called virtual sources) had been activated. Seismic interferometry by cross-correlation has been formulated using either two-way (for full wavefields) or one-way (for directionally decomposed wavefields) representation theorems. To obtain improved Green's function estimates, the cross-correlation result can be deconvolved by a quantity that identifies the smearing of the virtual source in space and time, the so-called point-spread function. This type of interferometry, known as interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD), has so far been applied only to one-way directionally decomposed fields, requiring accurate wavefield decomposition from dual (e.g. pressure and velocity) recordings. Here we propose a form of interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution that uses full wavefields with two-way representations, and simultaneously invert for pressure and (normal) velocity Green's functions, rather than only velocity responses as for its one-way counterpart. Tests on synthetic data show that two-way MDD improves on results of interferometry by cross-correlation, and generally produces estimates of similar quality to those obtained by one-way MDD, suggesting that the preliminary decomposition into up- and downgoing components of the pressure field is not required if pressure and velocity data are jointly used in the deconvolution. We also show that constraints on the directionality of the Green's functions sought can be added directly into the MDD inversion process to further improve two-way multidimensional deconvolution. Finally, as a by-product of having pressure and particle velocity measurements, we adapt one- and two-way representation theorems to convert any particle velocity receiver into its corresponding virtual dipole/gradient source by means of MDD. Thus data recorded from standard monopolar (e

  8. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  9. Meteorology Gauges for Spatial Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometers have been commercially available for many years. In addition, many versions have been built at JPL for various projects. This activity is aimed at improving the accuracy of such interferometers from the 1-30 nanometer level to the picometer level for use in the proposes Stellar Interferometry Mission (SIM) as metrology gauges.

  10. AIPY: Astronomical Interferometry in PYthon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    AIPY collects together tools for radio astronomical interferometry. In addition to pure-python phasing, calibration, imaging, and deconvolution code, this package includes interfaces to MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) and HEALPix (ascl:1107.018), and math/fitting routines from SciPy.

  11. Is Space-based Interferometry Dead?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisawitz, David; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Carr, J.; Fich, M.; Fischer, J.; Goldsmith, P.; Greaves, J.; Griffin, M.; Helou, G.; Ivison, R.; Kuchner, M.; Lyon, R.; Matsuo, H.; Rinehart, S. A.; Serabyn, E.; Shibai, H.; Silverberg, R.; Staguhn, J.; Unwin, S.; Wilner, D.; Wootten, A.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of the Decadal Survey and a January 2011 meeting of NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG), one might be tempted to conclude that space interferometry is dead. We explain why this slogan is hyperbole, summarize the steps currently being taken to prepare for a space-based far-IR interferometer, and reiterate the science case for an imaging and spectroscopic interferometer - SPIRIT - that would operate in space at long infrared wavelengths. Space-based interferometry is alive and well, but the center of activity has shifted to a spectral region (25 to 400 microns) in which no alternative measurement technique can provide information essential to answering several scientific questions deemed compelling by the Decadal Survey. Astrophysicists will use SPIRIT to: discover how the conditions for habitability arise during planetary system formation; find and characterize exoplanets by measuring their sculpting effects on protoplanetary and debris disks; and study the formation, merger history, and star formation history of galaxies.

  12. Diffusion in solids with holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dingyu

    1996-12-01

    It is of great importance for the formation of p-n junction in semiconductors by penetrating some impurities through the depth near the surface, so it has long been paid attention to control the concentration distribution of impurities during the diffusion process. In recent years, ionic carburizing, and ion bombardment penetration etc. for the treatment of metal surface have also attracted by material sciences. It requires that the diffusion depth and the diffusion time of the impurities should be under precise control. Different methods, such as the method of radioisotopic detection and the method of chemical analysis have been adopted, however, the reports of different workers are very different, especially in the real time measurement, so, finding new method is never ending. In 1984, H. Fenichel have performed experiments on the solutions of table salt and sugar with the method of holographic interferometry. As for metals which are opaque for the visible light, but they become transparent by making them into a very thin film so that, in principle, the diffusion of atoms within a film is capable of measure by holographic interferometry. Alternatively, the electromagnetic waves within 1 - 70 micrometers wavelengths may be utilized, some materials, such as high purified germanium and silicon are good materials for infrared transmission. Some fluorides of alkaline-earth metals have high transmittance in the range of 1 - 8 micrometers , the concentration of impurities in the semiconductor and metal surface treatment are of 1015 - 1020 atoms per cubic cm, which is capable of detection.

  13. Stellar Interferometry from the Ground and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stellar Interferometry began more than 80 years ago with the pioneering measurement of the diameter of Betelqueuse by Michelson and Pease using a 20 foot beam mounted at the top of the 10011 Hooker telescope at Mt. Wilson. Essentially no other work was done in this field until the 1960's when Hanbury-Brown and his colleagues developed and used the Intensity Interferometer at Narrabri, Australia to measure the diameters of a number of important hot stars. The modern period of Stellar Interferometry really began in the 1970's with the successes of 3 or 4 small research groups in the US and Europe, and scientific and technical progress in the field has been outstanding, particularly in the last decade. This has lead to the development of two major ground based facilities: NASA's own Keck Interferometer and ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer, and a number of space interferometers such as the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), among others. I will review the principles, history, and scientific progress in the field both on the ground and in space, and I will discuss a mission concept under development here at NASA Goddard, the Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer, a near-term mid-infrared imaging interferometer, which can serve as a scientific and technical pre-cursor for some of the more ambitious concepts being discussed within the Astronomical and NASA communities.

  14. Refractive index determination by coherence scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, H; Kaminski, P M; Smith, R; Walls, J M; Mansfield, D

    2016-05-20

    Coherence scanning interferometry is established as a powerful noncontact, three-dimensional, metrology technique used to determine accurate surface roughness and topography measurements with subnanometer precision. The helical complex field (HCF) function is a topographically defined helix modulated by the electrical field reflectance, originally developed for the measurement of thin films. An approach to extend the capability of the HCF function to determine the spectral refractive index of a substrate or absorbing film has recently been proposed. In this paper, we confirm this new capability, demonstrating it on surfaces of silicon, gold, and a gold/palladium alloy using silica and zirconia oxide thin films. These refractive index dispersion measurements show good agreement with those obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. PMID:27411157

  15. Speckle interferometry of nearby multiple stars. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balega, I.; Balega, Y. Y.; Maksimov, A. F.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Schertl, D.; Shkhagosheva, Z. U.; Weigelt, G.

    2004-08-01

    This paper is a continuation of diffraction-limited speckle interferometry of binary and multiple stars carried out at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Zelenchuk. The program has concentrated on nearby (π>10 mas) close binaries discovered or measured during the Hipparcos mission. Here, we present 132 measurements of relative positions and magnitude differences for 99 pairs and 8 measurements for 6 triple systems. 54 entries in the paper are new Hipparcos binaries. New triple systems with late-type dwarf components, discovered in the course of observations, are HIP 8533 and HIP 25354. Based on data collected at the Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russia. {Tables 1-3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?/A+A/422/627

  16. Speckle interferometry of nearby multiple stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balega, I. I.; Balega, Y. Y.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Maksimov, A. F.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Schertl, D.; Shkhagosheva, Z. U.; Weigelt, G.

    2002-04-01

    We present the results of diffraction-limited optical speckle interferometry and infrared bispectrum speckle interferometry of 111 double and 10 triple systems performed in 1998-1999 with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Zelenchuk. The observations concentrated on nearby close binaries discovered during the Hipparcos mission. Many nearby fast-orbiting low-mass binaries known before Hipparcos were also included in the program. New companions were first resolved in 4 systems: HIP 5245, ADS 3179, Kui 99, and ADS 16138. In addition to accurate relative positions, magnitude differences were measured for most of the pairs. We combined our results with the Hipparcos parallaxes to derive absolute magnitudes and spectral types for 63 binaries and 4 triples. Preliminary orbital elements and the mass-sum are derived for HIP 689, and improved orbits are presented for HIP 16602 (CHR 117) and HIP 21280 (CHR 17). Based on data collected at the Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russia Table 1 is only, and Table 2 also, available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymons ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/385/87

  17. Measuring extremely complex pulses with time-bandwidth products exceeding 65,000 using multiple-delay crossed-beam spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jacob; Bowlan, Pamela; Chauhan, Vikrant; Vaughan, Peter; Trebino, Rick

    2010-11-22

    We measure the complete electric field of extremely complex ultrafast waveforms using the simple linear-optical, interferometric pulse-measurement technique, MUD TADPOLE. The waveforms were measured with ~40 fs temporal resolution over a temporal range of ~3.5 ns and had time-bandwidth products exceeding 65,000. The approach is general and could allow the measurement of arbitrary optical waveforms.

  18. Measuring complex pulses with time-bandwidth products exceeding 65,000 using multiple-delay crossed-beam spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Jacob; Bowlan, Pamela; Chauhan, Vikrant; Vaughan, Peter; Trebino, Rick

    2011-03-01

    We measure the complete electric field of extremely complex ultrafast waveforms using the simple linear-optical, interferometric pulse-measurement technique, MUD TADPOLE. In its scanning variation, we measured waveforms with time-bandwidth products exceeding 65,000 with ~40 fs temporal resolution over a temporal range of ~3.5ns. In the single-shot variation we measured complex waveforms time-bandwidth products exceeding 65,000. The approach is general and could allow the measurement of arbitrary optical waveforms.

  19. Optical and Infrared Interferometry IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev K.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Malbet, Fabien

    2014-08-01

    Optical and IR Interferometry IV at the SPIE 2014 symposium in Montreal had a strong and vibrant program. After initial fears about budget cuts and travel-funding constraints, the Program Committee had to work hard to accommodate as many quality submissions as possible. Innovative, creative and visionary work ensured that the field has progressed well, despite the bleak funding climate felt in the US, Europe and elsewhere. Montreal proved an excellent venue for this, the largest of Interferometry conferences and the only one that brings together practitioners from the world over. Let us summarize a few highlights to convey a glimpse of the excitement that is detailed in the rest of these Proceedings.

  20. Precision Geodesy via Radio Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hinteregger, H F; Shapiro, I I; Robertson, D S; Knight, C A; Ergas, R A; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Moran, J M; Clark, T A; Burke, B F

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometry experiments, involving observations of extragalactic radio sources, were performed in 1969 to determine the vector separations between antenna sites in Massachusetts and West Virginia. The 845.130-kilometer baseline was estimated from two separate experiments. The results agreed with each other to within 2 meters in all three components and with a special geodetic survey to within 2 meters in length; the differences in baseline direction as determined by the survey and by interferometry corresponded to discrepancies of about 5 meters. The experiments also yielded positions for nine extragalactic radio sources, most to within 1 arc second, and allowed the hydrogen maser clocks at the two sites to be synchronized a posteriori with an uncertainty of only a few nanoseconds.

  1. Integrated optics for astronomical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, P. V. S.; Ghasempour, A.; Alexandre, D.; Leite, A. M. P.; Garcia, P. J. V.; Reynaud, F.

    2011-05-01

    Integrated optics is a well established technology that finds its main applications in the fields of optical communication and sensing. However, it is expanding into new areas, and in the last decade application in astronomical interferometry has been explored. In particular, several examples have been demonstrated in the areas of beam control and combination. In this paper, different examples of application integrated optics devices for fabrication of beam combiners for astronomical interferometry is given. For the multiaxial beam combiners, a UV laser direct writing unit is used for mask fabrication. The operation principles of the coaxial combiners fabricated in hybrid sol-gel were validated using an interferometric set-up. These results demonstrate that hybrid sol-gel technology can produce quality devices, opening the possibility of rapid prototyping of new designs and concepts.

  2. Meson interferometry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Recent HBT results form CERN experiment NA44; interferometry results from E802/E859/E866; recent results on two particle correlations from E814; source sizes from CERN data; intermittency and interferometry; Bose-Einstein correlations in 200A GeV S+Au collisions; HBT correlations at STAR; HBT interferometry with PHENIX; HBT calculations from ARC; three pion correlations; and pion correlations in proton-induced reactions.

  3. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology.

  4. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology. PMID:26550871

  5. MAGIA - using atom interferometry to determine the Newtonian gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhler, J.; Fattori, M.; Petelski, T.; Tino, G. M.

    2003-04-01

    We describe our experiment MAGIA (misura accurata di G mediante interferometria atomica), in which we will use atom interferometry to perform a high precision measurement of the Newtonian gravitational constant G. Free-falling laser-cooled atoms in a vertical atomic fountain will be accelerated due to the gravitational potential of nearby source masses (SMs). Detecting this acceleration with techniques of Raman atom interferometry will enable us to assign a value to G. To suppress systematic effects we will implement a double-differential measurement. This includes launching two atom clouds in a gradiometer configuration and moving the SMs to different vertical positions. We briefly summarize the general idea of the MAGIA experiment and put it in the context of other high precision G-measurements. We present the current status of the experiment and report on analyses of the expected measurement accuracy.

  6. Electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over 40  nm bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Durán, Vicente; Andrekson, Peter A; Torres-Company, Víctor

    2016-09-15

    Dual-comb interferometry is a measurement technique that uses two laser frequency combs to retrieve complex spectra in a line-by-line basis. This technique can be implemented with electro-optic frequency combs, offering intrinsic mutual coherence, high acquisition speed and flexible repetition-rate operation. A challenge with the operation of this kind of frequency comb in dual-comb interferometry is its limited optical bandwidth. Here, we use coherent spectral broadening and demonstrate electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over the entire telecommunications C band (200 lines covering ∼40  nm, measured within 10 μs at 100 signal-to-noise ratio per spectral line). These results offer new prospects for electro-optic dual-comb interferometry as a suitable technology for high-speed broadband metrology, for example in optical coherence tomography or coherent Raman microscopy.

  7. Electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over 40  nm bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Durán, Vicente; Andrekson, Peter A; Torres-Company, Víctor

    2016-09-15

    Dual-comb interferometry is a measurement technique that uses two laser frequency combs to retrieve complex spectra in a line-by-line basis. This technique can be implemented with electro-optic frequency combs, offering intrinsic mutual coherence, high acquisition speed and flexible repetition-rate operation. A challenge with the operation of this kind of frequency comb in dual-comb interferometry is its limited optical bandwidth. Here, we use coherent spectral broadening and demonstrate electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over the entire telecommunications C band (200 lines covering ∼40  nm, measured within 10 μs at 100 signal-to-noise ratio per spectral line). These results offer new prospects for electro-optic dual-comb interferometry as a suitable technology for high-speed broadband metrology, for example in optical coherence tomography or coherent Raman microscopy. PMID:27628354

  8. Electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over 40 nm bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, Vicente; Andrekson, Peter A.; Torres-Company, Víctor

    2016-09-01

    Dual-comb interferometry is a measurement technique that uses two laser frequency combs to retrieve complex spectra in a line-by-line basis. This technique can be implemented with electro-optic frequency combs, offering intrinsic mutual coherence, high acquisition speed and flexible repetition-rate operation. A challenge with the operation of this kind of frequency comb in dual-comb interferometry is its limited optical bandwidth. Here, we use coherent spectral broadening and demonstrate electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over the entire telecommunications C band (200 lines covering ~ 40 nm, measured within 10 microseconds at 100 signal-to-noise ratio per spectral line). These results offer new prospects for electro-optic dual-comb interferometry as a suitable technology for high-speed broadband metrology, for example in optical coherence tomography or coherent Raman microscopy.

  9. Special topics in infrared interferometry. [Michelson interferometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Topics in IR interferometry related to the development of a Michelson interferometer are treated. The selection and reading of the signal from the detector to the analog to digital converter is explained. The requirements for the Michelson interferometer advance speed are deduced. The effects of intensity modulation on the interferogram are discussed. Wavelength and intensity calibration of the interferometer are explained. Noise sources (Nyquist or Johnson noise, phonon noise), definitions of measuring methods of noise, and noise measurements are presented.

  10. Prism-pair interferometry by homodyne interferometers with a common light source for high-accuracy measurement of the absolute refractive index of glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Yasuaki; Hirai, Akiko; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2011-03-10

    A prism-pair interferometer comprising two homodyne interferometers with a common light source was developed for high-precision measurements of the refractive index of optical glasses with an uncertainty of the order of 10{sup -6}. The two interferometers measure changes in the optical path length in the glass sample and in air, respectively. Uncertainties in the absolute wavelength of the common light source are cancelled out by calculating a ratio between the results from the interferometers. Uncertainties in phase measurement are suppressed by a quadrature detection system. The combined standard uncertainty of the developed system is evaluated as 1.1x10{sup -6}.

  11. Optical Distortion Evaluation in Large Area Windows using Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Skow, Miles; Nurge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    It is important that imagery seen through large area windows, such as those used on space vehicles, not be substantially distorted. Many approaches are described in the literature for measuring the distortion of an optical window, but most suffer from either poor resolution or processing difficulties. In this paper a new definition of distortion is presented, allowing accurate measurement using an optical interferometer. This new definition is shown to be equivalent to the definitions provided by the military and the standards organizations. In order to determine the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach the distortion of an acrylic window is measured using three different methods; image comparison, Moiré interferometry, and phase-shifting interferometry.

  12. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  13. Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neyer, Barry T.

    1988-04-01

    This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

  14. Holographic Interferometry based on photorefractive crystal to measure 3D thermo-elastic distortion of composite structures and comparison with finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thizy, C.; Eliot, F.; Ballhause, D.; Olympio, K. R.; Kluge, R.; Shannon, A.; Laduree, G.; Logut, D.; Georges, M. P.

    2013-04-01

    Thermo-elastic distortions of composite structures have been measured by a holographic camera using a BSO photorefractive crystal as the recording medium. The first test campaign (Phase 1) was performed on CFRP struts with titanium end-fittings glued to the tips of the strut. The samples were placed in a vacuum chamber. The holographic camera was located outside the chamber and configured with two illuminations to measure the relative out-of-plane and in-plane (in one direction) displacements. The second test campaign (Phase 2) was performed on a structure composed of a large Silicon Carbide base plate supported by 3 GFRP struts with glued Titanium end-fittings. Thermo-elastic distortions have been measured with the same holographic camera used in phase 1, but four illuminations, instead of two, have been used to provide the three components of displacement. This technique was specially developed and validated during the phase 2 in CSL laboratory. The system has been designed to measure an object size of typically 250x250 mm2; the measurement range is such that the sum of the largest relative displacements in the three measurement directions is maximum 20 μm. The validation of the four-illuminations technique led to measurement uncertainties of 120 nm for the relative in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, 230 nm for the absolute in-plane displacement and 400 nm for the absolute out-of-plane displacement. For both campaigns, the test results have been compared to the predictions obtained by finite element analyses and the correlation of these results was good.

  15. Polarizing phase shifting interferometry of total internal reflection light for measurement of refractive index and its spatial variation in liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tania; Bhattacharya, Kallol

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the phase change in total internal reflection (TIR) is a function of the refractive indices of the pair of media involved. The spatial phase variations in a totally internally reflected beam are accurately measured using a Mach Zehnder interferometer employing polarization phase shifting technique. The evaluated phase change is then related to the refractive index variations of the rarer medium. One of the salient features of the proposed technique is that, unlike most interferometric methods where the measured phase is a function of the sample thickness, TIR phase is independent of the sample thickness as long as the evanescent wave field is fully confined within the sample. The theory of the technique is discussed and experimental results showing the three-dimensional profiles of the measured refractive indices and its spatial variations are presented.

  16. Low Coherence Interferometry in Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, A.; Seyda, V.; Herzog, D.; Emmelmann, C.; Schönleber, M.; Kogel-Hollacher, M.

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an additive layer manufacturing technology that offers several advantages compared to conven- tional methods of production such as an increased freedom of design and a toolless production suited for variable lot sizes. Despite these attractive aspects today's state of the art SLM machines lack a holistic process monitoring system that detects and records typical defects during production. A novel sensor concept based on the low coherence interferometry (LCI) was integrated into an SLM production setup. The sensor is mounted coaxially to the processing laser beam and is capable of sampling distances along the optical axis. Measurements during and between the processing of powder layers can reveal crucial topology information which is closely related to the final part quality. The overall potential of the sensor in terms of quality assurance and process control is being discussed. Furthermore fundamental experiments were performed to derive the performance of the system.

  17. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Precision Radial Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Muterspaugh, M W; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Herter, T; Feuerstein, W M; Muirhead, P; Wishnow, E

    2007-03-27

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic spectral comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. The moire pattern shifts in phase in response to a Doppler shift. Moire patterns are broader than the underlying spectral features and more easily survive spectrograph blurring and common distortions. Thus, the EDI technique allows lower resolution spectrographs having relaxed optical tolerances (and therefore higher throughput) to return high precision velocity measurements, which otherwise would be imprecise for the spectrograph alone.

  18. Future Looks Bright for Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Light for the PRIMA instrument The PRIMA instrument [1] of the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) recently saw "first light" at its new home atop Cerro Paranal in Chile. When fully operational, PRIMA will boost the capabilities of the VLTI to see sources much fainter than any previous interferometers, and enable astrometric precision unmatched by any other existing astronomical facility. PRIMA will be a unique tool for the detection of exoplanets. First Light of the PRIMA Instrument ESO PR Photo 29a/08 Preparing for PRIMA "PRIMA is specifically designed to see if one star 'wobbles' to and fro because it is has unseen planetary companions", says instrument scientist Gerard van Belle. "This allows us to not only detect exoplanets, but to measure their mass." PRIMA's expected astrometric precision of tens of micro-arcseconds is unmatched by any other existing astronomical facility, whether on the ground or in orbit [2]. In addition to taking astrometric measurements PRIMA will be the key to the imaging of faint sources with the VLTI using the science instruments AMBER and MIDI. Interferometry combines the light received by two or more telescopes, concentrating on tiny differences between the signals to measure angles with exquisite precision. Using this technique PRIMA can pick out details as sharply as a single telescope with a diameter equivalent to the largest distance between the telescopes. For the VLTI, the distance between the two telescope elements is about 200 metres. The PRIMA instrument is unique amongst the VLTI instruments, in that it is effectively two interferometers in one. PRIMA will take data from two sources on the sky simultaneously: the brighter source can be used for tracking, allowing the interferometer to "stare" at the fainter source for longer than is now possible with conventional interferometers. Although there have been earlier pathfinder experiments to test this technique, PRIMA represents the first facility

  19. An Introduction to Optical Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, A.; Lipson, S. G.; Nisenson, P.

    2006-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2 Basic concepts: a qualitative introduction; 3. Interference, diffraction and coherence; 4. Aperture synthesis; 5. Optical effects of the atmosphere; 6. Single-aperture techniques; 7. Intensity interferometry; 8. Amplitude interferometry: techniques and instruments; 9. The hypertelescope; 10. Nulling and coronagraphy; 11. A sampling of interferometric science; 12. Future ground and space projects; Appendices.

  20. An Introduction to Optical Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, A.; Lipson, S. G.; Nisenson, P.

    2014-03-01

    1. Introduction; 2 Basic concepts: a qualitative introduction; 3. Interference, diffraction and coherence; 4. Aperture synthesis; 5. Optical effects of the atmosphere; 6. Single-aperture techniques; 7. Intensity interferometry; 8. Amplitude interferometry: techniques and instruments; 9. The hypertelescope; 10. Nulling and coronagraphy; 11. A sampling of interferometric science; 12. Future ground and space projects; Appendices.

  1. Astronomical imaging by pupil plane interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribak, Erez

    1989-01-01

    Comparing rotational shear interferometry to standard speckle interferometry, it is found that it is easier in the first case to separate the atmospheric phases from the object transform phases. Phase closure and blind deconvolution should be directly applicable. Laboratory simulations were conducted to verify theoretical predictions and computer simulations for the phase closure case, and preliminary results show promise.

  2. Mechanical stress measurement by an achromatic optical digital speckle pattern interferometry strain sensor with radial in-plane sensitivity: experimental comparison with electrical strain gauges.

    PubMed

    Viotti, Matias R; Albertazzi G, Armando; Kapp, Walter A

    2011-03-01

    This paper shows the optical setup of a radial in-plane digital speckle pattern interferometer which uses an axis-symmetrical diffractive optical element (DOE) to obtain double illumination. The application of the DOE gives in-plane sensitivity which only depends on the grating period of the DOE instead of the wavelength of the laser used as illumination source. A compact optical layout was built in order to have a portable optical strain sensor with a circular measurement area of about 5 mm in diameter. In order to compare its performance with electrical strain sensors (strain gauges), mechanical loading was generated by a four-point bending device and simultaneously monitored by the optical strain sensor and by two-element strain gauge rosettes. Several mechanical stress levels were measured showing a good agreement between both sensors. Results showed that the optical sensor could measure applied mechanical strains with a mean uncertainty of about 5% and 4% for the maximum and minimum principal strains, respectively. PMID:21364725

  3. Holodiagram: elliptic visualizing interferometry, relativity, and light-in-flight.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Nils H

    2014-04-10

    In holographic interferometry, there is usually a static distance separating the point of illumination and the point of observation. In Special Relativity, this separation is dynamic and is caused by the velocity of the observer. The corrections needed to compensate for these separations are similar in the two fields. We use the ellipsoids of the holodiagram for measurement and in a graphic way to explain and evaluate optical resolution, gated viewing, radar, holography, three-dimensional interferometry, Special Relativity, and light-in-flight recordings. Lorentz contraction together with time dilation is explained as the result of the eccentricity of the measuring ellipsoid, caused by its velocity. The extremely thin ellipsoid of the very first light appears as a beam aimed directly at the observer, which might explain the wave or ray duality of light and entanglement. Finally, we introduce the concept of ellipsoids of observation.

  4. Holodiagram: elliptic visualizing interferometry, relativity, and light-in-flight.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Nils H

    2014-04-10

    In holographic interferometry, there is usually a static distance separating the point of illumination and the point of observation. In Special Relativity, this separation is dynamic and is caused by the velocity of the observer. The corrections needed to compensate for these separations are similar in the two fields. We use the ellipsoids of the holodiagram for measurement and in a graphic way to explain and evaluate optical resolution, gated viewing, radar, holography, three-dimensional interferometry, Special Relativity, and light-in-flight recordings. Lorentz contraction together with time dilation is explained as the result of the eccentricity of the measuring ellipsoid, caused by its velocity. The extremely thin ellipsoid of the very first light appears as a beam aimed directly at the observer, which might explain the wave or ray duality of light and entanglement. Finally, we introduce the concept of ellipsoids of observation. PMID:24787410

  5. Deformations and strains in adhesive joints by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Wood, J.; John, D.; Lubowinski, S.

    1984-01-01

    Displacement fields in a thick adherend lap joint and a cracked lap shear specimen were measured by high sensitivity moire interferometry. Contour maps of in-plane U and V displacements were obtained across adhesive and adherent surfaces. Loading sequences ranged from modest loads to near-failure loads. Quantitative results are given for displacements and certain strains in the adhesive and along the adhesive/adherend boundary lines. The results show nonlinear displacements and strains as a function of loads or stresses and they show viscoelastic or time-dependent response. Moire interferometry is an excellent method for experimental studies of adhesive joint performance. Subwavelength displacement resolution of a few micro-inches, and spatial resolution corresponding to 1600 fringes/inch (64 fringes/mm), were obtained in these studies. The whole-field contour maps offer insights not available from local measurements made by high sensitivity gages.

  6. Searching for Dark Matter with Atomic Clocks and Laser Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Yevgeny; Flambaum, Victor

    2016-05-01

    We propose new schemes for the direct detection of low-mass bosonic dark matter, which forms a coherently oscillating classical field and resides in the observed galactic dark matter haloes, using atomic clock, atomic spectroscopy and laser interferometry measurements in the laboratory. We have recently shown that such dark matter can produce both a `slow' cosmological evolution and oscillating variations in the fundamental constants. Using recent atomic dysprosium spectroscopy measurements in, we have derived limits on the quadratic interactions of scalar dark matter with ordinary matter that improve on existing constraints by up to 15 orders of magnitude. We have also proposed the use of laser and maser interferometry as novel high-precision platforms to search for dark matter, with effects due to the variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant on alterations in the accumulated phase enhanced by up to 14 orders of magnitude. Other possibilities include the use of highly-charged ions, molecules and nuclear clocks.

  7. Slow Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-05-01

    We will discuss an ion interferometer which is under construction. The device will utilize a laser-cooled source of ^87Sr^+ ions which will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions inside of a conducting cylinder. The interferometer will be able to measure electric and magnetic fields with unprecedented precision. Potential uses of the device include practical applications such as the precision measurement of the evolution of fields near solids to reveal their electronic structure. It will also be used for fundamental tests of the basic laws of electromagnetism and the search for a non-zero photon rest mass. The device should enable the detection of a possible photon rest mass more than 100 times smaller than previous laboratory experiments. We will discuss both the details of the device and the theory connecting deviations from Coulomb's inverse-square law to a theory of massive photons.

  8. 50 years of holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Karl A.

    2015-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Robert L. Powell and I discovered holographic interferometry while working at the Radar Laboratory of the University of Michigan's Institute of Science and Technology. I have worked in this field for this entire time span, watched it grow from an unexplored technology to become a widespread industrial testing method, and I have contributed to these developments. In this paper, I will trace my history in this field from our discovery to my involvement in its theory and applications. I will conclude with a discussion of digital holography, which is currently replacing photographic holography for most research and industrial applications.

  9. Radio interferometry depth sounding. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossiter, J. R.; Annan, A. P.; Latorraca, G. A.; Simmons, G.; Strangway, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results from an analog scale model and from field tests on two glaciers using radio-frequency interferometry (RFI) are interpreted on the basis of previously described theoretical results. The RFI technique is found to be a practical method with which to study layering in low-loss dielectrics. Three parameters of the upper layer can be estimated from the data: the dielectric constant, the loss tangent, and an estimate of the thickness to a reflector. The method is an inexpensive way to sound ice sheets less than a few hundred meters thick, and could be used to study low-loss layers on the moon.

  10. Golographic interferometry of physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the contribution of Yuri Ostrovsky to holographic interferometry, one of the fundamental scientific and practical applications of holography. The title of this paper is the same as the title of his doctoral thesis that he defended in 1974, and, as it seems to me, reflects most of the specific features of the majority of his scientific publications, viz., an inseparable link of the methods developed by him with the results obtained with the help of these methods in a wide range of investigations of physical processes and phenomena.

  11. Vibration analysis using moire interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, A.; Cheung, M. T.

    The present use of moire interferometry for low amplitude vibration and analysis demonstrates the possibility of obtaining out-of-plane displacement contours whose sensitivity is comparable to that of holographic methods. A major advantage of the present system, is the obviation of prior knowledge of resonant frequencies, as called for in time-average holography. The experimental apparatus employed encompasses a laser beam, a parabolic mirror, a high frequency (600 line/mm) grating, and a camera, in addition to the test model.

  12. Laser Development for Gravitational-Wave Interferometry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting on our development work on laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier systems for gravitational-wave interferometry in space. Our system is based on the mature, wave-guided optics technologies, which have advantages over bulk, crystal-based, free-space optics. We are investing in a new type of compact, low-noise master oscillator, called the planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser. We made measurements, including those of noise, and performed space-qualification tests.

  13. Sensitivity in X-ray grating interferometry on compact systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thuering, Thomas; Modregger, Peter; Haemmerle, Stefan; Weiss, Stephan; Nueesch, Joachim; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-31

    The optimization of compact X-ray grating interferometry systems is crucial for the progress of this technique in industrial devices. Here, an analytical formulation for the sensitivity of the phase contrast image acquisition is derived using previous results from noise analyses. Furthermore, experimental measurements of the sensitivity for different configurations are compared, providing further insight into the dependence on polychromatic radiation. Finally, strategies for the geometrical optimization are given.

  14. Decorrelation analysis of L-band interferometry over the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (France) using airborne LiDAR data and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedze, M.; Bretar, F.; Heggy, E.; Berveiller, D.; Jacquemoud, S.

    2012-12-01

    We combine ALOS-PALSAR coherence images with airborne LiDAR data, both acquired over the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island, France) in 2008 and 2009, to determine the cause of errors that affects repeat-pass InSAR measurements. We investigate how phase coherence varies with the nature of volcanic terrains and vegetation density in a typical volcanic environment. Our study is focused on several sites characterized by different vegetation densities (Leaf Area Index or LAI) and on bare volcanic surfaces displaying different geophysical properties: pahoehoe and a'a lava flows, slabby pahoehoe flows, and pyroclastic deposits (lapillis). The high resolution DTM generated using LiDAR data is used to subtract out the topographic contribution from the interferogram and to improve the radar coherence maps. To evaluate the coherence loss terms, the relationship between LiDAR intensity and radar coherence is then analyzed over several surfaces. Pyroclastic deposits and a'a lava flows are characterized by low coherence and intensity values, with high coherence standard deviations; pahoehoe and slabby lava flows display high coherence and intensity values, with low standard deviations; coherence decreases in regions covered with dense vegetation, whereas LiDAR intensity increases, and we observe a higher dispersion of coherence and intensity values depending on the type and density of plants. Additionally, a geological survey has been conducted in October 2011 to measure the physical properties of the surface and better interpret the radar images. From digital photographs, we first computed ~ 25 m^2 DTM at 1 mm spatial resolution using an automatic image matching method. Several 4 m long linear profiles have been extracted to calculate three roughness parameters: the standard deviation of height σ, the correlation length L_c, and the Z_s parameter defined as Z_s= σ^2/L_c. They describe soil surface microrelief: the rougher the surface, the lower the correlation

  15. Application of Bistatic TanDEM-X Interferometry to Measure Lava Flow Volume and Lava Extrusion Rates During the 2012-13 Tolbachik, Kamchatka Fissure Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubanek, J.; Westerhaus, M.; Heck, B.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial imaging methods are a well approved source for mapping lava flows during eruptions and can serve as a base to assess the eruption dynamics and to determine the affected area. However, clouds and smoke often hinder optical systems like the Earth Observation Advanced Land Imager (EO-1-ALI, operated by NASA) to map lava flows properly, which hence affects its reliability. Furthermore, the amount of lava that is extruded during an eruption cannot be determined from optical images - however, it can significantly contribute to assess the accompanying hazard and risk. One way to monitor active lava flows is to quantify the topographic changes over time while using up-to-date high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs). Whereas photogrammetric methods still fail when clouds and fume obstruct the sight, innovative radar satellite missions have the potential to generate high-resolution DEMs at any time. The innovative bistatic TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X Add-on for Digital Elevation Measurements) satellite mission enables for the first time generating high-resolution DEMs from synthetic aperture radar satellite data repeatedly with reasonable costs and high resolution. The satellite mission consists of the two nearly identical satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X that build a large synthetic aperture radar interferometer with adaptable across- and along-track baselines aiming to generate topographic information globally. In the present study, we apply the TanDEM-X data to study the lava flows that were emplaced during the 2012-13 Tolbachik, Kamchatka fissure eruption. The eruption was composed of very fluid lava flows that effused along a northeast-southwest trending fissure. We used about fifteen bistatic data pairs to generate DEMs prior to, during, and after the eruption. The differencing of the DEMs enables mapping the lava flow field at different times. This allows measuring the extruded volume and to derive the changes in lava extrusion over time.

  16. Vibration modal analysis using stroboscopic digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xizhou; Tan, Yushan

    1991-12-01

    Digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) is a promising optoelectronic testing technique for a wide range of applications. Compared with holographic and speckle interferometry, it has some attractive features such as needlessness of tedious film processing, high measuring accuracy, and satisfactory automaticity. The measuring data can be displayed on the monitor at real time. In this paper, the vibration of a clamped steel plate is tested using stroboscopic digital speckle pattern interferometry. The advantages of stroboscopic technique are that it can give both the amplitude and phase information of a harmonic vibration. This is very useful for the vibration modal analysis of engineering structures. This work is realized on an image processing system based on IBM-PC/AT personal computer. The stroboscopic wavefronts are obtained by chopping a CW He-Ne laser using acousto-optic modulator. The fringe patterns obtained with stroboscopic DSPI are superior to that with time-averaging TV holography (ESPI or DPI). The interpretation of the stroboscopic DSPI fringes and selection of the system parameters are discussed in detail. The measured results are also given.

  17. Monitoring with Coda Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gret, A.; Snieder, R.

    2004-12-01

    Aki has been a pioneer in monitoring the subsurface with coda waves and with guided waves. His analysis of temporal and spatial variations in coda Q has proven to be a powerful tool for monitoring purposes. We have extended his technique in new method called coda wave interferometry where changes in the full waveforms of coda waves are used to monitor changes in the subsurface. We have developed and implemented the theory to use this technique to monitor the following changes: a change in the seismic velocity, a change in scatterer locations, and a change in the location of earthquakes. As shown by Aki, the seismic coda is dominated by shear waves. Therefore our technique is primarily sensitive to changes in the S-velocity. Aki also worked on wave propagation in volcanoes. We have used coda wave interferometry to monitor two active volcanoes, Arenal (Costa Rica) and Mt. Erebus (Antarctica). I will give several examples to illustrate how coda waves can be used for monitoring purposes.

  18. Progression of Stellar Intensity Interferometry techniques using 3 meter telescopes at StarBase-Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Nolan; Kieda, Dave; Lebohec, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of large air Cherenkov telescope arrays have opened up the potential for high-resolution imaging of stellar surfaces using Intensity Interferometry techniques. Stellar Intensity Interferometry (SII) allows coverage into the optical and ultraviolet frequency bands which are traditionally inaccessible to classical Michelson interferometry. The relative insensitivity to atmospheric turbulence allows for unprecedented angular resolution scales as the baselines between telescopes can be made very large (>100m) without the need for precise spatial resolution as required by Michelson interferometry. In this talk I will illustrate the science capabilities of the SII technique and describe the progress achieved in developing a modern Stellar Intensity Interferometry system with a pair of 3 meter diameter optical telescopes located at StarBase-Utah. In particular, I will discuss the current status of the StarBase-Utah observatory and present results from two telescope low frequency optical correlation observations of the optical Crab pulsar. These measurements provide a first step towards actual intensity interferometry observations and establish the working condition of the StarBase-Utah telescopes.

  19. Simulation of GPR passive interferometry using cross-correlation for LNAPL model monitoring application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Zeng, Zhaofa; Slob, Evert; Chen, Xiong; Liu, Fengshan

    2014-12-01

    Passive interferometry technology is based on the relation between the reflection and the transmission responses of the subsurface. The transmission response can be received at surface in the presence of the ambient noise source in the subsurface with the cross-correlation (CC) or multidimensional deconvolution methods. We investigate the feasibility of electromagnetic (EM) wave passive interferometry with CC method. We design a 2-D finite-difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm to simulate the long-duration ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements with random distribution of passive EM sources. The noise sources have random duration time, waveform and spatial distribution. We test the FDTD GPR passive interferometry code with above source characteristics and apply the method to light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) monitoring. Based on the model simulation data, by using common midpoint velocity analysis and normal move out correction to process the interferometry retrieve record, we can accurately obtain the dynamic changing characteristics of the target's permittivity. The LNAPL dynamic leakage model can be imaged as well. The synthetic results demonstrate that the GPR passive interferometry is feasible in subsurface LNAPL monitoring. Our work provides a foundation for a passive interferometry field application using GPR.

  20. Bibliography of spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    The Bibliography of Spatial Interferometry in Optical Astronomy is a guide to the published literature in applications of spatial interferometry techniques to astronomical observations, theory and instrumentation at visible and infrared wavelengths. The key words spatial and optical define the scope of this discipline, distinguishing it from spatial interferometry at radio wavelengths, interferometry in the frequency domain applied to spectroscopy, or more general electro-optics theoretical and laboratory research. The main bibliography is a listing of all technical articles published in the international scientific literature and presented at the major international meetings and workshops attended by the spatial interferometry community. Section B summarizes publications dealing with the basic theoretical concepts and algorithms proposed and applied to optical spatial interferometry and imaging through a turbulent atmosphere. The section on experimental techniques is divided into twelve categories, representing the most clearly identified major areas of experimental research work. Section D, Observations, identifies publications dealing specifically with observations of astronomical sources, in which optical spatial interferometry techniques have been applied.

  1. Study of tympanic membrane displacements with digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Montes, María del Socorro; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando; Muñoz-Solís, Silvino

    2010-09-01

    The study of the tympanic membrane is fundamental because it is one of the most important components of the middle ear. By finding the membrane's vibration patterns and quantifying the induced displacement, it is possible to characterize and determine its physiological state. Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) has proved to be a promising optical non-invasive and quasi-real time method for the investigation of different mechanical parameters of biological tissues. In this paper, we present a digital holographic interferometry setup used to measure the frequency response of the tympanic membrane in post-mortem cats subject to acoustic stimuli in the range of 485 Hz up to 10 kHz. We show the resonant vibration patterns found for this range of frequencies and the corresponding displacement amplitudes induced by the acoustic waves. The results show the potential that this method has to help improve the understanding of the tympanic membrane's working mechanisms.

  2. Applications Of A Spatial Filtering Detector To Dynamic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Ichirou

    1987-01-01

    Interferometry has recently shown great advances in practical applications owing to progress and utility of electrooptic devices and computers. For objects of interferometry it is now strongly desired to measure such dynamic quantities as displacement, vibration, strain, and temperature. In this case rapid movement of interference fringes or speckle patterns has to be detected. However, the conventional image processing techniques using digital computers are not quick enough for this purpose. For reducing computation time it is necessary to endow the detector with a preprocessing function. One of the solutions is a spatial filtering detector with electronic scanning facility which has been used for three dimensional displacement meter [1] and for accerelating a laser speckle strain gauge [2]. This detector, which consists of a photodiode array and its control circuit, delivers a voltage that is proportional to speckle displacement normal to the array. This paper reports applications of this detector to catch the movement of speckles and interference fringes obtained from optical fiber interferometers.

  3. Two-dimensional attosecond electron wave-packet interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua

    2015-05-01

    We propose a two-dimensional interferometry based on the electron wave-packet interference by using a cycle-shaped orthogonally polarized two-color laser field. With such a method, the subcycle and intercycle interferences can be disentangled into different directions in the measured photoelectron momentum spectra. The Coulomb influence can be minimized and the overlapping of interference fringes with the complicated low-energy structures can be avoided as well. The contributions of the excitation effect and the long-range Coulomb potential can be traced in the Fourier domain of the photoelectron distribution. Because of these advantages, precise information on valence electron dynamics of atoms or molecules with attosecond temporal resolution and additional spatial information with angstrom resolution can be obtained with the two-dimensional electron wave-packet interferometry.

  4. Two-Dimensional Attosecond Electron Wave-Packet Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinhua

    2015-05-01

    We propose a two-dimensional interferometry based on the electron wave-packet interference by using a cycle-shaped orthogonally polarized two-color laser field. With such a method, the subcycle and intercycle interferences can be disentangled into different directions in the measured photoelectron momentum spectra. The Coulomb influence can be minimized and the overlapping of interference fringes with the complicated low-energy structures can be avoided as well. The contributions of the excitation effect and the long-range Coulomb potential can be traced in the Fourier domain of the photoelectron distribution. Because of these advantages, precise information on valence electron dynamics of atoms or molecules with attosecond temporal resolution and additional spatial information with angstrom resolution can be obtained with the two-dimensional electron wave-packet interferometry.

  5. Advancing differential atom interferometry for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Williams, Jason; Yu, Nan

    2016-05-01

    Atom interferometer (AI) based sensors exhibit precision and accuracy unattainable with classical sensors, thanks to the inherent stability of atomic properties. Dual atomic sensors operating in a differential mode further extend AI applicability beyond environmental disturbances. Extraction of the phase difference between dual AIs, however, typically introduces uncertainty and systematic in excess of that warranted by each AI's intrinsic noise characteristics, especially in practical applications and real time measurements. In this presentation, we report our efforts in developing practical schemes for reducing noises and enhancing sensitivities in the differential AI measurement implementations. We will describe an active phase extraction method that eliminates the noise overhead and demonstrates a performance boost of a gravity gradiometer by a factor of 3. We will also describe a new long-baseline approach for differential AI measurements in a laser ranging assisted AI configuration. The approach uses well-developed AIs for local measurements but leverage the mature schemes of space laser interferometry for LISA and GRACE. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a Contract with NASA.

  6. Absolute Geodetic Rotation Measurement Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, J. K.; Takase, K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity.

  7. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  8. Laser wavelength comparison by high resolution interferometry.

    PubMed

    Layer, H P; Deslattes, R D; Schweitzer, W G

    1976-03-01

    High resolution interferometry has been used to determine the wavelength ratio between two molecularly stabilized He-Ne lasers, one locked to a methane absorption at 3.39 microm and the other locked to the k peak of (129)I(2) at 633 nm. An optical beat frequency technique gave fractional orders while a microwave sideband method yielded the integer parts. Conventional (third derivative) peak seeking servoes stabilized both laser and cavity lengths. Reproducibility of the electronic control system and optics was a few parts in 10(12), while systematic errors associated with curvature of the cavity mirrors limited the accuracy of the wavelength ratio measurement to 2 parts in 10(10). The measured wavelength ratio of the methane stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 microm [P(7) line, nu(3) band] to the (129)I(2) (k peak) stabilized He-Ne laser at 633 nm was 5.359 049 260 6 (0.000 2 ppm). This ratio agrees with that calculated from the (lower accuracy) results of earlier wavelength measurements made relative to the (86)Kr standard. Its higher accuracy thus permits a provisional extension of the frequency scale based on the cesium oscillator into the visible spectrum.

  9. New surface forces apparatus using two-beam interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Mizukami, Masashi; Abe, Takashi; Fukao, Yasuhiro; Tajima, Haruo; Kurihara, Kazue

    2008-04-15

    We designed a new surface forces apparatus for measuring the interactions between two nontransparent substrates and/or in nontransparent liquids. The small displacement of a surface, the bottom one in this study, was measured by the two-beam (twin path) interferometry technique using the phase difference between the laser light reflected by the fixed mirror and that by the mirror on the back of the bottom surface unit. It is possible to determine the distance with a resolution of 1 nm in the working range of 5 {mu}m. This apparatus was successfully applied to measure the forces between mica surfaces in pure water and aqueous KBr solutions.

  10. Fringe Formation in Dual-Hologram Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.

    1989-01-01

    A first order geometrical optics treatment of holograms combined with the generation of interference fringes by two point sources is used to describe reference fringe formation in non-diffuse dual-hologram interferometry.

  11. The Brief Lives of Massive Stars as Witnessed by Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, C.

    2014-09-01

    Massive stars present the newest and perhaps most challenging opportunity for long baseline interferometry to excel. Large distances require high angular resolution both to study the means of accreting enough mass in a short time and to split new-born multiples into their components for the determination of their fundamental parameters. Dust obscuration of young stellar objects requires interferometry in the mid-infrared, while post-main-sequence stellar phases require high-precision measurements to challenge stellar evolution models. I will summarize my recent work on modeling mid-IR observations of a massive YSO in NGC 3603, and on the derivation of masses and luminosities of a massive hot supergiant star in another star-forming region in Orion. Challenges presented themselves when constraining the geometry of a hypothetical accretion disk as well as obtaining spectroscopy matching the interferometric precision when working with only a few photospheric lines. As a rapidly evolving application of interferometry, massive stars have a bright future.

  12. The brief lives of massive stars as witnessed by interferometry}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Massive stars present the newest and perhaps most challenging opportunity for long baseline interferometry to excel. Large distances require high angular resolution both to study the means of accreting enough mass in a short time and to split new-born multiples into their components for the determination of their fundamental parameters. Dust obscuration of young stellar objects require interferometry in the infrared, while post-mainsequence stellar phases require high-precision measurements to challenge stellar evolution models. I will summarize our work on a massive YSO in NGC 3603 including modeling mid-IR interferometric observations, as well as recent sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy with APEX. We find some evidence for a disk in the MIR, resolve multiple cores in the sub-mm with emission line spectra untypical for hot cores. I also report on the derivation of masses and luminosities of a massive O-type supergiant (ζ Orionis) in another star forming region in Orion. The small radial velocity semi-amplitudes coupled with few usable (i.e. wind-free) lines have made this work very challenging and forced us to base the mass determination on a photometric distance estimate. As a rapidly evolving application of interferometry, massive stars have a bright future.

  13. Fringe formation in dual-hologram interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.

    1990-01-01

    Reference-fringe formation in nondiffuse dual-hologram interferometry is described by combining a first-order geometrical hologram treatment with interference fringes generated by two point sources. The first-order imaging relationships can be used to describe reference-fringe patterns for the geometry of the dual-hologram interferometry. The process can be completed without adjusting the two holograms when the reconstructing wavelength is less than the exposing wavelength, and the process is found to facilitate basic intereferometer adjustments.

  14. Testing of fibers reinforced composite vessel by fringes projection and speckle shear interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainov, Ventseslav; Harizanova, Jana; Ossikovska, Sonja; Van Paepegem, Wim; Degrieck, Joris; Boone, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    Fringes projection and speckle shear interferometry are used for testing of subjected to cycling loading (pressure) composite vessel. As the sensitivity of the applied methods could vary in broad limits in comparison with the other interferometric techniques, the inspection is realized in a wide dynamic range. Two spacing phase stepping fringes projection interferometry is applied for absolute coordinate measurement. Derivatives of in-plane and out-of-the-plane components of the displacement vector over the object surface are obtained by lateral speckle shear interferometry in static loading (pressure). Non-linear mechanical response and fatigue of composite material are clearly detected after cyclic sinusoidal loading by macro measurement using lateral speckle shear interferometry. Fringes projection and speckle-shear interferometry are suitable for shape and normal displacements measurements in a wider dynamic range. The other advantage of the shown methods is connected with the possibility to realize compact and portable devices for in-situ inspection of investigated objects - machine parts and constructions.

  15. Application of Phase Shifted, Laser Feedback Interferometry to Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovryn, Ben; Eppell, Steven J.; Andrews, James H.; Khaydarov, John

    1996-01-01

    We have combined the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce a new instrument that can measure both optical path length (OPL) changes and discern sample reflectivity variations. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. LFI can yield a high signal-to-noise ratio even for low reflectivity samples. By combining PSI and LFI, we have produced a robust instrument, based upon a HeNe laser, with high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static (dc) or oscillatory changes along the optical path. As with other forms of interferometry, large changes in OPL require phase unwrapping. Conversely, small phase changes are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured. We introduce the phase shifts with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) and use either the Carre or Hariharan algorithms to determine the phase and visibility. We have determined the accuracy and precision of our technique by measuring both the bending of a cantilevered piezoelectric bimorph and linear ramps to the EOM. Using PSI, sub-nanometer displacements can be measured. We have combined our interferometer with a commercial microscope and scanning piezoelectric stage and have measured the variation in OPL and visibility for drops of PDMS (silicone oil) on coated single crystal silicon. Our measurement of the static contact angle agrees with the value of 68 deg stated in the literature.

  16. Experimental demonstration of deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Isleif, Katharina-Sophie; Gerberding, Oliver; Schwarze, Thomas S; Mehmet, Moritz; Heinzel, Gerhard; Cervantes, Felipe Guzmán

    2016-01-25

    Experiments for space and ground-based gravitational wave detectors often require a large dynamic range interferometric position readout of test masses with 1 pm/√Hz precision over long time scales. Heterodyne interferometer schemes that achieve such precisions are available, but they require complex optical set-ups, limiting their scalability for multiple channels. This article presents the first experimental results on deep frequency modulation interferometry, a new technique that combines sinusoidal laser frequency modulation in unequal arm length interferometers with a non-linear fit algorithm. We have tested the technique in a Michelson and a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer topology, respectively, demonstrated continuous phase tracking of a moving mirror and achieved a performance equivalent to a displacement sensitivity of 250 pm/Hz at 1 mHz between the phase measurements of two photodetectors monitoring the same optical signal. By performing time series fitting of the extracted interference signals, we measured that the linearity of the laser frequency modulation is on the order of 2% for the laser source used. PMID:26832546

  17. A spectroscopic refractometer based on plasmonic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jing; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a spectroscopic refractometer that employs plasmonic interferometry to measure the optical dielectric functions of materials in the visible range. The proposed device, dubbed a plasmonic refractometer, consists of an array of slit-groove plasmonic interferometers etched in a ˜300 nm-thick metal film (silver or gold) with arm lengths varying in steps of 25 nm up to ˜8 μm. The nano-groove in each interferometer is able to generate propagating surface plasmon polaritons efficiently in a broad wavelength range, without requiring prism- or grating-coupling configurations. An integrated microfluidic channel ensures uniform delivery of dielectric materials in liquid phase. Spectrally resolved plasmonic interferograms are generated by measuring light transmission spectra through the slit of each slit-groove plasmonic interferometer and plotting the normalized intensity as a function of arm length (0.26-8.16 μm) and incident wavelength (400-800 nm) for various combinations of metal/dielectric materials. Fits of the plasmonic interferograms with a surface plasmon interference model allow determination of the refractive index dispersion of a broad class of dielectric materials, over a wide range of wavelengths and dielectric constants. As proof of concept, we extract and report the dielectric functions of representative materials, such as silver, gold, water, methanol, and ethanol.

  18. Thermal expansion of composites using Moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, D. E.; Post, D.; Herakovich, C. T.; Tenny, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental technique for precise measurement of the thermal response of fiber-reinforced composite materials uses moire interferometry with fringe multiplication which yield a sensitivity of 833 nm (32.8 mu in.) per fringe. Results from the technique are compared with those obtained from electrical resistance strain gages, and also those predicted from classical lamination theory. Temperature dependent coefficients of thermal expansion for composite materials subjected to thermal cycling in the temperature range of 297 K (75 F) to 422 K (300 F) were determined for four laminate configurations (0, 90, 0/ + or - 45/90 sub s and 0/90/ + or - 45 sub s) of T300/5208 graphite epoxy, and ranged from -0.107 mu epsilon K/1 (-0.059 mu epsilon deg F/-) for the 0 laminate to 32.18 mu epsilon K/1 (17.88 mu epsilon F/1) for the 90 laminate. Moisture was found to greatly influence the thermal response of a quasi-isotropic laminate, resulting in hysteresis and residual compressive strain as the moisture content was reduced. Comparisons between moire and strain gage measurements were inconclusive with both techniques giving consistent but systematically different results. Differences of as much as 29% were observed.

  19. Precision Gravity Tests with Atom Interferometry in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tino, G. M.; Sorrentino, F.; Aguilera, D.; Battelier, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Bodart, Q.; Bongs, K.; Bouyer, P.; Braxmaier, C.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Gaaloul, N.; Gürlebeck, N.; Hauth, M.; Herrmann, S.; Krutzik, M.; Kubelka, A.; Landragin, A.; Milke, A.; Peters, A.; Rasel, E. M.; Rocco, E.; Schubert, C.; Schuldt, T.; Sengstock, K.; Wicht, A.

    2013-10-01

    Atom interferometry provides extremely sensitive and accurate tools for the measurement of inertial forces. Operation of atom interferometers in microgravity is expected to enhance the performance of such sensors. This paper presents two possible implementations of a dual 85Rb-87Rb atom interferometer to perform differential gravity measurements in space, with the primary goal to test the Weak Equivalence Principle. The proposed scheme is in the framework of two projects of the European Space Agency, namely Q-WEP and STE-QUEST. The paper describes the baseline experimental configuration, and discusses the technology readiness, noise and error budget for the two proposed experiments.

  20. Quantification of skin wrinkles using low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jung-Taek; Kim, Beop-Min; Son, Sang-Ryoon; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim, Dong-Yoon; Kim, Youn-Soo

    2004-07-01

    We measure the skin wrinkle topology by means of low coherence interferometry (LCI), which forms the basis of the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The skin topology obtained using LCI and corresponding 2-D fast Fourier transform allow quantification of skin wrinkles. It took approximately 2 minutes to obtain 2.1 mm x 2.1 mm topological image with 4 um and 16 um resolutions in axial and transverse directions, respectively. Measurement examples show the particular case of skin contour change after-wrinkle cosmeceutical treatments and atopic dermatitis

  1. Nonlocal Pancharatnam phase in two-photon interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Poonam; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Supurna

    2010-09-15

    We propose a polarized intensity interferometry experiment, which measures the nonlocal Pancharatnam phase acquired by a pair of Hanbury-Brown-Twiss photons. The setup involves two polarized thermal sources illuminating two polarized detectors. Varying the relative polarization angle of the detectors introduces a two-photon geometric phase. Local measurements at either detector do not reveal the effects of the phase, which is an optical analog of the multiparticle Aharonov-Bohm effect. The geometric phase sheds light on the three-slit experiment and suggests ways of tuning entanglement.

  2. Spectral interferometry for morphological imaging in in vitro fertilization (IVF) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Li, Chengshuai

    2016-03-01

    Morphological assessment of spermatozoa is of critical importance for in vitro fertilization (IVF), especially intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-based IVF. In ICSI, a single sperm cell is selected and injected into an egg to achieve fertilization. The quality of the sperm cell is found to be highly correlated to IVF success. Sperm morphology, such as shape, head birefringence and motility, among others, are typically evaluated under a microscope. Current observation relies on conventional techniques such as differential interference contrast microscopy and polarized light microscopy. Their qualitative nature, however, limits the ability to provide accurate quantitative analysis. Here, we demonstrate quantitative morphological measurement of sperm cells using two types of spectral interferometric techniques, namely spectral modulation interferometry and spectral multiplexing interferometry. Both are based on spectral-domain low coherence interferometry, which is known for its exquisite phase determination ability. While spectral modulation interferometry encodes sample phase in a single spectrum, spectral multiplexing interferometry does so for sample birefringence. Therefore they are capable of highly sensitive phase and birefringence imaging. These features suit well in the imaging of live sperm cells, which are small, dynamic objects with only low to moderate levels of phase and birefringence contrast. We will introduce the operation of both techniques and demonstrate their application to measuring the phase and birefringence morphology of sperm cells.

  3. Optical interferometry study of film formation in lubrication of sliding and/or rolling contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stejskal, E. O.; Cameron, A.

    1972-01-01

    Seventeen fluids of widely varying physical properties and molecular structure were chosen for study. Film thickness and traction were measured simultaneously in point contacts by interferometry, from which a new theory of traction was proposed. Film thickness was measured in line contacts by interferometry and electrical capacitance to establish correlation between these two methods. An interferometric method for the absolute determination of refractive index in the contact zone was developed and applied to point contact fluid entrapments. Electrical capacitance was used to study the thickness and properties of the soft surface film which sometimes forms near a metal-fluid interface.

  4. Terahertz Detection Based on Spectral-Domain Interferometry Using Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Akram; Sharma, Gargi; Singh, Kanwarpal; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to improve the performance of terahertz electric field measurements based on spectral-domain interferometry. The interferometer is introduced into the probe beam line to improve the temporal overlap between the two probe pulses. The probe pulse in the sample arm of the interferometer passes through the detection crystal and overlaps with the terahertz pulse, while the probe pulse in the reference arm does not. We measure the phase change between spectral components of these two pulses using spectral-domain interferometry. Using this new technique, we enable an unlimited temporal scanning window without the loss in the signal-to-noise ratio, thus overcoming the major limitation of conventional spectral-domain interferometry techniques for terahertz electric field detection.

  5. Spatial and frequency domain interferometry using the MU radar - A tutorial and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Shoichiro; Palmer, Robert D.

    Fundamental notions of spatial and frequency-domain interferometry are reviewed, and a novel method is proposed for steering the antenna beam after the data are stored. Also presented is a comparison of techniques for wind-vector determination with emphasis given to a method based on the linear variation of the phase of the cross-spectra. Recent applications of spatial interferometry (SI) and frequency-domain interferometry (FDI) are listed including an implementation of FDI with MU radar. The vertical wind velocity estimated from the Doppler technique is shown to be a measure of the wind perpendicular to tilted refractivity surfaces. The bias generated by horizontal wind is found to have a significant effect on the Doppler estimate in SI. The use of MU radar in FDI can facilitate measurements of the positions of high reflectivity layers smaller than the resolution volume.

  6. Quasar Astrophysics with the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen; Wehrle, Ann; Meier, David; Jones, Dayton; Piner, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.

  7. Two-dimensional laser interferometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehr, Leo; Concepcion, Ricky; Duggan, Robert; Moore, Hannah; Novick, Asher; Ransohoff, Lauren; Gourdain, Pierre-Alexandre; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our research was to create a two-dimensional interferometer which we will use to measure plasma densities at the Cornell Research Beam Accelerator (COBRA). We built two shearing interferometers and mounted them on an optics table. They intercept the probe laser beam which travels directly through the plasma and is captured by a 16-bit CCD camera. In comparing the interferometer images before the shot and during the plasma shot, we observed both lateral and vertical shifts in the interference pattern caused by the change of the refractive index due to the plasma electrons. We developed a computer program using Matlab to map a vector field depicting the shift between the two images. This shift is proportional to the line integral of electron density through the plasma chamber. We show this method provides a reliable way to determine the plasma electron density profile. Additionally, we hope this method can improve upon the diagnostic capabilities and efficiency of data collection used with standard one-dimensional interferometry. Undergraduate.

  8. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  9. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  10. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  11. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry Using SENTINEL-1 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosetto, M.; Monserrat, O.; Devanthéry, N.; Cuevas-González, M.; Barra, A.; Crippa, B.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on deformation monitoring using a Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique and the interferometric SAR data acquired by the Sentinel-1 satellite of the European Space Agency. The first part of the paper describes the procedure used to process and analyze Sentinel-1 interferometric SAR data. Two main approaches are described. The first one is a simplified Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach that exploits two key properties of the Sentinel-1 data: the high coherence of the 12-day interferograms and the reduced orbital tube. The second approach is a full Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach, where a more sophisticate data treatment is employed. The second part of the paper illustrates the results obtained with the two processing approaches. Two case studies are described. The first one concerns landslide detection and monitoring. In this case, the simplified Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach was used. The second one regards the deformation monitoring of an urban area. In this case, a full Persistent Scatterer Interferometry approach was used.

  12. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  13. An in situ method for diagnosing phase shifting interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, J.; Ma, D.; Zhang, H.; Xie, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Current diagnosing phase shifting interferometry is a time and funds consuming process. Hence a brief and effective method is necessary to satisfy the real-time testing. In this paper, mathematical solutions for errors were deduced from the difference of intensity patterns. Based on the diversity of error distributions, an effective method for distinguishing and diagnosing the error sources is proposed and verified by an elaborative designed simulation. In the actual comparison experiment, vibration, phase-shift error and intensity fluctuation were imposed to demonstrate this method. The results showed that this method can be applied into the real-time measurement and provide an in situ diagnosing technique.

  14. Spherical interferometry for the characterization of precision spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, R. A.; Bartl, G.

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry with spherical wavefronts is usually used for characterizing precise optics. A special spherical interferometer was set up to measure the volume of high precision spheres used for the new definition of the SI unit kilogram, for which a fundamental constant, such as Planck’s constant h or Avogadro’s constant N A, was to be determined. Furthermore with this type of interferometer and with a special evaluating algorithm, absolute form deviations of spheres can be determined. With this knowledge, a sphere can be processed further to reach unrivaled small sphericity deviations.

  15. Internal stress determination in a polymer composite by Coda wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Binetruy, C.; Burtin, C.

    2016-07-01

    Coda wave interferometry (CWI) is largely employed in geotechnical applications to monitor changes due to cracks in materials but it is still not used for composite materials. In this paper, the technique is proposed to study internal stresses in a composite laminate [0°/90°]63 and was compared with the traditional acoustic technique. It is shown that the Coda wave interferometry has better precision and sensibility than the method based on the first arriving time of flight (TOF) measurement, especially when the fiber orientation is normal to the wave propagation. This method is found to be promising for residual stress evaluation in composite materials.

  16. The Path to Far-IR Interferometry in Space: Recent Developments, Plans, and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David T.; Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    The far-IR astrophysics community is eager to follow up Spitzer and Herschel observations with sensitive, highresolution imaging and spectroscopy, for such measurements are needed to understand merger-driven star formation and chemical enrichment in galaxies, star and planetary system formation, and the development and prevalence of waterbearing planets. The community is united in its support for a space-based interferometry mission. Through concerted efforts worldwide, the key enabling technologies are maturing. Two balloon-borne far-IR interferometers are presently under development. This paper reviews recent technological and programmatic developments, summarizes plans, and offers a vision for space-based far-IR interferometry involving international collaboration.

  17. Large-Area Atom Interferometry with Frequency-Swept Raman Adiabatic Passage.

    PubMed

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L; Kinast, Joseph M; Stoner, Richard E

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate light-pulse atom interferometry with large-momentum-transfer atom optics based on stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage. Our atom optics have produced momentum splittings of up to 30 photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive interferometer for laser cooled atoms. We experimentally verify the enhancement of phase shift per unit acceleration and characterize interferometer contrast loss. By forgoing evaporative cooling and velocity selection, this method lowers the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty and enables large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates.

  18. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  19. Holographic interferometry: A user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, D.

    1993-10-01

    This manual describes the procedures and components necessary to produce a holographic interferogram of a flow field in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel. In contrast to classical interferometry, holographic interferometry records the amplitude and phase distribution of a lightwave passing through the flow field at some instant of time. This information can then be reconstructed outside the wind tunnel for visual analysis and digital processing, yielding precise characterizations of aerodynamic phenomena. The reconstruction and subsequent hologram image storage process is discussed, with particular attention paid to the digital image processor and the data reduction technique.

  20. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737